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The New Jersey Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

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FIRE & SAFETY SERVICES

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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ADVERTISER INDEX

Company Page 10-75 Emergency Lighting 65 1st Priority Vehicles 2,3,40 AAA Emergency Supply 77,113 AB Inflatables USA 87 Absolute Fire Protection 41 Air & Gas Technologies 58 Aire-Deb 95 Air Vac 911 91 American Trademark 68 All Hands Fire 9,45,75,103 Ambulance Protection Systems 131 Apparatus For Sale 128 Armor Tuff Flooring 60 Associated Auto Body 94,130 Bagole-Friedman 62 Bellmawr Collision 96 California Casualty 73 Campbell Supply 1,5,83 Choice Clean Gear 43 Choice Marketing 85 Circle D. Lights 29 Classified Page 130 Comedy Works 64 Defender Emergency 63 Elbeco 12 Emergency Equipment Sales 21 Equipment Marketers 101 ESI Equipment 97 Fail Safe 14 FDIC 109 FF1 15,31 Fit-Rite Uniform Co. 101 FireDex 17 Firefighters Equip. Co. 32 Fire Flow Services 35 Fire & Safety 1,66,67,132 Gold Leaf Fire Apparatus 20 HMA Fire 123 Hoffman Radio 102 Jersey Guys 24 Kimtek 33 Landfall Rescue 111 LEADER 59 Little Hearts Big World 74 Long Island Mega Show 55 LT’s Challenge Coins 103 Marco Equipment Sales 47 Med Logic 125 MES 27 Mid Atlantic Fire & Air 49 Montego Bay Resort 106 Morningside VFD 53 National Vol. Fire Council 129 NEIS, Inc. 130 NJ Fire Equipment 25,69,89 NJ First Aid Council 117 NJ University 71 PL Custom 13 Robbie Conley Architect 79 Safe-T 37,57,92 Spectrum Communications 42 Spotted Dog Technologies 119 Sprint 19 State Line Fire & Safety 100 Sutphen 81 Swab Wagon Co. 46 Swissphone 120 Tactical Public Safety 115 Tasc Fire Apparatus 51 Task Force Tips 7,93 The Bravest Decals 8 The David Christopher Band 107 The Fire Store 11 T-Mugs 99 Turn-Out Uniforms 121 Translite LLC., Veinlite 61 Ultra Bright Lightz 4 Valtek 22 VFIS 30 Waterway 23

CORPORATE INFORMATION

1st Responder News (ISSN 1525-1683) - New Jersey edition - Vol. 22 No. 9 - is published monthly, 12 times a year for $36 per year by Belsito Communications, Inc., 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. Periodicals Postage Paid at Newburgh, NY and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. No financial responsibility is assumed by this newspaper to publish a display, classified, or legal ad or for typographical errors except of reprinting that part of the ad which was omitted or in error. Omissions or errors must be brought to the attention of the newspaper during the A division of: s a m e month of publication.

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ROBERT POLICHT BEACHWOOD VOL FD

Training drill at old Carpet Land On Monday, August 17th, the Beachwood and Pine Beach Fire Departments along with the Beachwood First Aid Squad conducted a training drill at the old Carpet Land site at 300 Atlantic City Boulevard. The building is set to be demolished this week to make way for a new pharmacy and it afforded a unique training opportunity to both departments. Thank you to the CVS corporation and Builders Inc. for allowing us to conduct training in your building.

Allendale attends Rockland Fire Academy

On July 2nd, the Squad, Rescue, acting Truck, and two Engines from the Allendale Volunteer Fire Department in Saddle River trained at the Rockland County Fire Academy. Members worked through high heat and smoke on all of their skills including search, hose advancement, ventilation, victim removal, fire behavior, and teamwork. Crews had the opportunity to experience more realistic scenarios in the live fire training facility.


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1 Ardmore Street • New Windsor, NY 12553

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1st Responder News’ graphics team will work with you on your adverA division of: tisement free of charge. Additionally, we offer a complete marketing department for all of your printed needs. Whether they are posters, or single sheet handouts, full color or black and white, no one else delivers the high quality work at our competitive prices. As a newspaper in the Belsito Communications Inc. family, 1st Responder News has a state-of-the-art production facility which utilizes the latest scanning technology available. Materials are processed using Power Macintosh G4s. Output is handled on our HP Color LaserJet 8500 to produce this highest quality black and white or color prints on the market.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

In memory of those who gave all 1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

Idaho: Terry K. Sonner, 33 Rank: Wildland Full-Time Fire Operations Supervisor Incident Date: June 10, 2015 Death Date: June 10, 2015 Fire Department: Boise District Bureau of Land Management Initial Summary: Fire Operations Supervisor Sonner collapsed after he and his fire crew finished physical training at the Hammett Guard Station, Idaho. Fellow firefighters initiated medical treatment on scene but Sonner succumbed to a nature and cause of fatal injury still to be reported.

Wisconsin: Michael P. Miller, 45 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: June 20, 2015 Death Date: June 20, 2015 Fire Department: Green Bay Metro Fire Department Initial Summary: Lieutenant Miller was found collapsed on the floor in the fire station near his bunk in the early morning hours of June 20, 2015, and was quickly attended to by other department members who found no vitals signs present. Lieutenant Miller was pronounced deceased in the location found at 04:55AM. Lieutenant Miller was working a 24 hour shift and had responded to his last alarm, an EMS call, several hours earlier. The nature and cause of fatal injury is still to be determined.

Colorado: John Whelan, 46 Rank: Engineer Incident Date: June 28, 2015 Death Date: July 15, 2015 Fire Department: Denver Fire Department Initial Summary: On June 28, while checking for extension from a dumpster fire, Engineer Whelan was critically injured when a skylight collapsed and he fell through the roof of an abandoned building at 3860 Blake Street. Whelan was treated at the scene and transported to the hospital for medical care including several surgeries. On July 15, several days after being released from the hospital to recover at home, Engineer Whelan was taken to St. Anthony North Health Campus with shortness of breath where, less than an hour later, he passed away from medical complications. Pennsylvania: Melissa “Missy” Doll, 41 Rank: Fire Police Officer Incident Date: July 15, 2015 Death Date: July 16, 2015 Fire Department: Jefferson Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: Fire Police Officer Doll passed away from an apparent cardiac arrest on July 16 after responding to a mutual aid structure fire late the night before.

North Carolina: James Alan Hicks, 44 Rank: Captain Incident Date: July 26, 2015 Death Date: July 27, 2015 Fire Department: North Carolina Air National Guard Fire and Emergency Services Initial Summary: Captain Hicks was found unresponsive in his fire department bunkroom several hours after responding to a mutual aid structure fire at 39025 Kemp Road, Albemarle. Captain Hicks was treated by fellow firefighters and other responders but was pronounced deceased at the fire house. The nature and cause of fatal injury is still to be determined by authorities. South Carolina: Tyron Weston, 51 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: July 3, 2015 Death Date: July 26, 2015 Fire Department: Columbia Fire Department Initial Summary: Firefighter Weston fell ill while on shift on July 3, 2015. During his recovery, Firefighter Weston passed away on the morning of Sunday, July 26, 2015. The nature and cause of fatal injury are still to be determined.

California: David “Dave” Ruhl, 38 Rank: Acting Assistant District Fire Management Officer Incident Date: July 30, 2015

Death Date: July 30, 2015 Fire Department: Big Valley Ranger District of the Modoc National Forest Initial Summary: Acting Assistant District Fire Management Officer Ruhl was reported missing during the initial fire attack on the Frog Fire Wildfire in the Modoc National Forest. The Modoc County Sheriff’s Office was called for assistance in searching for the missing firefighter. Search and rescue personnel started the initial search at approximately 2000hrs and continued until about midnight when it was halted because of hazardous fire conditions. Efforts began again at 0600hrs, July 31, and continued until Captain Ruhl’s body was discovered at 0917hrs. The incident remains under investigation by local, state, and national authorities. California: Michael "Mike" Hallenbeck, 21 Rank: Fire Police Officer Incident Date: July 8, 2015 Death Date: July 8, 2015 Fire Department: U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit Initial Summary: Firefighter Hallenbeck, a member of Organized Crew 36 on the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, was struck and killed by a tree during the initial attack on the Sierra fire that broke out south of the Echo Summit mountain pass in California. A second firefighter was injured in the same incident but was treated and released from the hospital.

North Carolina: James D. “JD” Robinson, 59 Rank: Fire Chief Incident Date: August 14, 2015 Death Date: August 14, 2015 Fire Department: Brasstown Fire Department Initial Summary: While on standby at a local race track, Fire Chief Robinson told other members that he was going to take a break and rest. A short time later when members realized that he was not breathing, CPR was begun immediately and EMS was contacted. Fire Chief Robinson was treated at the scene and transported to Murphy Medical Center but succumbed to his injury; the nature and cause of which is still to be reported. North Carolina: Christopher Joe Daniels, 40 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: August 17, 2015 Death Date: August 17, 2015 Fire Department: Pine Level Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: Lieutenant Daniels arrived on shift at 0600hrs and per his normal routine ran for 30 minutes. He returned to the department's day room and was later found unresponsive at 0723hrs when members responded to a call. The nature and cause of fatal injury is still to be determined. Washington: Richard Wheeler, 31 Rank: Firefighter Washington: Andrew Zajac, 26 Rank: Firefighter

Washington: Tom Zbyszewski, 20 Rank: Firefighter

Incident Date: August 19, 2015 Death Date: August 19, 2015 Fire Department: Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest Initial Summary: Firefighter Wheeler, Firefighter Zajac, and Firefighter Zbyszewski were killed and one additional firefighter was injured when the Twisp wildfire trapped them in their apparatus on state forest land. The firefighters, members of an engine crew from the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, were involved in initial attack operations on the fire near Woods Canyon and Twisp River Roads in Washington State when their vehicle crashed and fire overtook it after winds suddenly shifted. The injured firefighter remains in the hospital in critical condition. Several other firefighters with dozer crews were also reported to have been injured. Investigation into the fatal incident continues.


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WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Ocean Grove firefighters attend engine company ops training class Members of the Ocean Grove Fire Department attended a class on engine company operations. The session was conducted off Broadway on July 23. The session was focused on use of two and a half inch hose lines and water monitors. Firefighters worked on advancing lines, teamwork, riding assignments and specifics on equipment, such as nozzle tip selection. The training was conducted by All Hands Fire Equipment & Training based in Neptune City. For details on similar training, please contact Training@AllHandsFire.com

JOSH TOMAN

NJMFPA Washington DC Fire Boat Visit Members of the New Jersey Metro Fire Photographers Association and friends visited the Washington DC fire boat during July. This is an example of the many stops visiting firehouses and friendships that are made during the annual Firehouse Expo in July which is held in Baltimore.

PETE MONACO, NJFFS

NJ Forest Fire Service wildland engine B10 operates at a major fire in Old Bridge, NJ on 11/24/13.

NJFFS crews deploy to the Pacific Northwest Trenton, NJ. A crew of 32 state firefighters headed out west on August 15, 2015 for a two week wildland fire assignment. Three type 4 wildland engines left three days earlier for the three day drive. The engines will stay on the fires as long as needed while crews will be rotated in as necessary. “Our crews have extensive experience in fighting volatile forest

JUMP TO FILE #081615100 fires, particularly in the fire-prone Pine Barrens,” said New Jersey State Firewarden Bill Edwards. “Our crews are top-notch professionals and will provide invaluable support, helping to provide some relief to firefighters who have

been working around the clock to control these wildfires.” The U.S. Forest Service will be reimbursing the state for all costs associated with the deployment of crews to the fires in the Pacific Northwest. This cooperative agreement with the U.S. Forest Service has been in place since 1985. - PETE MONACO


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A life saved that was meant to be UPS & DOWNS Notes from Ron Jeffers

On July 29th, North Hudson Firefighter Steve Alvarez's father, Manny Alvarez, 82, passed away. On July 30th, Alvarez, of Rescue Co. 1, was due to work. There was nothing he could do for his father now, and to keep his mind busy, he reported to the 43rd Street firehouse in Union City for his 24-hour tour. Firefighter Alvarez loves his job, and in the past, he has been known to show up for duty when he was scheduled for a vacation day. As 2nd Battalion Chief Mike Giacumbo indicated, it was meant to be. He helped save a life during that busy tour. Before getting a chance to have lunch, Rescue 1 operated at an all hands fire in a dwelling on the 3600-block Palisade Avenue in Union City. Later in the afternoon, they handled an overturned auto with entrapment call at 32nd St. and Kennedy Blvd., Union City. At 6:25 p.m., Rescue 1 rolled to a building struck by lightning on the 1100-block of Palisade Avenue, Union City. Most of North Hudson is located on the top of the Palisades overlooking Manhattan. Over the years, there have been many cliff rescue incidents involving people either falling or trying to commit suicide. One such location along Boulevard East in North Bergen is commonly known as “suicide bridge,” near 76th Street. Fire companies train for cliff rescue incidents. “You practice a thousand times,” said Alvarez referring to cliff rescues. Around 5 a.m., July 31st, a 16year-old girl, later known to first responders as Emily, climbed over a six-foot high fence and was in the “hang-jump position” at the top of a nearly vertical cliff with a 200-foot drop to the bottom. She became panic stricken and was unable to extricate herself from this perilous position. Patrolling North Bergen Police Officers Kevin Rodriguez and George Dabal were alerted by a passerby and responded to Emily's aid. They radioed for help and were holding the girl by her wrist when a North Hudson cliff rescue task force assignment began to arrive. The task force assignment included Engine 13, Squad 10, Ladders 3 and 4, Rescue 1, Safety 1, Battalions 3,2 and Deputy 1. Firefighters described the girl to be in a “shock syndrome.” As time was of the essence in accomplishing this rescue, Firefighter Alvarez donned a “life safety seat” device, which was tethered to Captain Ellerbrock's (Squad 10) Gemtor belt as an anchor. Acting Captain Rich Gora, of Rescue 1, was able to quickly de-

ploy “tubular webbing” around the girl, and, with the assistance of Firefighter Brian McCann, they held the girl in place. At this point, Firefighter Alvarez deployed over the fence and positioned himself behind the girl. The police officers then released their grip on the victim, allowing the rescuetask force members to get into position to complete the rescue. At this point, Firefighter Alvarez's grip on the girl was the only thing preventing her from falling. Firefighters quickly hoisted Emily over the fence to safety, followed by Firefighter Alvarez. The girl was turned over to North Bergen EMS and she was transported to Palisade Medical Center, located at the bottom of the cliffs. DOWNS: Two police officers and two firefighters were hospitalized, August 4th, after fire ripped through the Twinbrook Village apartment complex in Ocean Township. Residents of 12 apartment units were left homeless. One firefighter from West Long Branch and one from Wanamassa were transported to Monmouth Medical Center for non-life-threatening injuries. Another 15 firefighters were treated at the scene for heat exhaustion, officials said. UPS: Trenton firefighters hope city children, who visit firehouses, will soon be attracted to the new bookcases inside three firehouses, where they can check out a book to take home. The bookcases, stocked with children's books, are part of a literacy effort by city firefighters and a foundation started by local author Lisa Willever, whose husband is a city fire captain. Willever started the Nicky Fifth Foundation, named after one of her characters. Children are invited to stop by the three firehouses on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. to check out a book. The firehouses are located on South Broad St., Calhoun St. and West State St. DOWNS: A collision on the New Jersey Turnpike in East Brunswick, August 12th, left a traffic mess. Two trucks collided and ignited into a massive fireball. Fortunately, there were no serious injuries. UPS: The Voorhees Fire District will receive $15,513 in SAFER funds for safety operations. DOWNS: The driver of a dump truck that overturned and caught fire, shutting down the New Jersey Turnpike near Exit 13 in Linden, died in the August 4th crash, according to the State Police. UPS: Passaic was awarded $152,728 in Firefighter Investment Response Enhancement (FIRE) funds to purchased protective gear for 80 firefighters. DOWNS: In August, four girls were charged with arson after police say they set a series of fires at an Andover Township facility for emotionally disturbed youth. UPS: In August, Mercer County named a drill tower at the county fire academy for George F. Lenhardt, a longtime fire marshal

RON JEFFERS

North Hudson acting Captain Rich Gora, left, and Firefighter Steve Alvarez, of Rescue Co. 1, were part of a cliff rescue task force that helped save a 16-year-old girl from falling to her death.

who retired in 2014 after serving the county for 40-years. DOWNS: A Newark family of four, including two children, were in serious condition after their Bergen Avenue home caught fire on August 7th. Two firefighters also suffered minor injuries. UPS: The Garfield Fire Department was awarded a grant of $103,697 in FIRE Act funds to help purchase a compressor station and a rescue bailout system for 100 firefighters. DOWNS: Fourteen people, including a number of school-age children, were taken to area hospitals for evaluation following an August 13th school bus accident at Sanford and Springfield Avenue's, Irvington. UPS: Passaic firefighters rescued a woman from the attic of a burning Rosz Place dwelling, August 11th, while battling a four alarm fire. Arriving firefighters saw a woman leaning out of an attic window screaming for help and put up a ground ladder, and climbed to the attic to rescue her. “We had to get water between her and the fire,” Chief Patrick Trentacost Sr. said. “She was exposed to the flames. Her life definitely was in jeopardy.” DOWNS: A multi-alarm fire on Hill Place, Trenton, August 14th, ripped through several homes, seriously injuring a woman and leaving 11 homeless. A 21-year-old woman suffered burns to about 70-80 percent of her body, officials said. She was airlifted to Temple University's Burn Center in Philadelphia. UPS: Three of New Jersey forest fighting apparatus and 32 firefight-

ers were dispatched to the northwestern part of the U.S. in August to help fight wildfires. The New Jersey Forest Fire Service has been part of a cooperative agreement with other states and the U.S. Forest Fire Service since 1985. DOWNS: Pequannock Firefighter Chris Murphy, of Engine Co. 2, was operating in the attic of a burning Jacksonville Road home when steam and heat penetrated his gear, August 17th. officials said. He was transported to the burn center at St. Barnabas Medical Center, where he was treated for second and thirddegree burns on his neck and back and discharged later in the day. UPS: New firefighters in Hackensack are Nick “Fancy” Harris, Michael Cribben and Chad Vangendt. DOWNS: Firefighters battled an August 17th afternoon fire that tore through a steel building at Giordano's Recycling in Vineland during a heat wave. Emergency personnel rotated during the fire to rehydrate, officials said. UPS: Newly promoted fire captains in Bloomfield are Anthony Minervino and David Parsons. New firefighters are Jose Roman and William Todaro. DOWNS: A Paterson police source said a five-year-old boy was involved in setting a mattress fire in an apartment at 175 Godwin Ave., August 18th, and the fire spread to four other buildings. Authorities were investigating whether embers from the initial fire caused another blaze that damaged three abandoned homes on Rosa Parks Blvd. about an

hour later. Fire Captain Dave Coughlin ran into 181 Godwin Ave. twice and located and rescued a pet dog. The heat and humidity took a toll on firefighters and three were taken to the hospital. UPS: Trenton received a $14 million SAFER grant to retain 59 firefighters slated to be laid off, and $872,900 to hire five new members. DOWNS: A three-alarm fire destroyed an East Second St. dwelling in Plainfield, August 27th, and scorched two adjacent homes. Four occupants were displaced. UPS: In August, New Jersey made plans to send 30 additional members of the state's Forest Fire Service to help battle wildfires in Montana and Washington states, supplementing 32 firefighters previously sent. DOWNS: One firefighter was hospitalized and several people displaced, August 31st, when a fire raced through a three-story Amboy Avenue dwelling in Perth Amboy. Fire Chief Abraham Pitre said one firefighter was taken to the hospital with signs of heat exhaustion. UPS: The ceaseless efforts by Chester firefighters rescued a kitten trapped in a storm drain, in August. The kitten was trapped in an underground pipe on Orange Street. A firefighter grabbed a chimney brush long enough to reach the kitten, went back underground, and retrieved the animal, Fire Chief Toby Drysdale said. - CONTINUED ON PAGE 20


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ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos you would like to see in our Antique Apparatus feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

This 1965 Mack 1000/500 of the Passaic Fire Department once ran as Engine 6.

