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MARCH, 2018

DOUBLE-FATAL 3RD ALARM HOUSE FIRE

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Teaneck, NJ - Heavy smoke and fire filled the south end of Teaneck early Sunday morning, January 28th, as firefighters battled a fully involved house fire that would end as a double-fatal fire.

- See full story on page 9

SEE PAGES 36 & 37 FOR DETAILS.

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Healthy St. Patrick’s Day Eats FORK & HOSE CO. a Food Blog by A.J. Fusco

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

I have always said, if I wasn’t Italian I would be Irish. Not sure exactly why though. Maybe it’s the fact that when I hear pipes and drums playing I get excited, pumped up or in some cases emotional. I even tried to join the local Emerald Society when they recruited at my fire academy, but they didn’t buy my name as being A.J. “Mc”Fusco. Still, the Irish tra-

ditions run deep in the fire service and that may very well be the reason. The fire service and tradition are near and dear to my heart. But this is a food column right?! Irish cuisine here in America is not much to write home about. Please, to all the Irish out there, don’t beat me up over this. It happens to all cultures; Chinese food in the states is for the most part not at all how they eat in China. And very much the same can be said for Italian food here, and this I know first-hand having been to Italy twice. I hate to break it to ya, but chicken parm isn’t really a thing. In Ireland, there is a great food movement going on, showcasing the best produce, meat and fish the

Emerald Isle has to offer. But I digress, just because it may not be authentic certainly does not mean it can’t be good. So when I decided to make something “Irish” for dinner at the firehouse, I knew I wanted to do something familiar but put my own healthy twist on it. Shepherd’s Pie is delicious, I mean how could you not want beef smothered in a brown gravy-like sauce and topped with buttery mashed potatoes. But one of my favorite things to do is take a dish that is popular in the firehouse and make it a little more nutritious, so just a few ingredient substitutions and boom! A healthy variation on a classic!

“Turkey-Sweet Potato Shepherd's Pie” Serves 6 Ingredients:

1.5 Lb. Ground Turkey 6 Sweet Potatoes ½ Yellow Onion, diced 2 Garlic Cloves, diced 4 Medium Carrots, peeled and diced 8 oz. Mushrooms, quartered 10 oz. Frozen Peas 10 oz. Frozen Corn 2 Sprigs Fresh Rosemaryleaves removed and finely chopped 14.5 Can of Low-Sodium Chicken Broth Extra Virgin Olive Oil ½ tsp Ground Cinnamon ½ tsp Paprika ½ tsp Cayenne Pepper 2 tsp. Flour Salt and Pepper, to taste Procedure:

-Preheat oven to 500 degrees.

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Paterson Fire Damages Apartments Paterson, NJ - Firefighters responded to 22 Alois Place just after 10:00 P.M. on January 22nd after receiving multiple calls for an apartment fire. Battalion 2 was first to arrive on scene and transmitted the Working Fire as heavy smoke poured from the second-floor apartment. Engine 5 arrived on scene and quickly stretched a one-and-three-quarter inch handline to the second-floor. Ladder 3 arrived shortly after and laddered the roof to open up and check for any fire in the common cockloft. Engine companies were able to knock down the fire quickly and prevent any extension to adjacent apartments and the cockloft. No injures were reported and the fire remains under investigation.

add the mushrooms and sauté until nicely browned and no moisture is left in the pan. Add the garlic and rosemary, stirring often.

-Now add the turkey back to the pan with the peas and corn. Sprinkle the flour in, stir and cook for a minute or so. Add in the broth, bring to a boil and lower to a simmer for a few minutes until thickened. Place mixture in an oven-proof baking dish or tray.

soning. Spread on top of the turkey mixture. For a nicer presentation place the potato in a ziploc bag, cut one corner tip of the bag and squeeze the mixture on top of turkey like a pastry bag. -Place in the oven for 10-15 minutes until the top has browned. You can also use the broiler if you have one. Let cool for 10 minutes before serving.

-Now that the potatoes have cooled, peel the skin (you could chop the skin and add to turkey mixture for extra nutrients). In a large bowl add the potato flesh, a drizzle of olive oil, pinch of salt and the spices. Mash with a fork, taste and adjust sea-

-In a large pot, place sweet potatoes with enough cold water to cover. Salt the water like you would pasta water. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer and cook until soft, approximately 30 minutes. Remove and set aside to cool.

-While the potatoes are cooking, place a large skillet over medium heat. Add a couple glugs of olive oil. When the oil is simmering add the ground turkey, seasoning with a little salt and pepper. When the turkey starts to brown, stir it until cooked through and set aside. In the same pan add a little more olive oil and the onions and carrots. When the onions are translucent

AJ FUSCO


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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Large Warehouse Destroyed in Newark Newark, NJ - A massive building fire destroyed a large warehouse in Newark during the late morning hours of January 13th. Around 10:00 A.M., companies arrived to find heavy fire leaping out of the upper floor windows of a building on New Jersey Railroad Ave., between Garden Street and East Kinney Street. The building was vacant at the time of the fire. Outside streams went into operation as companies arrived. Firefighters braved the cold weather as temps were in the upper teens. New Jersey Transit briefly suspended trains in both directions as the building was directly next to the elevated railroad tracks, but service had resumed by afternoon. Two firefighters were taken to University Hospital with minor injuries.

Upper Greenwood Lake Ambulance Holds Annual Installation Dinner Hewitt, NJ - Upper Greenwood Lake Volunteer Ambulance Corps. held their 62nd annual installation dinner on January 13, 2018. Members were presented with a plaque to honor their outstanding service and dedication to the community.

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1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

Texas: Charles Edward Patterson, 60 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: December 1, 2017 Death Date: December 7, 2017 Fire Department: Bowie Rural Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: Firefighter Charles Edward Patterson collapsed in the front yard of a residential structure fire while working a hose line with other members of his fire department. Emergency medical personnel were on scene and provided immediate assistance. Firefighter Patterson was transported to the hospital where he died several days later from a nature and cause of fatal injury still to be reported. California: Cory Iverson, 32 Rank: Engineer Incident Date: December 14, 2017 Death Date: December 14, 2017 Fire Department: CAL FIRE Initial Summary: Engineer Cory Iverson died while fighting the Thomas Fire near Fillmore, California. The nature and cause of Iverson's death has not been released pending a Cal Fire serious accident review. Engineer Iverson was part of a multiengine strike team dispatched from the San Diego area more than a week ago to fight some of the largest fires in California’s history. Florida: Jeffery Atkinson, 43 Rank: Engineer Incident Date: December 15, 2017 Death Date: December 15, 2017 Fire Department: Tallahassee Fire Department Initial Summary: Engineer Jeffery Atkinson died while on-duty at the fire station from a nature and cause of fatal injury still to be determined. Texas: Dene Barber, 56 Rank: Captain Incident Date: December 13, 2017 Death Date: December 13, 2017 Fire Department: Brazoria Fire Department

Initial Summary: Captain Dene Barber responded with the Brazoria Fire Department to an apartment building fire on the evening of December 13, 2017. Firefighters made entry into the building and extinguished the fire. Upon exiting the structure, Barber complained to others of not feeling well. Captain Barber was treated on scene by West Brazos EMS, then transported to the hospital where in spite of all efforts he passed away from a reported heart attack.

