Best in Show Annual 2019

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Best in Show Magazine

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Best in Show Magazine

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Danilovic Jovana Publisher & Art Director jovana@bismagazine.com Kanninen Milla Advertiser Relations milla@bismagazine.com

Contributing Writers Anne Tureen, Richard Hellman, Juha Kares, Karl Donvil, Lisa Croft-Elliott Pekka Hannula,Bo Bengtson, Ante Lucin, Mihaela Kosic Contributing Photographers Lisa Croft-Elliot, Selene Favretto, Karl Donvil, Tommaso Urciuolo, Anna Szabo, Jeffrey Hanlin Web Designer Sanja Jukic Printed by GrafoMark d.o.o

Questions and feedback: Conaros Sportmanagement AG Landstrasse 58, 9494 Schaan, Liechtenstein

E-mail: ads@bismagazine.com Web: www.bismagazine.com While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this publication, the publisher Conaros Sportmanagement AG can not accept liability for any statement or error contained herein. Best In Show Magazine cannot accept responsibility for the claims, goods or services of advertisers. No part of this magazine, inckluding texts, photographs, illustrations, maps or any other graphics may be reproduced in any other way without the prior written consent of Conaros Sportmanagement AG.

Best in Show Magazine

intro Dear Best in Show readers and followers, this year we are celebrating the 7th birthday of Best in Show Magazine! We have successfully published 21 editions including our Annual 2019 where you will be able to enjoy beautiful photo reports from European Show scene taken by Karl Donvil, Anna Szabo, Tommaso Urciuolo, Beltran Alonso and Boris Glukharev. Again this year, part of Best in Show team has visited the greatest show in USA - Westminster. It is always a pleasure and special feeling to be in New York surrounded by all friends and collegues from around the World that I don’t have opportunity to meet very often. Somehow New York and its magic always brings new people to my life. Besides many show reports around the World, in the Annual 2019, you will be able to read interviews with one of World’s famous Shar Pei and Chow Chow breeders; as well as interviews with Christian Rangel, Marina Besedina, Mia Ejerstad and Pekka Hannula, Paolo Pietro Condo, China Kennel Union and many others. Through the year Best in Show Magazine was Official Media Sponsor of some of the biggest and most important shows in Europe, providing beautiful rosettes and many other presents for the winners. We are looking forward for many other shows to come. I truly hope you will enjoy spending time reading our new edition with a cup of coffee or tea till the next time.

Jovana Danilovic publisher & art director





















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Content

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112 294

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Euro Dog Show

80

Christian Rangel

100

Marina Besedina

112

Westminster NY

154

A Window on Italy

174

Literary Dog

192

Reports by Countries ‘18

278

Helsinki Winner

294

Meet the breed: Shar Pei

322

Meet the breed: Chow Chow

332

Interview with CKU

by Karl Donvil

Interview with Handler

Interview with Junior Handler

by Jovana Danilovic

Paolo Pietro Condo

Mia Ejerstad & Pekka Hannula

by Anna Szabo

Interviews with: David Williams • Peiday, USA Loretta Anders • Jade East, USA Joy Bradley • Jolerob, UK

Interviews with: Pam & Stef Godber • Lechan, UK T. Campi & M. Carinelli • Leoni Imperiali, Italy Arlene Robinson • Kwaitang, UK

by Anne Tureen







2018 Euro Dog Show 2018 WARSAW, POLAND by Karl Donvil

The Polish Kennel Club ZKwP, or Zwiazek Kynologicznyw Polsce, celebrates its 80th birthday this year, and for that reason, the FCI granted them the honor to organize the European Dog Show. The club started its activities in 1938 and was recognized rather quickly by the FCI. That was in 1939. Unfortunately that was only a year before the second World War and we all know that Poland was the first country that was attacked and suffered immensely under the German occupation. Many dogs were confiscated by the occupier, a lot were probably killed or given away as the people could no longer feed them or were prohibited to have some. After the war a few people did all they could to restart the cynological activities, collecting specimen of the local breeds as good and many as they still could find in Poland as well as in other countries. The Polish Kennel Club held its first show in Wroclaw, a national one, with 94 entries, representing 21 breeds. The first International show was only in 1962 when the country had recovered mostly from the war. That was in Poznan and this time there were 480 entries. From then on the Kennel Club’s effort started to have effect when in 1963 the Polish Lowland Sheepdog was recognized by the FCI followed by the Polish Hound in 1965 and the Tatra in 1967. The Polish Greyhound was recognized in 1989. My neighbor told me he had dogs like me during the war, as no guns were allowed in private hands and hunting was only possible with the help of dogs. The Germans gave him this “very effective dog to help controlling the rabbit and hare population on famers land.” The Germans told him he came from Poland. I hardly believed him at first as I had Salukis and they were so exotic during the war. Later I found out that it

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must have been a Polish Greyhound that resembled my Kurdish import Salukis , especially my Grizzle one. In 2016 the Polish Hunting dog was recognized and there is one breed that will probably soon follow, the Polish Hunting Spaniel that is already allowed on national shows. There were many cynologists in Poland with a very good international reputation and raised the standard of the Polish Kennel Club to a higher level. In 2000 they were granted the organization of the European Dog Show in Poznan and had 9000 entries. In 2006, again in Poznan, they held the World Dog Show and had a massive entry of 20840 dogs, a new record then. The Polish kennel Club says having 70.000 registrations /year and 50.000 births, which means that about 20.000 were probably imported and that is a lot. But it is clear that the club is flourishing well. The 47 subdivisions of the Kennel club organize about 200 shows/year of which 24 are CACIB shows. For their 80th anniversary Jubilee they were back on term this year to organize a big FCI event. Unlike the previous shows, it was decided to have the show in Poland’s capital Warsaw. About 20 km outside the city centre, a big expo complex, PTAK expo, proved ideal to welcome a huge amount of dogs. Poznan is older and has different halls, some old, some new, but PTAK expo is new and modern, in the country, next to a highway, easily accessible and with plenty of parking around. But the size of it proved to be more a disadvantage than an advantage. The complex has 6 huge halls of which 5 were in use. The distances were big. From the first hall in use, hall B, to the end where the main ring was, hall F, it was about 15 minutes walking. Some


said it was 1.7 km, but I think that is a little exaggerated. The trade stands were all situated in hall E and that was the first big mistake. If you have your ring in hall B, you need about an hour to only have a quick look around. Nobody likes to leave dogs and stuff unattended for that long or feels embarrassed to ask someone to keep an eye for that long. Not one trader was happy, and with some luck they had a moderate turnover, but most had difficulties to have a break even. And I was told that the rent per square meter was very high. If they were at least somewhere in the middle, but now they were at the very end, except for those who had to be in the main ring in hall F for the finals. People who wanted to come back to shop another day had to pay entry fee again. I keep on saying that more attention should be paid to the trade stands as the traders are the first to provide money to the organizers. This happens just too often! People need stuff and want to shop and the traders want to come and provide needs and introduce novelties. Therefore it is important that the organizers have to make this happen in the best possible way. The halls were very nice and spacious. It would have been enough to rent only 4 halls, thus limiting the distances to cross and still leaving more than enough space. The rings were all very large and covered with carpets. It was easy walking with no obstructions. Halls E and F were not linked directly and therefore a corridor was build of tents in case it would be cold or raining. But it proved to unnecessary as all four days the temperature was very nice, except for the morning. But the space created a very relaxed atmosphere even on Saturday and Sunday. A free bus line was set up from the city to the Expo centre. I have no idea about the number of visitors as it difficult to tell if the halls are very spacious. Hall A was not rented as there seemed to be a permanent shopping mall. Hall B was reserved for the Jubilee Show that was held at the same time, offering exhibitors a chance to win extra titles and/or becoming Polish Champion. 4348 dogs were entered for this show, coming from 55 countries. For the European Dog Show 15143 dogs came from 60 different countries, 3273 from Poland and 1503 from Russia. Italy came 3rd with almost 500 entries followed mainly by neighboring and East- European countries. Other big countries like France, Holland, Spain etc were poorly represented. France had only 76 dogs in competition,

Germany 140, Holland 46, Spain 95. There were 36 British dogs entered and 13 from the USA. Many far away countries were represented, however only by small numbers, like Argentina 7, Kazakhstan 8, Canada 4, New Zealand , Peru, Uzbekistan, Indonesia and Filipinas, all by one dog. The list is just too long to mention them all. Big numbers in breeds came from the American Staffordshire Terriers (311 entries), Beagles (195), Bernese Mountain Dogs (187), French Bulldogs (289), Cane Corso (258), Chihuahua’s (248), Golden Retrievers (217), Jack Russells (200), Labradors (249), Pugs (173), Australian Shepherds (166), Rhodesian Ridgebacks (182), Samoyeds (179), Welsh Corgi Pembrokes (154). These are the breeds with more than 150 entries. But other breeds are also worth mentioning . The Papillion for example was represented by 126 specimen, plus 15 in the Phalène variety (hanging ears). The Pomeranians are gaining a lot in popularity, 142 were shown here. Whippets have always been popular, 148 were in competition and the Weimaraners are probably the most popular hunting dogs, especially the short haired. To see 126 of them together you had to be here. The Dachshunds are one group, but in fact it is one breed that comes in 3 hair varieties and 3 sizes. If we see it as one breed then it is by far the most popular breed with 603 specimen shown on this show. The difference between Schnauzer varieties is bigger, especially the Riesenschnauzer compared to the miniature. All colors and varieties together there were 553. Shows of this size are always interesting to see some very rare breeds or native breeds, not yet recognized by the FCI like the Polish Hunting Spaniel. Group VI in particular and Group VI and V are always incomplete or poorly represented. Group VI, the Hounds, is one of the biggest groups, but on regular shows one of the smallest. This group has so many national varieties but are mostly in the hands of hunters who pay less attention to shows, that European and World Dog Shows are like festivals when it comes to these breeds. The Bava-rian Mountain Dogs and the Hannoverian Scenthound are more common over here, compared to other regions. There were respectively 54 and 13 of them entered. In Group V we found not only the range of Laika dogs, but also the Podengos, small, medio and large ones. There were some Jämthunden, Kishus, Korean Jindo Dogs, and much more rare breeds. A closer look

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at the native breeds learns us that we could meet some 50 Polish Hunting Dogs, 31 Polish hounds, 44 Polski Owczarek Nizinny (Polish Lowland Sheepdog), 69 Tatra Shepherd Dogs and 56 Chart Polski or Polish Greyhound. At the Jubileum show one could also find some rare en not yet FCI recognized breeds. The Polish Hunting Spaniel is one of them, 19 were entered. It is always good to find some old breeds

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amongst them, but there are also new breeds or varieties of a breed, often miniature versions of other coats or colors. I think it is more important to conserve old breeds instead of establishing new often fashion breeds. Things like this always make shows of this size always very interesting. The main ring looked very promising at first sight, a very large one, very wide in fact, a long rectangle. In front of the VIP area were two screens and the Press was offered seats at the left side. All press people who wanted to take pictures in the ring were had to wear a special press vest. It was a nice sight. They were granted 60 seconds to make pictures of all 4 placed winners. The position on the left, however, was far from ideal as the dogs entered on the right side. On the left side, opposite the photographers was a life band playing. Many puppies were afraid of the drums. The effect of live drums is totally different from drum coming out of loudspeakers that are often hanging high, while the drums were almost level to the floor. On the right side was the trophy table and the speakers corner. In front was a nice podium evenly lit with white light. On several occasions a fog machine was used. That fog was still hanging when the dogs entered the ring, a very annoying situation for the photographers. For the rest the main ring looked fantastic , well lit, blue carpet and large round spots for the selected dogs. The stairs for the spectators was a different problem. It was too flat, not like most stairs going up. There was one on each side of the large VIP side and it was boarded on both sides by a large panel, while in front there was a wobbling handrail that was so high that even standing adults had difficulties to look over them. And because the stairs were hardly climbing, it was very difficult for children to something of the main ring properly. As if that wasn’t enough there were no ring stewards to help the judge. From the start on it was pure chaos. One judge was lining them up on the right, out of sight of the press and the left stairs, another chose the left side, another the middle . Every judge could do as he pleased not taking care of what the spectators could see and even the VIP’s had serious problems to see anything. As if that wasn’t enough, the dogs could line up more or less as the wished. The first evening proved very chaotic. On day two the Press had better seats, more centrally


placed. But two photographers were offered the privilege to go into the ring first, while the rest had to wait until they were finished and all this within the 60 seconds. The next time they refused to go into the ring, much to the astonishment of the organizers. This decision was quickly undone for the rest of the show, a victory for the international Press. The lining up and the judging in general were a little better too, but still, there were judges who went to extremes. One judge was lining up his selection completely on the right part of the ring and made them run right there. The left tribune was left completely blind and could only follow the video screen, same for the VIP area, imagine! And as if that was not enough, the camera was forced to take the dogs from bird’s eye view as if looking at the judging from out of a window of a tall building! The sound of the speaker’s comments was another problem, very difficult to understand missing high tones so that it all ended in an unintelligible loud murmur. Notwithstanding the multiple remarks and requests for ring stewards, nothing much changed except for a few dancers of the folkloristic group that were asked to stand on the side and show the entering exhibitors where to line up. The judge however, continued to do as they liked, although most of them used the middle of the large ring in front of the VIP area. But on Sunday Mr.Rafael de Santiago, judging

the Best Veteran in Show, decided to do this in front of the band, completely on the left side, out of sight of the VIP’s and leaving the right podium totally blind. What a shame, what a waste, a beautiful, promising main ring completely spoiled by stubbornness to not place two ring stewards to lead everything in the right direction. Unbelievable! At least we were treated to some nice and entertaining performances by folklore groups. The act of a Eurovision contest singer was less appreciated, probably because she was unknown to the majority of the foreigners and the style was typical for the East European states. What really impressed was the violist with the wide robe whereon the most lovely patterns were projected from the top. It was the opening act and It certainly impressed all the spectators in the main ring and was given a standing ovation. Another good point was that the exhibitors in the pre-judging ring were offered snacks and sandwiches and that was very much appreciated of course. And also the press got treads, however, that proved not enough to cover up the many frustrations they faced. Such a nice main ring, how promising, but how frustrating seeing this all being overcastted by a few big mistakes, out of stubbornness. What a missed chance.

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FCI GROUP 1

Sheepdogs and Cattledogs JUDGED BY MR. TAMAS JAKKEL (H)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

DOUX OF ICE WINE White Swiss Shepherd Owned by Katalin Magyar

LUCA OHUNGARIKUM Tatra Shepherd Owned by Gabor Korozs

FARMARENS TAKE ME TO THE CIRCUS Bearded Collie Owned by Linnea Sandberg

4place th

CSERI-SUBAS CSÖRE Puli Owned by Bodil Rüsz



FCI GROUP 2

Pinscher and Schnauzer - Molossoid and Swiss Mountain and Cattledogs JUDGED BY MR. MR. ARNE FOSS (N)

HULK (NAVA)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

Fila Brasileiro Owned by H. Ulises Hernandez Melendez

MASTIFWAY ZANGA Tibetan Mastiff Owned by S. Svyatskaya

KING OF HELLULAND EVERYTHING WILL BEGIN Newfoundland Owned by Alexandra Silvas

THE RED SQUIRRELS KANDINSKY Dogue de Bordeaux

Owned by W. Toonen


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FCI GROUP 3

Terriers

JUDGED BY MR. ANDRÁS KORÓZS (H)

1st place

KARBALLIDO STAFFS UNDISPUTED LINE American Staffordshire Terrier Owned by Jose Ignacio Andres Carballido

2place nd

PRIDE OF AVALANCHE IZ GOLUBOI LEGENDY Kerry Blue Terrier

Owned by Ilia Vorontsov & N Pecherkina

3place rd

4place th

PAPERMAN ATLANTIS Lakeland Terrier

Owned by F. W. Schoeneberg

CRUMB’S PAPARAZZI Cairn Terrier

Owned by Julia Shcherbina


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FCI GROUP 4

Dachshunds JUDGED BY MRS. ELISABETH RHODIN (S)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

NORDEN LIHT LISA Miniature Dachshund Smooth-haired Owned by Irina Yakovleva

QUEENLORD SKINNY LOVE Miniature Dachshund Wire-haired Owned by Valentina Barcella

MAGIK RAINBOW AALSMEER GOLD Rabbit Dachshund Smooth-haired

Owned by Victoria Ivanova

4place th

EX SENTIA DEVIL’S ADVOCATE Standard Dachshund Wire-haired

Owned by A Moore & A Malecka


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FCI GROUP 5

Spitz and primitive types JUDGED BY MR. STELIOS MAKARITIS (GR)

1st place

POMSADMIRER’S PREMUIM LIMITED EDITION Pomeranian Owned by Tanya Bangyeekhan

2place nd

3place rd

LSA ANGEL RISING STAR American Akita Owned by Vladimir Khromov

INTER MELODY JUST TOO COOL FOR TROUBLE Siberian Husky Owned by Sylwia Goszka

JATAWA OF NOPPAKAO

4place th

Thai Ridgeback Owned by Dorota Tokarska


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FCI GROUP 6

Scent hounds and related breeds JUDGED BY MR. ROBERTO VELEZ PICO (PR)

1st place

DALMINO VOODOO VISION Dalmatian Dog Owned by Zeljka Halper Drazic

2place nd

LION KING OF RING AIRIN`S STYLE Beagle Owned by K. Evseeva & I. M. Vorozheykina

3place rd

HARMAKHIS WISDOM AURORA FLOYD Rhodesian Ridgeback Owned by Sara Venturelli & Monza Flavio

4place th

ESENIYA DLYA NADEZHDI KSENII Bloodhound

Owned by T. Ermolina, A. Bartashevich & O. Ivanova


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FCI GROUP 7

Pointing Dogs JUDGED BY MR PAUL STANTON (SE)

1st place

AMBRAVITTORIYA AMADEUS Vizsla Owned by Ekaterina Morunova

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

POLCEVERA’S PONENTE Italian Pointing Dog Owned by Gabriella Segato

MISWAKI’S BELIEVE YOU CAN English Pointer Owned by K. Kahri & S. Vartiainen

CORNADORE ARRO Irish Red and White Setter Owned by Nataliya Mikhaylova


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FCI GROUP 8

Retrievers, Flushing Dogs & Water Dogs JUDGED BY MRS. CARLA MOLINARI (P)

1st place

GALAKSI FREAKING FAMOUS American Cocker Spaniel Owned by Lotte & Michael Kristensen

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

LOCH MOR ONLY YOU Labrador Retriever Owned by Mara Basilico

AQUACREST MAGIC MIKE Spanish Waterdog Owned by K. Kahri, N. Haapanen & P. Uurtola-Kahri

ARNOLD DEL PESCHIO VICALE Lagotto Romagnolo Owned by Gianni Orlandi


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FCI GROUP 9

Companion and Toy Dogs JUDGED BY MR. MARCO MARABOTTO (I)

1st place

2place nd

LIVANDA KASHMIR Pekingese Owned by Suwan Ngamsiriwong

MANTICORNS ENRICO Griffon Bruxellois Owned by Joakim Ohlsson

3place rd

PARADISE HOPE DOS LOVEANDBULL French Bulldog Owned by Celestina Marques Neves

4place th

SAMARCANDA ITALIAN LOVER Standard Poodle Owned by Sonia Merati


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FCI GROUP 10

Sighthounds JUDGED BY MR. ESPEN ENGH (NO)

1st place

ABSOLIUTI IDILE ELECTRA BRILLIANT Whippet Owned by Ramune Balciuniene

2place nd

SOBERS VAGABOND Greyhound Owned by Pavlina Lorencova-Nowacki

3place rd

VETER KALINOW

4place th

LADY GODIVA DEI RAGGI DI LUNA

Barzoi Owned by Daria Kim

Italian Greyhound Owned by G. Caldarone & S. Anconetti


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1st place DALMINO VOODOO VISION Dalmatian Dog Owned by Zeljka Halper Drazic

2place nd KARBALLIDO STAFFS UNDISPUTED LINE American Staffordshire Terrier Owned by Jose Ignacio Andres Carballido


3rd place LIVANDA KASHMIR Pekingese Owned by Suwan Ngamsiriwong

4place th AMBRAVITTORIYA AMADEUS Vizsla Owned by Ekaterina Morunova










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Best in Show Magazine


Q: Dear Christian, thank you for taking the time to do this interview with us. Please, tell us from the beginning, how you got involved in dogs? Was it breeding or showing you started first? A: It all started in 1994 with my Dad buying an Akita from a breeder that showed his dogs at that point, so he invited us to a local dog show one time, we went and we thought it was fun, so my dad started showing our dogs in future events, I didn’t like it at the beginning, but he continued showing our dogs, I liked going to the dog shows and meeting with friends, just didn’t like to show the dogs. Q: Do you remember your first show, which dog did you show? Did you have a mentor in the beginning? A: One time my Dad had to work on a Saturday and we had a local dog show, so he told me If I wanted to show our Akita bitch I could if not it was fine, so I did and I got a group 2 and best Mexican Bred in Show, so I was hooked, that was the last day my Dad showed our dogs, I did from then on. Q: What prompted you to move from Mexico and start showing in USA? A: I still remember coming to a dog show in the USA in 2004 in San Antonio TX, and I was so impressed with the shows, so many rings, so many dogs, so many good handlers and an amazing atmosphere. I showed dogs in Mexico but I wan’t thinking of this as a job, I always went to school. When it was time to choose a profession, I went to Architecture school for 3 years and during that period I stopped showing dogs. In 2005 Clay Coady was judging a dog show close to home and I went and showed some dogs. That weekend he invited me to come work for him with his dogs, since he was retired from showing dogs and since I had good memories of the shows in USA, I decided 82

Best in Show Magazine

Photo 1 • CH. Cambrian Four Star General Photo 2 • GCH. Porsche (Terrazas) Photo 3 • GCH. Chester (Ordaz)


Photo 4 • GCH. Brisline’s Baron Basil Of Woodside

to give it a try, I came to the USA in June 2005 and never went back to Mexico. Q: How would you describe the differences between show life and the show scene in Mexico and the USA? A: The main difference I see is the size of the dog shows. The USA is big so dog shows are from 800 to 3500 dogs per show. In Mexico we have smaller shows, but they also have shows every weekend. In Mexico there are very good handlers also, very good dogs, that have come to USA and won a lot. I have brought a few and done very well with them.

