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The New Jersey Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

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RON JEFFERS

Union City, NJ - A fast moving fire during a period of 30-MPH winds consumed the upper floors of a mixed occupancy structure, killing a child and creating burning embers that set fire to a church steeple one-block away, on the morning of March 4th. In addition to the strong winds, the temperature was 21-degrees with a real feel temperature of 7-degrees. - See full story on page 10

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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Two-Alarm Fire Destroys Landscape Company Building Raritan Twp., NJ - At approximately 2:25 P.M. on March 22nd, firefighters were dispatched to a Level-3 Box Alarm, for a building fire at the J&J Landscape and Garden Center on State Highway 31 in the Township. JUMP TO FILE# Upon arrival of the 032317102 first responders, the call was quickly upgraded to a secondalarm which included dispatching the Tender Taskforce, as there were no fire hydrants in the area. The Tender Taskforce arrived and set up dump tanks at the business’ driveway entrance on the highway. Water was drafted from the tanks by Stockton FD's Engine to feed a supply line that stretched over 1050-feet up the driveway to the business, which supplied water to the engines at the fire ground. Fire ground operations included the use of Raritan’s Tower Ladder-21. After firefighters battled the blaze in bitter cold winds, the fire was reported under control at approximately 4:00 P.M. by the Raritan Township Fire Chief. Overhaul operations continued for a couple of hours to ensure that all hot spots were extinguished. The two southbound lanes of State Highway 31 were closed during the fire operations. Southbound traffic was shifted over to the single center turn lane around the fire. The agencies responding to the fire included the Raritan Twp. Police Department (Patrol 21), Raritan Twp. FD (Station 21), Flemington FD (Station 49), Quakertown Twp. FD (Station 91), Stockton FD (Station 23), Lebanon Boro FD (Station 18), High Bridge FD RIT Team (Station 14), Kingwood Twp. FD (Station 16), Sergeantsville FD (Station 47), Three Bridges FD (Station 33), Milford FD (Station 92), Amwell Valley FD (Station 48), Hunterdon County Fire & EMS Coordinators (Station 86), Flemington – Raritan Rescue Squad (Squad 49), Clinton Rescue Squad REHAB (Squad 45), Paramedics from the Hunterdon Medical Center (EMS 1), Raritan Twp. Fire Police (Station 21) and the NJDOT Traffic Incident Management Team. Additionally, fire departments from several Hunterdon County towns were called up for cover assignments to the towns involved in the fire operations. JCP&L was also on scene to cut power to the area due to power lines that fell by the fire building.

RICH MAXWELL

Firefighters responded to this two-alarm fire that destroyed a building on the grounds of J&J Landscape and Garden Center on State Highway 31 in Raritan Twp. on March 22nd.

- RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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With his family present, members of the FDJC offer a salute to a hero at the corner of Palisade Avenue & Hutton Street, also known as Carlos Negron Place.

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RON JEFFERS

Jersey City, NJ - Standing in front of 411 Palisade Avenue on the afternoon of March 20th, Chief of Department Steven Mc Gill said, “Carlos Negron will never be forgotten by the Jersey City Fire Department.” Twenty-four years earlier, Firefighter Negron gave his life while assisting fellow firefighters that were operating at a fire in the occupied three-story dwelling. Firefighters, members of the Gong Club, and Negron's family, participated in the brief ceremony. Negron, who lived a block away from the fire scene, was picking up groceries at a local store when he heard shouts of “Fire.” He ran to the scene to assist. First-alarm companies stretched hose lines and began to set up ground ladders against the building. Due to overhead power lines, aerial ladders from the trucks could not be used. Members of Truck-7 were setting up an extension ladder on slippery snow along the narrow sidewalk to reach the third-floor, when the ladder brushed against an overhead high voltage line. Firefighters Negron and Walter Milne were knocked unconscious by the electric shock. The incident commander, Deputy Chief Denis Onieal, who

JUMP TO FILE #032117111 now serves as the deputy fire administrator of the U.S. Fire Administration, transmitted second and third alarms, and ordered BLS and ALS units to the scene. The injured members were transported to nearby Christ Hospital. Firefighter Milne was revived and spent some 60-days in St. Barnabas Burn Center in Livingston (NJ). He later returned to duty. Firefighter Negron could not be revived and died from his injuries. Carlos Negron and his brother Frank were young children when they lived in an apartment house next door to the Gong Club's firehouse. This is an organization of fire buffs operating a canteen truck that responds to multiple-alarm fires in Hudson County. Staying at the club's quarters one late night, a member discovered smoke in that apartment house, which is the “B” exposure to the firehouse. The late Henry Haines rousted all to get out of the building, including the Negrons. The brothers both hung out at the club, and that's where the pair got their interest in the fire service. When they got older, both joined

that organization and were later appointed to the Jersey City Fire Department; a proud day in both of their lives. Carlos joined the Gong Club in 1973 and was appointed to the FDJC in 1981. On the 24th anniversary of Negron's death, Chief McGill and Battalion Chief Richard Gorman set up a memorial in front of the building where the hero firefighter died in the line-of-duty. A wreath was placed at the front of the structure as Chief McGill and FDJC Chaplain, Reverend James Pagnotta, spoke of Carlos, who was a personal friend to both. Reverend Pagnotta said that the fire department was his life and “that's why he got killed.” He lived in the neighborhood, learned of a fire and ran to help. Gong Club Life Member Paul Schaetzle mentioned that the weather in 1993 was similar to today, including mounds of snow along the sidewalk. Negron's son, Carlos Jr., a Jersey City Medical Center EMT, and his daughter Susan Ann, a Hoboken police dispatcher, were onhand. Both have followed in their father's footsteps working in public safety fields. Also in attendance were Susan's children, Azriel, 17, and Javier, 15. Susan gave an emotional speech about her father. She

remembers that morning when Carlos said he was going to the store and he said, “I'll see you soon.” She said, “I love you daddy.” She continued with saying that the fire department and Gong Club became family. The wreath was then marched to the corner street sign at Palisade Avenue and Hutton Street., which is also known as Carlos Negron Place, where firefighters offered Carlos a salute. The wreath was then transported to the Palisade Avenue firehouse several blocks away, which is also named after Negron, and placed next to his memorial plaque in the hallway. In 1993, the Gong Club renamed its annual valor award in his memory. That same year, FDJC and Gong Club members organized the Carlos Negron Memorial Run. This event is held annually in October and the proceeds of the (eight) 5-kilometer races benefit the St. Barnabas Burn Center. Firefighter Carlos Negron's dedication to the FDJC, the City of Jersey City, and the fire service in general through his volunteer work with the Gong Club, will always be remembered and appreciated. - RON JEFFERS


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May, 2017

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May, 2017

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In memory of those who gave all

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1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

Texas: William ‘Iron Bill’ Dowling, 43 Rank: Captain Incident Date: May 31, 2013 Death Date: March 7, 2017 Fire Department:Houston Fire Department Initial Summary: Captain William ‘Iron Bill’ Dowling passed away on March 7, 2017, from complications of the severe injuries suffered in the Southwest Inn fire on May 31, 2013, that killed four other Houston firefighters and seriously injured many more. The Southwest Inn fire is considered the deadliest day in Houston Fire Department history. In a statement, the Houston Fire Department said of Captain Dowling that “the incredible strength and bravery he showed as he and his family rebuilt his life – and theirs – after his injuries inspired us all. Please keep the Dowling family and all of the men and women of our fire department in your prayers.” Pennsylvania: Dennis DeVoe, 45 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: March 10, 2017 Death Date: March 11, 2017 Fire Department: Harrisburg Bureau of Fire Initial Summary: Lieutenant Dennis DeVoe died from injuries sustained while responding to a multiple alarm row house fire which had confirmed civilian entrapment. DeVoe’s privately owned vehicle was struck on the passenger side at a controlled intersection by a stolen vehicle, reportedly being operated by an intoxicated 19 year-old female who failed to stop. According to reports, the force of the accident sent Lt. DeVoe’s vehicle through a fence and into a parking lot. The driver of the stolen vehicle who fled the scene was arrested later at the hospital by law enforcement. Mississippi: Clinton Alvin Beasley, 80 Rank: Deputy Chief Incident Date: March 15, 2017 Death Date: March 15, 2017 Fire Department: Sumrall Volunteer Fire Department

Initial Summary: Deputy Chief Clinton Alvin Beasley and Firefighter Loretta Ann Sykes were directing traffic at the scene where a dump truck got tangled in power lines at Mississippi 589 and Oloh Road (Lamar County, MS) when they were struck by a hit-and-run driver. Both Beasley and Sykes passed away at the scene from injuries sustained when hit. The driver of the vehicle was later apprehended by Lamar County law enforcement. Mississippi: Loretta Ann Sykes, 53 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: March 15, 2017 Death Date: March 15, 2017 Fire Department: Sumrall Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: Deputy Chief Clinton Alvin Beasley and Firefighter Loretta Ann Sykes were directing traffic at the scene where a dump truck got tangled in power lines at Mississippi 589 and Oloh Road (Lamar County, MS) when they were struck by a hit-and-run driver. Both Beasley and Sykes passed away at the scene from injuries sustained when hit. The driver of the vehicle was later apprehended by Lamar County law enforcement.

New York: Yadira Arroyo, 44 Rank: EMT Incident Date: March 16, 2017 Death Date: March 16, 2017 Fire Department: FDNY EMS Station House 26 Initial Summary: FDNY EMT Yadira Arroyo, 44, was assigned to Station 26 in the Bronx and bravely served the Department for 14 years. EMT Arroyo was critically injured while responding to a medical call in the Bronx when an individual seized control of her ambulance and struck her. She was transported to Jacobi Medical Center where she succumbed to her injuries. She is the 8th member of FDNY EMS to die in the line of duty, and the 1146th member of the Department to make the Supreme Sacrifice while serving our city.


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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

NJ First Responders Brighten a Young Boy’s Life UPS & DOWNS Notes from Ron Jeffers

Five-year-old Little Ferry resident, Lil Ryu, told his parents that he'd like to become a fireman someday. Lil was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, a rare form of eye cancer, when he was 3-years-old. He has been battling metastatic retinoblastoma since 2016, and doctors say the best option for him is enucleation of his left eye to remove three tumors they discovered. Countless hospital stays has consumed his young life. Ridgefield Firefighter John LaFalce, a member of Pink Heals Bergen County, heard about the child's ordeal and wanted to do something special for the boy who wants to be a fireman. In the matter of a week, and through fire services connections such as Facebook, etc., local and out-of-area fire and EMS units converged in a Little Ferry parking lot on a cold Sunday, March 12th afternoon, to give this boy a treat. Fire apparatus and ambulances paraded up to Lil's home and stopped. There, first responders presented the boy with fire department related gifts, including a uniform with his name on it. He was now an honorary firefighter and chief for the day. After receiving gifts, he received another gift that all children love; a ride on a fire truck. With his parents, Lil “responded” to Little Ferry Hook & Ladder Co.'1's firehouse. There, he received a fire department T-shirt and stood by with his parents to watch a parade of emergency equipment pass by. Despite the weatherman's report of a “real feel” temperature of 8-degrees, a bundled up and shy Lil peeked at the long line of fire trucks and ambulances passing by with sirens blasting and first responders waiving, while he was in his father's arms. The parade was led by a LFFD chief's car and two Pink Heals Bergen County “chief” cars. One of the pink cars was occupied by Ridgefield Firefighter Ryan Handschin of Company 3, who is a cancer survivor. After the parade, all units parked in nearby lots and their members stopped by the firehouse to pose for photos with Lil and his parents; and then they enjoyed refreshments inside of a nice warm firehouse! Lil's father said that he was impressed by the actions of the first responders and saw how the Fire Service is also one big family. “He wants to be a fireman more than anything now,” Lil's mother said. “It's been amazing to see all of this.” Pink Heals Bergen County has been active in fundraising efforts for Lil to help his parents with medical costs. Emergency personnel that participated in the parade included fire and EMS units from Ridgefield,

Ridgefield Park, South Hackensack, Moonachie, Wood-Ridge, Hasbrouck Heights, River Edge, Garfield, Saddle Brook, Demarest, Dumont, Lodi, Fort Lee, Leonia, Edgewater, Palisades Park, Hawthorne, Parsippany, Budd Lake and Stillwater. DOWNS: Harold “Whitey” Swartz, 80, died in March. He spent 56-years as part of the Atlantic County fire service, including 31years with the Pleasantville Fire Department, retiring as deputy chief in 1989. He also spent 24-years as the county fire marshal. He was well known for his community work, photography and preserving firefighting history. His love of the fire service bloomed into the creation of the Firefighters Museum of Southern New Jersey, with an extensive collection of firefighting equipment and apparatus. “He felt it was important to keep this type of history alive,” said Vince Jones, director of the Atlantic County Emergency Management. UPS: The Tuckahoe Volunteer Fire Company honored ex-Chief Corville Griner, 80, for 65-years of service during the company's February installation dinner. Griner joined the company when he was 15-years-old and he has served every position that the unit has, including chief for 25-years. DOWNS: A 5-alarm fire on March 3rd destroyed a vacant hotel and three dwellings in Ocean Grove. The fire raged for hours as firefighters from multiple companies operated at the scene. UPS: With the assistance of Trenton firefighters, local Author Lisa Willever delivered another batch of books to Trenton school children in March. Willever, a former city public school teacher who now writes books for children, donated a copy of her latest book “Nicky Fifth Fit,” to every third, fourth and fifth grade in Trenton public schools. DOWNS: A 2-alarm fire damaged one portion of the Ramada Inn, on West Landis Ave., Vineland, Feb. 24th. Some occupants were attempting to jump and were rescued, witnesses said. “They were hanging out of windows and throwing their belongings out the windows,” Fire Chief Robert Pagnini said. UPS: Summit Firefighter Joe Moschello was the 2017 recipient of the Frank Smith Award for Public Safety. The award is given annually by the New Jersey Electronic Security Association (NJESA) to an active firefighter or police officer that “exemplifies commitment, loyalty, and consistently goes beyond the call of duty for the municipality they serve. “Joe sets an excellent example of how everyone should approach work with security companies to help them interpret fire codes and pass inspections,” Summit Fire Chief Eric Evers said. DOWNS: A Feb. 19th fire destroyed two stores and two floors of a building at 47-49 Main St., Madison. UPS: Butler Sgt. Colleen Pascale and Police Officer Bryan Gordon rescued a former 52-year-old fire-