New York: David Jahnes, 58 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: December 18, 2017 Death Date: December 18, 2017 Fire Department: Nyack Fire Department – Fire Patrol Initial Summary: Firefighter David Jahnes fell ill while at the scene of an investigation into an odor at a bank which turned out to be an overheating battery in the alarm system. Firefighter Jahnes was treated by fellow responders and transported by the Nyack Ambulance Corps to the hospital where later during treatment he suffered coronary failure and passed away. Indiana: Jeffery Alan Blackmer, 42 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: December 20, 2017 Death Date: December 20, 2017 Fire Department: Hamilton Township Volunteer Fire Company Initial Summary: Shortly after working a barn fire with his fire department, Firefighter Jeffery Alan Blackmer was discovered deceased at the fire station where he had been cleaning and stowing away gear used to fight the early morning blaze. The nature and cause of fatal injury are still to be determined by authorities.


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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

South Bergen Chiefs Honor Life-Saving Heroes UPS & DOWNS Notes from Ron Jeffers

At their first meeting of 2018, the South Bergen Fire Chiefs Association recognized local firefighters for their life-saving actions in 2017. Two Bergen County residents are alive today because of their actions. At a crowded meeting at the quarters of Little Ferry Hook & Ladder Co. 1, members of the Lyndhurst and Maywood Fire Departments received their awards. During a community pride event in Lyndhurst on St. Patrick's Day, Dick Italiano, 74, a DJ at the gathering, collapsed. Without hesitation, five people who were in attendance rushed to the man's aid. All five are EMTs. Township firefighters Nicholas and Paul Haggerty, Jr. and Dominic Rotundo, who were joined by Isabella Maldonado and Charles Pelle, took turns giving breaths and chest compressions to the victim. Shortly thereafter, Lyndhurst police arrived with a defibrillator. With one shock, the man was revived. Maywood Firefighter Roy De Young was honored for saving the life of a 69-year-old man while shopping in a Paramus Shoprite, March 13th. Approaching the checkout line, the man went into cardiac arrest and collapsed. Refusing to have this man check out at the checkout line, De Young and an employee performed CPR. Then, another employee arrived with a defibrillator and a shock was applied by the team. Paramus police and EMS arrived and assumed patient care, as the victim began breathing on his own. “I think, sometimes the residents of Bergen County don't always remember that they are protected by volunteers primarily,” said Maywood Fire Chief Chris Tuttle. “These could be their neighbors, someone standing with them in line, not always in a uniform, that could be there to save their lives,” he continued. Also at this meeting, service awards were issued to members that ranged from 50-years to 69-years of service to their respective communities. They were: Pete Peterson, Moonachie, 50-years; Larry Woods, Carlstadt, 51-years; John Fladung, North Arlington, 52-years; Jerry Winston, East Rutherford, 52-years; John Schwedhelm, Little Ferry, 53-years; George Heflich, Secaucus, 53-years; Howard Mulder, Saddle Brook, 54years; George Schroenrock, Secaucus, 55-years; John Ruschke, Moonachie, 56-years; Harry Yakimik, Garfield, 60-years; Frank Corso, Lodi, 69-years; and Luis Franco, Lodi, 69-years. DOWNS: A dwelling fire on Brookside Pl., in Cranford, Dec. 30th, left a resident and two dogs dead, officials said. Heavy fire conditions were encountered by first arriving units. UPS: On the morning of Jan. 1st, Middletown Fire Chief Anthony

Citarrella entered a smoke-filled Peach Blossom Lane home and rescued a child who retreated back into the house after the family started to evacuate their children, according to fire department spokesman Dennis Fowler. DOWNS: A 5-alarm fire involved a Summit Ave. apartment building in Summit, Dec. 31st. Fifteen families were evacuated from 125 Summit Ave., plus two nearby buildings were cleared, officials said. Multiple rescues of residents were executed by firefighters through windows, according to reports. Two residents were taken to Overlook Medical Center for non-life-threatening injuries and there were no injuries to firefighters reported. UPS: Firefighters from Mullica and the Sweetwater FD's Cold Water Rescue Unit rescued a German Shepherd that fell through ice on Mullica River, Jan. 10th. Firefighters used a tethered boat to help pull “Quincy” to safety. The dog was not injured and returned to its owner. DOWNS: A man was found dead on the morning of Jan. 3rd after a fire engulfed his Ridgefield Dr. home in Point Pleasant, officials said. Firefighters arrived to find the home fully involved in flames. UPS: Fire department promotions in Teaneck include Joseph Berchtold to deputy chief, Sean Mackey to battalion chief, Edward Gallone Jr. to captain and Sergio Cafmano to lieutenant. DOWNS: The American Red Cross was assisting 34 people displaced by a 4-alarm fire that involved a Maple Ave. dwelling, in Kearny, on Jan. 5th. Firefighters worked in dangerous conditions with temperatures below freezing. UPS: Mountain Lakes Fire Lieutenant Brian Caine was credited with the rescue of a woman who plunged into icy waters while skating on Mountain Lake, Jan. 3rd. She was about 25-yards away from shore and in the water about six minutes, officials said. DOWNS: Firefighters battled a 3alarm fire in subfreezing temperatures that engulfed the large Plastics Unlimited building in Indian Mills, Jan. 7th. UPS: A Lakewood mother and her infant son survived a dwelling fire on Woodlake Manor Dr., Jan. 5th, with the help of a good Samaritan, who caught them as they jumped from the second-floor, officials said. Rey Carpinteyro was parking his car when he heard a woman screaming to “catch her baby.” He ran over to the burning building and caught the infant as the mother tossed him from the window, a police statement said. He then helped break the mother's fall, who also jumped. She sustained multiple lacerations to her legs. DOWNS: A 68-year-old woman was killed as the result of a fire in a North 9th St. dwelling, in Kenilworth, Jan. 8th. UPS: New firefighters in Morristown are Thomas Dennehy, William Hofferer and Peter Dwyer. DOWNS: The Willamstown Fire Company has rallied around one of its members whose family home was destroyed in a fire on Jan. 7th. The

RON JEFFERS

(L to R): South Bergen Fire Chiefs Association Awards Chairman Rich Pelcher; First Vice President Tony Chiod; President Bryan Hennig with award recipients: Lyndhurst Firefighters Dominick Rotondo, Nick Haggerty and Paul Haggerty; and Maywood Firefighter Roy De Young.