KEN SNYDER

JOHN PECORARO

Paramus Rescue 7 dedication

KEN SNYDER

The Bogota Fire Department once ran this 1981 American La France 1500/500 as Engine 1.

On Saturday, August 15th, the Paramus Rescue Squad held its dedication for their new Rescue 7, which replaced the "old" Rescue 7. The new rescue truck was built by Rescue 1. The older rescue truck was built by Saulsbury in 1990. The dedication was attended by current and past members of Paramus Rescue, the Mayor and Council as well as chiefs of the Paramus Fire Department. Following the traditional "champagne" toasting of the truck, a dedication dinner was held at the Paramus VFW hall. The wet down of the truck followed the next day.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ENTER TTO WINN!! Enter to win with the abov a http:/ ht // //ww ww2.eelbe eco. o.c .co com m/ could win a Performannce S Jacket or a Job Shirt! Offer ends September 30, 2015

EJ RODE

Bogota Police Emergency Services Youth Academy

The Bogota Police Emergency Services Youth Academy accepts 52 highly motivated applicants who seek to challenge themselves. The Youth Academy cadets experience a highly demanding environment which pushes them to perform to the maximum of their ability. It is the goal of this program to instill a renewed sense of respect, duty and loyalty in each cadet. We reach out to our cadets and show them all the different aspects of the emergency services and the military. Our academy is staffed by a team of highly trained military and law enforcement professionals including members of the Bogota Fire Department, Bogota Rescue Squad and Bogota First Aid Squad. Program Director Sergeant Craig Lynch of the Bogota Police Department started the program five years ago.

eatures:: Two conncealed-carry utility c hest pockets with magnetic closure No-pill No p fleece-lined body and collar Low profile o utility shoulder er straps Can be used as a zip-in liner iner with Shield Duty D or HiVis shellss

Job SShirt hirtt Features:

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? If you have photos you would like to see in our Where are they Now? feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Dual fleece-lined side hand war a mer pockets with internal storage pockets for o cell phone and D-ring feature for carabineer/key security Mic pockets at both shoulders and a center tab at bottom of front zipper offering mic clip and sunglasses options Pen pockets on left sleeve Roomy c hest pocket at the seam m with hook and loop dividers to accommodate a full-sized radio or a smaller object without ut it dropping to the h bottom b off the pocket *Te erms and conditions may apply. Vo o where prohibited. See oid Seee landing page for details tails.

For more informatioon, please contact TTodd odd Armstrong email: tarmstrong@elbeco.com or phone: 856-889-8765

FRANK ROBINSON

Highland Park, PA now run this 1992 Spartan/LTI 100' Tower Ladder. The unit formally served Grenloch, NJ Fire Company.


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ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

WTES

Busy night in Mount Holly

It was a busy night for Westampton Township Emergency Services on August 18th. Ladder 2725, Chief 2700, and Deputy 2701 responded to a house fire on Sunset Drive in Mount Holly. Mount Holly Fire District No. 1, Lumberton Fire Company, Hainesport Fire Company Station 391, and Eastampton Fire-Rescue Department worked to quickly extinguish the fire. Mutual aid companies in the Rancocas Valley area all working great together.

RON JEFFERS

Demarest's 1977 Mack CF 1250-gpm pumper, their 1948 Mack "L" model 750-gpm unit and former Fairview Engine 3's 1945 Mack "L" 750-gpm rig, now privately owned by Teaneck Lt. Tim Moots, lined up in front of the Demarest firehouse in August.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

WOMEN IN FIREFIGHTING If you have photos you would like to see in our Women in Firefighting feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

WESTVILLE FIRE DEPARTMENT

Single vehicle crash on 295

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Holmdel Fire & Rescue Company #2 1st Lieutenant Meike Boyle heads over for rehabilitation after operating at a house fire on Hidden Hollow Ter.

Early on the morning of August 12th, Westville Rescue Co. 738, BLS 739 and Chief 701, along with Rescue 32 and BLS 3 (Bellmawr), responded to Route 295 in the area of 26.5 Northbound for a single vehicle crash into the median. The rescue company mitigated a small highway hazard and BLS stood by, as no injuries were reported. The investigation was handled by the New Jersey Sate Police


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ROMAN ISARYK

Muster organizer Steve Jason with his collection of model firefighting apparatus on display during the show. RON JEFFERS

Real and model apparatus muster as success Mine Hill, NJ. Swarms of model fire and emergency vehicles, plus the real thing, assembled at the Route 46 firehouse on the morning of August 29th for a successful gathering. Public safety model builders and collectors filled a meeting room with miniature vehicles, as the real ones assembled in a field outside. The event was run by the Revolutionary Fraternal Order of Leather Heads of Northern New Jersey, with an accent on miniature apparatus. Mother Nature was kind to organizers with a sunny day and low humidity in between the Dog Days of August. Apparatus enthusiasts had the opportunity to photograph firefighting apparatus, both antique and modern, separately and in groups of favorites, that kept the Mack buffs happy. Tables in the meeting room were filled with models of old and new firefighting apparatus, EMS and police vehicles. It reminded old timers of the many model apparatus meetings that were held back in the 1980's and 90's after a model club called the Fire Apparatus Models Builders Association (FAMBA) was organized in an Exempt firehouse in Union City, and spread across the country. In those days, toy manufactures did not welcome producing miniature fire trucks, but times have sure changed since then. With modern technology, your personal fire truck can be made through 3-D print designers. Those versions of model apparatus were also on display. Long-time model builder Tim McCue traveled up from Virginia to fill tables with his creations. McCue authors the “In Scale” column in Fire Apparatus Journal, and is a former New Jersey resident and fire officer. Event organizer, Millburn

JUMP TO FILE #090115103 Firefighter Steve Jason, had several tables filled with his collection of beautifully accurate fire apparatus models. In addition to the model show and apparatus on the grounds, vendors were on hand offering fire apparatus themed publications, tee shirts and models. Artist Ed May was also on hand with numerous photos of his art work on fire apparatus that he has done over the years. A food vendor was also present for refreshments. Thanks to members of the New Jersey Fire Museum, Mine Hill's former 1974 PemFab/Pierce pumper, all shined up, was in attendance. Earlier in the month, this rig was transported back to New Jersey from its storage location in Circleville, N.Y., and re-located to a storage facility in Monmouth County, as progress moves on for the state museum.

At the conclusion of the day, awards were given out to to fire departments or private apparatus owners in various categories. This included: Best Modern Apparatus to Randolph Co. 2, Antique Engine to Chester, Antique Brush to Hopatcong, Special Service Unit to Chester Ambulance, Oldest in Show to Dover 1885 steamer, Judges Choice to Richard Braint's 1924 Ford “TT” hose wagon, and Best in Show to Dover's American LaFrance pumper. Organizers and participants seemed to be very satisfied with the event and have plans for an even better time next year. Organizers, including Steve Jason, Rich Mackey and their committee, plus Mine Hill Chief of Department Phil Wick and the officers and members of the MHFD deserve a lot of credit for their hard work. In addition, their appreciation was extended to the many fire departments and owners of privately owned apparatus that showed up to display their pride and joy rigs.

Vehicle in the woods with entrapment Just after 300 p.m. on August 9th, West Tuckerton and Parkertown Fire Departments were dispatched to the Garden State Parkway for a motor vehicle collision with entrapment at milemarker 60.0 northbound. Units arrived on scene and had one person still in the vehicle. NJSP shutdown the parkway, so a medevac, MONOC 1, could land. The patient was removed from the vehicle in about 20 minutes and was transported to a nearby trauma center. The cause of the accident is under investigation by NJSP.

ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos you would like to see in our features, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

- RON JEFFERS

BILL TOMPKINS, WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

RON JEFFERS

Photographers lined up apparatus for photos in a field next to the firehouse

The pride of the Maywood Fire Department, Their immaculate 1938 Ahrens Fox pumper (Formally Hackensack Engine 4) makes its annual appearance in the Maywood 4th of July Parade driven by Maywood Firefighter Roy DeYoung.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

PAGE 17


PAGE 18

October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Well involved dwelling in Mantua Township

CONSTANTINE SYPSOMOS

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FUTURE 1st RESPONDERS If you have photos you would like to see in our “Future First Responders” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Mantua Township, NJ. District 22, Ladder 28, and BLS 8265 dispatched for a dwelling fire at 33 Hollybrook Drive. Chief 2201 arrived within minutes and reported a two story single family dwelling well involved with fire showing from all divisions. Engine 2212 arrived and went into operation with a deck gun and two and a half inch hoseline. Numerous lines were placed in service as well as Ladder 28's master stream.

JUMP TO FILE #082715138 Pitman, Washington Township, and Woodbury Fire Departments assisted at this fire. The fire was placed under control around the 40 minute mark and no injuries were reported. Local and county fire marshals were on scene for the investigation. - CONSTANTINE SYPSOMOS

FACES IN ACTION

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KEITH ADDIE

Senior Correspondent Keith Addie's daughter, Jenna, shoots a video at a multiple-alarm apartment building fire on Apollo Drive in Ocean Township on August 4, 2015.

WTES

Westampton Township Emergency Services Firefighter/EMT Bryan Iannacone and Firefighter/EMT Vince Knott recording a tutorial on CPR for the Dr. Oz show.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

PAGE 19

JOHN W. CARR

Firefighter Frank Rybyinski begins to flow water on the flames.

Vineland fire displaces three Vineland, NJ. Flames heavily damaged a home shortly after 11:30 a.m. on August 2 while the occupants were out. Stations 6 and 3 were dispatched to a dwelling fire in the 1000 block of N. Mill Rd., on August 2nd. While apparatus was en-route, the Cumberland County JUMP TO FILE # 911 Center upgraded 080215107 the job to a working fire. This brought Stations 1 and 4 and Vineland EMS. Ladder Tower 6 was first-in and found a one story, wood-frame dwelling with heavy smoke showing from the rear and attic vents and fire in the rear. Ladder Tower 6’s crew stretched a one and three quarter inch line to the rear and Engine 61, arriving a short time later, laid a five inch to a nearby hydrant to supply Ladder Tower 6. The five inch was transferred to Engine 31. The flames were quickly knocked down. As additional apparatus and personnel arrived, the house was laddered, ventilated, entry was made and a second one and three quarter inch line was placed in service. Thirty-two firefighters and fiveEMS personnel responded with four engines, two ladders and two ambulances. The fire was placed under control by Chief Robert Pagnini at 12:02 p.m. No injuries were reported. The occupants, a mother and two daughters, will be staying with relatives. Prior to the fire department arrival, a neighbor opened a door and let out the family dog which was located, unharmed, a while later. There was heavy fire damage to the C side, interior and exterior, and heavy smoke damage throughout. The fire originated on the C side, but the exact point and cause are under investigation. - JOHN CARR

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PAGE 20

October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

UPS AND DOWNS CONTINUED FROM PAGE10

DOWNS: A chemistry building at Princeton University was evacuated on September 1, when a small amount of hazardous material spilled inside a laboratory, officials said. Firefighters and hazardous materials specialists from the Trenton Fire Department were on the scene assisting the Princeton Fire Department and university officers. UPS: The Kearny Fire Department received $242,710 in SAFER funds to purchase SCBA, along with $49,316 to help the department obtain new fire prevention software along with arson investigating training. DOWNS: Two occupants of a small aircraft were seriously injured, September 4th, when their plane crashed in a Cresskill recreation field just hours before youth teams were due to practice, officials said. The crash occurred two blocks from the firehouse at Regan Field. Cresskill Firefighter and EMS Supervisor Patrick Hayes was one of the first to arrive and smelled fuel. The two occupants of the plane were trapped. They were conscious and talking to the firefighter. With the odor of fuel, firefighters rushed to get the men out. The plane's left door was partially open and Hayes crawled inside, officials said. He got one man out, but had to cut the seats to get the second victim freed.

The two were placed on backboards and removed to safety. UPS: Monroe Fire District 3 received $84,120 in FEMA funds to acquire 32 sets of turnout gear. DOWNS: Long Branch firefighters answered a house fire call on Joline Ave. and found a family of four mortally wounded inside a bedroom, September 2nd, and investigators determined the incident to be a murder-suicide. UPS: The Quakertown Fire Company received a $25,641 grant awarded by Pro Access Insurance Wholesalers and Firemen's Fund Insurance Co. to acquire firefighting and rescue tools, and for fire safety education. DOWNS: Nine months after a fire that tore through an Edgewater apartment complex, fire officials are renewing calls to lawmakers and the governor to strengthen fire-safety standards for new buildings, as developers continue to submit plans for residents similar to the Edgewater structure. Some law makers have called for changes to the state building codes, but none of the bills introduced has been voted on. In August, leaders from a variety of fire organizations stood before the razed Edgewater complex and demanded action. “It's pretty clear what the problem's and what the solution is,” said Glenn Corbett, member of the Bergen County Fire Chief's Association. “It's just that

RON JEFFERS

The intensive ruins of the Avalon apartment complex in Edgewater after the multi-alarm blaze, and months later no action has been taken in Trenton to improve building codes to avoid a repeat disaster.

they don't have the political willpower in Trenton to change it.” Standing near the Avalon complex, on August 22nd, Robert Beattie, second district vice president of the

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Professional Firefighters Association of New Jersey, said the apartment “is a virtual vertical lumber yard.” He pointed out that the building could be rebuilt as before under the current code. Corbett recalled the shock that followed the multiple-alarm fire. “You would've thought we could have gotten action quickly, and we got absolutely noth-

ing,” he said. “We got nothing from Trenton from this and we're demanding that it happen now.” Referring to the problem in an August 25th editorial in “The Record,” the editorial stated “This inaction is unacceptable.” -RON JEFFERS

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Memories” feature, please upload them to our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

New Brunswick's new deputy chief's duty unit, known as Car 21, is a 2015 Chevy Suburban with custom work by Daniel Krushinski of Emergency Services Systems.

The South Vineland Fire Company used this 1952 Brockway/Great Eastern pumper.

ED LESTER

RON JEFFERS

South Amboy Chief Michael Geraltowski answers alarms with this 2014 Ford Expedition.

LOU KELTER

RON JEFFERS

Saddle Brook Chief of Department Doug Haberman responds to alarms in a 2014 Ford Expedition.

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1sT Responder Newspaper - NJ

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PAGE 24

October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Two homes damaged in Fair Lawn blaze

BILL TOMPKINS, WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

A three alarm fire that started in a shed between two homes in Fair Lawn on August 7th, quickly spread to each of them and leaving both uninhabitable. Fair Lawn firefighters were dispatched to 41-77 Rys Terrace shortly before 4:00 p.m. and on arrival found fire between the two homes, extending up the outside of each and extending into both. A second alarm, quickly followed by a third was transmitted as lies were stretched into both homes as well as lines hitting the outside fire. Members opened up and extin-

JUMP TO FILE #081015111 guished the flames, and within a half hour, only residual smoke remained and the fire was able to be placed under control. No injuries were reported. Firefighters from Hawthorne, Saddle Brook, Glen Rock, and Elmwood Park assisted at the scene while others covered the firehouses. The cause is under investigation. - BILL TOMPKINS

WTES

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

PAGE 25

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

COMMAND VEHICLES If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KEN SNYDER

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

This Chevy Tahoe serves as a incident command unit for the Newton Fire Department

Intense blaze tears through Ocean Township apartment building Ocean Township, NJ. Dozens of residents were displaced on August 4, 2015 after a fire, which appears to have started on the outside and spread to the building, tore through their apartment building, leaving the entire building a charred pile of rubble. Firefighters from Ocean Township responded around 1:15 p.m. to the Twinbrook Village Apartments at 2120 Apollo Dr. for a reported fire. When police officers arrived on scene, they found shrubs burning near the building and the flames climbing up the wood balconies toward the roof. The officers immediately starting evacuating the residents from the building as the fire was intensifying and spreading quickly. Firefighters arrived on the scene and found heavy fire in the attic area

JUMP TO FILE #080515104 which spans the entire length of the building. Several water supplies were established and master streams were set up to make an attempt to stop the flames before it consumed the entire building. Multiple elevated master streams were placed in operation around the building to douse the flames that were rapidly taking hold of the entire common attic space. Water continued to flow for hours to extinguish the fire that ultimately destroyed the entire 12 unit building. The bulk of the fire was darkened by 4:00 p.m., but excavating equipment had to be summoned to the scene to dismantle the building and allow firefighters to hit smol-

dering areas that were not easily accessible. Two first arriving police officers along with three firefighters were treated by EMS for non-life threatening injuries, including smoke inhalation. All residents were able to escape their apartments unharmed. Approximately 35 people were displaced and are being assisted by the American Red Cross to seek temporary shelter. Several mutual aid fire departments from throughout Monmouth County responded to the scene to assist and cover the township during the extended operation. The cause of the fire is being investigated, but it appears to have started in the landscape near the building.

HENRY A. STRYKER III

Monmouth County Fire Marshal's Office two 2015 Ford Explorers operated as 93-1 & 93-6

- KEITH ADDIE

@FD4D

Wantage MVA Wantage, NJ. On August 28, 2015, units from the Wantage First Aid Squad, Sussex Fire Department EMS as well as Bemerville Fire and Sussex Borough Department operated on the scene of a two vehicle crash at Lewisburg Road and Compton Friday afternoon. The two injured patients were transported to Newton Memorial Hospital. KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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PAGE 28

October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

BEACHWOOD VOL FD

Beachwood assists at landing zone

The Beachwood Fire Department assisted the Pine Beach Fire Department, Beachwood First Aid Squad, South Toms River First Aid and MONOC paramedics with a motor vehicle accident involving a motorcyclist down this afternoon, August 6th. Fire department personnel set up a landing zone at the Pine Beach Elementary School as the victim was flown to Jersey Shore Medical Center by the New Jersey State Police's South Star Helicopter. The Pine Beach Police Department is investigating the crash.

