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The Pennsylvania Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

HOME SUBSCRIPTION - $36/YEAR

SEE OUR AD ON BACK COVER WWW.1RBN.COM

MAY, 2016

FIRE DESTROYS APARTMENT COMPLEX

GARY DIDAY

Harrisville, Butler County - Firefighters from Harrisville responded to a fully involved three tenant apartment fire on March 3, 2016 at 10:18 a.m. The apartment was located at 607 E. Mercer Street in the borough. The building was a two-story wood frame construction apartment that was being rebuilt from a fire in May 2015. Due to the lack of fire hydrants, tankers had to shuttle water three miles from the Allegheny Mineral Corp. quarry. - See full story on page 38

LOOK INSIDE FOR THE 1ST RESPONDER 2016 FDIC PREVIEW SUPPLEMENT!


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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

ADVERTISER INDEX

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

A guide to finding great companies

Company

1st Priority

AGT Battery

Page

5,10,20

All Hands Fire Equip Apparatus For Sale

56,57

17,43

58

Automan Diagnostics

39

Campbell Supply Co.

1,64

CA Reed Epoxy Floors Choice Clean Gear Choice Marketing CILS Inc.

39

21

45

35

Command Fire Apparatus 28 Emergency Equip Sales

31

Fire Expo 2016

25

Fabco Power FireDex

27 15

Hoffman Radio Network

37

Marco Equipment Sales

33

Mid Atlantic Fire & Air

23

Kimtek

MES Fire

9

19

Mid Atlantic Rescue

13

Safe-T

55

PPES

39

Spotted Dog Tech.

61

Swissphone

29

Sutphen

Task Force Tips The Fire Store

41

Waterways of PA

49

We Cut The Glass, LLC

Zodiac of North America

Bart Township Fire Company operate a 2008 Kenworth/Pierce 2000/3000 pumper tanker.

37 7

63 2

CORPORATE INFORMATION

1st Responder News (ISSN 1525-1683) - Pennsylvania edition - Vol. 20 No. 5 - is published monthly, 12 times a year for $36 per year by Belsito Communications, Inc., 1 Ardmore Street, NY 12553. Periodicals Postage Paid at Newburgh, NY and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street, NY 12553. No financial responsibility is assumed by this newspaper to publish a display, classified, or legal ad or for typographical errors except of reprinting that part of the ad which was omitted or in error. Omissions or errors must be A division of: brought to the attention of the newspaper during the s a m e month of publication.

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Engine 45 of the North Hopewell/Winterstown Fire Company is a 2005 Spartan/New Lexington 1750/1250

FRANK ROBINSON

11

Ultra Bright Lightz

KEN SNYDER

Reading, PA. With C platoon firefighters early into their final nightshift on February 6th, a box alarm was transmitted for 1149 North 5th Street. Engine 7 arrived at a three story MOR with nothing showing from the front. While crews were investigatin,g Medic 1 reported fire showing from the rear of the structure. Firefighters made a stretch through the front door and quickly knocked down the fire. With a thick volume of smoke spreading through the upper floors, crews from Ladder 3 and Rescue 1 found no victims during a search. The fire was placed under control at 7:56 p.m. with the homeowner being evaluated. The Fire Marshal's Office is investigating.

3

47

Waterway

Kitchen fire on North 5th Street in Reading

59

Translite, Veinlite LLC TurboDraft

BRETT MACK

TIMOTHY COOVER

RIT 1 training in East Donegal Township

East Donegal Township, Lancaster County, PA. Crews from Maytown/East Donegal, Columbia and Wrightsville spent several days working on their RIT 1 skills. Crews then worked to rescue downed firefighters from different scenarios while putting their new skills to work.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

SCOOTER BLAKELY EFD PHOTO UNIT

Three alarm fire consumes Erie business The City of Erie Fire Department Engines 8, 12, 13, Tower 2, and DC 324 were dispatched for smoke coming from a building on Feb. 5 at 4:28 a.m First on scene at 4:31 a.m. at 117 East 12th at Fred's Beds was DC 324, Mike Balliett. Initial size up was light smoke coming from the second floor of a two story commercial furniture store. Tower 2 made forced entry on Side A through the main front door and a roll up door. Engine 8 laid a four inch supply line to Side A. Engines 8 and 12 advanced two hand lines to the interior to locate and extinguish the fire. Tower 2 set up the aerial on Side D to access the roof for ventilation. Engine 13 was told to lay a four inch supply line to Side C of the building. DC 324 requested two more engines, bringing Engines 11 and 6, the remaining on-duty crews for the city. The interior crews encountered smoke on the first floor and fire on a

JUMP TO FILE #022516134 set of stairs leading to the second floor. Tower 2 ventilated the sky lights toward the back of the building. Heavy smoke and fire started venting form these openings almost immediately. Interior crews, trying to make the second floor, encountered heavy smoke and high heat conditions. The second floor was loaded from floor to ceiling with furniture. Upon hearing the reports from interior and roof crews and knowing the fire load of the building, DC 324 ordered an evacuation of all crews from the building at 4:45 a.m. All crews exited and a PAR was taken. Defensive operations were ordered. The side A second floor windows were taken out and heavy smoke and fire began venting out. Engines 8, 12 and 13 opened up their

deck guns and set up blitz fires as Tower 2 started flowing water. Mutual aid was requested from Erie County bringing Belle Valley Tower 369 to the scene to set up on Side C. The crews advanced hand lines to the roof and interior of Dominick's Eatery, a popular downtown restaurant. This was the bravo 1 exposure and was separated from the fire building by 12 inches. The building suffered smoke and water damage, but no fire extension. The back wall and roof the fire building began to collapse at 5:10 a.m. A full platoon call back was initiated by Chief 320, Tony Pol. Once in service, Engines 8X, 13X, and Tower 2X were dispatched to the scene to assist with extinguishing the fire. The fire is under investigation by EFD FIU. No injuries were reported.

GORDON PIPPIN

City Of Chester Bureau of Fire Engine 81 (2009 Pierce Arrow XT) arrived first with heavy smoke showing from a three story MOG dwelling at 712 Highland Ave.

- JUAN F. BLAKELY

STILL IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Still in Service� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Aston Township Fire Dept Truck 17 (2003 Pierce Dash) arrived as the first due ladder to 714 Apple Tree Court, Claymont.

GORDON PIPPIN

GORDON PIPPIN

FRANK ROBINSON

Avondale Fire Company still operates this 1992 Mack/4 Guys 1250/1500 pumper tanker.

City of Chester Bureau of Fire Engine 82 (2009 Pierce Arrow XT) arrived first due to a three story MOG at 425 Concord Ave, Chester.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

In memory of those who gave all 1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

Kentucky: David W. Conley, 48 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: February 10, 2016 Death Date: February 10, 2016 Fire Department: Olive Hill Fire Department Initial Summary: Lieutenant Conley fell ill from an apparent heart attack while on-duty at the fire station. Conley was treated by fellow responders and transported to the hospital in Morehead, KY, where he succumbed to his injury.

ambulance. Within two minutes of going into the bay and while on the bay floor, Larlee fell ill. Captain Larlee was treated by fellow first responders, but passed away at the scene from injuries sustained.

Pennsylvania: Earl J. Shoemaker, 68 Rank: Firefighter/Safety Officer Incident Date: March 12, 2016 Death Date: March 12, 2016 Fire Department: Eagle Fire Company #2 – Hanover Fire Department Kansas: Daniel F. Cool, 71 Initial Summary: Firefighter Shoemaker was reRank: Assistant Fire Chief sponding to the scene of a house fire on the 500 Incident Date: February 11, 2016 block of Pumping Station Road when he became ill. Death Date: February 14, 2016 The mobile air unit apparatus he was operating left Fire Department: Olive Hill Fire Department the roadway (Brunswick DR) and came to a stop Initial Summary: Assistant Fire Chief Cool re- several hundred feet away. Shoemaker, alone in the sponded to an emergency incident on the morning apparatus at the time, was rescued by local residents of February 11th. Later that day, he attended a train- and fellow first responders. He was then transported ing meeting and collapsed suddenly from a heart at- to the hospital where he was pronounced deceased tack. Chief Cool was admitted to St. Francis from a cardiac related injury. Hospital in Topeka, KS, where he succumbed to his injury early in the morning of February 14th. South Carolina: Christopher Gene Ray, 42 Rank: Firefighter II California: Shawna Lynn Jones, 22 Incident Date: March 20, 2016 Rank: Inmate Firefighter Death Date: March 20, 2016 Incident Date: February 25, 2016 Fire Department: Conway Fire Rescue Death Date: February 26, 2016 Initial Summary: Firefighter II Ray was operating Fire Department: CAL FIRE on the scene of a working residential structure fire Initial Summary: Inmate Firefighter Jones was when he was struck and killed by a fire engine. Acworking as part of a hand crew in a steep ravine on cording to a preliminary description of the incident a fire in Agoura Hills-Malibu, California, when a from the South Carolina Highway Patrol, Ray was large rock fell about 100 feet from the hillside above riding on a Conway fire engine when he fell off and and struck her in the head. Firefighter Jones was was struck as the fire truck reversed over him. The treated immediately on scene by her fellow fire- incident remains under investigation by local and fighters and quickly hoisted into a Los Angeles state authorities. County Fire Department helicopter then airlifted to UCLA Medical Center, where she succumbed to her Texas: Marco Davila, 45 injuries the following day. Thanks to firefighters on Rank: Driver/Engineer the ground combined with air attacks, the fire was Incident Date: March 23, 2016 brought under control and no structures were lost. Death Date: March 23, 2016 Investigation into the cause of the fire continues by Fire Department: Dallas Fire-Rescue Departlocal and state authorities. ment Initial Summary: Driver/Engineer Davila fell ill Maine: Peter Larlee, 57 while exercising at his residence several hours after Rank: Captain coming off of his shift at the fire department and Incident Date: March 2, 2016 within 24 hours of responding to an emergency reDeath Date: March 2, 2016 sponse incident. Davila succumbed at the hospital Fire Department: East Millinocket Fire Depart- several hours later from a nature and cause of fatal ment injury still to be determined. Initial Summary: Within one hour of responding to a medical emergency, Captain Larlee went into the fire department's engine bay to fix a mud flap on an


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

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May, 2016

DEPUTY CHIEF JIM SEIGER

Garage fire in Cumru Township

Cumru Township, PA. During the morning of February 8th, the Berks County Communications Center dispatched firefighters to 2431 Morgantown Road for a garage fire. A police officer from CTPD arrived at a fully involved garage fire with an exposed propane tank. Deputy Chief Jim Seiger (DC42-1) arrived after and requested a second alarm for additional manpower at 2:24 a.m. Firefighters worked the fire after managing a water supply issue. The structure collapsed into itself early on in the fire. Crews remained on scene for approximately two hours. No injuries were reported.

