Page 1

The New Jersey Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

HOME SUBSCRIPTION - $36/YEAR

SEE OUR ADS ON PAGES 5 & 55 WWW.1RBN.COM

MARCH, 2017

AERIAL LADDER HELPS FIREFIGHTER ESCAPE NEWARK HOUSE FIRE

JOHN HOPPER

Newark, NJ - During the early morning hours of Sunday, January 22nd, City of Newark Fire Companies responded to 361 Clinton Place for a reported structure fire. Units arrived on-scene to find a two-anda-half story, vacant, private dwelling with heavy fire showing in the rear. - See full story on page 38

Join our Team of Dispatchers Paging with a Rewards Program! Visit our website to fill out an application.

www.1rwn.com


PAGE 2

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Madison's Tower-1 venting the third-floor windows.

KEVIN WILLIAMS

Fire Strikes Community House in Madison Madison, NJ - At approximately 9:18 A.M. on January 25th, the Madison Fire Department was dispatched to the Madison Community House, located at 25 Cook Ave., for an activated fire alarm. First arriving FD units observed smoke coming from a third-floor window in front of the building. A second-alarm was requested, which brought assistance from Florham Park, Chatham, Morris Twp. and Cedar Knolls Fire Departments. Firefighters quickly stretched an interior attack line to

JUMP TO FILE #012717100 the third-floor. There, they were met with heavy fire and smoke. A quick and aggressive fire attack brought the fire under control in about 30-minutes. Fire units remained on the scene until 11:45 A.M. Morris County assisted by responding with their Medical Ambulance Bus for rehab and their Air Truck to refill firefighters’ air tanks.

The Morris County Fire Coordinator also responded to the scene. The fire is not believed to be suspicious and is being investigated by Madison Fire and Madison Police. The building was occupied by children and staff of the Community House's children program. The automatic activation of the fire alarm system and the many fire drills conducted monthly helped with the safe and timely evacuation of the occupants. - ROBERT DUNNE

ON THE LITER SIDE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “On The Liter Side” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Two Firefighters Injured at Paterson Blaze Paterson, NJ - Two firefighters were injured, one needing transport to Saint Joseph's Medical Center, as they fought an attic fire on December 26th. Units were initially dispatched to 217 E. 16th Street for an alarm activation, which was then upgraded to a Full Box due to multiple calls. The first arriving Battalion reported smoke from the attic of a large, two-and-a-half story frame and transmitted the Working Fire. Once lines were stretched and put into operation, the fire was quickly knocked down. The attic received serious fire damage and the floors below suffered extensive water damage. No residents were injured and the injuries to the two firefighters were deemed minor.

CHERRY HILL FD

Cherry Hill, NJ - On Monday morning, January 23rd, firefighters from Ladder-1324 and EMTs from BLS-1397 visited A. Russell Knight Elementary School to take part in the "Kindness Tunnel," where they welcomed and greeted students as they arrived to school. The Cherry Hill FD was more than happy to help the school kick off their “Great Kindness Challenge” week!


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 3


PAGE 4

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ADVERTISER INDEX Company

Page

1st Priority Vehicles

26,32,33

Absolute Fire Protection Co.

13

AGIN Signs

62

American Trademark

40

Apparatus For Sale

62

Armor Tuff Flooring

22

Associated Auto Body

Blaze Emergency Equipment

62

57

Campbell Supply

1,5,55

Choice Marketing

19

Choice Clean Gear

53

Defender Emergency Products FDIC

Fire Flow Services

Fire Line Equipment

Fire & Safety Services

Headline Entertainment

23

7,37,63

43,62

61

1,50,51,64

18

Kimtek

Long Island Mega Show

Mid Atlantic Rescue Systems NJ EMS Council

14

15

21,48

PL Custom

Robbie Conley Architect

11,28

29 49

44

Spotted Dog Technologies

25

Spectrum Communications

T-Mugs

35 45

3,47

Valtek

58 20

VFIS

39

CORPORATE INFORMATION

1st Responder News (ISSN 1525-1683) - New Jersey edition - Vol. 24 No. 3 - is published monthly, 12 times a year for $36 per year by Belsito Communications, Inc., 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. Periodicals Postage Paid at Newburgh, NY and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. No financial responsibility is assumed by this newspaper to publish a display, classified, or legal ad or for typographical errors except of reprinting that part of the ad which was omitted or in error. Omissions or errors must be brought to the attention of the newspaper during the A division of: s a m e month of publication.

845-534-7500 • (fax) 845-534-0055 Info@belsito.net

Beachwood, NJ - At approximately 7:45 P.M. on January 8th, the Beachwood Fire Department was dispatched to Birch and Surf Park to set up a landing zone for a severely injured subject. Upon arrival, Command units and MONOC's medical airship found that the location was unable to be used due to powdery snow conditions. The landing zone was then relocated to the parking lot of the Beachwood Elementary School. Fire Department personnel assisted Beachwood First Aid, South Toms River First Aid and MONOC medics with the patient.

Wantage, NJ - Units from Wantage and Sussex Fire Departments were called to the scene of a structure fire on North Shore Drive around 2:00 P.M. on Monday, January 16th. Quick response by the initial companies from Wantage and Sussex prevented any serious damage to the home. The Sussex Fire Department Emergency Services EMS provided standby services in case of any injuries. The Wantage First Aid Squad was unavailable due to lack of manpower.

41

South Jersey Credit Union

Task Force Tips

Landing Zone Operation for Beachwood Crews

Wantage and Sussex Fire Crews Save Home

27

Safe-T

Tasc Fire Apparatus

BEACHWOOD VOL. FD

39

New Jersey Fire Equipment New Jersey University

DAVID S. BURNS/@FD4D

RON JEFFERS

WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Three-Alarm Fire Destroys Sea Girt Residence Sea Girt, NJ - The Sea Girt Fire Department was called to a reported house fire on the afternoon of Wednesday, January 11th. Upon arrival at the 700 block of Chicago Boulevard, firefighters found a working fire. Sea Girt firefighters began an aggressive interior attack, but because the fire was rapidly spreading, firefighters were ordered out by Command and transitioned to a defensive attack. Mutual aid was requested, bringing in firefighters from Manasquan, Spring Lake Heights, South Wall, Spring Lake Borough, Wall Fire Company-1, Belmar and others. The fire is under investigation by the Monmouth County Fire Marshal's Office, as well as local fire and police officials.

Passaic's new fire captains, (L to R): Guillermo Hernandez, Louis Santiago and Adam Alberti.

Fire Captain Promotions in Passaic

Passaic, NJ - On the morning of January 18th, Passaic officials promoted six police officers and three firefighters to a higher rank at City Hall. Three fire lieutenants were escalated to the rank of captain. They are Adam T. Alberti, Guillermo Hernandez and Louis J. Santiago. Chief of Department Patrick Trentacost Sr. welcomed family and friends in the packed court chambers. Each fire officer stood at attention as their outstanding achievements and life saving actions were read off by Mayor Hector C. Lora before swearing them in to their new rank, with their families at their sides. All three are very capable to handle their new responsibilities.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 5

YOUR PARTNER IN THE FIRE AND RESCUE VEHICLE BUSINESS SINCE 1966.

Congratulations to the Board of Fire Commissioners Fire District # 3 Kingston Fire Company on your new Spartan ER Star Pumper! Features Include:

• Metro Star LLFD with a 10” RR

• 2 Year standard Spartan Warranty • Cummins ISL 450 HP

• Occupant Protection Advanced Protection System • Multi-Plex Display with Weldon Touchscreen • Transmission Allison 3000 EVS

• ON-Spot Tire Chains Rear Axle • Extreme Duty Interior

• Whelen emergency lighting

• Light Tower Model Will-Burt Nightscan • Wi-Fi Hotspot Mobile Gateway

• Waterous CSU 2000 GPM pump

• Booster Reel mounted above pump house

• Akron 95 GPM educator with 50 gallons of foam • Aluminum Star body with smart storage • 750 Pro-Poly water tank

• Smart Power 6KW generator

• Hannay Electric cord reel with 200’ of 10-3 cord

1015 Cranbury South River Rd. South Brunswick, NJ 08831 Phone: (732) 287-8884 • Fax: (732) 656-1925

www.facebook.com/CampbellSupply


PAGE 6

March, 2017

1 Ardmore Street • New Windsor, NY 12553

845-534-7500 • (Fax) 845-534-0055 • News@1stResponderNews.com

EXECUTIVE STAFF PUBLISHER

Joseph P. Belsito (Joe@1stResponderNews.com) ••• GENERAL MANAGER

Kathy Ronsini (Kathy@1stResponderNews.com) ••• PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Ashley Ramos (Ashley@1stResponderNews.com) ••• MANAGING EDITOR

Lindsey Palmer (Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com) ••• NEW JERSEY EDITOR

Ron Jeffers

••• MARKETING DIRECTOR

Greg W. Buff (greg@belsito.com)

••• CIRCULATION MANAGER

Michelle Belsito (Michelle@1stResponder.com)

••• DISPATCHER RECRUITMENT & RETENTION ••• OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR (Rich@1stResponder.com)

Nicole Roby (Nicole@1stResponderNews.com) EDITORIAL STAFF COLUMNISTS •••

Rick Billings (Cartoon) Henry Campbell (Staying Safe) Bob Long (Cartoon) John Malecky (Apparatus, Video, Bookshelf) Didymus McHugh (Chaplain’s Corner) Fernando Villicana (Chaplain’s Corner) Robert “Pip” Piparo (Health & Fitness)

CORRESPONDENTS •••

Keith Addie • Adam Alberti • Thomas Bischoff • David Burns • John W Carr • Willie Cirone • Don Colarusso • Damien Danis • Justin Derevyank • Doug Fenichel • Michael Flores • Bob Halberstadt • Todd Hollritt • Richard Huff • Roman Isaryk Jr. • John Malecky • Sylvie Mulvaney • Edward McMahon • Eddie Pfeifer • Frank Robinson • EJ Rode • Bob Sherman Jr. • Joe Siciliano • Ken Snyder • Conni Spellman • April Suk • Bill Tompkins • Chris Tompkins • Eugene Weber • Evan Webster • James Wood Sr.

EDITORIAL INFORMATION

Join our team of correspondents or columnists! 1st Responder Newspaper welcomes submissions by our readers. Send stories and photos to us at 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. Or, give us a call or send us an e-mail. If using the mail, please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope for all submissions you wish to have returned. Publisher reserves the right to refuse any editorial or advertising material submitted.

845-534-7500 ext. 212 • (fax) 845-534-0055 News@1stResponderNews.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION

If you would like information about how advertising in 1st Responder News can benefit your company call our advertising hotline at:

845-534-7500 ext. 211 • (fax) 845-534-0055 Advertising@1stResponderNews.com

CIRCULATION INFORMATION

1st Responder Newspaper is delivered to all fire, rescue, ambulance stations and hospitals. If you do not receive your papers, please contact our circulation department. Home subscriptions are $36 per year.

845-534-7500 ext. 220 • (fax) 845-534-0055 Circulation@1stResponderNews.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN/MARKETING

1st Responder News’ graphics team will work with you on your adverA division of: tisement free of charge. Additionally, we offer a complete marketing department for all of your printed needs. Whether they are posters, or single sheet handouts, full color or black and white, no one else delivers the high quality work at our competitive prices. As a newspaper in the Belsito Communications Inc. family, 1st Responder News has a state-of-the-art production facility which utilizes the latest scanning technology available. Materials are processed using Power Macintosh G4s. Output is handled on our HP Color LaserJet 8500 to produce this highest quality black and white or color prints on the market.