PATCHES If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Station 1 crew operating on the C side

JOHN W. CARR

Recycling/scrap yard blaze in Vineland Vineland, NJ. A stubborn, smoky fire in a building housing baled scrap paper gave firefighters a tough time on a very hot day. At 5:13 p.m., on August 17th, Stations 1 and 6, along with Vineland EMS, were dispatched to the 100 block of N. Mill Rd. for a commercial structure fire. Engine 61, commanded by Lt. Tony Saltar, was first on-scene and found medium to heavy smoke issuing from a large metal structure and blanketing Mill Road. Engine 61 went to the D side of the building and stretched a one and three quarter inch line to the interior. The building’s sprinkler system was holding the fire in-check. Acting Chief Mark Cifaloglio arrived on scene at 5:17 and called

JUMP TO FILE #081815103 for engines from Stations 4, 3 and Rosenhayn (Station 29). He also ordered an off-duty platoon recall. Station 2 covered Station 6 with E22. Ladder Tower 6 laid in with 900 feet of five inch line from a hydrant on Mill Rd. and went to the C side. Engine 11 completed the lay with another 200 feet. Engine 11 laid another 800 feet of five inch from an on-site hydrant to Engine 61. Ladder Tower 6 operated a master stream and a two and a half inch hand-line, but later attached it to a blitz-fire. Engine 61 operated

its deck gun. Fork lifts and front end loaders began removing the large bales of paper from the building and taking them to the yard for extinguishing. AC Cifaloglio placed the fire under control at 6:12, but crews remained on the scene until 10:58. Vineland EMS set up a rehab station. Thirty-seven fire and four EMS personnel responded to the job with five engines, one ladder-tower, a rescue and two ambulances. According to Assistant Chief Cifaloglio, there was no damage to the building from the blaze that originated in the bales of paper, in the center of the building. - JOHN CARR

@FD4D

Route 23 MVA in Hardyston

Westville Fire Department (the Gateway to South Jersey) in Gloucester County, NJ

WESTVILLE FIRE DEPARTMENT

Police and EMS units operated at the scene of a multi-vehicle accident that occurred late Monday afternoon, August 24th, on Route 23 in Hardyston. EMS units from Hamburg, Sparta and the County paramedics operated by Saint Clare's Hospital System responded to the scene. At least two were transported with non life threatening injuries.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Intense blaze destroys Linden firefighter recruit and family’s home Linden, NJ. A Linden firefighter recruit and his family lost everything, including their two dogs on August 1, 2015 after a devastating fire tore through their home. The Linden Fire Department responded to 222 Hayes Ave. just after 7:30 a.m. for a reported house fire after receiving a 911 call from a neighbor’s house across the street. When firefighters arrived, they found a single-family dwelling en- JUMP TO FILE # gulfed in flames 080415128 with an exposure problem on the Dside of the home. An exterior attack was initiated utilizing two 2 ½-inch hand lines due to the heavy volume of fire, which prevented firefighters from immediately entering the home. The bulk of the fire was darkened quickly on the exterior, allowing firefighters to advance additional hand lines inside to extinguish any remaining fire. All visible fire was extinguished within a half hour and declared under control shortly after. Firefighters were on scene for an extended period of time conducting overhaul on the heavily damaged home and assisting the family with possibly salvaging some belongings. The family was able to escape the burning home unharmed with just the clothes they were wearing. It is believed the two dogs that perished in the blaze alerted and saved the family when the fire started, allowing them to get out safely. The home was declared uninhabitable along with a neighboring home that sustained some damage due to the intense heat. The American Red Cross is assisting the family with seeking temporary shelter and collecting clothes and food. Mutual aid fire departments from Rahway, Elizabeth and Roselle assisted at the scene, while Cranford, Garwood and Clark covered the city during the incident. The cause of the fire is being investigated, but it appears to be accidental in nature. If you are interested in helping out the family, A GoFundMe page has been set up at http://www.gofundme.com/3u2at s-fug to accept donations. - KEITH ADDIE

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Knowlton Township responds to Route 80 truck fire

On August 20, 2015, a fully involved truck fire broke out at 7:45 a.m. sending three fire companies to Route 80 East at milemarker 6 in Warren County. Hope, Knowlton and Portland Fire Department poured foam onto the remains of the burned out cab of the truck on the right shoulder during the heart of the rush hour. One lane remained open while the road was cleaned up. The Knowlton Twp. Fire/Rescue Company responded to a working

proved to be stubborn due to the fire melting the tops off of the saddle fuel tanks. But with great cooperation, the fire was extinguished. There were no injuries reported by the driver of the truck or any of the firefighters. The Warren County Haz-Mat team, New Jersey State Police, and New Jersey Department of Transportation provided blocking and safety for the firefighters.

BOB HALBERSTADT

JUMP TO FILE #082015105 tractor trailer fire on the East bound side of Interstate 80. Engine 4163 and Tanker 4171 responded first due and requested mutual aid from the Hope Volunteer Fire Department and Portland Hook and Ladder. Hope responded with Tanker 3871 and Portland responded with Engines 3311 and 3312. The fire

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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PAGE 34

October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Iselin #9 Fire Company mourns the loss of Ex-Chief Carl S. Christensen

Iselin, NJ. Hundreds of family members, friends and firefighters gathered on September 3, 2015 to mourn the loss and celebrate the life of Iselin #9 Ex-Chief Carl S. Christensen. Carl S. Christensen, 75, of Iselin, passed away peacefully on Sunday, August 30, 2015 at home, surrounded by his family. Born in Newark, he was a lifelong resident of Iselin. Carl selflessly led a life of service. He proudly served in the US Navy from 1957-1959 aboard both the USS Prairie AD 15 and the USS Cushing. He served an additional eight years in the Navy Reserve. Locally, Carl was actively involved in the Iselin #9 Fire Company since 1961. During this time, he served in the following roles: Fire Officer in 1966, Fire Chief in 1969, joined the Board of Fire

BRIAN BENNETT

JUMP TO FILE #090815124 Commissions in 1982, and served as the Chairman of the Board since 1988. He also served as Trustee, Chaplain, and Treasurer. In Woodbridge Township, he served as an officer on the Joint Boards of Fire Commissioners, the Iselin Fireman's Relief Association, Iselin/Colonia Exempt Fireman's Association, the Woodbridge Township Fire Officers Association, and as an Executive Committeeman representing Middlesex County. Statewide, Carl was also active at the State Fireman's Home, the Exempt Fireman's Association, the Fire and Emergency Services Institute, the Volunteer Fire Chief's Association, the State Fire Chief's

Association, and the Volunteer Fireman's Association, and as the Vice President for the State Fireman's Association. Nationally, Carl served on the National Volunteer Fire Council, and the Congressional Fire Services Institute. Carl spent most of his career as a union pipefitter, and after retirement, he started a residential plumbing business. Carl often donated his services to those in need. He was also a longtime member of the First Presbyterian Church of Iselin. Carl will be remembered for his selflessness and dedication to the fire company, the community and his family. He will certainly be missed by all who have been touched by his life. - KEITH ADDIE

Iselin #9 Ex-Chief Carl S. Christensen

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DECOU HOSE COMPANY

Grant awarded to Hamilton Township

On Tuesday August 4, 2015 DeCou Hose Company, Hamilton Township Fire District #5 was awarded a grant from FM global insurance company for the amount of $2000 for fire prevention. This grant was written by Capt. Jarrett Gadsby which focuses on firefighting training, prevention, and emergency services education. The grant will be applied throughout the district and the community.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

A firefighter takes a break and cools off utilizing a hand line fog stream after working at an apartment building fire on Apollo Dr. in Ocean Township.


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EVESHAM FIRE-RESCUE

House fire for Evesham

Evesham Fire-Rescue crews tackled a house fire in the 100 Block of Weaver Drive on August 13. The fire was contained to the unit of origin with minor smoke and water damage to the neighboring townhouse. There were no injuries to firefighters or civilians and the Red Cross is assisting the family. The cause of the fire was accidental in nature due to improper use of charcoal cooking briquets the evening before.

COMMAND VEHICLES If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KEN SNYDER

Chief 42-60 of the Stillwater Area Volunteer Fire Company uses this Ford as a command vehicle

KEN SNYDER

Chief 57-60 of the Franklin Township Fire Department in Warren County uses this Dodge Durango

DAMIEN DANIS

Passerby rescues woman from Paramus house fire Two volunteer firefighters passing by a house fire in Paramus got a woman and her two pit bulls out of the house moments before it was engulfed in flames. Around 2:30 p.m. on August 14th, Paramus com- JUMP TO FILE# panies Engine 2, 081615104 Engine 4, Ladder 4 and the Rescue Squad were dispatched to 50 North Fairview Avenue for a reported structure fire. Upon arrival, numerous calls were received reporting a working fire. The woman said she was petting one of her dogs in the living room when she heard a noise from the rear of the house. The next thing she knew, flames were headed toward her. As the first fire units arrived ,they found a one and a half story private dwelling heavily involved. Heavy fire in the rear of the home had extended through to the interior. A second alarm was quickly transmitted, bringing the rest of the department to the scene, which included Engine 1, Engine 3 and Ladder 1. Lines went into operation as heavy fire took control of the rear of the house as well as the inside. A good knock down of the fire had most of the visible fire extingushed in about 15 minutes. Mutual aid from Washington Township, Rochelle Park, Oradell and Fair Lawn Fire Departments

covered empty firehouses. Teaneck Box 54 Club assisted by providing water for the firefighters. Fire Prevention Bureau and

DAMIEN DANIS

police detectives were investigating the cause of the blaze. - DAMIEN DANIS


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Life member from Evesham mourned It is with deep regret and great sorrow that Evesham Township Fire District No.1 announces the death of Member Earl Siegman. Earl passed away after a recent illness. Earl Siegman, 78, joined Marlton JUMP TO FILE# Fire Company in 082715128 May of 1966, prior to the formation of the Evesham Township Fire District. Earl was a life member of the fire department and was approaching 50 years of service. Earl began in the fire service as a firefighter and rose to the rank of Chief of the Marlton Fire Company. After Evesham Township Fire District No.1 was formed in 1968, Earl was elected to the Board of Fire Commissioners. Under Earl’s tenure on the board, the first career fire chief was hired, the Kings Grant fire station was added to the township, the Main Street firesStation and Kettle Run fire stations were rebuilt. The Marlton First Aid Squad was brought under district leadership and additional career staff were hired to supplement the volunteer staff and the growing community. Earl served on the Board of Fire Commissioners for more than twenty years and was instrumental in forming the Evesham Fire-Rescue as it is known today. During his time on the Board of Fire Commissioners, Earl also served on both the Lenape Regional School Board and Eve-

sham Township School Boards. Earl was also appointed to serve on a committee for Evesham Township that was tasked with researching if the community needed a Police Department. Earl was instrumental on this committee as well. Earl remained active in fire operations and administration after his time on the various boards. Earl served as a firefighter, lieutenant and captain at Station 225, Kettle Run, and Earl continued to serve as treasurer for the Kettle Run Fire Company,

EVESHAM FIRE-RESCUE

treasurer for the Evesham Township Fire District Relief/Exempt Association, treasurer for the Burlington County 200 Club and treasurer for the Burlington County Military Affairs Council. Earl’s commitment to pubic safety and public service was remarkable. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Siegman family and with all of his colleagues and friends with whom he so faithfully served. - EVESHAM FIRE-RESCUE

ALL IN THE FAMILY If you have photos you would like to see in our “All In The Family” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

FF1 PROFESSIONAL SAFETY SERVICES

FF1 spends a week with the Joint Base FD on trench rescue training

Between June 24th and June 30th, the Joint Base - McGuire Air Force Fire Department brought in the training team from FF1 Professional Safety Services to do some hands on trench rescue training for each of their tours. FF1 brought in trainers from across the state with extensive backgrounds in technical rescue techniques to teach awareness and operational level training. Despite the warm weather, instructors and students pushed hard to cycle several evolutions and get in as much hands on training as possible. Whether it's basic fire ground operations or technical rescue, choose FF1 for the most realistic training for your department! For more information visit us at www.FF1.com/training, call 973-940-3061 or email us at Training@FF1.com.

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Jersey City Captain Danny Dornacker, left, and his son Danny Jr., of Engine Co. 17, take a blow after working a three alarm fire on Boyd Avenue on August 5th.


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COMMAND VEHICLES If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KEN SNYDER

Chief 83-85 of the Washington Fire Department responds with a 2003 Dodge Durango

BEACHWOOD VOL FD

Pedestrian struck in Beachwood

FRANK ROBINSON

Pedricktown, Logan Twp. Fire used to respond with this 1991 Ford Crown Victoria chief’s car.

Beachwood, NJ. Personnel from Beachwood and Pine Beach Fire Departments assisted Beachwood First Aid and MONOC paramedics on the afternoon of August 3rd at the scene of a motor vehicle accident involving a pedestrian strike. The injured party had to be airlifted to Jersey Shore Medical Center by New Jersey State Police's Southstar helicopter. Beachwood Fire Department set up a landing zone operation at Birch and Surf Park. Beachwood Fire Police units also assisted at the scene with traffic control as Beachwood Police investigated the collision.


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APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

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Carteret Engine 2's 2015 Pierce pumper fed the Neptune System with over 4000-gpm during the North Brunswick ten alarm warehouse fire in July.

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Chlorine fumes injure several at Action Park Water Park On August 3, 2015, emergency units from the surrounding area including Vernon, Pochuk, Highland Lakes, Sussex and Wantage operated at the scene of reported chlorine fumes in the vicinity of Action Park, a popular water park located in Northwestern New Jersey late Monday afternoon.Approximately four people were taken to Newton MM Hospital and Saint Clare’s Sussex.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

West Long Branch Ladder 90 operating an elevated master stream at an apartment building fire on Apollo Dr. in Ocean Township.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Linden Engine 4 operating at a house fire on Hayes Ave.

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Car snaps pole in two Woodbridge Truck 6 operating at a house fire on Dunlop Dr.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Newton, NJ. On July 28, 2015, Newton Fire and EMS operated at a multi-car MVA on Mill Street near Sussex Community College. Units from the Newton Police Department, Newton Fire Department as well as the Newton Frist Aid Squad responded to the scene along with power company crews. The injuries sustained were believed not to be life threatening.


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MUTUAL AID

Crude by Rail training class

GORDON WREN

Earlier this year, one of our local fire departments was dispatched to a possible structure fire. When the fire chief signed in service, the dispatcher advised him that they received several calls reporting heavy smoke coming from what they had listed as a one-family home. When the chief got on the scene, he reported a working fire on the second floor and in the attic. He ordered the first line through the front door, utilizing the interior stairwell to get to the upper levels. As the first crew went through the front door, they found that the rooms that would normally be set up and furnished as a living room, dining room, etc., had been changed to a rooming house with multiple locked individual rooms. The same applied to the basement, second floor and attic. So instead of an occupancy consisting of a typical family unit, the firefighters faced an unusually heavy occupancy load of over two dozen people and needed to force every locked door, except for the shared kitchen and bathrooms. Our county has seen a tremendous proliferation of these illegal conversions, where absentee landlords charge $500 per month on average per single room. There are no leases, and many former one-family homes bring in well over $100,000 per year in cash. The problem with these scenarios is that many times when you look at these buildings from the street, they do not look much different from when they were legally occupied for one or two families. However, if one looks closely, there are usually signs indicating illegal conversions such as air conditioning units installed in the windows of attics, basements, garages, etc., multiple satellite dishes or cable hook-ups, entrance doors to basements where garage doors used to be, numerous vehicles parked in driveways and front lawns, several garbage pails, usually overflowing, curtains in the windows of normally non-habitable space, and numerous young men hanging out outside, particularly during the warm weather. Our local volunteer fire departments have started reaching out to civic groups, working with residents to ferret out these illegal conversions. Residents are taught what to look for and frequently will talk to other residents who are living in legal buildings located near the illegally occupied buildings. These law-biding residents are usually angry about the conditions in their neighborhood and will give valuable information regarding the illegal use and frequently the name and contact information for the illegal landlord. We then show them how to re-

port the possible violations to the proper authorities. Unfortunately, we have found in some communities, there is an appalling lack of enforcement, with almost no fines or penalties levied. With little or no deterrent, the absentee slum landlords are purchasing legal buildings and converting them as just described at a frenetic pace, placing the occupants and our firefighters in extreme danger. In next month's column, I will explain how our county government has taken strong action to provide the needed deterrent.

ROBERT POLICHT

Over the course of a week Captain R. Policht and Firefighter M. Pini traveled to Pueblo, Colorado to attend a Crude by Rail training class conducted at The Security and Emergency Response Training Center (SERTC). JUMP TO FILE# Members spent 072915107 three days learning about the anatomy of commercial railcars and the immediate dangers of crude oil as it compares to other commodities being transported today. On the third day of training members went through four vigorous incident scenarios raging from a small pool fire to multiple derailed cars with many uncontained fires. The crews had the opportunity to work with firefighters around the country including a group from San Bernardino County California, Kansas, New York State, and many more. - ROBERT POLICHT

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Where did the Volunteers go? LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Multiple alarm fire in Oakhurst

WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Multiple alarm fire in Oakhurst destroys apartment building On August 4, the Oakhurst Fire Department responded to the Twinbrook Apartments on Apollo Street for a reported fire. Upon arrival of first due units, a fire was rapidly spreading through the two story apartment building. Oakhurst firefighter aggressively attacked the fire, and called for additional alarms bringing Wanamassa Fire Company, West Long Branch, Deal, Neptune, Tin-

JUMP TO FILE #080715108 ton Falls and other agencies. The fire had extended to and engulfed the roof. Tower ladders were set up and doused the intense flames. Firefighters were on the scene into the evening. Estimates were that 40 resi-

dents were displaced from the 12unit complex. Two police officers and two firefighters were transported to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries. 15 firefighters were treated at the scene for heat exhaustion. The cause of the fire is under investigation. - DONALD COLARUSSO

WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Volunteer fire departments across the state, as well as the country, have always had issues with recruiting and retaining members, but what can be done to alleviate this growing problem? In New York State, many fire departments have some type of “Length of Service Awards Programs” (LOSAP) in place so as to give prospective members the extra incentive to join, and it also gives current membership some type of “retirement” when they hit a certain age. Other incentives in New York are through tax credits offered by the state. These current credits offer volunteer firefighters/EMS a small deduction on their income taxes, and may also give volunteers, who are homeowners, a property tax break as well. The Fire Association of the State of New York (FASNY), offers Scholarships and College Tuition Reimbursement Programs, along with many discounts from various businesses. With all of these programs available, fire departments are still finding themselves in a membership dilemma, and again, depending on where you live, it can go from bad to worse in some of the rural departments. On Long Island, fire departments can have 200-300 members on their rosters because of the population. These departments, though thriving, suffer the same daytime response issues as the rest of the departments due to work schedules and dducations. Would additional members ever solve that issue? It may help, but chances are they won't. Smaller departments, such as those in the Northern and Western parts of New York, hosting a roster of 20-100 members are no different in regards to the daytime response issues, but are struggling worse for membership. One of the biggest problems, at least in New

York State, is the training. Yes, we need to train, that's not the issue. The requirements, set forth for new interior firefighters, is a “basic training” (Firefighter I) that entails over 100 hours of training. This doesn't sound like a lot, but it is when a prospective member has a job, a family and/or an education to worry about. It's not like the “old days” when you learned as you went, most departments require that a member, wishing to be an interior firefighter, complete the course within a certain time frame. Some of these new recruits, hearing the requirements, are running for the hills! Our younger generation that used to consist of members 18-25 years old, has changed to 30-40 years old with the current membership. Without our younger generation stepping up, we will face larger issues in the near future, when the current membership has out lived it's own youthful abilities. Let's face it folks, we aren't getting any younger, and the need for “younger blood” is getting bigger as the days go on. The question of “What if a Volunteer didn't Volunteer?” might need to be changed to “What happened to all of the Volunteers?” In a 2013 report, published by NFPA, there were 1,140,750 protecting the United States. Of those, 69%, totaling 786,150, were volunteers! The volunteer fire service, being one of the largest fraternal organization in the country, has always been, and will always be, a needed asset for the communities they serve. It takes a unique dedication to fill the shoes of a volunteer firefighter. A person doesn't just wake up and decide to join, it's either been a life long dream, as it was mine, or your friends or family are involved. Either way, “probies” are very much welcomed, and very much needed. The sense of pride, of being a volunteer firefighter, cannot be explained, it has to be experienced. We need to find a way to pass on one of this country's oldest professions, dating back to 1736 when Ben Franklin became the first volunteer firefighter. - MIKE TURANO


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Atlantic Highlands First Aid helps rebuild Sandy damaged home

RICHARD HUFF

AHFAS Member Coral Wasserman works to sand repair work in a Union Beach home damaged by Superstorm Sandy as part of an AHFAS outreach effort with the St. Bernard Project.