Lil Ryu (center in green cap), with his parents and the first responders who participated in a parade in the 5-year-old's honor, assemble in front of Little Ferry H & L Co. 1's firehouse. RON JEFFERS

fighter from a burning East Belleview Ave. garage, March 4th. The officers arrived to find the garage filled with black smoke and were told by the man's wife that her husband was in the garage. They located the unconscious victim and carried him out, said Lt. Michael Moeller. DOWNS: Dozens of firefighters worked for more than five hours, Feb. 20th, to extinguish a 3-alarm fire at a trash transfer station in South Plainfield. About 65 firefighters responded from area companies, plus the Middlesex County Hazardous Materials unit. UPS: New firefighters in Passaic are J. De La Cruz, B. Rawls, A. Manzueta, V. Oliver Jr., N. Castillo Jr., B. Bautista Jr., M. Kenner, R. Policht, A. Larkin, S. Rawls and B. De La Cruz. DOWNS: More than 100 firefighters from some 20 departments battled a fire at the Marcal Paper Mills in Elmwood Park, Feb. 20th. UPS: The Tuckahoe Volunteer Fire Company celebrated 90-years of service during it's installation dinner, Feb. 25th. DOWNS: An early morning fire on March 13th at the Brick Gardens apartments left three firefighters injured and one resident suffering from smoke inhalation, officials said. The fire displaced 10 residents. UPS: Newark firefighters rescued a 60-year-old man from a burning North 6th St. apartment on the morning of March 13th. Public Safety Director Anthony Ambrose commended the life-saving efforts of the firefighters. The victim was transported to St. Barnabas Medical Center suffering from burns. DOWNS: Firefighters rescued a 53-year-old man from his burning Clermont Ave. home in Ewing, March 13th, but he later succumbed to injuries at a Trenton hospital, officials said. UPS: Fred Cottrell and his wife,

Barbara, have each logged 55 years of service with the Somers Point Volunteer Fire Company and were recognized by the City Council, Feb. 9th, for their “incredible record” of serving the community, in the words of Mayor Jack Glasser. Fred has served in several capacities, including chief and president. Barbara serves on the Somers Point Fire Company Auxiliary coffee truck. In addition, the city council recognized Daniel Ravese of Company 1 and Mickey Awg of Company 2 as Firefighter of the Year for their respective companies. DOWNS: Under windy conditions, firefighters battled a fire that damaged two units of the Brigantine Sundance Condominiums on East Brigantine Ave., March 14th. Two other units were saved. UPS: Members of the Wildwood City Fire Department provided ten city school teachers with their lifelong dream of being a firefighter for a day as part of a teacher in-service wellness initiative, on March 10th. The “firefighters” completed tasks that included dragging hose, tool carrying, forcible entry, victim dragging and fire attack. These tasks were completed while wearing full PPE. Firefighters who participated were Captains James Gravel and Daniel, along with Firefighters Rob Fetwell, Gerry Vessels, Matt Long, Tina Sacco and Sean Stanton. DOWNS: Paterson firefighters responded to a car fire, March 17th, and discovered two bodies inside the vehicle. The Audi S line was registered to Kim DePaola, who has appeared regularly on the “Real Housewives of New Jersey,” it was announced. UPS: In March, Union County Freeholder Alexander Mirabella presented resolutions to Roselle Park Firefighters Robert DelaRosa Sr. and Robert Stevens, congratulating them on their 50-years of dedicated service to the RPFD and to the

residents of Roselle Park. DOWNS: Brick firefighters battled a 3-alarm fire in a two-story waterfront home on Cartagena Dr., March 18th. UPS: Middlesex Borough firefighters were able to rescue a 74year-old woman and her dog from a burning home at Market & Main St.'s in March. The woman suffered smoke inhalation and was taken to St. Barnabas Hospital in Livingston. DOWNS: A 3-alarm fire ripped through an abandoned school on Bergen St. in Newark, March 21st. The William H. Brown Academy was closed in 2010 and still contained some books and furniture, a news source reported. UPS: On March 20th, North Wildwood police noticed several dolphins were stuck on a sandbar. Officials say two in the bunch were able to free themselves when the tide came in. North Wildwood firefighters arrived to help one dolphin that could not get back out to sea, using a flexible stretcher to carry the mammal into deeper water. DOWNS: Eight Perth Amboy residents were displaced on March 21st after a fire in a Washington St. dwelling, officials said. UPS: Wyckoff Firefighter and exChief Nick Ciampo was honored for 55-years of service during a March ceremony. DOWNS: An abandoned house was fully involved in fire on Willis St. in Penns Grove, March 19th. Assisting the Liberty Fire Company were units from Carney's Point, Reliance Fire Company, Deepwater and Pennsville. UPS: Frank Prezioso has been promoted to deputy fire chief in Clifton. New captains are Eric Marshalleck and William LeGates. Promoted to lieutenant were Thomas Tafro, Michael Rubine, George Kruckmeyer and William Espinoza. - CONTINUED ON PAGE 26


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

PAGE 9

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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Fire Storm Rocks Union City Neighborhood Union City, NJ - A fast moving fire during a period of 30MPH winds consumed the upper floors of a mixed occupancy structure, killing a child and creating burning embers that set fire to a church steeple one-block away, on the morning of JUMP TO FILE # March 4th. In addi- 030617101 tion to the strong winds, the temperature was 21-degrees with a real feel temperature of 7-degrees. North Hudson Regional fire companies were dispatched to 1404 Summit Avenue at 1:02 A.M., as fire control notified incoming units that they were receiving numerous phone calls and reports of people trapped. When 1st Battalion Chief Mark Lorenz arrived, he said he couldn't get a proper size-up of the building due to the thick smoke. There were people running out of the three-story structure, into the cold, with no time to grab any possessions or even a coat. One resident told the media that he escaped out of a window with his family. The chief reported a heavy volume of fire in the building and wanted ground ladders set up upon arrival of fire companies. He then struck a second-alarm, which was quickly followed by a third-alarm. In addition, he called for BLS and ALS units to report to the fire. Firefighters went to work as flames were also threatening the adjacent exposures in this congested city. The father of a twoyear-old escaped the flames, but was severely burned when he went back to try and save his son. Unfortunately, the child could not be reached by firefighters due to the heavy volume of fire. “The firemen tried,” said one resident to the media. As flames vented out of the front windows and through the roof, the rear of the building was a sheet of fire. The father was transported to St. Barnabas Burn Center in Livingston, and was later listed in critical condition. Flames extended to 1406 and 1408 as numerous hand-lines and a ladder pipe were set up and operating. A ladder pipe from Ladder Co. 1 was utilized in front of the structures. Due to numerous overhead power lines, Tower Ladder-3 could not set up on the 14th Street side. The high winds blew burning embers down around the neighborhood, east of the fire. Police officers began banging on doors of wood-framed dwellings on Central Avenue, one-block east of the scene, to evacuate residents due to fear of the embers starting other fires. Residents within a two-block area were told to leave their homes. A Union City police bus was quickly dispatched to the scene to help transport victims to a nearby school for shelter. About 30-minutes into the fire, Squad-7 on ember patrol re-

ported that the steeple of St. Joseph & Michael Church, located at the corner of 14th Street and Central Avenue, was burning. The church is located one-block east of the fire scene. A fourth-alarm was transmitted by Deputy Chief Charles Thomas as fire units converged on the church. The steeple was heavily involved in flames as Squad-7 set up their squirt boom to attack the flames. Burning embers were still falling down throughout the neighborhood and police were still banging on doors to wake neighbors up to leave the area. The flames in the church dropped down to the upper section of the century-plus old corner structure and Squad-7 was forced to move it's apparatus further north, away from the collapse zone that was now established. As burning debris fell from the steeple, two parked cars on 14th Street ignited in flames, followed by explosion noises coming from the tires. Eventually, as spectators watched in awe from a block away behind fire lines, the steeple came crashing down into the intersection, taking down power lines with it and causing bright white explosions from the lines. Five alarms were transmitted for the fires. Mutual aid companies at the scene came from Jersey City, Hoboken, Kearny and Bayonne. In addition, Secaucus Tower-2 reported to the front of the church on Central Avenue. This unit and North Hudson Ladder-5 maneuvered on this twoway street, hampered by a center island, to move their aerial devices around power lines that had not fallen and set up their master streams. Also, Tower Ladder-3 moved up on 14th Street to that side of the church and set up its operation as flames lit up the night sky from the church's upper floor area. Additional mutual aid was needed to cover the area during this time and for the possibility of embers setting more fires. Hoboken Engine-5 and Ladder-1 set up a ladder pipe operation on 14th Street, east of the fire, to protect the wood-framed homes and other occupancies if fire erupted on the roofs of those buildings. Fortunately, it was never needed. Calling in mutual aid companies didn't come without some road blocks. Essex County was unable to send a task force to relocate due to active fires in Orange and Irvington. A task force from Union County was summoned. In addition, due to the possibility of other fires erupting, a task force from the FDNY was called in. At 2:45 A.M., Manhattan dispatched Engine Co.'s 1, 14, Tower Ladder-12 and the 8th Battalion Chief to Union City. This was the second time since 2001 that FDNY companies reported to Union City. On that evening, due to a rash of fires in Hudson County, including three major fires at once in Union City, FDNY sent companies across the Hudson

Flames consumed the upper floors of a Summit Avenue mixed occupancy building in Union City, that took the life of a 2-year-old child on March 4th.

RON JEFFERS

and went to work in Jersey. The night of December 1st, 2001 is known as the “Night of Fire” by North Hudson members. This time, the FDNY units staged on 12th Street, but fortunately there were no additional fires and the New York City units did not go to work. During this time, fire companies that normally do not re-locate into North Hudson did so from places like Cliffside Park, Ridgefield and Edgewater. Firefighters were hampered by ice covered streets and equipment, including ice hampering their turnout gear movements and coating their helmets. Local D.P.W. crews came out and dropped rock salt over the streets, but it seemed like some of the ice on the streets would continue to form in a thin, undetected style, creating a hazard. Several firefighters were taken to the hospital for treatment of minor injuries. As the sun rose, master streams were still pounding the stubborn flames on Summit Avenue, as well as in the church that continued to smolder. Thick ice coated the downed wires and remains of the steeple in the middle of Central Avenue. Besides the shelter set up for fire victims at nearby Jose Marti Freshman Academy, Veteran's Memorial School, opposite the church, was opened for firefighters to warm up. Even though there was no electricity, the shelter from the cold and winds helped members warm up a bit before returning to the street. The Gong Club canteen and a Jersey City O.E.M. rehab bus set up on Summit Avenue. This was the second major fire to occur in the neighborhood in the past three months. On December 21st, a five-alarm fire consumed a furniture store on the North Bergen side of Kennedy Blvd. at 13th Street. The fire was answered by the same North Hudson tour

that operated on March 4th-Group 1. At that fire, two pieces of apparatus suffered radiant heat damage. Officials estimated that about 15 families were displaced from the Summit Avenue fire and about 80 people evacuated from other homes. Families, homeless with no possessions, a seriously burned father who has lost a son, and a church devastated by fire, has the lower Union City community in shock. St. Joseph and Michael Church has been a fixture since the 1860's, with many first responders that have grown up in the neighborhood attending over the years.

Police Chief Richard Molinari, a church parishioner, could only watch and supervise his members as the church burned. Church services were planned to be held in a local school. In the aftermath, an examination of the interior of the church showed conditions to be pretty much intact. A surprise to many, considering the heavy volume of fire that rose above the church. During this holy time of year, could it be a possible miracle? - RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Flames burn in an eerie cross shape before the steeple collapsed.


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ALL IN THE FAMILY

If you have photos you would like to see in our “All in the Family” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RICH MAXWELL

Morristown Captain Joseph Sanfelice II (left), with his son Joey, taking a blow after operating at a two-alarm fire on Lincoln Street on March 11th.

PROVIDED

Lt. Tamer Abdallah (left), and his brother Thaier, are both members of the Cliffside Park Fire Department.

RON JEFFERS

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Iselin #9 ex-Chief Ed Mullen and his son, Iselin #9 ex-Chief Ed Mullen Jr., observe the damage caused at a house fire on Cooper Ave. in Iselin, on March 17th.

A somewhat shiny 1994 Pierce Saber Rescue with an 18-foot body, that previously served PA's Harmony Fire District, found a new temporary home with NJ’s Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad as “Acting Heavy Rescue-455” while they wait for the delivery of their new 2018 Pierce Velocity.