845-534-7500 ext. 214 • (fax) 845-534-0055 Info@Belsito.com

In memory of those who gave all

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

New York: Arthur "Art" Brault, 54 Rank: Fire Chief Incident Date: December 20, 2016 Death Date: December 20, 2016 Fire Department: Cumberland Head Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: After responding with his fire department to a structure fire earlier in the evening, Fire Chief Arthur "Art" Brault was discovered by his wife deceased in bed when he did not turn out for a second structure fire alarm call.

New Jersey: Louis Kelly, 70 Rank: Deputy Fire Coordinator Incident Date: December 8, 2016 Death Date: December 16, 2016 Fire Department: Union County Fire Office of Emergency Management Initial Summary:Deputy Fire Coordinator Kelly responded to a multi-alarm residential structure fire in Clark, NJ. He arrived on scene and assisted with operations at the Incident Command Post. While on scene, he suffered a medical emergency and went into cardiac arrest. He was immediately tended to by emergency responders, who performed CPR and utilized an AED to regain his pulse and breathing. He was transported to a local hospital for treatment, and while still hospitalized the following week, his condition deteriorated and he passed away. North Carolina: Donald “Reid” Key II, 31 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: December 25, 2016 Death Date: December 27, 2016 Fire Department: Whispering Pines Fire Rescue Department Initial Summary: On Sunday, December 25, at 1617 hours, Station 51 was dispatched to an Automatic Fire Alarm (AFA). Lieutenant Key responded as the Driver of 516 (Tanker); however,

was cancelled upon arrival by the Chief who had confirmed the AFA was accidental and no assistance was needed. Upon returning to the station, Lieutenant Key assisted several fellow firefighters with washing, cleaning equipment, repacking hose on 511 (returning from 2nd alarm structure fire). Later that evening after returning home, Lieutenant Key began experiencing a headache. The next morning (12/26/2016), the headache worsened, at which time Key’s wife drove him to Moore Regional Hospital in Pinehurst, NC. After being evaluated, Lieutenant Key was airlifted to UNC-Chapel Hill Hospital where he arrived midday (12/26/2016). He passed away at approximately 1345 hours on 12/27/2016. The nature and cause of fatal injury are still to be reported.

Michigan: Fred A. Newton, Sr., 66 Rank: Captain Incident Date: December 27, 2016 Death Date: December 27, 2016 Fire Department: Somerset Township Fire Department & EMS Initial Summary: While preparing to leave the fire station upon completion of his shift which included responses to three emergency incidents, Captain Newton went out to the station parking lot to start and warm his car. At 0815hrs, as other members of the fire department arrived at the station, they noticed Newton was in his car and had perhaps fallen asleep while the vehicle was still running. When a firefighter went outside and knocked on a window of the vehicle there was no response. He then opened the door and noticed Captain Newton was not breathing. Emergency dispatch was notified and the EMS crew at the station immediately began to render assistance, including ALS procedures, and transported Newton to the hospital where he was pronounced deceased.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 7


PAGE 8

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

South Bergen Fire Chief’s Recognize Local Heroes UPS & DOWNS Notes from Ron Jeffers

On January 11th, the South Bergen Fire Chief's Association held the first meeting of the new year to conduct their usual business at Lyndhurst Fire Headquarters. Before the business portion of the meeting took place, the association took time to honor members of the Little Ferry and Wood-Ridge Fire Departments for their brave actions during an August of 2016 dwelling fire in Little Ferry. The late evening fire in a woodframe home took the lives of a fiveyear-old girl and her grandmother. Five other residents suffered severe injuries. It was reported that a series of explosions from the garage area occurred and flames spread to the Washington Ave. dwelling. Among those recognized were Wood-Ridge ex-Chief Tom Burniston and Firefighter Dennis Kronyak Jr. At the scene, they were informed that there was a five-yearold girl missing in the burning home. They entered the house and passed a fire room without the protection of a hose line. They located the girl on the third-floor, carried her out of the building and CPR was performed. Sadly, the girl later died from her injuries. Little Ferry Captain Robert Fuchs, ex-Chief Frank Smith and Firefighters Rob Cordasco, Dan O'Shea, Kyle O'Keefe and Robert Aikens received a Unit Medal of Valor for their team effort performing a ladder rescue. Members were setting up a ladder in the rear of the home to rescue a woman who was partially hanging out of a third-floor window, with flames surrounding her. Firefighters noticed that the ladder alone was not stable enough to bring down the woman, who was burned and tangled in curtains. They then set up a second ladder adjacent to the first ladder so that the woman could be safely brought to the ground. She was then taken to St. Barnabas Medical Center in critical condition, where she later succumbed to her injuries. Little Ferry ex-Chief Marty Loesner, acting as the safety officer, noticed a hose team trying to extinguish an open gas fire in the garage where gas meters were missing. Gas was free-flowing into the second-floor of the dwelling where firefighters were operating. After trying to shut off the valve at the curb, he was able to find the main shut-off valve under debris in the garage. Loesner, who saw the risk of a possible explosion, told the hose team in the garage to fog vent around him while he entered the garage area to shut off the gas valve. Once the gas was shut, firefighters were able to control the flames. Members of Little Ferry Hose Co. 1 and Hook & Ladder Co. 1, along with the Wood-Ridge Fire Department were honored with a

Unit Citation of Merit for their actions. In addition, Wood-Ridge Firefighter John Heflich was honored for his 50-years of service to the W-R FD and his community. His twinbrother George, a Secaucus ex-chief, was also cited for his 31-years of service with the NJ State Firemen's Association. DOWNS: On the morning of Jan. 5th, American Legion Post 152 on Elizabeth Ave. in Newark was heavily damaged by a 2-alarm fire. UPS: On Facebook, the Vernon Twp. Fire Department announced that they raised $2,060.00 with their T-shirt sales to benefit Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. DOWNS: A 56-year-old man who was severely burned in a Christmas Eve fire on Fourth Ave. in Asbury Park died from his injuries, officials said. Firefighters arrived to find a garage fully involved in fire behind the home. Robert Fourette was found in the front yard with severe burns. Fire Chief Kevin Keddy said the man used the garage to work on vehicles. UPS: In Newark, Rufus L. Jackson was promoted to fire chief on Jan. 10th. He is a 21-year veteran of the department. DOWNS: Investigators charged a 22-year-old man with aggravated arson, alleging he poured gasoline on the exterior of 309 Firth St. in Phillipsburg in December, officials said. The fire damaged two homes across the street from a town firehouse. UPS: The Clinton Fire Department will celebrate their 125th anniversary, and the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad will celebrate 50years of service with a parade on May 20th. DOWNS: An 87-year-old Elizabeth woman who was rescued from a fire on Flora St., Jan. 7th, later died at Trinitas Hospital from cardiac arrest, officials said. UPS: A Paulsboro woman was rescued from her home on Jan. 10th, thanks to the quick thinking of Mayor Gary Stevenson, a volunteer firefighter since 1984. Passing by, he noticed smoke coming from the house. He knocked on the door and woke up a shift-work resident, who was asleep. There was a fire on the second-floor. The mayor called the fire department and did a quick search of the home to make sure no other residents were inside. It took firefighters two-hours to bring the fire under control. DOWNS: Firefighters found a Little Ferry resident dead on the second-floor of a Pickens St. home on Jan. 18th. Other residents were away on vacation. The house was heavily involved in fire when firefighters arrived. UPS: State Senate President Steve Sweeny honored retiring Director of Fire Safety, William Kramer, at the annual Gloucester County Fire Chiefs and Fire Officers Association dinner and awards ceremony, held in January. Sweeny presented Kramer with a proclamation on behalf of the association, recognizing his four decades of service to the community. Kramer is also a 40-year veteran of

RON JEFFERS

During the South Bergen Fire Chief's Association's January meeting, Wood-Ridge ex-Chief Tom Burniston and FF Dennis Kronyak Jr. were recognized for their fire-rescue actions. (L to R): Wood-Ridge Chief of Department Ronald Phillips Jr., Burniston. First Ass't Chief Ken Schultz, Kronyak, and 2nd Ass't Chief Elizabeth Ferry.

the Cinnaminson Fire Department. DOWNS: An early morning fire, Jan. 8th, on East Shawnee Trail in Jefferson Twp., gutted a dwelling and the family “lost everything,” officials said. UPS: Andre Williams has been promoted to fire chief in East Orange. At 43, he becomes the youngest person to command the city's fire department. DOWNS: Firefighters were hampered by icy conditions and a frozen fire hydrant as they battled a 3-alarm fire in a commercial building on Nye Ave. in Irvington on Jan. 8th. UPS: During a 2-alarm fire on Cator Ave., Jan. 26th, members of Jersey City Tower Ladder-4 rescued a trapped occupant from an upper floor window. DOWNS: After members of Jersey City Tower Ladder-4 made a bucket rescue at a dwelling fire, Jan. 26th, they returned to their Ocean Ave. quarters, along with Engine Co. 22, and discovered that their firehouse had been broken into and valuables taken. Personal belongings of several members were stolen. UPS: On January 28th, Jersey City police arrested Antwan Barfield, 29, and charged him as the person who burglarized the Ocean Avenue firehouse two days earlier, officials said. Barfield was identified by police and arrested in the courtyard of an apartment house on Union St. after he tried to flee from police. One source said at least one of the firefighter's stolen credit cards was used at multiple local food establishments on the night of the burglary. DOWNS: An early morning fire heavily damaged a portion of the Mannington Medical Plaza building in Mannington Twp., Jan. 27th. Fire companies from around Salem County responded, some with

tankers. UPS: Wildwood City Fire Captain James Gravel recently completed an internationally recognized Peer Fitness Trainer Certification Program in Pennsylvania. The program is sponsored by the IAFF, IAFC and the American Council of Exercise. The purpose of the certification program is to provide a fitness trainer standard consistent with the health and fitness needs of the fire service throughout the US and Canada. DOWNS: Twelve children were taken to Bayonne Medical Center on Jan. 17th, after a truck carrying a “pungent chemical” emitted a substance into the air while passing two schools, officials said. They were all treated and released. The truck

passed Lincoln Community School and Nicholas Oresko School when the chemical got into the ventilation system of both schools. Fire Chief Keith Weaver said he was informed by a state EPA representative that only vapors of ethylacrylate made it into the environment. It is used in the manufacturing of paint. The cause was a malfunctioning gasket in a topside valve on the truck's trailer, officials said. UPS: Passaic promoted three fire lieutenants to the rank of captain on January 18th. This included “1st Responder News” contributor Adam Alberti. He was promoted, along with Guillermo Hernandez and Louis Santiago.

Christopher Alberti pins a fire captain's badge onto his father Adam's uniform during a promotional ceremony at Passaic City Hall, January 18th. Adam is also a "1st Responder News" contributor. RON JEFFERS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 9

Crews Battle Three-Alarm Townhouse Fire in Norwood Norwood, NJ - Norwood firefighters were dispatched to 310 Cedar Ct. on January 18th for a reported structure fire after the homeowner discovered heavy smoke coming from the garage. Norwood's Chief arrived onscene to find heavy smoke showing and immediately ordered a second-alarm. JUMP TO FILE# The heavy fire, 011917128 which started in the basement, had burned through the kitchen floor and a first-floor wall, causing the fire to travel up the voids and into the attic. Firefighters were able to knock down the fire in the basement; however, fire had already traveled to the upper floors. As firefighters conducted their interior operations, a Mayday was transmitted and quickly cleared as all members were evacuated from the building. A third-alarm was transmitted and Closter's tower was put into operation as fire vented though the roof. The fire was quickly knocked down, allowing crews to make a second interior attack. All visible fire was knocked down within one hour. One firefighter was transported to the hospital with minor injures. The fire remains under investigation. - CHRIS TOMPKINS

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


PAGE 10

March, 2017

Command Post setup.

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ROMAN ISARYK JR.