Volunteers from the Atlantic Highlands First Aid & Safety Squad recently got their hands dirty for a good cause when they used their home repair skills to help the St. Bernard Project rebuild a Superstorm Sandy damaged residence in Union Beach. Members spent part of Saturday, August 8, sanding, applying spackle and taping sheet rock in a home that experienced flooding during Superstorm Sandy. The AHFAS was connected to the St. Bernard Project through squad member and EMT Julie Giebler, who is a SBP AmeriCorps member. “We’ve all experienced the impact of Superstorm Sandy,” said AHFAS Chief Jerry Pandolfo. “This was one small way for the members to give back. A little bit of our time went a long way in helping get a family displaced by the aftermath of the storm get back to normal living.” SBP’s mission is to ensure that disaster-impacted communities and residents recover in an efficient and predictable manner. The organization was formed in 2006 in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, following Hurricane Katrina. The St. Bernard Project launched a division in Sea Bright in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy and has been working with families in Monmouth and Ocean Counties. “As a member of the AHFAS,

JUMP TO FILE #081215103 it felt great to work on recovery efforts alongside my fellow first responders who already donate their time and life to helping others,” Giebler said. Members of the AHFAS and some of their families helped with the workload. The team, which also included a member of the AHFAS Cadet organization, worked alongside staffers of the St. Bernard Project to get the first floor of the home ready for the next stage of repair. The goal is to get the family back into the home in late September. The AHFAS is an all-volunteer EMS and rescue organization that provides around-the-clock services to the borough of Atlantic Highlands and occasionally the surrounding area. The AHFAS operates on donations from the community and the borough. For information about the AHFAS log onto www.ahfirsaid.org. For information about the SBP visit www.stbernardproject.org. “Everyone who participated in the project walked away with a new perspective on the damage done by Sandy and what still needs to be done,” Pandolfo said. - RICHARD HUFF

ROMAN ISARYK

BRIGANTINE IAFF LOCAL 2657

Three new members in Brigantine On August 5, 2015, the Brigantine Professional Firefighters IAFF Local 2657 welcomed three new members to the Brigantine Fire Department. Firefighter/EMT Steve Sooy, Firefighter/EMT Kyle Doran, and Firefighter/EMT Kyle Fitzgerald were all sworn in at thecouncil meeting surrounded by their friends and family.

JUMP TO FILE #082715122 All grew up in Brigantine, living in the community and have been members of the Brigantine Beach Patrol. Sooy, a previous Camden County police officer, Doran, a previous laborer for Brig-

antine Water and Sewer Dept., and Fitzgerald, a previous BCBP lifeguard who was recently honored with a lifesaving award, will add valuable skills and talent to our outstanding department.

- BRIGANTINE IAFF Local 2657

Bass River collision sends one to trauma center

Just before 2:00 p.m. on July 31st, New Gretna Fire Company was dispatched for an MVC on Rt. 542 with a vehicle into the woods with three people injured. 4219 arrived on location .aTwod had one person with injuries. Two others refused medical attention. Great Bay EMS and AtlantiCare medics were also dispatched and responded to the scene. After the patient was removed from the vehicle, a Medevac was requested for a fly out. West Tuckerton Fire Department handled the landing zone for the arrival of PennStar II, which then transported the patient to a nearby trauma center. The cause of the motor vehicle collision is under investigation by the NJSP.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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Flanders Fire/Rescue receives new breathing equipment, practices extrication Flanders, NJ. Flanders firefighters and emergency medical technicians on August 20th rescued resident Fred Detoro Sr. and a baby from a crashed car near Railroad Avenue. When Detoro was safely removed from the car by firefighters, who carefully protected his neck and back, Detoro ripped off the protective collar and other equipment, hopped up from the stretcher and got back in the car so the first responders could do it again. Detoro is a long-time Flanders firefighter, who volunteered to be a victim in a regular drill at the firehouse, which is along Railroad Avenue. The baby in the car was a manikin in a car seat. The drill allowed firefighters and emergency medical personnel to practice their skills at removing injured victims of car accidents, a common call in town. Later, the firefighters used hydraulic tools and saws to practice cutting the car away from trapped victims. Meanwhile, other firefighters were inside the firehouse learning to use new air packs that will allow them to work inside dangerous atmospheres, such as a smoke-filled burning home, for an extra 15 minutes and do so with additional safety features on their side. “This is a typical Thursday

JUMP TO FILE #082615103 night at the Flanders firehouse,” said Fire Chief Michael McDermott. “We are constantly honing our skills and we often introduce new equipment and procedures. Anything that lets us provide better service for residents and more safety for our members is a welcome addition.” Outside, members used hydraulic tools, saws and hand tools to remove the doors, windows and even the roof of an old car donated for just this purpose. “With cars traveling at high speeds on Route 206 and Interstate 80, motor vehicle accidents are a common call for us,” said Fire Captain Scott Faluotico. “Often, we can simply remove the victims while protecting their head, neck and back to prevent further injury. That’s what we practiced first. “Sometimes, however, cars and trucks are crushed in a way that won’t allow us to open doors or that trap victims inside,” he continued. “We can’t just yank victims out without hurting them, so we have to quickly and safely cut the vehicle away from the victim. That’s when we use our extrication skills that we also sharpened tonight.”

“Injuries from car accidents can be complex,” added Melissa Widzemok, second lieutenant in the EMS Division. “Because Flanders Fire does fire, rescue and EMS, we’re able to incorporate the necessary skills into one drill and cross-train our people.” Meanwhile, firefighters who are trained to enter burning buildings and other places that might have poisonous atmospheres are learning to use new breathing apparatus. Fire Lt. Greg Widzemok said the 15 new air packs are state-ofthe-art MSA G-1 packs. They last 15 minutes longer, are more comfortable to wear and work in and have a variety of safety features. The new packs, along with equipment to maintain them, cost about $112,000. “Working in any air pack is hard,” said Widzemok. “The new ergonomic design of the G-1 makes them easier to work in and we can stay on the job for 45 minutes instead of only 30.” All packs have lights and alarms to alert a firefighter that he or she is running out of air. Widzemok said the new packs also have lights on the pack to alert the firefighter’s partner. He said it was also easier to be understood when speaking while wearing the pack and mask. “We try to have the best equip-

ment and training for our firefighters and EMS personnel,” said Chief McDermott. “But we also constantly practice using that equipment and keeping the training fresh. That’s how we are able to best serve the residents of Mount Olive in an emergency.” McDermott added that the town pays for most of the equipment, but the fire company, through its association, must pay for some equipment and much of the training. “We always appreciate it when people donate to our fire company

DOUG FENICHEL

during our fund drives or keep us in mind for special donations,” he added. “This is where that money goes,” he said, his arm sweeping from firefighters cutting apart a car, past apparatus to two firefighters practicing with the new air packs. And, he added, anyone who wants to get involved with the fire company is welcome to do so. “We can always use new members,” he said. - DOUG FENICHEL

Artist hits 35 year mark creating Burn Foundation images This September marks the 35th year for the artist and retired New Jersey State Police Arson investigator Joseph M. Getsinger in supporting the Burn Foundation. The fundraiser this year will start on Friday, September 18 at the Fireman’s Convention in the tented area adjacent to the Wildwood Convention Center. The new image is titled, "The View" and is sponsored for the 15th year by President David Russell of Fire & Safety Services, Ltd (www.f-ss.com/ ) of South Plainfield, NJ and Pierce Manufacturing. The Burn Foundation will be raffling off a #1 Giclee Canvas print, framed and signed by the artist valued at $1,500 along with 25 signed and numbered limited edition prints valued at $60.00 each. The artist will be present at the Burn Foundation booth to help sell raffle tickets and meet their supporters. Stop by and introduce yourself and buy some raffle tickets. There will be “The View” collector pins available at the booth for a donation of $5.00. Collector card #36 will be

JUMP TO FILE #071513129 created and donated by Chip Lillie of Choice Marketing Inc., who has been creating collector cards and supporting the Burn Foundation and the artist since 2000. You can reach them at 1-800-999CHOICE or on the internet at: www.choicecustomcards.com “The View” originated from a photo shoot by the artist with the kind assistance of Chief William Kramer, Jr., Cinnaminson Fire Department members and their families. This is one of over thirty five fire related images, which have been created by the artist since 1980 when he first created, “Night Call” for the Burn Foundation. This image depicts the view of the driver from the “2nd truck in” while the first truck and crew members are simultaneously laying out line to fight the fire and rescuing occupants. This image honors all firefighters, who risk their lives during their career to save life and property, their families, who support them and the Burn Founda-

tion, who raises funds to help burn victims and burn survivors. Support the Burn Foundation by purchasing raffle tickets before the convention. If you can presell 50-100 tickets before the convention, send the artist a check made out to the ”Burn Foundation” and he will mail you your tickets that you can distribute and turn in at the convention. Tickets will be available in August 2015 through J.M. Getsinger Art Studio – PO Box 97 Woodbury Heights, NJ 08097, studio: 856-853-8039. You can also donate funds directly to: Burn Foundation - One Medical Center Boulevard, Lewis House - Upland, PA 19013. Supporting the Burn Foundation is supporting burn survivors and firefighters injured during the course of a burn or firefighting. Find out how you can support them at www.burnfoundation.org or make a contribution. Contact them at: (215) 545- 3816

JOE GETSINGER

- JOE GETSINGER

JOE GETSINGER


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TODD HOLLRITT

ROBERT POLICHT

AVFD receives grant from the Lt. Joseph P. DiBernardo Foundation The Allendale Volunteer Fire Department would like to thank the Lt. Joseph P. DiBernardo Memorial Foundation for their generous grant. The non-profit organization works alongside the Leary Firefighters Foundation and strives to train and outfit departments in need of personal life safety rope systems. The funds have been used to purchase 12 RIT system personal escape rope systems and train

JUMP TO FILE #080415105 these members on the use of this equipment. These systems will allow our firefighters to safely bailout of a structure in the event that rapidly changing fire conditions cause immediate threat to a firefighter's life safety. On August 1st, Captains Rubino, Policht, and Firefighter Pini

attended the “Train the Trainer� course, conducted by All Hands Fire, for the RIT kits so that they may better the rest of the department in the future. On Sunday, nine more members participated in the training, which will now allow them to be equipped with one of these personal escape rope systems.

Honorary Firefighter, Country Artist Kenny Chesney Kenny Chesney was presented a fire helmet from New Jersey firefighters on Saturday night, August 15th at MetLife Stadium. The "No Shoes Nation" concert, which began in the afternoon and went well into the night, was a combination of Chesney's Big Revival Tour and Aldean's Burn It Down Tour with Brantley Gilbert, Cole Swindell, and Old Dominion. Kenny proudly displayed his new Honorary front shield to the fans after it was handed up to him.

- ROBERT POLICHT

BUDDY SHOTS If you have photos you would like to see in our Buddy Shots feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

ERIC MURPHY

Far Hills-Bedminster handles another car fire

RON JEFFERS

Members of Somerville Engine Co. 1 pose with their 2000 Pierce Saber 1500-gpm pumper.

On Monday, July 27, 2015 at 8:15 p.m., the Far Hills-Bedminster Fire Department and Far Hills-Bedminster First Aid Squad were dispatched to Interstate 287 northbound for a car fire. Chief Eric Murphy arrived on scene, established command, and confirmed a fully involved car fire. Engine 29-101 arrived on scene and stretched a one and three quarter inch handline. The fire involved gasoline that had spilled onto the roadway, so

JUMP TO FILE #080315111 the on board Class B foam system on Engine 101 was used to extinguish the fire. Tanker 29 arrived and stood by with additional water. The Far Hills-Bedminster First Aid Squad responded, stood by during the firefighting operations and provided rehab. - ERIC MURPHY


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Waretown places third Smeal in service

In Ocean County, the Waretown Fire Company in Ocean Township has placed their third Smeal apparatus in service. It joins a 2004 Spartan/Smeal pumper (sold by a former dealer) and a 2012 Spartan/Smeal pumper/tanker sold by New Jersey Emergency Vehicles, who also sold this one. We gave detailed specs on this new one in our last column, but will offer major specs here. It has a Smeal Sirius chassis with a rescue pumper body design. It is powered by a Cummins ISL, 400 hp diesel engine and a Waterous CS, 1500 gpm pump, 750 gallon water tank and an 8 kw generator. The 2012 pumper/tanker has a Spartan Gladiator Classic chassis, a 200 gpm pump 2900 gallon water tank and 9.8 kw generator. The 2004 pumper has a Spartan Gladiator Classic chassis with a 2000 gpm pump, 1000 gallon water tank and a 10 kw generator. Also featured in the photos is Waretown’s Brush 3619, a 1985 x-military vehicle on an AM General 5 ton chassis. It has a brush guard, 250 gpm pump and a 1275 gallon water tank. It was converted to brush truck status by Waretown Chief Engineer Warren Sutton with assistance of other members. New Jersey Emergency Vehicles delivered to the Bradley Gardens Rescue Squad, Bridgewater Township (Somerset County) a P.L. Custom Medallion 170 ambulance on a Ford E-450 chassis and to the Pioneer Hose Company in Brick Township (Ocean County) a Spartan Metro Star/Rescue 1 heavy duty rescue with 22 foot 4 inch body. Features include a Cummins ISL 9, 450 hp diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, 28 inch extended front bumper extension, hydraulic lift up stairs, ROM compartment doors, Whelen lighting package, Harrison HydraGen, 30 kw pto generator and a Will Burt 9000 watt light tower. The First Priority Emergency Vehicles ambulance division made the following deliveries: two Braun Express Type III’s on Chevrolet G3500 chassis to Old Bridge EMS (Middlesex County), a First Priority Renaissance remount of a Ford E-450 chassis under a Wheeled Coach module to the Manchester Township First Aid & Rescue Squad (Ocean County) and a First Priority Renaissance Remount of a Chevrolet G 3500 chassis under a Braun module for Vernon Township EMS (Sussex County.) FPEV’s apparatus division reports four KME orders. In Cumberland County, Vineland will receive two pumpers on Predator Severe Service chassis. The cabs will be LFD (141.5 inches) and have six seats, a 10 inch raised roof, a driver’s side compartment between front and rear doors and a heavy duty Line-X interior finish. Other specs include a Cummins ISL 9, 450 hp diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Hale Qmax singlestage 2000 gpm pump, side mount panel, five-inch rear intake with Bray butterfly valve, four-inch LDH discharge, 2 1/.2-inch front bumper discharge, three-inch deck gun discharge Please send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH

A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

John M. Malecky

Newark Mobile Communications Unit, 2006 GMC, C7500/World Class Trucks. It has a 7.5 kw generator and was formerly with the Newark PD. John M. Malecky

Waretown E-3631, 2015 Smeal Sirius, 1500/750 with 8 kw generator. It was sold by New Jersey Emergency Vehicles.

John M. Malecky

John M. Malecky

Waretown Brush 3619, 1985 AM General, 250/1275. Converted to brush truck status by Chief Engineer Warren Sutton and other members.

Cliffside Park EMS, CPA-2, 2015 Ford E-450/Braun Chief XL. It was sold by First Priority Emergency Vehicles.

John M. Malecky

John M. Malecky

Newark E-10, 2015 E-ONE Typhoon, 1500/800. It was sold by Absolute Fire Protection. with electric TFT 18 inch Extenda-Gun, rear 2 ½-inch preconnects, 750 gallon “L” shaped water tank, 3/16 inch aluminum KME Medium Flex single-axle body, hinged aluminum doors, driver’s side full height/split depth compartments, officer’s side low side compartments with ladders mounted on side of body, low hose bed and a Harrison 6 kw hydraulic pto generator. The Pinewald Pioneer Fire Company in Berkeley Township (Ocean County) ordered a Predator Panther pumper with 138.5 inch MFD cab having six seats, a 22 inch raised roof and Heavy Duty Line-X interior finish. Specs include a Cummins ISL 9, 450 hp diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Hale Qmax, 2000 gpm pump with side mount panel, six-inch front intake through the face of the front

bumper with a Bray butterfly valve, four-inch LDH discharge, four-inch deck gun discharge and three-inch full flow rear discharge, three crosslays (two 1 ½ and one 2 ½-inch) 750 gallon water tank, 3/16 inch aluminum KME short Flex body with 29 inch compartments, brush finished ROM roll-up doors, driver’s side full height/full depth compartments, officer’s side full height/split depth compartments, ladders stored next to the water tank, on right side accessed from rear door, three hard suctions stored inside body, four multiple wheel well sleeves for 11 spare SCBA cylinders, 94 inch wide hose bed, and 6 kw Onan Hydraulic/pto generator. - CONTINUED ON PAGE 58

Clinton Rescue Squad Asap-14, 2014 Asap Medstat 500 mini ambulance. It has a powerful telescoping floodlight on the right side. It was sold by Campbell Supply Co., LLC.

John M. Malecky

Westfield L-1, 2013 Pierce Arrow XT, 1750/500/40/105 foot and a 6 kw generator. It was sold by Fire & Safety Services.


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APPARATUS OF THE MONTH A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

- CONTINUED FROM PAGE 56

Lastly, the Whitehouse Rescue Squad in Readington Township (Hunterdon County) ordered a heavy duty rescue on a Predator Panther chassis having a 148.5 inch LFD cab with six seats, 22 inch raised roof, compartment on driver’s side between front and rear doors, transverse compartment behind rear cab doors and an overhead interior EMS compartment on rear cab wall. Other specs include a 3/8 inch painted steel front bumper with reel storage and full width lid, frontal and side curtain rollover air bag protection, Cummins ISL 9, 450 hp diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, 10 FRC Spectra LED brow and scene lights, KME 3/16 aluminum four side compartment walk around rescue body, Amdor roll-up doors full length roof top compartments, four winch receivers, cribbing compartment under body, four multiple wheel well compartments for 11 spare SCBA cylinders, ground ladder storage in upper walkway, 4 reels (two each utility air and electric cord), Onan 35 kw Protec pto generator and Command Light Knight 2 light tower with six FRC Spectra light heads. Fire & Safety Services reports the following Pierce orders: For the Mar-

tinsville Fire Company in Bridgewater Township (Somerset County) a Ford F-550 mini pumper; for Scotch Plains (Union County) an Enforcer pumper; for the Elizabeth Avenue Fire Company in Franklin Township (Somerset County) an Arrow XT heavy duty rescue with walk-in/walk-around body; for Keasbey in Woodbridge Township (Middlesex County) an Enforcer pumper and for Wayne Township (Passaic County) a Velocity rear mount aluminum 100 foot platform; and for Demarest (Bergen County) an Arrow XT pumper. Pierce deliveries include an Arrow XT pumper to Clinton (Hunterdon County), a Velocity dry side tanker to Green Knoll in Bridgewater Township and an Arrow XT mid-mount 95 foot platform to North Hudson Regional Fire Rescue (Hudson County.) Emergency Equipment Sales & Service delivered the Seagrave pumper to Iselin Fire Company 1 (Woodbridge Township.) It has a Marauder II chassis, 2000 gpm Hale pump, UPF 750 gallon water tank and a Harrison 10 kw generator. Absolute Fire Protection delivered to the Ocean Fire Company in Point Pleasant Beach (Ocean County) a 50 foot mid-mount Teleboom on an EONE Quest III chassis. It has a 2000 gpm pump and a 500 gallon water

tank. Being prepped is a 100 foot rear mount platform on an E-ONE Cyclone II chassis with 2000 gpm pump and 300 gallon water tank for the Avenel Fire Company in Woodbridge Township. E-ONE orders include for Hightstown a 137 foot rear mount aerial on a Cyclone II chassis. It will have a 2000 gpm pump and 300 gallon water tank (Mercer County) and for the New Market Fire Company in Piscataway Township (Middlesex County) a Cyclone II heavy rescue with 22 foot body, light tower and HRT system. FF1 Professional Safety Services reports that two Ferrara pumpers will officially be delivered after the Wildwood convention. One is a Cinder model with 1500 gpm pump and 500 gallon water tank for East Orange in Essex County assigned to Ashland Hose, Engine 1. An aerial ladder is under construction for them as well. The other is for Emerson in Bergen County and is an Igniter MVP rescue pumper, which according to Emerson will replace a pumper, a rescue truck and a reserve pumper. It has a 2000 gpm pump and 500 gallon water tank and is assigned as Squad 28. Also in Essex County the Orange Fire Department has a Ferrara pumper and an aerial under construction.