KEN SNYDER

Five displaced, family dog perishes in dwelling fire

Allentown, PA. On November 13th, a second alarm dwelling fire badly damaged an east side home located at 412 E. Mosser St. The fire started on the first floor of a two story home and spread to the second floor and attic area. At the time of the fire, the occupants were not home but the family dog did perish. Both exposures received some smoke damage. Two adults and three children were forced to relocate.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

New Holland Fire Co. 1918 American LaFrance

TERRY RITZ

UDFD PHOTOS

Fire strikes both sides of twin The Upper Darby Township Fire Department B Platoon went to work on a working dwelling fire at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 18th in the 69th Street section of the township. First arriving units found heavy smoke pushing from both sides of a three story twin dwelling, with a report of possible entrapment. Squrt 36 (Captain Gallagher, Firefighter Ganley and Firefighter Conlin) confirmed that the resident was

JUMP TO FILE #022916102 hanging out of the attic window in a heavy smoke condition. The crew rescued the victim via a ground ladder as additional units began firefighting operations. Hoarder conditions were encountered in the attached B Exposure, and with heavy fire in the rear roof area, and high heat and smoke con-

ditions with no visibility in the attic area, Deputy Chief Huf ( Upper Darby 11 ) ordered the evacuation of the dwelling and a defensive exterior attack was initiated. Fire units remained on the scene overnight to extinguish hotspots and flare ups (Squrt 36 and Tower 74). The cause of the fire is under investigation. - MICHAEL BAKER

East Greenville Fire Co. 1949 LS Mack

TERRY RITZ

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

KEN SNYDER

The Strinestown Community Fire Company maintains this retired 1954 GMC/Darley pumper, 500/800.

East Greenville Fire Co. 2013 Smeal/Spartan 105' ladder at an apartment fire in Pennsburg.

TERRY RITZ

FRANK ROBINSON

Wagontown Fire Company still maintains their 1967 Dodge Power Wagon 300/300 brush truck.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

GORDON PIPPIN

Darby Fire Company No. 1 (Darby Borough) Pipeline 4 (2008 Seagrave Marauder II) was the first to arrive at an apartment fire in Yeadon Borough at 300 North Front Street, Yeadon.

SHANE SWENSON

Car into a structure

Dauphin Middle Paxton Township, PA. Tonight while members were watching the Super Bowl on Feb. 7 at 8:57 p.m., Box 38-4 was dispatched for an accident with no injuries. Lt. 38-1 (Rose) responded and was advised by county that a vehicle went off the roadway and into a structure. Rescue 38 and Engine 38 arrived to find a vehicle was sitting on a resident’s front porch with the driver out of the vehicle with no injuries. The car took out the main supports for the porch roof, so members worked with the resident to shore up the roof. Crews were on scene for an hour until the vehicle was removed and the structure was secured. Engine 762 on the scene of a chimney fire in West Hempfield Township

TIMOTHY COOVER

We Buy Used Ambulances! Unhappy with your trade in price? Downsizing your fleet?

All makes and manufacturers considered, cash paid “on the spot.” Free pick up available. Call the Used Vehicle experts at First Priority Emergency Vehicles for a free, accurate and fair appraisal/offer on your preowned ambulance.

Call Today! 1.800.247.7725 J. KRIESHER

Phoenix Fire Company Engine 747 of Shenandoah operated to the rear of a three alarm fire on Main Street in Shenandoah in sub-zero temperatures.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

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TIMOTHY COOVER

Crews arrive to entrapment in East Donegal Twp.

Crews were dispatched at 1:19 a.m. on Feb. 14th for a Class 1 MVA with one into a tree. Crews arrived to find one vehicle into a tree and upgraded it to entrapment. Crews worked to free the patient and requested Life Lion to the scene. Once freed, crews helped with patient care and helped load the patient into Life Lion 1. Crews cleared the scene a short time later. Maytown/East Donegal Twp Fire Department was assisted by crews from Marietta, Bainbridge and Wrightsville Fire Departments.

PATRICK KIRN

Bus crashes through fence into creek Cumru Township, PA. On Wednesday morning February 17th, the Berks County Communications Center dispatched emergency crews to Govenor Mifflin Intermediate School for a reported bus accident. Kenhorst Chief Hart (C69) was in the area and arrived to a bus into the creek behind the school with the driver suffering from a medical issue. Rescue Engine 42 arrived with Southern Berks EMS and assisted with patient care while awaiting a recovery company. No students were on the bus at the time of the incident. The driver was taken to Reading Hospital.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

APPARATUS IN ACTION

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Crews watching over the building

ROMAN ISARYK JR

Maytown Fire Department Engine 792

TIMOTHY COOVER

Philadelphia battles fire and ice Just after 9:30 a.m. on Feb. 13th, the Philadelphia Fire Department was dispatched for a reported fire at Joe's Auto Body in an L shaped building on the 4900 Block of Griscom St. Crews arrived to find heavy fire and smoke coming from the shop. 30 minutes into the job BC 10 issued a second alarm. A mayday was issued by a firefighter inside one of the buildings due to the heavy smoke condition. That firefighter was accounted for a short time later.

JUMP TO FILE #021316104 At 10:40 a.m., a third alarm was struck. Less then 10 minutes later, the fourth alarm was struck. The fire spread quicklly due to heavy winds with gusts of 30 mph. At 11:25 a.m., the fifth alarm was struck for heavy fire conditions. 30 minutes later, the sixth alarm was struck per Car 2 as the fire continued to spread. Firefighters had a building

collapse at the auto shop along with a building on the Frankford Ave side. Crews continued to pour water on the blaze and as many as eight buildings were involved. The fire was brought under control almost five hours later. One firefighter was injured and a resident was also checked out for unknown injuries. The cause of the fire is unknown and is under investigation. - ROMAN ISARYK

TIMOTHY COOVER

Rheems, Lancaster County, PA. Tanker 70 operating on an ammonia leak in West Donegal Township

Dwelling fire in Middletown Twp. Middletown Township, Bucks County, PA. Firefighters from the Parkland Penndel, LanghorneMiddletown, William Penn, and Nottingham Fire Companies were dispatched to a dwelling fire (Parkland Fire Company Tactical Box 921) on Walsh Avenue at approximately 9:16 a.m. on Thursday, March 3rd. JUMP TO FILE# F i r e fi g h t e r s 030316113 went in service with multiple hand lines attacking the fire. Additional fire companies were dispatched to the assignment for manpower at the fire scene and for cover assignments at stations. Firefighters also remained on scene for an extended period of time hitting hot spots and conducting overhaul operations. PECO Energy was called to the scene to secure electrical hazards and utilities. Penndel Fire Company Fire Chief 8 Chuck Fox ran Walsh Avenue incident command. The Middletown Township Fire Marshal's office was on location investigating the fire. - JEFFREY GOLDBERG

ARTIE OSNIAK

Tanker 45 of the Bullskin Twp. VFC in Fayette County working at a early morning Easter Sunday fire.

Penndel Fire Company 8 Firefighter Henry Lovett checking for fire extension on the roof on Parkland Fire Company Tactical Box 09-21. JEFF GOLDBERG

JASON BATZ

Brush units from Cumru Township Fire Department and the Bowmansville Fire Company worked a small brush pile in Brecknock Township, Berks County.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

SCENES FROM PITTSBURGH EXPO Photos by Dan Meyersburg

Sutphen

HMA Fire

ESI Equipment

CA Reed

Waterway

The Fire Store

Kaler

California Casualty

First Out

Ultra Bright Lightz

Choice

Let’s Buy an Ambulance EMS ISSUE

CHELLE CORDERO

WEST RIDGE FD

Building burns in South Lebanon Township

South Lebanon Township, PA. South Lebanon firefighters were alerted to a structure fire at the Laicha Nursery around 3 p.m on March 5. With companies dispatched, a large column of smoke could be scene for miles. Engine 25 arrived at a fully involved two story masonry building. The owners of the building, who lived on site, advised no one should be inside. Several large lines were placed around the building along with an aerial master stream from Ladder 26. The fire was placed under control about an hour later. Assistant Chief Andy Ventura was in command. Firefighters from Neversink, Prescott, Quentin, and Lebanon assisted. The county fire marshal is investigating.

It’s a sad fact but all once-shiny and brand-new ambulances eventually need to be replaced; both highvolume and rural agencies put miles of use on an existing rig, weather conditions and exposure add more than a few blemishes to the body, and continually changing protocols keep adding new equipment which often requires more storage space in the ambulance. So, it’s settled, eventually you are going to have to shop around for a new ambulance. Where do you start? As the former VP and Rig Committee Chairperson at a local volunteer corps, I’ll share the methods we used. We began with a smaller, controlled committee which included riding members and budget administrators and we held an informal general membership meeting to gather recommendations from our riding members. Once armed with a list of requested priorities and knowledge of our budgetary limits, committee members were tasked with finding dealers who serviced our area and we let them know our parameters. The dealers got back to us and

let us know HOW they could help us in our quest. A few dealers responded with attempts to change our priorities and those were pretty much ruled out immediately. We also eliminated dealers who had known issues about reliability with timing (consistent delays in manufacture) and difficulty in maintenance (if there was local dependable service). The committee also looked into the overall reputation based on our own and other corps’ experiences.Once we had a manageable list of dealers (approximately three) we made individual appointments for each to bring a rig to our location to inspect, make a presentation, and answer questions. Committee members were required to attend these presentations, we also invited interested members as well; after each presentation we met (without the dealer rep) to briefly discuss our impressions. Armed with our checklist and notes, we asked the dealer/manufacturer any remaining (or new) questions, compared what was available to our refined list of priorities, and chose (on paper) which dealer was the most accommodating for our needs. Our next and final step was to present our recommendation to our Board of Directors; after any discussion and approval was granted, we entered into a contract with the dealer of choice. My corps’ top three priorities for a new rig were

(1) affordability, (2) safety and construction of the unit, (3) overall size (to fit our bay and other local access routes). I asked two other agencies what their most recent top three priorities were: Corps A (1) Gas vs. diesel, (2) serviceability and location, (3) ability and ease for remount Corps B (1) Price, (2) size for equipment (they carry hazmat gear in addition to the norm), (3) reputation of company and Maintenance/ reliability. Other things to consider may be how the vehicle will be used (consider terrain and weather/road conditions), fuel efficiency and economy of use, structural integrity, inside-box work area (should be big enough to treat a patient and not so big that the members inside cannot be secured during the ride), how available are replacement parts, and what is the anticipated life of the ambulance. While my experience in a volunteer corps may have relied more on riding members’ opinions than a commercial provider might include, it is important to have people involved in the decision who are familiar with the actual working needs and not just theoretical ones. The cost of the vehicle may be limiting and even though it is important to keep it within the budget, it should never sacrifice the safety of the emergency team or patient. Finally, even most used ambulances have value, don’t forget to ask the vendor how much you can get for a trade-in during your negotiations.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

Fire Force Butler, PA 724.586.6577 ww ww.fforce.com

Pro-Am Safety Warrrendale, PA 724.776.18 818

May, 2016

911 Safety Equipm ment Palmyra, PA 717.473.3843 www.911rapidresponse.com nse.com

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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

TERRY RITZ

TERRY RITZ

KEN SNYDER

East Greenville Fire Co. 2013 Smeal/Spartan 105' ladder East Greenville Fire Co. 2007 KME engine, 2013 Houtzdale Fire Co. No. 1 Engine 23-1 is a 2004 Sutphen Smeal/Spartan 105' ladder, 2009 KME rescue/pumper 1500/1000.