Q: Do you know approximately how many BIS wins you have won up to today? What about your first Best in Show and how did you feel winning your first BIS? A: I’m not sure exactly how many there have been, but between Mexico and USA, perhaps 60-70. I remember my first BIS in the USA, it was very special, especially because I used to see all these handlers in the magazines and now I was competing with them. My first was with Clay’s Lakeland Terrier and it was under a great judge Mr. Everett Dean (RIP) and not only was it my first BIS, but I won 3 that weekend.

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Photo 5 • CH. Open Fire Van Foliny Home

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Q: Which result do you consider your greatest? A: I’ve had many special wins, like winning the French Bulldog Club of America National, the Irish Terrier National, placing in the group at the AKC Invitational a couple times, but probably the best for me is winning the Miniature Schnauzer National Specialty and placing in the group under Clay Coady at Montgomery County KC, a dog bred and owned in Mexico so it made it more special. Q: How many shows per year do you attend? A: Usually we attend around 150 to 170 shows per year, lots of traveling, most of the time driving, occasionally flying. It gets crazy sometimes but somehow everything works out at the end. BIS: You are very well-known as a Terrier handler specialized for trimming breeds. What do you love about working with Terriers? A: I was in Architecture school, there I used to create spaces from nothing, but with a purpose, understanding how things work and why. That’s the way I see trimming terriers. Trimming is an Art to me, you can create something from nothing, but with the same purpose and understanding, to trim a dog certain way. Most of the time it takes months to get a dog in condition to show, but once it is ready it is rewarding, it can take me 4-6 hrs to trim a dog for any given weekend, it’s a hard work but when judges reward that dog, you know you have done your best to achieve that. Q: Do you have a favorite show? A: There are many great shows in the USA. For example, the AKC Invitational, Palm Springs KC, Del Valle KC, many more great shows but my top favorite is the Westminster Kennel Club. The energy when you are in that green carpet at the Madison Square Garden is unique, truly a great experience, it is the one show we all want to win.

Photo 6 • GCH. Lebull’s New Hope Wooly Bully Photo 7 • GCH. Yanga’s All The Time Photo 8 • GCH. Alenclaud Vicenta

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Q: Which dog that you have handled was your favorite, and was this dog also your most successful one? A: I’ve had the pleasure of showing many good dogs such as Airedales, Lakelands, Welsh, Goldens, Labs, Dobermans etc, but I really enjoyed to showing my Smooth Chihuahua, Victoria, last year. She just put a smile on your face. All the people at the dog show loved her, she was just happy to show, she ended the year as the #1 Smooth Chihuahua in the country and she won two All Breed Best in Shows. My most successful dog was my Miniature Schnauzer that placed at Montgomery County KC, he won 10 BIS and ended that year as the #7 terrier in the country, only doing local shows. Q: What part of your job you do like the least in this business? A: This is a good question, because I like most of this business. I enjoy the shows even when the results are not in our favor or when I think the judge made a mistake. I enjoy the traveling, I like driving the truck in long trips, its my time to think what I con do differently to make the next weekend better, what can I do to improve my dogs performance and think about what I can change on my trimming. Unfortunately at the end of the day, this is a competition and there’s people that try to take advantage of others. So that’s the one thing I don’t like, I wish we would all get along and be friendly. But I know, like any other job, that is not possible.

Photo 9 • GCH. Reflection’s You’re Amazing Just The Way You Are Photo 10 • GCH. Victory In My Veins Photo 11 • GCH. Yanga’s All The Time

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Q: Have you ever had a crisis which made you consider quitting this job? A: I think the most frustrating thing in this sport is when you think you have a nice dog, well presented, in excellent condition and judges don’t


Photo 12 • GCH. Yanga’s All The Time

reward it like you think they should. It is hard to wrap your mind around that, but even then I’ve never thought about quitting this sport. Q: What would you do, if you hadn’t decided to be a handler? A: I always think of that, and my other passion is the Architecture. Sometimes people that know I went to Architecture school ask me which I prefer, and I love Architecture and Showing dogs just as much. So if I wouldn’t have chosen dogs, definitely I would be an Architect. Q: Is there something in life that you would like to do or to visit, that is your life’s dream?

A: I’ve had the opportunity to travel around the world for business and pleasure, but there are many places that I would love to visit. Probably too many to make it happen. This world has beautiful places, even in my countries Mexico and the USA. I haven’t had the time to visit them all. I love traveling but unfortunately in this dog world we don’t have the time to travel for pleasure much. Q: Which people would you say you admire for breeding, showing, grooming or judging? A: There are a few incredibly talented people as breeders, handlers or judges. I admire my two mentors in dogs, Mr. Clay Coady and my

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father in law, Mr. Wood Wornall, and also Mr. Peter Green. Between them, they changed the way terriers were trimmed. But there are many more people I admire for their contribution to the sport. Q: How would you describe a Professional Handler? What are the most important skills for a handler? A: A Professional Handler is more than taking the dogs in the ring. There’s so much that people don’t see. There are weeks that we don’t have a day off, long hours, working with dogs is a 24hr job. We have to make sure they are in perfect condition for the show as well in good health for the regular life they have. One of the principal skills for me for a handler is to know what kind of dog we have, their faults. We can’t be blind and think is the best dog ever, you have to know what’s at the end of your leash. That way the wins are more enjoyable and the loses acceptable. Q: What about Junior Handling and do you think that Professional Handlers and judges should work more with young people? A: I was fortunate to have my parents support me when I decided to show in Juniors, they took the time to travel with me. I think we all need to work with the young people because in the end they are the future generations that will carry on with our sport. They will need to have the foundation to take our sport to the future generations. Q: If you could, what would you change in dog world? A: This is a hard question, right now in the USA we are seeing dog show entries at an all time low for some shows. This is the time to change what is wrong. It could be that we have too many shows, could be the judging, could be not 88

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Photo 13 • GCH. Brisline’s Baron Basil Of Woodside Photo 14 • GCH. Seneca’s Audacious Amelia At Marki Photo 15 • GCH. D. B. F. Santa Barbara Surfer Girl

enough new people in dogs. The pure bred dog market is strong, but we are not seeing the numbers at shows reflect that, we need to understand what to improve and act quickly.


7. – 9. 6. 2019 show grounds Agrokomplex Nitra

3 × CACIB & WORLD SPECIAL SHOW & AMSTAFF MAJOR 2019 7. 6. 2019

CACIB • PRESIDENT CUP 2019 & WORLD SPECIAL SHOW OF SLOVAK NATIONAL BREEDS CAJC, CAC, CACIB, PRESIDENT CUP WINNER ´19 Slovak national breeds: CAJC, 2x CAC, CACIB, WORLD SPECIAL MINOR PUPPY WINNER ´19, WORLD SPECIAL PUPPY WINNER ´19, WORLD SPECIAL JUNIOR WINNER ´19, WORLD SPECIAL WINNER ´19, WORLD SPECIAL VETERAN WINNER ´19

8. 6. 2019

CACIB • GRAND PRIX SLOVAKIA WINNER SHOW 2019 & AMSTAFF MAJOR 2019 CAJC, CAC, CACIB, GRAND PRIX SLOVAKIA MINOR PUPPY WINNER ´19, GRAND PRIX SLOVAKIA PUPPY WINNER 19, GRAND PRIX SLOVAKIA JUNIOR WINNER 19, GRAND PRIX SLOVAKIA WINNER ´19, GRAND PRIX SLOVAKIA VETERAN WINNER ´19

9. 6. 2019

CACIB • DERBY WINNER SHOW 2019 CAJC, CAC, CACIB, DERBY WINNER ´19 & CRUFT´S QUALIFICATION

SK PUPPY CHAMPION, SK JUNIOR CHAMPION, SK GRAND CHAMPION & SK VETERAN CHAMPION in one weekend.

www.nitracacib.sk Generálny partner:

QUALIFICATION 9. 6. 2019

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SHOWS WITH PRESTIGIOUS TITLES & GREAT ATMOSPHERE

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Q: Dear Marina, please tell us something about your beginnings. When did you get your first dog and how did you get an idea to start going to the shows? A: The first dog in our house appeared not long before my birth. It was the Irish red setter of local breeding. Then, in 2004, my mother brought another Irish setter from Hungary for the shows, with which one we began our way on a dog shows. Q: Do you remember your first Junior Handling competition? A: Yes of course, even though I was 6 years old, but I will never forget that day! Before the first competition I just started to learn it and when I got into the ring I was confused, the judge didn’t placed me by the very impolite way, that could offend any novice junior handler and create a bad impression of a dog shows and competitions. When we left the ring, I tried to hold back the tears but it did’t work and mom asked: “Are you not going to do it anymore?”. I, wiping away tears, answered: “No, I will!”. Well, actually it was just a beginning! Q: You did some impressive results in showing and in Junior Handling ring. What do you consider your greatest wins in both rings? A: In Junior Handling, for me the most important victories are 3rd place at the Crufts 2018 and first place at the European Dog Show in Poland, and in breed rings: Best of Breed with American Staffordshire terrier at the WDS in Amsterdam, BIG junior with English Setter at the WDS in Moscow and reserve BIG at the WDS in Moscow with Setter Gordon. Q: Do you have your favorite breed you specially enjoy showing and why? A: Setters in my heart forever, everything began with them! But now I also enjoying to work with American Staffordshire terriers , they’re 102

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beautiful strong dogs with amazing temperament. Q: Did you or do you have any mentors or people you specially admire? A: The very first my teacher was Ekaterina Voloshina, when she still lived in my hometown Vladivostok, but we didn’t have enough time to work. Then for a long time I was learning everything by myself, attended seminars of various handlers, took individual classes. I would especially like to thank Ivanova Larisa, without whom I probably would not have achieved such a results! And many thanks to Juan Miranda for a very useful and great advices and recommendations which helped me a lot before the main competitions as Crufts and EDS and of course for support! Q: How do you think seminars (Grooming and Handling) are important for young people? A: Of course! I personally always try to not miss a every single seminar in my city, it is very useful and interesting to learn something for a different people experience. Q: Many young people consider themselves Handlers even though they are still in Junior Handling. What is your point of view? A: Many Junior are showing the dogs and do all this stuff not worse than professionals. In this case, age is not the main criterion. Q: Lately there are many big handlers searching for assistants. What do you think Handlers are expecting from assistants? A: First of all for sure its help. Of course the big handlers have many dogs and it is impossible to do all the work alone. Also stress tolerance, diligence, responsible and attentive attitude to the dogs, the desire to gain experience and increase the level of their work. Best in Show Magazine

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Q: Which things are assistants looking to get from Professional Handlers besides knowledge? A: Practical experience, correcting your mistakes and useful connections with other experienced handlers or breeders.

Q: How do you manage your school and time for traveling? A: I finished school this year, but it was difficult to combine trips, especially in the last year when I was supposed to prepare for exams, but anyway I did it!

Q: What about the future? Do you plan on pursuing a career as a full-time Professional Handler or do you have some other dreams? A: Of course I will continue to do my favorite job! Many plans for the future, I will only continue to learn and improve my level , open new horizons.

Q: Do you have any advice for young people interested in Dog World? A: The main thing in our profession is to love dogs sincerely! Then not to be afraid to set a goals and achieve it! Improve your knowledge and skills, listen to more experienced people! Enjoy what you do! And never stop to Dream big!

Q: Do you have hobbies besides Junior Handling? A: No, I usually spend all my free time doing dog shows.

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HOUND GROUP

Judge: Ms. Patricia Craige Trotter

1st Place • Dachshunds (Longhaired) GCHP DC WALMAR-SOLO’S OMG SL JE

NON-SPORTING GROUP Judge: Mr. Mark R. Kennedy

1st Place • Shipperke GCHP CH RIVENDEL’S BAREFOOT BANDIT

Breeders: Kim Vidrine & Paula Carter & Wally & Mary Jones Owners: T. Nesbitt, K. Vidrine, J. Haverick, A. White & P. Grant

Breeders: Amy & Laura Halterman Owners: S .Middlebrooks,W. & T. Truesdale & A. Halterman

2nd Place • Whippet GCHB CH PINNACLE KENTUCKY BOURBON

2nd Place • French Bulldog GCHP CH LE PETIT PRINCE DE LA BETE

3rd Place • Beagle 15 GCHP CH GWENCALON’S TAM O’SHANTER

3rd Place • Chow Chow GCHB CH FLAMINGSTAR THE LION KING

4th Place • Basenji CH DARK MOON’S BLACK TRI AFFAIR

4th Place • Standard Poodle GCHG CH STONE RUN AFTERNOON TEA

Breeders: Justin Smithey & Yvonne Sovereign Owners: Dr Ken Latimer & Justin Smithey

Breeders: Kathleen & William Friend Owners: RKathleen & William Friend

Breeders: Veronica & John Predale & Michael Work Owners: Veronica & John Predale & Michael Work

TOY GROUP

Breeder: Peter Photos & Blake Hamman Owners: A. Geremia, B. Hamman & P. Photos

Breeder: Cathy Clapp Owners: Vicki DeGruy & Phil DeGruy

Breeder: Connie Unger Owners: Connie S Unger & William Lee

HERDING GROUP

Judge: Ms. Sharon Newcomb

Judge: Ms. Peggy Beisel-McIlwaine

1st Place • Havanese GCHG CH OESTE’S IN THE NAME OF LOVE

1st Place • Bouvier GCHS CH QUICHE’S MAJOR LEAGUE

Breeders: M. E King, R. H .Schindler, J. Vogel & T. McFadden Owners: M. E King, R. H .Schindler, J. Vogel & T. McFadden

Breeders: Elaine & Louise Paquette Owners: Julianna Garrison & Elaine & Louise Paquette

2nd Place • Pug GCHP CH HILL COUNTRY’S PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ

2nd Place • Border Collie GCHP2 CH MAJESTIC ELITE CLEVER ENDEAVOR PT

3rd Place • Yorkshire Terrier GCHP CH KARMA’S PROMISE KEY-PER

3rd Place • German Shepherd GCHG CH MARQUIS’ HERMES V KENLYN

4th Place • English Toy Spaniel (Blenheim & Prince Charles) GCH CH PERI’S BIG SHOT

4th Place • Old English Sheepdog GCHG CH BUGABOO’S LET IT GO BLU MTN

Breeders: Kristy & Kevin Ratliff Owner: Carolyn Koch

Breeder: Karrie Halbur Owners: N. Smith, J. Huff, K. Bevil & K. Halbur

Breeder: Per Ingar Rismyhr Owners: Amanda Toner & Per Ingar Rismyhr

Breeder: Ronni Delay Owners: Ricki Johnson, J. F. Baylis & Ronni Delay

Breeders: Kent Boyles & Liz Oster Owners: Liz Oster & Kent Boyles

Breeder: Pam Henry Owners: M. Lint, D. & M. Johnson & C. & H. Johnson



SPORTING GROUP

TERRIER GROUP

Judge: Mr. Douglas Johnson

Judge: Ms. Christine Erickson

1st Place • Sussex Spaniel GCHS CH KAMAND’S FULL OF BEANS @ ERINHILL

1st Place • Wire Fox Terrier GCHB CH KINGARTHUR VAN FOLINY HOME

2nd Place • Irish Setter GCHP CH MILITZA’S MY CHERIE AMOUR

2nd Place • American Staffordshire Terrier GCHS CH ALPINE’S LBK LIVING ON THE ROAD DS CGC TKN

Breeders: Karen Ann Toner & Amanda W Toner Owners: Karen Ann Toner & Amanda W Toner

Breeders: T. & R. McNeal, K. Wall, J. Fisher DVM & N. Godbey Owners: T. & R. McNeal , K. Wall & J. Fisher DVM

Breeders: R. De Munter & D. Uiterwijk Owner: Victor Malzoni Jr

Breeders: Ed & Karen Thomason Owners: E. & K. Thomason, L. Keller, K. Townsend & C. Kramer

3rd Place • American Water Spaniel GCHS CH CAROLINA’S RUNNING WITH THE HARE BN RN SH JHR CGC

3rd Place • Skye Terrier CH JUGER EDELWEISS PRINCE LIONHEART

4th Place • American Cocker Spaniel GCHP CH CLERWOOD SILHOUETTE SPEED OF LIGHT

4th Place • Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier GCHS CH J’ADORES STANLEY CUP TOEWS AT RAELYN

Breeder: Lois H McCracken Owner: Lois H McCracken

Breeders: Linda Pitts & Laurie Ferland Owners: E. Charles, R. Beinhauer, S. Kaul, L. Pitts & M. Furukaw

WORKING GROUP

Breeders: Mihhail Knut & Julia Knut Owner: Karen J’Anthony & Chris St John

Breeders: Kimberly Wright & Lynn Cone Owners: Kim Munson & Kimberly Wright

BEST IN SHOW

Judge: Mr. James Moses

Judge: Mr. Peter J. Green

1st Place • Boxer GCHP CH CINNIBON’S BEDROCK BOMBSHELL

1st Place • Wire Fox Terrier GCHB CH KINGARTHUR VAN FOLINY HOME

2nd Place • Siberian Husky GCHP CH SHARIN NICK OF DYNASTY RC KENNEL

2nd Place • Havanese GCHG CH OESTE’S IN THE NAME OF LOVE

Breeders: Bonnie Wagaman & Nicole Manna Owners: K. & C. Robbins, B. Wagaman & D. Caywood

Breeder: Hsu Wen Tang Owner: Hsu Wen Tang

3rd Place • Kuvasz GCHB CH EDERRA’S GLACIER THE POWER OF MO’NE

Breeders: Maria Arechaederra & Deb Blank Owners: Caroline Clegg & Mary Clegg & Maria Arechaederra

4th Place • Doberman GCHP CH FOXFIRE’S ALLTIMATE WANNA BE Breeder: Michelle Santana Owners: Tony MacKenzie & Kim MacKenzie

Breeders: R. De Munter & D. Uiterwijk Owner: Victor Malzoni Jr

Breeders: M. E King, R. H .Schindler, J. Vogel & T. McFadden Owners: M. E King, R. H .Schindler, J. Vogel & T. McFadden










AW

ow o I

A 2019 mini series on the dog world in Italy

PIE RO PAOLO COND Wr

A

ur

Mr. Condò is an Italian judge approved for all breeds. He and his wife have bred Cavalier King Charles Spaniels since 1985. He organizes the annual San Remo show in conjunction with Genova, one of Italy’s most ambitious events. He teaches training courses for candidate judges, and is currently responsible for translating all FCI approved standards into the Italian language. He lives along the border of France with his family, his dogs and other animals, which he has rescued from compromising situations, especially his beloved pony who is now living in peaceful retirement. He doesn’t drink alcohol, and is a ‘mammal vegetarian’. When he is not busy with his dog related activities he spends time by the sea with his canoe, or walking along the shores and woodlands with his wife, Marina, and his dogs. He also enjoys reading, especially Wilburn Smith and taking care of his garden. He writes for dog magazines, has written several books on his breed, and looks forward to future publications 154

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Q: Who were your principal mentors over the years? A: From the very beginning of my involvement with dogs I connected with some of the greats of the Italian dog world as well as in other countries. These men were examples of ethical behavior who also possessed profound culture concerning dogs. Among these, most appertain to the past, such as the Baron PieroRenaiDella Rena, Raffaello Mariotti , Luciano Bernini, or Enrico Adinolfi. However Captain Gioachino Murante is active in the dog world today and he has been a great influence on my thinking. I am honored to have known these gentlemen who were already advanced in their career when I was just beginning, because they were able to share with me something of what this discipline was like before the ‘electronic age’. I feel enriched now to have known them as I did, and to have absorbed from them a considered approach that is rarely found now when things all require great immediacy to be relevant or valuable. Q: When you go into the ring to judge, what are you hoping to achieve? A: When I go into the ring, I am always first and foremost a breeder. While I am looking at the dogs I am thinking, which ones would I want to take home? I want to help breeders direct their breeding programs. Time at shows is limited, but I hope breeders understand what I have to say from the comments and from the classification I am able to make when there is the opportunity to do this. If there are many dogs, I spend the time to classify down to the last one, rather than just the first four, excusing the rest. I hope to make a clear picture of my interpretation of the breed and of the importance I attribute to the various characteristics. I think most colleagues would agree with me that while ‘talking dogs’ over the dinner table is great, the most elec-

trifying moment is in the ring. After a long trip and all the official acrobatics involved in shows, a judge finally enters the ring and gets to work. I want to extend this comment just a bit, because so often I perceive that people don’t quite understand what judging is about. A judge is called to the show to give educated and experienced direction to breeding programs. By qualifying a dog in comparison to the standard and then classifying the entries in relation to Best in Show Magazine

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one another, a judge is applying the breed standard to the living examples of the breed. A judge is a notary, an instrument of the kennel club, which has trained and confirmed him or her to represent it. Judges dedicate their time to this service, for the love of dogs, and of the work of breeders. In Italy, exhibitors have the good fortune to obtain a paragraph of comments for each entry. In my view, this is of infinitely more value than a ribbon because here you have observations on every part of the individual dog. As a result, you know just where your breeding is on target, and where it needs a bit more work. Q: When does judging give you the most satisfaction? A: When I find that supreme expression of a certain breed in the ring. Just speaking about it now gives me the shivers. When I see a superior dog in construction and expression but above all in attitude, I feel deep emotion. For example, I had a large entry of Tibeten Spaniels in the ring in one of the Scandinavian countries. There were a number of top quality champion dogs, but one beautiful dog in Junior class was in the line up, and he made a gesture with his head of such sublime nobility that he simply demanded the first place… I “trusted him” he went best of breed, and I was pleased to find that he became a big winner and really I think in addition to his type and construction he had that attitude- so … “Tibetan”! Q: When does judging require the most patience? A: It is frustrating waiting for the dogs to get into the ring. If time is precious and there is plenty of work to do, I don’t feel very patient with people getting distracted, running in late. The judge needs to really focus to get a clear picture of the breed and if there is a long wait between classes, the whole picture gets diluted. 156

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Q: In a scale of importance, where would you place construction, type, attitude… A: Type is king. Type is everything. You can have a dog is a mixed breed that has excellent construction, but you need to have type to be that breed. Type is the general picture but it is also in the details. If you have a great German Shepherd, but the tail is curled, you have to disqualify him. This means that type is in every little part of the dog, from the feet to markings and the breed specific points. Q: A judge once said to me: ‘grooming is not genetic’, how important is grooming in your opinion? A: Over grooming is one of my pet peeves. I


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cannot bear overdone topknots or long flowing mantles with no dog underneath. In those cases, you know the dog lives a life based on maintaining a beautiful coat, probably spending most of the time between baths in a crate, I cannot condone this, dogs deserve our greatest respect, we cannot treat them like fetish objects. On the other hand, dogs that are not well kept and have dirty ears or tangled coats are equally offensive. I like a clean well cared for dog with plenty of muscle showing that he is more than just a living hanger for the mantle, that he has a full and active life. Moderation is the key concept.

and behavior that is constantly noble makes a difference. The handler has his hands full in this case because every minute in the ring counts. There is never any ‘down time’ in my ring. In general, I hope most people presenting their dogs will act and dress appropriately, I wear a coat and tie even in 30° weather and that is to show respect for the people participating and for the host club. You don’t need an evening gown, though some people wear them, and it is ridiculous, better something sober and neat, after all it is the dog who is center stage. The elegance and dignity of our dogs ought to bring out the best in all of us. I would add to this how sad it makes me to see people who behave with arrogance and do not graciously accept the judge’s opinion. The dogs were entered expressly to have my opinion, it seems logical and legitimate, my duty in fact, to give it! If every breeder who brought a dog to that show were already a ‘master breeder’ they would all have ‘excellent’, but some breeders are just starting out, some have lost their direction, so clearly there will be dogs who will be awarded ‘very good’, or ‘good’, which simply means, ‘keep working’, there is room for improvement. This is not an offence to that breeder, it is a challenge to up the game.