1994 Pierce Saber Rescue Finds New “Temporary” Home in Clinton Clinton, NJ – Because of increasing demands for service and equipment, the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad decided it was time to replace Heavy Rescue-455 with a new one. After considerable deliberation, the Squad placed an order for a new heavy rescue truck that will fill their needs; a Pierce Velocity with a 26-foot body. Bigger and better than the old 2004 Pierce Heavy Rescue, the new Pierce Velocity will be a 2018, as its delivery isn't expected until sometime during the Spring of 2018. But shortly after placing the order, a conundrum developed; there was a buyer for the “old Heavy Rescue-455,” who really wanted the truck now, long before

JUMP TO FILE #031917111 the new truck would be delivered to Clinton. What was the Squad to do?! In steps the distributor selling Clinton their new truck and also brokering the deal for selling their old truck, offering to lend the Squad a heavy rescue truck from their used inventory, free of charge. During the first week of March this year, a somewhat shiny 1994 Pierce Saber Rescue with an 18foot body, came rolling onto the apron of the Squad building. The loaner Heavy Rescue had previously served in Pennsylvania’s Harmony Fire District, a suburb of Pittsburgh.

The 1994 heavy rescue only has 20,000-miles on it, seats six personnel, is equipped with a 35k generator, a four bottle hi-pressure cascade system, a light tower, and room for most of the Squad’s equipment. The balance of the existing equipment will be spread thoughout other response vehicles in the Squad’s fleet. So, for now, the 1994 Pierce Saber Rescue has a new lease on life, serving the Town of Clinton and the surrounding communities in northern Hunterdon County as “Acting Heavy Rescue-455.” That is, until the sparkly new 2018 Pierce Velocity bumps it off the first line 12 months from now! - RICHARD MAXWELL

NJ’s Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad's old Heavy Rescue-455, a 2004 Pierce, was removed from service in Clinton as it was sold to another agency. It has been replaced by a loaner rig, a 1994 Pierce Saber, until delivery of their new 2018 Pierce Velocity sometime in the Spring of 2018.

RICH MAXWELL


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Two-Alarm Blaze Rips Through Home in Liberty Township Liberty Twp., NJ – On March 8th, firefighters from several departments battled a two-alarm fire that was reported to have started in the garage of a two-story home on Marble Hill Road in the Township. Crews arrived to find the two-car garage and part of JUMP TO FILE# the second-floor 030917134 and attic, fully involved in flames. The residence was located up a long driveway, over 600feet from the roadway, in a section of the Township that does not have fire hydrants. The residents were home at the time of the fire and quickly evacuated the building after calling the fire in at 3:33 P.M. There were no injuries reported, but one of the family pets, a dog, was not with them and feared to still be in the house. Firefighters found the missing pooch safe and sound on the first-floor and he was quickly reunited with his family. Mountain Lake Engine 72-62 was first to arrive on the scene, laid a supply line from the road up to the house, and quickly stretched lines to attack the fire. The engine was followed by Mountain Lake’s Tanker, which fed water to the engine until the Tanker Task Force could supply water. A Tanker Task force was dispatched to supply water to fight the fire, as there were no hydrants in the area. Two portable ponds were set up on the road by the driveway with Independence FD’s Engine 73-63 drafting from them to feed the supply line up the driveway. Some of the tankers that dropped water were from Allamuchy FD, Oxford FD, Belvidere FD and Independence FD. A tanker fill site was set up by Hope FD’s Tanker 73-63 at a standpipe located on Danielle Drive, a little under a half-mile from the fire scene. Some of the tankers were refilled at this location. The agencies responding to the fire included the NJ State Police, Mountain Lake FD (Station 72), Independence FD (Station 73), Hackettstown FD (Station 78), Oxford FD (Station 39), Hope FD (Station 38), Allamuchy FD (Station 91), Washington Boro FD’s RIT Team (Station 83), Belvidere FD (Station 21), Allamuchy-Green Rescue Squad (Squad 95), Hackettstown Rescue Squad (Squad 21), Oxford Rescue Squad (Squad 39) and Warren County Fire Coordinators. - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL

Firefighters from several agencies battled this two-alarm fire in Liberty Township on March 8th.

RICH MAXWELL

The homeowner’s brother, Emmet O’Bryne, carries one of the family dogs who was rescued by firefighters from this two-alarm fire in Liberty Twp. on March 8th.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

The South Amboy FD Honor Guard led the contingent.

CONNI SPELLMAN

South Amboy Celebrates St. Patrick’s Day with Parade

South Amboy, NJ - March is a big month for celebrating St. Patrick's Day, even after the day has passed! South Amboy's parade is one example of that. Hundreds of area residents lined the parade route on Sunday, March 19th, which was chilly but sunny, making it a great day for celebrating.

RON JEFFERS

Flames consumed the upper floors of 1401 Summit Ave. in Union City, taking the life of a 1-year-old boy on March 4th. The father and another man have been charged with starting the fire, authorities announced on March 16th.

Baby’s Father Accused of Starting Union City Conflagration Union City, NJ - The father of a 1-year-old boy killed in a March 4th fire is one of two men charged with starting the fire, authorities announced on March 16th. The father, Eddie Gonzalez Sr., 26, and Edwin Diaz, 20, have been charged with causing widespread damage and creating a risk of widespread injury or damage, Hudson County Prosecutor Esther Suarez announced on March 16th. Eddie Gonzalez Jr. died in the second-floor apartment his family rented at 1404 Summit Avenue. Officials said that the father was badly burned trying to save his son and he was hospitalized at St. Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, before being released several days later. Suarez said that the investigation is ongoing and did not elaborate on the charges, or detail how the men allegedly started the multiple-alarm blaze. Also involved in the investigation are the Union City Police Department, state fire marshals and the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

JUMP TO FILE #032017104 Suarez said that the fire started in the rear room of the Gonzalez family's apartment, where the father and son lived with Eddie's mother and 5-month-old sister, who were both able to use the fire escape to escape the fire. Suarez added that city police officers who arrived on the scene first found Gonzalez Sr. at the top of the fire escape, and he was first taken to a local hospital with burns and heavy smoke inhalation. The fire quickly spread throughout the three-story building and extended to adjacent exposures. Winds, rated at 30-mph, carried embers throughout the neighborhood and ignited the steeple of St. Joseph and Michael Church, located one block east of the original fire scene. The steeple later collapsed to the street, taking down utility wires with it and knocking out power in the area. - RON JEFFERS


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Ten Residents Displaced by Passaic Fire Passaic, NJ - A two-alarm fire struck a Passaic home early on the morning of March 23rd, leaving all residents homeless, but causing no serious injuries. At about 5:00 A.M., companies JUMP TO FILE# were dispatched to 032317113 371 Highland Avenue. On arrival, heavy smoke and fire was visible from the attic area of a large, two-and-a-half story duplex. The truck company was ordered to immediately ladder the roof due to reports of children trapped. Fortunately, it was determined that all occupants were safely out of the structure. Lines were stretched up the interior and eventually through a second-floor window to attack the flames. The truck company vented the roof and soon, most of the visible fire was knocked down. As companies opened up, fire showed from the roof line at the “A-B” corner and also dropped down to the second-floor, but both were quickly dealt with. The fire was placed under control in about one hour with assistance at the scene from Clifton and Wallington. The cause of the fire is under investigation. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Clinton Rescue Squad Receives Donation of Pet Oxygen Masks Clinton, NJ – The Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad (CFARS) recently received a donation of specially designed pet oxygen masks from Canine Company. They were given four complete sets and each set consists of three different size masks, enabling rescuers to JUMP TO FILE# resuscitate pets res- 032017100 cued during house fires. Deputy Chief Bucky Buchanan reached out to Canine Company after learning about their “Canine Saves” campaign, an endeavor to get these life-saving masks into the hands of first responders in communities where the company's clients live. “Masks similar to these were recently used on a house fire and helped as part of the team effort to save a dog and two cats in Raritan Township," stated Chief Frank Setnicky of Clinton’s Rescue Squad. The volunteers and staff of CFARS trained with the new masks prior to placing them into service on three ambulances, the REHAB units and the Heavy Rescue Truck. Statistics show that when fire strikes a home, family pets are at they greatest risk because they don’t know that they should leave the house. Instead, they often hide and suffer severe smoke inhalation. An estimated 40,000 family pets die each year from smoke inhalation in

house fires. These specially designed cone-shaped masks fit over the pet's snout and then simply connect to the standard oxygen tanks already carried by rescue crews. To help rescuers know there are pets in a home, Canine Company is offering free "Pets Inside" window decals to families in the CFARS service area. To request your decal, go to https://www.canincecompany.com/topic/petdecal.aspx. "Our company was founded by a family of pet lovers and our mission is to help other families keep their pets healthy, safe and happy, " said Renee Coughlin of Canine Company. "We do that with the services we offer and it’s the focus of our charitable programs too." Last year, Canine Company donated more than 120 sets of masks to first responders across the Northeast, including 44 New Jersey fire departments and EMS Squads. CFARS provides pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services and Rescue Services to the Town of Clinton, Clinton Twp. and Lebanon Borough, as well as portions of Franklin Twp. and Union Twp. Canine Company’s sales area covers New Jersey, New York and New England. If your organization falls within these states and you want to add theses pet oxygen masks to your rescue equipment, visithttp://www.caninecompany.co m or call 800-818-3647. - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL

Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad EMTs are joined by "Sarge," one of the member's pets, to help demo the donated masks from Canine Company, along with available window stickers and brochures.

Washington Township Firefighters Extinguish Car Fire Washington Twp., NJ – At 8:30 P.M. on March 15th, firefighters were dispatched to a car fire with flames showing at a residence on Mill Pond Road in the Township. Police arrived on the scene to report that the car was fully-involved in the driveway of the residence, but not JUMP TO FILE# near the building. 031717110 To get to the Ford Mustang that was blazing away, firefighters had to traipse through about a foot of snow that was dumped in the area by winter storm "Stella" the day before. The firefighters quickly extinguished the fire and began overhaul to look for smoldering spots. There were no reported injuries during the incident. Mill Pond Road was closed to traffic during the incident at Sky View Drive. Responding to the call were the Washington Twp. Police Department, Washington Twp. Fire Department (Station 76), and the Washington Rescue Squad (Squad 83). - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL


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Change Starts with YOU HEALTH & FITNESS by Robert “Pip” Piparo

If you have read my past 1st Responder News articles, you may notice a trend forming. I’m sure when you see the word 'fitness' though, the trend that is forming doesn’t come to mind. Most folks probably think these articles are about backs and bi’s, and chest and tri’s, or the latest diet and exercise craze that’s sweeping the nation; but they're not. They are about a cultural shift within the fire service. Hopefully by now, I have laid a good enough foundation to have most of you convinced that this change needs to occur, and needs to occur now. Somehow, the fact that for the past 15 years, cardiac related events have been the leading killer of firefighters nationwide, just doesn’t seem to be enough. We still have firefighters who believe that being fit is not part of their job description. But hey, thats the fire service that we all know and love. Change is bad, even if it makes you stronger, faster and healthier; i.e., a firefighter who is better at their job and who will live longer. Now the question is, where do we go from here? The answer my friends, is simple. We work to make ourselves better, which will in turn make the fire service better. I recently spent some time with the Chief of a large department and he explained it to me like this: 'If my people are happy and healthy, then they are going to do a better job for the people we are here to protect. After all, they are the ones we are here for.' So now it’s time to step up and make the change. You have to make this change in your life and you have to commit to it. It won’t be easy and it shouldn’t be easy. After all, if it

was easy, everyone would be doing it! You will have failures, you will have bad days and you will continue going back to the old way. That’s all ok! That’s life. But just like an Alfred told a young Bruce Wayne: Why do we fall?? So we can learn to get back up again. Each week I hear success stories from firefighters who are just like you, unsure if they should start working out, unsure of how to start, or where to go. The first day is always hard and the second day is even harder, but guess what; they should be! See, that's the thing firefighters need to accept about fitness. It always has to be hard, you can always get stronger and faster. You have to put in that hard work to get results. You are required to get results, not just for you, but for them, the people you swore an oath to protect. You also have something unique to our society. You have hundreds and thousands of brothers and sisters who understand, who do our job everyday and know just how hard it is. Fitness brings us all together. We all have something different to bring to the table. We can learn from each other because there is no 'one' way to get “firefighter fit," just like there isn’t 'one' way to put out a residential structure fire. Just like when we put out a fire, there are some tried and true strategies and tactics that will work to get you on a path to being fitter, and over my next few articles, I would like to highlight the ones I feel can provide the most benefit to everyone. I am lucky enough to have a network of friends around the world, who work hard each and every day to stay fit. I am going to draw from them and share their experiences here. Should you have any ideas, questions or suggestions for this column, please feel free to email me at Pip@555fitness.com. After all, this is all about us; us changing the fire service culture towards fitness for the better.

PROVIDED

“HONORS” Named as 2017’s Burn Foundation Fundraiser Image For the third year, Cinnaminson Fire Chief William Kramer, Jr. and members of the Cinnaminson and Pennsauken Fire Departments, in addition to EMTs, have assisted Artist Joseph M. Getsinger with a photoshoot for this year’s creation, “HONORS.” Getsinger has been the Burn Foundation Artist for the last 37 years. This year, David Russell, President of Fire and Safety Services, Ltd., a longtime supporter of the Burn Foundation and the artist, again gave his full financial support of this project for the seventeenth consecutive year. Fire and Safety Services, Ltd., located in South Plainfield, N.J., is a dealer and distributor of Pierce Manufacturing apparatus, all of which were utilized in this photoshoot. In the past 37 years, the artist

JUMP TO FILE #032117115 has created many paintings to support burn victims and survivors for the Burn Foundation. Last year, it was the “Enemy of Fire.” While attending the Wildwood Fireman’s Convention in September, Deptford, N.J. Firefighter and bagpiper, Captain Ron Taylor, Jr., came up with an idea to utilize a bagpiper in the scene for this year's image. Joe immediately thought the idea was great and hadn’t painted a bagpiper as of yet. The idea rolled around until he came up with a scene he’d decided to paint. This idea from Captain Taylor gave him the inspiration to create the scene for this year. The artist has also created a new and improved website where you

can not only see all the up to date fire art available, but also the many other creations and prints available by Joseph M. Getsinger at www.jgetsingerarts.com. In addition, he has added other artists' works he represents, or has acquired to sell. You can also donate funds directly to the Burn Foundation at: Burn Foundation - One Medical Center Boulevard, Lewis House Upland, PA 19013 Phone: (215) 545- 3816 - Fax: (215) 545- 3818 - info@burnfoundation.org Sponsor: Fire & Safety Services, Ltd. - 200 Ryan St., So Plainfield, NJ 800-400-8017 www.f-ss.com - COURTESY OF THE BURN FOUNDATION

FIRE EQUIPMENT

If you have photos for Fire Equipment, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

DID YOU K NOW

?