OLD & NEW

To see your photos in in our “Old & New” feature, please upload them onour website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Paramus Rescue Squad 7's 1992 Simon-Duplex/Saulsbury unit, left, has been replaced by a 2015 Spartan/Rescue 1 model. Both rigs were used in the squad's August wetdown ceremony. EVAN WEBSTER

EVAN WEBSTER

The Clark Fire Department recently replaced this 1998 Pierce Arrow pumper with this 2015 Pierce Velocity pumper. The old Engine 1 is now designated as Engine 5.

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New Jersey company introduces Connecticut firefighters to escape systems New Jersey based company, All Hands Fire Equipment & Training, was recently in Greenwich, Connecticut providing firefighters there with an in-depth look at Firefighter Escape Systems and Class 2 harnesses. JUMP TO FILE # Participants re- 091115107 ceived full access to a variety of escape systems - different ropes, descenders, anchoring hooks and carry bags. They were able to jump on the systems and get a feel for all of the various options and functions for each. All Hands Fire is an authorized dealer and trainer for all of the leading escape systems that are available, including the Petzl EXO, Sterling F4, RIT PRESS, RPI and DEUS Rescue System. For details, contact Training@AllHandsFire.com.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? If you have photos you would like to see in our Antique Apparatus feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

Former Lyndhurst Hill Co. 3 operated this 1973 Mack 1500-gpm pumper. In later years it served as West Glocester, Rhode Island, Engine 1 and was refurbished with a Ranger body. It is now privately owned. This rig broke Lyndhurst Fire Department tradition when delivered, as American La France apparatus dominated this department. Former Engine 3 pumped for several days at Lodi's Kruger Bros. Box Co. fire in 1974.

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW? If you have photos you would like to see in our Where are they Now? feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Willingboro Volunteer Fire Co. No.1 once ran this 1985 Mack R/Swab heavy rescue. This unit is now privately owned. FRANK ROBINSON

JOHN M. MALECKY

Carteret Fire Department, EMS-4, 2008 Ford E/Medtec ambulance formerly saw service with the now defunct Linden EMS.

Jackson Mills Rescue 5403 was a donation. It is used as a water/ice rescue truck and is a 1985 GMC 7000/Swab with 20 kw generator. It formerly saw service with the Woodbridge Ambulance & Rescue Squad and Iselin First Aid Squad.

JOHN M. MALECKY

RON JEFFERS

Former Morristown Municipal Airport's 1996 Walter 1000gpm/1500-gwt/180-gft CFR is now part of the outdoor vehicle display at the Aviation Hall of Fame in Teterboro.


October, 2015

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Laugh your way to the bank with a stand-up comedy fund-raiser

ROBBINSVILLE TWP FD

Water spray cool down

The Robbinsville Township Fire Department provided a water spray cool down on a hot 91 degree day, August 14, 2015 on the field at Pond Road Middle School. Approximately 200 children were in attendance at Robbinsville Recreation Department's last day of Summer Camp 2015.

BOB HALBERSTADT

Truck rollover knocks out power Hope, NJ. A northbound box truck knocked down a JCP and L utility pole on State Highway 519 near Jenny Jump Road in Hope Township, Warren County. The accident cut power to area residents for several hours on Monday afternoon, August 17th. Hope Volunteer Fire Department and Blairstown EMS were dispatched to the scene. A passing firefighter from Greene Township/Hope Fire Department helped the driver out of his vehicle while sparking wires set the branches on fire.

Who needs to laugh more than the Fire Companies ---the first responders who deal with dangerous circumstances each and every day? There’s an innovative concept for fund-raising developed by Joey Novick, who is a stand-up comedian and the Fire Commissioner in his hometown: Stand-up comedy shows. Fire companies can get much-needed laughs and profit financially as well. Novick's company, ComedyWorks, provides all-star headline comedians from HBO, Comedy Central, Showtime, Last Comic Standing, and the Tonight Show. Novick’s been producing comedy shows since 1977, and has experience producing shows with such comedians as Jerry Seinfeld, Rosie O’Donnell, Larry The Cable Guy, and Tim Allen. "The comedians were very funny, and very professional," wrote Mark Bruhmuller, Fire Chief of the Churchtown Fire Company of New York. “Joey Novick did an excellent job. Everybody loves to laugh, and it's a great deal of fun." ComedyWorks produces more than 300 shows a year, almost 150 of those for emergency service organizations. The money these shows can

VENDOR TIDBITS Notes from the emergency service business community

raise varies, depending on things like the number of tickets sold, how they're priced, the amount spent on promotion and whether food and drink are available. "Mostly companies produce shows in their own facilities, which may hold 300–400 people," says Novick. "We'll put together a show for them that will bring in comedians from major comedy clubs, with a headliner from HBO, Comedy Central, or the Tonight Show. The feature performer will be someone who's headlined the comedy circuit: Catch a Rising Star, the Improv, the Comedy Store. The host of the show will be a comedian who's very high-energy, like a gameshow host, to get the audience warmed up. A triple headliner show!” The Somerset Fire Company of New Jersey produces two fundraisers a year through ComedyWorks. "We've done about ten shows so far, and it's been great," says Mike Rein-

beck, who coordinates the shows for the 65-member volunteer department. "A friend of mine who had used Joey told me, 'This guy books really good acts.' So, we did the first show, everything was great, and we've been doing shows with Joey ever since." "I find their people to be very funny," agrees Adam Hubney, chief of the Atlantic Highlands Volunteer Fire Department in New Jersey, which books comedians through ComedyWorks for its annual dinner. "We have a professional comedy club in our county, and the quality is just as good." Comedy Works provides a 30-page ‘How-To’ guide that assists organizations through the comedy show production and warns of mistakes to avoid. "We make sure they follow everything in the guide," says Novick. "If a company has never done this before, it gives you everything from you need to know. We make sure that things get done right. Clients who follow the guide always do very well and tend to make money.” For information on Comedy Works, call 1 (888) 782-4589, go to www.comedyworks.org or e-mail joeynovick@earthlink.net.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

RICHARD HUFF

NJ EMS Task Force to host 2nd Annual Emergency Preparedness Expo The New Jersey EMS Task Force will host the 2nd annual Emergency Preparedness Expo for members of the healthcare, longterm care, EMS, fire and police communities on October 6, 2015 at the Meadowlands Exposition Center in Secaucus. “The team is putting together an impressive day-long program,” said NJ EMS Task Force Chairman John Grembowiec, Sr. “Our goal is to show everyone from the healthcare provider communities, long-term care and all first-responder organizations what the NJ EMS Task Force can do to help in planning for, and responding to, man-made and natural disasters, as well as preplanned events.” The event will feature displays and demonstrations of Task Force assets, dynamic learning sessions using real-life incidents, classes and chances to network for EMS, healthcare, hospital, emergency management, police and fire professionals. This year’s NJ EMS Task Force Emergency Preparedness will showcase the multiple response and planning capabilities of the Task Force for statewide constituents and others. The NJ EMS Task Force was

JUMP TO FILE #073015106 formed in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The organization consists of more than 200 volunteer and career EMS professionals, who respond to man-made and natural large-scale events using a variety of response units strategically placed throughout the state for maximum impact. The NJ EMS Task Force has been a key component in the response providing staff and assets to such incidents as Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene, wildfires in southern New Jersey, nursing home evacuations, and at events such as Warped Tour, Bamboozle, and the New Jersey Marathon. Registration for the NJ EMS Task Force Emergency Preparedness Conference is free by logging onto http://bit.do/nj-ems-tf-expo. CEUs will be available. The event will get underway at 8 a.m. Lunch will be provided. “This will be a great way for folks to learn about what the Task Force can do,” said Grembowiec. - RICHARD HUFF

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

KEN SNYDER

Ladder 101 in Roxbury is a 1999 American La France Metropolitan 1500/400/75’.


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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Risk, Possibility, and Probability STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

The following article was first published in 2006 and has been revised and updated as I discuss risk in the next few columns. It was April, 2006 when a midwest fire department responded to a controlled burn that had gotten out of control and spread to adjacent brush. During the operations at the fire, one of the apparatus became stuck in soft ground. In order to free the mired apparatus, a tractor was employed to do the pulling and a driver needed to steer the fire apparatus. During the towing operation, according to reports, the clevis connection failed and the tow rope/cable whipped back through the windshield striking the firefighter steering the apparatus in the forehead. He was flown to the nearest trauma center, where he underwent brain surgery. The firefighter passed away as a result of his injuries a few days later. Over the years, the word risk has become a common word in the field of firefighter safety. We risk a lot to save a lot, and we risk little to save little. Of course the risk that we are talking about is one’s life. How much jeopardy (risk) shall we place upon our life in order to accomplish a specific task or function? When we speak of risk, isn’t there risk in our everyday lives as well? The potential to fall in the shower, get hit by a car, be involved in a motor vehicle accident, having something fall on us, or just simply trip and fall injuring ourselves. What about the folks in our great country who live in areas devastated by a multitude of other possibilities like tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes? Do we lock ourselves at home only to have the ceiling fall on us? Do we pack our bags and move? The answer to both questions, of course not! We go about our daily routine with very little thought given to the aforementioned risks as life goes on. We base our rationale on possibility versus probability. There are those who have the sky falling, as everything is possible, but the folks who crunch numbers based on past experience talk in probabilities. Like what was the probability of that clevis failing? It is the real world we operate in and therefore we must, when making a risk assessment, consider probability over possibility.

Doing so does not negate a review of all the risk factors that may be encountered on scene and consideration given to both possibility and probability. The proper risk analysis requires one to eliminate any life hazard whenever and wherever possible, or to reduce the risk hazard by altering the plan of operations whenever the hazard cannot be eliminated, and in this case visually checking the tow rope/cable and related equipment. The American Heritage Dictionary defines Probability as a number expressing the likelihood that a specific event will occur, expressed as the ratio of the number of actual occurrences to the number of possible occurrences. It defines Possibility as the fact or state of being possible, something that is possible; and it defines Accident as an unexpected and undesirable event, especially one resulting in damage or harm: car accidents on icy roads. Risk is defined as a factor, thing, element, or course involving uncertain danger. Could one have planned for such an incident? The possibility of the tow rope or cable may have been a passing thought for most on scene personnel. How old was the cable or rope? Was it inspected prior to use? It would still have to penetrate the windshield, which was acting as a simple protective barrier, but whoever would think it would or could happen. How about your operations at motor vehicle incidents? Do you clear the immediate area of all personnel whenever the tow truck hooks up to a disabled vehicle? What is the reliability and dependability of the tow cable? Who certifies the operator of the tow vehicle? Many questions to which I don’t have the answers, but all pose the potential of risk should the cable snap and how much thought do we give to that occurring? Do we continue to second guess ourselves about every detail after making a decision, if we do, nothing will be accomplished? There is only so much that we can prepare for without becoming paranoid. If we believe that everything can and will go wrong, there will be little need for us to leave the fire station. We do our best to be prepared and sometimes, despite all our efforts, things just don't go the way we had anticipated. In this incident, I believe accident is the correct word, what occurred was just an accident; unfortunately it claimed the life of a firefighter. Till Next Time, Stay Safe and God Bless!

LITTLE BIG GUYS

If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JOHN M. MALECKY

The Little Big Guys this month is Utility 2904 of the Silverton Fire Company in Toms River Township. It is used as an air supply and rehab unit and is a 2004 Ford F-550 with an E-ONE body. Features include a food supply, a misting fans, two cylinder air cascade system, three SCBA units with spare cylinders an awning on the body, a Will Burt Night Scan and two portable generators one of which powers the Night Scan.

Right rear view of Silverton's Utility 2904.

JOHN M. MALECKY

30 Years Being a Volunteer Firefighter in Wildwood... Home of the NJ State Convention!


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JAMES BESSEMER WWW.NJFIREFIGHTING.COM

Allamuchy and Green conduct roof ventilation drill Firefighters from Allamuchy and Green practiced roof ventilation, utilizing a roof prop provided by FF1. More images from the drill can be found at www.AllamuchyFire.com

WILLINGBORO FIRE DEPARTMENT

Spending the day training On Wednesday, August 12th, the cadets from the Willingboro Fire Department spent the entire day at the BCESTC. Training consisted of simulated fires in a single family dwelling with reported victims trapped, the smoke house maze, and simulated fires in high-rise buildings.

DAMIEN DANIS

Garages destroyed at Avalon in Wood-Ridge Firefighters made quick work of a blaze in Wood-Ridge that destroyed four garages at the Avalon development the evening of August 14th. Firefighters arrived just after 7 JUMP TO FILE# p.m. to find a row 081515106 of four garages behind Building 4 heavily involved. Chief Ron Philips Jr. struck the second alarm bringing mutual aid to the scene. Engine 902 arrived and stretched a handline and a blitz fire mini gun to go into operation. Hasbrouck Heights Engine 616 operated an exposure line between the garages and the main building. A crew from 905 also operated a handline on the garage. A Little Ferry engine was sent to the neighboring Curtis Wright complex to check for any brush or rubbish that may have caught fire. Additional companies from Carlstdat and Moonachie operated on the scene. Police and firefighters briefly evacuated Building 4 as a precaution as the intense heat started to melt the exterior of the building. A third alarm was struck, which brought that alarm to cover at Wood-Ridge fire headquaters which included companies from Rutherford and North Arlington. Wood-Ridge police took four juveniles from the Avalon apartment complex into custody for setting a fire as per fire officals. An investigation was made by fire officals, police detectives and

the arson squad to determine the cause and origin of the blaze. No injuries were reported to

any firefighters.

ROB KNOBLOCH

- DAMIEN DANIS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Dr. Stephen Vetrano named Medical Director of the New Jersey EMS Task Force Dr. Stephen Vetrano has been named Medical Director of the New Jersey EMS Task Force, it was announced by NJEMSTF Chairman John Grembowiec, Sr. Dr. Vetrano’s appointment is effective immediately. Dr. Vetrano, who has been a member of the NJEMSTF since its inception, will have oversight for all medical issues, head up the Task Force’s Physician Go Team, and oversee quality control and set protocols for all members of the organization. “Dr. Vetrano is an innovator in the field of emergency medicine,” Grembowiec said. “His experience will be invaluable to the Task Force and all of our members, as well as residents of New Jersey, will benefit from his experience and knowledge.” “The NJEMSTF is the top EMS disaster response agency in the state and has been the model for similar agencies around the country,” Vetrano said. “I have believed in this team since it was started and it is an honor to be named Medical Director. I look

JUMP TO FILE #073015107 forward to working with everyone on the team to assure the Task Force is providing the best medical care to our patients.” Dr. Vetrano is an attending emergency physician at St Francis Medical Center, Trenton NJ. He serves as associate medical director for the Department of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Vetrano also is medical director for various BLS agencies throughout Central NJ. He is active on several state EMS advisory councils and frequently lectures on EMS/Disaster Medicine topics. He lives in Mercer County with his wife and two daughters. The NJ EMS Task Force was formed in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The organization is comprised of more than 200 volunteer and career EMS professionals, who respond to man-made and natural large-scale events using a variety of response units strategically

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Dr. Stephen Vetrano has been named Medical Director of the NJ EMS Task Force.

placed throughout the state for maximum impact. “Dr. Vetrano will be an asset to all of us in the Task Force,” said State Leader Michael Bascom. “He is a great mentor, a great educator and everyone on the Task Force will be better because of him.” Follow the NJEMSTF on Twitter @NJEMSTF.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Oakhurst Engine 78 pumping at an apartment building fire on Apollo Dr. in Ocean Township.

- RICHARD HUFF

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? If you have photos you would like to see in our Where are they Now? feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Tinton Falls Engine 180 relay pumping at an apartment building fire on Apollo Dr. in Ocean Township.

ON THE BOOK SHELF FRANK ROBINSON

Lewistown, PA City Hook & Ladder operates a 1991 Sutphen 100' tower. This unit once served Middletown, NJ.

Jr

by John Malecky

On Call By Allen B. Locklier,

Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, #4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800522-8528 E-mail:support@fire-policeems.c-om www.fire-policeems.com Price: $19.99

This is a soft cover book measuring six inches by nine inches and has 229 pages. It is a compilation of memoirs of a paramedic firefighter, who served a career in the Clark County, Nevada Fire Department whose headquarters is in Las Vegas. During his career, he served as a firefighter, paramedic and arson

On Call

investigator, so the 57 chapters in the book reflect on memories of all three duties and as you can imagine the stories are short! Not all of the stories are “in the field”, shall we say, as some of them take place in the station and other places. I believe it is helpful to explain a little about Clark County and the fire department. The county itself is the largest in the state of Nevada and is the size of the state of New Jersey which is 7790 square miles. One of it’s jurisdictions is protection of the Las Vegas strip, so alarms on that strip receive a dual response from the county and the city. They also cover the largest part of Las Vegas Valley, which is 293 square miles and to three resort townships. They maintain 29 career and 13 volunteer stations the latter being in rural areas. In any event this book is a good read!


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Unspoken Words (sometimes silence is not golden) Chaplain's Corner Didymus McHugh

There are many times that we do not keep quiet when we should, but there are times that are worse. It is the time that we should open our mouths, but do not. It may be because we are ashamed, or do not know who to talk to, or think that we should be able to handle the situation. Well, there are times to be vocal and this is the time to start the discussion. We would do a disservice if we never continue the conversation. Firefighters hurt in so many ways, but all too often, we’ve become used to being hurt and do not want to admit that we have a problem. This subject will be brought up more often. The topic for the month is SUICIDE, in particular firefighter and EMS suicide. I have been going to classes about suicide and there is so much information, that people ignore. The public may talk about police suicides. This sticks out because the officers have the method of suicide strapped to them, almost all day and night. I reminded the instructor that they forgot about the entire population of firefighters and EMS.

They told me that they did not hear about a firefighter going home with an axe and dieing via suicide. We know so many ways and are exposed to many more ways and methods. So far, about 675 cases of suicide have been tracked. Out of that number, five deaths were by immoliation, that is setting yourself on fire. The major method was via firearms. There is something wrong going on here. We need to be sensitive to our brothers. We need to know each others’ base line behavior, so that we can tell when they are off their game. Remember that you are allowed to have tailboard chats to express your concerns about a brother one on one with nobody around. One of my friends had a good friend who died via suicide and it was painful. “Why did I not see it coming?” We start asking a lot of questions after it happens, but how about a lot of questions to possibly help the person? Do you even know what to look for? According to the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention, these are the Suicide Warning Signs “People who kill themselves exhibit one or more warning signs, either through what they say or what they do. The more warning

signs, the greater the risk. Talk if a person talks about: • Killing themselves • Having no reason to live • Being a burden to others • Feeling trapped • Unbearable pain • Behavior A person’s suicide risk is greater if a behavior is new or has increased, especially if it’s related to a painful event, loss, or change. • Increased use of alcohol or drugs • Looking for a way to kill themselves, such as searching online for materials or means • Acting recklessly • Withdrawing from activities • Isolating from family and friends • Sleeping too much or too little • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye • Giving away prized possessions • Aggression Mood People who are considering suicide often display one or more of the following moods. • Depression • Loss of interest • Rage • Irritability • Humiliation • Anxiety My thoughts are that so many times a death by suicide is swept under the rug and reported a dif-

ferent way. This may be done so that the family receives all the life insurance and death benefits. But people, look at the reasons. How many people know that the divorce rate for firefighters is 85% versus 77% for police? We walk around with so much stress and just keep burying it inside. We still hold onto the “macho” personality that we can handle anything. Do we reach out for our help or the help of a brother? Why not? If we use a CISM team for incidents, and might discuss the incident, why do we hold back? If we keep bottling up our stress, it will come out. This is not too be debated. It can be our health. I have talked with some people, who have attempted death via suicide and found that hope seemed to be missing in their lives. There are many places to find hope. It is interesting that the number one way of death by suicide for law enforcement is also the number one way of death by suicide for fire and EMS. The most reported deaths by suicide is of active firefighters versus retired, fired, resigned or disabled. The high number of deaths by suicide by age are close from 18 to 50. So far this year, there have been 68 completed suicides. Last year was the largest amount since

the tracking began and that was 104 deaths. What happened last year? I personally ask that if you are thinking of hurting yourself or if you know of someone thinking about hurting themselves, please call either Serve and Protect at 615-373-8000 or the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255). Even though times may seem extremely dark, there is hope that can be found and people that are will to assist you. Psalm 23 states “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.” I want you to think about the word “through”. We go through the hard times. We do not continue to live there. Granted it may take some time and may be painful, but please remember that God is there with you. You may feel alone, but it is alright to call out to Him for help. I ask that you do not give up, there is hope. (If you learn of a fire or EMS death by suicide, please report it to ffbha.org, so that we have accurate information to help our brothers and sisters) Thank you and stay safe.