Q: Do handlers occasionally do things to weaken the presentation of their dogs? A: Sometimes handlers, and here I do not refer to professional handlers, invalidate the results of their dog attempting to mask evident defects, this makes for an unsightly situation. The same is true when the dog is not permitted to move with his natural gait. Though I feel especially tolerant of novices, and I want to encourage people who are launching into new experiences, I do expect focus and respect. I keep an eye on everyone in my ring, even those not right before me at the moment. I get a fuller picture of the dog’s general attitude, and the posture

Q: Does the organization of shows have an impact on the judges, can they make the job easier or more difficult? A: Everything works together, if the judges arrive to the event relaxed with a comfortable trip behind them, if the hospitality is sincere, then harmony is created and the work to be done in the ring is taken up with proper spirit. This is equally true of the exhibitors, the organization must guarantee maximum hospitality concerning parking, quick and easy entry to the venue, practical and comfortable waiting areas guaranteeing that people and dogs get to the ring relaxed having had the opportunity

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to prepare their dogs in an accommodating environment. It requires a great deal of work, because reality has to be dealt with. There aren’t any venues expressly designed for dog shows, the regulations are endless and all have to be complied with. Every individual situation cannot be attended to, but when I am part of the organizing committee I see everyone really dedicated to making a great show. Obviously, the number and quality of the ring stewards is essential. Q: Are the people watching the ring usually enjoying the show? A: Yes, I’d say the public, especially at the BIS ring is a positive element. Most people come to a show between noon and 5pm. If we could move some of the BIS ring activities to an earlier time, say at noon have Junior handling, and move up to BIS by 5, we would have a larger crowd and everyone would get to see the spectacle. As things are now the show ends closer to 7 and the only people who see the confetti and balloons are the cleaning crew. A nice ‘side effect’ of an early BIS is that we all go home at a reasonable hour, kids have school the next day, kennel help can be one day less, and judges don’t necessarily have to stay another night out so the Club saves some money, etc. Q: Do you think fewer shows with more dogs compared to shows every weekend with lower entries would be better or worse or that wouldn’t matter in your opinion? A: My motto has always been ‘fewer and better’. I do not appreciate shows that have been thrown together, people attending have to overcome obstacles to get to the show, and there is a feeling of discomfort and anxiety in the air. Taking into account that holding a show is an extremely expensive undertaking, the

shows that just get by in a mediocre way detract from entries to the shows that really make sacrifices to organize a top quality event. I think the various clubs need to make an honest attempt of self evaluation and make a decision whether to continue or not. The exhibitors as well ought to exercise their vote and choose the shows that offer the most in hospitality and quality competition. They need to evaluate their reasons for participating, if they just want a ribbon even though it was won against a few mediocre dogs, or none at all, then any local show will do. If they hope to obtain a constructive contribution to their work from a qualified judge, then a quality jury will be of paramount importance, and a numerous, quality entry will give scope to this experience Q: For some time now the FCI has invited judges to take a stand on health issues in breeding, especially concerning extremely short muzzles, or extremely over angled posterior construction, have you had to use ‘disqualified’ on any dogs due to extreme breeding? A: Yes, I have had to make those calls sometimes. It is for the welfare of the breed and terribly important. We have some ancient breeds which have the shortened muzzle or other extreme characteristics which have survived until today even through hard times and without today’s veterinary medicine. That means that these breeds are intrinsically healthy and selection has been properly carried out. Thus it weighs upon us to maintain their health and prosperity, something the judge helps to guard. If we apply the standard correctly, with zero tolerance for disqualifying faults, we will safeguard the physical and psychological well being of these breeds.

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Q: Do the various countries show national character in their native breed standards, for example do you see a difference in mindset in the French standards compared to Japanese? A: Yes, I should say we used to see that. Now the FCI has asked all member countries to conform to a specific layout where the points are all discussed in the same order and the same major observations are made. This was heresy for the Italians because our standards were like poems, long and detailed and expressive. It was a challenge shortening them, like squeezing a peony into an ice cube tray. The new standards are definitely briefer and concentrate the image of the breed to a snapshot, and they may be leaving out some details. A fancier of the breed must go to the literature to find all the information. However, concerning Italian standards, in the end it all balanced out because we have a special section of the ENCI website where we have an ‘extended’ 160

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standard with images. So, we were able to put all the poetry back into our native breed standards and then add images such as old paintings showing our breeds from 100 years ago, that sort of thing. That material is also available in English, so anyone can access an enriched version of our standards. Q: Among the standards currently approved and used by all of us is there a large percent that have remained unaltered over time? A: Many breeds were formed naturally due to their isolated environment so they were self selected, or naturally selected to survive in a certain climate and adapt to other considerations. These have come to us as they are, since there was no need to make changes, one example of these is the Cirneco dell’Etna. Other breeds were subject to heavy intervention by man to obtain a specific look or ability. This is where guidelines come most into play. These breeds


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are not just ornamental, they have very specific jobs to be fit for such as the Pointer, or even the Pug whose human like features were meant to give comfort to people. I think updating a standard is a delicate question because a refreshed standard can be useful. Look at the case of the Mastino Napoletano. This breed was supposed to weigh in at about 120 kilos, which resulted in compromises in construction. The new standard is lighter and we are seeing some more functionality in these dogs. The other side of the coin is when people call for a new standard to cover up the fact that something is failing in the breed and they want to ‘change the ideal to reflect reality’. Fortunately changing a breed standard is a long process, and a lot of people need to agree with each other. Q: When a standard has ‘snags’, when something is not correct in a standard because it is not coherent with past standards, or is objectively foreign to the breed, is it possible for breeders or breed clubs to ask for a correction? How should a judge deal with this issue when something in the standard is clearly not right? A: In life, things happen! Sometimes, we can even find an error in a standard, but there are solutions. Firstly, we need to verify if it is an error of translation, and that is easier to correct at the level of the national kennel club which made the translation error. If, on the other hand the error is found in the original version prepared by the native country of the breed, say if there is something that contradicts itself, then a great effort must be made to set the record straight. Judges are bound to abide by the standard, so future champions and breeding programs will not be affected by an erroneous description of a breed. The kennel club of the country of origin of the breed must be notified 162

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if there is an error, so that they can analyze the wording and determine whether they ought to request intervention by the FCI standard committee. Obviously, this cannot be done with a couple of emails, there is plenty of burocracy to face, but the problem can be rectified. In the meantime, a judge, while respecting the standard, needs to apply a spirit of observation, logic, and keep in mind the original function of the breed. Q: Back in the 1930’s at the world Cinelogical congress of Monaco, delgates Huge, Herout and Solaro proposed that every champion be measured, would that be a good idea? A: Absolutely yes, we are going back a good


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while, official cinephilia was just taking root with the instruments available at that time. So every breeder or judge had his own ‘measuring stick’, moreover of different criteria concerning size and proportions. With the advent of real measurements of the various breeds, we were able to talk in numbers rather than just in theories, and from there to precise points of reference that unified type. These parameters are still relevant today. If the genealogical book is still open, the first step at the specialties is to collect data and measurements. This process is also carried out by the breed club if there is a trend that needs correcting. An example is the Rough Collie, which in Italy we find getting smaller and smaller in stature. The breed club is gathering data at their specials especially regarding height at withers so that they can structure specific warnings to the judging committee to avoid extremes. Thus the initiatives created by the founding fathers of cinephilia were right on target! Q: Do the various groups give importance to different qualities in their standards? For example, group 9 perhaps gives more detailed specifications on coat than group 6? What on the other hand are the universal commonalities? A: This is both a question of the standard and of logic. Terriers are not going to do their job very well if they are missing premolars. So a judge needs to be more aware of that sort of thing in group 3, whereas the Chinese Crested dog has the gene for hairless skin which inhibits the formation of teeth, so applying the same parameters used in the terrier breeds to this breed is not logical. However all groups share the priority of correct morphology, solid topline and excellent character are a few examples. Coats are important, something that we tend to underestimate, especially in determining specif164

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ic colors prescribed by the standard. The colors are like the flag of the breed. An example is the Cavalier King Charles, especially the Bleinheim, a pearly white ground with rich chestnut patches is found more and more to be a rich chestnut ground with white patches. Dalmations are another breed subject to a lack of rigor in judging colors, the form and intensity of the spots is being lost. The list goes on… Q: What would you say is the ‘mission’ of the standard of a specific breed for the judge and for the breeder? A: The standard is a guide. Some are brief and vague, but if you reason them through you can find more information than appears at first sight. Perhaps the anterior angulation is not mentioned but the rear is, and you are told the dog is supposed to be harmonious in construction. By implication the harmonious dog must be well angled in front as well. This is an example of why a standard must be studied and understood, not just read. It’s always nice to see a group of dogs that fit the standard well, but that clearly show the interpretation of a certain breeder. Sometimes the winners you choose are from the same kennel because they have presented the same convincing image of the breed in all of their dogs, peculiar to this kennel, without compromising the breed standard. Q: Do you think judging trends seem to be changing in Italy? A: In terms of new judges, yes. For a while ENCI was not especially interested in seeking out and training new judges, we already have a full roster. However, in recent times, they have opened the doors and we’ve seen many applicants and many new faces. I am involved in the courses we prepare and that is an important part of the kennel club activities.


Moreover, judges nowadays are having a difficult time finding their feet in the sphere of social media. If you are a qualified judge, and you are invited by a club and people sign up for your opinion, you must represent the kennel club proudly, and simply give an honest opinion. Afterwards, there is no reason to go on social media and hash through what happened, there is a certain dignity to maintain in representing ENCI. I would also say there is a change in the attitude of judges in Italy in evaluating dogs. ENCI is inviting us all to consider the FCI definitions of Excellent and Very Good etc., and to reflect on what a truly excellent dog is. Exhibitors are getting sensitive about this and they are almost offended by the judgement of ‘Very Good’, or ‘Good’. They seem to want to pressure judges to hand out ‘Excellent’ in order to avoid being targeted for abuse. But this is not a game. We have the future of the breeds in our hands, and a well prepared and experienced judge who prepares an exact comment supporting his opinion, ought to find agreement in the exhibitor. Q: If you could change something, practical or fantastical, in the dog world, what might that be? A: Well, making the show more succinct, to start at 9am, and end by 5pm would be my wish. I think we need time to expand the pre ring for the BIS, even putting dogs on the table, evaluating movement coming and going and making some decisions there, so that the honor ring is already a considered choice of select dogs and just a quick final evaluation can wind up the judging. However, I would have one other wish. I wish that we could create a more positive atmosphere. Today I see handlers making faces, leaving the ring without congratulating the winner. Frankly, that lacks healthy competitive spirit

as well as common courtesy. I have all the evaluations of all my dogs in files at home. They are useful documents and I have definitely learned from them, perhaps most of all from the negative ones through the years. Today the evaluation may not please me but next time I can do better, and having an expert evaluate our stock is the reason we all go to the shows in the first place. Thus my wish, perhaps a bit Utopic, is to see dog shows as stock selection rather than self-affirmation exercises for people. Let me conclude by saying that our world is a beautiful one, edifying and involving, which preserves breeds pioneered by past generations, and offers a stimulating and dynamic way of life which renews us all both in body and spirit!

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L r r Dog REEDING LI E PROS P Wr

Pekka Hannula, from Finalnd, has written a number of books on breeding, judging, and handling. He has just come out with his latest work, Breeding Like Pros (2018, Altea Pub). This is nearly 300 pages of material on breeding, caring for and showing dogs as interpreted by Mia Ejerstad and Fabrizio Bocchino. Mia has literally been in dogs since she was 7 years old, and Fabrizio began at about the same age, so there is a lot of experience packed into each chapter! They hold nothing back from Pekka as they discuss every aspect 174

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of their life, from morning to night in the kennel, grooming and training their dogs, going to shows and their thoughts on shows, judges, and most of all- breeding. One chapter takes a look at the modern kennel facilities they have just built slightly north of Rome in Italy. Mia shares her layout to which all of her experience has contributed and discusses in detail each choice from fencing to gravel. A full chapter is dedicated to her nutrition plan, an issue to which she has always dedicated much thought. She has, over decades of research and experimentation, worked out her own way to provide balanced fresh nutrition for a kennel full of dogs, which she explains fully. Althea has produced a quality edition, in a handy format. The design and photos are especially well done, though some of the dark photos, for example in the photos of a beautiful black Pomeranian, are difficult to make out. There are poetic images of the place and people and the activities of this kennel that bring to life the text that is characterized by Mia’s


contagious energy. The text that has been written in English has some rough patches, but the content is thick with good advice from the voice of experience. Pekka Hannula Q: Pekka, this book is a noteworthy addition to your long list of great books. In a way it is your ‘masterwork’ because it addresses many different subjects. How did you plan it? A: I met Mia and Fabrizio when they stayed in our house for a week during the WDS Helsinki 2014. I know a lot of dog people, but I never met such pros. We had hot weather at that time, but she trained handlers on exactly what to do eight hours on one day. Then Mia decided which dog fit best to each handler. And the grooming! Wow! During the show days they woke up at 3 am to be the first ones on the line when the doors opened. Since they had a lot of dogs, they also needed space. One morning Fabrizio asked if they could sleep half an hour more. Mia just said to him “we have travelled here 3000 km and you want to sleep an extra half an hour?”. I have never seen anything so professional in my life. I have been breeding for decades, but felt myself a total amateur. I knew I wasn’t the only one who would feel that way if they had seen that. But the idea of the book didn’t start right then (or who knows what the subconscious produces). First, I had the idea of a book on great breeders, but right after that I knew the only people who would be the best for that – Mia and Fabrizio. Q: What was the atmosphere like while you were working on the book with Mia and Fabrizio? A: During the interviews they were just like they are, professional. Very intensive! They have a

lot of dogs to take care of so no time to waste. But we had our funny moments like when Mia me about the time she met Fabrizio. The questions – and they are the key – came easily. Also, because I wanted to know the answers. The questions follow always the topics I have already addressed in different books. If they are interesting and not trivial, the answers are interesting. Of course, every writer has their own technique. Q: You use several techniques in presenting the material, summary, one on one interview, three way interview and journalism. What do you think are the advantages of each? A: Oh, I have experimented with them all over the years, and like a painter I choose between them as between working in pencil, oil or watercolor, I goes with what feel right for the job. Best in Show Magazine

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Q: You had Swedish, Finnish, Italian and some English going on, how did you manage the languages? A: Fabrizio knows a lot and has a lot to say. So it was obvious that he had to have a chance to use his mother language. It was not an obstacle, because Mia, such a bright person, could translate everything immediately. Q: There are a huge amount of photographs in this book, that must have been a Herculean job to sort out! A: I visited their place twice, first in June and again in August and we looked through some pictures. However, the actual work of sorting them was made by Mia, Fabrizio and the publisher Barbara Ferratini. Q: There were many different breeds involved: Collies, Schnauzers, Jack Russells and more, there must have been a lot going on? A: They are breeding several breeds. For the reader it’s only a benefit, because comparing them gave a wider scope to the book. They also have every age, prenatal mothers, puppies of all ages, then the young adult and veteran dogs, not to mention the huge guard dogs, thank goodness Mia is a consummate trainer! Q: Mia and Fabrizio have been moving around Europe, but I think they have found a permanent home now. Tell us a little about the kennel, and how they planned and executed their ideas. A: They have the best facilities one could imagine. Every detail has been thought over, the huts of the dogs, the ground made out of stones. Everything has its place and is spacious without being a ranch or anything like that. It is very well planned. Impressed is not the right word. Stunned is better! Wow! 176

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read more and play on their mobile phones less. They are an adventure book for teenagers and a book of bed time stories for small children. In that one I try to feed the imagination of small children so that they later value books as a source of life in their heads

One major difference between Mia and other handlers is that she is both a professional handler and a Breeder owner handler! I think she just wins, with others and with her own dogs! She has learned a lot from other breeds which she has handled too. She is smart and skillful in both breeding and handling. Q: Tell us a bit about yourself, how did you get into writing and the dog world? A: I’m a biologist by education, but nowadays a writer. I also have been a breeder, handler and a judge for decades. But when those started to feel repetitive, I wanted to start sharing the ideas and angles I had seen. But not just to the dog world. I have written a series of books of biology, customer service and other subjects. Q: Do you have anything ‘in the oven’ for an upcoming book? A: I have one more dog book coming. Pretty slowly though! Then I will write with my good friend a book on Fishing the Pike. We were joking that when the time comes - maybe not soon – we can read extracts of this long book at the funeral if one of us dies before it’s finished! But then I am working on two REALLY important books with which I try to get children to 178

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Mia Q: It must have been nice seeing Pekka again? Because creating Breeding Like Pros, was not your first collaboration with him? A: Yes, Pekka and I have known each other for some years. I collaborated for his books “Keys to Top Handling”, and “Keys to Top Breeding Vol 2” – and now, this one “Breeding Like Pros”, where I and Fabrizio are the “main subjects”. I might be more well-known to some as “Mia the handler”, who don’t know my real background in the dog world. But in this book, I and Fabrizio were able to speak about breeding, which was my first love, and I would say has always been my greatest interest. We all should never forget that, without top breeders there would be no top dogs…neither to show nor to groom! So, one objective of this book is to share our experiences in a lot of aspects regarding breeding, what we do and the decisions Fabrizio and I make when breeding. Today there’s a huge amount of information available and sharing through internet and social media is one of the main forums nowadays, but it is necessarily brief. There is a lot to say about breeding that will never fit into a ‘post’ – and it’s here in the BOOK its rightful place. But even in a book there will not be “enough” of space to put down everything, of course. So, even if there are topics that we could have gone deeper into, or some topics are hardly touched upon, I hope that, what we wrote will stimulate other breeders, because they can make comparisons with their own ideas and


thinking. One thing that will probably come across, is that we take a very traditional approach to selection. Testing for health is very important, but one should never forget to take a closer and honest deep look at the dog itself. It is here, where it all begins. We always put much emphasis on breed essence and breed specific points. Type and essence are the first considerations. With Swedish, Italian, English language - then different breeds like Schnauzers, Collies, Shelites, Poms and all the others - you guys had a lot going on… It was Babylon! Fortunately, our connecting language was English. Because Pekka’s Finnish is a language of its own, but he knows English and also some Swedish – but no word of Italian. I can manage enough in both Italian and English, but my native language is Swedish. English is obviously “only” a second language for both Pekka and me, so while in the end everything worked out very well, it was really more time consuming than we expected. The recording of the interviews and the writing was done in English, but with instant translations to Italian for Fabrizio and vice versa to Pekka… It wasn’t easy for myself to be there in the middle of everything! My father is a professional translator, and as he says, something is always lost, or at least not equal to the original, in translation. What made it all keeping together and making it possible and feeling worthwhile, was our passion for dogs! Q: Which part of the book is your favorite? A: I have to say I am well satisfied with everything, but perhaps the ‘Name Game’ was the most fun to do and in a way a “lighter” chapter. Q: Did you get any interesting feedback while signing copies at Crufts? A: I was only available on the Saturday, and the books sold out so fast, but it was great

speaking with some of the readers. Many remarked on the great passion that transpires the whole book and that is inspiring the reader. Another thing I heard, was the appreciation of the simplicity of the writing. People who are not native English speakers liked the fact that the language in the book was very clear. Q: There is a chapter in the book about how to plan your kennel facilities.There were a number of obstacles you had to overcome to get the kennel facilities at your new home started. Are there things you would do differently now that would have made it all easier? A: One thing everyone has to do, is to deal with the limitations that the site and preexisting buildings and terrain present. In my mind, I can build castles, but when you buy a property, it will have certain characteristics that must be taken into consideration. But that is also a kind of challenge – to make and create “that” place into “your” place for you and your dogs. To find valuable solutions and make the best out of what you have! Many things worked out as we had thought when doing the plan of the kennel. Other things we have of course been modified after having lived here now for a couple of years. For example, in order to keep the runs clean and dry, we put down some more outdoor tiles in some places, and we shored up the gravel in certain areas with bars. Keep in mind that we built our kennel for our own breeds. While I think most breeds would be well kenneled in a structure like ours, a Husky could jump our fencing in a heartbeat, so there is no universal perfect kennel for “all breeds”. Our goal was to make our kennel facilities fitting into our home, and not give the feeling of a “prison”, neither for the dogs nor for the people. We have about 100 dogs at any given time, some veterans, some in the middle of their show career, some pregnant Best in Show Magazine

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and then pups and youngsters of all ages. We had to keep in mind so many different criteria – and special consideration given to “bad weather days”. It’s easy to make your kennels work well in good weather conditions, but one must absolutely think about those really bad weather days and how to find good solutions. Another thing we designed for is not just good kenneling, but optimal conditions for show dogs. In that respect, using the facilities correctly is important. For example, the young dogs do not stay outdoors all day long. They have a bit more “controlled” and regulated life style. They are taken out three times a day, staying outdoors several hours every time. This is time consuming, but important mainly for two reasons. First, I want to get my hands on the youngsters, every day and several times a day, and this is actually where they do some important learning. When I come get them, and we walk, and then at meal times, they get their “every-day180

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education”, they learn to listen and to be attentive to you, and I also expect them to behave in an orderly way. Mind you, Schnauzers are an amazing breed, so sturdy, so smart, but I would still do this with any breed. The second reason I don’t allow the youngsters to remain out all day, is that they get wild or bored depending on each individual, and they act up digging and roughhousing. This ruins the coat, beards and furnishings, which we take care to maintain (and much time to regrow if ruined) as these youngsters are our future “show prospects”. But, youngsters are youngster in every sense, just like any specie, and they absolutely need enough space and time to be able to play and run around with each other. But on the other hand, they also need to be able to relax inbetween!