DEBBY COOKE

OTFD's 2017 Line Officers (L to R): Lts. Jin Yhu and Alex Naylis, Chief Dave Keil, Dep. Chief Chris Reilly, Capt. Evan Kutzin and Lt. Brian Morgan.

Old Tappan Volunteer FD Installs Officers For 2017 Old Tappan, NJ - The Old Tappan Volunteer Fire Department recently installed it's Officers for 2017. The Officers represent the Leadership of the Department. Installed as Officers of the Line, the officers who will lead the Firemen of the Department in the fire attack are: Dave Keil, Chief of Department; Chris Reilly, Deputy Chief; Evan Kutzin, Captain; Brian Morgan, Alex Naylis and Jin Yhu, Lieutenants. Installed as Administrative Officers, who are responsible for the business affairs of the Department

USCG with their air unit overhead.

ROMAN ISARYK JR.

Search Conducted for Missing Boater in Tuckerton

JUMP TO FILE #010917106 are: Jim Butler, President; Jin YHU, Vice President; Rick Annis, Secretary; Dave Keil, Financial Secretary and Artie Lake, Treasurer. Chief Keil and the Department request and remind all Old Tappan residents during the Winter months to please be sure to shovel out and around the fire hydrant nearest their home. Help them to help you! Residents are also reminded that

to report a fire, or fire related emergency in the Borough of Old Tappan, they should call 911. During the past year, on at least three occasions, residents with a fire or fire related emergency dialed the Department’s business phone. Because the Department is staffed by all volunteers, there is not someone in Quarters on a 24/7 basis, 365 days a year. Remember: Dial 911 and they're on the run! - BILL AUTH, CHAIRMAN, PUBLICITY COMMITTEE

BUDDY SHOTS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Buddy Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Tuckerton, NJ - On January 13th, the Tuckerton, West Tuckerton and Mystic Island Fire Co.'s were dispatched to the end of South Green Street to set up a Command Post for a missing boater. Once on the scene, crews launched boats into the water and began their search. Soon after, the NJSP Marina Unit arrived along with the USCG. NJSP and USCG air units also responded and conducted an air search that stretched from Tuckerton to Beach Haven. According to reports, the boater was last heard from on Thursday, January 12th. His family went out to look for him the next morning when they found his boat adrift in the bay and called 911. Crews remained on-scene until about 1:30 P.M., at which time the search continued with the USCG and NJSP.

BOB SHERMAN JR.

Hamilton Township, NJ - Hamilton Township Fire District-7 career staff "D" Platoon, Captain Jason Bergstrom and Firefighters Craig Crowley, Brian Clarke and Chris Dixon, pose with Tower-17.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 11


PAGE 12

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Three-Alarm Blaze Strikes Elmwood Park Cleaners Elmwood Park, NJ - An Elmwood Park commercial cleaner was struck by a three-alarm fire during the bitter cold of January 8th. Firefighters were dispatched to 495 Boulevard for multiple alarm activations. The building was a large, one-story commercial build- JUMP TO FILE# ing, housing several 010917137 businesses. Heavy smoke was emanating from “Clean Shirts Inc.," a commercial cleaners. A second-alarm was transmitted as an overhead door was forced and a two-and-a-half inch line advanced. The fire was located in a utility room in the rear of the structure. Additional lines were stretched to the rear and roof as members opened up. The main body of fire was knocked down quickly, but the flames had extended to the roof joists and above the drop ceilings in a mezzanine section. A third-alarm was called to bring more manpower to the scene. A large hole was opened in the roof and the fire was able to be extinguished. Crews were rotated and rehabbed at the recreation center across the street. No injuries were reported and the cause is believed to have been from a problem with the heating unit. Units from Garfield, Fair Lawn and Saddle Brook assisted at the scene. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 13


PAGE 14

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

DAVID BURNS/@FD4D

Wantage House Fire Brings Out Large Response Wantage, NJ - Dozens of firefighters, led by the Wantage Fire Department and companies from multiple fire departments, worked on the night of January 5th to extinguish fire in a single-family home located on Haggerty Road. The fire was reported at approximately 7:00 P.M. As first-due companies arrived on-scene, they found a large body of fire and quickly transmitted additional alarms for companies and manpower. Most of the departments in northern Sussex County responded to the fire or provided station cover. Water was drawn from the pond at High Point Regional High School and ferried by tanker trucks to the scene. At the scene, firefighters used the aerial truck from the Sussex Fire Department to pour water down onto the burning house. The Sussex County Fire Marshal was on-scene, as well as the Wantage OEM Official and the New Jersey State Police.

D ID YOU K NOW

?

Fire Fighting was actually a sport at the 1900 Olympics in Paris.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 15


PAGE 16

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

PATCH OF THE MONTH

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Vacant House Burns in Passaic EUGENE WEBER JR.

The Avalon Fire Department is located in Cape May County, NJ.

ACTION SHOTS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Action Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Passaic, NJ - Shortly after the snow stopped on January 7th, Passaic firefighters faced a stubborn house fire that caused extensive damage, but inflicted no reported injuries. The weather that day left about four-inches of snow, but temperatures in the teens is what caused the bigger hardship when Passaic firefighters responded to 58 Bond St. at about 7:20 P.M. A working fire in the basement of the unoccupied, large, two-and-a-half story frame structure was evident on arrival. A second-

JUMP TO FILE #010917123 alarm was sounded as an attack was commenced. Flames spread up within the walls and the first-floor began to collapse. A third-alarm was transmitted as members were temporarily withdrawn and the fire was hit from the outside. The visible fire was quickly knocked down, but the fire in the walls eluded the firefighters. Members opened up from both

the inside and outside of the structure, leaving a huge hole on the “D” side of the home. After several hours, the smoke condition lessened and some companies were able to be released, but others were held much longer for the extensive overhaul. The fire is initially considered suspicious due to the home being vacant and is under investigation. There were no reported civilian or firefighter injuries. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Little Ferry, NJ - Hackensack Deputy Chief Steve Kalman, in as mutual aid to a house fire in Little Ferry, checks out the “C” side of the building where the Hackensack ladder will set up.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 17

Man Dies in Little Ferry House Fire Little Ferry, NJ - One resident was killed as flames gutted the second-floor and attic of a Little Ferry home on January 18th. Shortly before 8:00 A.M., calls started coming in for a house fire at 47 Pickens Street. The home was visible from the firehouse, located one block away. Heavy smoke and fire was showing from the second-floor and extending up to the attic. Mutual aid was summoned before the rigs responded. Two lines were quickly stretched in the front door and to the second-floor. Crews were able to knock down the fire on the second-floor, but access to the attic could not be located and the fire soon had full possession, with flames venting out of windows in both the front and rear. The roof was vented in the front by the Little Ferry tower and

JUMP TO FILE #011817111 in the rear by the Hackensack stick. A deck gun was put into operation from the front, while a hand-line was operated from the aerial in the rear in addition to several lines at ground level. Flames extended out of the vent hole and eventually consumed a large portion of the roof. The attic continued to burn due to the inability to access it. Crews extinguished all fire on the secondfloor and then discovered the badly burned victim. Once the fire was knocked in the attic, the blaze was placed under control. No other injuries were reported. The Bergen County Prosecutor's Office was investigating. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Submitting photos and press releases is EASY!

Register at www.1rbn.com to begin posting directly. Prefer emails? Email your press release and photos directly to

Lindsey@1strespondernews.com BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


PAGE 18

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

MEMORIAL BOARD If you have photos for the Memorial Board feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Piscataway, NJ - The New Market Fire Department recently announced with deep regret the passing of Life Member and exChief Martin " Marty " MacMillan. Martin passed away on January 25th at the age of 88. He was a discharged veteran of the United States Army and served his country in the Korean War, but his true passion and calling in life was being a firefighter. For over 50 years, Martin proudly served with the New Market Fire Company in Piscataway. He worked his way through the line officers and served as Fire

WANT TO PUT MORE “FUN” IN YOUR FUNDRAISING? OUR COMEDY NIGHTS ARE THE ANSWER!

Chief in the mid-70's. In 1971, Martin was a recipient of a National "Fireman of the Year" Award, where he was recognized for saving the life of a child in an apartment fire. Additionally Martin served as a Fire Commissioner for many years. Martin leaves behind his loving and devoted family; daughters Jean Magee and Edward of New Hampshire, Rebecca MacMillan and companion J.W. Price of Hillsborough, son John MacMillan of Piscataway and three grandchildren; Shawn Martin MacMillan and Robert and Ryan Magee.

EDIANS

HEADLINE COM

S VA R IE T Y A C T

C E L E B R IT IE S MUSIC & MOR

E

FIRE DEPARTMENTS

FUNDRAISERS

GOLF OUTINGS PBA’S & MORE

Our philosophy is simple: To provide you with the great acts and expert guidance you need to make your next fundraising event a memorable one. “The services of Johnny Lampert and Headline Entertainment has allowed the Scotland Volunteer Fire Department to become the leader in comedy events in the eastern Connecticut area. Johnny has provided outstanding talent for our comedy nights and has gone above and beyond to ensure that our fundraisers are successful.”

- Scotland Volunteer Fire Dept, Scotland, CT “Thanks again for a great show. Both acts were great and everyone had a fantastic night. Everyone raved about what a funny show and great time that they had.”

- Manville PBA, Manville, NJ “I have to say, this was one of the best shows we have ever had! Those 3 comics were just amazing. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed themselves and had nothing but great things to say!” - Liberty Corner Fire Dept, Liberty Corner, NJ Martin " Marty " MacMillan.

NEW MARKET FD

“The acts you sent were great. Our fundraiser was a big hit and everyone loved them! Thank you!” - Vails Gate Fire Dept, Vails Gate, NY “Thanks again for providing the outstanding entertainment for our fundraiser last week. I am sure you will be pleased to learn that the event raised tens of thousands of dollars! We really appreciate your help in getting us there.”

- Weston Vol. Fire Dept, Weston, CT

BOOK NOW! Dates Are Going Fast.

1-888-552-6737 Your good time is our business. HeadlineActs@gmail.com

HeadlineEntertainment.us (to see streaming video clips of our talent in action)


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 19


PAGE 20

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

NEW JERSEY GIGS

NEW JERSEY MEMORIES

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Gigs” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Memories” feature, please upload them to our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

The Quakertown Fire Company uses this 2003 Dodge Durango as a duty car.

Former Bradley Beach Co. 3's Maccar apparatus is part of the NJ Fire Museum collection.

RON JEFFERS

Plainfield Operations Chief Car 3 is a Dodge Durango.

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Slackwood Fire Company Deputy Chief Todd Lenarski answers alarms with a 2009 Ford Expedition.

RON JEFFERS

East Whitehouse Chief Paul Hobretz answers alarms in a 1999 Ford Expedition.

RON JEFFERS

Chevron-Perth Amboy used this American La France pumper that is now part of the NJ Fire Museum collection.

Valtek, the FiretruckShop.com, provides the highest quality painting and collision work for fire equipment in the NJ/NY metropolitan area. We also have the spray booth, safety equipment and permits you expect. Work is done quickly for a fair price by people that know fire trucks. Nearby at Exit 60 off Route 80. Come see for yourself why over 229 departments have chosen Valtek for their painting and collision needs.

Valtek™ is the first Axalta Certified Commercial Refinisher in the area.