J. KRIESHER

Fire tears through Shenandoah downtown Shenandoah, PA. At 4:19 a.m. on February 14, Shenandoah Marshal 747 spotted smoke coming from a building in the unit block of North Main Street in the borough. M747 radioed into Schuylkill County 911. The first alarm was dispatched. Squrt 745 responded and a second alarm was requested. Heavy fire was showing from the rear. Ladder 745 sent a crew to the roof to start to open up. Mahanoy City Rescue 993 assembled a RIT. The second alarm dispatched Frackville, Englewood, Mahanoy City Citizens, Shenandoah Heights and Ringtown Valley Fire Companies. Frackville Ladder 43-20’s stick went to the roof and a crew ascended. An additional RIT from Pottsville was requested into the scene. Multiple additional hand lines were stretched to the rear. Heavy smoke continued to poor

JUMP TO FILE #021516124 from the third floor of the original fire building, leading to a third alarm be struck. The third alarm brought in Girardville, Saint Clair, Nuremberg-Weston and Ashland Fire Companies. Nuremberg Ladder 581 and 4320 worked on the roof of the end building to open the walls of the original fire building. Ashland Ladder 38-25 sent their crew to the roof to relieve the 745 companies. Crews were unable to make any interior progress and smoke conditions continued to deteriorate leading to the Squrt putting the master stream in service through the third story window. At this point, concern was raised that the front of the building may collapse so the Squrt was shut down and pulled down. The Squrt was put back in service as an elevated master stream.

Twomaster streams began to prove effective. Firefighters were able to rehab in a heated tent provided by Ryan Township EMS. The Red Cross was also on scene providing aid. The temperature hovered between 0 and -5 degrees. The Schuylkill County EMA Incident Support Vehicle and Schuylkill County COMM1 were also on scene. By 10 a.m., the bulk of fire had been knocked down and third alarm companies were released. At 11 a.m., all crews were ordered to break down their equipment and regroup. Second alarm companies began to be released at this time. One firefighter was taken to the hospital and released for a minor injury. A State Police Fire Marshal was requested to help investigate the cause. All units were clear in the early evening. - JC KRIESHER


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ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.comor email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Saylesville Fire Dist. 1 1952 L 85 Mack pumper

Indian Valley Fire Assoc. 1955 Model B Mack

TERRY RITZ

TERRY RITZ

49 left homeless after fire ravages Swissvale apartment building At around 6:45 p.m., on the evening of March 1st, Swissvale Fire Department was dispatched to a possible structure fire located at the corner of Woodstock Avenue and Melrose Street in JUMP TO FILE# Swissvale. 030416135 Fire units arrived to find a three story multi-unit apartment building with a working fire on the third floor. A second alarm was immediately dispatched and firefighters attempted to make an interior attack. However, the fire, fed by very high winds that night quickly engulfed the building sending crews into defensive mode. Due to the size of the building and the amount of fire, the incident quickly went to four alarms. Throughout the course of the night, several collapses occurred including a total collapse of the rear of the building. Power was cut to several hundred residents as a precaution due to the fire along with the high winds that night. The fire was finally placed under control around 10:45 p.m. with crews staying on scene for an extended period of time. Due to the instability of the building, it was decided to immediately demolish the building, which commenced in the early morning hours. Amazingly, everyone in the building made it out safely, but

one firefighter was injured when a piece of metal blown by the high winds struck him in the face, but did not cause serious injury. A total of 49 people, including 25 adults and 24 children lost everything in the fire. The American Red Cross immediately began helping those displaced. Many in

ERIC RASMUSSEN/FIRST DUE PHOTOGRAPHY

the community donated clothes, food, money and more that will be going to the displaced residents. The Allegheny County Fire Marshals Office is now investigating what may have caused this devastating blaze. - ERIC RASMUSSEN

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

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Engine 25 of the Merion Fire Company of Ardmore is a 2013 Pierce 1500/750

KEN SNYDER


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

Third floor fire in Reading

KEN SNYDER

Five displaced, family dog perishes Allentown, PA. On November 13th, a second alarm dwelling fire badly damaged an east side home located at 412 E. Mosser St. The fire started on the first floor of a two story home and spread to the second floor and attic area. At the time of the fire, the occupants were not home but the family dog did perish. Both exposures received some smoke damage. Two adults and three children were forced to relocate.

Reading, PA. During the evening of Sunday, February 28th, the Berks County Communications Center began receiving calls reporting a house fire on North 12th Street. Companies were dispatched to JUMP TO FILE the 700 block of #022916101 North 12th Street for flames showing from the upper floors of a row home. Engine 9 arrived moments later at a three-story MOR with fire showing from the third floor. A hose line was rapidly stretched into position with crews knocking down the fire in twelve minutes. All searches were reported to be clear in the fire building along with the adjoining exposure properties. The fire was placed under control by Chief Kemery (C3) at 8:33 p.m. No injuries were reported. The Fire Marshal's Office is investigating. - JASON BATZ

JEREMY BICE

ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.comor email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

A. GETKA

Close call in Manheim Township While Truck 204 was returning from a fire alarm, Manheim Twp Engine and Truck 204 along with mutual aid were dispatched for an attached garage fire in the 2000 block of Pennwick Rd in East Lampeter Township. Engine and Truck 204 arrived to find smoke in the garage with some charring to the ceiling and corner walls. The homeowner advised after smelling smoke, he checked the garage and noticed the RC car batteries he was charging caught fire. With the help of neighbors, they were able to move the car into the snow and extinguish the fire with more snow. Fire crews ventilated the house and overhauled the involved area of the garage.

First West Chester Fire Department once ran this 1966 Seagrave 1000/500 engine

FRANK ROBINSON


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

JOHN G. ENGLAND IV

Early morning fire with strong winds Get your personal copy of

The PA Edition

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Warminster Township, Bucks County Pa. Firefighters from Hartsville Fire Co. (Station 93) assisted Warminster Fire Department (Station 90) on Tactical Box 90-09 for an early morning dwelling fire on Feb. 25. Battalion 91 was first on scene with heavy fire from the rear of a dwelling with several close exposures. Warminster's Engine 92 laid a five inch water supply line from a fire hydrant on Date Street and led off with hand lines. Squrt 93 arrived and took the hydrant that Engine 92

JUMP TO FILE #022516105 dropped in from and sent their manpower to the scene. Everyone made it out safely and there was no reported injuries. Warminster Fire Department was assisted by Hatboro Fire Co., Horsham Fire Co., Willow Grove Fire Co. and Upper Southampton Fire Co. - JOHN ENGLAND IV

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STEVEN JOHNSON

Car flips into porch in South East Reading Reading, PA. Early in the shift on Saturday morning, Feb. 6, the Berks County Communications Center dispatched crews to an accident on Perkiomen Avenue. Companies arrived at an SUV flipped on it's side resting against a porch. The occupants were able to remove themselves from the vehicle. After checking the occupants, structural stability and a broken utility pole, crews cleared the scene. Chief Stoudt (C7) was in command.

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FRANK ROBINSON

Second alarm in Gordonville Gordonville Fire Company received multiple calls for smoke in the area on Irishtown Road during a heavy rain storm. Firefighters arrived on scene to find a working dwelling fire in a large house. Crews encountered harsh conditions with the weather and the house was set a distance from the road. Some apparatus even got stuck in the mud. Command was established and mutual aid was requested. The fire, which heavily damaged the home, was knocked down in one hour, but firefighters from many fire companies remained on the scene for several hours containing hot spots. Mutual aid responded from Intercourse, Farmersville, Ronks, Strasburg, Willow Street, Bird in Hand, Lafayette, Witmer, Kinzer and Gap Fire Companies. The cause is yet to be determined.

IRISHEYEZ PHOTOGRAPHY

Lionville Fire Company of Chester County, PA operates this 2015 Pierce Arrow XT with a 750 gallon tank and 2000 gpm pump. Unit is designated Engine 47


DEPARTMENT PROFILE

To see your photos in our “Departmnt Profile” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

YOU WON’T RUN OUT OF THINGS TO DO AT .... FIRE EXPO 2010

LANCASTER COUNTY FIREMEN’S ASSOCIATION’S 44TH ANNUAL

KEN SNYDER

These are the units of the Milroy Hose Co., Armagh Twp. in Milroy

FIRE EXPO 2016 SHOW HOURS

Lancaster County Station 80 - Columbia Borough Fire Department

TIMOTHY COOVER

FRIDAY, MAY 20 – 10 AM - 5 PM SATURDAY, MAY 21 – 10 AM - 5 PM SUNDAY, MAY 22 – 10 AM - 4 PM The Gates Will Close One Hour Prior to Closing Time

ADVANCED TICKETS $9 ARE AVAILABLE THRU MAY 1, 2015 at LCFA.COM OR BY SENDING CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO FIRE EXPO AND SELF-ADDRESS STAMPED ENVELOPE TO:

FIRE EXPO 2016 940 Village Road, Lancaster, PA 17602

717-464-3291 • Fax: 717-464-3291 Email: expo@LCFA.com Website: lcfa.com

IRISHEYEZ PHOTOGRAPHY

Close call at Cracker Barrel Restaurant

On Thursday night, February 18th, the Downingtown Fire Company was dispatched to the rear of the Cracker Barrel Restaurant for a truck fire. While enroute, Downingtown Police reported an RV well off with exposure to the building. Engine 6 (West Whiteland) was added to the call at that time. Upon the arrival of Engine 46, they dropped a five inch supply line into the scene and requested the working fire dispatch due to the exposure problem. This added units from 47 (Lionville), 38 (Thorndale) and 51 (First West Chester). Crews pulled several hand lines to attack the fire and to provide a water curtain to help protect the building. Crews also went to the roof of the restaurant and inside to check for extension, which was very minimal if any at all. Crews operated on scene for approximately two hours.