Applying Super Glue to cotton results in a rapid chemical reaction that releases enough heat to cause minor burns, so typically this should be avoided. However, if enough super glue is added to the cotton, it will catch on fire, making this a great trick to keep in mind in survival situations. So if you ever find yourself lost in the woods with nothing but a first aid kit, this little trick will help you start a fire.

RICH MAXWELL

Raritan Twp., NJ - A supply line stretches over 1050-feet up the driveway of J&J Landscape and Garden Center to feed water to the engines battling a two-alarm fire on March 22nd.


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Save the Date for a Huge Parade and Party to Celebrate Two Birthdays! Clinton, NJ – Save the date now, because on May 20th, 2017 there’s going to be a party that you won’t want to miss! The Clinton Fire Department and the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad will both be celebrating anniversaries on that date. The CFD will be 125-years-old JUMP TO FILE # while the CFARS 031917109 will be turning 50! The joint anniversary parade will kick off at 12:30 P.M. at the Clinton Community Center on Halstead Street. The parade will wind throughout town, going through the center of town on Main Street and eventually ending up at Hunts Mill Park, off of Haver Farm Road. The park is where the festivities will continue with food, drinks and music played by a DJ. There will be trophies awarded for a variety of categories to fire apparatus, rescue squad vehicles and marching units that participate in the parade. The announcement of the winners of the event fundraisers will also take place at the park. The deadline to register for participation in the parade is March 31st, 2017. You can go to the parade website for details on how to register: http://www.clintonfirerescueparade.com/rsvp This event is just another example of how these two volunteerbased organizations have not only worked side-by-side, but also to-

gether over the years. They don’t show their collaboration by just working together at fire scenes, motor vehicle crashes and other emergencies, but many of the volunteers are, or have been, members of both outfits. This brings out a special type of comradery that is not experienced in a lot of emergency service groups. The Clinton Fire Department began its roots when a seed was planted after a devastating fire in 1891. On Main Street, an inferno stormed through building after building, unchecked for numerous days. At that time in history, there was no Clinton Fire Department. Clinton’s mayor had to telegraph for help from towns that had fire companies. Flemington to the south, along with Phillipsburg and Easton, PA to the west, loaded firemen and firefighting equipment onto trains and headed to Clinton. Even though everyone fought to save the businesses and homes along Main Street, the losses were still staggering. In March of 1892, as a result of this catastrophic fire, the Clinton Steam Engine Company No. 1 was founded. In 1925, they purchased their first modern fire truck. In 1938, the Clinton Fire Department was officially incorporated as a non-profit organization. In 1949, the Ladies Auxiliary was founded and in 1987, the CFD Junior Firefighter Program began for teenagers. Let’s switch to present day. The Clinton Fire Department has a fleet

RICH MAXWELL

Current members of the Clinton Fire Department. The department will be celebrating their 125th birthday with a big parade and party on May 20th.

of modern firefighting apparatus, which consists of Tower-45, a 2007 American LaFrance 100' Mid-mount Platform, equipped with a 2000GPM pump, and carries 300-gallons of water; Engine 45-1, a 2001 American LaFrance, equipped with a 2250-GPM pump, and carries 800gallons of water; Engine 45-2, a 2015 Pierce, equipped with a 2,000-GPM pump, and carries 1,000-gallons of water; Special Service-45; Car 45-1, a Ford Expedition; and Car 45-2, a 2017 Ford Pick-up. Believe it or not, CFD still has the original 1926 American LaFrance pumper, purchased by Clinton Steam Engine Company No. 1, as part of their fleet. They call her "Lulubelle," and she is still running strong! Even though Lulubelle doesn’t respond to fire calls any more, she is their pride and joy. They proudly put her on display year after year at fire shows and parades. The Clinton Fire Department continues to be completely made up of 100-percent volunteers, who have been proudly serving the Town of

Clinton and the surrounding communities for 125 years. If you are interested, the Department is always looking for volunteers to join them! The Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad opened their doors on August 1st, 1968 answering 260 calls for service during the first year. They began answering calls with two ambulances, a 1953 Ford (which they acquired from the Manville Rescue Squad for one dollar!), and a 1955 Cadillac, which was given to them by the Blairstown Rescue Squad. From 1968 to 1976, if you called for an ambulance, the phone would ring at Clinton Farms. They provided 24hour dispatching services to the Squad, free of charge, as a donation and community service. Beginning in 1976, calls were routed to the Hunterdon County Communications Center, a county-wide system, where they are still answered at present day. Now, 50 years later, CFARS has 148 members and responds to over 3,400 calls for service a year in the Town of Clinton and surrounding communities. The Squad answers

calls with six ambulances, a heavy rescue truck, a water rescue support truck with four rescue boats, a REHAB Medical Support truck for fire calls, an off-road/all-terrain MSU ambulance, an Incident Support trailer, a Technical Rescue Trailer and a Command Vehicle. They also have a new heavy rescue truck on order with delivery expected sometime next year. CFARS continues today as a volunteer-based organization with the same mission its always had; to provide high-quality, professional emergency medical care for the sick and injured. They too are always looking for new members to join their Squad. If you are interested in supporting the parade event, want to sign up to participate in the parade, or just want to learn more about the events on May 20th, visit the parade’s website at www.clintonfirerescueparade.com. You can also reach CFD at www.clintonfd.org or CFARS at www.joinclintonems.com. - RICHARD MAXWELL

DAVID BURNS/@FD4D

Wantage and Sussex Firefighters Battle Afternoon Blaze Wantage, NJ - A house fire broke out early Sunday afternoon, March 5th, on Ruth Drive. Crews from Wantage and Sussex Borough Fire Departments arrived first-due and quickly transmitted a second-alarm, bringing in Mutual Aid from the Hamburg, Hardyston and Montague Fire Departments, as well as the Pochuck Fire Department in Vernon. The Unionville and Johnson Fire Departments in New York also assisted onscene. Several volunteer ambulance squads also responsed, including the Sussex, Hamburg and Lakeland First Aid Squads. The Sussex County Fire Marshal was on the scene to investigate the cause of the fire.

RICH MAXWELL

Current members of the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad. The squad will be celebrating their 50th birthday with a big parade and party on May 20th.


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NEW JERSEY GIGS

NEW JERSEY MEMORIES

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Gigs” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Memories” feature, please upload them to our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Ridgefield Firefighter Ryan Handschin of Company 3 and a cancer survivor, is one of the members of Pink Heals Bergen County that operates this 2004 Ford Expedition.

RON JEFFERS

PROVIDED

Trenton Truck Co. 2 operated with this 1924 American LaFrance, 65-foot, tractor drawn aerial ladder.

RON JEFFERS

Deputy Chief Zak Harabedian of the Whitehouse Rescue Squad in Readington Twp., is one of the officers that uses this 2001 Ford Excursion duty unit.

RON JEFFERS

Montgomery Twp. District 2 Car 46 is a 2010 Chevy Tahoe/Odyssey model, used by Chief Justin Kabis.

Pompton Lakes 59 is a Chevy Suburban transport unit.

RON JEFFERS

Camden SS-1 utilized this GMC special service unit.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Maywood Firefighter is a Shoprite Shopper Life Saver

RON JEFFERS

Maywood Firefighter Roy De Young, Jr. (left), with his pride and joy Ahrens Fox pumper, talking to Hackensack Chief Thomas Freeman during the H.F.D's 100th anniversary celebration in 2014.

Paramus, NJ - Maywood volunteer Firefighter Roy De Young, Jr. stopped in at the Paramus ShopRite to pick up some groceries on March 13th, but he didn't expect his first responder training to be tested between picking out items. A 69-year-old man went into cardiac arrest and collapsed. De Young observed people standing in a circle JUMP TO FILE# around the victim. 031417105 The man was on the floor, wasn't breathing and had no pulse. A ShopRite employee was on his knees next to the man and told De Young, “I used to be an EMT.” The firefighter performed CPR, but there was no response. Another employee arrived with a defibrillator. “We shocked him and he came back,” De Young said. “Paramus police and EMS showed up and took over from there.” Roy De Young, a Maywood D.P.W. foreman, became a volunteer firefighter at the age of 16. He is often seen driving the department's classic 1938 Ahrens Fox pumper at local firematic events. That's his baby! “All I can say is I was in the right place at the right time,” he said. “I still had to pay my $41 in groceries,” he said with a laugh. - RON JEFFERS

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Defender Emergency Products Sales & Service Congratulations to the Amwell Valley Fire Company on your Rosenbauer 4x4 Pumper!

Thank You North Brunswick Fire Co. #3 for your camera purchase!

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

EMS If you have photos you would like to see in our “EMS” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

Fire consumed the attic area of an 87th St. dwelling as deck guys protected neighborhood buildings from burning embers.

Another Night of Ice and Fire for North Hudson Firefighters North Bergen, NJ - After battling major multiple alarm fires and an All-Hands in a waste disposal plant, North Hudson firefighters battled another fire in below freezing temperatures with ice coated equipment on icy streets. Around 1:30 A.M. on March 12th, a full assignment was dispatched to the corner of 87th St. and Third Avenue for a fire in a building. Additional calls reported a fire at 801-87th Street. First arriving police units reported an “active fire.” Firefighters found fire venting from the attic area of a large, twostory, corner dwelling. Residents escaped the structure into the street, where the real-feel temperature was rated a 8-degrees. A second-alarm was transmitted, later followed by a thirdalarm. Fire consumed the attic

JUMP TO FILE #031317130 area and dropped down to the top floor of the dwelling. Fearing additional fire spread via burning embers, deck guys water spray were set up to protect wood-frame buildings on the east side of Third Avenue. This created another obstacle, with the forming of a thin layer of ice on the streets and sidewalks. Numerous hand-lines were used and members pulled down the ceiling in the top floor to find and extinguish flames. The fire was declared “probably will hold” by Deputy Chief Charles Thomas in about an hours time. The Gong Club canteen truck was dispatched for rehab purposes. - RON JEFFERS

RICH MAXWELL

Clinton, NJ - Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad displayed their Medical Support Unit (MSU) in the FSSP St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 12th.

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A utility worker checks the overhead power lines as "Comm. Tec." FF Lou Koenig (left), and Deputy Chief Thomas look on. RON JEFFERS

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May, 2017

COMEDY NIGHT FUNDRAISERS

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Put more fun in your fundraising! “The services of Johnny Lampert and Headline Entertainment has allowed the Scotland Volunteer Fire Department to become the leader in comedy events in the eastern Connecticut area. Johnny has provided outstanding talent for our comedy nights and has gone above and beyond to ensure that our fundraisers are successful.”

- Scotland Volunteer Fire Dept, Scotland, CT DAMIEN DANIS

Late Morning Fire Destroys Home in Fair Lawn Fair Lawn, NJ - A general alarm fire destroyed a single-family home located at 11-06 Alexander Avenue in Fair Lawn on the morning of March 4th. Fair Lawn Fire Companies were dispatched at 10:51 A.M for a reported fire in a home. Arriving chiefs were greeted by heavy smoke and fire coming from the rear of the home. All occupants of the home were standing uninjured in the driveway upon the arrival of police. A second-alarm was quickly struck by chiefs, bringing a mutual aid FAST team to the scene and outof-town companies to cover. The fire quickly extended to the attic of the home and shortly after, heavy fire engulfed the entire attic, blowing out of the side of the home and through the roof. The high winds that day played a role in the fire spread through the home.

JUMP TO FILE #030417110 A partial collapse of the roof occured during operations. Truck1's tower ladder went into operation to knock down the fire on the top floor, which was venting after the collapse. The fire reportedly started on an outside rear deck of the home before extending inside. Mutual aid from Saddle Brook assisted on the scene with a FAST team, while companies from Elmwood Park, Hawthorne and Glen Rock covered firehouses. Fair Lawn Heavy Rescue and Fair Lawn EMS also assisted on the scene. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Thank you FLFD for their assistance with this article and access to the fire ground. - DAMIEN DANIS

“Thanks again for a great show. Both acts were great and everyone had a fantastic night. Everyone raved about what a funny show and great time that they had.”

- Manville PBA, Manville, NJ “I have to say, this was one of the best shows we have ever had! Those 3 comics were just amazing. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves and had nothing but great things to say!” - Liberty Corner Fire Dept, Liberty Corner, NJ “The acts you sent were great. Our fundraiser was a big hit and everyone loved them! Thank you!” - Vails Gate Fire Dept, Vails Gate, NY “Thanks again for providing the outstanding entertainment for our fundraiser last week. I am sure you will be pleased to learn that the event raised tens of thousands of dollars! We really appreciate your help in getting us there.”

