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PORTFOLIO Bendik Herdlevær Støckert, Architect MAA February 2016


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CONTENTS 00

Curriculum Vitae

01

Works The Visual Void, Chart Art Fair 2015

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02 03 04

Postgraduate (MArch, RIBA part II) Preserving Pyramiden Transformation of Ammonium Plant in Fredericia The Daylight Device

20-37 38-45 46-51

05 06 07

08 09

Internship (TYIN Tegnestue) TRD Heinemann Barnetraakk Lyset Paa Lista Undergraduate (BArch) Architectural Parametrics Undergraduate Projects

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54-59 60-65 66-75

80-83 86-91

Front and back cover: Detail of concrete and steel model Opposite: Merge of photos from the daylight device. Photos: Pasi Aalto, Hampus Per Berndtson, Bendik Støckert

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00

CURRICULUM VITAE

Bendik Herdlevær Støckert, Architect MAA 1989.08.19, Trondheim, Norway

+45 81 71 86 50 bendikstockert@gmail.com Sommervej 13 2920 Charlottenlund Denmark

EXPERIENCE (RECENT)

E DU CAT I ON

Elgaard Architecture Architect MAA http://elgaardarchitecture.com/ February 2016 - Current / Copenhagen

Aarhus School of Architecture Master in Arts of Architecture (M.Arch, RIBA part II) Studio Building Design, Studio Context September 2013 - July 2015 / Aarhus, Denmark

Frich, Silva, Bay & Stoeckert Founding Partner & Architect August 2015 - Current / Oslo, Norway

TYIN Architects Internship http://www.tyinarchitects.com June 2013 - February 2014 / Trondheim, Norway

The Scandinavian Design College Guest Teacher August 2012 - Current / Randers, Denmark

Aarhus School of Architecture Bachelor in Arts of Architecture September 2010 - July 2013 / Aarhus, Denmark

StudArk Executive Editor September 2014 - February 2015 September 2012 - June 2013 / Aarhus, Denmark

The Scandinavian Design College Architecture and Product Design August 2009 - June 2010 / Randers, Denmark

Aarhus School of Architecture Assistant, Drawing of The Year 2014 June 2014 - February 2015 / Aarhus, Denmark

The Royal Norwegian Navy Military Service, Coast Guard July 2008 - July 2009 / Bergen, Norway

TYIN Architects Intern http://www.tyinarchitects.com June 2013 - February 2014 / Trondheim, Norway

Byaasen Upper Secondary School Science Studies A Level: Mathematics, Physics & Chemistry August 2005 - June 2008 / Trondheim, Norway

Yashar Hanstad, TYIN Architects Carpenter / Smith Assistant June 2013 - February 2014 / Trondheim, Norway

GRANTS & FOUNDATIONS The Architects´ Union (AFAG) Travel Scholarship March 2015 / Oslo, Norway The Erasmus Program Erasmus + EU Grant September 2013 / Aarhus, Denmark


HONORARY POSITIONS

SKILLS

Association for Student Politics and Association for Innovation, Networking & Entrepreneurship Co-Leading Coordinator / Co-Chairman Aarhus School of Architecture September 2012 - July 2013 / Aarhus, Denmark

Creative Suite (Id, Ps, Ai) Rhinoceros 3D Vray Render Autocad Sketchup Adobe After Effects MS Office Revit Archicad Grasshopper 3D studio MAX

Advanced Advanced Advanced Advanced Advanced Advanced Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate

3D-printing CNC-milling Lasercutting Physical Modelling Drawing

Intermediate Intermediate Advanced Excellent Excellent

Association for Innovation, Networking & Entrepreneurship Leading Coordinator / Chairman Aarhus School of Architecture September 2011 - July 2012 / Aarhus, Danmark The Architects´ Union (AFAG) Student Representative June 2012 - July 2013 / Oslo, Norway Aarhus School of Architecture Board Member December 2011 - July 2013 / Aarhus, Denmark