RON JEFFERS

Years of Service award recipients that attended the South Bergen Fire Chiefs January meeting.

fire company launched a collection for the Parisi-Orr family seeking monetary donations and gift cards for groceries and other essential items. UPS: John Hendershott has been promoted to fire captain in Vinerland. New lieutenants are Michael Feaster and Terrence McManus. DOWNS: Volunteer Firefighter Jason Penwell jumped on a fire truck dispatched to a fire on Fireland Rd., Jan. 3rd. When Tabernacle Fire Chief Dave Smith arrived first and gave a report, Pennwell realized the address was his. Smith said no one was injured, but one family dog was killed. An online fundraising campaign was set up by Tabernacle Fire Company 1. Pennwell, who is an active-duty Air Force technical sergeant, said Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst planned to arrange housing for him. Pennwell is also a firefighter at the base. UPS: Jonathan Yahr has been promoted to fire captain in Lakewood. DOWNS: One person died and

three families were displaced after a fire involved a Talmage Ave. dwelling in Bound Brook, Jan. 7th. UPS: The Oaklyn Fire Department received a Compassionate Fire Department Award from PETA for saving a dog who fell through ice on Newton Creek, Dec. 30th. Two firefighters equipped with ice rescue suits, ropes and a sled reached “Lilly's” side and entered the water with her. She was then brought to shore safely, warmed with a blanket and returned to her owner. DOWNS: The Country Town Diner, in Berlin, was badly damaged by a fire on Jan. 11th. UPS: Chris Annunziata has been promoted to deputy fire chief in Hackensack. DOWNS: A fire in a Cass St. dwelling in Trenton, Jan. 13th, killed a woman and injured three other residents. UPS: Newark Firefighter Paul Leber, who was seriously injured fighting a fire in a tire shop in De-

cember, was released from Jacobi Medical Center, in the Bronx, and transferred for rehabilitation in West Orange, Jan. 9th. DOWNS: Ten people were treated after being exposed to “hazardous material” at the Saint Gobain Performance Plastic business on Dey Rd., Wayne, Jan. 14th. Fumes and smoke came from the manufacturing of Polytetraflouorethylene, which is better known as Teflon, officials said. It was not clear what caused the fumes at the time of the incident. UPS: Kearny Fire Captain Dave Hamilton and Lt. Chris Hamilton were part of a January 13th ceremony where the K.F.D. recognized their great-uncle, Fireman Robert Hamilton, who died in the line-of-duty on Jan. 13, 1941. A plaque dedication was mounted on Engine 4's apparatusthe company Fireman Hamilton was assigned to when he died. - CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Teaneck Firefighters Battle Double-Fatal 3rd Alarm House Fire Teaneck, NJ - Heavy smoke and fire filled the south end of Teaneck early Sunday morning, January 28th, as firefighters battled a fully involved house fire that would end as a double-fatal fire. Initial calls were received at 6:37 A.M. for a re- JUMP TO FILE# ported house fire at 012818102 130 Sherman Avenue. Teaneck PD quickly arrived to find a two-and-ahalf story woodframe fully involved and attempted to enter the home, however were pushed back by fire. A working fire was transmitted while the tour commander was enroute after seeing a large column of smoke from a distance. Once on scene, a secondalarm was transmitted and crews went into defensive operations with (two) two-and-a-half inch handlines stretched to either side of the home to protect the exposures. Tower-2 arrived in front of the home and was fed by Engine3 of Englewood. As heavy fire vented, the "Delta" exposure began to catch fire and (two) oneand-three-quarter inch lines were stretched into the exposure. Hackensack Ladder-1 set up in a driveway from the street behind the fire and went into ladder pipe operations on the main fire building. The heavy fire was knocked down within a half hour, but crews remained on scene for hours hitting hot spots. Two homeowners were unaccounted, and after it was safe to enter the home, searchers located two bodies that perished in the blaze. Due to extensive damage to the home, heavy demolition equipment was called in to demolish it. A few minor injuries were reported, and the fire remains under investigation. Mutual aid from Hackensack, Englewood, Bogota and Ridgefield Park assisted on the scene.

Heavy fire on arrival.

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

- CHRIS TOMPKINS

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Two-Alarm Fire in Paterson on Frigid Night Paterson, NJ - Heavy fire consumed a large home on Fulton Street late Sunday night, January 7th, as temperatures dropped into the low teens. The first call came into dispatch just before 11:30 P.M. reporting a house fire at 178 Fulton Street. First arriving units were met with heavy smoke and fire conditions showing from the first-floor and threatening another home, causing a second-alarm to be transmitted immediately. Firefighters stretched multiple lines and made an interior attack, knocking down the fire on the first-floor. The fire had already extended to the second-floor and heavy fire conditions forced firefighters to evacuate the building. Exterior handlines were able to protect the exposure and knock down the heavy fire as firefighters made one more interior attack on the second-

JUMP TO FILE #010818122 floor. An aggressive attack was able to knock down fire on the second-floor, but the fast moving flames had already extended into the attic as heavy smoke poured from the roof. Command once again called for evacuation tones as a collapse was reported and fire began to vent from the attic. Two ladder pipes and exterior lines knocked down the heavy fire as it vented through the roof. The fire was knocked down and under control in just over one hour. The residents were able to escape uninjured, however one firefighter suffered minor injures. The cause of the fire is still under investigation. - CHRIS TOMPKINS

Lynda DeRosa donated 9 sets of Pet Oxygen Mask Kits to First Responders in Hunterdon County on January 23rd. (L to R, back row): Sean Smith, Captain High Bridge FD; Bradley Patkochis, Chief Quakertown FD; Walter Dorf, Chief Clinton FD; Lynda DeRosa; Robert Emery, Chief Annandale Hose Co; Kevin Saharic, Chief Lebanon Boro FD; Gene Schaedel; Marilena Parker, Clinton Rescue Squad. (L to R, front row): Bucky Buchanan, Deputy Chief of EMS for Clinton Rescue Squad; Mark Brong, Deputy Chief High Bridge FD; Jack DeRosa & "Crash"; and Mike Lapczynski, EMS Lieutenant Clinton rescue Squad. RICH MAXWELL

Clinton Twp. Resident Donates Pet Oxygen Masks to Northern Hunterdon County First Responders Clinton Twp., NJ - Lynda DeRosa decided not to buy and exchange Christmas presents this season; instead she chose to donate nine sets of Pet Oxygen Mask Kits to First Responders in her community. Mrs. DeRosa and her husband, Jack, met with member representatives of the North Hunterdon Fire Alliance and Clinton Rescue Squad at Annandale’s Fire Station #1 on Tuesday evening, January 23rd, to hand out the kits. Lynda DeRosa started “Jaci & BigBoy’s Hands Helping Paws” in memory of her niece Jaci and her

JUMP TO FILE #012618102 pet dog BigBoy. She stated “Everyone I have met along this journey has been absolutely wonderful. I feel very blessed to be able to bless others who selflessly give their service to all of us in our community and at the same time honor my niece Jaci and dog BigBoy as well.” Mrs. DeRosa is hoping to make this an annual or even semiannual event, as she believes that all First Responders should be wellequipped to take care of residents'

pets in the event that tragedy strikes. Each kit contains three specially designed oxygen masks (small, medium and large) that fit over the snout of an animal to allow for the flow of life-saving oxygen. The agencies that received the kits were: Clinton FD (Station 45), Annandale Hose Co. (Station 46), Lebanon Boro FD (Station 18), Quakertown Fire Co. (Station 91) and their EMS Division (Rescue 91), High Bridge FD (Station 14), and the Clinton First Aid and Rescue Squad (Rescue 45). - RICHARD MAXWELL

PATCH OF THE MONTH

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the Month” feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

The new patch for Netcong Hilltop Fire Company #2, designed by Kyle Faucher.