Restored by

FiretruckShop.com • (9 73) 27 8-1 444


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 21


PAGE 22

March, 2017

VIDEO REVIEW Video reviews by John Malecky

A Good Job

A Good Job Stories of the FDNY HBO Documentary Films Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, #4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800-522-8528 e-mail: fire-police-ems.com www.fire-police-ems.com Price: $19.00 (DVD) This is a 60-minute DVD comprised of a large group of interviews with FDNY firefighters of many ranks, both active and retired, about the memories of their careers, including the good times, the bad times, the happy and sad moments, times of transition and the personal effects that the ordeals and experiences left on them. The interviews are done by Steve Buscami, an award winning actor and director, who prior to his acting career, had taken the test for firefighter in 1976 and spent four years at Engine-55 in the Little Italy section of Manhattan. Steve returned to Engine-55 after 9/11 to lend a hand on “the pile," in search of missing members.

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

The interviews address “the war years,” named for the fires in the 1960’s and 1970’s, including the Madison Square Tragedy which claimed 12 firefighters in 1966 and the Waldbaum’s roof collapse in Brooklyn in 1978, which claimed six members. The advent of female firefighters, black firefighters, self-contained breathing apparatus and new bunker clothing is discussed. Two retired female firefighters, including a battalion chief, give details of their indoctrination and treatment when women first got assigned to stations. The Happyland Social Club fire in 1989 is discussed and of course, the World Trade Center in 2001. Some of those interviewed lost family members, including two sons of Deputy Chief Ray Downey. The firehouse kitchen is touched on where jokes and horseplay abound, especially with probationary firefighters. Retired commissioner Sal Cassano and retired Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn are interviewed. Dunn could have lost his life at the Madison Square fire with the difference of his order by the deputy chief and the order given to Engine-18. If those orders were reversed, we would never have benefited from his textbooks, one of which was “The Collapse of Burning Buildings!” I believe this video will keep your undivided attention for it's duration and help both firefighters and non firefighters to appreciate what working in a burning building is like, realizing that the horrors of the job can stay with the person for many years to come.

Like our Facebook Page for a Chance to Win a $50 Gift Card to Home Depot!

www.facebook.com/1stResponderNews

One New Winner will be Chosen Monthly and Announced on our Facebook Page.

ONE DAY INSTALLATION! LIFETIME WARRANTY Cannot Crack or Fail EVER!

8:00 AM

5:00 PM SAME DAY

DON’T BE FOOLED BY SUPRATILE IMITATIONS NYPD EMS IN BRONX

Priced Comparable to Epoxy Goes Right Over Your Old Floor

ARMOR-TUFF FLOORS, DIVISION OF ARMORPOXY sales@armor-tuff.com • www.armor-tuff.com • 855-72FLOOR


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 23

Defender Emergency Products Sales & Service Congratulations to Manitou Park Fire Company on your Rosenbauer Walk-In Rescue Truck!!

Call Us Today! 732-840-9389

Congratulations to Hopewell Fire District #1 on your Rosenbauer Custom Rescue Pumper!!

“Building Relationships One Customer, One Truck at a Time”


PAGE 24

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

The After Affects of LODD or Injury STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

Who else is affected when a firefighter gets injured or killed is a question many of us in the fire service tend to avoid, or not dwell upon. Unfortunately, that doesn’t make the realities and pain of life go away and all emergency service personnel should realize that the death and/or injury of a firefighter will have far reaching impact in their family, department and community. The injury that befalls a firefighter can be a lasting and traumatic experience; in some instances, it may require extensive long-term medical treatment and care, maybe disfiguration, paralysis, or living the rest of one’s life with a permanent disability. It can be a very high price to pay, especially if the injury could have been prevented. The ultimate price would be the death of a firefighter as an immediate result of performance of duty, or at a later date from complications from injuries sustained while in the performance of duty. Needless to say, death is final, the last whistle has blown and the game has come to an abrupt end. Spouses, families, friends, department and community will be heartbroken and saddened, and they may be devastated by the loss of a brother/sister firefighter. With the sadness brought about by death or injury, in the days and years ahead there will be many problems and issues that will have to be addressed and overcome, and in most instances, they will have a lasting impact on the family, department and community. We can evaluate this impact in the form of physical, financial, emotional and psychological stress. The physical damage will be in the form of the injury, medical care needed and potential for rehabilitation. Many firefighters think small when they think of injuries; a cut, broken bone, sprain, minor burn, or some form of injury that will be short-term and soon forgotten. Unfortunately, there are other forms of injuries that may render the firefighter incapacitated for the rest of their life, placing a tremendous burden on family, friends and the department to always be there in support. Some victims and their families may have tremendous difficulty in handling the emotional and psychological trauma that can accompany long-term injury and potential confinement to bed, a wheel chair, or walker, and the end-

less medical appointments and treatments. Included will be the additional stresses in providing home care and transportation for an incapacitated individual. It will not be an easy task, and it will be fraught with deep mixed emotional feelings and at times, frustration and “Why me?”. What about the financial and economic aspects of being injured? Who will pick up the bills, both medical and living expenses? In most instances, it will be the department's insurance carrier, or the local municipality, or state government through Workers Compensation, Volunteer Benefits Law, or the state pension system. What about future educational requirements for children and all those little extras one gets accustomed to, where will the extra cash come from? In most instances it stops and may bring about a change in lifestyle for the family. The department will suffer for a variety of reasons, including saddened and weakened morale, increased costs for liability and workers compensation, increased workload, and additional operating costs. Some of these will also trickle down to the community, as any financial increases for the department will inevitably be passed on to them. The department and the community will be effected by the loss of services. In the death of a firefighter, much of the impact and burden mentioned previously will be similar, but nothing will replace the fallen firefighter. There will be the mourning and wake, generally followed by a departmental funeral attended by colleagues from surrounding jurisdictions, all of which is quite ceremonial and impressive. More importantly, it doesn’t bring you back to life. Neither will all the benefits that come with dying in the line-of-duty. And remember, you don’t get the benefits, your survivors do as they will surely need them. These benefits have greatly increased over the years, but they still aren’t worth dying for. Practicing firefighter safety and maintaining an attitude to stay safe will help keep you out of harm’s way and extend your life and career. Remember, death is forever and much longer than life, so do your best to live a long, healthy life in the performance of your duties by looking out for your personal safety and the safety of your fellow firefighters. When you do, you will also be looking out for those silent partners consisting of family, friends, department and community, to whom you mean so much. Till next time, Stay Safe and God Bless!

LITTLE BIG GUYS If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Unit 4602 of the Ship Bottom Fire Department is this 1997 Ford F-350 4x4 pickup with brush conversion. It had also been a primary response vehicle for beach and water emergencies until the company acquired a Hummer after Hurricane Sandy. The Hummer is now the beach rescue unit. This unit has a five seat cab, a Hale 250-GPM pump, one-inch forestry line, (two) one-and-three-quarter inch whip lines, a 250-gallon water tank, five-gallon foam tank, hand tools, a dry chemical extinguisher, six-ton front winch and a Will Burt Night Scan.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Ship Bottom Unit 4602, 1997 Ford F-350, 350/250/5 with six-ton winch and Will Burt Night scan.

Right/rear of Ship Bottom Unit 4602 shows pump, whip lines and water tank.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Visit us on the web! www.1rbn.com


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

MEET ROVER

Meet His App “ROVER MOBILE”

Phone: (203) 445 6536 • www.spotteddogtech.com Built by firefighters, for firefighters

PAGE 25


PAGE 26

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

We Buy Used Ambulances! Unhappy with your trade in price? Downsizing your fleet?

All makes and manufacturers considered, cash paid “on the spot.” Free pick up available. Call the Used Vehicle experts at First Priority Emergency Vehicles for a free, accurate and fair appraisal/offer on your preowned ambulance.

Call Today! 1.800.247.7725

HE HE ER ERO ROES RO OES ES INK INK

1st Responder Newspape er features EMERGENCY SERVICES RELA ATED TATTOOS

Spelter, WV - Trevor Vance is a 19-year-old firefighter from West Virginia who has been serving his community since he was just 15-years-old. He is currently a firefighter at Spelter Volunteer Fire Department in Spelter, West Virginia and decided to get this tattoo done approximately two years ago. When asked what inspired him to get the tattoo, he said "being a firefighter is a brotherhood, so I thought to myself, why not get a tattoo that will be there forever and remind me of what I have been through and who I've been through it with." Trevor also said that the tattoo lets him show off what he's so proud of doing.

Would you like your emergency services related tattoo featured here? Contact Lindsey at

Lindsey@1strespondernews.com

Does Social Media Belong in Today’s Fire Service? Today, almost everyone has a smart phone and endless opportunities to record life in real time, the good and the bad. Fire departments must now embrace the social media world in which we live. But what role does social media play in the fire service? Most fire departments now have an SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) or SOG (Standard Operating Guideline) addressing social media. But is social media helping or hurting your department? Herein lies the problem. Does the SOP or SOG truly guide the fire service to use social media to their advantage? Public Relations is something the fire service has definitely not mastered. As a rookie volunteer firefighter in the early 90’s, one of the first things stressed to me was “Never take any pictures because you will end up in court." The truth is, I would end up in court with or without the pictures and it would be much more difficult to convey accuracy without pictures to support and recreate the scene. Several departments have now used social media, such as Facebook and Instagram, to propel their departments to a new level. This allows fire departments the ability to reach a new generation of firefighters because the new generation is definitely connected by technology and social media. Some departments have even utilized social media to enlist community support to obtain new apparatus, afford pay raises, and seek potential new personnel. Social media has also heightened public awareness of the dangers involved with firefighting and virtually taken viewers into the fire via social media. Scott Ziegler, a firefighter with Detroit Fire Department, wore a helmet cam for a year while employed as a firefighter with Highland Park, Michigan Fire Department. Scott then appeared on national news, giving the nation a glimpse into the lifethreatening experiences a firefighter faces every day. Am I implying that all social media, or even news media coverage is good? Absolutely not! The key is to train staff about social media etiquette and how to embrace the photographers on the side lines of the scene or during an incident. Yes, you read that correctly; “photographers on the side lines". I recently traveled to California to experience fire photography as a fire chaser, known as buffing. I had the honor of working side by side with two Southern California fire photographers, Tod Sudmeier (@epn564) and Brandy Carlos (@epn106). I was amazed at how many fire departments not only welcomed our presence, but they actually encouraged us to get close to the action. Of course, we followed the safety rules outlined by each fire de-

BRANDY CARLOS/@EPN106

Chief Joel Miller, Federal Government Fire Chief, fire department social media consultant and owner of the world’s largest Fire Instagram page (@chief_miller).

partment, such as wearing wildland firefighting gear as we stood on the front lines, streaming live footage via Periscope and Facebook Live to hundreds, even thousands of viewers around the world. We each shared awesome pictures capturing the action in real time on some of the world’s largest fire service based social media sites. Social media has even helped the fire service recruit some of the best candidates for the job simply due to the awareness and visibility, triggering an increase in applicants. Los Angeles County, Los Angeles City and Cal Fire are some of the most recognizable departments in the world, partially due to social media and dedicated fire photographers. Social media also raises community awareness of the great service their tax dollars are paying for. Shortly after my California experience, again with California fire photographers Tod Sudmeier (@epn564) and Brandy Carlos (@epn106), we traveled to Detroit, Michigan. Detroit is one of the country’s most deprived cities and busiest fire departments. They are confronted with a high number of arson related fires. I found that the Battalion Chief would be the one to set the temperature as to how well received the fire photographers were on scene. I made calls where the Battalion Chief himself would be snapping shots as much as he could. Most Battalion Chiefs welcomed us as we followed their rules and stayed out of harm’s way. Real-time live broadcast from DFD went out around the word via social media. The world saw top notch firefighters doing an amazing job, despite the struggles their de-

partment has experienced in the way of equipment and manpower. We later responded to a call with DFD where the Battalion Chief was anti-fire photographer and anti-social media. As one photographer was streaming live to viewers world-wide (while obeying all the rules and respecting the firefighters on scene from a safe distance outside the hotzone), the Battalion Chief began yelling at him. The photographer, a retired firefighter himself, chose to cut the live feed as to not reflect negatively on the fire department. After all, it was the firefighters that we were there to represent and they deserve the utmost respect. Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident and the photographer has felt it necessary to cut live feed on other occasions at different locations. Realistically, we live in a world where everyone is at the mercy of social media. Fire departments need to embrace the professional fire photographers, as their goal of honoring the fire service is the one true defense guarding fire departments from the negative effects social media can bring. Your department can either stand by and become a casualty of social media, or your department can choose to prepare staff and public relation officers on how to use social media to propel your department to the next level. Social media is here to stay. I encourage each of you to choose a direction and develop a plan for the role social media will play in the success of your department. The choice is yours, make it a good one! - CHIEF JOEL MILLER


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 27

New Jersey Fire Equipment Co. Equipment, Hose, Supplies Since 1930

SCOTT SIGHT • Hands free thermal imaging - Need we say more?