LANGUAGE HONOURS & REWARDS The Danish Architects’ Association The Architects’ Association Undergraduate Scholarship June 2013 / Aarhus, Denmark The KAB Foundation The KAB Foundation Scholarship June 2012 / Aarhus, Denmark The Royal Norwegian Navy Promotion to Leading Private March 2009 / Haakonsvern, Norway

Norwegian (Bokmål & Nynorsk) English Danish French

Native Fluent Fluent Good


WORKS 01

The Visual Void


01 THE VISUAL VOID 10


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JULIUS.26_A THE VISUAL VOID CHART ART FAIR 2015

CHART ART FAIR 2015 launched an architecture competition aiming at talented students from three Nordic schools of architecture. In teams of two, the students were invited to design six pavilions for Kunsthal Charlottenborg’s courtyard. The pavilions housed the restaurants of CHART GASTRONOMY. Bjarke Ingels, architect and founder of BIG, Rolf Hay, designer and founder of HAY, and Dorte Foss judged the competition. The competition was launched in partnership with HAY and FOSS.

Location:

Charlottenborg, Copenhagen

Event:

Chart Art Fair 2015

Project:

Pavillion

Cost:

30.000 DKK

Building Period:

August 2015

THE ART becomes exhibited by its surrounding void. It is the final element - reluctant of its process and its creator. It is stripped, as increased by its spatial setting.

Team:

Thea Dahl Orderud (designer) Christopher Fischlein (designer) Jens Vium Skaarup Johan Mumm Sylvest Kristoffer Kodam Michael Wolsing JULIUS.26_A Iben Enevoldsen Mikkel Møller Roesdahl Bendik Herdlevær Støckert

THE ARCHITECTURE encloses the void. It is the threshold which frames, thought its compliment lies in the space in beCHART ARCH 2015 tween. The space in which one can enter. In this commentary the architecture is seen merely as a definition of the void. A canvas for exhibiting not the art but the usage itself. The architectural elements frames become the frame and the backdrop, though demolishing the expected spatial relation through a juxtaposition of geometrical shapes.The function is the architecture - and through it, the function becomes the art. Through its shifting composition, the spectator becomes the one exhibited.

ck

Juxtapositioning the void.

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All photos @ Hampus Per Berndtson


Opposite: Exploded axonometric of the suggested pavilion Above: Overview of the pavillions at Charlottenborg p. 12-13: The Visual Void Pavillion in use 13


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Opposite: Picture taken through the fabric of the juxtaposed pavillion “Once In A Blue Moon� by Monica Skovgaard and Katja Meyer Above: Detail of the railway and the stairs up to the balcony 15


Above: Zoom-in of thes structure. The surface is coloured by the surroundings and the reflections. Opposite: The Visual Void in nighttime. Colours from juxtaposing pavillion is coloring the great wooden wall.

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POSTGRADUATE 02 03 04

Preserving Pyramiden Transformation of Ammonium Plant in Fredericia The Daylight Device

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PRESERVING PYRAMIDEN


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PRESERVING PYRAMIDEN PART II PROJECT 2015

The final design project is a revitalisation of the abandoned Soviet / Russian Coal Mining Town, Pyramiden, on Svalbard. In a Norwegian as well as an international context, Pyramiden represents a unique cultural heritage site, tracing the century-old mining traditions of Svalbard´s recent past. Moreover, from the early wooden dwellings of the original Swedish settlers to the Soviet-era planning ideals, its architecture reflects the changing tides of history that have shaped the town in its wake.

M.Arch Final Design Project, Spring 2015 Revitalisation of Soviet / Russian Coal Mining Town Pyramiden, Svalbard (Spitsbergen) Aarhus School of Architecture Studio Building Design Tutor: Mo Michelsen Stochholm Krag, PhD-Fellow, Cand.Arch