MARK SYLVESTER


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

EMS Mom Recounts Personal Experience Responding to Son’s Burning Home Stillwater, NJ - Responding to a call for help is a normal day in the Martin family. My husband Bill, who was a 23-year veteran of EMS, died while driving an ambulance to a landing zone. He was transporting a burn victim from a structure fire. My son Andy is an offi- JUMP TO FILE# cer with the Sussex 011118116 County Sheriff's Dept. Andy is also an EMR with the Stillwater Emergency Rescue Squad. I have 28 years of service to EMS. I was a 911 operator for over 10 years. Volunteerism and community service is our way of life. It's a commitment we passed to our children. Andy and Beth were recently married and spent the first few weeks of marriage painting an old Victorian house. They cleaned and polished till everything gleamed. They displayed wedding photos and wedding presents. They were settling down to enjoy being a new family. On January 4, 2018, I responded to a call for a smell of smoke; it was the home of my son and his wife Beth. I got a panicked call from Beth telling me she smelled smoke in her home. She had called the fire department, but she was okay. I raced out the door and was on the way there in minutes. Because the location was just up the street, I was first on scene. I notified dispatch via radio that I was just seconds out. As I got to the end of the street, I noticed the bright orange color in the lower windows. The glow was terrifying, as I didn't see my daughter-in-law outside. I shouted in the radio, "I got flames showing". Later, one fireman approached me and said that he has known me for years and that was the first time he heard panic in my voice. He said he rolled out of bed faster. A longtime fire dept. member from a neighboring town called me and said my radio dispatch made the hair on his neck stand on end. He said he knew I was in trouble. Another EMS member told me he stepped up his response when he heard my voice. I will admit that is the first time in my life I witnessed the devil...it was in the form of FIRE..it was sheer terror. So many horrible thoughts ran through my head in those few short seconds. Flashbacks to almost five years ago when Bill went to a structure fire and didn't come back. I searched the darkness and finally saw Beth running toward me in her nightgown and robe. I have never felt such relief. She was safe, but crying and covered in black soot. I held her tight trying to calm my fear. I notified dispatch that the structure had been evacuated. Stillwater EMS arrived on scene. They offered blankets and a warm place

to sit inside the truck. It was hard to walk away, so we stayed...watching. EMS stayed with us. Beth and I watched the flames lick through the walls and melt the siding. The windows buckled and fell out. The shattering noise of glass breaking was heart wrenching. Black smoke with bright embers floated up in the night sky. The bone-numbing cold cut through us while we watched the fire grow brighter. We were helpless till the fire department arrived on scene. Minutes later, the trucks arrived, one after another. Men and women jumped off the trucks ready to tackle what was destroying a new family's dream. My son, Andy, arrived from work. He jumped in carrying hoses, still in uniform. Neighboring fire departments were simultaneously dispatched for this structure fire, an action that saved the home. Thank you "Tripod dispatch". When the fire was extinguished and the scene cleared for safety, we were escorted into the house to get much needed possessions. Walking into the house, we saw walls with dripping water, heavy black soot and charred memories. New furniture that was polished with pride, now covered with fallen plaster and broken ceiling fans. Destruction was everywhere, nothing was recognizable in the main fire area. Christmas presents totally gone. What was left there was only huge masses of sodden ash and soot. The walls and doors six-feet down from the ceiling were covered with black soot. The light switches and furnace thermostat were melted mass dripping down the walls. The heat was intense; the fire did its damage. As we walked through the house my son noted his prized John Wayne posters were leaning against the wall. They were covered in black. He dropped his head and just walked away. I got three firefighters to secure these framed posters and turn them over to EMS to safe guard for us. Throughout the house, Andy and Beth picked up what they could save. They kept saying to each other, "no one was hurt," "it's just stuff," and "it's okay". The one wedding present they bought themselves was a huge big screen tv. It was Andy's pride and joy. He had it hooked up before he had cable. It melted off the wall. On the floor below where it hung lay the mass that once brought joy. Andy just hung his head. No words. Just silence. Returning to his childhood home, Andy brought his new wife and black garbage bags of what was salvaged in his burnt home. No toothbrush, no clean clothes, just what they were wearing. So many friends and family have reached out to make sure they were okay. These contacts have kept them going. A GoFundMe page was started and the response has been overwhelming. Responses from as far

Before the fire struck.

away as Germany have been coming in. Days after the fire, a request for clean up and salvage assistance was put out via Facebook. Not knowing how many, or if anyone would show up, we went back to the house. Our family was met at the scene by neighbors, friends, family, EMS and fire department members. All ready to help. The Stillwater mayor, Lisa Chammings, came and was working in the muck with us. Stillwater Emergency Rescue squad came with a rig, crew and Captain. Yes, an ambulance. After all, we are an EMS family. There is always an ambulance. Stillwater Fire Department

After the fire struck.

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members were there helping with salvaging of what we could find. The local church opened its doors for food and a warm place to rest. Neighbors who could not help dropped off packing supplies and food. The Stillwater community gathered around to assist one of their own. The cold just seeped through your clothing no matter how warm you dressed. The smell, oh the smell. You don't forget that quickly. Not one person complained. On that day there would be no tears, just smiles. Everyone was there for Andy and Beth. A few hours after the clean up at the house, I received a call from the EMS crew. They were stopping

at the house. They had a surprise. Rob Losey and Trevor Havens of Stillwater Emergency Rescue Squad brought back the three posters that were taken from the house the night of the fire. They had spent hours cleaning the John Wayne posters until they were pristine. These young men took time to ease the pain of a fellow volunteer. That is family. That is a volunteer for EMS and Fire. I am proud to say I am a resident of Stillwater, N.J., where the term "family" includes your neighbors, friends and fellow volunteers. - TERI MARTIN

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Remembering All Those Lost AFTER 9-11 I am one of many retired NYC firemen who went to the towers to offer my help in the recovery. It always amazed me that there were so many rescue and firefighters that came from all parts of the country to help. After 9-11, the NYFD notified its members about the passing of its members. In 2002, one firefighter passed away from a World Trade Center illness (WTC). The following year it was four firefighters. Going ahead to 2017 the numbers go up to 20. Since 9-11, a total of 165 members of the NYFD have now died from WTC illness. I also found out that more than 1,000 recovery workers have died since 911. It is reported that by 2020 there will be more people dead from 9-11 than all those who were killed on 9-11-01. The federal government took

JUMP TO FILE #012318121 11 years to recognize 58 types of cancer connected to the events of 9-11. I was one of the lucky ones to survive two types of cancer. We must never forget 9-11 and those we lost that day, but we must also remember all those that have died after 9-11 and continue to die. To view the list of names of WTC Related Illness Deaths, please visit: http://www.ufanyc.org/wtcrelated/ - THOMAS COONEY

Thomas Cooney is a retired member of NYFD Ladder 30 and author of "The Man Behind Badge 711".