ADMISSION: Adults $9.00 Children 9 and under FREE

HOSTED BY LANCASTER COUNTY FIREMEN’S ASSOCIATION There were 366 Exhibitors Displaying Products in 488 Booth Spaces and exhibiting 217 Emergency Vehicles Last Year To Provide For Your Needs and Services

Attendance in recent years has been over 20,000

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CONNECTIONS HOUSING

1-800-262-9974 or https://resweb.passkey.com/go/2016fireexpo or 1-855-476-6976


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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

LITTLE BIG GUYS If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

FRANK ROBINSON

Slatington Fire Department runs a 2012 Ford F550/KME, towing a 2011 Polaris.

BARBARA WEST

Garage burns in Cleona FRANK ROBINSON

Irishtown Fire Company operates a 2004 Ford F250/Reading Utility Truck.

Cleona Borough, PA. Early in the morning of Sunday, February 28th, firefighters from the Annville-Cleona Fire District were dispatched to a working garage fire at 33 North Center Street. Assistant Chief Jason Weikel arrived at a fully involved two story garage. Firefighters stretched lines from Engine 581 and knocked the fire down in 15 minutes. Crews spent the remainder of the time on scene overhauling the structure. No injuries were reported. The Lebanon County Fire Marshal's Office is investigating. Units from Palmyra assisted.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

HEEROES HE ER ERO ROES RO OES ES INK INK

1st Responder Newspape er features EMERGENCY SERVICES RELA ATED TATTOOS each month in all of ourr editions.

This tattoo is in honor of Paul Mauro, Sr., my father. He was a volunteer firefighter in Hillsborough Township, NJ and is the reason why I became a volunteer firefighter. I've been a firefighter with Toms River Volunteer Fire Co. #2 for over 20 years.The work was done by Jey Collins at Daruma Tattoo in Toms River, NJ. Tom Mauro Firefighter EMT Toms River Fire Co. 2 (NJ)

Two trucks collide in Maidencreek Twp. At 8:22 a.m. on Feb. 12, Ladder 12 (Blandon Fire Co.) and Ambulance 520 (Blandon Ambulance) were alerted to the area of Allentown Pike and Evansville Rd in Maidencreek Twp for a reported tractor trailer versus an unknown other vehicle. After the initial dispatch, the assignment was quickly upgraded to possible entrapment JUMP TO FILE# adding Rescue 11 021516123 (Temple Fire Co.), Engine 32 (Walnuttown Fire Co.), and Medic 535 (Fleetwood Ambulance). Ladder 12 arrived to a tractor trailer versus a garbage truck with one male trapped in the tractor trailer. Assistant 12 took Maidencreek command and an OPS channel was assigned putting the crew off Ladder 12 quickly to work with tools to free the trapped male. Chief 12 added Rescue 32 as well 45 fire police to the assignment. Rescue 11 assisted with removing the rear of the tractor in order to gain access to remove the driver. Rescue 32 began controlling a large amount of diesel fuel and oil down on the roadway. There were no injuries in the garbage truck. The patient was extricated within 13 minutes. Once the patient was extricated, all crews began controlling the large amount of fluids that were down in the roadway. Spill 10 (Goodwill Fire Co.) was requested to assist the county spill trailer with oil dry. DEP was notified of the large

amount of fluids that were down on the roadway and possibly in the grass on the shoulder of the roadway. Elk Environmental Services completed the clean up process. Ladder 12 remained on the scene while the spill was cleaned up and the highway remained closed both Northbound and Southbound for 7 hours.

O. HELLER

Apparatus on the scene included Chief 12, Assistant 12, Assistant 12-1, Ladder 12, Car 12, FM12, Rescue 11, Engine 11-1, Rescue 32, Engine 32, Spill 10, Ambulance 520, Medic 535, and Fire Police from 33, 35, 37, 45, 55, and 85. - OWEN HELLER

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Would you like your emerge ency services related tattoo featured here?? Contact us at News@1stResponderNe ews.com

Air 24 of the Gladwyne F ire Company is a 2010 International/EVI

KEN SNYDER


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

PAGE 29

Stairs burn away in Reading blaze

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

The Chalfont Fire Company Rescue 34 is a 2015 Rosenbauer 1500/750

KEN SNYDER

Reading, PA. Shortly before lunch time on February 20th, the Berks County Communications Center began receiving phone calls reporting smoke coming from a house in the 1100 block of Green JUMP TO FILE #022116103 Street. Ladder 3 arrived at a working fire at 1164 Green Street. Smoke was observed from a two and a half story MOR. Firefighters forced entry and stretched a line through the front the basemen,t which had spread up the stairwell. Search crews found the stairs to the second floor burned away. Ladder 3's main was used to access the upper floors to continue searching for occupants. A portable ladder was also used to bridge the staircase. The fire was placed under control 30 minutes later. No injuries were reported and the Fire Marshal's Office is investigating. - JASON BATZ

TIMOTHY COOVER

Truck 642 is a 2007 Crimson 100 foot rear mount steel ladder tower. It has a 500 gallon water tank.

WILLIAM LOMNYCHUK


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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

STILL IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Still in Service� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

JEFF GOLDBERG

Firefighters participate in EVOC Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County, PA. Firefighters from the Yardley-Makefield Fire Company, Newtown Fire Association, and Warwick Fire Company participated in the driving portion of their sixteen hour EVOC-Emergency Vehicle Operators Course on Sunday, February 21, 2016. The course provides apparatus drivers with the knowledge and skills to safely operate a fire truck in emergency and non-emergency situations.

FRANK ROBINSON

Marshalls Creek Fire Company still operates a 1981 GMC/Pierce 400/2000 Pumper Tanker.

Franklin Fire Department still maintains a 1977 Mack CF 1250/500 55' Telesquirt.

FRANK ROBINSON

TOM LESZCZYNSKI

Fatal accident in Reading Reading, PA. On Wednesday, February 24th, the Berks County Communications Center dispatched a rescue assignment to Carbon and Lackawanna Streets. With companies responding in the rainy weather, Chief Moyer (C9) was advised that the occupants were not moving. Ladder 3 arrivedto a three vehicle accident with rollover. The driver of a rolled SUV was found to be deceased. Crews worked to free another injured driver from their vehicle. The occupant was taken to Reading Hospital. Firefighters remained at the scene to assist the coroner's office.

Nanty Glo Fire Department still operates a 1977 Mack CF 1000/1000.

FRANK ROBINSON


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

RICHARD BILLINGS

ANTIQUE APPARATUS

If you have photos you would like to see in our Antique Apparatus feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

ANTHONY MICCICKE

The Reading Fire Department operated this 1966 International/1948 Pirsch 100' tractor-drawn aerial as reserve Ladder 4. The rig previously ran as Ladder 3.

Apparatus and personal vehicle response safety STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

From dispatch to return to station at the conclusion of the incident, one must maintain a constant vigilance relative to a safe response, be it on apparatus or ones personal vehicle. Each year, firefighters/EMS personnel are killed in motor vehicle crashes with slightly under half of these deaths occurring while responding. I mention only deaths, but how many more were injured? How many civilian injuries and deaths? What was the loss in apparatus and operating expenses? How was the local responding departments insurance impacted? Response can be very deadly and very expensive. Responding to the scene of an emergency, whether driving your personal vehicle or driving an emergency vehicle, requires careful thought and control in order to complete a safe response. In either response mode, you are of no value if you don’t arrive safely. You may further complicate the initial response if you are involved in your own emergency and will now require assistance! The response begins with your size-up, the day of the week, time of day, weather conditions, and vehicle conditions. Is an alternate response route suggested due to prevailing conditions? Do you know where you are going? If not, find out before starting out as you will have other responsibilities and concerns, and the added anxiety that comes with not being sure of your destination will detract you from those responsibilities. When responding in your personal vehicle remember you are not an Emergency Vehicle, rather just another

vehicle sharing the road with no special privileges. You must comply with all traffic regulations whether responding to the fire station or directly to the scene of the emergency. The blue light identifies you as a volunteer member of the Fire/EMS department responding to an emergency call. If the driver in front of you is kind enough to yield the right of way, be thankful, the next one may not. Be patient, no matter how important you think you are. Responding with your personal vehicle or driving apparatus, do not pass through red traffic lights, stop signs, do not cross traffic lines or pass unsuspecting motorists, and do not exceed the speed limit. Yield at all yield signs and yield whenever the other driver fails to do so. Should there be a crash, you will be judged by what action you took to avoid the crash, even if you had the right of way. I am oft reminded of an old verse “Here lies the body of Robert Gray, He died maintaining his right of way, He is dead, just as dead, As if he had been wrong!” Reckless driving of your personal vehicle or an emergency vehicle can lead to accidents, and accidents can lead to injury and death. No matter the consequences of injury and/or death, ultimately there will be lawsuits and trials and it is always more difficult than you think to exonerate yourself in a court of law. Responding while driving an emergency vehicle includes all of the above, and requires additional considerations, skill, and proper mental attitude. Emergency apparatus drivers should be selected upon satisfactory completion of an emergency vehicle operators training program. Just because someone drives a truck for a living does not qualify him or her for a position as an emergency vehicle driver. Mental attitude is as equally important as mastering the driving

skills. Some drivers get behind the wheel of an emergency vehicle and think they “own the road,” driving to out race the speed of the siren. They are asking for trouble, an accident waiting to happen, a seat behind the steering wheel is not for them. Emergency vehicle response requires maintaining the apparatus in good mechanical condition, all equipment secured and stored properly, and warning lights and audible sounding devices operating properly. The response begins with dispatch, ensuring all personnel are onboard, in full protective gear, and all secured with seat belts, including you. A slow, cautious exit from the station, which may require personnel to stop vehicular traffic in the street and if so, stopping for them to board and fasten seat belts. Now as you begin your response with your valuable cargo, being alert and driving with caution will be your major concerns. Red warning lights must be on and you must be sounding an audible warning device to be in an Emergency Vehicle mode. Should the response not warrant “lights and siren” then, you are not considered an emergency vehicle and are required to comply with all traffic laws and regulations. When responding as an Emergency Vehicle with “lights and siren,” you may cautiously violate some traffic regulations. You may cross traffic lines and lanes, pass through red traffic signals, and exceed the posted speed limit. My recommendation is DON’T. Never exceed the speed limit while responding; should you be involved in a crash, it will be used against you. Excessive speed does not help to reduce response time; it only increases the risk for crashes, resulting in injury and death. Always stop for red traffic lights and stop signs, looking in all directions before continuing

KEN SNYDER

This 1961 Ford/American La France 750/1000 once served York Haven and is now privately owned.