• Enhanced situational awareness - improved hot zone accountability. • Powerful and light - At 8 ½ ounces you won’t even know it’s there.

• Fits any AV-3000 HT facepiece - Buy altogether as a completed kit or upgrade your current AV-3000 HT facepiece • 160x120 resolution at 9 frames per second - Everything you need and nothing you don’t. • In-mask Display - See a clear image unobstructed by the environment. • Infinity lens - Ensures a clear picture with no eyestrain.

Authorized Scott Representative Since 1945

• Adjustable display - Configurable to your line of sight.

• Minimum four-hour battery life - Powered by simple, everyday AAA batteries. • NIOSH & NFPA certifications pending - Expected early summer 2016. • Made is the USA

NEW JERSEY FIRE AND SCOTT - THE FINEST FOR THE BRAVEST - FROM THE BEST

NEW JERSEY FIRE - AUTHORIZED NEW JERSEY STATE CONTRACT VENDOR A NEW JERSEY BASED AND OPERATED BUSINESS FOR 85 YEARS SERVING NEW JERSEY CUSTOMERS STATEWIDE 119-131 Route 22 East • Green Brook, NJ 08812 295C Bergen Turnpike • Ridgefield Park, NJ 07660 68 First Avenue • Atlantic Highlands, NJ 07716

(Phone) 732-968-2121 • (Fax) 732-968-4724 (Email) info@njfe.com • (Web) www.njfe.com


PAGE 28

March, 2017

Robert Bruce, Battalion Chief.

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

DAMIEN DANIS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Hawthorne Firefighters Make a Great Stop Robert Chvasta Jr., Battalion Chief.

DAMIEN DANIS

Michael Sulick Jr., Assistant Chief.

DAMIEN DANIS

Hawthorne, NJ - Several tenants of a two-family house located in Hawthorne were temporarily displaced after a fire caused damage to both apartments and the utilities on JUMP TO FILE# January 2nd. 010317131 Hawthorne firefighters were alerted at about 2:00 P.M. for reports of a fire at 195 Hawthorne Avenue. Smoke and flames were extending up the exterior of the two-and-a-half story structure from the basement to the roof on the “D” side as companies arrived. Searches were performed and it was determined that the sole occupant at the time of the fire was already out of the building. The exterior fire was quickly knocked down and members peeled back the siding to check for any extension. The fire was also knocked in the basement, but additional fire was found in the walls up to the first-floor. After extensive opening up and hitting hot spots, the fire was placed under control in less than one hour. No injuries were reported. - BILL TOMPKINS

William Shadwell, Chief of Department.

DAMIEN DANIS

New Chiefs Installed for Elmwood Park Elmwood Park, NJ - On January 19th, the Elmwood Park Council installed the 2017 officers for the borough’s fire department. Officers installed include William Shadwell, Chief of Department; Michael Sulick Jr., Assistant Chief; Robert Chvasta Jr., Battalion Chief and Robert Bruce, Battalion Chief.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 29


PAGE 30

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Flanders Chooses New Fire Chief and Officers for 2017 Flanders, NJ – Members of Flanders Fire Company #1 and Rescue Squad recently promoted an experienced fire officer to be chief of department for 2017. Tyler Wargo, who had been first assistant fire chief, was elected to the top position of the fire and EMS department during the recent elections. Wargo joined the fire company in 1999. He became an EMS lieutenant in 2003 and a fire lieutenant in 2013. Since then, he has served as captain and assistant chief. Wargo has received a variety of awards and recognitions, including an Award of Valor from the 200 Club of Morris County in 2015. He received that honor for rescuing a blind man from a burning apartment at what is now "Overlook at Flanders" apartments. He replaces Michael McDermott, who had served two terms as chief. McDermott was elected to the first assistant chief position, a position he requested. Frank Zeller will remain second assistant fire chief. Other fire officers elected include Gregory

Newly promoted Tyler Wargo.

JUMP TO FILE #011917106 Widzemok, captain; Michael DeFelice, first lieutenant; and Pat Piserchio, second lieutenant. Fire company members stuck with the same team of emergency medical services officers for 2017: Melissa Widzemok, captain; Mayra Garcia, first lieutenant; Laura DeFelice, second lieutenant; and Storm Shawl, second lieutenant. Fred Detoro Jr. was elected for another term as president of the association, which manages the firehouse and other facets of the fire company’s business. Other association officers include Joseph Abrusci, vice president; Kevin Dolan, treasurer; Tano Giacchino, assistant treasurer; Tom Puder, personnel officer; Pat Piserchio, assistant personnel officer; Pat Piserchio; Cheryl Schoch secretary; and James Staszak, trustee. The 2017 officers will be installed on February 18, 2017. - DOUG FENICHEL

PROVIDED

RON JEFFERS

Bergen County Fire Marshal Bryan Hennig (right), reads an account of the 1917 explosion near a monument in Tessie McNamara's honor as Mayor Robert Giangeruso looks on.

An American Heroine Recognized in Lyndhurst Lyndhurst, NJ - Europe's war kept New Jersey munitions factories busy. On July 30, 1916 the Black Tom Munitions Depot in Jersey City exploded. On January 11, 1917 a large shrapnel and shell complex in Kings- JUMP TO FILE# land (now called 011317106 Lyndhurst), blew up. Later, both explosions were labeled as sabotage. Today, a monument stands on Clay Avenue in Lyndhurst, recognizing a local heroine-a switchboard operator named Tessie McNamara. On that day in 1917, Tessie's office caught fire when the first artillery shell crashed through the wall. The shell passed her head, but she held her post. She called every building on the huge complex, telling everyone to evacuate. “Get out or go up!” was her message. Tessie McNamara is a Lyndhurst and American heroine, surviving one of the largest acts of foreign sabotage ever committed on American soil. The attack was blamed on German spies. Workers ran and slid across the frozen Hackensack River to safety in Secaucus. Thanks to Tessie, no one perished. The fire was fed by high winds and quickly grew to nearby buildings. The factory, built to manufacture arms for the Russian military, contained stockpiles of gun power and TNT, plus half-amillion artillery shells in 40 buildings. About 1,700 people were working at the plant on the day of the explosion. Hundreds rushed

to the main gate to find it clogged with people. They put shoulders to the metal fence and toppled it, running over barbed wire. Artillery shells fell on homes and businesses, starting numerous fires. After Tessie made all of her phone calls, she left her burning office and fainted on the way out. Firemen wrapped her in a turn-out coat and carried her from the building to safety. On the 100th anniversary of the explosion, Lyndhurst officials and residents gathered at the monument on Clay Avenue in Tessie's honor. Behind the monument in the Meadowlands stands a smokestack, a piece of what was left of the munitions factory. Presiding over the memorial and wreath presentation was Scott Ackerson, President of the Lyndhurst Historical Association; Mayor Robert Giangeruso; Fire Chief Joe Roofe and Bergen County Fire Marshal and ex-town-

ship Fire Chief Bryan Hennig. They read off the events of that day, 100-years in the past, and praised Tessie McNamara for her heroic actions. “She saved everybody,” Hennig said. Lyndhurst firefighters also participated at the memorial with two engines and a truck company. Hennig said those companies were the same volunteer organizations that responded to the 1917 explosion with two horse-drawn and one motorized apparatus. Hennig said that the old-timers in the Fire Department were still talking about “The Big One” when he joined the L.F.D. in 1981. Now, as an old-timer himself, he keeps the memories alive as the department historian. “The fact that my grandfather was there and helped respond to this as a firefighter makes me proud,” Hennig said. - RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 31

FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES

To see your “Faces” in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com, email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com or mail them to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553.

NJ SHARING NETWORK

Mahwah, NJ - The "New Jersey Sharing Network" recently discussed organ and tissue donation with Fire 1 students at Bergen County Law and Public Safety Institute in Mahwah.

Cliffside Park, NJ - Fire chiefs and line officers for the Cliffside Park Fire Department were sworn in at Borough Hall on January 24th by Mayor Thomas Calabrese. The new officers are: Chief David Martone, Deputy Chief Greg Yfantis, Battalion Chief Brian Martone, Captains Michael Hromin, Chris Gaul and Charles Diaz, and Lieutenants Michael Hook, Gian Vargas and Tamer Abdallah. RON JEFFERS

SYLVIE MULVANEY

Sayreville, NJ – Membership Secretary Sue Meyer (left), and Council Secretary Barbara Platt with past President Charles Willer, who swore them in during the EMSCNJ installation of officers for 2017, held on January 15th.

Wood-Ridge, NJ - Wood-Ridge ex-Chief John Heflich (right), with his brother George after receiving an award for 50-years of active service to the community of WoodRidge from the South Bergen Chief's Association in January. George, ex-Chief of the Secaucus F.D., received an award for 31-years of dedicated service with the NJ State Firemen's Association. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Twp. of Washington, NJ - Township of Washington Battalion Chief Dave Hayes operating at a mutual aid fire in Paramus.

North Hudson, NJ - North Hudson Firefighter Randy Consenting (fourth from left), received his retirement presentation during a firehouse lunch on January 10th, after 25-years of service. (L to R): B.C. D. Fresse, B.C. D. DeOrio, Capt. F. Fede, retired FF Brian Consentino (brother), B.C. R. Morrison and D.C. C. Thomas. Consentino, who was part of the former West New York F.D., was serving as the "Comm Tech" on Group 1. Safety Officer Captain Fred Fede said Consentino was always concerned about the members operating at incidents and he "always had your back."


PAGE 32

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 33


PAGE 34

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

EMS If you have photos you would like to see in our “EMS” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

LAKELAND EMERGENCY SQUAD

Andover, NJ - The Lakeland Emergency Squad's 2017 Installation of Officers Banquet was held on January 21st. Pictured here is Chief Cubberly with his Line for 2017: Deputy Chief Ted Leenstra, Captain Stephanie Leenstra, Lieutenant Rachael Gaul, Sergeant Cory DiBiase and Sergeant Ashley Hebble.

SYLVIE MULVANEY

Lincoln Park, NJ - Lincoln Park EMS (LPEMS) President Ruth Poskitt (left), and Chief Jay Meisch congratulated EMT Donna Moeller on 40-years of volunteer service during the squad’s 2017 installation dinner held in Oakland on January 14th. Moeller, who has held every one of the 51-year-old squad’s offices during her tenure and remains an active riding member, is the first LPEMS member to receive the award. Moeller, who also received a commendation from the EMS Council of New Jersey, estimates that she has answered several thousand calls during the last four decades. “My most memorable call would probably be responding to Liberty State Park on 9/11 and seeing the response and dedication of the numerous agencies who responded from New Jersey to back up New York’s EMS agencies,” Moeller said. “I’m so proud of New Jersey’s volunteer EMS.”