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

CHRIS TOMPKINS WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Garfield Engine 1, a 1998 Pierce Quad, operates at one of a series of house fires to strike the city at the end of last year.

DAMIEN DANIS

Lyndhurst Engine 1, a 1995 Pierce Lance, operating at a house fire on Page Ave. on January 3rd.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

UPS AND DOWNS - CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

DOWNS: A 40-foot section of ceiling was damaged by fire at St. Phillip the Apostle Prep School in Clifton, Jan. 11th. Officials believed an electrical issue started the fire. UPS: Freehold Firefighter Andrew Dale was honored for his 50-years of service at a Borough Council meeting on Dec. 4th. The Engine & Hose Co. 1 member has served as captain, chief and department president. DOWNS: Six people were left homeless after a fire in a Shore Rd. duplex on Jan. 14th in Linwood. UPS: In January, the Mount Tabor Fire District, in Parsippany, received a pet oxygen mask thanks to a donation by Canine Company. In 2017, Canine Company donated 69 sets of masks to first responders in 28 New Jersey municipalities. DOWNS: Fire officials believe a bedroom space heater may have started a fire that displaced four families from a Sussex Ave. dwelling in Morristown, Jan. 20th. One firefighter was treated for a mild concussion and released from Morristown M.C., according to Fire Chief Robert Flanagan. UPS: Hammonton volunteer Firefighter Frank Silvesti is celebrating

70-years with the fire company. He remains active at meetings and as a mentor to young firefighters and an example of service to his community. DOWNS: A father and two of his children died in an early morning fire in a Park Ave. dwelling in Bridgeton, Jan. 22nd. Officials said the two-story building was fully involved upon arrival of first responders. UPS: The Jersey City Fire Department and New Jersey City University have partnered with Renewable Fuels Association to bring an Ethanol Safety Seminar to New Jersey. The seminar is free and will teach students how to deal with ethanol related emergencies. Two classes will be held, starting at 8:30 am to 4 p.m, on April 6th and 7th. The location is the Gilligan Student Union Building's multipurpose room at NJCU, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City. To register, go to: www.rfa.traincaster.com DOWNS: Eighteen people were displaced due to a fire at the Riverside Terrace housing development in Paterson on Jan. 22nd. Three apartments were damaged. UPS: Life-long city resident Steve McGill, with over 30-years on the job, was promoted to chief of the Jersey City Fire Department, in January.

Chief Steve Mc Gill, left, was promoted to Chief of the Jersey City Fire Department in January. JOE SHINE

DID YOU K NOW

RICH MAXWELL

Firefighters battled a fully involved building fire in freezing temps and winds on Stockton St. in Phillipsburg during the early morning hours of January 6th.

Phillipsburg Man Charged with Arson and Multiple Burglaries on Same Night Phillipsburg, NJ - Firefighters were dispatched to a working fire in an abandoned building on Stockton Street at 1:25 A.M. on January 6th. They arrived to find the building fully involved. The fire had been discovered by a Phillipsburg Police Officer while on patrol. The building had been abandoned for many years, it was boarded up and in a state of disrepair. It consisted of two floors covering over 8000-square-feet. In addition, there was an attic in the building. Firefighters conduced exterior operations only in attacking the fire with several master streams were set up in addition to two areal ladders. Phillipsburg’s 94-69 was set up on the street in front of the fire building while Harmony’s 23-69 was set up in the parking lot next to the fire building by a neighboring

JUMP TO FILE #012618111 building. Water streams were also employed to protect nearby buildings. According to a press release from the fire chief, the fire was brought under control by 3:40 A.M. and fire units cleared the scene by 9:20 A.M. In addition to battling the blaze, firefighters had to fight the extreme cold temperatures and strong winds which caused icing, frozen turnout gear and slippery conditions. Firefighters were called back to the scene later in the morning for a rekindle of the fire. During the fire, Phillipsburg police were dispatched to a burglary of a business on State Highway 22, about a half mile from the fire scene. They were able to apprehend

a suspect after a short foot chase. It was later reported by lehighvalleylive.com that a local man had been arrested and charged with setting the fire to the abandoned building and burglarizing two separate businesses in town, all in the same night. The fire was investigated by the Phillipsburg Police Department, New Jersey Division of Fire Safety, and the Warren County Prosecutor’s Office. Responding to the fire were the Phillipsburg Police Department (Patrol 94), Phillipsburg Fire Department (Station 94), Harmony Township Fire Department (Station 23), and Phillipsburg Rescue Squad (Rescue 94). Other fire companies were called up for cover assignments. - RICHARD MAXWELL

?

For patients involved in a motor vehicle accident, strokes or heart attacks, the firefighters along with the EMTs only have 1 hour, also known as the golden hour, from the second the accident takes place to get the patients to the hospital and seen by a doctor.

RICH MAXWELL


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Ensuring First Responder Safety on the Tracks In books and movies, heroes are larger-than-life people with extraordinary abilities. In reality, heroes are people who go the extra mile to help others in need. When the time comes, they rise to the occasion, often putting their lives on the line to keep everyone safe. First responders are the best example of this. F o r t u n a t e l y, there are different training programs to JUMP TO FILE# help first responders 010918100 stay safe and successfully accomplish their jobs in potentially dangerous environments. NJ TRANSIT’s Rail Training Department offers this type of training, helping first responders handle emergency situations on and around the railroad. NJ TRANSIT’s First Responder Training Program was developed to take away the unknowns for first responders. They learn who is in charge upon arrival, how to identify and communicate with NJ TRANSIT personnel on scene, how to remove train car emergency windows, how to gain access to the train, how to work around electrical hazards, and how to safely work on the tracks if needed. They also learn about incident priorities, what agencies they should contact, and how to work within the incident command system to ensure all departments on scene are communicating effectively with one another. Additionally, they are given examples of what could happen if the wrong steps are taken during an emergency. The NJ TRANSIT First Responder Training Program is designed for Police, Fire, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) , Emergency Management, Community Emergency Response teams and others who play a role at an incident scene. It is available to all first responders in NJ TRANSIT’s rail service area at no cost. The class is taught by Sr. Training Specialist Christopher Scanlon. Chris was an NJ TRANSIT loco-

motive engineer for 11 years before taking on his new role, but he also brings 15 years of fire department and EMS experience to the job. Chris is a New Jersey State Certified Fire Instructor and has attained accreditation from the New Jersey Division of Fire Safety to help teach the class. “While we always hope dangerous incidents around the railroad never happen, this program allows us to promote first responder safety and prepare them for the unique challenges and hazards they may encounter while working on or near the tracks, no matter where they are on our system,” said Chris. First responders from outside the agency take the class alongside student locomotive engineers, student train conductors, newly hired New Jersey Transit Police Officers and catenary power dispatchers (overhead catenary wires provide electricity to power electric trains). This helps them get to know each other in the event they meet again at an NJ TRANSIT scene. In 2017, more than 1,200 first responders participated in the First Responder Training Program statewide, with nearly 500 coming from the Jersey City Fire Department. “The Jersey City Fire Department understands the hazards of operating at rail-related incidents,” said Battalion Chief Rob Daly. “We lost a firefighter at a rail incident in 1978 and have vowed to have all of our members trained by NJ TRANSIT to hopefully prevent future incidents. The training provided by NJ TRANSIT will enable our department to have the knowledge necessary to operate safely and overcome the challenges presented at rail emergencies. I encourage all firefighters that have NJ TRANSIT trains operating in their jurisdiction to take advantage of this free training program.” For more information on the First Responder Training Program or to schedule a class, call Chris Scanlon at (973) 522-3719. - GEVON KNOX