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Q: Which part of the kennel plan was the most challenging? A: The solutions for the bad weather days as I said. Outdoors we have grass and gravel; the grass of course is not practical if there is rain, but it’s nice, not only to look at but also to walk on, both for us and for the dogs. So, we have a first outdoor space near the indoor area that is covered so the dogs can be outside if they wish, whether there is sun or wet and they will not be affected. Each of these covered yards connects to another graveled and partly paved area, and then again to an even larger open space that we use in good weather. They can really run and play there. In addition, we also have several another huge runs, where the dogs are allowed, weather permitting, to stay and play in even bigger groups. Then, there is the constant challenge of cleaning. I like my kennel to feel really clean, indoors and outdoors. My whole morning is dedicated to cleaning and feeding, which leaves the afternoon for grooming and some show training. But show training is also done in the everyday life with the dogs. Every time I am with a dog, we are actually communicating. Every time I put a dog on the table, for example, the show posing and stacking is trained automatically. When taking a dog on the leash, this is also a time for training – and that is especially asking him to give me his attention, whether moving or standing. This way of “natural every-day training” has become such a normal thing for me, that when I hold my workshops, sometimes I forget to point out some behaviors or ways of doing something, because they have become such ingrained habits that I don’t even think about them.

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Q: Has anything changed since you settled in the new kennel? A: I’m always exhausted at the end of the day, that hasn’t changed! I love to do things, I love to work, and especially with the dogs, I hate to do “nothing” …! Sometimes I feel what we do with our dogs is not enough, even though we are completely dedicating our lives to them! But then, when a family comes for one of our puppies or youngsters, they call us the next day and say, ‘It feels like this dog has always been with us!’ That makes us so happy. That means that our dogs have got the right up-bringing, and first and foremost that they are trusting humans and are willing to go out into life with a positive attitude. Our dogs are very selectively bred, they are balanced and satisfied, and well-conditioned both physically as mentally, so what more could one ask for? Breeding like pros, in our way of thinking, breeding selectively for quality in a dedicated “professional” and responsible way.


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THE TOP TEN CHAMPIONSHIP SHOWS IN AUSTRALIA IN 2018 SYDNEY ROYAL – Entry: 3416 Judge: Mr Stavros Argyrou (Cyprus) Puli USA GCHS & AUST SUP CH CORDMAKER MISTER BLUE SKY Owned by Sue Huebner & Penny Kelly

CANBERRA ROYAL– Entry: 1767 Judge: Mr D Stojanovic (Bosnia) Beagle CH ALOTORIUS OLD GLORY CATCH ME IF YOU CAN Owned by Joshua Grant & Mellissa Grant

MELBOURNE ROYAL – Entry: 3209 Judge: Mr Francesco Cochetti (Italy) Afghan Hound MULTI CH ALAQADAR RIGOLETTO Owned by Arnold Tan & Wayne Douglas

VICTORIAN WOMEN’S D. C. (MELBOURNE) – Entry: 1453 Judge: Mr Ole Nielsen (Canada) Old English Sheepdog BERKSHIRE’S CAPTAIN AMERICA Owned by C., S. & J. Moore

ADELAIDE ROYAL – Entry: 2210 Judge: Mr Frank Kane (UK) English Springer Spaniel AUST SUP CH KINSHERAN FERRANDO Owned by Vin McPhee

THE SPRING FAIR (SYDNEY) (SATURDAY) – Entry: 1411 Judge: Mr M Fujita (Japan) Alaskan Malamute AUST CH HAMALEK CRUZE CONTROL Owned by Hayley & Rebekah French-Davis & Shelley Turner

SUNBURY CANINE CLUB (MELBOURNE) – Entry: 1959 Judge: Mr Fabio Amorim (Brazil) Cocker Spaniel (American) AUST SUP CH STARYANKS STOLE THE SHOW Owned by Paul & Debbie Wilkes & Paige Hopkins

THE SPRING FAIR (SYDNEY)(FRIDAY) (FCI – CACIB) – Entry:1187 Judge: Mrs Y Savard (Canada) Irish Setter CH NORTHWINDS CLASH OF THE TITANS Owned by Ashley Reid, Tony Eales & Lauren Moxham Bryson

BRISBANE ROYAL– Entry: 1886 Judge: Mr Carlos Flaquer (Brazil) Petit Basset Vendeen AUST SUP CH BONDESTIN RIGHT ON THE KISSER Owned by Miss A Cooney & Dr Caryn West

DOGS SA WINTER IDS (ADELAIDE) (SUNDAY)– Entry: 1151 Judge: Mrs Yoshimi Suzuki (Japan) Samoyed AUST SUP CH KALASKA LOVER BOY Owned by Kristine O’Riley


2018 was a year in Australia that saw a different dogs winning Best In Show at the Top Ten Championship shows. Royal shows continued to attract the largest entries in each state and cluster shows grew in popularity with international panels of judges. Australia held it’s first FCI CACIB shows in Adelaide, Perth, Sydney and Hobart and the first crop of International Champions were crowned with dogs here requiring four CACIBs under four different judges in four different states. Due to Australia’s isolation and strict quarantine laws, dogs are not required to obtain qualifications in other countries but if a dog has they may be used towards qualifying for the International Champion title. Australia has held FCI CACIB shows in the past but only one dog ever qualified for the International Champion title at that time before the ANKC decided to cease holding these qualifier shows. Australia has two optional point scores for number one dog and both were won by the Puli who won BIS at Sydney Royal. The Puli currently is the greatest Best In Show winning dog of all-time with 178 Best In Show awards and was number one dog all-breeds in the USA and Australia. At the Top Dog competition the Puli was crowed the overall winner for 2018. Runner-up in both point scores was the Pharaoh Hound Est Ch, Est Jnr Ch & Aust Sup Ch Caletto Fly High (Imp Estonia) owned by Ron and Diane Besoff and M Viirsalu. The Pharaoh Hound currently has 51 Best In Show awards in Australia and Estonia. Another significant milestone was achieved by the Labrador Retriever, Aust Sup Ch Bradorla Sculpture of Ice owned by Glen Vernon and Caron Ellis who became the greatest winning Gundog of all-time in Australia and now has 108 Best In Show awards - one of only nine dogs to ever achieve over 100 Best In Show awards in this country. Interestingly, Ron and Diane Besoff and Glen Vernon have two more dogs in the 100+ list

with their two Dalmatians: USA Ch, Brz GCh, Arg GCh, Urg Ch & Aust Sup Ch Paceaway At Rosemount “Vino” - co-owned with his breeder, Fran Darling, winning 153 BIS and Aust GCh Swiftgait In The Fast Lane “Jennifer” winning 106 BIS! Mind boggling record of achievements! Mention must be made of the Afghan Hound “Riggs” who won BIS at Melbourne Royal who ventured to Europe and the UK and made his presence felt by winning the Group at the WDS in Amsterdam and G2 at Crufts as well as some other significant achievements and he was piloted to those wins by his co-owner, Wayne Douglas. Australia is a country as large as Europe or the USA with 26 million people speed across the island continent so we punch above our weight with show entry numbers and the quality of the dogs exhibited.


Cocker Spaniel (American) AUST SUP CH STARYANKS STOLE THE SHOW

Samoyed AUST SUP CH KALASKA LOVER BOY

Petit Basset Vendeen AUST SUP CH BONDESTIN RIGHT ON THE KISSER

Pharaoh Hound CH CALETTO FLY HIGH

Labrador Retriever AUST SUP CH BRADORLA SCULPTURE OF ICE

Afghan Hound MULTI CH ALAQADAR RIGOLETTO



CACIB GRAZ – MARCH 3RD & 4TH Best in Show, Judged by Stefan Sinko, SLO English Cocker Spaniel GALLINAGOS CAUSE NOTHING COMPARES Owned by Dusko Piljevic

CACIB SALZBURG - APRIL 7TH Best of Day – Sunday, Judged by Lisbeth Mach, CH Bernese Mountain Dog JERMANN – WHERE THE DREAMS HAVE NO END Owned by Sara Copercini

CACIB SALZBURG - APRIL 7TH Best of Day – Saturday, Judged by Marja Talvitie, FIN Chow Chow FANTASY GIN SHEN TE CHOWS Owned by Andrea Jurcan

CACIB WIESELBURG – MAY 12TH Best of Day – Saturday, Judged by Otto Schimpf, A Jack Russell Terrier Original Master’s Voice Lovesong RNB Owned by Joszef Faradi


CACIB OBERWART – JULY 14TH & 15TH Judged by Orietta Zilli, I Whippet CHERUMBIM‘S ROYAL JUBILEE JULIAN Owned by Maximilian Mayer

CACIB TULLN I - SEPTEMBER 29TH Judged by Barbara Müller, CH Papillon GRIFFIN JP MANNY PACQUIAO Owned by Yvonne Weber

CACIB INNSBRUCK I – AUGUST 18TH Judged by Lisbeth Mach, CH Smooth Fox Terrier WANDA VD SCHÖNEN BERGEN Owned by F. W. Schöneberg

CACIB TULLN II - SEPTEMBER 30TH Judged by Stetan Sinko, SLO English Pointer SOLIVIA‘S WELL WELL WELL Owned by Irena Maroszczykova

CACIB INNSBRUCK II – AUGUST 18TH Judged by Otto Schimpf, A Black Russian Terrier LUKRETSIYA BORDJIA S ZOLOTOGO GRADA Owned by Ozhogina Irina

CACIB INNSBRUCK II – AUGUST 18TH Judged by Patricia Burunkai, HU Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen BLACK MAJESTY’S ROLLERCOASTER DEL LAGO DEGLI ORSI Owned by Iva Raic


WEELDE 2018 After the big success of last year with 2083 entries, the number dropped dramatically to 1371! And that is really undeserved! The halls are so fantastic, large, free parking, enough space, what more do we need for a show? Some say it was because entering was very expensive, however contrary to most other shows the parking was included. The first weekend after new year is right after a very expensive period that has a serious impact on the family budget. And there was Brussels, only 3 weeks earlier and Santa Claus, Amsterdam Winner, Christmas, New Year and Weelde...no wonder you make choices. Weelde is a small place right to the border of the Netherlands.The halls are a little bit remote from everything. This out of use Nato base offers lots of opportunities, but heating and sanitary facilities need to be rented. It was however, rather chilly inside but not extreme. Mrs.Myriam Vermeire was BIS-judge. Her winning dog was a Shih Tzu named “Saffron Sherhy Dustin” owned by Dorien Van Slycken from Belgium. Saffron is a Russian import, bred by Irina Cherkasova and is a little over 3 years old. He was entered in Intermediate class for judge Siret Lepasaar from Estonia to compete with 18 others. Mr.Dirk Spruyt, husband of Mrs.Vermeire was the group judge. The next show will be in March, the weekend of the 16th17th and one week after Crufts.

MOUSCRON 2018 For its 45th edition Mouscron can look back with pride,they had 1941 entries, only a little less than the previous year. Since two years this people are now able to walk around because there are now passages protected with fences, dividing grooming areas from the passages and places to be used by the handlers . It is still very crowded but now you can move and walk around and there is much less tension and stress. Another positive factor is the buffet. For a very democratic price you can eat, frites, hamburger, cakes all kind, sandwiches... Small details make often a big difference, it creates the general atmosphere and it determines of someone comes back for sure, maybe or never. On Saturday there were 922 dogs entered, on Sunday there were 1019. From across the Chanel came 52 dogs from the United Kingdom and 6 from Ireland. Best In Show was offered to Mr.Francisco Salvador Janeiro from Portugal. For the finals only 3 dogs were placed! FANTASTIC! An example to many other shows that place all dogs. And for the BIS Mr. Francisco had to place only one dog! His winning dog was a real surprise! It was a Sloughi, a breed that rarely scores so high. This was the second time in history I was told but I cannot check it. Kosmas Kristina entered her Champion for Mr. Hlebarov’s judgment. He was also the group judge “ Malala SchuruEsch-Schamps”, is a German bred dog of a little over 4 years old.


GENT 2018 From one show every two years to a double show now and this every year. The show will probably move to May. 1504 Dogs were entered on Saturday, 1470 on Sunday. A big part were entered on both shows, especially the foreign dogs. At the last single show Gent had 1966 entries, now they had almost 3000 dogs for the two shows. But compared to both shows individually they lost nearly 25% of the entries. Mr/Markku Mähönen from Finland was asked to judge the Best In Show on Saturday. Winning dog was the American Staffordshire Terrier “Carmichael’s Liar Liar Pants On Fire” . This bitch was entered in Champion Class by Olaf Verhorevoet who bred her and owns her along with Benny Cheek. She lives in the Netherlands. Last year this bitch was 3 times Best In Show. She’s 3 years now! On Sunday Mrs.Liliane De Ridder from Belgium was on term to judge Best In Show. And who won the Best In Show this time? Yes, believe it or not, the very same dog as Saturday. Liar Liar writes history for sure, being one of the most crowned Amstaffs in the Benelux and double BIS winner on one weekend. I saw a lot of Saturday podium places come back on Sunday. A good thing was that only 3 dogs were placed in the groups. Unfortunately all dogs had to be placed for the BIS, maybe that will change soon too.

GENK AMBIORIXTROFEE 2018 Bad luck affected this show as a heavy snowstorm prevented British and Irish judges to come over to Belgium. As this could not be foreseen it was a big problem for the committee as they were forced to look for judges who could replace them in the very last moment. Mr. Wade, Mr Stearle , both from Ireland and Mr Chapman from the UK were forced to stay home . After lots of stress, phone calls and puzzling the judging panel could be repaired by 6 Belgian. We have to take into account that the average dogs/judging day rate was extremely high with 72 dogs and I don’t need to tell that the impact is huge if a judge needs to be replaced, let stand 3 judges. “Chapeau” for the committee! The total amount of dogs was 1513 and that is very, very good, taken into account that it is a CAC show, not a CACIB! And it proves that a single show has more competition to offer than a double show, and often attracts more rare breeds too. Mr.Aleksoski was asked to judge Best In Show. It was the winner of group 2 who won Best In Show, a Mastino Napoletano, named “Pirelli Luigi”, bred and owned by Sonja Smidova from Belgium. Luigi is 2 years olf and was entered in Champion Class along with 2 others and was judged by Mr. Schogol who was the Group Judge as well.

BRABO SHOW 2018 It was the 52nd edition of this famous show in Flanders capital. It is, fortunately, a single CACIB show and a rather good one with 1826 entries. Last year there were 2152 entries .Affected by the new rage of double shows ?The show was on the very same weekend as the famous and very popular 10-miles run in Antwerp. Best In Show judge was Mrs. Monique Van Brempt, world famous and originating from Antwerp herself. Best In Show went to the Toy Poodle “Yamit Muskat Boomer” . Judge Vanaken Jean - François from Belgium is his proud owner. Let us hope that Brabo will face the concurrence of the many double shows and stand out as one of the big shows in Belgium.


WIEZE 2018 Notwithstanding rumors that it would be the last edition of this show, nothing was the case. As often troubles can arise within an organization and as often rumors go around and start a life of their own. That was what happened in this committee too. Without going into details, the new committee took over with great enthusiasm. There was a new layout of the rings and main ring. It was much more comfortable, easy walking and talking and gathering around the 3 indoor cafés, food-stands and commercial boots. It was more “breathable” as usual. 1259 dog were showed this year, over hundred more than other years. For a CAC show it is a good result. There were also 20 dogs from the United Kingdom and 5 from Ireland entered. The show did end each day at a very reasonable hour and that makes that there is public around the ring until the very end and applause for the final lining up and BIS winner. Best In Show judge was Mr.Stefan Sinko from Slovenia. Best in Show went to the Kleinspitz Orange “Dan-StarKom Griffon Boy”. The breed was judged by Mr.Van Den Bosch from Belgium. Griffon Boy is Russian bred and 4 years old. He lives with Vanvaerenbergh-Van Den Brant Julie from Belgium. The group was judged by Mr.Nodalli from Italy.

LOMMEL 2018 It was pouring rain in several areas of Belgium and Lommel was at risk. But the showers were very local. Halfway from my place to the show I had to drive trough 20 to 30cm of water as the road was flooded over about 5km. Fortunately Lommel was not affected, but there was always a chance as a lot can happen in a weekend’s time. But they were lucky as it was warm, not too hot and no accumulation of heath in the sports hall where the show takes place. About the same number of dogs as last year were entered, 1131. A printed catalog could be ordered for 5 EURO extra if not you had a free digital version online. Alike last year I loved the speakers team! One was asking questions while the other one explained alike in a radio and TV shows. Mrs.Mieremieczyk from Poland, a well known judge, was granted the honor of choosing the best dog in show. Her winner was the particolor American Cocker Spaniel “Royalty Inc.Beat It”. This male was entered in Veteran Class and won that class in the main ring. Later on he won the group and ended BIS, nice! He is 8 years old! Mr.Pawel Osak was his judge for the breed judging and again, he was the group judge too. It was quite impressive to see the numbers of trophies handler/breeder Jessica Van den Boom could take home. The owner of the dog is Mr.Rui Da Silva. One tip: rent a bungalow in the Center Park 1 km away and make it a long, relaxing weekend in combination with the show.


GENK LKV 2018 Again a single CACIB show, the LKV show of Genk with 1613 entries. The weather was very warm that weekend and we all crossed our fingers that there would be no stupid exhibitors or visitors leaving dogs unattended in closed cars. Fortunately there was not a single incident. Inside the halls the temperature was pretty OK and everybody seemed to be very relax. Mr.Miguel Angel Martinez is a famous and popular judge and as a member of the board of the FCI he needs to come over from time to time to Belgium where the FCI has its seat. The Toy Poodle “Christmas Spirit Superior World” was the ultimate choice of Mr.Martinez. This little black poodle was entered in Open Class males and won it from 10 other competitors. Judge was Mr.Jean-François Vanaken from Belgium. His Group judge was Mr.Vidal Montero Jose from Spain.

LOVANIUM TROFEE 2018 The winning dog was the Standard Dachshund shorthair “Kurt Kentwood Excellmagic”. This male was entered in Champion Class too and won it from 8 concurrents. His breed and group was judged by Mrs. Roxana Opris. Kurt was imported from Russia and is living with Heidi Droogmans from Belgium. He is 2 years now and has still a long career in front of himNext year is a jubilee year , the 30th editions! That will happen on 26 and 27 October. Next year the Belgian Kennel Club has promised to bring down the number of double shows, so there is good hope that this 30th edition will have a significant raise in entries.

LIÈGE 2018 GOLDEN DOG TROPHY The Golden Dog Trophy has always been the pearl of Wallonia, the best organized and most colorful show. Best In Show judge on Saturday was Mrs.Monique Van Brempt from Belgium. Mrs. Verstovsek was the judge of the Toypoodles and found 13 in her ring. She made “Yamit Muskat Little Pride of Art of Life “ as her BOB. This 5 year old boy was entered in Open Classe and is owned by Kurbatskaya Polina from Russia. Mr. Neofytou from Cyprus agreed with that choice and send him to the finals to represent group IX. And that was how he became finally Best In Show. On Sunday it was Mrs. Kelveri Philipou from Cyprus who had the honor to judge Best In ShowThe Best In Show winner was the Miniature Dachshund “Magic Rainbow Verino Roberto Gold” coming from St.Petersburg with his master Ivanova-Chudinovskaja Victoria. The dog is 4 years and was entered in Champion class that was judged by mr.Victor Lobakin from Azerbaijan, and Mr.Lobakin was the group judge too. Verino won the group on Saturday too but it was a nice surprise to see a Dachshund win Best In Show as too often they are placed behind in the lineup.




FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW, DAY 1 At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show, 15th of February, Best in Show went to West Highland White Terrier - LOUD LIKE LOVE SUNSHINE CELEBRATION, owned by Martina Kanasova. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. William R. Umanha.

FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW, DAY 3 At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show, 18th of February, Best in Show went to Gian Schnauzer Black - GENTLY BORN UNDER CONTROL, owned by Anna Vlasova. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Andras Korozs.

FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW, DAY 2 At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show, 17th of February, Best in Show went to Magyar Vizsla - HELVECIA-VADASZ FLORA, owned by Dorottya Vaczi and Domok Sandor. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Tamas Jakkel.

CACIB SZILVASVARAD, DAY 1 At the International Dog Show in Szilvasvarad, 19th of May, Best in Show winner was Old English Sheepdog - BOTTOM SHAKER ZEPHYR DREAM, owned by Jozsef Koroknai. 2nd place was Affenpinscher - POINT DEXTER V. TANI KAZARI, owned by Hanna Szreder, 3rd place was Wire Fox Terrier - QUIRINIUS V. WALDHAUS, owned by F. W. Schoneberg and 4th place was French Bulldog - SPARKLING PRIDE MON TOUT, owned by Vonk Van Der Linden Els. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Francesco Cochetti.


CACIB SZILVASVARAD, DAY 2 At the International Dog Show in Szilvasvarad, 20th of May, Best in Show winner was Affenpinscher - POINT DEXTER V. TANI KAZARI, owned by Hanna Szreder. 2nd place was Medium Poodle Black - ALKVALON SARDANPAL, owned by N. Sachkova, 3rd place was American Akita - TOMO NO KIMI TIGER FORCE, owned by Anna Rutskaya and A. N. Kurdyashova and 4th place was Magyar Agar - ILLA-BEREK APROD, owned by Akos Fidrich. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Geir FlycktPedersen.

GRAND PRIX BUDAPEST, DAY 1 At the International Dog Show in Budapest, 23th of June, Best in Show winner was Newfoundland - SKIPPER’S ARAMIS, owned by Laszlo Kovacs. 2nd place was Maltese - CINECITTA’S LUCAS BLACK, owned by Szilvia Grof, 3rd place was Shikoku - YUU-SAIKI VAN DE EGMATO, owned by Egitte Van Veghel. Best in Show has been judged by Mrs. Carla Molinari.

CACIB SZILVASVARAD, DAY 3 At the International Dog Show in Szilvasvarad, 21st of May, Best in Show winner was Newfoundland - URSINUS VELUTUS GUY, owned by Bartus Zoltan and Oton Fantur. 2nd place was Medium Poodle Black - ALKVALON SARDANPAL, owned by N. Sachkova, 3rd place was Magyar Vizsla - ESPECIAL OF SKYROCKET, owned by Payer Frigyes and 4th place was Miniature Dachshund Smooth Coated - CYBERDACHS MINI JAY-Z, owned by Tibor Kis. Bes in Show has been judged by Mr. Sean Delmar.