HACKENSACK FD

Exterior fire extends up into attic Hackensack, NJ. On Monday, August 17th at 9:36 p.m., members of the 4th platoon responded to 143 Polifly Road for an exterior fire that started in a mattress and extended up the exterior wall to the attic of a two and a half story garden apartment. First arriving companies found residents self-evacuating from the building and members of Hackensack police assisting one person from a apartment.

JUMP TO FILE #082415107 Deputy 4 transmitted a second alarm, bringing Teaneck’s FAST team to the scene. Hackensack companies stretched several hand lines and knocked down the fire in under ten minutes. Additional companies checked for extension and began to over-

haul. Three firefighters and two police officers were treated at Hackensack UMC for minor injuries. The fire is still under investigation by members of Hackensack FirePprevention. Six residents were displaced and the American Red Cross assisted them. The scene was turned back over to the building owner . - JUSTIN DEREVYANIK

BILL TOMPKINS, WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


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Forcible entry

DAMIEN DANIS

Rescue made of occupant in Passaic Passaic firefighters rescued a woman from the attic of her burning house on the evening of August 11th. Shortly before 5:30 p.m companies were dispatched to 9 Rosz Place for a confirmed fire. Police units and an off duty firefighter confirmed the working fire. As units pulled out of city firehouses, they radioed to dispatch they had heavy smoke in the distance. Battalion Chief transmitted a second alarm while enroute, which brought companies from Wallington, Paterson, Clifton and Carlstadt to the scene, A working fire was transmitted by Battalion 3 as heavy fire was engulfing the rear of the building. Firefighters observed a woman leaning out of the top window

JUMP TO FILE #081315115 screaming for help. A ladder was raised to the top floor of the house from firefighters of Ladder 2 and made the rescue of the woman, who was taken to a hospital. The rapidly spreading fire extended to 11 Rosz Place at this time, and a third alarm was struck bringing additional out of town units from Little Falls Totowa, Woodland Park, East Rutherford to the scene. As fire now involved both houses, additional lines were stretched from several blocks away from different water mains. Command requested several ambulances to the scene as firefighters suffered heat related injuries. The Teaneck

Box 54 was also called the scene to provide rehab. Heavy fire took control of the top floor of the main fire building and attic of the exposure. Firefighters were evacuated from the main fire building, but were kept in the exposure to knock down the fire. Outside hand lines were put into operation also Ladder 2's ladder pipe was also put into operation. After almost two hours of firefighting, the blaze was knocked down. The fire was under control after 7 pm. Two firefighters suffering from heat exhaustion also were taken to the hospital. The cause is under investigation. - DAMIEN DANIS

Training, lets look at what the Fire Academies are teaching the recruit firefighters. They are teaching them what we all say is “just enough to get them killed”. It is up to the senior firefighters to show them the way, but how did we learn and have we stopped learning? I have been in emergency services since 1981. I am currently 53 years old and I still am hungry to learn about my job. Firefighters are a unique type of people. They will put their lives on the line, not knowing what could happen when they run into a burning building. But wait! Hold the pagers! What do Firefighter really do??? That is the big question. When I became a police officer ,the senior police officer in the family would have a talk with you. Well, I am not going into the particulars of the whole conversation, but Uncle Joe had hit it on the head of what a police officers job really is, and that is to solve people’s problems. I look at what firefighters actually do and we solve people’s building problems. As buildings change, we have to change tactics and one of the main tactics is how to do more with less. I know as a career firefighter for the last 25 years, I am always pushing to say we need more help. But what about little child who is trapped on the third floor and the only thing between you saving the child’s life is a door. That is why we must learn how to get

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR in there by using what we have. The halligan bar has come to a new light on entering a door and after training four hours on just the halligan bar, I now have a new respect for this tool. Rescue, truckies even SWAT teams can learn that one person with the halligan bar and one wedge can enter a door in less then two minutes. Yes, did I say two minutes? I believe I did said that! So now that I have peaked your curiosity, one firefighter using one tool and using the laws of leverage can open most of the doors we come up to within the fire service. Let us train you and your department on forcibly entry so you can save the little child on the third floor and let all go home safe. Let’s change the statement that the fire service is a thousand year tradition untouched by progress. We are a thousand years of training and training and what more training. We all need to know the job from the smallest volunteer department that gets two fires a year to the metropolitan city that gets two fires a shift. Be safe my brothers and sister in blue we are the worlds bravest and don’t you forget it. - JOHN THOMAS

FACES If you have photos you would like to see in our Faces feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Norma Alliance Tender 24-5 at a recent fire in Rosenhayn

EDAN DAVIS

Hasbrouck Heights Assistant Chief Rob Knobloch directs firefighters at a third alarm in town


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IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

FRANK ROBINSON

New Market Fire Company No. 1 operates a 2009 E-One 2000/300/ 100' tower ladder.

FRANK ROBINSON

Wayne P.O.L Fire Company run this 2012 Spartan/Toyne 2000/750.

Flames tear through Holmdel home, resulting in heavy roof collapse Holmdel, NJ. A woman and her dog were able to escape unharmed on August 7, 2015 after a fast-moving fire tore through their home, leaving it completely destroyed. Firefighters from Holmdel responded just before 8:00 a.m. to 17 HidJUMP TO FILE# den Hollow Terrace 080715109 for a reported house fire. Upon arrival, heavy smoke and fire was showing from a large one-story single-family dwelling. Hand lines were advanced to make an attempt on an aggressive attack, but firefighters were forced to set up a defensive operation and battle the blaze from the exterior. The flames quickly spread across and through the roof, causing the majority of it to collapse into the structure. Master streams continued to flow until the bulk of the fire was darkened, allowing firefighters to make entry into the structure to extinguish hot spots. The fire was declared under control in approximately an hour, but crews remained on scene for an extended period of time conducting overhaul operations in the heavily charred home. There were no reported firefighter or civilian injuries at the scene. The home was deemed uninhabitable and declared a total loss. Mutual aid fire departments from North Centerville, East Keansburg, Keyport, Union

Beach and Morganville assisted at the scene, while other Monmouth County fire departments covered the town during the incident.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

The fire is being investigated by Holmdel fire officials. - KEITH ADDIE

FACES If you have photos you would like to see in our Faces feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

KEN SNYDER

Engine 24 of the Stirling, NJ Fire Company is a 2009 Pierce Quantum 2000/750

JOHN M. MALECKY

KEN SNYDER

Hackettstown Engine 78-63 is a 1999 Pierce Saber 1500/750

Members of Jersey City’s Engine 15, Group A, stand by their new Pierce pumper. From L to R, Firefighters Joe Dagato, David Myers, Tyson Hardnett and A/Captain Adam Dalton.


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For Information on NJ Sales and Service Please Contact: Garden State Apparatus Tim Moots 201-281-9468 • Jeff DeSimone 201-522-1565 • gardenstateapparatus@gmail.com


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ROBERT POLICHT

Multiple incidents at Nursing Home in Allendale On Sunday, July 26th, the Allendale Volunteer Fire Department responded to the local nursing home for a smoke condition in one of the units. Units arrived to find an electrical issue with one of the roof top units. A few hours later, units responded back to another section of the facility for an air conditioning unit on fire. Crews arrived, isolated and overhauled the effected area.

ERIC MURPHY

Far Hills-Bedminster responds to two extrications in one day On Thursday, July 30, 2015, the Far Hills Bedminster Fire Department responded to two extrications. The first was on Interstate 287 northbound at 2:42 p.m. A sedan rolled over and the steering wheel needed to be cut for removal of the patient. One victim was transported to the hospital via Robert Wood Johnson Somerset BLS Unit 8B3 and Atlantic Medic 12. The fire department responded with Engine 29-101, Rescue 29 and Incident Command 29. For the second incident, the Far Hills-Bedminster Fire Department and First Aid Squad were dispatched to Interstate 78 westbound at 8:43 p.m. First Aid Captain

JUMP TO FILE #080315112 Demitri Bezzek arrived first on scene and confirmed a three vehicle accident, one vehicle being a tractor trailer and a total of six patients. One patient was confirmed trapped in a passenger vehicle. Five additional BLS ambulances were requested and patient care was coordinated by Captain Bezzek. Two ambulances from the Peapack Gladstone First Aid Squad and two ambulances from the Green Knoll First Aid Squad responded to assist with patient care and transport. Engine 29-101 and Chief Eric

Murphy arrived on scene and began scene stabilization and extrication operations. The driver ‘s door and A post were removed from one of the vehicles to allow patient access and removal. In addition to the extrication, the tractor trailer that was involved ruptured its saddle tank spilling diesel fuel onto the roadway. A haz-mat pool was deployed to catch the spilling fuel and speedy dry was applied downhill of the accident. The Somerset County Haz-Mat team was requested and responded to assist with the spill and clean up. All units cleared at 11:40 p.m. - ERIC MURPHY

OLD & NEW If you have photos you would like to see in our “Old & New” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

ROBERT POLICHT

AVFD trains at acquired home

On July 15th, Allendale Volunteer Fire Department members had the opportunity to conduct a rolling response drill at an acquired home in the borough. Captains Rubino and Policht created a low visibility environment in the dwelling that simulated the smoke filled conditions during an actual fire incident. Members spent the entire night going through evolutions consisting of stretching lines, searching for victims, radio communications, and roof ventilation

RON JEFFERS

North Caldwell Engine 4 placed into service a 2015 Pierce Enforcer 1500-gpm rescue pumper, left. replacing a 2000 Freightliner FL-80/Marion 1250-gpm model.


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STILL IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Still in Service” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

JOHN M. MALECKY

TODD HOLLRITT

Norfolk Southern locomotive honors first responders Norfolk Southern Railroad recently painted a freight locomotive honoring all first responders. The unique scheme was designed recognizing the hard work of police, fire, and emergency services personnel across JUMP TO FILE # 090615100 the nation. It can now be spotted anywhere on Norfolk Southern’s 22-state rail network. You can see the Maltese Cross of fire services, the Emergency Medical Services’ “Star of Life,” and a Police shield. It also features the logo for Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response (TRANSCAER), a national organization dedicated to providing education and resources to help raise the level of emergency preparedness for the unlikely event of a rail incident. The locomotive number “9-11,” is of course a well known phone number to request emergency assistance. Jim Squires, NS president and CEO said of the 911, “The relationships we have with first responders across our network are vital components of operating a safe transportation system.” He went on to say, “We hope everyone, who sees this locomotive will think about the dedication, the expertise, and the sacrifices first responders make to serve our communities. We at Norfolk Southern are grateful for their support, bravery, and partnership.” Keep an eye out for the brightly painted 911 hauling a train near you. Norfolk Southern operates many miles of railroad tracks in New Jersey and could show up anywhere! - TODD HOLLRITT

In Ocean Township, Ocean County, the Waretown Fire Company's E-3611 is still in service. It is a 1985 Ford F-800/Grumman with a 1000 gpm pump and 500 gallon water tank.

New ASAP Polaris Med Stat ready for immediate delivery!

• Polaris 800 EFI

• 4000 watt onboard generator

• Heat / AC in cab and patient compartment • Under body storage compartments • Aluminum Wheels

• 4500LB Multi Point Winch • LED Warning Lights • LED scene lights

1015 Cranbury South River Rd., South Brunswick, NJ • Tel: (732) 287-8884 • Fax: (732) 656-1925 2040 State Rte 208, Montgomery, NY 12549 • Tel: (845) 565-7700 • Fax: (845) 427-0825


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FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES To see your action shots in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com oremail them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

RON JEFFERS

Members of New Brunswick Engine Co. 5 pose with their new Ferarra 1750-gpm pumper. L-R: Lt. Donald Parkins, and Firefighters Kenneth Payne and Gary Bonura.

Woodbridge Firefighter Chad Carrick operating on the turn table of Truck 6 at a house fire on Dunlop Dr.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Newark firefighters prepare for the 26-story climb in the Spring of 2015

NEWARK FIRE DEPARTMENT

RON JEFFERS

A full moon over rose over North Hudson Captain Tom Tormey, of Ladder Co. 4, during a 3-alarm blaze on Kennedy Blvd., North Bergen, Aug. 29th.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

A Hopelawn firefighter heads over to assist crews in overhaul at a house fire on Dunlop Dr. in Woodbridge.


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New Jersey

VENDOR SPOTLIGHT BATFAN, New portable battery fan

LEADER continues to be a major player in the PPV world having recently developed the BATfan.

BATfan is powerful and lightweight for completely self-contained operation and allows fast implementation and maximum flexibility during response, while requiring little storage space.

MONOC Medical Director brought to Dubai to discuss global access to healthcare

Two versions are available: • BATfan 20-minute runtime with a total weight of 51.8 lbs • BATfan 45-minute with 60.6 lbs They also run on mains electricity if necessary.

Compact & mobile, it folds up and stows easily in vehicle trunk (2 BATfan occupy the space of one conventional fan)! It is quicker to set up than conventional fans as there is no time wasted searching for a power socket! BATfan is multi-functional equipment for PPV attack, PPV combined ventilation, etc. More info: www.leadernorthamerica.com

ABOUT LEADER:

A major company for several decades, LEADER designs, manufactures and promotes high performing equipment used in firefighting and search and rescue

applications. LEADER offers innovative products such as PPV fans for firefighting, Search equipment for tech rescue operations, flame simulators for training, etc.

Maintaining your emergency rig

Protecting your emergency vehicle body will pay long term dividends by increasing the life of your equipment. Common enemies of your emergency vehicle’s body are age, dirt, scratches, and corrosion. Some uncommon ones are more likely to occur for emergency. When responding to a fire, your truck may be exposed to fire ash. If the ash is white, dust it off before washing. Applying water with the fire ash dust present can form an alkaline solution that will start corrosion. After dusting, a thorough wash with an automobile wash product is important. If the ash is black, you can start with a water based wash; do it as soon as possible.

Regular washing is the most important step you can take to keep that body in shape, BUT water can also cause serious discoloration and water spotting problems. Have your wash water checked for mineral content. If it is hard water, invest in a water conditioner. Use clean sponges and microfiber clothes to wash and dry the body. Wash them out after each wash. If they fall on the ground, put them out of reach until they are clean again. Rubbing dirt in will break the paint surface. Water and fluids can then get under the protective painted skin and weaken overall protection. Do not use a high pressure power washer. It can transform minor flaws and weaknesses into a compromised

painted surface, subject to lifting and reduced protection. Always wash off the undercarriage after a run on salty roads. Waxing every few months will add to the paint surface’s protection. It will also provide a chance to inspect and touchup paint wherever inroads against your vehicle’s body have been made. Have an experienced emergency vehicle repairer promptly inspect and make recommendations about corrective painting and body work as soon as you discover a problem. It is a worthwhile cost saving measure you can take. To learn more, visit Firetruckbodyshop.com

Wall, NJ – July 29, 2015 --- Dr. Mark A. Merlin, System Medical Director of MONOC Mobile Health Services and Vice-Chairman/EMS Fellowship Director Newark Beth Israel Medical Center was recently brought to Dubai to discuss global access to healthcare. Dr. Merlin was one of 70 professionals from around the world selected by Shaffi Matter, attorney, entrepreneur and founder of India’s Emergency Medical System (pictured to Dr. Merlin’s right).

According to Dr. Merlin, “over five billion people worldwide have no access to healthcare. If someone is in an accident, no ambulance or Emergency Medical Services System is available to take them to the hospital. This amazing meeting brought together physicians, information technology experts and business leaders to create a technology based global health network to provide access to healthcare.”

Pictured next to Shaffi Mater is Eli Beer who is the President and Founder of United Hatzalah, Israel’s EMS System and founder of Hatzalah EMS in over 20 countries with an average ambulance response time of 90 seconds.

### MONOC Mobile Health Services is a non-profit hospital cooperative consisting of 15 acute care hospitals located throughout New Jersey.

Formed in 1978 MONOC’s mission is to improve healthcare and reduce costs. MONOC employs over 700 employees and operates a fleet of over 100 ambulances.

Together this shared services consortium acts as a healthcare cooperative for these acute care hospitals and over 2.8 million residents that they serve living in more than 1,800 square miles of the Garden State. Among its numerous service lines, MONOC operates MICU Paramedic Services, Helicopter interfacility and 911 services, Mobile Critical Care Services and Basic Life Support interfacility and 911 services.

Additionally, MONOC operates the State’s largest EMS education department and a 24/7 state of the art 9-1-1 dispatch center which handled over 146,000 requests for service in 2014.


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New Jersey

VENDOR SPOTLIGHT For years, ONE Boat (Rescue One Corporation) has been providing emergency responders all across the globe with rescue boats & water rescue equipment. They got started by providing their all-welded aluminum hull rescue boats that incorporate a unique gunwale system that allows them to connect to other boats. This utilitarian vessel is the “multi-tool” of the marine industry as it has the capabilities of being used in any kind of mission. It can be the one boat for all your many missions… • Dive/Rescue Operations • Firefighting • Flood Evacuation/Rescue • Patrol/Security Enforcement Swiftwater Rescue • K9 Search and Rescue

ONE Boat has also been providing their rapid response inflatable rescue boats at an affordable price with a multitude of standard features for the rescue industry. Their inflatable boats are a 1/3 of the price of other well-known inflatable rescue boat brands, while still providing a 5 year warranty to cover any manufacturing or material defect. All inflatable boats are susceptible to tears, rips, punctures, and other types of damage, which is why our boats include a repair kit with your purchase. However, you can have peace of mind that our inflatable boats won’t bust your budget if you

Lightmodule Inc.’s LM PRO Electronic Flare available from EES

had to replace them. They come in (3) sizes: 12’, 14’, 16’ and are available with aluminum floor panels or an air-floor design. Unlike our competitors we glue and bolt our transoms to the tubes for added stability and to increase the life-span of your vessel. ONE Boat’s newest product line is their Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RIB) that range from 15’ to 20’ with a stable fiberglass hull and large inflatable tube design with handle & lifelines. These boats were built with rescue departments’ needs in mind to deliver a versatile work boat. The boats can be customized to any department’s particular requests. These boats are available is Military (black), Patrol (grey), or Dive/Rescue (red) Hypalon (Orca 820) dual coated material. Models come in tiller steering or Console steering configurations. Standard features include: • Bow locker

• Over Inflation Valves • Dive Patch Port/Starboard • Bow/Transom lifting eyes • Heavy-duty rub rail & keel strip • Tube handles & lifelines • Bow D-rings • LED navigational lights • 2 Year Warranty

Optional features include: • VHF radio • 2” aluminum T-top with Sunbrella cover • 2” aluminum light/radio tower • GPS/Sonar • Dual battery bank with isolator switch • LED Spreader Lights Our RIBs come fully equipped directly from the factory and are ready to hit the water! For more information about these products visit our website at www.theONEboat.com, email us at sales@theONEboat.com, or call us at 800-737-2831.