Submitting photos and press releases is EASY! Register at www.1rbn.com to begin posting directly. Prefer emails? Email your press release and photos directly to Lindsey@1strespondernews.com

NJ TRANSIT employees and Jersey City firefighters attended a recent first responder training class at the Meadows Maintenance Complex in Kearny, the corporation’s largest rail maintenance facility.

NJ TRANSIT

NJ TRANSIT

NJ TRANSIT Sr. Training Specialist Christopher Scanlon teaches first responders the importance of safety around the railroad, with an emphasis on equipment and infrastructure.

NJ TRANSIT

A recent training class of NJ TRANSIT employees and the Jersey City Fire Department takes time out for a group photo in front of a diesel locomotive and a Jersey City fire truck.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Three-Alarm House Fire in Lodi Lodi, NJ - A three-alarm fire tore through the attic and roof of a Lodi home on January 10th, leaving the structure uninhabitable, but causing no serious injuries. The fire was reported at about 7:45 A.M. at 131 Spring Street. Heavy fire and smoke were venting out of all attic windows as companies pulled up. A second-alarm was immediately called for as two lines were stretched into the front door and up the staircase to attack the flames. As additional companies arrived, water problems due to frozen hydrants began to surface. Members were withdrawn so the heavy fire could be knocked down, one of several times this needed to happen. A third-alarm was transmitted as longer stretches were required and more manpower was needed to as-

JUMP TO FILE #011018111 sist. Garfield Truck 4 and Wallington 201 operated elevated master streams as well as a deck gun from Lodi 615. Eventually, all heavy fire was extinguished and one final time members entered to hit hot spots and open up. The fire took about two hours to control with most of the roof burned off and the attic consumed. Some fire dropped down to the secondfloor. One resident was treated for minor smoke inhalation. A family cat is unaccounted for. The cause has yet to be determined. - BILL TOMPKINS

Deputy Chief Oral Presentation: Private Sessions Lieutenant/Captain Oral Presentation: Private Sessions Battalion Chief/2nd Level Captain: Written/Oral Class March 27th OR April 23rd (Pick the day that works best for you) Entry Level Physical Performance Test (PPT): March 3rd

Entry Level Written Book #1: April 14th

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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March, 2018

PRIZED POSSESSIONS If you have photos you would like to see in our “Prized Possessions” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

ANTHONY RAZZANO

Two-Alarm Structure Fire in Newton

We are excited to be debuting our new feature called "Prized Possessions," that will showcase people's FIRE/EMS related possessions and collectibles! We are 'kicking it off' by featuring these flame sneakers worn by 1st Responder News correspondent, Damien Danis. When asked about his infamous sneakers, Damien had this to say: "I wear the sneakers only once a year to the Wildwood Fire Expo. The flames go with my nickname, "Flamien Damien". My friend's brother gave me the nickname years ago and it stuck!!" DAMIEN DANIS

Newton, NJ - On January 27th around 6:30 A.M., Newton FD was dispatched for a possible structure fire. Within minutes, patrol confirmed a working fire with occupants trapped on the front roof. Newton PD, using their patrol car, were able to assist the occupants down from the roof prior to FD arrival. All occupants were accounted for and out of the building on FD arrival. Crews found heavy fire on "C" side of the building upon their arrival. Three handlines were stretched and the main body of fire took approximately 45 minutes to control. All units cleared by 11:40 A.M., after overhaul. Engines 1 and 2, Squad 3, Tower 4, and Chiefs 810 and 811 were all on scene. Other agencies on scene included Andover Twp. FD, Byram Twp. FD for their air truck, Newton Police (NJ), Newton Volunteer First Aid & Rescue Squad, Lakeland Emergency Squad for Rehab Unit, Alantic EMS, Stillwater Emergency Rescue Squad, Newton DPW, Newton Water Dept., JCPL, Elizabethtown Gas, Hampton FD and Fredon FD., providing station coverage.

CONGRATULATIONS Whiting Volunteer Fire Company Specifications:

Final Drawing Of Their Future Sutphen Pumper

• Sutphen Custom Monarch Cab & Chassis • Aluminum Body

• Sutphen 73” Long cab with a 15” raised Roof

• Scene View – Side Mount / Top Mount Pump Panel

• 2000 GPM Hale QMax Pump

• Cummins ISL 9 – 450 HP engine

• Hale 5.0 Foam Logix Foam System

• Zico Electric Ladder Rack

• Smart Power 10KW Hydraulic generator

• Wilburt NS10- 6000 watt LED Light Tower • Akron 3440 Deckmaster electric deck gun with wireless controls

Blaze Emergency Equipment Company 102 Firehouse Rd. Browns Mills, NJ 08015

Phone: 609-893-3600 • info@blazeemergency.com

www.blazeemergency.com


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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

NEW JERSEY GIGS

NEW JERSEY MEMORIES

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Gigs” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Memories” feature, please upload them to our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

Hightstown Fire Marshal Chad Reed utilizes this 2007 Ford that saw original duty as a police unit.

Edgewater Engine 4 used this silver over red painted Mack enclosed cab pumper.

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Camden Engine 6 operated with this Dodge/American LaFrance apparatus.

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RON JEFFERS

Mahwah Assistant Chief Mike Roe answers alarms in this 2011 Chevy Tahoe.

RON JEFFERS

Berkeley Heights Car 2 is a 2008 Dodge Durango used by Deputy Chief and Fire Official Jim Hopkins.

Basking Ridge EMS 20-163 is a Dodge Durango.

RON JEFFERS

Valtek, the FiretruckShop.com, provides the highest quality painting and collision work for fire equipment in the NJ/NY metropolitan area. We also have the spray booth, safety equipment and permits you expect. Work is done quickly for a fair price by people that know fire trucks. Nearby at Exit 60 off Route 80. Come see for yourself why over 229 departments have chosen Valtek for their painting and collision needs.

Valtek™ is the first Axalta Certified Commercial Refinisher in the area.