GRAND PRIX BUDAPEST, DAY 2 At the International Dog Show in Budapest, 24th of June, Best in Show winner was Magyar Agar - ILLA-BEREK APROD, owned by Akos Fidrich. 2nd place was Dachshund Kaninchen Wire Haired - DRAGON BOY DEL WANHELSING, owned by Gabriel Pascarella, 3rd place was Tibetan Terrier - GRACE KELLY FROM TASTE OF AMBROSIA, owned by Robert Kotlar. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Kari Jarvinen.


CACIB KOMAROM, DAY 1 At the International Dog Show in Komarom, 19th of October, Best in Show winner was Standard Dachshund Wire Haired - JULIANA TINTO DA CASA AMARELA, owned by Annaluce Saletti. 2nd place was West Highland White Terrier - TARA MIA SUNSHINE CELEBRATION, owned by Hanna Szreder, 3rd place was Newfoundland - URSINUS VELUTUS ZESRY GUY, owned by Zoltan Bartus and Oton Fantur. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Stefan Sinko.

CACIB KOMAROM, DAY 3 At the International Dog Show in Komarom, 21st of October, Best in Show winner was Miniature Poodle Brown - LOVED CHOCOLADES SWEET, owned by Nicole Palme. 2nd place was Magyar Vizsla - HELVÉCIA-VADÁSZ GYÖMBÉR, owned by Dorottya Vaczi, 3rd place was Basset Hound - BORIS BECKER V. GRUNSVEN, owned by Tamas Dudas. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Tamas Jakkel.

CACIB KOMAROM, DAY 2 At the International Dog Show in Komarom, 20th of October, Best in Show winner was Basset Hound - BORIS BECKER V. GRUNSVEN, owned by Tamas Dudas. 2nd place was Standard Dachshund Wire Haired - . JULIANA TINTO DA CASA AMARELA, owned by Annaluce Saletti, 3rd place was Xoloitzcuintle Standard - NIZUC ARENA, owned by Marek Sopko and Georges Klinker. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Jill Peak.

IV PRESIDENT CUP HUNGARY At the President Cup Hungary, 2nd of December, Best in Show winner was Tibetan Terrier - GRACE KELLY FROM TASTE OF AMBROSIA, owned by Robert Kotlar. 2nd place was Old English Sheepdog - BOTTOM SHAKER THE GREATEST PICTURE, owned by Jozsef Koroknai and 3rd place was Pomeranian - TOPLINEPOM STAR LEGEND, owned by Tibor Schulhoff. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Andras Korozs.


CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS At the Champion of Champions, 1st of December, Best in Show went to Magyar Vizsla - DOLGOS-NIMRÓD CSÁSZÁR, owned by Roland Nagy. 2nd place was Basset Hound - BORIS BECKER V. GRUNSVEN, owned by Tamas Dudas, 3rd place was Bullmastiff - SAFETY OF FLATLAND HELLGUARD, owned by Gyula Kozel. Champion of Champion judges were Mr. Jakkel Tamás, Mr. Kelemen Atilla, Mrs. Barbka Novak, Mrs. Siret Lepasaar and Mr. Marko Lepasaar.


Review from

INDONESIA Photo credits: Ferdinal Chandra

The Greatest show in JAKARTA 2018, February 22-24 2018

Best in Show Winner at the first CAC show in Jakarta was Pomeranian Valcon von Kacapiring, judged by Mr. Chua Ming Kok from Singapore.

Best in Show #2 was Pekingese - Ch. SW’s Morroco.

Best in Show #3 was Beagle - Chaucer Scandalous Byte

Best in Show Judge Mr. Chua Ming Kok from Singapore.


Best in Show Winner, at the second show in Jakarta, was Beagle - Chauer Scandalous Byte, second was Welsh Corgie Pembroke Ch. Avengers Way To Go With Hangaram and third was Doberman Ch. Alristar’s Gray At East Lake. Best in Show judge was Sigurd Wilberg from Norway.

Best in Show Winner, at the third show in Jakarta, was Bichon Frise - Ch. Regina Bichon My Adventurer, second was Pekingese Ch. SW’s Morocco and third was Pomeranian Seraphina von Kacapiring Best in Show judge was Ronnie F. Natividad from Philippines.


Review from

INDONESIA Photo credits: Ferdinal Chandra

The Greatest show in JAKARTA 2018, February 22-24 2018

Best in Show Winner, at the fourth show in Jakarta, was Welsh Corgie Pemrboke Ch. Avengers Way To Go With Hangaram.

Best in Show #2 was Beagle Chauer Scandalous Byte.

Best in Show #3 was Golden Retriever Ch. Golden Victorious Jordan Of Legend.

Best in Show Judge Mr. Stelios Makaritis from Greece


Best in Show Winner, at the second show in Jakarta, was Beagle - Chauer Scandalous Byte, second was Pomeranian B. Lucky von Joe Hauze and third was Bichon Frise Ch. Regina Bichon My Adventurer. Best in Show judge was Mrs. Shellie Marshall from Australia.

Best in Show Winner, at the third show in Jakarta, was Beagle - Chauer Scandalous Byte, second was Bichon Frise - Ch. Regina Bichon My Adventurer and third was Welsh Corgie Pemrboke Ch. Avengers Way To Go With Hangaram. Best in Show judge was Mr. Ramon Podesta from Chile.


The Israel Kennel Club is not one of the biggest, with a few thousand members only. However, what it lacks in quantity it makes up for in quality. There are many excellent dogs who win at the various club and international shows and also represent the IKC in large global events, including the World Winner and European Winner shows. Among the most popular breeds in Israel at the present time is the Pomeranian, which for the past few years has been a real “fad”, fetching top prices. Other popular breeds are the American Akita, Border Collie and Schnauzer. The IKC and breed clubs invite many top international judges to judge at their shows, and this year was no different, with Paul Stanton from Sweden, Rui Oliviera from Portugal and Maite Gonzalbo of Spain, to name a few.

Visitors who come to dog shows in Israel with an FCI champion can win the Israeli championship title in one show, by winning champion class. Several lovely dogs have come to shows from different countries, going back with fond memories (and a title). The Israel Terrier Club held a double show in November. At the first show, Scottish Terrier bred in Ireland by Eileen Aiken and owned and handled by Helen Braiman was put up as BIS. The dog is Shevecroob Fergus who has gained the tiles of International Champion, Irish Junior and adult champion, Israeli champion and grand champion and has won several BIS’s. In the second show, this dog went reserve-BIS. He was also r-BIS at an international show held the previous month under judge Michael Leonard from Ireland.

Portuguese judge, Rui Oliviera, judged a Terrier Club show and put up this Cairn Terrier female as his BIS. The bitch, Spicy Beit Dembin, bred by Dorit Dembin and co-owned with Sima Windman, is an Israeli champion, junior champion and grand champion, an international champion and was awarded the R-CACIB at the European Winner Show in Poland.


This Great Dane, Israeli champion, junior champion and grand champion Lion King Kelev Tov Yerushalayim, was put up as BIS by Spanish judge Maite Gonzalbo. He has done a lot of winning and is Israel’s top-winning Dane this year. Bred by Libby and Dmitri Uvaroski, co-owned with Dr. Leonid Litvak and handled by Svetlana Lukovkina.

At the annual Hunting Dog Show in December, attended by dogs from seven breed clubs, Israeli judge Dr. Zafra Sirik put this Hungarian Viszla as her Best in Show. Her name is Valley Hunter Lady Violet, owned by Patti Golan, Israel, and bred in the USA by Jean Matmor, Betty Anderson and Adele Neuper. At this show, the bitch finished her Israeli championship title.

In September, judge Paul Stanton from Sweden judged a Hound Club show. He put up this Beagle, Jericho Star XXX (aka Marley) as his BIS. Marley was bred by Tali and Zeev Krotman and is fifth generation in their kennel. He has been put up many times in club and all-breed shows, including in the group, has all the Israeli championship titles and is waiting for confirmation of his International Show Champion title. Handled by Avishag Morgenstern. Israel’s representative at the Cruft’s international junior handling competition, judged by Mr. Yiannis Vlachos of Greece, was Shaked Elan, who was there for the second year in a row. Shaked did a nice job although she did not make the cut.

Irish Setter, Ch. Valentine the Great Lover of Glory Red, bred and owned by Beronica Yamin, was entered for the European Winner Show in Poland under Sean Delmar of Ireland and placed in the champion class. He was also handled by Tuval Kadar (with him in the photo) in the junior handling competition at this show, where they were placed among the three best handlers of the day.


American Akitas, although a powerful breed with a strong guarding instinct, can be quite sweet tempered, as seen here. Shady Almagam Magic of Magnum was bred by Shady Ali , owned by Rany Khaleel and hugged by his handler Yael Davidovich. This was moments after he had won BIS at the CACIB show in October under Irish judge Michael Leonard.

Israel’s top-winning Australian Shepherd in 2018 was Grand Ch. Regmon Hi Caliber, bred by Shimik Regev and co-owned with Danny Simcha. He has won BIS at many of the club and international shows in the past couple of years, handled to perfection by his breeder. Here he was put up by Australian judge, Sue Bownds, at a specialty show in September. Judge Shimshon Berger (Israel) judged a Schnauzer Club show in October. His BIS was this Standard Salt and Pepper bitch, Gemma from Spicy Land, Israeli champion and junior champion. She is handled by her breeder and owner, Alina Zelikovski.



LUXEMBOURG SPRING 2017 There was a serious drop down in numbers of entries. Last year the spring edition had 4551 entries, this year it dropped to 4038. Luxembourg will always remain popular as it is relatively easy to become Champion of Luxembourg, notwithstanding the fact that there is strong competition. Winning here is always worth the title because there are lots of good dogs to beat, lots of good entries from many different countries and that means something! Last year this show faced bad publicity due to a few dogs that were trapped in close cars on the parking. But I know that this show is doing many efforts to prevent this. This year they had even more people checking cars and again some dogs were found in cars. Urgent messaged were send via the intercom and windows had to be smashed. In every hall, on every exit, on every eye-catching spot posters were hung, warning against the danger of leaving dogs unattended in cars, even in the shade with windows open, but still, there are always people who are convinced that it is enough. In Luxembourg they will no longer be welcome. The FCI should make up a list of such handlers and exhibitors if proven that they neglected their dogs. The show of this year is a very special one. Mrs. and Mr. Schwab, presidents of the show and of the Luxembourg Kennel club, decided to retire and this show would be their last show. How long exactly that they were at the helm of this show and this organization is not know,

but it must certainly be more than 30 years. It is amazing how they turned their semestrial show to a level that many other clubs can only dream of. Belgium , never had a show with more than 5000 entries. Luxembourg had 5529 in 2009! For all the FCI judges it is one of the greatest honors to be invited to judge and enjoy the splendid hospitality and stay in the Hotel Royal, the most prestigious hotel in town. The prestige and glamour that this show enjoys is without any doubt due to this couple. I am almost sure that they will still come and help and advice the new board where they can. Barbara Müller from Switzerland was the lucky lady responsible for choosing Best In Show The Scottish Terrier was the ultimate winner of this edition of the Luxembourg show. Mrs.Valentina Popova from Russia was allowed to take the beautiful BIS trophies home. It was “Filisite Brash Beauty Never Lies”, a female, not 3 years old yet and bred by Valentina herself. A nice entry of 36 showed up for Mr.Paul Stanton from Sweden who was also the Group judge. It is also one of the favorite breeds of Mrs.Schwab who is a Terrier specialist judge. A nice tribute to her and her husband. Next edition was planned for 1 and 2 september of this year. It will be the first time that the show would be organized under the authority of Mr.Raymond Jung who follows in the foodsteps of the Schwabs and that is not a comfortable start knowing that the Schwabs brought this show to one of the highest standards in Europe. Unfortunately for him the government of Luxembourg interfered after the previous incidents and forbade the Kennel Club to organize its September edition notwithstanding the efforts of the Kennel Club who did all they could to prevent future problems and checked and rechecked the parking areas, but due to the works around the halls that seem to take many years, there is a constant problem to find parking. And as always and everywhere, there will be people with no scruples, who are more involved with money than with the dogs, travel around with vans full of dogs and don’t properly take care of them. But while they don’t stand for the big majority of the exhibitors they are on the basis that all dogshow-lovers and the clubs are affected. We will see what the future will bring for Luxembourg and cross our fingers.



BELGRADE At the International show in Belgrade, March 4th, Best in Show winner was American Akita - Moonshine Red Mist, owned by Mirjana Makevic-Solomun. Reserve Best in Show was Welsh Terrier - Monaline Hot N’ Spicy for Matranenisis, owned by Peter Annus and 3rd placed was Pug - Grof Legend-Lord of The Ring’s, owned by Vlado Sekulic.

VRSAC At the International show in Vrsac, March 25th, Best in Show Winner was Rottweiler - Gringo Vom Zica Maradona, owned by Dragoslav Drazic. Reserve Best in Show was Maltese - Big Bang Baby Angel of Eden, owned by Rade Pops-Dragic and 3rd placed was Golden Retriever - Fianna of Golden Duck, owned by Marija Peter.

BOGATIC At the International show in Bogatic, March 24th, Best in Show Winner was Doberman - Pride of Russia Chingay, owned by Milan Matic. Reserve Best in Show was Srpski Gonic - Lisko, owned by Goran Blagojevic and 3rd placed was Yorkshire Terrier - Again You Are My Gold Sea, owned by Anna Galino.

NATALINCI At the International show in Natalinci, April 22nd, Best in Show Winner was Standard Poodle White - Star Sapphire Taj Mah, owned by Fine Eleni. Reserve Best in Show was Pointer - Aligi’s Conan, Bratta Pasquale, owned by Bratta Pasquale and 3rd placed was American Staffordshire Terrier - Buster Shining Field, owned by Darko Zivanovic.



STARA PAZOVA At the International show in Stara Pazova, April 29th, Best in Show Winner was Alaskan Malamut - Ice of Kingwolf, owned by Monica Costinesci. Reserve Best in Show was Maltese - Big Bang Baby Angel of Eden, owned by Rade Pops-Dragic and 3rd placed was Bullmastiff - Ch Cooperdale Precious Keen, owned by Bob Buijsen.

OPLENAC, TOPOLA At the International show in Topola, May 13th, Best in Show Winner was Sarplaninac - Arap Vujin, owned by Milan Vujovic. Reserve Best in Show was Italian Greyhound - Crystaldrift Aral Sea, owned by Karolina Szymanska and 3rd placed was Dachshund Long Haired - Milord Kragujevacki As, owned by Mirko Markovic

SUBOTICA At the International show in Subotica, May 27th, Best in Show Winner was Maltese - Big Bang Baby Angel of Eden, owned by Rade Pops-Dragic. Reserve Best in Show was Cane Corso - Be Charly Magia di Coraggio Corso Sotto, owned by Dejan Vasic and 3rd placed was German Shepherd - Falvavolgyi Tabata, owned by Der Istvan.





Group

1

NEED FOR SPEED DES COSTYS DU TOMBERG Australian Shepherd Owned by Iris Sablery Judged by Gerard Jipping

MY MILA V. TANI KAZARI Group

Affenpinscher

2

Owned by Monika Jablanovska Judged by Franki Leung

Group

AIDANTE IN LOVE WITH A BOY

3

Group

4

Scottish Terrier Owned by A. Lucin and J. Gonzales Mendikote Judged by Enrique Mate Duran

FRANZ DASCHMANIA Dachshund Short Haired Owned by Branislava Brjakov Judged by Jakkel Tamas


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Group

5

Group

6

ICILYS ROCK AROUND THE ROSE Siberian Husky Owned by Sanja and Miodrag Vretenicic Judged by Denis Kuzelj

BLUMINGSDALE WORLDS FINEST COMICS Dalmatian Owned by Nenad Devic Judged by Nebojsa Surbatovic

NOK HAUS ILEMARK Group

7

German Shorthair Pointer Owned by Marko Adamovic Judged by Slobodan Milosevski

GALLINAGOS LA BOMBA Group

8

English Cocker Spaniel Owned by Dusko Piljevic Judged by Linda Volarikova


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Group

9

AMASEN ALL ABOUT ME Lhasa Apso Owned by S. Paolantoni and L. Miele Judged by Carla Molinari

MY CAMELOT TALISMAN Group

10

Whippet Owned by Nenad Devic Judged by Zoran Popovic

NOK HAUS ILEMARK BIS

1

BIS

2

German Shorthair Pointer Owned by Marko Adamovic Judged by Slobodan Milosevski

GALLINAGOS LA BOMBA English Cocker Spaniel Owned by Dusko Piljevic Judged by Linda Volarikova


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Best In Show at the International Show in Zaragoza, 4th of February, was Maltese - Cinecitta Rango, 2nd was Miniature Schnauzer Black - Tajinastes Epico, and 3rd placed was Chow Chow - King of Egypt de los Perros de Bigo. Best in Show has been judged by Paul Stanton.

Best In Show at the International Show in Valladolid, February 25th, was Bullmastiff - Casa Alto Cristelo Storm Guardian Windsor, 2nd was Chow Chow Winter Solstice de los Perros de Bigo and 3rd placed was Gordon Setter - Goango Black Hip-Hip Hooray. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Michael Forte.

Best In Show at the Mandatory Point Show in Madrid, April 29th, was Chow Chow - King of Egypt de los Perros de Bigo, 2nd was Lakeland Terrier - Zavetnaya Mechta La Bomba and 3rd was Spanish Waterdog - Tango. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Antonio Rojo Fajardo.

Best In Show at the International Show in Santander, May 13th, was Chihuahua Smooth Coated - La Prohibida de Malkanorah, 2nd was Irish Red Setter - Irishserry Do to Me, 3rd was Dogo Argentino - Santino Bravoure Blanche. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Horst Kliebenstein. Best In Show at the International Show in Badajoz, May 13th, was Samoyed - Samspring Carry On my Secret with Joy, 2nd was Medium Poodle - Faralaes Avatar and 3rd was Spanish Mastiff - Romero del Retamalon, owned by Mrs. Vija Klucniece.

Best In Show at the Mandatory Point Show in Talavera, October 7th, was Toy Poodle - Evak’s Watermark, owned by Jose Luis Santiago. 2nd was English Setter - Calé de las Cumbres de Jacaranda and 3rd was Lakeland Terrier - Chelines Hi Pituflix, owned by J. Francisco Carbonell. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Angel Garach Domech.

Best In Show at the Mandatory Point in Malaga, November 25th, was Standard Poodle Black - Samarcanda Italian lover, 2nd was American Staffordshire Terrier - Karballido Staffs Mambo Golden Legend, and 3rd was Spanish Mastiff - Talismán Montes del Prado. Best in Show has been judged by Mr. Rafael Malo Alcrudo. Best in Show rosette is sponsored by Best in Show Magazine - Media Sponsor.



The Alliance Canine Latine was created by the National Canine Organizations of Spain, France, Italy and Portugal to promote an agreement of mutual cooperation between these four contries to fully work together in Cynological matters of common interest in an ever challenging and changing time in our Dog World. We are convinced that such agreement will benefit in many ways all parties as well as dog lovers in our four countries. The Latin Winner event will be the official event organized on a yearly basis by each of these countries at one of their major Shows. In this major event several official and important titles will be in dispute, and they will be included in the official pedigrees of all dogs issued by the four National organizations signataries of the Agreement. SPECIFIC DIPLOMAS WILL ALSO BE ISSUED. We invite exhibitors to participate in these challenging events and show the world the quality of their dogs as well as their talent as responsible dog breeders and exhibitors. LATIN CHAMPION TITLE The “Latin Champion” title will be given to the dog that obtains three CACIBs in “Latin Winner” shows, in three different countries, by three different judges, with no time limit. Latin Winner titles: Baby Latin Winner, Puppy Latin Winner, Junior Latin Winner, Latin Winner and Veteran Latin Winner. Calendar for 2019: Porto Latin Winner in January (Portugal), Madrid Mandatory Point in April (Spain), Paris Championship point in June (France) and Enci Winner in December (Italy)







CHESTER DE LOS NIEGOS Group

Briard

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KARBALLIDO STAFFS MAMBO GOLDEN LEGEND American Staffordshire Terrier Owned by A. Lucin and J. Gonzales Mendikote Judged by Peter Lauber

PROUD HUNTER ELIXIR Dachshund Short Haired Owned by Joaquín Vaillo Herranz) Judged by Antonio Choya


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Gordon Setter Owned by Julia Bango Prendes Judged by Adriรกn Argente

HARADWATER TROUBLEMAKER English Cocker Spaniel Owned by Isabel Galรกn Cao Judged by Linda Volarikova


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APOLLO DE CANIPALMA Group

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Irish Wolfhound Owned by Maria Joao Miranda Judged by Roberto Vélez Pico

PLATINUM CHOWS RAINBOW WARRIOR Chow Chow Owned by Adrián Peralta Macias

SAMARCANDA ITALIAN LOVER Standard Poodle Owned by Sonia Merati


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CACIB Nitra, 10th of February Best In Show went to English Setter ASLAN LIKE AN ANGEL ROYAL SETTER Owned by Pavel Thiel

CACIB Nitra, 11th of February Best In Show went to Samoyed SAMMANTIC QUICK Owned by Barbara Bruns and Wolfgang Stamp

Champion of Champions Bratislava, 17th of February Champion of Champions was Medium Poodle JOYFUL JEFFREY STARRING MORAVIA Owned by Tereza Vaverková and Jana Vavroušková.