Today, Pyramiden remains a deserted town, but for a few hardened locals who welcome the occasional tourists to its harbour. Nevertheless, for all its desolate character and sheer isolation, the majestic scene of its glacial surroundings imparts on it a serene quality, as if waiting, one day, to be brought back to life. This projects challenges the existing programme for Pyramiden, which is a renovation of the hotel and an implemented area plan. It considers a more ambitious architectural program and intervention, that facilitates the preservation of the buildings and facilities, the growing tourism through the invention of a summer/winter route and a visitor centre, and lastly it functions as a test site for agriculture and locally produced food, made with a series of strategically distributed facilities. The project addresses three challenges: it protects and preserves the unique cultural heritage site that is continued to be shaped by very distinct set of conditions, not only local environmental and climatic extremes, but also overall economic, political and cultural circumstances that currently impacts the Arctic region. Secondly, it facilitates the rapidly growing tourism to the area and lastly, the intervention of arctic farming can meet the demands of locally produced food, as well as it offers a foundation for a sustainable, independent economy that can both provide for the preservation ofthe site, and possibly secure the existence for future ex-coal mine workers on Svalbard. This thesis explores the opportunity to reinterpret Pyramiden in its contemporary context, where the intervention can bring this remarkable history back to life and impart on it a lasting relevance for the future.

p. 20-21: Overview of the abandon settlement, Pyramiden. Opposite: Illustration showing the location of the site. From global and arctic view, to the archipelago and lastly the local sitation. 22


LOCATION The site is located in Dickson Land in Svalbard, Norway. The settlement «Pyramiden» is located on the south side of the pyramid-shaped mountain, Pyramiden, by Mimer bay on the west side of Billefjorden.

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Latitude: 78°40´45´´ Longitude: 16°23´43´´

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20°

25°

35°

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The nearest settlements Longyearbyen (Norwegian), 50 km south, and Barentsburg (Russian), 80 km southeast.

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80°

78°

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76°

76°N

25° 15°Ø

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ENTRANCE MINE

HAMMER % SICKLE (MIRU MIR)

CABLE CAR TO COVERED MINE CONVEYOR BELT WATER WORKSFOR COAL

MECHANICAL INITIAL ADMINISTRATIVE WORKSHOPS BUILDING

BRICK FACTORY (PREVIOUS) TRAINING FACILITY FOR FIRE IN MINE FOOTBALL STADIUM

MINE BATH

COVERED FIRING SVIMMING HALL RANGE

COVERED WALKWAY FROM MINE TO CABLE

RADIO STATION

OXYGEN STATION FIRE STATION / JAIL

ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING LARGE APARTMENT MONUMENT COMPLEX

FEATURE FILMS MONUMENT IN STORAGE LENIN MONUMENT TOWN SQUARE CULUTRAL PALACE (SPORTS HALL, SCHOOL THEATRE, CINEMA, SMALL APARTMENT MESS HALL

STOREHOUSES

HOSPITAL LARGE APARTMENT COMPLEX

DWELLING GREENHOUSE COMPLEX REFRIGERATOR

SNOW MOBILEVEGETABLE PARKING STOREHOUSE

PIPELINE CAGE WALKWAYS

HOTEL TULIP

BLOCKS

ROAD TO WATER RESERVOIR BLUE LAGOON

THE FINISH HOUSES, OLDEST DWELLIGNS

DWELLING COMPLEX HIGHER RANKING STAFF

GARAGE, WORKSHOP FOR VEHICLES

PIG HOUSE

STORAGE FOR BRICKS

COW BARN

OIL TANKS & WAREHOUSE

HEN HOUSE

OUTDOOR PIOGSTY

ANIMAL MANURE DEPOSIT FOR GREEN HOUSE STORAGE FOR BARRELS

ASH AND GARBAGE DEPOSIT

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PYRAMIDEN MONUMENT

HELIPORT


POWER PLANT ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING LOADING COAL FACTORY HALL LINE

COAL STORAGE

STORAGE AREA FOR EQUIPMENT & BUILDING

ACCOMODATION & TOURIST INFORMATION

WORKSHOP

DOCK CONNECTING POWERPLANT

DOCK

PYRAMIDEN, Billefjorden, Spitsbergen Island, Svalbard, Norway. Latitude: 78°40´45´´ Longitude: 16°23´43´´

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Page 24-25: Context plan of site with functions. Opposite: Town Plan and Strategy with focal points and routes through the site. Above: 1-5000 context model in CNC-milled smoked oak. 27


Illustration: Isometric view of the interventions in the town.