Fire-Dex Welcomes Jessica Baumgartner and Jordan Paris as the Newest Editions to the Sale Team

Medina, Ohio - (July, 2015) - FireDex is pleased to announce the addition of Jessica Baumgartner and Jordan Paris as Regional Sales Managers. Jordan Paris will be covering the Northwest Territory, T55, which includes AK, ID, MT, OR, WA & WY. Jordan is a Marine veteran, serving as squad leader during his two tours in the Middle East. He resides in Tacoma, Washington, not far from where he was raised. Jordan has a background in public

relations along with over 5 years of sales experience and is currently working on a Business degree. He enjoys spending time with his fiancé, hiking, snowboarding, and target shooting. Jordan's contact info is as follows: Email - jordanparis@firedex.com Office - (330) 723-0000 ext. 373 Mobile - (253) 677-1486

Jessica Baumgartner will be taking over the Southeast Territory, T20, which will now include FL, GA, AL, MS, and AR. Jessica has 10 years of sales & marketing experience work-

ing with such companies as Jim Beam, Unilever, Sony & Cannon. She holds a degree from The Ohio State University. Jessica currently resides in the Indianapolis area but will be relocating to Florida in the near future. In her spare time, Jessica enjoys cooking, running, traveling, and attending OSU football games. Jessica's contact info is as follows: Email jessicabaumgartner@firedex.com Office - (330) 723-0000 ext. 389 Mobile- (614) 638-9443

As responders to all types of emergencies, particularly motor vehicle crashes, firefighters often find themselves operating in areas where they run the risk of being struck by oncoming traffic. We’ve implemented many safety measures over the years to combat injury on the roadway; however, sometimes oncoming motorists still don’t see us.

One of the problems with our system of alerting motorists is the use of short-term traffic flares. These disposable devices don’t last a long time and yet are fairly expensive. A few reports also indicate that flares are bad for the environment. It has been shown that partially burnt flare residue is a contaminant, smoke produced from flares is bad for the user’s lungs, flares can’t be used near flammable environments and they also create a fire hazard when stored in vehicles. So where do you turn if you want to use a product other than the traditional flare as an early warning signal device on the roadway? Lightmodule Inc. has an answer to that question. The company has created a device called the LM PRO, an electronic flare that’s specifically designed to provide extremely bright warning light for increased safety and visibility. The device features a special, parabolic, sealed head that houses several high-powered LED lights, which emit 360 degrees of light. The head screws onto a rechargeable battery pack that’s provided with a D-ring hook.

But Lightmodule didn’t stop at just the standard flare design. There are several variations of the LM PRO that can be created by switching out the head of the device: One head functions as a flare only, another functions as a high-powered area light, a third functions as a flashlight, and a fourth combines the functions of both the flare and the area light to provide optimal flexibility. The flare LEDs emit a red light, while the area light LEDs emit a white light; however, an individual

user can specify other colors, if needed. Other key features of the LM PRO include:

Brightness matches that of a chemical flare. Area light is powerful enough to illuminate an entire room or campsite. Gives up to 16 hours of light per charge when used as a flare; six hours when used as an area light. Device can be handheld, deployed on the ground, cone-mounted for greater visibility or hung via a Dring. Flashlight head dramatically increases range of visibility over a traditional flashlight. Provides up to 1,000 charge cycles per replaceable battery pack.Each electronic head comes standard with three function modes: full brightness, increased battery life and an SOS mode (which can be customized to user specifications). At first glance, the device may appear awkward looking; however it’s extremely bright, easy to use and intrinsically safe. It can also be used in hazardous areas where standard flares cannot.

While testing the LM PRO, I discovered that it was extremely durable, the battery life seemed sufficient, and everyone who saw it stated that it was very bright. I also discovered that it could have a couple additional uses: 1) for rapid intervention, it could be used to help mark ingress/egress pathways to facilitate faster rescue or removal of victims, if needed, 2) for response agencies that operate boats on waterways and 3) for signaling or carrying on life vests in the event someone goes overboard. The device can also be made to emit a GPS signal specifically for marine applications. Given its many uses, its brightness and its more environmentally friendly design, it would be well worth your while to give the LM PRO a chance so you could see for yourself just how durable and flexible this rechargeable flare is compared to the standard chemical flare. Emergency Equipment Sales, LLC 4 Youngs Road Trenton, NJ 08619


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ON THE LITER SIDE If you have photos you would like to see in our On the Liter Side feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JOHN W. CARR

Millville battles stubborn multi-alarm blaze Millville, NJ. Firefighters had their work cut out for them at the onset, on a very hot and humid day, as they battled a stubborn blaze in the main business district. At 5:08 p.m., on July 29th, Millville firefighters were dispatched to 19 N. High Street for a commercial structure fire. Engine 34, commanded by Act. Captain Steve Alcorn, was first on the scene JUMP TO FILE# and reported heavy 073015112 smoke showing from a three story commercial structure, with a business on the first floor and vacant apartments on the second and third floors. Chief Michael Lippincott was en-route and, after hearing the initial report and seeing the smoke from several blocks away, immediately struck a second alarm for a recall of off-duty personnel. AC Alcorn and crew took a one and three quarter inch line through a side door on the D side at the rear and attacked the flames. Ladder 35 arrived on scene and laid in with a five inch line to the front of the building. The crew took a line through the front door on the first floor. The structure, which was built in the late 1800’s and had been remolded numerous times, had high tin ceilings on all floors. The first floor was broken up into smaller rooms. The floors were of tongue and groove construction. At about a half hour into the job, conditions started to look pretty good, but shortly after that, smoke conditions again became heavy as the flames found new pathways of travel and crews had opened up providing air to some concealed areas. The temperature and humidity were taking a toll on crews prompting Chief Lippincott to order a third alarm at 5:30 and a fourth alarm at 6:23 for additional personnel. In addition, several other companies were special called at 7:23. The third alarm brought units from Rosenhayn and Vineland and Gouldtown covered Millville’s station. Gouldtown later responded to

JOHN M. MALECKY

If you were in the Bay Head fire station and needed to use the men’s room, you most likely would emerge with a memorable impression. Many years ago, long time member Charles (Charlie) J. Tillson had an idea to firematically decorate the restroom. He with the help of his friend Bob Ryan took on the project fashioning it partly after their antique pumper. The fire department ordered a Series 700 American LaFrance pumper in 1947 and took delivery in 1948. It served them well and they still have it. Using some parts and equipment from it and from other similar American LaFrance pumpers that they subsequently bought for parts, they decorated the men’s room. The main attraction is the urinal which has a photo of the antique as seen from the rear running board. It makes the person standing at the urinal look as if he is riding the rear step. Two alternately flashing warning lights operate as you stand there. These are actual lights that came from one of the pumpers. Mounted on the walls are a collection of shoulder patches, manufacturer name plates, SCBA masks and other miscellaneous memorabilia of old. A sheet of diamond plating is on the floor. Charles says that he intends to decorate the ladies room in a similar fashion later this year.

the scene and Cumberland covered Millville's station. The fourth alarm brought units from Bridgeton and another from Vineland. Special called were PortNorris, Cedarville, Heislerville and another unit from Rosenhayn. Also responding were two ambulances from Millville Rescue Squad, which set up rehab areas in the front and rear of the building. Chief Lippincott declared the fire to be under control at 10:00 and crews remained on the scene until 1:46 a.m. Crews played hide and seek with the fire up until about midnight, digging out hot spots with the aid of thermal imaging cameras, where fire was running in the walls, pipe chases and voids in the ceiling on all floors. A total of seven hand-lines were utilized and three aerial ladders performed ventilation.

JOHN W. CARR

A total of 77 fire and EMS personnel responded to the scene. Crews took a beating, but because of their hard work and perseverance, the building was saved. No injuries were reported. The first floor, which operated as a hair salon and barber shop, sustained heavy fire and smoke damage, while the second floor had moderate fire damage in three areas and the third floor had minor fire damage. All floors had smoke and water damage. The Cumberland County Fire Police, Millville Police, Millville OEM and the Cumberland County Fire Coordinator responded to the scene. The Salvation Army Canteen was on hand to provide food and cold drinks to firefighters. - JOHN CARR

Submitting photos and press releases is

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October, 2015

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LITTLE BIG GUYS

If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

FRANK ROBINSON

Chews Landing Fire Department run this 1992 Ford F350 250/250 brush truck.

WTES

Two extricated by Westampton FRANK ROBINSON

The New Jersey Forestry Service operates this 2006 Ford 250/290 brush truck.

Westampton Township Emergency Services Squad 2723 and Chief 2700 cleared a serious MVA on Jacksonville Road with two serious injuries on August 16th. Both patients had to be extricated from the vehicle. A big thank you to mutual aid companies Burlington Township Fire Department, Eastampton Fire Department and America EMS for their assistance.


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ANTIQUE APPARATUS If you have photos you would like to see in our Antique Apparatus feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KEN SNYDER

This Westville 1976 Maxim 1000/500 is now privately owned.

KEN SNYDER

The Union Fire Company No.1 of Westville once ran this 1954 Maxim 75’.

Allendale trains on new escape systems On August 1st and 2nd, members of the Allendale Fire Department attended a two day Firefighter Escape Systems training class at the Bergen County Fire Academy in Mahwah. This project was funded by the Lieutenant Joseph JUMP TO FILE # DiBernardo Founda- 080715106 tion. The class was dedicated to Joey, and participants stood proudly for a picture with a banner honoring him. The training was on the RIT Pre-Rigged Egress Safety System (P.R.E.S.S.). Members first attended a classroom session. Then went on to skill stations, which included deploying the system, anchoring, horizontal movement and packaging. Following the skill stations, each member performed nine bailout jumps at varied levels of difficulty. The equipment and training was provided by All Hands Fire Equipment & Training, based in New Jersey. All Hands Fire is an authorized dealer and trainer for the RIT Safety Systems . For details, please contact Training@AllHandsFire.com - DONALD COLARUSSO

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Jack Siegel Bob Hahn Tel: (973) 589-9162 Fax: (973) 589-9230


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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Vehicle News

In Randolph Twp., Millbrook Engine Co. 2 placed into service a 2015 Pierce Arrow XT 4WD 1500-gpm/700-gwt/40A-gft pumper as Engine 21. It was sold by Fire & Safety Services. RON JEFFERS

ERIC MURPHY

Far Hills-Bedminster car fire

Emerson replaced an engine and rescue truck with Squad 28, a 2015 Ferrara 2000-gpm/500-gwt rescue-pumper that possesses a 4-bottle air cascade fill station, sold by FF1 Professional Services.

RON JEFFERS

On Sunday, July 26, 2015 at 1:05 p.m., the Far Hills-Bedminster Fire Department and Far HillsBedminster First Aid Squad were dispatched to Interstate 78 westbound for a car fire. Chief Eric Murphy arrived on scene, established command and confirmed a fully involved car fire. Engine 29-101 arrived on scene and stretched a one and three quarter inch handline to extinguish the fire. The Far Hills-Bedminster First Aid Squad provided rehab. No injuries were reported.

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www.bellmawrcollision.com


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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Vehicle News

Alpha Engine 82-63 received a 2015 Pierce Impel PUC North Caldwell Engine 4 has been assigned a 2015 The Woodbury Heights Fire Dept took delivery of a 2015 1500-gpm/1250-gwt/30A-gft CAFS pumper sold by Fire & Pierce Enforcer 1500-gpm/750-gwt rescue-pumper sold Ford F250 that was donated by a local business, HollySafety Services. by Fire & Safety Services. wood CafĂŠ. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

FRANK MUENZENBERGER

The Hackensack Fire Department is operating this Cranbury Special Service 48 is a 2014 Peterbilt/KME unit Bridgeton Rescue 7 has been assigned a 2015 Seagrave Bergen County OEM 1990 BMY five-ton 6X6, former mil- that carries swift water rescue equipment, extrication heavy rescue unit. itary unit, for special operations. tools and assorted support equipment. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? If you have photos you would like to see in our Where are they Now? feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

MONROE TOWNSHIP FIRE DISTRICT NO. 3

Capt. Gerard Chipura, Elaine Chipura, Susan Cohen (twin of John Chipura), Nancy Chipura, Commissioner Les Barta, FDNY Chief of Department James Leonard, Commissioner Joel Kaplan.

Monroe engine dedicated for fallen 9/11 FDNY firefighter

Monroe Township, NJ. FDNY Firefighter John G. Chipurra had dedicated his life to service as a Boy Scout, then became a Marine, an NYPD police officer, and finally an FDNY firefighter. On 9/11, he answered his final call on that fateful day, but the fire district hopes his memory and service continues in spirit with a dedica- JUMP TO FILE # tion of their fire en- 081415108 gine. The dedication ceremony was held in conjunction with the regular monthly board meeting at the fire/EMS station located off Applegarth Road at 16 Centre Drive in Monroe Township. The fallen firefighter's twin sister lives in the Township Monroe Township Fire District No. 3 purchased a new Seagrave engine and came in contact with Susan Cohen, John’s twin sister who lives in Monroe Township. According to Commissioner Les Barta, after learning of Mr. Chipurra’s story, the Board of Fire Commissioners decided to dedicate the apparatus to “never forget” and to continue the proud service in honor of others who paid the ultimate sacrifice. - LES BARTA

JOEL L GEBET

Shabbona, IL operates this 1989 Sutphen 1500/1000/65-foot platform that was originally operated by Harvey Cedars, NJ.

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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ANTIQUE APPARATUS

If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Fit-Rite Uniform Company, Inc. Serving the Public Safety Professional since 1969 • Badges • Insignia • Years of Service Pins • Patches/Emblems • Fire Dress Uniforms • T-Shirts

FRANK ROBINSON

The Denville Fire Department still owns their 1926 American La France 750/40.

PAGE 101

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Phillipsburg JT Baker Chemical Co. used to run this 1963 Jeep FC170/Hahn 250/100. The unit is now privately owned.

www.fitriteuniform.com


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STILL IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our “Still in Service” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

BOB HALBERSTADT

Equestrian airlifted in Blairstown Blairstown, Warren County, NJ. A dispatch from Warren County Communications at 11:00 a.m. on September 3rd sent North Warren EMS to Hope Township for an injured horseback rider. The patient, JUMP TO FILE # who fell from a 090415100 horse, was driven by ambulance to the Blairstown Airport where Atlantic Air One awaited the department. The injured rider was transported to Morristown Medical Center for treatment. - BOB HALBERSTADT

For daily news updates, visit our website at www.1rbn.com

FRANK ROBINSON

Pennsville Fire & Rescue still operate this 1984 Mack CF 1000/1000.


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October, 2015

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

WELCOME TO WILDWOOD!


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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PRESIDENT

New Jersey State Fireman’s Association

QUALIFIED * DEDICATED

29 Years with NJSFA as Executive Committeeman, 2nd Assistant Secretary & Vice President.

Currently serving as your President for the past 8 years At the 138th Convention September 18th and 19th, 2015 in Wildwood, New Jersey


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“Prevention” Sounds Great to Me – Let’s Do it!!!!! FIREFIGHTER FITNESS Lori Ann Hodgkinson

Each year, October rolls around and we are surrounded with information, events and activities in the area of Fire Prevention. The efforts I observe from local fire departments are remarkable. Countless hours volunteered to bring the information to schools, businesses and communities. It’s organized, it’s well thought out and it works. It saves property. It saves lives. Excellent! As remarkable as it is, It prompts me to wonder what is it that has all these wonderful people dedicating so much of their lives to saving others yet keeps them from recognizing the value of prevention in their own lives. In my line of work, I often obtain new clients soon after they have experienced a health issue. Sometimes it is high blood pressure…sometimes elevated cholesterol and/or triglycerides. Diabetes, Heart Disease and Cancer often send folks in my direction. Age doesn’t seem to discriminate. They are young and old alike. Many are firefighters. Many are the same firefighters that I have watched devote countless hours to the community in all areas, including fire prevention. Rest assured, I love them all and shall always willingly do all I can to guide them on a proper journey to Health and Wellness. When they arrive to me, there are no lectures of “why didn’t you come to me sooner?” There are no “I told you So’s”. I will always stand at the ready. Always – and be grateful they came, regardless of when or why. BUT….. (I imagine you knew there was a BUT!)… I naturally urge you (and all of them) now (while healthy) to dutifully consider Personal Health and Wellness. See your physician. Take the first steps toward improving your nutritional habits. Get going on that exercise program. Surely once cleared by your physician you can get moving on that, even on the most basic level. Quite simply: Begin and Continue. I am not sure what is keeping people away. I know we are all well versed in the perils of Heart Disease and its title as the #1 cause of “Line of Duty” deaths. I know the fact that Cancer is

the fastest growing killer amongst firefighters has been duly noted. I have yet to run across anyone who doesn’t know that exercise can reduce the risk factors of both Heart Disease and Cancer. It’s a well known fact that exercise has long been touted for decreasing Obesity, High Blood Pressure and Stress. Heck it can even enhance more restful sleep. Surely sleep has gotta be up there on the list of ‘must haves'. Do we need to run through the entire list? It is frustrating to me, yet a fact nonetheless, that I cannot make the decision for others. They have to be ready and they have to be committed. Ready and committed are two qualities ever present amongst firefighters – so I remain hopeful things will change. I have often told firefighters it’s quite possible that I am addressing the wrong audience. I just may have greater success addressing their loved ones, because we are the ones who will be left behind to miss ‘em like crazy. “We can’t imagine our lives without you and we don’t ever want to lose you”. I say “we” because this is something that is all too familiar to me. Lost my Dad 26 years ago (“Line of Duty” Heart Attack”). Since that time I have lost many many friends, young and old (far too soon) to a disease that has been proven to be preventable in many cases. We all know there are no guarantees. We also know that prevention is about decreasing the risks. Let’s go for that and keep more of you around for many years to come. prevention – sure sounds g reat to me! I urge you all to see your physician and get on the Road to Prevention ASAP. Stay Safe…See ya Next Month - and the month after that…and the month after that…etc...Yes???? PS...Fitness programs are popping up in more and more fire houses throughout the country. I am thrilled that everyday more and more of you are exercising. To those of you who are already on the right track, I commend you. Quite possibly you have a buddy or two, who has yet to take that first step. Why not make October "Take your Buddy to the Gym Month"? Of course they have to see the Dr. first, but I'm confident you'll get the job done. Spread The Word. Save a life!

WELCOME TO WILDWOOD!


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

WELCOME TO WILDWOOD! What You See Isn’t Necessarily What You’ve Got

EMS ISSUE CHELLE CORDERO

You’re called to the scene of heated family dispute; a young man is throwing things against the wall and his mother is scared so she dialed 911. The police arrive moments before the ambulance crew and announce that the scene is secure. You enter and mom tells you that her son is autistic and gives you a list of medications he’s on. She adds that his behavior isn’t normal. Since autistic patients often respond better with familiarity you ask mom to come in the ambulance with you while you transport the young man to the hospital. While in route to the hospital, mom begins to complain of a headache and nausea… Suddenly you begin to wonder if the young man’s erratic behavior is being caused by something other than his autism. Some apparent behavioral disorders often have some not-so-obvious causes. It’s necessary to look beyond the assumptions and actually treat the patient to the best of our abilities.