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Finding Time for What’s Important Chaplain's Corner

Pastor Fernando Villicana

RICH MAXWELL

First Responders prepare to search a well for the driver of a car that had crashed into a house on Sad Hill Rd. in Raritan Twp. on January 24th.

Car Crashes into House in Raritan Twp., First Responders Search Well for Driver Raritan Twp., NJ - Emergency crews were dispatched to a report that a car had crashed into a residence on Sand Hill Road at the intersection of Thatchers Hill Road at 11:46 P.M. on January 24th. Early reports came in that there was no driver or occupants at the scene. A BMW, that was apparently traveling northbound on Thatchers Hill Road just prior to the crash, had run off the road on the opposite side of the “T” intersection with Sand Hill Road. It crashed through a hedge, struck the corner of a house, and destroyed a stone well structure in the front yard of the residence.

JUMP TO FILE #012618101 First Responders were concerned that the driver may have fallen down the now open well after the crash. The well was about 30-feet deep with water in the bottom of it. An extension ladder was lowered into the well so that one of the Rescue Squad members could climb down to check the bottom. He was harnessed up with two safety ropes which were secured to Heavy Rescue 49-5 and ran through pullies connected to Tower Ladder 21 which was posi-

tioned directly over the well opening. Once the safety rigging was all set, he descended down the ladder into the well. The search did not reveal anyone in the well. First Responders then started to secure all of the equipment and cleared the scene around 1:25 A.M. The crash is being investigated by the Raritan Township Police. Responding to the incident were the Raritan Township Police Department (Patrol 21), Flemington-Raritan Rescue Squad (Rescue 49), and the Raritan Township Fire Department (Station 21). - RICHARD MAXWELL

In the fire service time is of the essence and we are loaded with priorities and important choices. Once emergency services arrive on scene of a crisis, the decision wheels begin to turn. In business “time is money". In the fire service, time can be a matter of life or death. Even though there are procedures in place, the incident commander must begin using each moment wisely as well as deciding what resources to deploy. Making the best use of time and resources is the name of the game. There seems to be an increased emphasis on Time Management nowadays. Companies are investing more resources to provide seminars and instructional material on how to plan your life out. Corporate America realizes that if employees are taught this concept, the company can be more fruitful and productive. Prioritizing is the name of the game and more and more books are being published on the subject. But what are the things that are most important in life? Well, there could be a long list of things depending on the person and their status (single, married, retired etc.). Exercise is important for a healthy body. Spending quality time with your spouse and your children is important. Reading your Bible and praying everyday is important. Maintaining balance between work and play is important for a healthy life. For the most part, we already know the right things to do! The problem is we have a hard

time finding time for these things that are important. Today in our society there are more time-saving devices than any other time in the history of mankind. Yet we still don't seem to have enough time. We're always in a hurry. We just can't seem to get it all done. The fact is: You can't be all, do all, and have it all. You have to make selections and choices in life. It’s called time management! The Bible has this to say about time management. Ephesians 5:1516 (Phillips trans.) "Live life with a due sense of responsibility not as those who do not know the meaning of life but as those who do. Make the best use of your time.” We all have the exact same amount of time - 168 hours a week. The bad news is that next week you're not going to have any more time than you did this week. So, the only thing that can change is how you manage it, how you use it. You can't save time, you can't stretch time, you can't add time - you just have to manage it well. The big question is: what do I want to give my time and my life for? And you decide what really matters most. Nothing really happens until you schedule it. You may say spending time with God is important. You may say spending time with your kids is important. You may say quality time with your spouse is important. You may say exercise or anything else is important, but if you don't schedule it, it's not really important to you. Scheduling is where the rubber meets the road. Start setting a date with yourself and with the Lord and with your spouse ... things like that. Thank you for taking the time to read through this message. -Pastor Fernando Villicana, Fire Service Chaplain

! T I S S I M DON’T Allentown Spring Melt Fire Memorabilia Marketplace 0 $1 tr Con ibution for Admission Free Parking!

Sunday, April 29th Opens at 9 A.M.

Agri-Plex at Allentown Fairgrounds 302 N. 17th St., Allentown, PA

Fire Service Antiques, Collectibles, Apparatus, Equipment and much more..

Over 300 Vendors Selling

www.unionhistoricalfiresociety.com

RICH MAXWELL

A Rescue Squad member starts to descend the ladder into a well to check to see if the driver of a car had fallen into it after crashing into a house in Raritan Twp.

For the 30th year in 2018 ... Firematic Antique Auction

Saturday, April 28, at 9 a.m.

Auction info: Donn Zalewski, Phone: 216-780-4821 or Email: donnDRZ22@aol.com


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ON THE LITER SIDE If you have photos you would like to see in our “On the Liter Side” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

A Frigid Four-Alarm in Kearny

RICH MAXWELL

Have You Volunteered Yet??? I found this sign on the fence of a ball field at a park in one of the towns in Hunterdon County. Even though it is most likely intended for people using the fields or attending a game, it can easily apply to the field (pardon the pun) of emergency services. For those that want to complain or make comments about the Volunteer Firefighters, EMTs, and all the other 1st Responders, what do the say...."walk a mile in someone else's shoes"...or something like that.

MARTY PELTA

Paterson Handles ThreeAlarm Dwelling Fire Paterson, NJ - On January 17th, the Paterson FD, under the command of its new Chief, Brian McDermott, handled a threealarm house fire on E25th Street. The fire was contained to the fire building and there were no injuries. Ladder Company #1 got to use their new Pierce Aerial on its first job.

Kearny, NJ - As the temperatures dipped even lower after the first snowfall of the year, Kearny firefighters, with help from companies from across Hudson and Bergen Counties, worked JUMP TO FILE# to contain a blaze 010818100 that destroyed an apartment building and damaged two others on January 5th. Snow was still covering most of the roads and sidewalks, the wind was gusting and the temperatures were in the single digits when at a little before 7:30 A.M., Kearny fire units were dispatched to 238 Maple Street. Heavy smoke was blowing across Kearny Ave. on the rear side of the structure as companies arrived. A second-alarm was called for heavy smoke from the rear of a large three-story frame multiple dwelling. Residents were exiting the building, many in pajamas and carrying what they could. Firefighters made a search to be sure all were out. Heavy fire soon vented out the rear from the firstfloor and extended to the upper floors and cockloft. Water supply became a problem as several frozen hydrants were encountered. Additional alarms were sounded as longer stretches were required. As conditions deteriorated, members were withdrawn and exterior lies were put into operation. Kearny Tower 2 worked in the front and North Arlington operated a ladder pipe set up in a parking lot off of Kearny Ave., in the rear. Jersey City also set up a ladder pipe, but it was not used. Handlines were also working from all four sides of the main fire building. There was extension to exposure “B”, a similar structure, but damage was kept relatively small

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

with the help of an exposure line. The exposure “D” building, a onestory frame, received roof damage from falling burning debris. All heavy fire was knocked down in under two hours. Companies re-

mained at the scene well into the afternoon. There were no initial reports of serious injuries. -BILL TOMPKINS


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Congratulations to Hopewell Borough Fire Company On Your Recent Purchase!