Greenhouse

Butchery

Pig House / Transformation

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Permafrost Chamber / Storage


Cafe: / Transformation

Visitor Centre

Hotel / Transformation

Raised Walkway

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Hotel / Transformation Visitor Centre

Cafe: / Transformation

Raised Walkway

Greenhouse

Permafrost Chamber / Storage

Butchery

Pig House / Transformation

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Opposite: Plan Above: Sections

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Top: Elevation nighttime. Bottom: Elecation daytime

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Above: Construction isometric of the greenhouse Opposite: 1:100 model in three steps. 1. The pilars and walkway. 2. The building structure. 3. The polycarbonate skin 34


3.

2.

1.

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Above: Visualisation of the scenario


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TRANSFORMATION OF FREDERICIA AMMONIUM PLANT


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TRANSFORMATION OF FREDERICIA AMMONIUM PLANT

The atmospheric Journey The walk: Approaching, entering and experiencing The story of the first meeting with the silos actually started before the confrontation in Narrative I. We arrived by car, parked just outside the structures, and quickly entered the site. There was no real transition or approach - no time for preparation; the silos were demystified. This I believe is a general issue in architecture today - we do not have time to prepare for something, we just want the reward without too much effort or denial. The approach should include more of the atmospheres at the site. Just south of the site is the New Little Belt Bridge with its hypnotic humming sound being transported through the heavy concrete and into the space underneath it. East of the site we have a strong connection to the dock where the local fishermen patiently wait for their catch. North of the site a small forest is blurring the insight to the old ammonium plant, and a narrow beach is stretching from south to north - connecting the atmospheric spaces. ‘The path of our movement (in this case along the beach) can be conceived as the perceptual thread that links the spaces of a building, or any series of interior or exterior spaces, together. Since we move in Time, through a Sequence of Spaces, we experience spaces in relation to where we come from and where we go or anticipate going’ (10). Sometimes the transition from one space to another is seamless, other times we can give a small hint of what is coming and then experience it in its fullness. Another option is to challenge the expectations of the observer by creating unexpected spaces - spaces that have completely changed condition and character. «If we approach Garnier’s Opera in Paris along the Avenue of the Opera we are led through a sequence of existential shifts where our part in the larger construction is adjusted in a balance between manipulation and complicity. The parts of this sequence work on us so that when we reach the performance we have a good chance of being in a suitable frame of mind to absorb the terms of the performance.» Chard, Nad (11) The act of walking becomes a journey of seductions, hints, invitations, shifts and transitions through a series of different spatial experiences before arriving at the final stage.

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9. semester: Studio Building Design September 2014 - January 2015 Tutors: Anders Gammelgaard Nielsen, Peter Bullough


DIAGRAM - A PROJECTION OF FACADES The walls have small openings, not revealing what is in the inside. The facades seems very closed - but on the inside - the journey continues through a sequence of paths penetrating the ruin.

Opposite: A plan of the industrial areas in Fredericia. Above: Abstract model of ruin and walkway and representation Above right: Collage made by an interpretation of Walkscapes, by Francesco Careri 41


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Opposite: Roof Plan of the intervention and steps of the journey Above: Extruded Isometric of the building components 43


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Opposite: Visualisation of the approach of the cafe / visitor centre Above: Visualisation of the space were the steel insertion invites movement between the inner and outer concrete shell inside the silo 45