Slovak Winner - CAC Bratislava, 18th of February Best In Show went to Australian Shepherd MARKÝZ SRDCOVÉ ESO Owned by Zuzana and Linda Hodová


CACIB Nitra, 7th of April Best In Show went to Basenji BAHATICCA’S HOGWARTS WIZARD Owned by Martyna Nowak and Alicja Pazdzierkiewicz

CACIB Nitra, 8th of April Best In Show went to Medium Poodle DREAM CATCHER STARRING MORAVIA Owned by Jana and Pavel Vavrouskovi

President Cup - CACIB Nitra, 8th of June Best In Show was Old English Sheepdog BOTTOM SHAKER ZEPHYR DREAM Owned by József Koroknai

Grand Prix Winner - CACIB Nitra, 9th of June Best In Show was Lhasa Aps AMESEN ALL ABOUT ME Owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Luisa Miele

Derby Winner - CACIB Nitra, 10th of June Best In Show went to Affenpinscher POINT DEXTER V. TANI KAZAR Owned by Michal and Hania Szreder

CACIB Velká Ida, 8th of July Best In show was Siberian Husky CUPIDO LOVE IN HANDS PERFECT TO ME Owned by Michal Ilcík


CACIB Bratislava, 27th of October Best In Show was Afghan Hound • EL ROALITO EASYGOING, Owned by Cornelia Schllenbeget

CACIB Bratislava, 26th of October Best In Show was Chinese Crested Dog NILUFER MOLOSOS GRATZI Owned by Alla Dmitrieva

CACIB Bratislava, 28th of October Best In Show was Chinese Crested Dog NILUFER MOLOSOS GRATZI Owned by Alla Dmitrieva









British Dog Scene 2018 by Anna Szabo

The British show scene in 2018 was more gloriously, and somewhat more dishonourably, action-packed than ever. ‘Clarges Street 10’ faced a political turmoil never seen within the Kennel Club of London before. The storm has thankfully (seemingly) come to an end, and The Kennel Club of London is now looking ahead the New Year with its newly elected Chairman, Mr Steve Croxford. 2018 in Britain – the year of the Hounds Even for a kennel of with the success and history of Soletrader, 2018 was something of a bumper year. Merely five years on from the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen female, Ch Soletrader Peek A Boo’s Best in Show at Crufts in 2013, Sara Robertson and Wendy Doherty’s Ch Soletrader Magic Mike (handled by Sara and bred by Sara and Gavin Robertson) won the second Top Dog All Breeds UK - following in her dam, aforementioned ‘Jilly’s footsteps – for his breeders / owners. With 14 All breed Best in Shows and 31 Group firsts to his account, he has earnt his place in the dog world’s history books as the UK’s top winning Hound of all time. He is also the breed record holder: his record of 30 UK CC’s is unlikely to be beaten anytime soon, I predict. To top it all, homebred Irish. Ch. Soletrader Buddy Holly, owned by Miss E & Master O Robertson, Miss E Greenslade & Miss C Neill, claimed the ultimate crown in Ireland as the country’s Top Dog All Breeds in 2018. 258

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Photo 1 • Collooney Tartan Tease: Best in Show at Crufts this year was Yvette and David Short’s Whippet female, WW’17’18 UK.Ch. Collooney Tartan Tease, bred by master breeder Vivien Coulter. Photo 2 • The Whippet female, Ch Collooney Tartan Tease won Best in Show at Crufts to an enormous storm of cheer and applause – Team Tease saw to that ! From left to right they are: Lisa Smith, Per Iversen (Norway), Ashley Place, Kirsty Green, Yvette Short (owner - handler), Mel Gorridge, Age Gjetnes (Norway), Helen Johnston, David Short (owner), Espen Engh (behind David), Vivien Coulter (breeder, Ireland), Jake Wilson (beind Viv’s hand), Christa Robertson and Luke Johnston.


Photo 3 • In 2018, The UK’s Top Dog All Breeds was the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen male, Sara Robertson and Wendy Doherty’s UK.Ch Soletrader Magic Mike - handled by Sara and bred by Sara and Gavin Robertson.

Crufts is undoubtedly the world’s greatest dog show. Its unparalleled atmosphere, fame and prestige are second to none - and make it the one dog show in the world EVERYONE dreams of winning. This year, the Sighthound fancy around the world raised their hats for the hugely successful Whippet female, Ch Collooney Tartan Tease, who won Best in Show at Crufts (having won Best of Breed in a breed entry that scored above 400, and a total entry of nearly 21000!) for breeder Vivien Coulter and owners David and Yvette Short (Scotland). She did so to a storm of applause and cheering, ‘Team Tease’ saw to that ! ‘Tease’ then proceeded to win her second FCI World Winner title at the World Dog Show in Amsterdam, making her one of the very few Whippets in history to gain this title twice. We shall be

looking forward to her return into the show ring at the Eukanuba World Challenge next year. An honourable mention goes to the standard wire-haired Dachshund female, BIS Ch Silvae Solo, bred and owned by Kim and Duncan McCalmont and handled by Kim, who won Best in Show at Birmingham National, and therefore became the first ever ever standard wire bitch to do so. I was fascinated to discover that the Silvae kennel, founded by the late Ethel ‘Mum’ Grosvenor Workman and her daughter Jill Johnstone and now passed onto Kim and Duncan, won their first BIS at all breed championship level in in 1947 – 71 years ago ! The UK’s #1 Standard Wire Haired since 2014, she had previously won a Group-2 and Group-3 at Crufts in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

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That famous Cocker Bum… Great Britain is undoubtedly the beacon of Gundogs in the dog world. Nowhere else one will see such a beautiful collection of Gundogs – and in such authentic weather! – as in the United Kingdom. Therefore, it’s perhaps most appropriate that the country’s #2 Dog All Breeds emerged from this group. Sarah Amos-Jones’s Cocker Spaniel male, Sh Ch Veratey Vincenzo at Cassom JW, bred by Ruth Bradley, became the breed’s CC record holder when he won his 61st CC (needless to say, all from different judges) at Paignton Championship show. I must note that English Cockers are amongst the most competitive breeds in the UK… He ends 2018 with 70 CC’, a Best in Show win at City of Birmingham, further three Reserve Best in Show wins at All breed Championship shows in the UK, eight Gundog Group wins and further fourteen Group placements, two Best in Show wins at the Cocker Club Ch show and two BOB wins at Crufts (with a Group-2 in 2018). The veteran Pointer bitch, Sh Ch Kanix Chilli (aged seven and a half,) won Reserve Best in Show at Crufts for owner Heather Blackburn-Bennett and breeders Joanne, Heather and John Blackburn Bennett and Mr and Mrs Sigurd and Kari Wilberg, handled by Heather’s daughter Joanne. What a comeback into the show ring for this well accomplished oldie! It must have been a thrill in itself to win the breed in such an extremely competitive breed as Pointers, let alone the Gundog group, and then Reserve Best in Show ! Age appears to be best in four things; old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read – wrote Francis Bacon. I’m risking the cheek now to add a fifth ‘thing’ to his list, who would be ‘Dan the Man’, Sue Smith’s Samoyed male Ch Nikara Diamond Dancer, co-owned and bred by Val Freer. ‘Dan’ the smiling Samy celebrated his 8th 260

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Photo 4 • The country’s #3 Dog All Breeds was the Miniature Poodle male, UK.Ck. Minarets Best Kept Secret, owned and bred Melanie and Carole Harwood. ’Frankie’ won Best in Show at Paignton and Driffield, and Reserve Best in Show at Three Counties and East of England. In 2017, he won Reserve Best in Show at Crufts.

Birthday in March 2018, and seems to only become more and more beautiful as the years go by. He won the incredible 100th UK CC for his breeder Val at Paignton Championship show – a most ironic record as Val won her first ever ticket at Paignton back in 1980 with her first bitch, Ch Kamelia of Fairvilla, who is ‘Dan’’s great, great, great Grandmother… ‘Dan’ won Reserve Best in Show at Crufts in 2014 and has been one of the UK’s most prominent show dogs ever since with numerous Group / BIS wins / placements. He ended 2018 with a Reserve Best in Show win at Ladies Kennel Association Championship Show, and as the country’s #1 Pastoral dog. The UK’s Best Kept Secret To me, and I believe to several other guests of the 2018 Pawscars gala dinner, the highlight of the night was to see Melanie Harwood struggling to get herself through her acceptance speech, in tears, as she was presented with The Pawscars Exhibitor of the Year award. That was only the start of a brilliant 2018 for her and her mother Carole, for their homebred Miniature Poodle male, Ch Minarets Best Kept Secret was to collect several top awards, such as Best in Show at Paignton and


Photo 5 • The UK’s #2 Dog All Breeds, Sarah Amos-Jones’s Cocker Spaniel male, Sh Ch Veratey Vincenzo at Cassom JW, bred by Ruth Bradley. He won Best in Show at City of Birmingham, Reserve Best in Show at Birmingham National, Paignton and Darlington and is the breed record holder with 70 CC’s to his account (at the Best time ofinwriting). Show Magazine


Photo 6 • The UK’s #4 Dog All Breeds was the Toy Poodle male, UK.Ch Afterglow Aloysius, owned by John Shaw, Jason Lynn and Tom Isherwood and bred by Michael Gadsby, Tom Isherwood, Jason Lynn and Sue Baker. ‘Al’ won Best in Show at Blackpool Championship Show and more recently Group-1 at Ladies Kennel Association Championship Show. Photo 7 • One of the more recent of many championship show BIS winners the Afterglow team have produced is the American Cocker Spaniel Sh Ch Afterglow Life Of Brian, who won at Gundog Society of Wales for owner Susan Crummey, only a few weeks after his Reserve Best in Show win at South Wales. He had an incredible career as a puppy in 2017: wins in puppy included six CCs, four BOB, Best Puppy in Show at Blackpool, Welsh Kennel Club and Gundog Society of Wales, and RBPIS at Bournemouth and South Wales.

Driffield, and Reserve Best in Show at Three Counties and East of England. ‘Frankie’ ended the year as the country’s #3 Dog All Breeds. To be followed by the Toy Poodle male, as the UK’s #4 Dog All Breeds, Ch Afterglow Aloysius, owned by John Shaw, Jason Lynn and Tom Isherwood and bred by Michael Gadsby, 262

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Tom Isherwood, Jason Lynn and Sue Baker. ‘Al’ won Best in Show at Blackpool Championship Show and more recently Group-1 at Ladies Kennel Association Championship Show. To best describe what an incredible year the Afterglow team had, allow me to quote the very brilliant Simon Parsons: “Now the show year is done, here are a few especially remarkable achievements from the season. I saw Mike Gadsby on the first day of LKA and he told me the Afterglow team had bred and/or owned ten new champions of 2018, from five different breeds, three of them ending up number one in their breed. A few minutes later I saw him again, and the number had risen to 11 new titleholders! Not sure in how many breeds in total the team has produced champions in total but Affenpinschers were added to the list this year. And that doesn’t count two more with the affix crowned in 2018, in Spinoni. As a bonus the Standard Poodle Ch Afterglow Poppa Don’t Preach the next day took BIS at the Winner Show in Amsterdam. The Toy Poodle Ch Afterglow Aloysius was a BIS winner in the UK and the American Cocker Sh Ch Afterglow Life Of Brian was a group show BIS winner during 2018. Tan Nagrecha tells me of another remarkable record – the Chandlimores have produced the top St Bernard for 20 consecutive years, 1999 to 2018. Would be interesting to know how many other kennels can match this – very few I suspect. This tops off a wonderful year in which, perhaps uniquely, the team won three of the groups at Bath with a Saint, Pyrenean and Norwich, following by both BIS and reserve at National Working and Pastoral.” – writes Simon in his online journal ‘Beyond the Dog House’ The Nembo Kid on the block The Italian Tasselli family’s homebred UK.Ch Balboa Nembo Kid, shown by Phil Davies (Perrisblu, Wales) in the UK, surprised his breeder Roberto Tasselli and owned Filippo Tasselli with a string of high-profile wins throughout 2018.


Photo • The Standard Poodle female, JWW’17 UK.Ch Afterglow Poppa Don’t Preach, bred by Michael Gadsby and Jason Lynn in the UK and owned by Maud Nilsson, Jason Lynn and Tom Isherwood, held the British flag fly high at the Amsterdam Winner Show this past December by winnning Best in Show in an extremely competitive BIS line-up. Young ’Grace’ is Group winner at general Championship show level in Great Britain.

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At his very first UK appearance, he won Best in Show at National Terrier (homebred UK.Ch Balboa Belmondo won Best in Show at National Terrier in 1997 – 21 years ago!). He then proceeded to win Best in Show at Belfast and Darlington, as well as further three Group firsts at Windsor, Leeds and Bournemouth. He is the UK’s Top Terrier in 2018. As #2 and #3 Terriers in the ranking list follow Marie Burns’ homebred UK.Ch Burneze Our Marnie and Victor Malzoni’s homebred Am.UK.Ch. Hampton Courts Monte Cristo, presened by the very capable Warren Mark Bradley. Most of you will be reading through these pages at Crufts 2019, and on behalf of the Best in Show team, I would love to wish those of you exhibiting good luck, and to those of you spectating a lovely time at the world’s greatest dog show !

Photo 9 • The Bernese Mountain dog male, UK.Ch. Ch Meadowpark High Class, bred and owned by Carole Hartley-Mair and Gary Dybdall (and the late Bernice Mair) took the 5th spot in the country’s Top Dog All Breeds ranking, in limited showing, and is the country’s Top Working dog for 2018. The year before, he was the UK’s #2 Dog All Breeds. Meadowpark, established in 1958, also celebrated its incredible 60th anniversary last year. Photo 10 • The country’s Top Terrier, Fillippo Tasseli’s UK.Ch. Balboa Nembo Kid, bred by father Roberto Tasselli and shown by Phil Davies (Perrisblu, Wales) in the UK. He won Best in Show at National Terrier, Darlington and Belfast Championship shows.

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Photo 11 • The third Siberian Husky ever to win Best in Show at a UK all-breed championship show was Jess Allen’s UK.Ch Siberiadrift Keep The Love for Zimavolk, bred by Kelly Hughes. ’Akela’ became the first ever UK champion for her owner Jess, and homebred Ch for her breeder Kelly at Windsor Championship show, where she won Best in Show under Robin Newhouse.


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Wor Dog Show S ANG AI, Ch Interview with China Kennel Union Wr

As part of our miniseries leading up to the WDS 2019 in China, BIS has interviewed the China Kennel Union (CKU), which will be hosting the event. Q: Can you tell us a short history of the China Kennel Union? A: The CKU was established, and joined the FCI in 2006; and in 2013, the CKU became the only FCI full member in China with a unanimous vote, also the CKU won the right to host the 2017 Shanghai FCI ASIA-PACIFIC SECTION SHOW the same year. Later in 2015 CKU won the right to host FCI WDS SHANGHAI 2019 overwhelmingly. And in 2017, the CKU hosted the FCI ASIA-PACIFIC SECTION SHOW in Shanghai successfully and created a new record of most entry times and largest show scale. Q: How did it feel when the General assembly of the FCI approved your bid for the 2019 WDS? A: I think all dog lovers in China just felt the same as me, delighted, proud and encouraged! It stands out as one of the notable landmarks in the progress of dog sports development in China, meanwhile it shows that our dog sports 298

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and pet loving trend is rising. This WDS SHANGHAI 2019 is a big party since 37 years have gone by since it was held in Asia, also it is the second time for the WDS to be held in Asia within its 40 year history. Here we thank all our sister associations in the AsiaPacific section, and your strong support makes it happen also, it lets us know that the CKU are surrounded by true friends. We appreciate all your assistance and encouragements. As a young member of FCI, we are glad to gain your recognition and we won’t disappoint you. In other words, being able to compete with other three leading NCOs in the dog world with rich experiences is quite memorable. Q: Are you already busy getting organized? A: For now, the specific website of this WDS SHANGHAI 2019 has been launched online, and you can follow the latest updates of events, judges, show venue information and many other things. What we have to say is that since there will be other international events including FIBA Basketball World Cup and International LNG Conference also held in Shanghai in 2019, now we are making final confirmation for the show venue and hotels and will try to release it online at the first opportunity.


This is the website and please follow us ://asia. cku.org.cn/2019world/index.html Q: Will you try to connect some of the European capital cities to Shanghai with special package flights with bus transportation to the hotels and venue? A: CKU will provide shuttle bus between the hotels and the show venue for free to all participants, and we are still confirming other aspects which can make it more convenient to enter the show. We will release all the latest news in the WDS SHANGHAI 2019 website. Q: Can you tell us briefly about your national breeds? A: The CKU is gradually paying more attention to the protection and continuation of Chinese native breeds, for example we have professional Tibetan Mastiff seminars and specialty shows regularly to popularize FCI standards as the correct breeding standards. At the same time, the CKU established the CKU NATIVE BREEDS CONSERVATION CLUB for all Chinese native breeds which have not been accredited by the FCI. This club is devoted to keeping the stability of quality and quantity of these native breeds meanwhile to maintain their heritage and development, also we hope to achieve the accredited FCI breeds standards soon. CKU NATIVE BREEDS CONSERVATION CLUB now offers access to register these breeds: Shanxi Xi Dog, Laizhouhong Dog, Shandong Dog and Chongqing Dog. Q: Does China have breed clubs and do you think they will be preparing events to meet their worldwide colleagues? A: Now we have CSV, CKURK and CKUDC as subordinate clubs of CKU and they are running successfully. Like CSV German Shepherd Club, it has become one of the three leading clubs

in WUSV around the world, and our breeding examples are already at the international advanced level. CKURK and CKUDC has also won the right to host 2019 IFR Rottweiler WDS and 2019 AMDA Dogo Argentinos WDS in Shanghai. Q: Do dog lovers in China compete in agility and other dog sports? A: Since the growing popularity of Agility in China, the CKU has established CKUTC in 2016 to hold correlated training courses and events, including agility. And our members are always involved in such events like IFCS/WAO before CKUTC established, and they did well. We will continue to introduce more excellent dog events to China which are welcomed worldwide, like Frisbee, diving dog and dog dancing. Q: Will there be any stands with traditional Chinese handcrafts? A: Yes there will be some stands like this. As you can see the Creative design of the logo of this WDS SHANGHAI 2019 is based on Chinese traditional paper-cuts, so CKU will launch more related supplies with Chinese elements design in this WDS SHANGHAI 2019. Q: Is drinking water for our dogs an issue? A: We will set up more drinking places as much as possible to facilitate all dogs in the show venue of this WDS.

Q: What will the grooming regulations at the venue be? A: This WDS will follow the FCI breed standards and FCI show routine, so that means that CKU will also follow FCI grooming standards. Furthermore, the audience will see many CKU grooming events which are at the international advanced level in this WDS. Best in Show Magazine

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Q: Will exhibitors have the opportunity to learn about and support dog welfare groups active in China? A: All dog lovers in China are looking forward to this WDS and we need the support from the dog lovers both at home and abroad. Your love and passion for dogs will affect more local people, and our China Small Animal Protection Association will join CKU together to drive the development of companion animals culture and pet culture with a view to enhancing animal welfare. Q: Will there be any special cultural events worked into the WDS that exhibitors can attend? A: We are planning to hold some cultural exchange activities and to show Chinese dog lovers’ attitude to their dogs and more important, is that we hope this WDS can be an opportunity to let the world know the rising and unique dog culture in China, also to reduce some unconscionable misunderstanding. Q: Will there be some culinary stands with typical dishes form regions of China? A: The show venue is well-chosen so it will be easy to taste many local snacks. We will also prepare more choices for all participators in the show venue. Q: How can European exhibitors prepare themselves for the cultural impact, apart from the language, will there be important differences in social habits or show protocol that we need to be aware of? How can we avoid being perceived as rude by our Chinese hosts? A: With the development and progress of Chinese society and the increase of international exchanges, the cultural differences between China and Europe are no longer a problem.

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More and more Chinese dog lovers go abroad to join many international dog shows. And we do hope more European friends will come and feel the dog culture here in our show and to throw off misunderstandings. Q: After this event, what do you think the exhibitors will have learned about China and the dog community there? A: We have mentioned to all NCOs when we applied for WDS in 2015 that there are some customs left by history that caused us to be castigated for our treatment of dogs, things like dog eating abuse. But the CKU has shouldered the mission to convert these bad customs. We definitely love dogs and actually there are many associations and individuals who are constantly devoted to animal welfare here. They deserve to been known by the whole world. And just for this purpose, the CKU united with China Small Animal Protection Association and we hope to show our people the love and glamour of dogs and how other people treat their dogs abroad. And so much more than this, our goal is to let our government see the importance of Ghandi’s famous idea “The attitude of how a country treats animals can judge the greatness of the country and the degree of its moral progress.” Also, we hope this will set the stage for the legislation of the animal protection law in China, and to enhance the importance of companion animals for our government and Chinese society as a whole. We hope every participant can see the efforts of CKU and our whole society before the end of WDS SHANGHAI 2019. All of you can know more about us through this show and keep joining our events and efforts to fight for companion animal protection and welfare in China.