The “intoxicated patient” that dispatch sent you to may not have had a drop of alcohol, the angry and foul mouthed senior may normally be docile and polite, and the hysterically crying teen may have something wrong beyond simple upset. Toxins, drugs, diabetic emergencies, physical traumas, fevers, strokes, CO poisoning, internal hemorrhaging, pain, hypo/hyperthyroidism, and some tumors may present as behavioral disorders. A chemical imbalance can cause confusion, erratic behavior, tremors, lack of response, or unconsciousness. Failure to medically treat some of these conditions may cause more harm, or worse, for your patient. Dealing with emotionally disturbed or volatile patients can be challenging and even dangerous. Your first priority is always safety for yourself, your crew and your patient. Restraints, soft only, should only be considered if the patient is a threat to you, others or him/herself — and if restraints were necessary, don’t remove or loosen them because the patient “promises” to behave. Be careful, if restraints are used, that you are not impeding the patient’s ability to breathe or cutting off circulation. No matter what the situation is, your patient is a human being and entitled to both quality

care and respect. Always evaluate your patient from a medical standpoint in case there is any physiological cause for his behavior. Even if there is a physically medical explanation, such as hypoglycemia, causing the patient’s volatility, use caution because he can still cause harm by striking out. Remain alert at all times. If your patient is suffering a case of acute anxiety disorder, severe depression, uncontrollable rage, there is no need to force him to talk out his problems (if he wants to talk you can certainly listen) but don’t push an attitude adjustment or lecture him on what he should be feeling. Be careful in dealing with suicidal patients, ordering them to put down a weapon or come off a ledge may be perceived to be more of a challenge than a suggestion. The best idea is to remain calm and express concern for the patient; transport to the appropriate medical facility (local protocol may indicate a psychiatric facility) and leave counseling to the professionals. Remember whenever you respond to an EDP (emotionally disturbed patient), be alert and aware of scene safety, remain calm, don’t assume anything, call for assistance (law enforcement) if necessary, transport and document everything carefully.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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October, 2015

SHOTS FROM AROUND THE STATE 1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

To see your action shots in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

BILL TOMPKINS, WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Kearny Chief of Department Steven Dyl (L) and Kearny Deputy Chief Robert Osborn (R) discuss operations in on mutual aid to East Newark on July 28th.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

A Hopelawn firefighter holds a hand line for crews conducting overhaul at a house fire on Dunlop Dr. in Woodbridge.

RON JEFFERS

Apparatus enthusiast examine former Roselle Park's Engine 3's 1950 GMC/TASC pumper at the annual Fairchester Hose Haulers muster in Circleville, N.Y., August 9th. The rig is owned by the NJ Fire Museum which hopes to bring it back to a storage building in Upper Freehold Twp. this year, while plans are made for a permanent building to house the museum.

RON JEFFERS

Members of the New Jersey Fire Museum did some quick maintenance on former Ocean Grove's 1962 Pirsch 100-foot tractor drawn aerial ladder before driving it back to New Jersey from the Fairchester Hose Haulers of the Hudson Valley's warehouse in Circleville, N.Y., where it was stored. L-R: Ed Burdgg, Bob Burns and Dale Bennett.The museum has acquired a storage building in Upper Freehold Twp. to store rigs as they work on plans for a permanent museum building. For info, go to www.njfiremuseum.org

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Woodbridge Firefighter Ryan Horvath returns from a break at a house fire on Desota Ave.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

October, 2015

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FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES To see your action shots in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

RON JEFFERS

North Hudson Chief of Department Frank Montagne, right, with representatives of the five municipalities covered by the regional department at a recent promotional ceremony and display of new fire apparatus.

EMT's from the West New York EMS stand by their new ambulance (EMS 19.) From left to right Jerome Vinc and Ricardo Rodriguez.

JOHN M. MALECKY

EJ RODE

Bogota Police Emergency Youth Academy group posing in front of a New Jersey State trooper helicopter in Olsen Park.

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Members of Maplewood Engine 32 assisting Irvington Firefighters at a 3rd alarm on Union Ave. Pictured Left to Right - Probationary Firefighter Bob Tretola, Captain Brett Derewsky, Firefighter Keith Addie, and Firefighter Ken Yarussi.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Woodbridge Firefighter T.J. Kane operating the pump on Truck 6 at a house fire on Dunlop Dr.


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FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES To see your photos in the newspaper, upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com ot email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

CONSTANTINE SYPSOMOS

Garfield, NJ. Ex chief John Kopacz and Chief of Department Mike Calon discuss operations.

NJ Editor Ron Jeffers, right, remembers Rob Knobloch as a little kid wishing he could go out buffing with him and his father, the late Artie Knobloch, back in the day. His father was Chief of the Hasbrouck Heights Fire Department and founding member of the NJ Metro Fire Photographers Association and past president and newsletter editor. His son, was also newsletter editor, and is currently an Assistant Chief with the HHFD and the borough's fire official. His father would be proud.

PROVIDED

BOB HALBERSTADT

South Amboy Captain Tom Szatkowski and Firefighter Dave Szatkowski

CERT members Cathy Brandt, Mike Cestari, Karen Lance and Bob Brandt at the Emergency Services Day in Blairstown

BOB HALBERSTADT

BRETT DZADIK

Forest Fire Service firefighter Eric Weber and Dennis Dockey put their specialized vehicle on display at the Emergency Services Day in Blairstown

Volunteer recognition night in West Milford with Mike Russo and Joe Siciliano.

JOE SICILIANO


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES To see your photos in the newspaper, upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com ot email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Blairstown Chief Darren Occhiuzzo

BOB HALBERSTADT

BEACHWOOD VOL FD

The Beachwood Fire Department would like to congratulate Captain William Hopson on his election to represent Ocean County on the Board of Managers for the New Jersey Firemen's Home.

BILL TOMPKINS, WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

JOHN PECORARO

Lincoln Park Engine 100 standing by at Paterson Fire Headquarters as the PFD battled multiple fires

Paramus Rescue Squad Chief's: Ex-Chief Rutishauser, Ex-Chief Hamlin, Chief Pecoraro and Ex-Chief Braun

Blairstown Ambulance member Sue Lothian demonstrates proper hand placement for CPR.

Millville Chief Michael Lippincott gives orders to Vineland Station 2 crew.

BOB HALBERSTADT

JOHN W. CARR


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Palisades Park blaze linked to smoking Quick work by Palisades Park and mutual aid firefighters kept a two alarm fire, that apparently was caused by smoking, from getting out of hand and causing serious damage. Early in the afternoon of Labor Day, September 7th, the Palisades Park Fire Department was dispatched to 7 Broad Ave. for a reported working fire. Due to the PPFD truck being out of service, Ridgefield was dispatched for a ladder. On arrival heavy smoke and fire was visible from the top floor of a three story multi occupancy bank and retail building. A second alarm was transmitted bringing additional mutual aid units to the scene. The standpipe was charged and a line advanced to the fire area. The

BILL TOMPKINS, WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

JUMP TO FILE #090915101 visible fire was quickly knocked and companies found that what they had was an outside fire that extended to the outer covering of the building and extended to the inside at the top of a stairwell. Opening up and checking found no further extension. Mutual aid began to be released in less than one hour. The cause is believed to be occupants of the building smoking on the roof and being careless. No serious injuries were reported, but the heat took a toll on several firefighters. - BILL TOMPKINS

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS September 23-26, 2015 PA - The 2015 Pennsylvania State Firemen's Convention will be held in Lake Harmony from September 23 - 26, 2015. The festivities will be held at the Galleria Sports Complex. Visit www.lakeharmonyfire.com for details. September 25, 2015 NJ - The Freehold Fire Department's 150th Anniversary Committee welcomes you to join us for our 1st Annual Golf Outing. Outing will be held at Gamblers Ridge Golf Club on Friday September 25 with a shotgun tee off at 8am. Contact Nick at 732-904-3234 for details.

September 26, 2015 NY - On September 26, 2015, the Highland Mills Fire Company will celebrate its 125th Anniversary by hosting the Orange County Volunteer Firemen's Association convention and parade. Visit their website for details.

September 26, 2015 NJ - Rutherford West End Engine & Hose Co. 3 will host their 125th Anniversary Parade & celebration. Registration opens at 9am with the parade at 1pm. Party and trophies to follow. Contact neil.ohara@verizon.net for details.

studies and how the results have impacted fireground strategy and tactics. Contact Chief Moran at 508-896-7018 for details.

October 3, 2015 NC - 2015 Foothills Fire & Life Safety Expo will be hosted by Caldwell Fire. The region's unique expanding event includes Fire, Rescue, EMS, Law Enforcement, Health and Safety Disaster Response, Recovery, Mitigation, Fire Prevention, Life & Public Safety Information, Displays, New Apparatus & Equipment Vendors, Antique Apparatus Show. Visit www.caldwellncfire.com for details.

October 3, 2015 NJ - The Silverton Volunteer Fire Co. is hosting a Poker Run and their 8th Annual Fall Festival with Fire & Vehicle extrication demonstrations, Antique Fire Trucks, TR Police Motorcycle Unit & K9 demonstratoins, and over 100 motorcycles. Visit www.svfc29.com for details.

October 10-11, 2015 NY - The Storm King Engine Company #2 will once again be hosting the Annual Clancy-Armitage Softball Fall Classic tournament at the Black Rock Fish and Game Club in Mountainville. Contact Jeff at rollemal@hvc.rr.com for details.

September 28, 2015 NY - 23rd Annual Steffens/Mayforth Golf Outing designed to raise fund to present scholarships to students who attend Ramapo, Spring Valley, and North Rockland High Schools will take place at the New York Country Club Golf Course in New Hempstead followed by dinner at Mt. Ivy fire house. Contact Gary at 845-222-1358 for details.

October 10, 2015 NJ - The Freehold Fire Department 150th Committee is proud to present an 8 hour seminar, Considerations of the Fire Officer. Instructors will be North Hudson Regional Fire Rescue Deputy Chief Anthony Avillo (ret.) and Newark Fire Dept. Deputy Chief Dr. Harry Carter (ret.). For further information contact Nick Palumbo Jr @ 848-207-7620

October 3, 2015 NJ - The 129th Annual Convention of the NJ State Exempt Firemen's Association will be held at the Governor H.G. Hoffman High School at 1000 O'Leary Blvd. Visit www.njsefa.org for details.

October 16-17, 2015 NJ - NJ State First Aid Council 2015 Annual Symposium and Trade Show will be held at the Sheraton Parsippany Hotel. Visit www.njsfac.org for additional information.

October 3, 2015 NJ - South Amboy Fire Department is hosting their 125th Anniversary Parade at 12:30 pm in conjunction with the NJ Fireman Exempt Convention. Contact Michael at 848-2509903 for information.

October 3, 2015 MA - The Challenges of Modern Fire Behavior presented By FDNY Deputy Chief George Healy Hosted by the Barnstable County Fire Chiefs Association. This one-day program will provide attendees with a detailed explanation of the recent Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) ventilation and fire behavior

October 11, 2015 NJ - The 7th Annual Sussex County Antique Fire Muster will be held at the Sussex County Public Safety Training Academy in Newton with firefighter competitions, fire extinguisher training, jaw of life demonstration and a high angle rescue demonstration. Visit www.sussexcountymuster.com for details.

October 17, 2015 NJ - Fireground Size-Up and Situational Awareness Seminar with Michael Terpack and sponsored by the Toms River Fire Department. Payment must be made by October 3. Contact Dave at 732-504-4859 for details.

October 24, 2015 NJ - Harvey Training Weekend sponsored by the Bergen County Fire Chiefs Association in partnership with the 200 Club of Bergen County and the Tenably Fire Department. Last day to register is October 15th. Contact fmjack1948@gmail.com for details.

October 26, 2015 NY - Woodmere Fire Department Benevolent Association is hosting their Annual Golf Outing with breakfast and registration at Woodmere FD headquarters. Shotgun start at 10:30am at Woodmere Club. October 29-31, 2015 NY-The Association of Fire Districts of the State of York is hosting their Annual Fall Vendor Expo and workshops at the Honors Haven Resort in Ellenville, NY on October 29-31, 2015.

November 28, 2015 NJ - Wallington Fire Department is happy to announce that they will be presenting their 14th Annual Holiday Parade on Saturday November 28, 2015 at 6:00 pm. The parade begins on Mt. Pleasant and Roehrs Drive and concludes at the Veteran’s Monument on Union Boulevard and Paterson Ave. The after-parade ends at the Centennial Field, where participants will enjoy entertainment, refreshments and the presentation of various parade trophies. Visit www.walllingtonfdholidayparade.webs.com. February 20-21, 2016 NY - Long Island's Fire, Rescue & EMS Mega Show 2016 will take place at the Brentwood Sports Field House

May 20-22, 2016 PA - Lancaster County Firemen's Association Annual FIRE EXPO Show will be held at the Pennsylvania Farm Show & Expo Center in Harrisburg, PA. For information, call 717-4643291.

June 15-18, 2016 NY - Register Now for the NYSAFC 109th Annual Conference, EDIAFC 89th Annual Conference, and FIRE 2016 Expo at the Turning Stone Resort in Verona, NY. Visit nysfirechiefs.com for more details.

August 13, 2016 NY - The 2016 SPAAMFAA National Convention will be held in Middletown, New York. August 10-13, 2016, sponsored by the Fairchester Hose Haulers of the Hudson Valley Chapter of SPAAMFAA. Visit www.fairchesterhosehaulers.org for more information.

To see your Calendar of Events in the newspaper, upload them on our website, www.1rbn.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.


October, 2015

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IN SERVICE If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “In Serv ice� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

FRANK ROBINSON

BOB HALBERSTADT

Fire Service Firefighter Dennis Dockey instructs Nathan Boyd in the use of the fire hose.

Chews Landing Fire Department operates a 1998 Seagrave 95' Aerialscope.

Emergency Services Day in Blairstown Blairstown, NJ. It was Emergency Services Day in Blairstown on Friday, August 7th. Sponsored by the Blairstown Police Department, the township invited area residents to come and meet the members of their local emergency services personnel. There were hands on tours of fire engines and ambulances. It was also a meet and greet with Smokey Bear and two of the mem-

JUMP TO FILE #081715114 bers of the fire service firefighters. Children were given a chance to use the hose to aim at little wooden fire targets. The Search and Rescue Teams of Warren County along with Simber, the therapy dog, displayed a tracking, hiking and survival skills guide

for those interested. The Blairstown Police Department did photo and fingerprint registrations for children and the Community Emergency Response Team members (CERT) were recruiting volunteers to help support the local fire and EMS personnel. There was free food, snacks and prizes for all those attending. - BOB HALBERSTADT

FRANK ROBINSON

Denville Fire Rescue operates a 2004 Spartan/Smeal 1250/400/75'


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Visit us in Wildwood! 1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ October, 2015 PAGE 121


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October, 2015

BOB LONG

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

IN SERVICE If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “In Serv ice” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KEN SNYDER

Tower 804 of the Newton Fire Department is a 2011 Pierce 95’

KEN SNYDER

This Quick Attack unit of the Passaic Fire Department is a 2004 Ford F 150 /National Foam


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Verbal alarm escalates to three alarms in North Bergen North Bergen, NJ. A verbal alarm from North Hudson Ladder Co. 5 escalated and caused serious damage to a two-story commercial building at the corner of Kennedy Boulevard and 82nd St. on August 29th. Ladder 5 is lo- JUMP TO FILE# cated on the oppo- 090115100 site side of “the Boulevard,” at 83rd Street. were Flames visible, extending outward from the top-floor windows above New Images Mirror & Glass Co. when the alarm was transmitted around 12:45 a.m. It was reported that the floor above the business was being renovated into apartments, and no occupancy had yet been established. Deputy Chief Curtis said there was heavy fire showing from that floor, and, as a result second and thirdalarms were struck.

Master streams were quickly set up on the wide street. This included ladder pipes from Ladder Co.'s 1 and 4 and Squad 7's squirt device. The heavy fire condition was quickly knocked down, as exterior hands lines were also placed into operation. Forcible entry was conducted by other crews. A partial collapse of the roof occurred while the fire was in progress. The fire was under control around 2:30 a.m., with members working on hot spots. Some fire companies were released at 2:32 a.m. The Gong Club canteen responded to the scene to set up a rehab area, and the NJ Division of Fire Safety was also called in as part of the fire investigation. -RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Deputy Chief Dave Curtis, third from left, makes a point after the visible flames were knocked down.

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KEN SNYDER

The Lodi VFD Foam Unit 616 is a 1994 GMC/UPF with 1000 gallons of foam

NEPTUNE SPECIAL OPERATIONS TEAM

Rescue drill conducted by Neptune Township’s Special Operations Team On July 22, members of Neptune Township's Special Operations Team conducted a rescue drill at a vacant apartment complex on Davis Avenue in the township. The scenario was that an inspector was checking a storm-damaged home. He was on the roof and fell through. The inspector (a rescue randy dummy) was lodged into the

JUMP TO FILE #080715103 roof truss beams. Rescuers were instructed that they had to first install vertical shoring under the victim (on the first floor). Then they had to access the patient, package him and then lift him with a rope system.

KEN SNYDER

Engine 23-62 of the Harmony VFD is a 2002 Smeal 1750/1000.

Approximately 30 members of the team participated. They were divided into three groups: patient rescue, structural shoring and rope rescue. The three groups worked as a team, each accomplishing their role in the overall mission - to free and remove the victim. - DONALD COLARUSSO

KEN SNYDER

Somerville Engine Company 1 is a 2000 Pierce Saber 1500/700/50.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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October, 2015

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IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

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NOTICE TO BIDDERS: Sealed bids will be received by the Board of Fire Commissioners, Uniondale Fire District, Town of Hempstead, NY until 5PM on Tuesday, July 21, 2015. Bids will be publicly opened and read at 6:45PM on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 in the meeting room of the Board of Fire Commissioners, 501 Uniondale Avenue, Uniondale, NY for: Emergency Ambulance. Instructions to Bidder, Form of Bid Bond, Proposal and the Specifications are “Contract Documents,” Prospective Bidders may pick up the “Contract Documents” at 501 Uniondale Avenue, Uniondale, NY 11553 or contact the Fire District Secretary at (516) 481-8411 between the hours of 9AM to 5PM, Monday-Friday. The bidder shall furnish a 5% Bid Security assuring fulfillment of the contract in all its provisions. Security for bid as set forth herein must be presented with the bid. Failure to provide the required security will render the bidder nonresponsive and the bid will not be accepted. The contract will be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder or the bid will be rejected within forty-five (45) days of the date of opening. The Board of Fire Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bid(s). The proposal shall be annexed hereto a noncollusive bidding certification as prescribed in 103-d of the General Municipal Law.

KEN SNYDER

Tower 1 of Kittatinny Hook & Ladder in Newton, NJ is a 2011 Pierce 95’

The Town of Weston is seeking bids on a 1976 Mack R-600 Attack Pumper. 50 Gallon Fuel Tank • 21,000 miles. Heavy Duty 5 Speed Standard Transmission. 1,000 Waterous Pump 1,000 Gallon Water Tank. Very Good Condition. All bids must be submitted to the Town Office in a sealed envelope by noon September 21, 2015 clearly marked “Bid 1976 Firetruck.” Mail to Town of Weston Attn: Selectboard PO Box 98 Weston, VT 05161. Bids will be opened on September 22, 2015. The Town of Weston reserves the right to refuse or reject any or all bids. For more info please contact Brian Lundberg at 802-824-6788 or email lundbergvt@myfairpoint.net.

For Sale 2014 Kymco 500 side by side 4×4 UTV. It has 26 miles on it. Asking price $6,500.00 OBO For more info call 845-238-4228 Email: Atkins11@optonline.net

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