04 THE DAYLIGHT DEVICE 46


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THE DAYLIGHT DEVICE DIRECTING MOVEMENT AND ATTENTION

The interplay of light and shadow articulates spaces (rhythm and sense of scale), in-between zones and transitions. The question is how do we create these hierarchies and focal points? How can light invite movement? How can the interplay of light be embedded in the journey of approaching, entering and experiencing architecture - reflecting the exterior world? The purpose of the daylight device is to investigate the ability of light to invite movement and directing attention. Method and Shape The method is simply pushing the roof surface of a quarter cylinder, down towards the corner. The shape consists of completely enclosed by walls and an adjustable ceiling surface. The Process 1. The device is a closed form; complete darkness 2. A small amount of light penetrates the opening - slowly revealing the shape of the space - drawing the cornes and edges with thin lines. 3. The surface starts to dissolve as more light penetrates the opening. There is still a distinction between the surface near the opening where the light is reflected upon and the wall of the cylinder. 4. The individual elements starts to distinguish gradually as the ceiling is pushed downwards. 5. The ceiling touches the floor and the space expresses an even and soft graduation from darkness to a full brightness. The different «frames» of the device provides a series of spaces that in themselves are interesting. Basically, one could make a sequence of spaces with the quality of each step, with an increasing depressed plane. Another option would be to make the architecture move and adjust to create a specific atmosphere; making the architecture the «live» thing - An event. The device is designed to prevent vision to the outside and let only the power of light be the invitational factor. The fact that you do not know what is behind the bright light, makes the experience increasingly intriguing - putting focus on the light that is being «produced» and not the light-emitting surface. In order to fully experience the sensation and significance of the full brightness at «the end of the tunnel», it is equally important to experience the counterweight with a phase through darkness, mediating a sensation of weight before entering the state of weightlessness.

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About Model: NIKON D7000 Color Space: RGB Color Profile: sRGB IEC61966-2.1 Focal Lenght: 24mm f-Number: 4 Exposure program: 3 Exposure: 1/5 - 1/10 Date 23.10.2014 14.00


Exposure: 1/5

Exposure: 1/5

Exposure: 1/5

Exposure: 1/5

Exposure: 1/8

Exposure: 1/8

Exposure: 1/8

Exposure: 1/10

Exposure: 1/5

Exposure: 1/6

Exposure: 1/6

Exposure: 1/6

Exposure: 1/10

Exposure: 1/10

Exposure: 1/10

Exposure: 1/10

Opposite: Pen drawing of the light machine Above top: The process of pushing down the roof plane Above bottom: Sequence from closed roof to fully depressed plane in corner. 49


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Opposite: Enlarged photo of the final stage in the light device Above: Zoom-in of the shades in the juxtaposed picture 51


INTERNSHIP 05 06 07

TRD Heinemann Barnetraakk Lyset Paa Lista


05 TRD - HEINEMANN 54


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TRD HEINEMANN

Gerb. Heinemann SE & co is one of the worlds largest corporations in duty free retail. They have stores at most european airports with international traffic. A number of these stores include a regional area, wherein regional products can be presented in a specifically tailored atmosphere. In company with some of the most known architect offices of the world, TYIN was asked to design this regional area in the Heinemann store at Trondheim Airport. The project has two main objectives. First, to show the uniqueness of the city and its cultural heritage. Second, to create something authentic and real, in stark contrast to the otherwise artificial and sterile environment of the airport. Hiding behind the facades of Trondheims unique wooden buildings are the backbones of Norwegian building tradition, the timber log structures. This way of building is several centuries old, and still in use today. Trondheim is also known for its steel industry related to shipping and seafare, another integral part of Norwegian cultural heritage. We began the process by searching for an old, traditional log house typical for the Trondheim-area. The log house we ended up with dates back to the 1880s. It was in a bad state and destined for demolition. After saving it from certain destruction, we carefully dissected and moved it to an indoor building hall. The rotting logs were removed, and the shape of the remaining structure dictated the design. The project is carried by miniature pier houses, a common trait of Trondheims traditional building mass. The miniatures are silhouette replicas of actual buildings. The steel shelves are burrowed deep into the timber logs, with each module containing a complex network of electric wiring, supplying the shelves with LED-lights. Remaining logs were cut into pieces and used to create a natural wooden back-wall. All work on the project was done by local craftsmen in a local setting. With this project we attempt to display our core values and our way of design, our love for simplicity in details and material choice, at the very heart of the commercial world All photos @ Pasi Aalto

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Location:

Værnes Airport Trondheim, Norway

Client:

Gebr. Heinemann

Project:

Duty Free Shop, Regionals Area

Cost:

1.600.000 NOK / 193.000 EUR

Building period:

November 2013 - March 2014

Area:

62 m2

Built by:

Hanmo (welding) Tømrer Stangvik (carpentry) Tømrer Geir Wettland (carpentry) Interiørmontør Kostic (carpentry) Trondheim Elektro (electricity)

Products by: Norsk Spon (back-wall timber) Livos Naturmaling (furniture oil) Nordby Gulv (flooring) Sifa (laser cutting) Helping students: Hilde Nessa Alice Lødemel Sandberg Kristin Solhaug Næss Sissel Westvig Simen Andreas Aas Håvard Eide Kornelie Solenes Henriette Bakke Nielsen Jonas Velken Kverneland


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06 BARNETRAAKK 60


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BARNETRAAKK TYIN & RINTALA-EGGERTSSON

This project was done for, and with help from, the children of the Gran Municipality. It is a pilot project initiated by Norsk Form, the State Department for Roads (Statens Vegvesen) and Gran Municipality.

Location:

The main aim of the project is to encourage activity in children and youngsters, by adding appeal to the options of walking or biking to school. Inactivity is a growing concern in this age group, and this project is one of many countermeasures to mend this negative development.

Project:

Meeting Places

Cost:

150 000 NOK / 18 000 EUR

Building period:

June - October 2013

These small meeting places are placed along the school road in Gran. The separate and independent units are painted in strong colours, fulfilling simple and diverse functions. The main idea behind the project came into being after arranging a series of workshops for the children that would later make use of the modules. The modules can stand on their own or in clusters. At them, the kids can meet up on the way to or from school. The modules answer to practical concern while inviting play and social interaction.

Area:

20 square meeters

The project was realised with help from students and the modules were built at Oslos School of Architecture and Design (AHO). A major goal of the project is to inspire other cities to follow suit and initiate similar projects, making the meeting spots a common sight along the school roads of Norway. All photos @ Pasi Aalto

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Gran Municipality, Oppland, Norway

Client: Gran Kommune, Statens Vegvesen, Norsk Form

Planning team: Yashar Hanstad Andreas G. Gjertsen Sami Rintala Dagur Eggertsson Vibeke Jenssen Trintom Elementary School Children Students: Johannes Ørn Dagsson Mio Oribe Tereza Mznak Matthias Tellquist Aleksander Svingen Lasse Kilvær Åsa Johanson Ona Flindall Magnus Vågan Anja Petkovic Karlsen Carla Carvalho Magnus Hellum Frida Hultberg Idunn Hylland Photos:

Pasi Aalto

Sponsors:

Kebony, Essve, NTNU, AHO


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07 LYSET PAA LISTA 66


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LYSET PAA LISTA

Lista is situated in the southernmost part of Norway, and it is home to some of Norway`s most unique and fascinating landscape. The small region is troubled by increasing migration, a problem all too common in small, rural parts of Norway today. This particular project was born out of the desire to combat this development. This was to be done by showcasing the wild natural beauty of the area, hoping to draw investments and funding to Lista. The clients was a group made up of 50 local landowners. This group wants to realise the areas potential for tourism, an ambition they share with the local government. We decided the best way to go about this would be to create a physical structure in the midst of the sand dune landscape, so potential investors and decision makers can experience the beautiful and unique nature of Lista firsthand. The group working with us on the project included architecture students from Mexico and Norway. We started out empty-handed, there were no sponsors, no government approval, no specific lot to work on and no housing for the project participants. The student group was very positive and easy to work with. The process can be described as typical TYIN, as design took place on the lot in tandem with the building process, guided by pragmatical factors such as material availability. The entire local community of Lista pitched in, helping with sleeping arrangements, providing food, materials and access to machinery. In just three weeks the project participants managed to create a sizeable structure. Our overarching idea of the project was to create a rigid construction that would stand out and form a contrast to the wildness of the Lista nature. The construction forms a straight line over very complex and uneven landscape. A wooden pathway running 60 meters in length ensures universal access to the small cabin found at the end of the structure. The cabin is optimised for enjoying the beautiful scenic landscape that surrounds it. A prerequisite for the task placed on the project by local government was to abstain from the use of permanent materials. Any construction in this unique area has to be fully reversible. This ruled out the use of concrete in the foundation work. Our answer to this challenge was rooting poles deep into the sand ground, and then constructing on top of these. The hut is structured as a seamless continuation of the pathway. Our aim for the project is to kickstart a positive development in the area, helping it combat the migration problem. Shortly after the completion of the project, the local ground owners named it 'The light of Lista', referring to the dazzling natural light unique to this area.