- Weston Vol. Fire Dept, Weston, CT

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UPS AND DOWNS - CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

DOWNS: Firefighters were injured, eight people displaced and businesses destroyed as the result of a fire in a multiple occupancy building at Summer & Verona Ave.'s in Newark, March 24th. UPS: Rahway firefighters rescued a man from a burning West Grand Ave. apartment, March 23rd, and he was airlifted to St. Barnabas M.C. for treatment of burns and smoke inhalation, officials said. Firefighters forced their way into the burning unit and found the victim on the kitchen floor, Battalion Chief Clifford Schlosser said. They carried the man outside where EMTs began treating him. DOWNS: Dozens of firefighters from Atlantic County answered a two-alarm fire on Cedar St., Hamilton Twp., March 22nd, that destroyed a house, but all occupants escaped

unharmed. Tanker units lined the narrow street as firefighters worked to knock down the fire. UPS: A mother, her 8-year-old son and her 4-year-old daughter, were rescued from their Kennedy Blvd. apartment building in Jersey City, March 13th, after a dryer in a firstfloor laundromat caught fire. Firefighters found heavy smoke filling the upper residential floors and the trio were unable to self evacuate due to the heavy smoke and no fire escapes, officials said. Firefighters vented the hallway and assisted the victims to safety. All three were treated for minor smoke inhalation at the scene by JCMC EMTs. DOWNS: A dog perished in a late evening fire involving small florist shop and apartment on Paterson Avenue in Wallington, March 4th. A garage abutting the building also caught fire.

RICH MAXWELL

Snowy Roadway Contributes to Multiple Crashes on I-78 in Hunterdon County Bethlehem Twp., NJ - The New Jersey State police were investigating several motor vehicle crashes on March 10th, including a van that rolled over on a short stretch of Interstate 78 westbound, where it goes over Jug Town Mountain near Mile Post 9. The calls started coming in right around 7:45 A.M. as the snow was falling. The initial dispatch for the first responders indicated that several cars and tractor-trailers were involved in a crash. What was found however, were several vehicles with rela-

JUMP TO FILE #031217102 tively minor damage all pulled over to the shoulder. While crews were responding to and looking for the initial call, a van lost control and rolled over onto the shoulder of the westbound lanes near Mile Post 8, which was called in by the first responders. These crashes resulted in some injured occupants who were transported to the local hospital by the

responding rescue squads. The injuries were not reported to be lifethreatening. NJDOT crews responded and salted the roadway. The NJ State Police is handling the investigation of the crashes. Responding to these incidents were the NJ State Police (Perryville Station), the Pattenburg FD (Station 25), Bloomsbury FD (Station 43), Pattenburg Rescue Squad (Squad 25), and Clinton Rescue Squad (Squad 45). - RICHARD MAXWELL

EMERGENCY AIRCRAFT

RON JEFFERS

A dog perished in this fire that involved a Wallington florist and apartment that was fought by area firefighters in below freezing weather on March 4th.

If you have photos you would like to see in our Emergency Aircraft feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

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Harvey Cedars, NJ - Just after 3:00 P.M. on March 13th, a Medivac was requested for a victim who fell from an unknown height. Barnegat Light EMS requested the fly out and MONOC medics met them at the landing zone, which was set up at Salam Park by High Point Vol. Fire Co. The patient was placed in the helicopter and flown to the nearest Trauma Center for unknown injuries.


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DAMIEN DANIS

Another Fire Strikes Recycling Company in North Bergen North Bergen, NJ - North Hudson firefighters operated at a Working Fire at 3700 West End Ave. on March 10th. Companies were able to hold the fire to a first-alarm on the very cold and windy evening.

RICHARD BILLINGS

Pastor Fernando Villicana, Fire Service Chaplain.

Local Heroes Chaplain's Corner

Pastor Fernando Villicana

Isaiah 3:1 (NIV) See now, the Lord, the Lord Almighty, is about to take from Jerusalem and Judah both supply and support… v2 the hero and the warrior, the judge and the prophet, the diviner and the elder, v3 the captain of fifty and the man of rank, the counselor, skilled craftsman and clever. It’s interesting to me how God uses heroes as part of the supply and support structure of society. As part of His judgement, God removes key people who are essential for a society to thrive. The removal of “heroes” leaves a huge vacuum in that city. Who are the “heroes” described in Isaiah? Well, to be honest, the Bible doesn’t give us specifics on the matter. However, what is clear is that they are a vital part of the health and all being of that society and are mentioned first in a list of essentials. If I were to address a group of Firefighters and ask all the “heroes” in the room to stand - few, if any, would respond. Why? Because if you refer to any Firefighter, Paramedic, EMT or Fire Support staff as a hero, they would not want to be identified as such and would most likely tell you that they are just doing their job. Well, they may think they're “just doing their job,” but the fact is that they are a critical part of the fabric of our society. -When a mother cries out for help and dials 911. -When a prayer goes out from under the wreckage of a TC. -When a family member is experiencing a full arrest.

PROVIDED

-When first responders roll up on scene of an MCI on the freeway. -When prayers are being uttered as a citizen is experiencing maybe the very worst day in their lives. Our Firefighters/Paramedics/EMTs are Gods answer to those prayers. It's not what you do, it's who you are. You are our local heroes. “Hard times don't create heroes. It is during the hard times when the 'hero' within us is revealed.” (Bob Riley) It’s not just what you do, it’s who you are! You are a special breed of people who rise to the occasion every shift to answer the call for help. You are our local heroes. PRAYER: God, we come to you today with a sense of pride yet humbled by the fact that you care for us and are mindful of us. Proud of what you have been able to do through our Fire Departments - humbled and grateful for the strength and skill you have bestowed upon each first responder. A skill which enables them to do what they do to help those in need. We know that your word declares that “without You, we can do nothing.” I pray that your hand of protection would be upon each Firefighter as they place themselves in harms way and continually stand in the gap for the citizens of our cities. We thank you Lord, and pray with the faith that “when they walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you.” (Isaiah 43:2b) We pray that you would reveal yourself to each and every one of our heroes as they become tools in your hand. We pray all of this in the name of the Father the Son and the Holy Spirit AMEN


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Daytime Fire Destroys Old Farm House in Bloomsbury Bloomsbury, NJ - A little after 1:00 P.M. on March 10th, the Hunterdon County Communications 911 Center received a call from a motorist traveling on Interstate Route 78 who reported seeing a building on fire off the highway by Exit JUMP TO FILE # 7. The caller could 031217104 not provide an exact location of the building. A Level-3 Box Alarm was dispatched for several of the county’s fire departments to respond, which included the Bloomsbury and Pattenburg Fire Departments, as well as the Pattenburg Rescue Squad, along with notification to the New Jersey State Police (Perryville Station). All of these agencies encompass that general area. The fire was initially believed to be in Bethlehem Township, which borders Bloomsbury right near Exit 7. Responding units quickly located the fire, which involved an old farm house at the end of a 1650-foot winding, narrow, tree-lined dirt road known as Ash Lane, which is off State Highway Route 173 in Bloomsbury. Fire was showing on the exterior of the building when the first-due engine stretched lines to attack the fire. Because there were no fire hydrants

in the immediate area, Bloomsbury and Milford Fire Department tankers were set up at the fire ground to feed water to Pattenburg’s Engine 25-1, Bloomsbury’s Engine 43-1 and Bloomsbury’s TAC 43, which was set up to the rear of the house. The Hunterdon County Tanker Taskforce West was activated as part of the box alarm. This brought in additional tankers from the Quakertown, Milford, Holland and Kingwood Fire Departments. These tankers set up a shuttle system to bring water down the dirt road to keep Bloomsbury’s tanker and Milford’s first tanker supplied with water. In order to be in the proper position to feed the water to the fire ground equipment, the tankers had to back down a portion of the dirt road. The fill site for the tankers was set up by Clinton Fire Department’s engine at a hydrant on Main Street in Bloomsbury, about a half a mile from the fire grounds. A command post was set up by the County Fire Coordinators in one of the farm fields by the house to coordinate the firefighting efforts and provide logistical support. Additionally, the Clinton Rescue Squad responded with their Medical Support Unit and set up a Rehab Station near the command post for the firefighters. The fire seriously damaged the two-story home, including a partial structure collapse in the rear section

of the building. There were no injuries reported during the fire, but unfortunately, there were reports that two pets had perished in the fire. It had snowed earlier in the day, which left a couple of inches of snow on the ground around the house and covered the fields near it. The snow also caused the dirt road to become a muddy mess. Firefighters were still on the scene after 4:00 P.M. The cause of the fire is under investiga-

tion. Responding to the fire was the NJ State Police (Perryville Station), Bloomsbury FD (Station 43), Pattenburg FD (Station 25), Clinton FD (Station 45), Quakertown FD (Station 91), Holland FD (Station 15), Milford FD (Station 92), Kingwood FD (Station 16), Hunterdon County Fire Coordinators (Station 86), NJ Regional Fire Coordinator, Pattenburg Rescue Squad (Squad 25), Clin-

ton Rescue Squad (Squad 45), Hunterdon County HazMat (Station 86), Hunterdon County Prosecutors Office (Station 89), and the NJ Fire Marshal’s Office. Numerous fire departments were also called up from both Hunterdon and Warren Counties to cover for the agencies at the fire scene. RICH MAXWELL

- RICHARD MAXWELL

RON JEFFERS

Early Morning Fire Consumes Attic of Kearny Home Kearny, NJ - An early morning fire consumed the attic area of a Laurel Avenue dwelling in Kearny on March 24th. There was heavy smoke in the area as Engine-3 pulled up to report fire breaking through the roof. A second-alarm was transmitted by Deputy Chief Robert Osborn. Local firefighters were assisted at the scene by units from Harrison, Jersey City and North Arlington. One firefighter was taken to Clara Mass Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ALL IN THE FAMILY

If you have photos you would like to see in our “All in the Family” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Clinton, NJ – Clinton Fire Department’s father and son members, William (Bill) Wintermute and Scott Wintermute, have a combination of 83 years of service to the community. Both have worked their way through the ranks to the top, serving as Chief and President of the Department, but serving in the top slots has not stopped them from continuing to contribute to the community and department. Currently, Bill serves as the

Department’s Treasurer and Scott holds the position of Captain (again). He is also President of the Hunterdon County Fire Chiefs Association. Additionally, Scott is a past member of the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad. Both father and son possess an amazing amount of dedication, which shows in what each has accomplished and continues to accomplish. - RICHARD MAXWELL

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Firefighters continue to hit hot spots as smoke emanates from the house.

Neighbor Rescues Man from Burning Home in Iselin RICH MAXWELL

Clinton FD's father and son members, William (Bill) Wintermute (right), and Scott Wintermute (left), have a combination of 83 years of service to the community.

Vineland Mayor Anthony Fanucci swears in Andrew Hartman as a new career firefighter.

JOHN W. CARR

Vineland Swears in New Firefighter

Vineland, NJ – On March 3rd, Andrew Hartman was sworn in as a career firefighter during a ceremony held at Vineland City Hall. A nice crowd of family, friends and fellow firefighters was present. The 22-year-old life long resident has served as a volunteer in Vineland Station-3 since 2012 and was just promoted to Lieutenant this year. Hartman is certified as Firefighter I and II, EMT and Hazardous Materials Technician. His first tour of duty will begin March 6th on B-platoon. This addition brings the career department’s strength to 28.

Iselin, NJ – A man trapped on the second-floor of his burning house was rescued on March 17th by a neighbor who was returning home and noticed flames engulfing the single-family dwelling. The neighbor raised a ladder to allow the man to escape. Firefighters from JUMP TO FILE# Iselin District #9 and 031917106 #11 responded at 1:23 A.M. to 107 Cooper Ave. for a reported house fire. While en-route to the scene, responding apparatus was updated by dispatch that there was a report of someone trapped on the second-floor. Upon arrival, heavy fire was showing from the first and second floors with extension to the attic. All occupants were reported to be out of the house by the time firefighters arrived. Engine 9-2 established a water supply near the front of the residence and immediately went into deck gun operation to knock down the bulk of the fire that was showing from the front of the home. Two hand-lines were then advanced through the front door to both the first and second floors, where heavy fire conditions were encountered. While attempting to advance to the second-floor, the interior crew discovered the stairs were burned through and severely compromised. A ground ladder was placed on the stairs, allowing the crew to gain access to the second-floor. A third hand-line was stretched to protect the "Bravo" exposure, while a fourth hand-line was advanced up a ground ladder to the second-floor as a back-up. Ladder 9-2-4 vented the roof to relieve the interior suppression crews, while ground ladders were placed on all sides for a secondary means of egress. Searches of the en-

tire home were conducted with negative results. The bulk of the fire was knocked down within a half hour and declared under control in approximately one hour. There were no firefighter injuries reported at the scene, but three occupants who were home at the time of the blaze were transported to JFK Medical Center in Edison to be evaluated for non-life-threatening injuries. The home suffered severe damage and was deemed uninhabitable by the Woodbridge Township Build-

ing Department. Firefighters from Avenel, Colonia, Fords and Hopelawn responded to the scene to assist with bringing the fire under control, while South Plainfield, Metuchen and Carteret covered both districts during the incident. Rehabilitation was set up by the Woodbridge Township Rescue Squad and C.E.R.T. Team. The cause of the blaze is unknown and is being investigated by the Iselin #9 Fire Prevention Bureau.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

- KEITH ADDIE


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Mass Notification - Paul Revere or the Click of a Button? by Chief Joel Miller