KEN SNYDER

The Polish American Fire Co. of Shenandoah once ran this retired 1954 Seagrave 750 gpm pumper.

ahead. Look twice! Anticipate vehicles passing vehicles that have stopped to yield you the right of way. Be alert for children playing and their increased excitement as you pass and the potential for them to do the unexpected. Scan all sides of the street for vehicles that may be entering the roadway from residential driveways, shopping malls, etc. Almost everyone is in a hurry today with the radio blasting, preoccupied while they eat, drink, do their hair, read, talk on a cell phone or a myriad of other things. The one thing they may not be doing is paying attention to their driving, adding to your responsibilities for a safe response. Upon your safe arrival at the scene of the emergency (turn your siren and unnecessary lights off!), locate your emergency vehicle according to need, department SOP’s, or as directed by an officer. If at all possible, try not to block the road unless that is the intent. Additional apparatus/ambulances may be required and the closer to the scene they can locate, the more efficient. All apparatus should be chocked once at its

final destination. Should you have responded to the scene in your personal vehicle; park it out of the way, preferably a half-block or more away. Returning to quarters is done in full compliance with the traffic laws. No lights, no sirens, and no needless haste, with all passengers riding with their seat belts fastened. When approaching quarters you may wish to turn your warning lights on, come to a complete stop and permit personnel to disembark and control street traffic to facilitate your backing into quarters. Once the apparatus/ambulance is safely in quarters, it is time to prepare for another safe dispatch. One final subject is BACKING UP. Extreme caution and a guide are required when backing up. Never back up if it can be avoided, many fender bender type crashes occur when backing up, some resulting in injuries and deaths. Remember, whether driving for pleasure or driving an emergency vehicle, driving is a full time chore, requiring your full attention.


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PROVIDED

Montoursville rescues homeowner On Jan 27th, 2016 at 3:00 a.m., Montoursville was alerted to 199 Sechler Drive for a report of smoke in the structure. As crews were turning out, Communications upgraded the incident to a working house with the possibly of multiple occupants trapped. Chiefs 120, 220, and the engine company arrived on scene finding a split level residence with nothing evident from the exterior. As the engine company was placing multiple handlines in service, Chief 220 was advised by a neighbor that they could hear an occupant inside near the rear porch. The engine crew began searching via side A after forcing entry. Chief 220 entered from the side C porch. The engine officer and Chief

JUMP TO FILE #021016111 220 found one unconscious male inside the residence and removed him to the front yard, where EMS was awaiting. The truck company arrived shortly after the victim had been removed and began placing ground ladders and opening up. The engine company extinguished the fire inside the basement. The fire was knocked and victim removed prior to mutual aid arrival. Command at the scene was Chief 120 with Operations Chief 220. - AMBER BUBB

IN SERVICE

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BARBARA WEST

Weavers Bologna Factory fire North Lebanon Township, PA. Fire companies from North Lebanon Township were dispatched to a fire at the Weavers Bologna Factory on Saturday morning, February 6th. Firefighters arrived at the plant around 11:00 a.m. to smoke showing from a smoke house. Several hose lines were stretched to a second floor entrance to knock down the fire. The fire traveled across the roof into a connected building, which had been added during an expansion. The fire was placed under control at 12:30 p.m. One employee sustained minor injuries with no other injuries reported. The factory is owned by Godshall's Quality Meats. Firefighters from Weavertown, South Lebanon Township, Mt. Zion, Glenn Lebanon, Rural Security, Keystone Hook & Ladder, Goodwill and the Lebanon Bureau of Fire. Chief Don Steiner was in command.

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Hereford Fire Co. runs with this 2008 KME 2700 gal. tanker

TERRY RITZ

KEN SNYDER

Limerick Fire Company Engine 54 is a 2010 KME Predator 2000/750.

3906, Gettysburg Fire Department’s Rescue 1

DOUGLAS KAHN


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW? If you have photos you would like to see in our Where are they Now? feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JOANNE KITSOCK

George Kleppinger, Ron Smith and Ned Beck received the “Volunteers of the Year” award.

Schuylkill Historical Fire

FRANK ROBINSON

Society hosts 2016 members banquet Norwegian Township, Schuylkill County, PA. On March 5, 2016, the Schuylkill Historical Fire Society hosted their annual banquet at the Seltzer Fire Company social hall. Nearly 50 members were present for this year’s banquet and award ceremony. The event started off with a big welcome from the Society President Michael Kitsock. David Houseal, a fire book author and retired Harrisburg City firefighter was the guest speaker for the event. The banquet had another special guest, who was recognized by the president. Mr. Matthew Connolly of North Hampton, who is a

Seven Valleys Fire Company now runs this 2002 E-One 2250/750. The unit formally served Lenni Heights, PA

JUMP TO FILE #030616115 future US Congress race candidate spoke to the banquet guests. George Kleppinger, Ron Smith and Ned Beck received the “Volunteers of the Year” award. They were awarded for their dedication and untiring support of the organization. John Rowe won the annual Fire Extinguisher Lamp drawing. The lamp is kept by the winner for a year till the next banquet. - STEPHEN BARRETT

FRANK ROBINSON

Freeland Fire Department once ran this 1974 Seagrave 1000/750. The unit is now privately owned.

MEET OUR CORRESPONDENTS If you have photos you would like to see in our Meet our Correspondents feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

TIMOTHY COOVER

Crews arrive to find one trapped PROVIDED

While hanging at the station, Firefighter Patterson, Firefighter Soltis, and Firefighter Henne had their senior pictures taken.

On March 3rd, crews were alerted for an MVA with entrapment in Marietta Borough. Crews arrived to find one vehicle into a parked car with the car on it’s side and the driver trapped. Crews worked to stabilize both vehicles and to free the patient by making access through the roof of the vehicle to extricate the patient.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

Can Emergency Responders Find Your Home? LETTERS TO THE EDITOR If you’ve ever received a call from people coming to your home for the first time stating, “I’m on your street, but I can’t find your house,” it may be time to check and update your house numbers. If your guests can’t find your home, first responders may not be able to either during an emergency. You might not think about your house numbers on a daily basis, but making sure they’re visible can save your life. Every second counts when responding to an emergency call, and time spent trying to find your home is time wasted. Numbers should be posted near the front door, above eye level, and within a well-lit area. While spelled out or fancy numbers may look nice, they’re harder to read from the street. Stick with basic Arabic numerals, at least four inches high. Make sure the numbers contrast the paint color of the house. For example, light colored walls should have dark numbers. Avoid bronze or brass numbers, they may look nice in the store, but they’re difficult to read on any background. In addition to numbers on your house, it’s also smart to put numbers on your mailbox. Use a reflective material, which you can find at most hardware stores. If you do put numbers on your mailbox, make sure they’re on both sides. Anything you can do to make it easier for emergency responders to find your home, the better. While having your house numbers painted on the curb can also be useful, be cautious of any notices posted to your home about curb painting. It is a common scam; someone will leave a notice that your house numbers will be painted on your curb for a fee. Contact your city to see if they require curb numbers and if it is a service they provide. Some other things to keep in mind: · Make sure that your house numbers are easily seen from 150 feet · If your house is at the end of a long lane, or driveway, post house numbers near the street where cars enter your property · Numbers should be easy to see in both the day and night · Check periodically to make sure that trees, bushes or shrubbery don’t obscure your house numbers · It is not necessary to include the street name on your house or mailbox, especially if it forces a reduction in the physical size of the house numbers

May, 2016

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Chimney fire with extension in Ralpho Township

JASON BATZ

Cumru firefighters drill with rescue equipment

On Monday night, February 22, Cumru Township firefighters drilled with some rescue equipment without having a vehicle available. A "jenga" tower was constructed out of 4x4 cribbing. Firefighters practiced their skills with hydraulic tools moving the blocks up the stack. Another skill involved picking up bottles of water and to move them without breaking. Crews also worked with airbags, lifting an unstable load.

EMERGENCY AIRCRAFT

At 5:22 p.m. on March 4, Stations 290, 170 and 6-3 were alerted to a dwelling fire on Drumheller Road. Chief 290 arrived on scene to a chimney fire with JUMP TO FILE #030616110 extension. Truck 294 arrived on scene and sent one crew to the second division with a hand line and another crew to ladder the structure. Engine 174 arrived shortly thereafter and established a water supply and stretched another hand line to division two via a ladder. Crews worked to open up and found fire in the second floor outside wall and extinguished the same. Engine 6-3-1 assisted with overhaul. Shamokin Rescue 62 had the RIT assignment. The fire was knocked down quickly. Units remained on scene for two hours performing salvage and overhaul. This was the second fire of the day for the first alarm departments. - DENNIS SEROSKIE

DENNIS L SEROSKIE

If you have photos you would like to see in our Emergency Aircraft feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

J. KRIESHER

Lehigh Valley Health Network MedEvac 7 on scene for a burn victim from a fire on Grier Avenue in Barnesville.

GARY DIDAY

Fire destroys apartment complex IRISHEYEZ PHOTOGRAPHY

JeffStat 3 based out of Brandywine Hospital in Chester County, PA now operates this Eurocopter EC-130T-2

Harrisville, Butler County, PA.. Firefighters from Harrisville responded to a fully involved three tenant apartment fire on March 3 at 10:18 a.m. The apartment was located at 607 E. Mercer Street in the borough. The building was a two-story wood frame construction apartment that was being rebuilt from a fire in May 2015. Due to the lack of fire hydrants, tankers had to shuttle water three miles from the Allegheny Mineral Corp. quarry. A total of ten fire departments were called to battle the blaze, many from neighboring Mercer and Venango Counties. The state police fire marshal was called to investigate the fire.