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by Blai Ilobet

Most of the times when someone studies a breed standard and makes their interpretation of it, this is the first step of subjective results as everyone sees the breed type in their own way, when the most important thing to remark is that there is only one type for each breed. The ideal concept, quoting the famous words of Frank Sabella “when a dog walks into the ring the first thing I ask myself is if this dog screams its breed�, is to find a perception of the breed, which allows us to identify it by just one look, or in other words find its unique qualities. 306

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Most of the Shar-Peis in Europe come from America. We have to remember and thank Matgo Law, who was afraid off losing this breed when the Communists took over in his country during the 40s, and even during those times when they almost had no food they bred some litters in Hong Kong, which were sent later to the USA, from there at the end of the 70s they arrived in Germany, and from there they were reparted all over Europe and were the inspiration of the actual FCI standard which was based on them. China and Hong Kong have always treasured that traditional Shar Pei, which is a little bit thinner, with less bone, with straighter and taller legs, and smaller heads with a bit long muzzle. They have easy and rapid movement which looks elegant. They usually have the coat type called horse coat, which is shorter and tightly against the skin, and with thinner wrinkles. However, this is not an absolute truth as in China they always had two coat types, in the South a shorter coat and in the North longer coat due to the climate. Otherwise they would have not survived the extreme climate over there. The Shar-Peis that arrived in Europe, already had a different type of look, they were


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more robust, with wider legs, moderate bone, and bigger heads compared to their bodies, but still in proportion, with more wrinkles in their skulls, but they would not interfere with their eyes. With more width in their necks with more wrinkles, and the wrinkles all over the body were bigger and more defined. The movement was still free, balanced, active with good forward reach and strong drive, but a bit more heavy. When the welfare of the breed becomes more relevant, they make notes of different issues that affected this breed, and there was a big issue made of the wrinkles and the eyes. This led to many judges basing their decisions on which dog should win depending on the wrinkles they had. It’s easy to breed away from wrinkles, but structure and movement takes generations. This tendency of putting up the dogs with less wrinkles, and the breeders wanting to improve their offspring and become more competitive at the dog shows makes them do breedings between those two types of Shar Peis, although really we have just one type the one described by the FCI , the AKC and the KC. This traduces to heterogeneity in the rings, which makes all of us confused. Do you breed for winning or do you breed for the breed type. This said, all of the standards by the FCI, the AKC, and the KC have this same description of what makes the breed distinctive: “The short, harsh coat, the loose skin covering the head and body, the small ears, the “hippopotamus” muzzle shape and the high set tail impart to the Shar-Pei a unique look peculiar to him alone” When we analyze the two most characteristic and unique things in this breed, which are also the two things most talked about when we talk of the welfare of the breed and therefore also the most important in the show rings, 308

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their wrinkled heads and the “hippopotamus” muzzle shape and the loose skin covering the head and body, we come up withthe following: HEAD Rather large in proportion to body, but not overly. Proudly carried and covered with profuse wrinkles on the forehead continuing into side wrinkles framing the face. The wrinkles in their forehead, is one of the most symbolic things in this bread, in China called “Wo Lo Tau”, which means pumpkin shaped head, and these wrinkles make a form which looks like the symbol of long living in Chinese. They are considered very important, as they are also found in cats such as the tiger or the lion. The hippopotamus Muzzle a distinctive feature of the breed. Moderately broad and full with no suggestion of tapering. Lips and top of muzzle well padded. Bulge at the base of the nose permissible. BODY When comparing the three standards, they all state that the front legs should not be wrinkled. The problem comes when we look at the rest of the body, both the AKC and the KC say that heavy folds should only be present in the withers, but for the rest of the body they want no excessive wrinkling or thickening. But the FCI generates a slight confusion in their standard, as on one side, in the definition of the body, they say that the wrinkles are only permitted in the withers and in the base of the tail in moderation, but when they state the faults, they mention <<Heavy folds of skin on body (except withers and base of tail) and limbs>>. The European Federation of Shar Pei Clubs in its first Master class 2018 (Source: Viera Staviarska) present an aid, which includes a very interesting tip on how to detect when the


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wrinkle is excessive or not. Don’t count the wrinkles. The most common mistake during the assessment is the counting and accept maximum 3 wrinkles. It is very famous rumor about shar pei. Look for wrinkles inside the triangle. “Cheek-Elbow-Tail”. Everything out of this trinagle is too much. So what should we do? The Breeders have went on with the tendencies that have been made by the majority of judges in Europe, with good results at the dog shows. They’ve bred clean bodies without any wrinkles. On the other side, the Breeders who are trying to do this are also losing the typical wrinkles the dog should have in their heads, something that is completely understandable, because the university in Barcelona has made a study organized by Lluis Ferrer that states “ mucinosis is what generates excess of hyaluronic acid in the skin of Shar-Peis and this is what makes their characteristic wrinkles”. There is no way of generating mucinosis in just one determined area. Andrew Brace in one of his articles, talked about how important it would be for breeders in the UK do have an open vision and look for dogs outside the country in order to improve the lines, with better results in their breeding. When I try to apply this in my breed, if I would base my breeding only in the European style off Shar Pei which is completely clean of wrinkles, in a few years we would find ourselves in a very complicated situation, as we would find ourselves going to the completely opposite direction. However, importing a dog from outside Europe could help us to go back to the beginning and it could help with our breeding program, although at the dog show world it would probably be a very questionable dog, as happens with all the breeds that have many 310

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different breed standards. But in this case we are talking about a breed that has only one standard although the dogs look completely different. Personally, I would like to continue applying the words of Carlos Renau: “Quality has no nationality!” I think of how many times this fantastic dogs of this breed are not winning as they should at the dog shows for having the typical characteristics that make it special, by a judge who prefers not to understand the words without excessive wrinkling or thickening and making his decisions whether they are healthy or not, and prefers to directly think that if the dog is wrinkled he is not healthy. I think it is so easy to breed dogs without wrinkles, but to breed dogs with a good structure and the correct movement takes Generations. I think of all the judges during these years who have told me that the dogs should not be judged by their defects, but by their virtues. I think of all the times people have asked me what breed do you have and when I answered Shar-Pei, as I said in the beginning of this article oh, I imagine the perception of that person and he’s thinking of one single word, Wrinkle. And then I remember all the unique characteristics of Shar-Pei, which must be found in the dog that I think must represent this breed.


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P Shar Peis by David Williams, USA I

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Q: Firstly can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Shar Pei? A: I bought my first Shar-Pei in 1991. I was fortunate enough that the breeder I bought from sat me down and gave me the breed standard, signed me up for the local and national breed club and invited me to my first specialty after spending hours talking about the breed. I started showing shortly after that and a few years later bred a litter. Wasn’t long before friends were asking me to show their dogs for therm. I decided that handling dogs was more for me and breeding took a back seat. I did breed occasionally, and have had the honor to breed with some of my clients and friends. My homebred Ch Peiday’s One In A Million “Millie” was my first number one dog. Since then I have had a successful career campaigning many number one and top winning dogs. Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you bred your first litter? A: I first started with another kennel name with a friend and when she switched breeds I decided I wanted something with a theme. I chose “Peiday” and most of my dogs have been

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named with money and numbers theme. Not sure exactly but in 28 years probably 10-12 litters. My first litter I believe was in 1992. Q: Where did your first dogs come from? A: My first dogs care from a local Texas breeder that no longer breeds. They sold me dogs with great soundness and a foundation to breed from. I never wanted to maintain a kennel but rather a few bitches that I could build off of and breed to great dogs. Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: In the beginning I did as I said above just owning a few and working to breed better dogs. Over the years I have co bred litters with Beverly Wall of Double O Kennel and Loretta Anders and Esmae Minne of Jade East Kennel. Loretta has taught me about having a long term plan and know where you are going with future generations. Her ability to line breed and build and maintain a bloodline is something that isn’t seen often these days. Her dogs have a look that has been established for years.


Flirt (jade East I Know What Boys Like) going Best Bred by Exhibitor in Show in Houston under Prudence Hlatky. Group 1 under Sharon Beeson Boyd.

Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? A: My foundation was a bitch Ch Flying W’s Lady Shar Mein. She had great structure and movement but lacked in type. My goal was to add type without losing the soundness.

breed and won 5 BIS and several BISS with a relatively new owner handler on her lead. After retiring she also got her companion dog (CD) obedience title.

Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? A: Line breeding produces the most consistency but you have to outcross from time to time. Finding a dog for that cross is difficult. Especially one that has the health clearances we need in our breed.

Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what a Shar Pei should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: Sure everyone has their interpretation of the breed. I think our standard in many ways is too vague. Balance in dogs is very important to me and they must be sound of mind and body. The hippopotamus shaped head, the harsh offstanding coat and the topline and tailset are the distinguishing features that set the breed apart.

Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: My “Millie” was a number one dog in the

ABOUT THE BREED

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Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Shar Pei? A: Balance, outline and breed type and with that if a dog is balanced, proper movement should go along with it. Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: I wouldn’t tolerate bad temperaments and unsound dogs. Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: Generally dogs in the US have more breed type. IE bigger heads, more wrinkle and heavier bone. Dogs in other areas are more moderate.. Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? A: The breed is so much better than when I began. Eye and skin issues are rare these days and dogs have better structure, better temperaments and much better soundness. Q: Can you describe an ideal Shar Pei? A: The general appearance section of the AKC breed standard says it in so many words. “ An alert compact dog of medium size and substance; square in profile, close coupled, the well proportioned head slightly but not overly large for the body. The short, harsh coat, the loose skin covering the head and body, the small ears, the “hippopotamus” muzzle shape and the high set tail impart to the Shar-Pei a unique look peculiar to him alone” .

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Q: Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: Bred by me: CH Peiday’s One In A Million GCH Jade East You Know I’m No Good (just starting her specials career) and Multi Ch Peiday Robinson Steel Magnolia (shown outside the US mostly) . Not owned or bred or handled by me: Gch Brekkukots Allies with Underdog, Ch Panache Beam Me Up Scotty and Ch Meiting Luv Wun Macmurfee. Handled by me: Ch Asia Excalibur Whiplash , GCH Jade East Do You Know The Way To San Jose and GCH Chaoyang Chick Magnet at Asia. Q: What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Millie had beautiful type and outstanding movement Q: What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Shar Pei? A: Having a long term plan and know where you are going in future generations and be prepared with a back up plan when things go wrong. Be objective and see your own dogs faults and work to improve them.

Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: Find a mentor and learn everyday from them. When you think you have learned it all, forget that idea and go back for more knowledge. Be prepared for setbacks and work to get over them.


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E Shar Peis by Loretta Anders, USA I

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Q: When did you start to breed Shar Pei? A: When my husband brought home my first Shar-Pei, I was not overly impressed with the scowling expression and the big hippo muzzle of the breed. After my first litter of puppies, I fell in love with the bundles full of wrinkles and the breed. Keeping two puppies from the litter and fulfilling my childhood interest in showing dogs, I entered the show ring. Along with those first ribbons came a life-long passion and dedication to the breed. Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you bred your first litter? A: Since the breed is from China, I wanted a name that had an oriental connotation to it but was also made up of easily remembered English words. Hence Jade East Shar-Pei came into existence. I bred my first litter in 1981 and have averaged at least 3-4 litters a year. In my thirty-eight years in the breed during which I have bred and whelped over 114 litters, with each litter averaging approximately four puppies. 318

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Q: Where did your first dogs come from? A: I started with three Shar-Pei. My first was a black male Tzo Tzo Hei Ti Ying bred by Bill and Joann Gremminger. Two young bitches from Ellen Weathers Debo in California quickly followed. Both bitches were black and were sired by Shir Du Sam Ku. They were Reddy’s Black Gem O’ Bedlam and Bedlam’s Little One. The male and one of the females came back from the Orthopedic Foundation For Animals (OFA) with hip dysplasia. When Reddy’s Black Gem Of Bedlam’s hips passed, she became the 39th Shar-Pei to have hips certified by the OFA. She went on to become my foundation bitch. Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels, or you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: I have learned over the years to be careful and to make certain that kennels and breeders, with whom I work, share the same standards and views that I do. Before considering breeding a dog, they must have no major faults, be a



whom I sell my puppies. I try my best to ensure that my dogs or their offspring are kept in excellent conditions, preferably in the house, and are not being indiscriminately and irresponsibly bred. For that reason, in trying to protect my dogs and lines, my contracts are very thorough. Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? A: CSPCA CH Jade East Cinn Cinn Nati Red, born in 1986 was the most important dog early in my breedings. In the 1990’s I bred out several times to MBISS CH Chesapeake’s Beam Me Up Scotty ROM owned by Tami Luddeke. In 2000 out of a bitch that was a combination of Scotty and Nati Red, I got Multi BISS, Multi CH Jade East Mission To Mars ROM, WW’2002 2003 2004 2005 2007. Mission has made the biggest contribution for almost two decades to the Jade East line. Mission can be seen today in the red color, dark clear expressive eyes, profile, movement, and structure of the dogs bred here today.

champion and have hips, elbows, and patellas certified through the OFA. I only breed a bitch three times and not after they are six years of age. All of my dogs for the last decade and a half have been co-owned with my good friend, Esmae Minne, in the Netherlands with whom I have an excellent relationship. I also have co-owned a few select dogs with friends in the USA. Feeling a responsibility, not only to dogs that I bring into the world but to the offspring of the dogs I produce, I seldom offer my dogs out for stud, and I am very cautious where and to 320

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Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program, line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? A: I prefer line-breeding with an outcross brought in periodically to add or improve on something needing improvement in the line. For successful line breeding, you have to be very familiar with the pedigree of the dog with which you are line breeding. Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: My greatest achievement has been the ability since the early 80’s to continually breed healthy and quality dogs that successfully compete in the show ring. I owe a lot to my first mentor in 1981 for pointing out that the structure and movement of the dog was of upmost importance.


The highlight of my breeding career was winning the big events at our National Specialty Show in 2012 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. MBIS MBISS GCHP Jade East Do You Know The Way To San Jose (Josey) WW’13 won Best of Breed, the Top 25, Grand Maturity, and The People’s Choice. At this same National Specialty CH Jade East Dancing Through The Milky Way (Milky Way) won the Grand Futurity and Best Puppy In Sweeps. Josey went on to also win the Top 25 at our National Specialty in 2013 and 2014, Westminster in 2014 and was the World Winner in Budapest in 2013. At Nationals 2013 Milky Way won the Grand Maturity, making her the only Shar-Pei to win both Grand Futurity and Grand Maturity. No story of highlights or accomplishments would be complete without a word about MBIS Multi CH Jade East Mission To Mars ROM, who

left his paw print in the FCI. Mission won the World Winner Title at the World Dog Show five different times in five different countries: Amsterdam-2002, Dortmond-2003, Rio de Janeiro-2004, Buenos Aires-2005, and Mexico City-2007. Not only Mission, but his offspring and grand offspring have also won a multitude of World Winner titles in many different countries. ABOUT THE BREED Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what a Shar Pei should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: Seeing different interpretations of the standard is what makes showing dogs fun. However, the winner should be the dog that best Best in Show Magazine

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exemplifies the standard, winning is a validation of a breeder’s interpretation. In the thirty -eight years I have been breeding, I have tended to keep the dogs moderate, with structure and movement being of supreme importance. Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Shar Pei? A: Head carriage with a beautiful side gait are the first thing that I notice. I also place importance on the profile, the nicely arched neck, shoulder and rear angles, high tail set, and correct top line. Since the head of the Shar-Pei is singular, I feel that it is extremely important. Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: Straight shoulders, overloaded chests, and the neck set down into the shoulders immediately turn me off. I can also not tolerate a flat or reverse top line. Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: The amount of wrinkling found in the dogs is the biggest difference in the dogs shown in Europe and those shown in the USA. The FCI standard states “folds of skin on the body in mature dogs is highly undesirable except on withers and base of tail, which show moderate wrinkling.” The AKC standard states “loose skin and wrinkles covering the head, neck, and body are superabundant in puppies, but these features may be limited to the head, neck and withers in the adult.” Because of the wording, “undesirable,” in the FCI standard, FCI judges penalize the amount and location of wrinkle on the dog. AKC judges because of the wording, “may be,” do not penalize wrinkles all the way down the back or bags on the rear legs. 322

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Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? A: Temperaments, fronts, tighter curl to the tails, and rear angulation have improved tremendously. We have declined in top line, shoulder angulation and the extremely high tail set. Q: Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owned nor bred by you. A: Owned by me: MBISS, Multi CH Jade East Mission To Mars ROM WW’ 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007. MBIS MBISS GCHP Jade East Do You Know The Way To San Jose WW’13. GCHS Jade East Mission Into Space. Not owned by me: MBISS CH Chesapeake’s Beam Me Up Scotty ROM (Tami Luddeke) MBIS MBISS GCH Vaje’s Miss Jayne Hathaway (Jeff and Vicki Mauk) MBIS MBISS GCHP Brekkukots Allies With Underdog, CGC (Jeff Mauk, Simone Demirjian, Susanna Bjornsson) Q: What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: That would have to be Josey, GCHP Jade East Do You Know The Way To San Jose WW’13. Josey’s movement coming and going and side gait with her head held high were superb. She exhibited the correct profile with a beautiful shoulder and rear angulation, correct length of neck, a beautiful head, and the extremely high tail set, which we seldom see today in the breed. She had that show attitude and sparkle every time she entered the ring.


Q: What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Shar- Pei? A: I knew what I liked from the beginning and have stuck to that look, improving it as I went along. When planning a breeding, I do it always with a plan in mind for what I will be doing with the offspring in the future generation or two. Keeping my focus on what is important, instead of breeding out to a wide variety of dogs or because a dog is winning at the time, has kept consistency in what I produce. You can spot an Jade East dog in the ring.

Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: When you purchase or get a dog from a breeder, you are also purchasing that breeder’s knowledge and expertise. For that reason go to a dog show or multiple dog shows. Find a line of dogs that best fits what you want. Talk to the breeder and get a feeling for that breeder’s standards and ethics. Choose a breeder with whom you think you can work. If you are wanting to show and exhibit your dog, having a mentor who will introduce you to other people in the breed and help you get started makes getting into a new breed much easier. Best in Show Magazine

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o ro Shar Peis by Joy Bradley, United Kingdom I

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Q: Firstly can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Shar Pei? A: My dad bought me my first dog when I was 3 years old - a cross breed terrier type dog called Beauty. That little dog, who died when I was 21 years old, lit a flame inside me which, to this day, still burns. I just love dogs and in fact, all animals. In 1979, I bought my first pedigree dog, a Great Dane. This dog introduced me to the world of dog shows - and I was hooked. I bought my first Shar Pei in 1983 and, in 1987, I bought my first French Bulldog, another breed that had captured my heart. I enjoyed living with both breeds whilst trying to gather as much information as I could about all aspects of the breeds including type, different lines and health aspects. Breeding and judging both breeds followed after some years, both aspects of which added to my ongoing education. It was difficult to find ‘mentors’ in Shar Pei in

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those days as the breed was so young in the country so it was an ongoing learning curve learning by both successes and mistakes. The breed in the 80’s and 90’s was certainly very different to the breed of today and presented many hurdles for breeders to overcome, including numerous health issues and general conformation. A Breed Club “The Shar Pei Club of Great Britain” was started in those formative years by a group of enthusiasts, of which I was one and I went on to serve in several capacities including Secretary and “The Wrinkle” editor. I also have the honour of designing the Club logo, which is still used today. After a lot of work and dedication by members, the Club was eventually recognised by the Kennel Club and on 27th September 1987, under the umbrella of “A Rare Breeds Spectacular” , the Club held its first Open Show and I remember how thrilling it was to be part of that special day. When I bought my first Shar Pei, it was never



with the intention of breeding. I loved the breed and the more I owned, the more I wanted to learn and ultimately, I wanted to show. Breeding just seemed like a natural progression. By then, I had met and become friends with Tim - and the rest is history. Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you bred your first litter? A: My dad helped me to buy my first 2 puppies so when it came to choosing a KC affix, I wanted to acknowledge that help and incorporate his name into my affix. I played around with different variations of our names, including that of my partner, Robert. In those days, several options had to be submitted to the KC. My 1st choice was JOLES and further down the list was JOLEROB. The rest is history - the list of choices was submitted to the KC and JOLEROB was given to me. I bred my first litter in 1985. It was certainly not the success I had hoped for! There were 4 puppies in the litter - a black, a cream and 2 particolours. The cream was diagnosed with megaesophagus and was eventually euthanised. This was the first of numerous learning curves I would encounter as a ‘breeder’. I can’t recall how many litters I have bred. I thoroughly enjoyed breeding but only bred a litter when I wanted something for the show ring; as we all know, that doesn’t always work out, especially in those early days. It was a bit like ‘trial and error’. It was probably a decade before aspirations became any kind of reality and something resembling a breeding programme established. Q: Where did your first dogs come from? A: I was at work one day in 1981/82 and nonchalantly picked up a newspaper, not realising that that simple action would have such an ef326

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fect my life. As I flicked through it, I saw a full page advertisement for a face cream which used a head study of dog, the like of which I had never seen before. It was love at first sight! Some frantic research revealed that the dog I had seen was a Chinese Shar Pei and the breed had been introduced into England by a lady called Heather Liggett, who was the founder of the Heathstyle kennel. I eventually made contact with her and after a wait of almost 2 years, I got my first 2 Shar Pei puppies - litter brother and sister, Heathstyle Sweet William and Heathstyle Sweet Pea - and the journey began. Following quite soon after, I acquired 2 chocolate horse coats, mother and daughter from Terry Purse and Nigel Marsh of the Tidemill kennel. Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: In 1984, during a conversation with Heather Liggett, she happened to mention to me that she had sold a puppy to a guy called Tim Ball who she thought lived in a town near to me. I did no more than scour the telephone directory, trying to locate him. After a couple of ‘wrong numbers’, I eventually rang a number and was delighted to speak to Tim. We arranged to meet the very next day. Little did we realise that that first meeting would be the foundation of a wonderful friendship and eventual partnership that has lasted until now, some 35 years later.