Back in the good ol’ days, mass notification was fairly simple. All it took was one call to the local television and radio stations by a confirmed source and the news would appear on the screen, or echo across the air ways. Of course, that was during the era when everyone watched their local television channels and listened to local radio stations. A more simple time when satellite radio was just a dream and the local stores and businesses didn’t have piped-in-music from corporate office on the other side of the country. Today’s world is a completely different environment, where technology has made things quite different. Most everyone now has satellite television, Amazon Fire sticks, Netflix, or some other type of non-local televised entertainment. Not to mention that radio now has satellite, Pandora, Spotify, and many more listening options, such as a personal playlist on our phones that sounds through the car stereo system, minus the advertisements of course. The masses cannot be notified of local news if the mass amount of the population isn’t tuned in to local broadcasting. So how does your department notify the masses when there is an emergency or evacuation situation in progress? Do we need to revert back to the days of Paul Revere and ride through the streets yelling “Haz Mat situation at intersection of 3rd and Oak! Avoid the area and shelter in place if you are in a three block radius of the incident.” Sounds a little crazy, doesn’t it. I don’t think we can go back to those days since no one would even hear us from inside their well-insulated homes and automobiles. As you already know, the masses can’t even hear a Federal Q siren blaring from behind them in traffic. Today, the fire service does not have to ride through the streets on horseback yelling, nor do we have to reinvent the wheel. It’s as simple as the click of a button on your smart phone. That’s right. In a couple of easy steps, you can notify hundreds,

even thousands of people, along with television stations and radio outlets of an emergency situation, all while instructing the population of what they need to do. What is the name of this wonderful device? Social Media! That’s right, and it’s FREE! You have the power of real time notification at your fingertips. Hold your own press release live with Periscope, Facebook Live, or Instagram Live. You can give people the most current and up-to-date information with a quick Tweet on Twitter, just like President Trump. You have the same power as the President of the United States! Okay, maybe that’s a little exaggerated, but you do have the same power on Twitter. Cal Fire uses Periscope for situational updates and daily fire reports during wildland fire season. You hold the power to report local news to the citizens of your bustling metropolis, down to your one horse town, giving them the latest and most crucial information in real time without even making a phone call, or waiting for someone to approve the interruption of Days of Our Lives, or Taylor Swift belting out “ Shake it Off.” Okay, okay……maybe it’s not quite that easy and now you have some work to do. Your department will need to choose the social media outlet that best fits their needs and start building a following. The reality is that almost everyone has a smart phone with them almost 24/7. Most jump every time someone starts a live broadcast or updates their online status. Social Media has three great characteristics that the fire department administration will love. First, IT'S FREE! Second, it’s easy to use. And third, there are multiple options available. There are even social media consults, like myself, that can help you build and execute a plan. So, tap into social media now and be the new Paul Revere when you need mass notification. “The fire department is coming! The fire department is coming!”

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Abandoned School Burns in Newark Newark, NJ - It took the flames two tries, but in the end, a large portion of the long, vacant Bergen Street School was destroyed in a three-alarm fire on March 21st. Firefighters were initially dispatched to the large, three and four story brick structure at about 11:00 P.M. to battle the All-Hands, Signal-11 fire. The building had been vacant since 2010 and was reportedly frequented by squatters. The fire was knocked down and most of the units had been returned, but several units were still on the scene when the fire flared up once again at about 2:30 A.M.

JUMP TO FILE #032117108 A second-alarm was transmitted as fire showed from several floors of the three-story section along Bigelow Street. A third-alarm was sounded as conditions deteriorated and flames took possession of the top floor, breaking through the roof. Lines were stretched to all floors, but as parts of the roof collapsed, all members were withdrawn. Poor water supply in the area soon became a problem. Supply

lines were stretched for several blocks to get the water needed. Eventually, three ladder pipes were put into operation along with a deck gun, several ground monitors, and additional lines were stretched to a rear courtyard. By about 5:00 A.M., all heavy fire had been knocked down. Companies continued to hit hot spots. The fire was kept from extending to the large, four-story section of the school, and was placed under control at about 6:00 A.M. No serious injuries were reported. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM PROVIDED


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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BUDDY SHOTS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Buddy Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

YOU WON’T RUN OUT OF THINGS TO DO AT .... FIRE EXPO 2010

LANCASTER COUNTY FIREMEN’S ASSOCIATION’S 45 TH ANNUAL

Three "buddies" of the Quakertown Fd from Franklin Twp. (hunterdon County), take a moment to pose for the camera during a house fire in Kingwood Twp. on Thursday, March 16th. (L to R): Trevor wene, Carmine Ricciardi and Jay Chardoussin. RICH MAXWELL

FIRE EXPO 2017

PET FRIENDS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Pet Friends” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com, or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Show houRS

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Newark, NJ - "Sonny," the firehouse mascot of Newark Engine-16, takes the driver’s seat as the rig operates at a multiple alarm fire on March 23rd.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

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Garage Fire in Paramus Quickly Knocked

Paramus, NJ - Paramus firefighters responded to 427 Bailey Road on March 5th for a reported house fire. First arriving units found smoke showing from an attached garage and quickly gained access to extinguish the fire before any extension could be made to the home. The fire was knocked down within 15 minutes and no injuries were reported.

Children 9 and under FREE

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Vineland Dwelling Fire Displaces Family of Five Vineland, NJ – A Vineland family of five was displaced on the morning of March 5th by a fastmoving fire that caused heavy damage to their home. At 10:45 A.M., Vineland firefighters and EMS were dispatched to the 1700 JUMP TO FILE# block of Venus 030517113 Drive for a dwelling fire, reported to be working. Responding on the working fire box were Engines 11, 31, 33, 42 and 61, Tower-6 and Ladder-2. Tower-6, under the command of Capt. Luigi Tramontana, arrived on the scene and was met with heavy fire from the rear and the roof of a bi-level, wood-frame dwelling. E-61, under the command of Lt. Paul Harvey, laid in with a five-inch line. Lt. Harvey and his crew stretched a one-andthree-quarter inch line to the rear of the dwelling, on the "C/D" corner, to knock down the heavy fire. His crew then repositioned the line and entered through the front door to cut off the interior extension. Lt. Harvey’s crew found heavy fire in the kitchen and living room, with fire extending the entire length of the attic. Additional crews provided backup one-and-three-quarter inch lines and opened up walls and soffits. Crews opened ceilings and battled the wind-driven flames in the attic and managed to keep the fire out of the other rooms. Capt. Tramontana declared the fire under control at 11:21 A.M. and the last company cleared the scene at 1:43 P.M. A total of 39 fire and EMS personnel were at the scene. Rosenhayn (Station-29) covered Station-6 while Station-5 covered Station-2. No firefighter injuries were reported. Damage was extensive and the family is receiving assistance from the Red Cross. Several members of the family were home at the time of the fire and escaped uninjured. The blaze appears to have originated on the exterior area of the "C" side. Vineland FD investigators are working to determine the cause.

Heavy fire showing from the attic shortly after exterior flames were knocked down.

JOHN W. CARR

- JOHN CARR

Stay on top of the news. Visit 1st Responder on the Web at

www.1RBN.com Crews working on the "C/D" corner.

JOHN W. CARR


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

In the shadow of the Empire State Building, two Union City EMS ambulances stand by over the I.495 Lincoln Tunnel cut during an All-Hands fire on March 6th. These are two-of-four new units added to the fleet, built by Wheeled Coach.

RON JEFFERS

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Asbury Park Engine-75 drafting out of a nearby lake during a massive fire on Lake Ave. in Ocean Grove on March 3rd.

Lt. Dave Bell gets an occupant down who was standing on the burning roof.

JOHN W. CARR

Working Dwelling Fire in Vineland Displaces Four Vineland, NJ – A late morning blaze heavily damaged a dwelling and left four occupants displaced on March 13th. Vineland firefighters were dispatched to the 2200 block of Sunset Ave. for a dwelling fire at 11:42 A.M. Engine-61, commanded by Lt. Dave Bell, was first on the scene and found a one-story, brick dwelling and reported medium smoke showing from the roof. Chief Robert Pagnini was en-route when he heard the report and ordered a Working Fire box. Responding to the scene were Engines 11, 31, 42 and 61, along with Ladder-2, Tower-6 and Vineland EMS. Rosenhayn (Station-29) covered Station-6.

JUMP TO FILE #031317145 As a one-and-three-quarter inch line was being stretched to the rear, Lt. Bell discovered one of the occupants on the roof, which had flames burning through. Lt. Bell used a small step ladder, which was already there, to quickly get the man to safety. Crews attacked the flames from a rear doorway and made entry to cut off the fire that was rapidly spreading through the attic. Tower6 laid in with a five-inch line to supply E-61. Another one-andthree-quarter inch line was taken through the front door. A two-and-

a-half inch line was pulled to the "D" side, but not operated. A crew vented the roof while interior crews made good headway in stopping any further fire extension, although there was some drop down fire damage to a bedroom. The fire was placed under control by Chief Pagnini at 11:52 A.M. A total of 24 fire and EMS personnel responded to the scene. Fire damage was confined to the roof, attic and a bedroom, and no injuries were reported. The displaced occupants were receiving assistance from the Red Cross and the cause of the fire is under investigation. - JOHN CARR

JOHN W. CARR


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Automatic Fire Alarm or Is It? STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

The other morning, as I was finishing breakfast and admiring the 22-inches of freshly fallen snow from two days prior, my pager opened, announcing for my department to respond to an Automatic Fire Alarm at a private residence. I pushed away from the table, bundled up, and headed for the location, which was less than a mile from my home. En-route to the location, an additional dispatch announced that the alarm company had called back, reporting an overheated pan on the stove. With the heavy snow plowed up on the side of the road, it made it difficult to spot addresses on mailboxes, which were covered in snow. As I found the correct location, a residence sitting back 200-feet from the street, the first rig pulled up. Three of us trudged up the driveway, rang the door bell and were met by the homeowner, who offered her apologies for having us respond to an unnecessary alarm. She explained that she was drying a large cast iron frying pan on the stove and had momentarily forgotten about it, that is, until the home alarm sensed the smoke and activated the alarm system. The homeowner had called the alarm company requesting they cancel the alarm and was advised that the fire department was on the way and couldn’t be cancelled. We explained how her alarm system works and how fire dispatch works in conjunction with her alarm system. The homeowner was most appreciative of our response and explanation as to why we continued our response to her location. We said our goodbyes as she continued to apologize, and headed back to the fire station. Our fire department, like many others, is dispatched to many AFA’s (automatic fire alarms) in our community, and as in many departments, we have members who tend to shrug off AFA’s with a negative remark, and others who may not respond to the alarm. The members will complain that the AFA’s are wearing them out, the constant crying

“Wolf” when there is no wolf, has an impact on them. Many years ago, fire alarm systems were found in commercial buildings, buildings of public assembly, institutional facilities, and where fire sprinkler systems were installed. Today, under the name Security Systems, they can be found in almost any type occupancy, including residential homes. The primary function of the alarm system is to detect and initiate the transmission of an alarm to a private monitoring agency, where it is then transmitted to the local 911 dispatch center. Fire, Police or EMS assistance, or any combination, will be automatically dispatched and once on the way, will not be returned by dispatch. Dispatch may transmit additional information, but they will not terminate your response. That will be determined by on scene investigation, or department policy. On scene investigation is always the best method. Maybe the occupant thought the problem was minor and had not noticed any fire spread. Cancelling response based on occupant call back may result in having to play catch up, followed by legal ramifications. There also are false alarms transmitted from AFA’s caused by a variety of reasons. The primary reason would be poor, or lack of maintenance. Dust in the detector head is common; blow it out with a can of air and the system is back in business. Every now and then, the system may malfunction for no apparent reason. If it is a continual problem, the system needs technical assistance to correct the problem. Many communities have local ordinances that levy fines after so many false alarms are transmitted. AFA’s are a part of the American technology age and they do make the job of firefighting safer by initiating early response to what may be smoke scares or incipient fires. Even I have a system! Definition of automatic fire alarm system: a fire alarm system which detects the presence of a fire and automatically initiates a signal indicating its detection. To be continued... Till next time, Stay Safe and God Bless!

Visit us on the web! www.1rbn.com

LITTLE BIG GUYS If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

The Robertsville Fire Company in Marlboro Township (Monmouth County) has Brush 28-2-93, a 1985 Ford F-350 4x4, which formerly saw service with South Old Bridge. From what I can make of the body, it appears to say “Dianum” as the builder, which is an unfamiliar name and one I’ve never seen on a brush truck. Anyway, it has a CET 150-GPM pump and a 250-gallon water tank. Other features include two whip lines, a ¾-inch booster reel, Indian tanks, saws, a brush cage, fire shelters, long tools, a fire rake and shovels.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Robertsville Brush 28-2-93, 1985 Ford F-350/Dianum, 150/250. It formerly saw service with South Old Bridge.

Right/rear view of Robertsville's Brush 28-2-93.