MADISON FIRE DEPARTMENT

CNG Fueled Garbage Truck Fire in Madison Madison, NJ - At approximately 5:49 A.M. on January 24th, the Madison Fire Department was dispatched to a reported garbage truck on fire in the area of 255 Main Street. The garbage truck was a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) JUMP TO FILE# fueled truck that 012717102 posed some very unique challenges and safety concerns. Once the CNG lines/tanks were compromised, the truck fire turned into a huge inferno. CNG fed flames that were 3040 feet into the air and the cab was fully involved. The garbage collection part of the truck was empty. The truck burned on the shoulder of the road, which then burned through electrical and communication wires above, causing a power outage in the area. Once the CNG burned off, firefighters were able to completely extinguish the fire. Mutual aid from Florham Park and Chatham FD was provided at the scene. The Madison Electric Department responded quickly to make repairs and restore power in the area. All fire units were cleared at 8:30 A.M., while utility crews remained on the scene to make repairs. There were no injuries reported. - ROBERT DUNNE

Visit us on the web! www.1rbn.com

MADISON FIRE DEPARTMENT


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 35

BUDDY SHOTS If you have photos you would like to see in our “Buddy Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

OCEAN CITY FIRE & RESCUE

Early Morning Structure Fire in Ocean City

BOB SHERMAN JR.

Mercer County, NJ - Hamilton Township Fire District-9 “A” Platoon Firefighters (L to R) Harry Eastburn, Jay Benjamin and Captain Joseph Muzzillo, pose with mascot “Ember” and Engine-19. HTFD #9 promoted Firefighter Muzzillo to Fire Captain, effective January 3, 2017.

Ocean City, NJ - The Ocean City 'B' platoon had an early morning structure fire on January 7th in the 800 block of Plymouth Place. Battling below freezing temps, the first arriving crews were able to get a quick knockdown of the fire and help contain the bulk of the fire to two bedrooms on the third-floor. With the assistance of Margate FD and off-duty OCFD personnel, the fire was held in check and no injuries occurred. Two occupants were displaced and able to seek shelter with family. The cause of the fire is under investigation.


PAGE 36

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

DRILLS/TRAINING

To see your Drills in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

BLACKWOOD FIRE CO.

Blackwood Fire Co. Lieutenant Deploys Overseas Blackwood, NJ - Blackwood Fire Company Lt. Jason Stott reported on Monday, January 16th for a one-year overseas deployment with the U.S. Army. Members from Blackwood Fire Co. and the Gloucester Township Police Department turned out early the same morning to wish him well. Good luck and see you soon, Jason!

JOE SICILIANO

West Milford, NJ - Members from West Milford Search and Rescue are pictured as they packed gear during a recent cold weather training class, held at the West Milford First Aid Squad.

DOUGLAS HAVILAND

Point Pleasant Boro, NJ - Combined members of the Point Pleasant Borough First Aid and Emergency Services Unit (ESU), working together at their regular monthly drill to hone extrication skills at John Blewetts Auto Salvage, in nearby Howell. With the assistance of the Herbertsville Road auto recycler, the Borough units conduct regular training to practice with tools and techniques for motor vehicle crash rescue.

DAMIEN DANIS

New Year’s Eve House Fire for East Rutherford East Rutherford, NJ - On New Year's Eve at 5:41 P.M., East Rutherford Fire companies were dispatched to 68 Boiling Springs Avenue for a reported house fire. As Captain Felten approached the scene, he reported a heavy smoke condition in the area. On his arrival, he requested a Wallington FAST team and a second-alarm, bringing units from Rutherford, Carlstdat, Lyndhurst and Passaic to the scene. Firefighters battled heavy fire conditions in the rear of the home. Fire Chief Mike Felten said that parts of the first, second and third floors were engulfed in flames. The flames extended to the attic, but was quickly knocked down. The fire was under control after about one hour.

Hewitt, NJ - Upper Greenwood Lake Ambulance Squad and West Milford Search and Rescue members receive instruction on tourniquet use during a recent "Stop the Bleed" class, held at the Upper Greenwood Lake Volunteer Ambulance building. JOE SICILIANO


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 37


PAGE 38

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

TOOLS OF THE TRADE

To see your “Tools of the Trade” shots in the newspaper, upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

JOHN HOPPER

JOHN HOPPER

Aerial Ladder Helps Firefighter Escape Newark House Fire

Newark, NJ - During the early morning hours of Sunday, January 22nd, City of Newark Fire Companies responded to 361 Clinton Place for a reported structure fire. Units arrived onscene to find a two-and-a-half story, vacant, private dwelling with heavy fire showing in the rear. Multiple lines were stretched and put into operation. Due to the heavy amount of fire, units were pulled from the building. A firefighter had to escape the building via aerial ladder. The fire was placed under control in approximately two-hours. No injuries were reported.

DID YOU K NOW

?

“Jake,” a slang term for “Firefighter,” was first used during the early 20th century in the Greater Boston area. Although it’s origins are recognized as “officially unknown,” many agree that the affectionate term was derived from the “J-Key,” a key shaped like the letter ‘J’ that was used to open the fire alarm box. The firefighters who held the J-key to open the fire box began being referred to as “Jakes”.

Riverton, NJ - Members from the Riverton Fire Department recently donated fire hose to Hose2Habitat (located in North Bethesda, Maryland), for it's next "Fire Hose Cubed" enrichment creation project planned for this coming Summer. About Hose2Habitat: Founders Anthony Slamin and Lisa Daly met when they volunteered as Emergency Medical Technicians with the same fire department. Their complementary skills, mutual love of the

environment and animals, and work as volunteer EMTs with fire departments - where they saw dumpsters of fire hose taken to landfills - led to the establishment of Hose2Habitat, which partners zoos, animal sanctuaries, and wildlife rehabilitation centers with sources of surplus fire hose and other recyclable materials to repurpose the fire hose and other materials as habitat enrichment for animals in zoos, sanctuaries, and wildlife rehabilitation centers.

PROVIDED

Lance Salins brings his expertise and joins Tony and Lisa to complete the board of directors. Lisa, Tony, and Lance are not compensated for their position on the board or for any other work they do for Hose2Habitat. They volunteer their time to Hose2Habitat. In addition, Hose2Habitat has 100% board giving as the founders and other board members each also donate funds with an annual pledge to the organization.

RICHARD BILLINGS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

The Heart of the Matter is a Matter of the Heart Chaplain’s Corner Fernando Villicana

Teach me Your way, O Lord; I will walk in Your truth; Unite my heart to fear Your name. (Psalm 86:11) Singleness of heart/purpose is not a foreign concept to the firefighter or EMS worker. The very duties of these occupations cry out for a concerted singleness of our purpose to fulfill the mission. Meeting the immediate needs of the patient is the first responder's mission. Upon arrival of an emergency call, we must be totally focused on the patient as well as our surroundings. It is essential. This essentiality also applies to our spiritual lives. Only when we pursue God with singleness of heart do we experience the fulfillment of His purpose in our lives - to rescue us. Indecision about God is described in the Bible as "doublemindedness" - and doublemindedness is a costly habit. With so much contentment at stake, why do we waver? Why don't we choose God more wholeheartedly? "Unite my heart to fear Your name." This is a prayer for the integrity of a "pure" heart, one that is not only clean, but also decisive. James wrote, "Draw near to God and He will draw near to you...purify your hearts, you double-minded" (James 4:8). What we need is the courage to pursue God with singleness of purpose. Finally, all of you be of one mind, having compassion for one another; love as brothers, be tenderhearted, be courteous; (1 Peter 3:8). Hereby perceive we the love of God, because he laid down his life for us: and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. (1 John 3:16) Blessings, Pastor Fernando Villicana Fire Service Chaplain

March, 2017

PAGE 39


PAGE 40

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Perth Amboy Fire Department Honor Guard 2nd Annual Training Seminar

“SAFETY LEADERSHIP”

CHIEF RON KANTERMAN

This Course examines the responsibilities of Firefighters, line officers and senior leadership in the fire service in insuring the safety and health of all members. Some national programs are discussed such as the NFFF 16 LSI’s, IAFF, IAFC’s initiatives and others. Case Studies examined through photos, videos, and a host of other resources presented in a hands-on workshop atmosphere.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 41


PAGE 42

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Enjoy taking photographs? Get the most out of your hobby! 1st Responder News compensates correspondents for their article & photograph RICH MAXWELL

Interstate Closes to Search for Driver of Crashed Vehicle Greenwich Twp., NJ – On January 29th at 9:48 P.M., the NJ State Police, Greenwich Township EMS Rescue Squad (Squad-98) and Stewartsville Fire Department (Station-98) were dispatched for a reported car crash on Interstate-78 eastbound by mile post-4, with possible ejection. The Warren County Communications Center placed a medivac helicopter on stand-by. Upon arrival of emergency crews, no occupant from the crashed vehicle could be found. This started a land and air search for the possibly injured person. Police and first responders searched the wooded area alongside the Interstate as a NJ State Police helicopter (NorthStar) was summoned to the scene and utilized it’s FLIR to search for the person. The eastbound side of the Interstate was closed at the beginning of the incident, causing a consider-

JUMP TO FILE #013017133 able backup of traffic, but the left two lanes were eventually opened back up. The on-ramps from Rt.-22 and Rt.-173, to Rt.-78 east were both closed during the incident. Search efforts were unsuccessful in finding anyone from the vehicle. The highway and ramps were all opened back up around 10:40 P.M., at which time all units cleared the scene. Also responding to the incident were the Greenwich Twp. Police, Pohatcong Twp. Police, Pohatcong Twp. Fire Police and paramedics from Hunterdon Medical Center. The N.J. State Police (Perryville Station) is handling the investigation. - RICH MAXWELL

Serving those who serve us.

HeroesMortgageProgram.com

877-541-HERO

submissions.

Contact Lindsey TODAY for more information! Lindsey@1strespondernews.com

845-534-7500 ext. 212


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 43


PAGE 44

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Fully Involved Tractor-Trailer Fire in Hunterdon County Bethlehem Twp., NJ - The N.J. State Police, along with Pattenburg Fire (Station-25) and Bloomsbury Fire (Station-43) were dispatched to a tractortrailer fire on Interstate-78 eastbound on the evening of January 26th at 11:45 P.M. The truck was located on a shoulder JUMP TO FILE# one-half mile west 012717118 of Exit-11. Upon arrival, crews found the cab of the truck fully involved and destroyed by the fire, with the trailer empty. There were no reported injuries. All three lanes of the eastbound side of the interstate were closed for over 45-minutes while firefighters worked on the incident. In addition to the initial companies, the Pattenburg Rescue Squad responded and Stewartsville Fire Department (Station-98, Warren County) was requested for a tanker. The N.J. State Police (Perryville Station) is handling the investigation. - RICH MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 45

Tasc Fire Apparatus

Athletix™ from Globe

Training • Sales • Service Call us today! 732-431-1515


PAGE 46

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

APPARATUS IN ACTION

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

TODD HOLLRITT

Woodland Park, NJ - West Paterson Engine-3 ("The Ridge Runners"), back in Quarters and cleaning hose after battling a large blaze for two hours at Environmental Renewal on Andrews Drive in Woodland Park. The fire was reported around 5:30 P.M. and lasted into the night as a Nor'easter struck the area on January 23rd. Firefighters operated a deck gun and three attack lines at the fire after dropping 800' of supply line into the scene.

Dover, NJ - Dover Ladder-8 and Picatinny Tower-17 knocking down flames during a defensive attack on a fourth-alarm structure fire in January.

JASON BELL

SYLVIE MULVANEY

Assemblywoman Nancy J. Pinkin congratulates EMSCNJ President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr.