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

May, 2016

Homeland Security CHAPLAINS CORNER Pastor Fernando Villicana

The Department of Homeland Security: Formed post 9-11 as a counterterrorism measure. Its stated goal is “to prepare for, prevent, and respond to domestic emergencies, particularly terrorism.” This is accomplished (in part) by analyzing and sharing information. This is what we’re going to do - analyze and share information from the Word of God to help prepare for, prevent and respond to domestic emergencies (marriages). Philippians 2:2 (Phillips) "Live together in harmony and love, as though you only had one mind and spirit between you." Wouldn’t that be great? If we would do this, we would all be on the same page. Our marriages would flourish. Is that even possible (harmony, love, sharing the same mind/spirit)? The answer is yes! Remember, God would never frustrate himself by asking us to do something that was impossible. Not only is it possible, but it is God’s desire for our lives and He’ll help us get there. The reality is that a lot of families are in disharmony, conflict and disappointment. A lot of people will say, "I feel cheated by my marriage." Maybe you’re like the guy who said: "When I got married, it started off ideal; a few months later it turned into an ordeal, now I'm looking for a new deal." What happened? Well, good marriages and families don't just happen! Ephesians 4:3 "Make every ef-

fort to keep the unity of the Spirit." It takes energy and effort to create/maintain Homeland Security. If you need some work when it comes to unity in your marriage, I've got some good news for you: You don't have to completely change your life around to make your marriage better. Minor changes will make major differences. 2 Keys to Homeland Security. KEY #1 COMMUNICATION Proverbs 13:17 "Reliable communication permits progress." In any emergency, the fire service’s top priority is to maintain good communication. This is why ICS is so important - a common language for all emergency responders. For progress to take place in your marriage, you've got to talk to each other too. I must be concise and reliable. OHRC - open, honest reliable communication permits progress. KEY #2 CONSIDERATION Consideration means you start thinking of “we” instead of “ me.” In an emergency it involves a good size up, getting the whole picture. In marriages it means showing common courtesy, helping each other. Ephesians 4:2 "Show your love by being helpful to each other.” How many have been told “Don’t just say you love me - show you love me” or, “talk is cheap.” We should all make an effort to show our love to each other. James 3:17 "Wisdom shows itself in being considerate." A mark of being wise is being considerate (thoughtful, kind, understanding, selfless…) The Bible says in Romans 15 “We must be considerate of the doubts and fears of others. If we do what helps them we will build them up in the Lord.” These are just two keys to many in assuring Homeland Security.

First Choice of First Responders

GUARDIAN® Safety & Survival Training Simulator U. S. Patent # 7,901,212 B2 is manufactured by Personal Protection Equipment Specialists (PPES), a full-service company specializing in meeting the needs of first responders. In addition to the patented GUARDIAN® Safety and Survival Training Simulator, PPES provides rescue and EMS equipment, service, training and certification.

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FACES OF PENNSYLVANIA’S EMERGENCY SERVICES To see your action shots in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Reading firefighters pose with retired Chief Frank Nefos before a promotional ceremony.

JASON BATZ

Cumru Township Firefighter Kevin Nelson

The Reading Fire Department welcomes a class of eight new recruits.

JASON BATZ

LT. RON BANKS

JEFF GOLDBERG

Members from Columbia, Maytown, and Wrightsville after RIT 2 training

TIMOTHY COOVER

Yardley-Makefield Fire Company Firefighter Joe Fusco in service on Upper-Makefield Fire Company Tactical Box 71-05.


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IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Ladder 45 of the Newtown Fire Association is a 2008 Pierce Velocity 105’.

KEN SNYDER

DAVE SMILEY JR.- NOZZLE NUT PHOTOGRAPHY

Working house fire in Phoenixville

IRISHEYEZ PHOTOGRAPHY

Westwood Fire Company, Chester County operates this 2006 Pierce Dash rescue/poumper designated Rescue 44

In the early morning hours of January 28, the box alarm was dispatched by Chester County Fireboard for a fire in a residential building on James Street. Upon arrival of Company 65, the working fire dispatch was dispatched and fire was found from the first and second floors. Multiple hand lines were placed in service and command ordered the evacuation tones set off about 45 minutes into the incident. Crews operated for approximately three hours before clearing. The home was a total loss.


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Where’s the Fire? Just Ask. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

JEFF GOLDBERG

Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company Line Officers getting sworn in by Langhorne Manor Borough Mayor Robert Byrne.

58th Annual Fire Company Banquet Bristol Township, Bucks County, PA. The Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company hosted its 58th Annual Fire Company Banquet at the Falls Manor Catering on New Falls Road in Bristol on Feb. 6. The 2016 Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company administrative officers are President Kurt Geiselhart, Vice President Will Simon, Financial Secretary William Meredith, Treasurer Steven Weng, Secretary Lou Ann Geiselhart, Trustee Charlie Berk, Trustee John Scheetz, Trustee Joe Taylor, Trustee Ray Hopkins, and Trustee Jerry Vacchiano. The 2016 Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company line officers are Fire Chief Frank Farry, Deputy Chief Joe Taylor, Assistant Chief Jerry Vacchiano, Battalion Chief 21 Patrick McWilliams, Battalion Chief 22 Bob Walter, Captain 21 Gary Wiley, Captain 21-2 David Kaiser, Captain 22 Kurt Geiselhart, Lieutenant 22 Mike

JUMP TO FILE #020716108 Lentine, Safety Officer Chris Gentry, and Chief Engineer Charlie Berk. The 2016 Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company fire police are Captain Larry Harvey, Lieutenant William Meredith, and Corporal Will Simon. The top responders for the Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company to 598 alarms in 2015 were 145 alarms Tom Brown, 146 alarms Gary Wiley, 173 alarms Mike Filipczak, 202 alarms Andy Filipczak, 206 alarms Patrick McWilliams, 207 alarms Jerry Vacchiano, 223 alarms Frank Farry, 227 alarms Mike Ryan, 246 alarms David Kaiser, 277 alarms Kurt Geiselhart, 298 Bob Walter, 308 alarms Riley Gillespie, 309 alarms Mike Lentine, 316 alarms Chris Gentry, 319 alarms Tim Walter, and

396 alarms Joe Taylor. Years of service awards were presented to: 5 Years John Dott and Mike Lentine. 10 Years Bryan Distler, Dave Kaiser, Dan Regan, and Andrew Silcox. 15 Year Craig Hitchen and Gary Wiley. 25 Years Frank Farry and John Ford. 35 Years Mike Brinker and Mike Burnell. 40 Years Charlie Berk, John Delp, Robert Meredith, and Ted Stoudt. 45 Years Bill Donlin. The 2015 Presidents Award was presented to Steven Weng. The 2015 Fire Chiefs Award was presented to Larry Harvey. A special plaque was presented to Woods Services in appreciation of their ongoing support to the Langhorne-Middletown Fire Company. A Special Appreciation Plaque was also presented to Joe and Rose Amato. - JEFFREY GOLDBERG

FUTURE FIRST RESPONDER If you have photos you would like to see in our Future First Responder feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

RICKY BROWN

Aiden Scott, is the son of Molly Maxwell and Eric Oberdorff. Molly is a firefighter in Hellam, and Eric volunteers at the Wrightsville Fire Dept., both in York County, PA.

Moths to the flame. There may be a bit of truth to that description of firefighters. How often do we witness fire crews charging off of first arriving fire units past residents or business owners huddled near the building entrance? Perhaps a bit more often than we realize. There can be a wealth of information available from those residents, owners and workers if we take a few seconds to ask. Simple questions that can be answered quickly can save time and effort once inside the building initiating operations. I have always tried to ask these questions when time allows and there are people near the entrance: Anyone know what’s burning? Anyone know where the fire is? (room, apartment, floor) Is this the best entrance to get to the fire? And of course, is anyone still inside? If the fire building is pushing smoke out the front door, it is often valuable to ask where the stairs to the upper floors and to the basement are located. Older homes may have many closets, whose doors resemble the basement doorway. Stairways to the second floor can be in the entrance hallway, off of the living room near the front entrance or across the room as is the case in many row homes. A little knowledge from the homeowner can save a lot of feeling your way in the smoke. (Yes, I know TICs can also make this task easier, but not every unit has a TIC and when used, they still may require a bit of “what’s behind door number 1” searching.) A late night/early morning apartment building fire in a large apartment complex brings to mind an example of how asking a simple question or two can expedite the location and attack on a fire. As we arrived on the first due engine, we encountered good smoke pushing from the eaves of sides B and D of a three story apartment building. We advanced our attack hoseline to the courtyard entrance of the building, where we found a large group of residents who had obviously hurried out of their apartments. The smoke condition in the glass fronted stairway indicated smoke on the second floor and heavier smoke on the third. Right before masking up, I asked a gentleman, who was closest to the entry steps, if he knew where the fire was. And answering as calmly as if

I had asked the time of day, he pointed to a third floor apartment and said, “yeah, right there”. Once upstairs in the hallway, a quick push on the door with a haligan confirmed his information as true. An attack on an advanced kitchen fire was started and search crews located and removed an unconscious victim. Speaking of apartment buildings, we have all at one time or another been in a hallway with the unmistakable odor of burnt food in the air and with enough smoke to tell us that someone opened their apartment door just long enough to activate the hallway smoke detectors and set off the fire alarm bells or claxons. Often times, the same resident will quickly close the door and retreat to the "safety" of that apartment knowing that they were responsible for the bells sounding and their fellow residents leaving the building. Door banging and yelling "fire department" will eventually be annoying enough for the culprit to come forward and own up to the careless cooking. Now, change the senario to asking the huddled residents outside who set off the fire alarm and quite often they will be more than happy to give you the apartment and even the name of the resident: "It's that Mr. Smith in 308...Again!” In the case of reported entrapment, relevant questions can help to sort out the validity of the report (although we always search, right?) and channel rescue efforts to the right area. A police officer asking an excited neighbor if someone is in the house will almost get a yes answer, unless the occupants are visible on the outside of the building. Who would say no, and feel responsible if a victim was found? Not your average neighbor. Likewise, a car in the driveway may be an indicator of persons inside the home. But asking if the car is normally there and/or is it what the residents normally drive may provide valuable information to the search team. "That car hasn't moved in five years". When in doubt, ask. So consider becoming a "fire detective" when you arrive at fire scenes. Think Who, Where and How. Who lives or works here? Where is the fire? How do we best access the fire? Of course, we don't interrogate people or make them feel guilty for calling us. But quick questions with quick answers may be a tool that can be added to the first arriving units tactical approach to locating, confining and extinguishing the fire. Stay Safe.


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Vehicle News

White Rose Ambulance, York PA took delivery of two Eureka Fire Company of Stewartstown operates a 2015 Castanea Fire Company operates a 2015 Spartan/ERV Ford Transits built my Marque Inc. Sutphen 2250/750 Hose Wagon. Heavy Rescue. ALAN WALLACE

FRANK ROBINSON

FRANK ROBINSON

Blain Fire Company, Blain PA took delivery of a 2016 Aquashicola Tanker 131 is a 2014 International/4-Guys Wagontown Fire Company now runs this 2015 Ford Dodge 5500/Life Line Superliner 750/2100 F350/Knapheide 50/250 Brush Truck. ALAN WALLACE

KEN SNYDER

FRANK ROBINSON

The Clinton Township Fire Company of Lycoming The Glen Richey Fire Company, Lawrence Township, The Willing Hand Hose Company of Montoursville County recently placed a 1995 Sutphen tower in serv- Clearfield County are placing an attack truck in service, placed Brush 20 in service, 2014 Ford F-550, 300 pump ice. 1994 AM General Hummer, 250 pump, 360 water and 300 tank DARIN SMITH

DARIN SMITH

DARIN SMITH

The Independent Fire Company of Jersey Shore recently The Gregg Township Fire Company in Centre County Cranberry Township EMS in Butler County has taken deplaced a 2015 Mack Granite as Tanker 3 in service, 3000 placed Tanker 720 in service, a 2015 International livery of two Demers ambulances on Mercedes-Benz gallons of water and has a 750 pump 4400/Toyne with a 300 pump, 2300 water Sprinter Chassis DARIN SMITH

DARIN SMITH

ERIC RASMUSSEN


May, 2016

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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

Structure Fires 2014, Volume 1 VIDEO REVIEW

Video reviews by John Malecky

Structure Fires, 2014, Volume 1 Alan Simmons Productions

Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, Suite 4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800522-8528 E-mail:support@firep o l i c e - e m s . c - o m www.fire-police-ems.com Price $19.95 (DVD)

This DVD is 55 minutes in length and covers three fire incidents. The first is the Colby fire, which took place in January of that year and started as a result of an illegal campfire, which spread in the morning hours during Santa Ana winds. It took six houses within the first hour and spread a great distance. This was in the area of Glendora in the Angeles National Forest.