JOHN M. MALECKY


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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PAGE 46

May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

RICH MAXWELL

Fire Destroys Residential Greenhouse in Raritan Twp. Raritan Twp., NJ – On March 10th at 2:30 A.M., firefighters were dispatched to a Level-3 Box Alarm for a possible structure fire somewhere on Johanna Farms Road by the Hunterdon County Communications Center. The caller reported seeing large flames, but did not know what was on fire. JUMP TO FILE# Upon their ar- 031117105 rival, the Township Police reported a working fire in a greenhouse that was behind a residence. They quickly evacuated the residents of the home for safety reasons. The first arriving apparatus was Squad-21 from Raritan Twp. Fire Station 21. Firefighters stretched two hand-lines and started to knock the fire down. After Engine-21 arrived on location, it hooked up to the Squad to supply additional water. Squad-21 has a 1000-gallon tank, while Engine-21 carries 2000gallons of water. Because there were no fire hy-

drants in the area, a Tanker Taskforce was activated as part of the alarm. Additional water was supplied to the Engine by tankers from the Sergeantsville and Amwell Valley Fire Departments. Raritan Township Fire Chief Doug Day reported the fire under control at 3:00 A.M. and began extensive overhaul operations. There were no reported injuries during the incident, but the greenhouse was destroyed by the fire. Johanna Farms Road was closed off at South Autumn Leaf Boulevard during the fire operations. The fire department units cleared the scene around 6:55 A.M., turning it over to the police department. Responding to the fire call was the Raritan Twp. PD, Raritan Twp. FD (Station 21), Flemington FD (Station 49), Sergeantsville FD (Station 47), Amwell Valley FD (Station 48), Flemington-Raritan Rescue Squad (Squad 49), Raritan Twp. Fire Police (Station 21), and the Hunterdon County Fire Coordinators (Station 86). - RICHARD MAXWELL

TOM WALKER

Working Fire Destroys Garage in Browns Mills Burlington County, NJ - At 4:23 A.M. on March 22nd, the Pemberton Township Vol. Fire Department was dispatched for a report of a garage fire at 24 Pepper Road in the Browns Mills section. Upon arrival, the garage was heavily involved with fire on the interior of the building. The owner of the garage informed first responders that he had acetylene tanks that he used for wielding inside of the garage. As fire units were arriving, the acetylene tanks ruptured, accelerating the fire throughout the garage. There were also several propane tanks, but

JUMP TO FILE #032317120 they were not involved with the fire. The PTFD was assisted by units from the Goodwill FD, Joint Base McGuire, Dix and Lakehurst Fire Departments, Cookstown Fire Co. of New Hanover Township and Hampton Lakes Air Service Unit. Virtua and the PTFD EMS Division stood by, along with the Tabernacle Rescue Squad Rehab Unit, to provide medical coverage. Also called to the scene was the Plumstead Township Fire Depart-

ment's Water Tender Truck to provide extra water since there were not any hydrants in the area. Fire Departments from Vincentown, Tabernacle, North Hanover and Whittings (Ocean County) provided coverage for the township during the incident. One firefighter was transported to the hospital, but was quickly treated and released. The fire was brought under control at 4:59 A.M., but the building was a total loss. The fire was declared accidental by the Burlington County Fire Marshal. - THOMAS WALKER

ON THE LITER SIDE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “On The Liter Side” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

RICH MAXWELL

On March 6th, North Hudson Fire Control dispatched a full assignment to 32nd Street and New York Avenue in Union City for a report of a brush fire against a building. Upon arrival, units found a smoke condition on the third-floor of a three-story, wood-frame dwelling. A brush fire on the third-floor? You can't make this stuff up!


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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ACTION SHOTS FROM AROUND THE STATE

May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

To see your action shots in the newspaper, upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

An ice coated North Hudson Battalion Chief Mike Giacumbo checks with Squad-7 members as the sun rose over Union City, after flames consumed the steeple area of St. Joseph and Michael Church on March 4th. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

North Hudson Firefighter Alain Amaro of Ladder Co. 4 (center), checks in with Deputy Chief Dave Donnarumma to locate the owner of a pet dog that was rescued from a burning Palisade Avenue apartment in Union City on March 2nd.

RON JEFFERS

Glen Rock Firefighter Rich Gallagher operates the department's tower ladder at the scene of a fire involving a recreation hall on the grounds of St. Catharine Church on March 7th. The fire was extinguished in about 45 minutes, Chief Tom Jennings said. Three days earlier, a five-alarm fire devastated a church in Union City during this holy time of year.

Standing by at the command post during a two-alarm fire in Glen Rock on March 7th, (L to R): Paramus Engine Co. 3 Captain Mike Cleenput and Midwest Bergen Mutual Aid Coordinators, Joe Alvarez and Lou Graglia. RON JEFFERS

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

Iselin#9 ex-Chief Ed Mullen Jr. changes the bottle for Iselin #11 exChief Chris Wertz at a house fire on Cooper Ave. on March 17th.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

May, 2017

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American Firefighters, Heroes in Action VIDEO REVIEW

Video reviews by John Malecky

American Firefighters Heroes in Action By Brain Damage Films Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, #4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800-522-8528 E-Mail: support@fire-policeems.com www.fire-police-ems.com Price: $19.95 (DVD) This DVD is 70 minutes in length. It is dedicated to the brave men and women of all fire departments across America. It promotes the viewers to support their local firefighters. Its purpose is to provide action footage of many emergency scenes where firefighters show dedication, professionalism and efficiency, resulting in most cases with the saving of life. The clips are quick. They are of different types of fires (one of a

car fire set by vandals), a boat rescue and numerous traffic accidents. Most of the accidents resulted from alcohol and bad judgement. The locations are not identified, just the time of the incident’s operation and type of call. The viewer can see by the apparatus lettering and firefighter uniforms as to where most of these incidents occurred. In almost all of the scenes, the American River Fire Department operated. This department is part of the Sacramento County, California Metro Fire District, which includes a number of other fire departments. There are many close up shots, particularly when patient immobilization and extrication came into play. Conversations among the emergency responders can also be heard. This is a video that does justice to the recognition of the work of firefighters and is a salute to their professionalism and compassion for the patients that required emergency medical service. I, as a retired member of the fire service, appreciate the recognition shown by Brain Damage Films.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Flames Cause Allendale Home to Collapse Allendale, NJ - A three-alarm fire consumed a home in Allendale early in the morning on March 13th, leaving nothing but charred rubble, but causing no serious injuries. Allendale firefighters arrived to the home at 127 Crescent Place at about 3:00 A.M. to find a fullyinvolved, two-and-a-half story, large frame dwelling. With no chance of an interior attack and the residents accounted for, a defensive operation was set up. The

JUMP TO FILE #031317136 building was at the end of a deadend street and water supply immediately became an issue. Low water pressure from the closest hydrant prompted a long lay to a hydrant out on Crescent Avenue. The Allendale tower set up in a neighboring driveway, while the Wyckoff tower set up near the "A/D" corner. As soon as a water

supply was established, both towers were put into operation. Numerous collapses occurred, leaving little of the original structure standing. Several hand-lines were also used to knock down the fire. Most visible fire was extinguished by about 5:00 A.M. and some of the mutual aid began to be released. Allendale units remained at the scene to hit hot spots. No serious injuries were reported. - BILL TOMPKINS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Three-Alarm Fire Consumes Building in Newark Newark, NJ - A large building containing a restaurant, grocery store and apartments was gutted in Newark’s North Ward on Thursday, March 23rd. The building, located at Summer Ave. and Verona Ave., was well-involved when firefighters arrived at about 11:00 P.M. The response JUMP TO FILE# grew to a third- 032417118 alarm as the fire spread throughout the structure, sending thick smoke and flames skyward. Long stretches were necessary to supply the water needed for the ladder pipes, ground monitors and hand-lines used to contain the fire. The fire was placed under control at about 1:30 A.M. and some units were released, but others remained well into the next morning hitting hot spots. There were no reported serious injuries and the cause is being investigated. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

PROMO CODE FH16


PAGE 52

May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES

To see your “Faces” in the newspaper, upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com, email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com or mail them to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553.

BOB SHERMAN JR.

Hamilton Township Fire District #4's Firefighter Steven Holmes and Captain Joseph Horn, pose with their fire safety notice.

There were some special events at the March meeting of the Cliffside Park Fire Department. Fire Official Frank Poerio cooked a big meal for St. Patrick's Day, and Firefighter Tom Lanzalotto and his wife Angela, celebrated his retirement from the borough's D.P.W. "Lanz" has been a local volunteer firefighter since 1974. RON JEFFERS

On the same week that Steve McGill (right), was named the interim Chief of Department for the Jersey City Fire Department, he was the special guest and placed first in line for the Gong Club's annual St. Patrick's Day dinner on March 11th, as the organization's chef, Bob Bozewski (left), makes sure everything is set up. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Hamilton Township Fire District #4's Station-14 "A" Platoon members, Captain Joseph Horn and Firefighters Richard Bents, Robert Miller and Steven Holmes, pose with Engine-14.

BOB SHERMAN JR.

Is this his last fire? North Hudson 3rd Battalion Chief Dave Barth operates at a two-alarm fire involving a West New York pizzeria on March 25th. On this day, the chief had five tours left until retirement.


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May, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Spartan Buys Smeal; E.E.S.& S. Moves Last December, Spartan Motors, Inc. announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, Spartan Motors USA, agreed to purchased Smeal Fire Apparatus and its subsidiaries. For over 30 years, the two companies have had a relationship, which includes Spartan selling chassis to Smeal. Smeal’s subsidiaries are U.S. Tanker and Ladder Tower Company (LTC). LTC is located in Ephrata, PA and is the same property that Ladder Towers, Inc., and American LaFrance occupied and built the aerial products. We can go back in history to 1974 when Grove Manufacturing, which built cranes and aerial ladders, decided to sell off the aerial ladder division and concentrate on cranes. The Grove aerial ladder was of the steel cantilever bridge design and had a distinct thick bed section base, which set its appearance apart from other aerial ladder designs. In 1974, the rear mount platform was developed by the man who named it LTI or Ladder Towers, Inc. As time went on, other companies entered into the picture and the names heretofore mentioned were used. It is not known at this time how this new acquisition will affect Smeal and Spartan ER dealers. In dealer news, Emergency Equipment Sales & Service, who offers Seagrave fire apparatus and Excellance ambulance sales, has moved from Trenton to 119 Winterwood Avenue in Ewing Township. They also sell equipment and offer service on all brands of apparatus, both at their facility and on the road. They have an order from the Wallington FD (Bergen County), for a Seagrave Attacker HD pumper. Specs include a stainless steel eight seat cab, Cummins 500-HP diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS transmission, Waterous CMU, 2000-GPM pump, Elkhart foam system, 500-gallon water tank, 18-inch extended front bumper, Akron deck gun and FRC Spectra LED scene lighting. Firefighter One Professional Safety Services reports that the Ferrara HD100 mid-mount for Summit (Union County), is nearing completion. It is on the Intruder chassis. They have also received an order from Garfield (Bergen County), for an MVP rescue pumper on an Igniter chassis. It will have a Hale Qmax 1250-2000-GPM pump, 750-gallon water tank and an aluminum body. Defender Emergency Products reports that they have an order from the Amwell Valley FC in Hunterdon County for a Rosenbauer 4x4 pumper on an International 7600 chassis, with a 750-GPM pump and 500-gallon water tank. New Jersey Emergency Vehicles delivered to the Princeton First Aid & Rescue Squad (Mercer County), a P.L. Custom Medallion 170 ambulance on a Ford E-450 chassis. Fire & Safety Services reports the following Pierce orders: in Bergen County for Lyndhurst, a Velocity pumper and a Velocity 75-foot aluminum ladder, and for Saddle Brook, an Impel 75-foot steel ladder. The Griggstown FC in Franklin Township (Somerset County), ordered an Arrow XT PUC pumper. Pierce deliveries include an Arrow XT pumper to Clifton Please send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

JOHN M. MALECKY

Kingston E-5, 2016 Spartan ER Metro Star 2000/750/50 with 6-KW generator. It was sold by Campbell Supply Co., LLC.

Naval Weapons Station, Earle, Tanker 51, 2006 International 7600/Pierce Contender, 1000/3000.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Naval Weapons Station, Earle, Tower 51, 2013 KME Severe Service, 2000/300 with 95-foot platform and 10-KW generator.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Plainsboro SS-49, 1996 Ford F-350/2014 Knapheide with 5-KW generator. The chassis came from their former brush truck.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Prospect Heights Squrt 31 (Ewing Twp.), 2016 Smeal Sirius/LTC, 2000/750/30 with 54-foot Squrt and 10-KW generator. It was sold by New Jersey Emergency Vehicles.

JOHN M. MALECKY

(Passaic County) and an Arrow XT 95foot, mid-mount platform to Elizabeth (Union County). Absolute Fire Protection has completed E-ONE final inspections of South Plainfield’s platform and Hoboken’s pumper and rescue pumper, and they will be receiving these vehicles shortly. Campbell Supply Co., LLC reports the following Spartan ER orders: for Randolph Township (Mount Freedom) in Morris County, a pumper on a Spartan Metro Star LFD chassis with 10inch raised roof cab, Cummins ISL, 450-HP diesel engine, Spartan 200 CFM One Touch CAFS, Hale Qmax, 1500-GPM pump, 750-gallon water and 25-gallon foam tanks, Spartan Advanced Protection System, Extreme Duty interior, Spartan Mobile Gateway Wi-Fi hotspot, FRC scene lighting and a rear view camera. For Wayne Township FC. 1 (Passaic County), a Star Series 100-foot, midmount tower on a Gladiator MFD chassis with 10-inch raised roof cab,

Cummins ISX-15, 565-HP diesel engine, Spartan Advanced Protection System, Hale 8FG, 2000-GPM pump, 300-gallon water tank and a Smart Power 10-KW generator. Also, the Wanamassa FC in Ocean Township (Monmouth County), ordered an EVI special operations unit on a Ford F550, 4x4 chassis with crew cab. Specs include a 13-foot, non-walk-in body, Zico Quic access roof ladder, Davit lift crane, ROM roll-up doors, Whelen emergency lighting, back up camera and FRC scene lighting. They have delivered to Saddle River (Bergen County), a 103-foot rear mount Star aerial ladder on a Spartan ER Gladiator LLFD chassis, with a 10-inch raised roof having a 7-inch trench. It has a Cummins ISX 600-HP diesel engine, Spartan Advanced Protection System, Waterous 2000-GPM pump, 650-gallon water tank, a 500pound tip load on the ladder, ladder rung illumination and a Harrison 10KW generator.