During one conversation with Tim, we became engrossed in the idea of importing a dog from Matgo Law and before we knew it, Tim was booked on a flight to Hong Kong, arrangements made for him to stay with my ex husband who lived there and an appointment made to meet Matgo and see his dogs. We ended up importing 4 dogs from Matgo, none of which we were able to register with the KC, due to no reciprocal agreement in place with the English KC and the Hong Kong & Kowloon KA being in place - another hard and expensive lesson learned!! Tim’s affix is Kaitak and in later years, Jolerob and Kaitak have been inextricably linked. Over the years, initially instigated by Tim, we imported numerous dogs, mainly males from America. These included ‘Tetley’ (GF’s Storm In A Tea Cup) and ‘Quinn’ (Good Fortune Good Things Come). Both possessed amazing tem-

peraments and became prepotent stud dogs. They had a huge influence on the breed in England and can be found in the pedigrees of many of today’s top winning dogs. Quinn was the sire of the stunning bitch - Ch Bellicose Headcase , who was the UK breed record holder for a long time and the first Shar Pei to win a BIS in England. He was also the sire to my first home bred Champion - Ch Jolerob I’m No Bloomin Angel, aka Digit. Others followed, including Am Ch Margem’s Just The Facts, aka Friday. A moderate male but with much to offer the breed. If a breeder wanted to improve top line and tail set, he was the dog to use; Ch & Am Ch Jokuba’s Above The Law aka Grisham. What a boy - both in the show ring and as a sire. His progeny has gone on to be a big influence in kennels around the world. In the ring, he was #1 Shar Pei in England and at the age of almost 6 and 3 years Best in Show Magazine

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after ‘retiring’, he entered the ring one last time and became Shar Pei of the Year 2014. Probably our most well known import is the amazing Ch & Am Ch Asia’s Red Marsh Whip It Good aka Wrink. This dog truly was the dog of a lifetime. The phrase “never met a stranger” was coined for him; as well as being an outstanding example of a Shar Pei, he possessed the most amazing temperament. He was a real clown, a pleasure to live with and was a born showman. His show wins include a BIS, 10 Group 1’s (including 1 Veteran Group), BOB at Crufts and he was the breed record holder for a long time, eventually being overtaken by his son. It is to his absolute credit that he himself was a BIS winner and he produced a BIS winner - the ultimate accolade for any dog. Wrink took us on a journey that was remarkable and memories will stay with us forever. The most heartfelt thanks go to Kristen Marshall for allowing Wrink to come to us. Things didn’t always go to plan though - we imported a fabulous male called Am Ch Graylands Hey Good Looking GF aka Booker from Beth Gray (Graylands) and Grace Fritz (Good Fortune). We had seen him as a young male at the National Specialty in Virginia Beach, in 1995, so you can imagine how excited we were to learn that Beth and Grace were willing to let him come to us. He was a wonderful dog to live with, with the calmest and friendliest of temperaments. More importantly, he had so so many virtues to offer the breed including the harshest brush coat I have ever felt. He certainly made his mark in the show ring, winning 25+ Best Dog awards, many with BOB but sadly for us, he became sterile before we ever used him. I think that journey home after being told he was sterile was one of the saddest days Tim and I have spent together. The other side to that coin were the halcyon days of winning “the double” with Booker and Blaze (Ch 328

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Thunder Moon’s Woodland Glory) so many times. Sadly for Booker, CCs had not been allocated to the breed during his time in the ring, so he was unable to gain his English Ch title. We were certainly blessed that all of our imports had the most amazing temperaments. So, to answer your question, I think it is true to say, we preferred to have our own stud dogs but that didn’t stop us using other males when we thought another male would be more suitable. We have both bred litters under our own affixes but in more recent years, our dogs have been co-owned and litters have been co-bred. Tim and I have a reciprocal influence on each other, have total respect for each other and each other’s opinion and implicit loyalty to and total honesty with each other which is why our friendship and partnership has lasted through the years. Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? A: Tim had imported a bitch - Ch Thundermoon’s Woodland Glory aka Blaze, from Coleen Kehe of the Thunder Moon’s kennel in America. Prior to travelling to England, she had been mated to Am Ch Smug’lrs ZZ Top. The resulting litter was born in quarantine and included a cream dilute bitch who was to become Kaitak All Fired Up for Jolerob aka Looby. She was eventually bred to Chesapeake I Rest My Case, who had been imported by Peter Clarkson of the Isola kennel. This mating produced a cream dilute bitch called Jolerob Nearly An Angel, aka Pudding......my heart dog. This little girl had everything I had hoped for plus a bit more. She had a short (due to injury) but relatively successful show career, winning numerous BPIB awards, a CC and a days heat of what was then The Pedigree Chum Puppy Stakes. She had the most endearing tempera-


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ment, was to me ‘nearly an angel’ and was the start of ‘the Angels’. She was only bred once, to Quinn, producing a litter of 5 puppies, 1 boy - Digit and 4 girls. 3 of the girls ended up staying with me, each playing an integral part in developing the ‘Angel’ line. I still have a descendant of Pudding with me Jolerob Angels and Halos aka Cheeky Chops, who is almost 14 years young and a constant reminder of my first Angel. So, it is difficult to decide if I consider Looby or Pudding to be my foundation bitch. Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? A: Firstly, in England, inbreeding is no longer allowed. It was never something we ever contemplated anyway with Shar Pei. Generally speaking, Tim and I did outcross breedings, always concerned with the hidden health issues of the breed. When contemplating a breeding, we considered breed type, soundness, pedigree and longevity. In recent years, with more information about health being available, we did combine out crossing with line breeding with some success. Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: Wow, that’s a difficult question to answer as there are so many aspects I consider as achievements but I think the answer is to have played a part in other people’s breeding programme. Be it providing them with their foundation bitch or them using one of our stud dogs. It is very rewarding to see a Shar Pei you like in the show ring and, on looking at the pedigree, you realise that the dog goes back to your stock in some way. Dogs of our breeding have been imported into many parts of the world and it is so rewarding to see those kennels go on to establish their own breeding programmes. 330

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ABOUT THE BREED Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what a Shar Pei should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: The standard is a collection of words which outline the requirements for a breed and is a descriptive framework from which to work, a detailed guide. However, words are just words and open to interpretation; interpretation is very subjective. When one person reads a word or phrase, they immediately get a mental image of their own interpretation of those words, which creates their own ideal, but that can be different to someone else’s interpretation, so it naturally creates differing points of view. All points of view are valid and give a good basis for discussion - never a bad thing. Prolific kennels around the world produce their own type and it’s good that that type is immediately recognisable. Shar Pei, like many breeds, is a breed which has many types but that isn’t wrong, so long as the dogs fit the standard. It would be amazing if everyone liked the same type - we all see what we see and like what we like. Everyone has their own ideal, their own mental template of what they want to produce - the name of the game is striving to get there. Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Shar Pei? A: I think the only way I can answer that question is by thinking about the first things that strike me when I’m judging and that is “silhouette”, “balance” and “soundness”. Of course breed type is imperative but if the dog is not made correctly, it won’t move correctly, if it is short/ long in neck, loin or leg, it won’t be balanced and if it has a level top line or low tail set, it won’t show the correct outline. Many people still refer to Shar Pei as a ‘head


breed’ - something I find very frustrating. There is so much more to a good Shar Pei than just a head. As breeders, those 3 things were always in our aspirations, with emphasis on soundness, combined of course with every other breed specific detail. Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: A fault is a fault is a fault. Is one fault more of a fault than any other? Tolerate is a very strong word. We all strive to make improvements with every planned litter. Some aspects can be improved in one generation, others take much longer, unsoundness being a prime example.

So maybe that is a fault I have the most difficulty coming to terms with. It’s so frustrating to see a beautifully balanced dog in profile with super outline and type only to see it look like a spider when it moves. Then there are the hidden faults, only visible on close examination - a bad bite or poor pigment. As a breeder, I don’t want any faults (not that there is a perfect dog), but maybe for me, the one I want least is unsoundness. Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: There is very little difference among good Shar Pei around the world. Dogs imported/ Best in Show Magazine

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exported between continents win in the show ring and contribute greatly to breeding programmes. Firstly, in England, since it’s recognition, the breed is known as the Shar Pei and not the Chinese Shar Pei. There are several differences between the AKC, the FCI and the English KC standard, some very significant. The AKC standard still asks for a ‘small sunken eye’, with the FCI standard not referring to size at all and the KC standard calling for a ‘medium sized’ eye. Both the FCI and KC standards refer to health issues relating to the eye area whereas the AKC standard fails to make any such reference. The FCI standard asks for a head ‘rather large in proportion to the body’. That phrase was reworded in both the English and AKC standards to promote a head size in proportion to the body. The FCI standard still refers to ‘hippopota mus muzzle’, a phrase removed from both the AKC and English standards. There is a slight variation in the size of the breed. The FCI standard calls for 17.5” - 20” (44 - 51 cms) whilst the English and AKC standards ask for 18” - 20”. The other big difference is the English standard has NO “disqualifications”. Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? A: I would most definitely say the breed has greatly improved over the years, which is a credit to the many dedicated breeders around the world. Thankfully, the breed has become far less exaggerated and generally we no longer see dogs dripping in wrinkle or with heads like buckets, factors which have contributed to improved health - a major factor for any breed. It is amazing to see such improvement over a 332

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relatively short period of time within the concept of dogdom. One negative which is becoming more apparent in England and America, but not so much in Europe, is the breed is getting smaller. The breed standard is 18” - 20” not 16” - 18”. That needs to be addressed sooner rather than later Q: Can you describe an ideal Shar Pei? A: A balanced dog which shows the correct silhouette. Strong neck, leg length commensurate with depth of body. The dip behind the withers being neither too shallow nor too exaggerated. Fine wrinkling over the withers. Strong loin. A high tail tail. Good width of chest. A head which should fit the dog, being neither snipey nor overdone and is ‘brick shaped’ with the correct proportions. Work in the head to create the expression. Small, thick, tip curled ears with tips pointing to the corner of the eye. Correct angles front and rear to produce flowing movement. Well muscled quarters. Q: Please name 3 of your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: Bred by Am GCh Kaitak Jolerob Yur Gonna Fly, Ch Jolerob I’m No Bloomin Angel andInter & Multi Ch Jolerob Angel’s Back St Law. Not owned/bred by - really not an easy question to answer. There were beautiful dogs of bygone years who were fabulous for their own era. I have eventually opted for dogs from recent years. Multi Ch El Yoc Giada, Am Gch Shine’s N’Nustars Deck The Halls MingYu and Am Ch Asia’s Excalibur Whiplash Q: What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Oh, good question!! Several dogs come


planning a breeding, never double up on known faults. Never use your own dog just because it’s easier if, especially if you know it’s not the best choice. Think about the next and even the next generation. Breed to the standard, don’t lie to yourself and never re-evaluate the standard to fit what you’ve bred. Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: Do your homework. Learn as much as you can and gather in as much knowledge as possible. Research pedigrees of dogs you like. Visit different kennels, look at as many dogs as possible and try to decide what type you want to own and eventually produce. Knowledge is everything. Don’t be swayed by any one breeders own PR.

to mind, each with something I would tweak. Closest - probably Am GCh Kaitak Jolerob Yur Gonna Fly aka Journey. I once described her as ‘the epitome of the breed standard’. A couple of tweaks and she certainly would be. She is as sound as a pound and has the most beautiful profile with the correct top line and super tail set and is totally balanced. She has the most magnificent head piece with the correct proportions and planes. Lots of work without being exaggerated in any way whilst maintaining femininity. A stunningly beautiful bitch. A very close second would be Digit. Q: What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Shar Pei? A: First and foremost, being honest with yourself and NOT being kennel blind!! We all love our dogs but that is very different to knowing and inwardly acknowledging their faults. When Best in Show Magazine

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L h Chow Chows by Pam & Stef Godber, United Kingdom

The beginning: Having never been allowed to have a dog whilst growing up, once married to Stef we agreed once circumstances were correct we would purchase a puppy. Stef has had various breeds all his life but had never had a Chow. I was besotted with the breed having seen a black male eating an ice cream whilst on holiday. Love at first sight. In 1976 we decided this was the right time for a puppy and saw an advert in the Our Dogs newspaper put in by a Chow owner who had recently made up a Champion and who also had a litter of puppies. Initially we were not going to pursue because we wanted a self-red bitch and they only had blacks. Against our better judgement we arranged to visit and that’s how we met Dave & Kath Walton (Kaishan) who we became great friends with. We purchased a black male, in those days you

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could name them yourself, so he was Highfield Black Prince Sired by Duarte of Weircroft and his Dam was Eroan Ebony Satin. What a learning curve for Stef he had never had a breed like this. We attended our first show in 1976 which was the Midland Chow Chow Club Championship and took “Panyo” along for people to see and to decide if we wanted to show him. Unfortunately, like most first-time owners we did not realise about “training” or the Chow indifference to orders. He was a beautiful dog in our opinion and our foundation for the Lechan Kennels. A little later we purchased a second male “King Elvis” from Anne & Frank Barrow they had used Ukwong Barbarossa and had a red dog puppy for sale he was born 1 December 1976. This started us showing in more


Photo 1 • Highfield Black Prince Photo 2 • Ch Lechan Damien

depth, he won many puppy classes, but his rear movement was not typical although he had a fabulous head and body. We were learning about the Breed.

In 1980 we produced our first litter from, a self-red bitch purchased from the “Tauleo” kennels Dorothy & Cyril Simms. Tamara Of Lechan, her Sire was Weircroft Leading Star and her Dam Tauleo Precious Pearl. She was Weircroft/ Junggwaw lines and line bred to Ch Fairwood Fu Simba. We at this point had the affix “Lechan” produced from the names of our two pet Chows Leo and Panyo. She was mated to “Black Prince” and our first litter was born on 14 November 1980. It was not the most successful experience having to have a Ceaser and the bitch spayed because of complications. It however produced our “Rainbow litter” Blue, Red, Fawn & Black this began our love of colours other than reds. From this litter we retained a black bitch and a blue bitch. The black bitch was CH. Lechan Kelly Marie our first Champion in 1984 and the blue Lechan Lady of Steel At Shemiff who produced 3 Champion bitches. Ch. Lechan Silver Lady (Fawn). Ch. Lechan Moonlighting (Fawn) and Ch. Lechan Lady Kassandra (Black). Over the years we have tried to follow the lines we like and to produce a type which is we hope is consistent. We do line breed if possible but of course the problems come when you need to outcross finding the type and pedigree that you like. Today it is more difficult because of the introduction of a lot of new breeding by way of imports. We imported a cream dog from Sweden Amcho The Iceman In A Rolls Royce with Lechan in 1994. We have never produced a cream ourselves, but he produced some very good creams & blacks which are behind a lot of today’s creams. We have Hip scored and elbow scored through the BVA/KC schemes since 1982 and now include eye testing on our breeding stock this however is quite new to the breed. We believe one of the best dogs we have bred

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was Ch. Lechan Damien (2-5-1988 -11-101991) who by the age of 3 when he sadly died had won 24 CC’s, 19 RCC’s, 2 All breed Best In Shows,1 RBIS and numerous BIS at Breed Championship Shows including The Chow of The Year Show 1989 at 11 months old and the RBIS in 1991. He also produced 2 Champions. We felt his best had yet to come and sadly had only used him at stud a few times. Another Dog that we purchased at 8 months old (born 3-02-2006) sired by one of our stud dogs is Ch/IR Ch Cherrymount Good To Be Black For Lechan JW. He has to date sired 4 Champions plus other CC winners. He was the Top Stud dog in 2013, 2014 and now 2018. Sadly, he passed away in 2017. He was also a BIS Chow of the Year winner 2008 & 2010. Plus, the dog CC at Crufts 2011 and 2013. We have owned or bred 17 UK Champions up to 2018, plus 9 Irish Champions and 10 Champions in other Countries including Sweden, Norway. The standard is the blue print for the breed, and we do try to breed to this. Everyone has their own interpretation of some of the standard and what they like in type. Different Judges forgive different things no dog is perfect. A Chow can look the part but needs hands on examination. Our view is that a Chow should be box like and well-constructed. A good deep rib cage. Not too short in leg and with good bone. Not too heavy in head, no wrinkles and needs a broad skull. Small thick ears tilted slightly forward. Clean dark eyes. Good reach of neck. Profuse coat not trimmed or sculpted to produce the outline. Require good typical pendulum movement with a straight front. Small cat like feet well up on their toes. We agree that for us the distinct movement of a Chow is a must so very impor-

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Photo 3 • Ch/Ir Ch Cherrymount Good To be Black For Lechan JW

tant. I personally do not like large or soft ears it can spoil the expression nor signs of entropion, but this is not as prolific as in the past. Breeders and the change in the breed standard have improved the incidence of this. Yes, we believe there is some difference in type between the UK, Europe and the AKC countries.. Europe and the UK use the same standard but the AKC differs slightly. In our opinion some of the FCI countries do have a heavier head type of Chow but having both of us judge in Scandinavia and Italy on several occasions we have been pleased with the standard of the exhibits. Some would be better than here in the UK. We have been asked to name the three all-time favourite winners owned or bred by us and we agree on Ch. Lechan Damien, Ch Lechan Americano and Ch Cherrymount Good To Black for Lechan. We did disagree on number 2 having considered Ch. Hantuki Topaz Of Lechan as a favourite not only did she become a Champion but bred 5 litters producing 2 Champions from these one being Ch Lechan Americano.


Photo 4 • Best in Show at East of England - Ch Lechan Damien

The three favourite winners not bred or owned by us caused some discussion and we think in our opinion these should be: Ch. Weircroft Saul Of Ukwong, Ch. Weircroft Miss Donna and Ch Taibel Texas Tiger of Ukwong. You asked what we considered to be the secret of continued success in this breed and I think not to be put off when things do not go your way, either showing or breeding. We had decided to follow the lines which produced the type of Chow we like, it did not always work so hours have been spent looking at pedigrees.

I know a lot of todays breeders do not and cannot read a pedigree, but it is so important to look back even beyond 5 generations. It is sometimes a surprise what is lurking behind the generations. For new comers in the breed talk to older more experienced breeders, learn and listen you can sift out what you don’t want but talk. Look at pedigrees and ask questions. Health test and use stock which has also been health tested it is no guarantee, but it will help for future breeding.

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Lo I r Chow Chows by Tiziana Campi and Massimiliano Carinelli, Italy I

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Q: Firstly can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Chow Chows? A: I had one Chow, Suki, as a pet and decided I wanted another so I thought I would breed my own.

o

Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: I have since the 1990’s had all of my breeding Chows X-rayed. I do not work with anyone else and choose a dog to suit my bitch - regardless of who owns them. I have never had joint ownership and just occasionally have let someone have one of my pups and asked for a pup back in exchange instead of taking money for the dog. I have stud dogs that I allow other people to use.

Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? A: I keep all of my dogs in the home. My kennel name was chosen simply because it sounded oriental. I have bred approximately 35 litters over a 45 year period. My first litter was in Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? 1976. A: I have had no definite line. I bred a few litters, mainly using the MINHOW stud dogs, Q: Where did your first dogs come from? A: My first Chow was from a “puppy shop”. then stopped as my dogs were getting older. Like a many people at that time there was not Then I went into the Fort Knox Here’s the Tiger a lot of information as to where to buy a puppy line. Now I have two RENDEL stud dogs who from so I turned to the obvious. I was lucky, she are out of a dog that I bred CH Kwaitang Kristian at Kyong. Both boys are siring nice puppies. was healthy and lived to be almost 14.

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Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? A: I have done both and had success with both. I prefer line breeding but always check if there are dogs in the pedigree that I don’t want to double up on. Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: Breeding Ch Kwaitang Kristian at Kyong. He was top puppy 2012. Top Chow 2013 -4-5-6. and top stud dog 2017. The reason I am so proud of him is that he has been such a good ambassador for the breed.

ABOUT THE BREED Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what a Chow should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: We all read the same breed standard but all have our own interpretation of it. I am sure, like most other judges, that we all think that OUR interpretation is the right one. Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Chow? A: Breed type. Balance is most important. Correct Chow stilted movement. Clean dark eyes. Best in Show Magazine

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Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: I do not like wet eyes that are too deep set or obscured by excess padding and wrinkles. I would penalize heavy labored breathing. Most other faults, depending on the severity of them, I accept, IF the dog has enough good breed points to counteract the fault/s. So often, we see dogs with no real faults but no real breed virtues either. This is when we lose breed type. Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: I like a lot of dogs from everywhere. The thing I find with the USA dogs is that so many ( not all ) do not have the same strength of bone in the rear legs as the front and some of the coat on manes and head is quite heavy, throwing out the overall balance. European type varies greatly. Some of the countries seem to still have quite heavy heads and small deep set eyes. Having said that there are a lot more that I would dearly love to own. I am not familiar with the AKC standard so cannot comment. Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? A: The UK Chows have changed. We have worked hard to reduce the incidence of entropian by penalizing eyes that are deep set, obscured by wrinkle and the wrong shape. We still have a long way to go as some Chows are more “spitz� like - it is still possible to have strength without excess without going too plain in head. Q: Can you describe an ideal Chow? A: Balanced. Viewed from the side I like to see a square between the front and back legs and

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ribs to ground. Same amount of bone in front and rear legs, a perfectly balanced head that doesn’t dominate the dog, lovely little hocks, and movement. Nothing is nicer when viewed from the side than seeing a Chow skim the ground, so light footed, moving with a pendulum like movement. Q: Please name 3 your all time favorite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: Not in any particular order. Rodney Oldham’s Towmena Impudent Miss. Paul and Eunice Westley’s Ch Mr Christian. Stefania Bettini’s Int CH Heart Mind Fire Dei Leoni Imperiali. Q: What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Oh gosh. I would swap bits on all of them. Perhaps CH Kwaitang Kasha. Q: What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Chow? A: Taking as much care as I possibly can to improve on what I have. Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: Go to shows. Don’t just show your dog and go home. Listen and learn. Ask questions. Learn why a dog is winning or losing and recognize good points and bad points. Don’t be fooled by coat - there is a lot of dog underneath the coat that we need to get right.

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w g Chow Chows by Arlene Robinson, United Kingdom I

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Q: Firstly can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Chow Chows? A: I had one Chow, Suki, as a pet and decided I wanted another so I thought I would breed my own. Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? A: I keep all of my dogs in the home. My kennel name was chosen simply because it sounded oriental. I have bred approximately 35 litters over a 45 year period. My first litter was in 1976. Q: Where did your first dogs come from? A: My first Chow was from a “puppy shop”. Like a many people at that time there was not a lot of information as to where to buy a puppy from so I turned to the obvious. I was lucky, she was healthy and lived to be almost 14. 346

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o

Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: I have since the 1990’s had all of my breeding Chows X-rayed. I do not work with anyone else and choose a dog to suit my bitch - regardless of who owns them. I have never had joint ownership and just occasionally have let someone have one of my pups and asked for a pup back in exchange instead of taking money for the dog. I have stud dogs that I allow other people to use. Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? A: I have had no definite line. I bred a few litters, mainly using the MINHOW stud dogs, then stopped as my dogs were getting older. Then I went into the Fort Knox Here’s the Tiger line. Now I have two RENDEL stud dogs who are out of a dog that I bred CH Kwaitang Kristian at Kyong. Both boys are siring nice puppies.


Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program line breeding, inbreeding or out-cross? A: I have done both and had success with both. I prefer line breeding but always check if there are dogs in the pedigree that I don’t want to double up on. Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: Breeding Ch Kwaitang Kristian at Kyong. He was top puppy 2012. Top Chow 2013 -4-5-6. and top stud dog 2017. The reason I am so proud of him is that he has been such a good ambassador for the breed. ABOUT THE BREED Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what a Chow should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: We all read the same breed standard but all have our own interpretation of it. I am sure, like most other judges, that we all think that OUR interpretation is the right one. Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Chow? A: Breed type. Balance is most important. Correct Chow stilted movement. Clean dark eyes. Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: I do not like wet eyes that are too deep set or obscured by excess padding and wrinkles. I would penalize heavy labored breathing. Most other faults, depending on the severity of them, I accept, IF the dog has enough good breed points to counteract the fault/s. So often, we see dogs with no real faults but no real breed virtues either. This is when we lose breed type.

Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: I like a lot of dogs from everywhere. The thing I find with the USA dogs is that so many ( not all ) do not have the same strength of bone in the rear legs as the front and some of the coat on manes and head is quite heavy, throwing out the overall balance. European type varies greatly. Some of the countries seem to still have quite heavy heads and small deep set eyes. Having said that there are a lot more that I would dearly love to own. I am not familiar with the AKC standard so cannot comment. Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say it has gone to better or worse? A: The UK Chows have changed. We have worked hard to reduce the incidence of entropian by penalizing eyes that are deep set, obscured by wrinkle and the wrong shape. We still have a long way to go as some Chows are more “spitz” like - it is still possible to have strength without excess without going too plain in head. Best in Show Magazine

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Q: Can you describe an ideal Chow? A: Balanced. Viewed from the side I like to see a square between the front and back legs and ribs to ground. Same amount of bone in front and rear legs, a perfectly balanced head that doesn’t dominate the dog, lovely little hocks, and movement. Nothing is nicer when viewed from the side than seeing a Chow skim the ground, so light footed, moving with a pendulum like movement. Q: Please name 3 your all time favorite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: Not in any particular order. Rodney Oldham’s Towmena Impudent Miss. Paul and Eunice Westley’s Ch Mr Christian. Stefania Bettini’s Int CH Heart Mind Fire Dei Leoni Imperiali.

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Q: What homebred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Oh gosh. I would swap bits on all of them. Perhaps CH Kwaitang Kasha. Q: What would you say is the secret to continued success in breeding Chow? A: Taking as much care as I possibly can to improve on what I have. Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: Go to shows. Don’t just show your dog and go home. Listen and learn. Ask questions. Learn why a dog is winning or losing and recognize good points and bad points. Don’t be fooled by coat - there is a lot of dog underneath the


coat that we need to get right.

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