Need I say more? It made for some spectacular fire and firefighting by the L.A. City and County Fire Departments assisted by other agencies. A show called air show took place with Canadair Super Scooper’s (air tankers), which jointed the battle. This is followed by two third alarm fires fought by Glendale and Burbank Fire Departments. Both were pretty much “surround and drown” events. The first was in a large bakery/café, which was two stories in height and the fire was throughout thebuilding. Ladder pipes and street streams operated and truck crews opened up roofs to try and check the spread. Ladder pipes and street streams also operated at a strip mall in which most of the occupancies had been compromised. Fire was through the roof in both incidents. The collection of apparatus is impressive. As I have said in the past, there is plenty of fire for everyone. It is a DVD of interest for those who want to see fire operations.

Second alarm struck in East Reading Reading, PA. On the evening of Saturday, February 19th, the Berks County Communications Center received a call from a resident at 636 South 16-1/2 Street reporting smoke filling his home. As A platoon companies were responding, a large JUMP TO FILE# column of smoke 022116102 was observed. Chief Lessar (Car 6) arrived at a two and a half MOR with smoke showing from all floors. Firefighters began a hose stretch into the home while Tower 1 setup out front. With a fast-moving, wind driven fire spreading into 632 and 636 Chief Kemery (C3), requested the second alarm. Units encountered water issues due to a water main break in East Reading. Technicians managed to divert more water to the fire scene after 20 minutes. At 2246, a floor collapse was reported, which caused all companies to switch to a defensive attack. The RIT was placed in service and request was made for an additional company. The fire was eventually placed under control four minutes after midnight. Several companies remained for another one to two hours. No injuries were reported, the Fire Marshal's Office is investigating. Firefighters from Mount Penn, Exeter and Spring Township assisted. Off-duty Reading firefighters placed reserve units in service. Companies around the city were also placed on standby. - JASON BATZ

JEREMY BICE

A second alarm was transmitted for this dwelling at 634 South 161/2 Street. After a few hours firefighters got the upper hand on this wind-driven fire.

COMMAND VEHICLES If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

TIMOTHY COOVER

Crews pop a door in Conoy Township Crews were dispatched to the 700 block of Stackstown Road in Conoy Township for a MVA with entrapment on February 7, 2016. Crews arrived to find a large debris field and one patient still trapped in one of the vehicles. Crews extracted the patient and then helped with patient care and cleaned up the roadway. Bainbridge Fire Company was assisted by Maytown/East Donegal Fire Department and Northwest EMS.

Chief 29 of the Barren Hill Fire Company is a 2004 Chevy Tahoe

KEN SNYDER


1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

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APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

COMPANY 41

One trapped for the squad on the Hill Hellam Township, PA. At 5:34 p.m. on Feb. 23, the rescue company was alerted for a reported MVA with entrapment at the intersection of Cool Creek and Mt. Pisgah roads in the first due. Chiefs 40, 41, 41-1, both rescues, and the wagon were on the street with 18 personnel in three minutes. York gave an update upon response of an off duty Lancaster County police officer on scene with confirmed entrapment. Chief 41 requested Rescue 38 (Yorkana) to be added to the assignment. Chief 41 arrived on scene toa two vehicle accident, with one patient heavily trapped beneath a dash, and four other patients out of the vehicles. Chief 41 requested additional

JUMP TO FILE #022516100 ALS, and BLS resources which was equivelent to a Mass Casualty Response. Rescue 41-1 arrived on scene and stabilized the vehicle, and performed door and roof removal, as well as pushing the dash to free the patient. Rescue 38 arrived on scene and pulled a line for safety, while crews from 21 assisted with extrication and fluid control. The patient was extricated in about 20 minutes after the arrival of Rescue 1. - ERIC OBERDORFF

FUTURE 1st RESPONDERS If you have photos you would like to see in our “Future First Responders� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

J. KRIESHER

Minersville Fire-Rescue Engine 528 pumps on the scene of a working dwelling fire on Pine Hill Street in their first due. Engine 528 is a 2012 KME pumper with a 1500 gpm pump, 1000 gallons of water and 30 gallons of foam.

Correspondent Contest Sponsored by Mid-Atlantic Rescue Systems

The readers of 1st Responder Newspaper have helped make www.1rbn.com the fastest-growing Fire/Rescue/EMS site on the web. Information comes from our valued correspondents. Each time you post an entry on our website, your name will go into a drawing for a monthly prize. Only web entries are eligible. The prize for our May editions from Mid-Atlantic Rescue Systems is one free admission to their Stabilization University class in Malaga, NJ on May 15th. Our April editions winner of a Viper Wildland Nozzle from KIMTEK was Jeff Goldberg from PA. If your company would like to provide a prize and sponsor our monthly contest, contact Heather at 845-534-7500.

TIMOTHY KNEPP

10 month old Maggie Knepp takes a moment for a photo at the twoalarm house fire in Lemoyne on March 9. She is seen with her father, Timothy Knepp, Jr., who is a second generation firefighter.


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APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Minersville Fire-Rescue Engine 528 pumps on scene of a working dwelling fire on Pine Hill Street in their first due. Engine 528 is a 2012 KME pumper with a 1500 gpm pump, 1000 gallons of water and 30 gallons of foam.

J. KRIESHER

ERIC OBERDORFF

First due fire in Hellam Township Hellam Township, PA. At 10:45 a.m., the engine company was alerted for a first due fire on the 800 block of Leiphart Lane in Hellam Twp. Chief 41, both rescues and the engine were enroute with 21 personnel in four minutes. Communications advised Chief 41 that the homeowner stated that the house was filling with smoke, with hot walls in the area of the chimney. Chief 41 arrived on scene to a two and a half story single family dwelling with smoke pushing from the eves, establishing Leiphart com-

JUMP TO FILE #022416101 mand. Engine 41 stretched a one and three quarter inch line to the attic. Crews found moderate smoke throughout the structure with fire in the attic. Engine OIC (Firefighter S. Livelsberger) reported a chimney fire with extension in the walls from Division 1 to the attic. Rescue 41-1 deployed a two inch line to side C and advanced to Division 2. Crews from

Engine 21 (Hellam) and Engine 44 (Craley) deployed the front bumper line to Division 1 in the area of the wood stove. Crews opened up interior walls and other void spaces to find hidden fire. Truck 80 (Columbia) supplied vertical ventilation. The fire was placed under control at 12:08 p.m. Special thanks to Companies 19, and 893 for transferring to the 41 house. - ERIC OBERDORFF

Hereford Fire Co. Brush 58 at a recent brush fire in Upper Hanover Township

TERRY RITZ

APPARATUS IN ACTION

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

ERIC RASMUSSEN/FIRST DUE PHOTOGRAPHY

West Deer Station 290 tanker, a 2012 Pierce/International 3000 gallon tanker assisting at a commercial structure fire in Penn Hills

DAN WADE

Reading Ladder 3 squeezes into the block to assist on a porch fire. Companies were sent to 27 South 9th when police officers were flagged down by bystanders.


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Witmer Public Safety Group announces the passing of Robert “Bob” Hlavacek

WITMER PUBLIC SAFETY GROUP

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of Robert Hlavacek, who most of you probably know as Bob. Bob passed away on March 10, 2016 after an arduous battle with Muscular Dystrophy. After graduating from West Chester University in 1989 with a B.S. in Marketing, Bob held several roles that showed his absolute passion for marketing—from acting Junior Partner and Partner of Pennsylvania-based marketing firms, to Campaign Coordinator and Business Director of Canine Partners for Life, a non-profit provider of canine service dogs for individuals with disabilities. Bob’s incredible knowledge and drive to succeed was evident in all of his conversations; he truly didn’t miss a beat. For the last ten years, Bob worked for Witmer Public Safety Group (WPSG), serving in both the Marketing Supervisor and Public Relations Specialist roles. Bob was instrumental in the growth of WPSG through his development of the Marketing Department, and the phenomenal relationships he established with our advertising partners and vendors have continued to be exemplary of

JUMP TO FILE #031116132 Bob’s level of dedication to the success of WPSG. “Bob was such an integral part of our company’s growth since he came onboard in 2005,” said WPSG Chief Executive Officer James Witmer. “He brought so much knowledge to the table, was willing to learn new things, and he pushed the boundaries of our marketing capabilities. He challenged our team to do it’s best work and helped make sure that our marketing was “Best in Class”. On top of all those things he was also a faithful friend, a compassionate listener, and a thoughtful provider of advice. We’ve missed having him around the office as his health declined and certainly his passing touches us all.” One of Bob’s biggest passions outside of his career was his ministerial work. Bob worked as a Prayer Minister after attending Elijah House, an international ministry that equips and empowers individual’s hearts to be healed and changed for fulfilled life.