EMS Council of NJ Installs Officers for 2017 Sayreville, NJ – With assistance from two state legislators, EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) officers recited their oaths of office for 2017 on January 15th at the Middlesex County Fire Academy. Senator Bob Smith (DDist. 17) and Assemblywoman Nancy J. Pinkin (D-Dist. 18) were on-hand to administer the oaths to several of the officers. The executive board members, all incumbents, include: President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr (Neptune), Northern Area Vice President Cyndy Reardon (Bloomingdale), Central Area Vice President John Butterweck (Morganville), Southern Area Vice President Phil Wien (Maple Shade), Treasurer Ken Weinberg (Pittstown), Assistant Treasurer Leroy Gunzelman

JUMP TO FILE #012017102 (Somerville), Council Secretary Barbara Platt (New Egypt) and Membership Secretary Sue Meyer (Berkeley Heights). The 21 district vice presidents for 2017 include: District 1 – Anthony Murtha (Spring Lake), District 2 – Kari Phair (Springfield), District 3 – John Tymon (Ridgefield Park), District 4 – Ernest Bubier (Salem), District 5 – Marylyn Kampo (Somerset), District 6 – Barbara Flowers (East Hanover), District 8 – Karen Johansen (Morristown), District 9 – Steve Kurs (East Windsor), District 10 – Andie Hutchins (Phillipsburg), District 11 – Paul Kennedy

(Keansburg), District 12 – Edna Deacon (Mine Hill), District 13 – Eric Rudd (Belvidere), District 14 – Alfred Low-Beer (Kendall Park), District 15 – James Ambro (Nutley), District 16 – Kim Iadanza (Tinton Falls), District 17 – Mary Claire Shiber (Wayne), District 18 – Alison Wallin (Demarest), District 20 – Vikki Castellano (Oakland), District 22 – Rich Litton (Moorestown), District 23 – James McAlister (Freehold) and District 24 – Tarcisio Nunes (Lyndhurst). The 88-year-old nonprofit EMSCNJ represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 rescue squads throughout the state. - SYLVIE MULVANEY

FIRE EQUIPMENT If you have photos you would like to see in our “Fire Equipment” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

NEW MARKET FD

Piscataway, NJ - A firefighter's helmet after battling a recent structure fire is pictured in front of the company patch, both representing New Market Fire Company District-1.

SYLVIE MULVANEY

Past President Sue Van Orden administers the oath of office to Treasurer Ken Weinberg (left), and Assistant Treasurer Leroy Gunzelman.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 47


PAGE 48

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

BEACHWOOD VOL. FD

Captain Represents Beachwood FD as Graduation’s Keynote Speaker

Beachwood, NJ - The Beachwood Fire Department was proudly represented by their Captain, William Hopson, when he was the keynote speaker on January 26th during the Firefighter 1 graduation, held at the Ocean County Fire Academy. The recruits successfully passed a rigorous course over the past few months and will now move on to the next chapter in their careers as certified firefighters. Congratulations to all of the graduates, we wish you continued success as firefighters and leaders in your community!

RON JEFFERS

Union City, NJ - Using Tower-6, North Hudson firefighters "open up" to find concealed fire after knocking down a heavy fire load that consumed the front of a two-story dwelling on Seventh St. in Union City, on January 13th.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 49


PAGE 50

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

FIRE & SAFETY SERVICES 800-400-8917

South Plainfield, NJ

www.f-ss.com

If You Can Dream It - We Can Build It

March, 2017

PAGE 51


PAGE 52

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 53


PAGE 54

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

West Cape May Front & Center The West Cape May Volunteer Fire Department is an interesting one in the way of fire apparatus. It is quite a distance from where I live so I have only been there two or three times, but I was always treated well. They have had a mixture of both new and used apparatus, with the most interesting being their aerial ladder trucks, which are now in the third generation. The first one was a 1951 Mack L 75-foot service aerial that previously saw service with the Cape May City Fire Department. The next generation was a 1976 Seagrave cab forward 100-foot service aerial that saw service with the Glenside Fire Company in Cheltenham Township (Montgomery County), Pennsylvania. Their current unit is a 1987 Pierce Arrow 105-foot rear mount, formerly of the Cape May Court House Fire Company. It has a 1250-GPM pump, but no water tank. It also carries a 2500-watt portable generator. Last year, they took delivery of the 2016 KME Predator pumper with 2000-GPM pump, 1000-gallon water tank, 40-gallon foam tanks and an 8KW generator. It was sold by First Priority Emergency Vehicles. They also have a 1993 3-D Fire Apparatus pumper on a Freightliner FL-80 chassis. It has a 1500-GPM pump, a 1000gallon water tank and a 6-KW generator. As you may remember, 3-D Fire Apparatus had been absorbed into American LaFrance in the very late 1990’s. It later lost it's identity when all of the manufacturers that Freightliner took over were renamed American La France. Another pumper they still have is a 1978 Oshkosh/Sanford with 1250GPM pump and 1200-gallon water tank. To my knowledge, these last three were purchased new. Other second hand vehicles they have are a 1982 Chevrolet step van that serves as a utility/rehab truck. It formerly was a Snap On Tools truck. Their brush truck is a 1981 Chevrolet with Reading body that will eventually be featured in the Little Big Guys. It formerly saw service with the Cape May Point Volunteer Fire Department. Finally, they still have their original pumper, a 1921 Ford with a Hale pump. During the time I was there, it was not set up to be pulled out, however if you want to see it, check out their website. Author’s note: In last month’s column, it was reported that Plainsboro ordered a Sutphen tanker with an aluminum body. It should have said a stainless steel body. While on the subject of Plainsboro, they have updated their special service truck. Formerly a converted ambulance, in late 2014 they purchased a Knapheide walk-in body and mounted it on a 1996 Ford F-350 chassis from their former brush truck. A photo will be featured in a later column. Firefighter One has delivered the Ferrara HD-100 platform to Wildwood Crest (Cape May County). It has an Inferno chassis, aluminum body, 100foot mid-mount platform, with 100,000-PSI steel construction, Waterous CSU 1250-2000-GPM pump and 300-gallon water tank. Summit’s HD100 mid-mount platform is currently under construction. It is on an Intruder chassis, has an aluminum body and a 100,000-PSI steel constructed platPlease send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

West Cape May E-5731, 1978 Oshkosh/Sanford 1250/1250.

JOHN M. MALECKY

West Cape May L-5755, 1987 Pierce Arrow with 105-foot aerial, 1250-GPM pump and 2.5-KW generator. It has no water tank. It formerly served Cape May Court House and was sold by Fire & Safety Services. JOHN M. MALECKY

West Cape May E-5732, 2016 KME Predator, 2000/1000/40 and 6KW generator. It was sold by First Priority Emergency Vehicles.

West Cape May Utility 5770, 1982 Chevrolet utility/rehab unit. It was a former Snap On Tools truck. JOHN M. MALECKY

JOHN M. MALECKY

West Cape May E-5730, 1993 Freightliner FL-80/3-D Fire Apparatus, 1500/1000 with 6-KW generator. JOHN M. MALECKY

form. Summit is located in Union County. Absolute Fire Protection reports that they are prepping the E-ONE Cyclone II top mount pumper for the Colonia FC in Woodbridge Township (Middlesex County), and the Typhoon HP-75 for Hillside (Union County). The apparatus division of First Priority Emergency Vehicles will be delivering a custom KME pumper to the Flagtown FC in Hillsborough Township (Somerset County). Features include a Predator XLFD chassis with 156.5-inch cab, 22-inch raised roof, Cummins ISX 12, 500-HP diesel engine, Hale Qmax 2250-GPM singlestage pump, side mount panel, front intake with 180-degree swivel, fourinch LDH discharge, three-inch deck gun discharge with TFT Hurricane manual monitor, (two) two-and-a-half

inch driver’s side rear and (two) twoand-a-half inch officer’s side rear discharges, no crosslays, (two) two-and-a-half inch front bumper discharges, one-inch booster reel on driver’s side above pump, 750-gallon water tank, 3/16-inch aluminum KME 172-inch Flex single axle body, with 29-inch deep compartments, full height/split depth compartments on both sides, ladders stored on officer’s side on a Ziamatic single arm overhead hydraulic ladder rack and a 10-KW Onan hydraulic generator. At the time of this writing, they were expecting to receive the Fanwood (Union County) pumper at their shop. New Jersey Emergency Vehicles has made two P.L. Custom ambulance deliveries. The first is to the North Arlington Volunteer Emergency Squad (Bergen County) and is a Medallion

Adelphia FC, Howell Township E-19-2-85, 2016 Spartan ER, Gladiator Classic, 1500/500 with 15-KW generator. It was sold by Campbell Supply Co., LLC.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Milltown L-73, 2016 E-ONE Typhoon 2000/500 with 78-foot aerial and 10-KW generator. It was sold by Absolute Fire Protection.

JOHN M. MALECKY

170 Type III on a Chevrolet G4500 chassis. The other is to the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad (Hunterdon County) and is a Medallion 170 on a Ford E-450 chassis. Fire & Safety Services reports the following Pierce orders: Neptune District 1 (Monmouth County), an Enforcer non-walk-in heavy duty rescue; in Bergen County, an Arrow XT pumper for Hackensack, a Velocity pumper for Englewood Cliffs and an Arrow XT 105-foot ladder for Maywood. The Old Bridge VFC in East Brunswick ordered an Arrow XT pumper (Middlesex County), Merck, Inc. (Union County) an Enforcer pumper and a Freightliner combination walk-in/non-walk-in heavy duty rescue. In Cape May County, Town Bank in Lower Township ordered a Velocity PUC pumper and the Belleplain FC in

Dennis Township an Enforcer pumper. Maplewood (Essex County) ordered an Enforcer pumper, Washington Township (Gloucester County) an Enforcer PUC 107-foot Ascendant ladder, Mt. Bethel FC in Warren Township (Somerset County) a Velocity 107-foot ascendant ladder, Harmony Township (Warren County) a Saber 4x4 pumper and the Clinton First Aid & Rescue Squad (Hunterdon County) a Velocity walk-in heavy duty rescue. Pierce deliveries include to Berlin (Camden County) an Ascendant 107-foot ladder, which is the first one in N.J. on an Enforcer chassis; to Palisades Park (Bergen County) an Arrow XT 105-foot ladder; to Montclair (Essex County) an Arrow XT 105-foot ladder (no pump or tank), and to Elizabeth (Union County) two Arrow XT pumpers.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 55

Why Isn't it Okay to be a Fit Firefighter?