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Location:

Lista, Farsund, Norway

Client:

Hanangermona Grunneierlag

Project:

Viewpoint

Cost:

300 000 NOK / 36 000 EUR

Building period:

September 2013

Area:

120 sqm

Built by:

Students and TYIN

Universities: Tecnológico de Monterrey, Puebla Norwegian University of Science and Technology Students: Håvard Eide Marco Antonio Aparicio Kirwant Jonas Velken Kverneland Margarita Cuesta López Hildne Nessa Henriette Bakke Nielsen Fernanda Miranda Noriega Monir Jiménez Fernández Rafaelly Paulina Martínez Rodríguez Kornelie Solenes Rosalba Martínez Villaseñor Sissel Westvig Simen Andreas Aas Sponsors: Innovasjon Norge Byggvell Montér Naust Bygg NorDan Optimalt AS NTNU


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UNDERGRADUATE 09 10

Architectural Parametrics Undergraduate Projects

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09 ARCHITECTURAL PARAMETRICS 78


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ARCHITECTURAL PARAMETRICS

The illustrations shows the result of a 1-week workshop with second year students at Aarhus School of Architecture, who have been working with parametric design and digital fabrication. Through the use of software utilities such as Grasshopper and Rhino, a parametric model has been built for the architectural study of the semester´s theme - structure and seriality. The themes of the studies has been a fundamental exploration of the relationship between structure, rhythms, transparency and movement. The architectural studies through parametric models were dynamically interconnected with economy, material consumption and production data. The resource and manufacturing costs of any design proposals have been evaluated by the students regularly during the design phase. The parametric model has given instructions directly to the structure´s construction, which was done through the laser cutter and handheld tools. The result is an interplay between optimised conventional mass fabrication and digital manufacturing unique items. (1) 1) BORUP, Ruben, SØNDERGAARD, Asbjørn, Architectural Parametrics, 01. Edition, January 2012 2nd Year, Aarhus School of Architecture Read more: http://www.blurb.com/books/3003740-architectural-parametrics or https://vimeo.com/36907762

Above: Grasshopper formula for the model Opposite: The structure in the exhibition / auditorium building 80

Leaders:

Ruben Borup Asbjørn Søndergaard

Location:

Aarhus School of Architecture

Team:

2nd year

Time:

1 week in January 2012

Tools

Rhinoceros + Grasshopper


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Above: Structure from above Opposite: Elevation, plan and rendering from rhino 82


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10 UNDERGRADUATE PROJECTS 84


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UNDERGRADUATE PROJECTS

This chapter is a small showcase of different projects from the undergraduate at Aarhus School of Architecture. The pictures represent fragments of different phases in several projects. The pictures are presentented as a simple montage, simply to give the observer small hints of the whole.

LYSRUM (LIGHT SPACE)

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LOUNGE CHAIR

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FROM OBJECT TO SERIALITY TO SPATIAL STRUCTURE

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BUNKER

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AUTO

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THANK YOU


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Architecture Portfolio 2016  

The Architecture Portfolio of Bendik Herdlevaer Stoeckert, Architect MAA. Includes academic and professional work from Aarhus School of Arch...

Architecture Portfolio 2016  

The Architecture Portfolio of Bendik Herdlevaer Stoeckert, Architect MAA. Includes academic and professional work from Aarhus School of Arch...

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