Cheesequake Tower 204 (Old Bridge Twp.), 2016 Sutphen 2000/500 with 100-foot platform and 10-KW generator. JOHN M. MALECKY

JOHN M. MALECKY

Naval Weapons Station, Earle, Squad 51, 2014 KME Predator Severe Service with 25-KW generator, air cascade and 9,000-pound winch.


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Residents Make Community Stronger by Learning CPR at Atlantic Highlands First Aid Squad Atlantic Highlands, NJ - A group of residents from Atlantic Highlands are better prepared today to help someone suffering sudden cardiac arrest thanks to a recent CPR class held at the Atlantic Highlands First Aid & Safety Squad, taught by squad trainers. The community JUMP TO FILE# CPR class devel- 031117101 oped through a conversation between AHFAS Captain Tom Hayden and resident Colette Umar, who asked about being trained in the critical, life-saving skill as part of her studies as a preschool teacher. From there, Umar put out a call for participants on Facebook. More than 40 people responded and 14 were able to attend a program delivered by AHFAS members who are American Heart Association certified CPR instructors. “The class was a great refresher since it has been a few years since the last one I took,” Umar said. “The class was both informational and a lot of fun!” “The idea for the class was Colette’s and it mushroomed into something quite nice,” said Hayden. “This was a great way for us to connect with the community we serve, while also building the number of people who can provide CPR in times of emergency. Together, we are making the community stronger.” Residents gathered on a Sunday morning to go through the class, which included learning CPR, how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED), how to help choking victims, and how to handle the same situations with infants and children. In addition to Hayden, the instructors included AHFAS Chief Lance Hubeny, Richard Huff, Shannon Martiak and Tim Barnes. “The Atlantic Highlands First Aid Squad presented one of the most professional and effective child and adult CPR classes that I have ever attended,” said Dawn M. Greenleaf, owner of "A Child First at Miss Dawn’s Cottage," a childcare program for infants and young children. “As safety is a top priority of mine, it is important to me to both stay current in my infant-child CPR skills and to give parents reassurance with a formal certificate and to be able to help in any emergencies with family members, or the general public, as well.” Over the course of four hours, the residents, using training manikins and AED units, participated in hands-on training they can use in case of an emergency in their homes or workplace. The AHFAS instructors told attendees they will play a key part when encountering someone suffering from sudden cardiac arrest and

that what they do immediately could save a life. “The squad members were lovely people and the presentation style was clear and thorough, yet concise,” says Greenleaf. “The large number of instructors who participated was impressive and provided us students with very helpful individual attention. It was refreshing to participate in a class where I truly felt like the focus was on ensuring the class learned the skills successfully, rather than a rush for staff to see how quickly they could get through the class material so that everyone could leave as soon as possible.” The AHFAS is an all-volunteer emergency medical services organization that responds to emergency calls around-the-clock, 365 days a

year. The organization operates only on generous donations from the borough and residents. For more information on the AHFAS or how to help by becoming a member, or through financial support, call the non-emergency number of (732) 291-8118. Follow the AHFAS on Facebook and Twitter, and online at www.ahfirstaid.org. “I know all of the instructors had a lot of fun teaching the class and meeting our neighbors,” Hayden said. “Plans are already underway to hold another session in the spring. The more people we can train to perform CPR the better it will be for everyone in the borough.” - RICHARD HUFF

AHFAS EMT and instructor Tim Barnes demonstrates for class attendees how to help a person who may be choking. RICHARD HUFF


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

FIRE & SAFETY SERVICES 800-400-8917

South Plainfield, NJ

www.f-ss.com

If You Can Dream It - We Can Build It

May, 2017

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Massive Blaze Tears Through Multiple Buildings in Ocean Grove Ocean Grove, NJ – More than 100 residents were displaced on the early morning of March 3rd after a massive wind-driven fire tore through multiple structures in the quiet historic town, resulting in mass destruction. The Ocean Grove Fire Department responded to the fire, located at JUMP TO FILE# 22 Lake Ave., just 030417103 after 5:00 A.M. and were met with a vacant former hotel engulfed in flames with partial collapse and multiple exposures endangered. Several water supplies were established, while large handlines were deployed and ladder pipes set up to halt the rapid flame spread that was threatening structures on the entire block. Embers were raining down on the fleeing residents and firefighters as the fire was quickly spreading to adjacent structures. Firefighters were able to surround the involved structures with multiple master streams, preventing the fire from wiping out the entire block. A total of seven buildings were either completely lost or severely damaged. The massive five-alarm blaze took several hours to bring under control, but firefighters remained on the scene most of the day to hit hot spots. The former Warrington Hotel was reduced to rubble with only the foundation remaining, while additional structures were completely destroyed or suffered significant damage. Buildings that sustained damage included private dwellings and the La Pierre and Marlborough condominium complexes. The buildings that were deemed a total loss are slated for demolition. The Red Cross was set up at nearby St. Paul’s Church to assist residents whose homes were destroyed or damaged. All occupants miraculously escaped safely with the assistance of police officers, who combed through the threatened buildings to get everyone evacuated. Two firefighters suffered minor injuries while battling the blaze, but were expected to make a full recovery. The fire occurred near the iconic casino and carousel house located on the boardwalk of Asbury Park. Several mutual aid fire departments from Monmouth County responded to assist and rotated throughout the incident, along with Ocean Grove firefighters. The cause of the fire is being investigated by fire officials, but it appears to have started in the vacant Warrington Hotel.

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM

- KEITH ADDIE

KEITH ADDIE - NJFIREGROUNDPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Two-Alarm Fire Guts Home in Kingwood Township Kingwood Twp., NJ - On Thursday, March 16th, firefighters were dispatched to a fire call at a residence on County Route 519, a two-lane country road in the Township. The house is located a little over three-miles south of the Kingwood Firehouse, which is also located on CR 519. The call was quickly upgraded to a secondalarm and two tanker taskforces upon the arrival of fire crews. Extra firefighters were required to help battle the blaze, as there were no fire hydrants in that section of the township. Just south of the fire scene, one of the portable ponds was set up in the roadway for Kingwood’s Engine 16-64 to draft from. The tankers ferried water from two different fill sites to the fire scene. West Amwell’s Quint-26 set up on the roadway in front of the residence and stretched it’s ladder up and over the trees to drench the flames with water. The fire was reported around 4:30 P.M. and brought under control by 5:30 P.M. Firefighters continued with overhaul operation and extinguished hot spots as they found them. The last fire units did not clear the scene until after 8:00

JUMP TO FILE #031717102 P.M. The fire caused extensive damage to the building, gutting the second-floor and attic. Lambertville – New Hope Rescue Squad set up their REHAB tent, equipped with heat, on the roadway near the fire grounds for firefighters to catch a break and check their vitals. No injuries were reported during the fire. County Route 519 was closed between Barbertown Idel Road and CR 651 during the incident. Law enforcement agencies responding to the fire call included the NJ State Police (Kingwood Station) and the Hunterdon County Prosecutor’s Office (Station 89). The following fire agencies responded to the fire as part of the initial dispatch, the second box alarm and the two tanker taskforces: Kingwood FD (Station 16), Sergeantsville FD (Station 47), Frenchtown FD (Station 11), Raritan Township FD (Station 21), Quakertown FD (Station 91), Clinton FD (Station45), West Amwell FD (Station 26), Stockton

FD (Station 23), Flemington FD (Station 49), Milford FD (Station 92), Glen Gardner FD (Station 12), Holland Township FD (Station 15), Three Bridges FD (Station 33), Amwell Valley FD (Station 48), Bloomsbury FD (Station 43), Delaware Valley FD (Bucks County PA), New Hope FD, (Bucks County PA), Midway FD (Bucks County PA – as a cover assignment), Hunterdon County Emergency Management Fire & EMS Coordinators (Station 86). EMS agencies involved in the call were Kingwood Rescue Squad (Squad 16), Lambertville – New Hope Rescue Squad with their rehab unit (Squad 17), and Milford – Holland Rescue Squad (Squad 92) were on a cover assignment for the squads at the scene. Also, Paramedic unit EMS-3 from the Hunterdon Medical Center stood by down the road. It is now standard protocol to include an ALS unit with all Level 3 Second Box Alarms in Hunterdon County. - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

PATCH OF THE MONTH If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the Month” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RICH MAXWELL

Firefighters Respond to Early Morning Shed Fire in Lebanon Township Lebanon Twp., NJ – On March 10th at 5:47 A.M., a Level 3 Box Alarm for an unknown structure fire on Meiers Lane was transmitted by the Hunterdon County Communications Center to several fire departments in the northern part of the county, after a caller reported seeing flames. After the arrival of the Township Police and the Fire Chief on the scene, all responding apparatus were advised that it was a fullyinvolved shed fire. Shortly before the call was dispatched, it had begun to snow, causing slippery road conditions as the snow started to accumulate on the

JUMP TO FILE #031117104 roadways. The first arriving engine from Lebanon Township Fire Station-19 quickly knocked the fire down and began overhauling operations. Additional water was supplied to the engine by Tender-19, which carries 3000-gallons of water. The shed was totally destroyed and a Toyota that was parked in the driveway near the shed received some fire/heat damage. There were no reported injuries during the incident.

Meiers Lane was closed off during the fire operations and reopened after the fire department units cleared the scene around 6:55 A.M. Responding to the fire call were the Lebanon Township PD, Lebanon Township FD and EMS (Station 19 & Squad 19), High Bridge FD (Station 14), Lebanon Boro FD’s RIT Team (Station 18), High Bridge Rescue Squad (Squad 14), Clinton Rescue Squad (Squad 45) and the Hunterdon County Fire Coordinators (Station 86). - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL

A Toyota that was parked near the early morning shed fire in Lebanon Twp. received fire damage.

EUGENE WEBER JR.

Bay Head Fire Department is located in Ocean County, NJ.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Fire Damages Recreation Center in Glen Rock Glen Rock, NJ - A three-alarm fire caused heavy damage to the "Academy of Our Lady" recreation center on Tuesday afternoon, March 7th, as firefighters rushed to extinguish the fire. Glen Rock firefighters were requested to respond to the rear of 905 JUMP TO FILE# Maple Ave. for a re- 030717122 ported structure fire. Fair Lawn and Ridgewood Fire Departments were also requested to respond to the scene as a working fire was confirmed in the recreation center. Heavy smoke pushed from the attic area of the one-and-a-half story structure. A second-alarm was quickly requested as Fair Lawn and Ridgewood engines laid supply lines into the scene. (Two) one-and-three-quarter inch handlines were stretched into the structure as firefighters attempted to locate the fire. The fire, which was eventually located in the rear of the building, was knocked down within 30-minutes. A third-alarm was later transmitted to assist in overhaul. Mutual Aid from Fair Lawn, Ridgewood, Ho Ho Kus, Midland Park and Waldwick assisted at the scene. No injuries were reported and the fire remains under investigation. - CHRIS TOMPKINS

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Vehicle News

Gloucester Twp. District 6 has placed into service a new Pine Hill Engine 62 is a new E-One 2000-GPM/530-GWT Union City EMS has placed four new Ford/Wheeled SpartanER 1500-GPM/700-GWT/50-GFT/28-foot Boomer pumper. Coach ambulances into service. model, sold by Campbell Supply Co. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

ADAM ALBERTI

ADAM ALBERTI

Berlin Quint 21-1 has the distinction of being the first The Whitehouse Rescue Squad in Readington Twp. rePierce Ascendant 107-foot ladder in N.J. The Impel cently received a 2016 KME Predator, non-walk-in, heavy model has a 2000-GPM pump, 500-gallon water tank, rescue. It was sold by 1st Priority Emergency Vehicles. and it was sold by Fire & Safety Services.

The Annadale Fire Co. of Clinton Twp. placed this 2016 KME Predator Panther MFD rescue pumper into service as Squad 46. It has a 1500 single stage pump, 500-gallon water tank and was sold by First Priority Emergency Vehicles.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

JAMES WOOD SR.

Wallington Firefighters Save Florist Shop from Burning Wallington, NJ - At 9:30 P.M. on March 4th, the Wallington PD's phone was flooded with 911 calls reporting a fire at Lezze Florist, located at 341 Paterson Ave., on the corner of Mt. Pleasant Avenue. Chief Hrywniak arrived on the scene to find the rear of the florist fully involved, which had an apartment attached to it. There was also a garage next to it that also caught fire, along with a pickup truck. The fire went to a second-alarm and mutual aid from Woodridge, Carlstadt and Garfield were called in. It took 30-minutes to bring the fire under control. There were no injuries reported, but one dog perished in the fire. The cause of the fire is being investigated by the borough fire officials.

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BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Residents Displaced by Paterson Blaze

Paterson, NJ - All occupants of a large duplex structure were left homeless after an All-Hands fire severely damaged the structure on March 9th. Fire units were dispatched at about 4:00 A.M. to 66 State Street for the report of a rubbish fire. On arrival, flames were extending from between the duplex and an adjacent auto body shop, upwards and into both buildings. Lines were stretched into both buildings and trucks opened up. The fire took hold of the attic and it took over an hour to control the blaze. It was kept at an All-Hands assignment. The two-and-a-half story duplex at 66 State Street was heavily damaged. The auto body shop had fire damage in the roof area and the exposure on the “B” side suffered some exterior damage. No serious injuries were reported and the cause is under investigation.

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