It seems almost silly that I’m writing this article. It actually seems like a great waste of time that it even has to be written. However, my inbox continues to fill with questions about why it’s so hard to convince other members of their departments that being fit is really a good thing. It’s almost unreal that in our society we are still convincing people that being fit is good; that our bodies weren’t made to carry hundreds of extra pounds, or that our joints and muscles need to be utilized and trained to work well, or that our organs can only work with our help. Oh and by the way, all of that applies to firefighters' bodies too. We don’t get a “service” discount on that one. As firefighters, why do we create these stigmas when it comes to fitness within our service, and why do we allow them to continue? I suppose it depends on how you look at the bigger picture because about 30-years ago, we wore hip boots and long coats. At that time, anyone who wore bunker pants was wrong. Same with Self Contained Breathing Apparatus. I think we can all agree that the level of protection bunker pants provides is far superior to that of hip boots. Wearing your SCBA is much better than eating smoke. In the end, bunker pants are good and so are SCBAs. So, maybe fitness is just as good...maybe even a better thing for the fire service than bunker pants and SCBAs. In part-one of this two part series, I plan to point out some of the common pitfalls that seem to plague the fire service when it comes to fitness and in part-two, I plan to address some ways to overcome them. Let’s start off with the biggest one of all. Fitness standards will be used as a way to discipline or even replace firefighters, further discouraging people from volunteering. It’s very possible that if a department established a mandatory health and wellness program, a person who refuses to participate could be removed from that department. Why anyone would refuse is a mystery to me. It’s a proven fact that participating in a health and wellness program sponsored by your employer is a benefit to the employee, not to mention you'd also have an added benefit, called living a better life. The statement above also applies on the volunteer end; but, if you have an established health and wellness plan, do you really want a person to volunteer who doesn’t want to be a part of it? Our Line-of-Duty-Death numbers should answer that question for you... Then we have the firefighter who still feels that the only reason we want to workout is so we look good at the beach. Well, maybe looking good at the beach isn’t such a bad thing for the fire service. Af-

ter all, we are constantly in the “public's eye." So tell me, who do you JUMP TO FILE #013017120

want representing your department? The firefighter who looks good at the beach, or the firefighter who can’t see his/her belt buckle because their stomach is hanging over it. Please realize that the above statements have zero bearing on appearance. Take a moment and picture this...you just called a Mayday from a collapse. Which of the above firefighters would you want on your Rapid Intervention Team? A firefighter fitness "hater line" that I just can’t seem to wrap my head around is when someone says "you shouldn’t workout on-duty, or at the firehouse because you might be “tired” from working out when a re-

ported fire comes, impairing your ability to respond." In that case, I suppose we should never stretch lines, or put up the ladder, or do any form of training while on-duty because what if a reported fire comes in and we’re tired? It makes no sense to me at all. We are not “working out” at work. We are training our bodies to do our job. We just have to be smart enough to not deplete our entire tank, same as how we watch the air gauge in our masks while entering a commercial structure. In part-two of this series, I will better explain how to create a fitness culture within your department and trust me, the "quick-fix" haters won’t like this one either simply because it won’t cost $29.99, nor provide free shipping, nor promise you the ultimate weight loss or fitness solution specifically designed and doctor approved for firefighters. At the end of the day, don’t let any

haters keep you down, just let them keep on hating! Every new change that was brought to the fire service was met with resistance and every

PROVIDED

new change that comes along will be met the same way, fitness included.

- ROBERT "PIP" PIPARO


PAGE 56

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

JAMES WOOD SR.

Chief Hrywniak standing with his dad and nephew as the borough administrator gives the oath of office.

Jacob Hrywniak Sworn in as Wallington Chief for Second Time

Wallington, NJ - Wallington FD Chief Jacob Hrywniak recently took an oath of office for the second time. This is only the second time in the town's history that a Chief went out, only to be sworn right back in. Hrywniak was the department Chief in 2014. He is also a career firefighter for the City of Passaic.

WESTVILLE FIRE DEPT.

Westville Firefighters Operate at All-Hands Dwelling Fire

West Deptford Twp., NJ - On January 24th, Engine Company-733 was special called in to operate at an All-Hands dwelling fire in the 1200 Block of Hessian Avenue in West Deptford. Units assisted with vertical ventilation, primary and secondary searches, as well as overhaul and extinguishment. One resident was transported to a local hospital for unknown injury.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 57

THE SUTPHEN SLR 75 REAR-MOUNT AERIAL LADDER IT’S EVERYTHING YOU’VE COME TO EXPECT FROM A SUTPHEN.

Highlights:

• #304 Stainless Steel Body, huck-bolted to the stainless steel sub-frame. Door options are roll up or hinged. • Low overall travel height of 11' 9", and short overall length of 38’ 3”. • Low, open hose bed for easy access and deployment/reloading of hose. • Stabilizers are out and down "H" style with a set up width of 16'. • The aerial device is constructed of #6061 T6 Aluminum that will withstand intense heat and extreme climate conditions, unpainted for ease of maintenance and repair, and huck-bolted for superior strength. • The compact 3-section ladder measures in at 75' of vertical reach and 65' 11" horizontal reach. • The aerial is rated for #750 tip load dry and #500 while flowing with 100 pounds of equipment. The wind rating is for up to 50 mph gusts, and 30 mph sustained. • The aerial has a 3:1 structural safety factor. • Hale or Waterous pumps in 1500-2000 gpm, mid-ship mounted. • 300-500 gallon water tank capacity. • Over 200 cu. ft of compartment space

Contact Blaze Emergency Equipment to Schedule a Demo! Blaze Emergency Equipment Company 102 Firehouse Rd. Browns Mills, NJ 08015

Phone: 609-893-3600 • info@blazeemergency.com

www.blazeemergency.com


PAGE 58

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ACTION SHOTS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Action Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

NEW MARKET FD

Fire Erupts in Piscataway Twp. Auto Body Shop

Piscataway Twp., NJ - At 7:25 P.M. on January 10th, New Market Fire was dispatched to 550 New Market Road at "Able Auto Body," for a reported furnace fire. The first units on scene saw fire and quickly requested retone for a structure fire. Mutual Aid companies were also requested and responded to the fire.

TODD HOLLRITT

Woodland Park, NJ - The West Paterson Fire Command Post during a large blaze that occurred at Environmental Renewal on Andrews Drive. The fire was reported around 5:30 P.M. on January 23rd and lasted well into the night as a Nor'easter struck the area. Assistant Chief Muccio directed operations.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

PAGE 59

March, 2017

First-Ever 1947 American Lafrance Tiller Returning Home The first-ever American LaFrance 700-series, tractor-drawn aerial ladder truck, was built in 1947 for the Middletown Fire Company in Middletown, NY. It has since traveled across the country and will soon be returning home. The truck, with a 100-foot long lad- JUMP TO FILE# der, resided in Mid- 010517104 dletown, NY until it was sold in 1967 to the Tulatin Fire District in Oregon. The Continental powered, six-cylinder tiller served Tulatin and eventually made its way into service for the Jackson County-3 Fire District in southern Oregon, where the compartments were modified and the truck was converted into a fire prevention/public education unit. It was with Jackson County that the rig last saw fire-related service. The truck is being restored by Chief Juan Diaz of California's Mountain View Fire Department, with the intention of returning the apparatus to its original owner. The Cuban immigrant, who arrived in this country at the age of 15, unable to speak English, developed his love of antique iron during his formative years in Cuba and his passion still burns brightly. Diaz, part of a family of five, arrived in Miami during the Cuban Mariel Boat Lift on a vessel tagged the "Sun Hippie." The family stayed with relatives until relocating to Santa Clara, CA. The young Diaz attended Santa Clara High School during the day and worked as a janitor at night to help his family pay rent in addition to saving money to buy the first of his many classic cars; a 1965 Mustang convertible. A strong work ethic and desire to help others led the young man to volunteer with the Santa Clara Fire Department until he was hired as a career firefighter with the San Jose Fire Department at the age of 23, where he served in a variety of positions during his 25year career with the department, rising through the ranks to the Deputy Chief spot. After leaving San Jose, Juan Diaz was named Chief of the Mountain View Fire Department in May of 2014, where he still serves. It was the firefighting profession that gave Diaz the opportunity to save for, and purchase many classic vehicles, including a 1956 ElDorado, a 1928 American LaFrance Engine, a 1940 Ford Engine and now, the first-ever 700 series tiller made by American LaFrance. Diaz discovered the tiller, which had been repainted a bright yellow, had its ladders removed and compartments modified, sitting in a San Jose salvage yard that he passed regularly on his commute to the SJFD. Chief Diaz eventually stopped in to inquire about the apparatus that had been stripped of mirrors, bumpers and anything else of value. The owner indicated that he had bought it in

The 1947 tiller in service in the 1970's. This picture is in the San Jose Fire Museum.

Oregon, spent $1500 to have it towed down, and originally planned to turn it into a rolling art piece for California's famed "Burning-Man Festival." The artwork never started and the 1947 classic just sat in the yard. Diaz couldn't resist. He offered a few hundred dollars to the owner and became the proud owner of a true labor of love. Chief Diaz has invested over 100 hours restoring the trailer to date and claims to be about halfway through the restoration of that part. Both the tractor and trailer have been repainted by Diaz to the original color. The purist has not counted all of his receipts yet, out of fear. The biggest expense, other than getting it hauled back to Middletown,

PROVIDED BY CHIEF JUAN DIAZ

will be the application of handpainted gold leaf. According to Diaz, American LaFrance had gold leaf everywhere and he expects to pay thousands-of-dollars to have it done properly, to the 1947 factory condition. Chief Diaz, who is working alone for the most part on this project, is planning on getting the apparatus back to Middletown, NY in the Summer of 2018. When asked about his firefighting career and his restoration projects, Diaz said "this is the best country in the world and if you apply yourself, and with God's willing, you can be anything you want." - TODD BENDER

CHIEF JUAN DIAZ

Mountain View Fire Chief Juan Diaz in the paint booth.

Before and after the return of the AFL red paint.

CHIEF JUAN DIAZ


PAGE 60

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Wayne Fire Department Lays One of Their Own to Rest Wayne, NJ - Chief Donald 'Big Daddy' Simmons, Sr., who passed away on January 9th, was laid to rest on January 13th with full Departmental Honors by his Brothers and Sisters of the Wayne Fire Department Community Fire Company #1. Don served three terms as Chief of Company #1 during his 48-years as a member. He was also a Passaic County Committeeman in the NJ State Firemen's Association

JUMP TO FILE #012517108 and ultimately became their Vice President. Don was loved, admired and respected by many, and will be missed by all. Rest in eternal Peace Chief...We'll take it from here. God Bless. - RON JOHNSON

RON JOHNSON

Chief Donald Simmons, Sr.

PROVIDED RON JOHNSON

RON JOHNSON

RON JOHNSON


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

FIREFIGHTER PROFILES If you have photos you would like to see in our “Firefighter Profiles” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

PROVIDED

Maywood, NJ - In January, Chief Chris Tuttle of the Maywood Fire Department presented both Eddy Stelter and Roy De Young Jr. with 25-years of service awards.

March, 2017

DRILLS/TRAINING

PAGE 61

To see your Drills in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

NEW MARKET FD

Piscataway, NJ - During the weekend of January 22nd, New Market Fire participated in an Ice Rescue training class, hosted by the South Plainfield Volunteer FD. Even though there was a lack of ice, their members made the best of what they had! Three members trained to a technician level while four members trained to an awareness level.


PAGE 62

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

All Repairs Unconditionally Guaranteed

Free Estimates at your Location. Free Pick Up and Delivery! 381-405 Raymond Blvd. Newark, NJ 07105 Email: assocauto@aol.com www.associatedautobodyandtrucks.com

Info@fireflowservices.com

Jack Siegel Bob Hahn Tel: (973) 589-9162 Fax: (973) 589-9230

Mark LaGreco 877.302.6472

APPARATUS FOR SALE CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR USED VEHICLES ONLINE! VISIT WWW.1RBN.COM CLICK ON “VEHICLES”

20’ Rescue 1® Walk-Around Demo Available for Immediate Delivery. Spartan Metro Star MFD-2015 chassis, Cummins ISL 450 HP diesel engine, seating for crew of six. 20’ all extruded aluminum body, upper storage compartments. Curb side roof access lift-up stairway, absorbent compartment with electric re-loader and dispenser, 9000 lbs. portable winch with three receiver positions. Participating co-op purchasing programs: GSA, H-GAC, and New Jersey State Contract. Contact Mike Marquis (800) 752-8786, (732) 223-1411 in New Jersey, or info@plcustom.com

For Sale Extremely Versatile Type III Ambulance Road Rescue Ultramedic remounted onto a 2015 Chevrolet G4500 Diesel Chassis Unique Dual Squad Bench Design - Great for Critical Care, High Risk Transport or Rehab Services. Can Easily Be Equipped For Bariatric Transport As Well. Complete Repaint with Bedliner Exterior Compartments. $125,000 For additional information or photos, email vsales@emergencyvehiclecenter.com or call 732-657-1104.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2017

PAGE 63


PAGE 64

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1st Responder New Jersey March Edition