In Bob’s words, “that was the beginning of me understanding why I was made, what God had wanted me for”. He also worked closely with Providence Church in West Chester, PA, where he was made an Honorary Pastor in 2014. “My role is one of encouragement,” Bob said in his 2013 YouTube Video, “A Body Made Whole”. “He’s refined in me my ability to play that role. I’ve embraced that role.” Although Bob’s Muscular Dystrophy confined him to a wheelchair in 2002, he always managed to find joy in his everyday life, and lived his life with the purpose to help others do the same. Services for Bob will be held after the Easter Holiday. In lieu of flowers, donations in Bob’s name will be accepted via Providence Church, Canine Partners for Life, and the Muscular Dystrophy Association. To watch Bob’s YouTube Video, please visit: http://bit.ly/ABodyMadeWhole - WITMER PUBLIC SAFETY GROUP

The “heart” of the matter...Is physical fitness in the forefront of your department? FIREFIGHTER FITNESS Lori Ann Hodgkinson

Each year, we review those all too familiar statistics reaffirming that the number one cause of premature death in the fire service is heart disease. It’s always alarming – yet never a surprise. Although more and more departments are implementing fitness and wellness programs, the reports continue to come in. I am thrilled with the growth of physical training that continues within the fire service. That being said, I can’t help but ask – “Are we doing enough?” I am continually met with responses like “you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make ‘em drink”. I know all the limitations legally and otherwise, that sometimes prohibit just how much we are able to require. So being my stubborn self, I just have to ask, “if we can’t make ‘em drink, maybe it’s the “leading to water” part that needs a bigger push. We need to ask ourselves, are we doing enough leading? Yes, the opportunities to get and stay fit (and well) within the fire service are more available than ever. That’s great news. Now look within your department and see what percentage of your membership is taking advantage of what’s provided.

Additionally, which sector of your department is participating in your fitness program? Are the services being utilized by those members who need it most? Conversely, is it predominantly being utilized by the healthiest and most fit individuals who would be physically active regardless of whether a department program was present? I’ve written numerous times about “no exerciser left behind”. Is your department doing all it can to reach out to those who have the greatest need? Unfortunately, it’s quite possible we have gotten caught up in the legal aspect and approached fitness as “legally we have to provide it…it’s up to each individual whether or not they choose to take advantage of it.” Hey, I get it. I truly do. Again, I am not suggesting we “mandate or make it happen”. I am, however; suggesting that we do more to present the opportunities making it as accessible and doable to all individuals at all times. Fitness is often an entity of opportunity. I have found that striking while the iron is hot is a key factor in participation and continued compliance. Often the department work I do is performed on an annual basis. Medical clearance is obtained annually, along with fitness assessment and exercise prescription. That is a great thing. It was a long time coming and I am grateful for the progress that led to its estab-

lishment. This process has reached many and the programs continue to grow. To bring this forward to reach more and more members (especially those in need) we have to do things to keep physical fitness (wellness) in the forefront all year long. We do provide fitness assessments and exercise prescriptions periodically to catch those who may have resisted or have fallen through the cracks at year’s onset. This is done at the member’s request. It certainly helps, but I believe we need to do more. Here are just a few ways that I continue to recommend in order to keep Fitness in the Forefront. UTILIZE YOUR NEWSLETTER - Add a fitness section to your newsletter. If you don’t already have a newsletter, put together some fitness facts and distribute it monthly. Remember to include information regarding how to get started in the department physical fitness program for those who are not yet participating. UTILIZE YOUR WEBSITE devote a section on your website to fitness. If possible make it interactive so that personnel have a place to go and exchange information. Again, post dates and times that fitness assessments, orientations and exercise prescriptions will be available. UTILIZE YOUR MEETINGS, CLASSES AND DRILLS - Occasionally, begin scheduled meetings with a group warm-up and stretch

or at the very least a short presentation on physical fitness and its importance in the fire service. It can be as simple as providing a single fact/statistic or tip. You already have a group assembled; make it an opportunity to get information out or a message across. Did you stir some interest? Announce how and when members can get additional training. UTILIZE YOUR BULLETIN BOARD – Post fitness tips, exercise suggestions or interesting statistics to keep fitness in the forefront of the minds of your members/personnel. You can use humor/cartoons or go the more serious route with firefighter death and injury reports. Once again I urge you to post dates and schedules of fitness activities so everyone is in the loop. PROVIDE WORKSHOPS – schedule a workshop provided by a fitness professional where members can gain fitness and wellness knowledge as well as practical experience. ORGANIZE WEEKLY GROUP WORKOUTS – schedule weekly workouts – even if it is just an outdoor walk with or without gear. PROVIDE NUTRITIONAL COUNSELING – proper nutrition is a key component to any fitness/wellness program. Schedule a session with a registered dietician to provide important usable information to help your members/personnel understand and adopt good dietary habits.

INCORPORATE SMOKING CESSATION – quitting smoking is one of the single most important steps an individual can take to avoid premature death due to cardiovascular disease. Since heart attacks are the leading cause of premature death in the fire service. Why not offer a smoking cessation program? Keeping fitness in the forefront will help to get more and more of your members in action. The desire to get fit can strike at anytime, but if members are forced to wait till the beginning of the year to get involved, they can easily lose interest before they even get started. When physical fitness is highlighted in your newsletter and on your bulletin board, it is more present among your membership. Giving physical fitness a home on your website or regular mention at your monthly meetings will keep it ever present. So, “yes we can lead a horse to water, but we can’t make ‘em drink,” but we sure can do a better job at leading and leading and leading! If it means we lose less of our firefighters, our family and our friends it is surely worth the effort. Okay, so now let’s all get going, let’s go workout, and why not bring somebody with us? Good Luck and Stay Safe! Remember to have your physician’s approval before beginning any exercise program.


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ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos you would like to see in our Antique Apparatus feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

TOM MCLAUGHLIN

Station 10 Deputy Chief Mark Slonaker, Station 10 Captain Dustin Rinehart, and Station 10 Asst. Chief Brandon DiBona along with personnel from Station 50 bring the patient up the final few yards to the top.

Hiker rescued from Chimney Rocks Trail Hollidaysburg, Blair County, PA. Phoenix Station 10 received a dispatch at 3:27 p.m. on Sunday, Feb 21, for a hiker unable to continue on the trail below Chimney Rocks Park. 1001, Chief Tony DiBona responded direct and was first to reach the hiker. He found the male fatigued and dehydrated with his vitals unstable. He radioed for EMS and rescue personnel to respond with a stokes basket. Station 20, (Duncansville) and Station 50 (Allegheny Twp) were

JUMP TO FILE #022916117 dispatched for additional manpower if needed. Rescue personnel and EMS hiked down from the other end of the trail, about 1/4 mile to where the patient was located. The steep narrow trail was muddy and slippery, so a rope was tied at the top of the trail to grab onto. After stabilizing the patient and securing him on the Stokes basket,

crews carried him back up the steep trail. Upon reaching the top of the trail, the patient was taken to a waiting ambulance and transported to the hospital. His condition was not life threatening. Approximately 30 personnel responded from the three stations. Station 10 was in command and 1003 was in command of the area from the access road to the point where the patient was brought up. - TOM MCLAUGHLIN

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Truck 80 out of Columbia Fire Department in Lancaster County

TIMOTHY COOVER

DAN WADE

The Temple Fire Company in Berks County maintains this 1944 Mack 750 gpm pumper which previously ran as their frontline engine.


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Pennsylvania

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Spartans All-in-One Boomers design lends itself to protect raised homes on the Jersey Shore with the extra reach of the waterway. Lastly, our ambulance division has been going very strong! Wheeled Coach is the largest manufacturer of ambulances with hundreds of chassis on the ground ready to go, which translates to shorter build times and the final product to you faster!

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Whether the need is a patient transport ambulance, a critical care unit, an advanced life support ambulance in the emergency medical service or a fire pumper, aerial ladder/platform, rescue truck in the fire service, First Priority has the solution. For nearly 20 years, First Priority has distinguished itself from the competition by offering vehicles that are best suited to each client's exact mission and offers both stock designs as well as fully customized emergency vehicles to suit a wide variety of budgets.

By maintaining a firm understanding of the most current automotive, emergency, safety and fuel technologies, First Priority has the ex-

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The company takes a collaborative, consultative approach to its clients' needs and identifies cost effective solutions to produce high-value vehicles, products and solutions. Robert J. Freeman, President of First Priority Emergency Vehicles, states “Across the nation, First Priority products are used daily by American heroes in their life saving

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First Priority is consistently recognized by first responders across the US and worldwide for technical innovation and functional design. We are grateful for their sacrifices and proud to partner with them by providing the tools necessary to ensure the public safety of our nation and its families.”

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APPARATUS IN ACTION

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Chambers Hill Fire Company Engine 456

TIMOTHY COOVER

Family injured in MVA in Plum Boro A family traveling at a fast rate of speed up Cox Comb Road in an SUV tried to avoid but made contact with an elderly women, who pulled into thier path from Long Wood Retirement JUMP TO FILE Village. The family #030816107 members and elderly women were severly injured and the SUV ended up on the Oakmont Country Club property. Plum Boro Police and Plum EMS responded quickly along with Logans Ferry Volunteer Fire Department and Guardian Angel ambulances. At least four patients were transported. A small child in car seat appeared to be uninjured and was comforted by a nurse from Longwood while the mother was being cared for. This stretch of road between Oakmont and Plum Boro has a very bad reputation for speeding motorists and there have been several fatal accidents in past decade including several serious accidents at this intersection. - NICK MARKOWITZ

J. LENNON

Lake Harmony's Ladder 17 in service with aerial operations, blitz fire gun, and three hand lines at Blakeslee Inn fire.

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Linglestown Fire Company Engine 35 on scene supplying some water

ERIC RASMUSSEN/FIRST DUE PHOTOGRAPHY

Swissvale 278 Truck, a 2009 Crimson/Spartan 103' quint working at the scene of a multi-alarm apartment building fire in Swissvale.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - PA

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APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JORDAN BANKERT

Jackknifed on the 30 Strip

J. KRIESHER

Minersville Engine 514 has the address of an apartment building fire that went three alarms and sent one occupant to a burn center.

Hellam Township, PA. At 6:42 p.m. on Feb. 16, the Rescue Company was dispatched for a vehicle accident with unknown injuries on Route 30 Eastbound in the area of the Penn Dot shed. Both rescues and the chief were on the street in one minute with twelve personnel. Crews arrived on scene to find a tractor trailer in the median jackknifed. Crews checked the saddle tanks for an active leak, which was torn, but not leaking. Crews remained on scene and awaited the towing company. Crews went available when the truck was removed.

J. KRIESHER

Ryan Township Engine 26-10 positioned in the driveway as the first due engine for a working house fire in their first due

NOZZLE NUT PHOTOGRAPHY

Fire rips through residential dwelling in Delaware County

On March 2nd at around 2 p.m., Companies 71, 59, 17, Medic 104-7D, Medic 100A, and RIT 23 were alerted to the unit block of Wilson Circle in Chester Heights for a residential fire, dispatched as a working fire. Upon the arrival of Engine 71, Truck 17, and Engine 59-2, multiple lines were placed in service and crews made an aggressive attack. As crews were making entry, Companies 46 and 66 were added to the assignment. The incident was placed under control in about an hour. No injuries were reported.

BARBARA WEST

Firefighters from the Annvile-Cleona Fire District work from the bucket of Truck 5 during a garage fire.


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1st Responder Pennsylvania May Edition  

1st Responder Pennsylvania May Edition