Give us a like on Facebook!

DefenderServices@aol.com

If your department is looking to purchase, keep us in mind for your next Apparatus!!!

Call Us Today! 732-840-9389


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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ALL IN THE FAMILY

If you have photos you would like to see in our “All In The Family” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Town of Clinton, NJ – (January 26, 2018) – The Langstons have developed a long history with the Clinton Volunteer Fire Department located in the northern part of Hunterdon County, New Jersey. William “Bill” Langston Sr. joined the Department in April of 1947, and continued to be an active individual around the firehouse until his passing in 2004. Bill Sr. had worked his way up the ranks of the Company, stopping at Deputy Fire Chief. Bill’s love extended outside the Fire Department to the United States Marine Corps, in which he also served. To this day, the retired Marines still meet monthly at the firehouse, an activity he was involved in setting up.

Bill Senior’s two sons followed his firefighting calling when they joined the ranks of Clinton Volunteer Fire Department. William “Bill” Jr. joined in January of 1974 while his other son, Tim, signed on in June of 1987. Bill Jr. worked all the way through to the ranks up to Fire Chief. He left the department as a result of moving out of the area, but has recently returned back to Clinton and is currently serving as a Chauffeur for the department. Bill Jr. was also part of the planning committee for the Department's 125th Anniversary Parade which was held in May of 2017.

Tim also rose through the line officer positions, achieving the rank of Fire Chief in June of 2003. One of Tim’s legacies as Chief was commanding the firefighting efforts at a four-alarm fire in the downtown business district of Clinton that year. Tim is staying active in the department, serving as a Chauffeur

and a Trustee, in addition to heading the by-laws committee.

The third generation of Langstons to join the fire service is Bill Junior’s son, Tyler Langston. He started as a member of Bloomsbury Hose Company in 2008. He then expanded becoming a member of Clinton, following in the footsteps of his Grandfather, Father and Uncle. Tyler was serving in the position of Lieutenant until early January of this year. Tyler was hired by the North Charleston Fire Department, thereby starting a new branch of the Langston family as a Career Firefighter in the State of South Carolina on January 8, 2018.

During the Town of Clinton’s council meeting on January 2nd, Mayor Janice Kovach awarded Clinton Volunteer Firefighter Tyler Langston with a Proclamation thanking him for his years of service with the fire department and wishing him success in his new job as a career Firefighter with the North Charleston in South Carolina. Tyler joins a growing list of Clinton Volunteer Fire Department members who have gone on to become career firefighters, including Ex-Chief Steve Feinberg who is presently serving as a Battalion Chief in North Charleston.

Clinton Fire Chief Walter Dorf said that “Tyler's hard work and dedication has paid off and we know he will show his Clinton Fire Department’s pride in his new position. We will miss Lieutenant Langston but wish him a long and safe career.” - RICHARD MAXWELL

Clinton Vol. FD’s Langston family, (L to R): Bill Jr., Tyler, Bill Sr., and Tim. Three generations of the family have served on the Fire Dept., with Bill Sr. joining in 1947. Tyler has gone on to become a career firefighter in the North Charleston FD, located in S.C. RICH MAXWELL

DAMIEN DANIS

Fire During Single-Digit Temps Destroys Lyndhurst Home Lyndhurst, NJ - At 10:50 A.M. on the morning of January 6th, the Lyndhurst Fire Department was dispatched to 140 Page Avenue on a confirmed residential structure fire. Lyndhurst Police Officers arrived on scene and ExChief Haggerty, who was working as JUMP TO FILE# a patrol officer at the 010718100 time, advised of heavy fire showing from the "A/B" corner of the second division, which was auto-exposing to the attic. A FAST Team from North Arlington Fire Department was dispatched on the initial assignment. Upon the arrival of Engine 1, a one-and-three-quarter inch hand line was advanced to the room of origin, and the main body of fire had been extinguished. Engine 1 immediately learned that their water supply was hindered due to a frozen hydrant on their initial forward lay into the scene. Engine 3 arrived on scene and secured a secondary water supply mid bock which also was found to be inadequate. Second Assistant Chief Abruscato arrived on scene and maintained command of the incident. Mutual aid was received at the scene by the North Arlington FAST (Rescue 5) as well an East Rutherford engine company, while a Rutherford engine company, Nutley engine company, and a North Arlington ladder company provided station coverage at fire headquarters. Firefighters were met with adverse weather conditions due to the below-freezing temperature outside. Chief Abruscato commended the department on their initial aggressive attack which was hampered by numerous water supply issues. Due to the floor collapsing on the second-floor, crews were

evacuated from the building while a defensive operation ensued to attack the fire that was located in the attic. Interior crews were met with rigorous conditions due to the amount of contents located within the second-floor and attic. The fire was placed under control at 1:15 P.M., and the cause was determined to be electrical, with the possibility of a faulty extension cord being the source in the second-floor bedroom which was the room of origin. A special thanks was extended to the Lyndhurst Police Emergency Squad, Lyndhurst Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary, Lyndhurst DPW,

DAMIEN DANIS

Lyndhurst Parks Department, Teaneck Fire Department BOX 54, and the Moonachie First & Rescue squad for their support in providing rehab and provisions to the members on scene. No injuries were sustained to any civilians or emergency personnel on scene. The residence was deemed uninhabitable due to the extent of the fire damage, which displaced two occupants. Thank you to the Lyndhurst Fire Department for the article and access to the fire scene. - DAMIEN DANIS


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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

HE HE ER ERO ROES RO OES ES INK INK

1st Responder Newspape er features EMERGENCY SERVICES RELA ATED TATTOOS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Baby Resuscitated at Jersey City Multiple

"My name is ex-Captain Steve Delamar, from fire emergency services Heavy Rescue Co. No. 1. in Central Islip, New York. I have been with the company 24 years. The shark has been on our trucks for the past 35 years. As you would say, here is the jaws of life."

Jersey City, NJ - Three residents and one firefighter were injured battling a four-alarm fire in Jersey City on January 31st. The blaze at 21 Grant Ave. started at about 7:00 P.M. in the basement of a three-story multifamily building. Firefighters encountered heavy fire in the basement with flames extending upward. A second-alarm was transmitted. Two men were pulled from their basement apartment by firefighters. One was hospitalized with a life-threatening condition due to

JUMP TO FILE #020218102 burns. The other man fled the scene and investigators are trying to locate him. A 6-month-old baby was rescued from above the fire and removed unresponsive due to smoke inhalation. The baby was revived at the scene and transported to the hospital. The infant is expected to be OK. Another resident received a hand injury, and one firefighter was treated for burns to his hands. Flames traveled up and soon

heavy smoke was pushing from the roof vents and third-floor windows. Additional alarms were sounded and as conditions continued to deteriorate, members were withdrawn and operations went defensive. Tower Ladder-4 went to work in front of the structure and several lines operated into the fire building and protected the exposures. Smoke continued to vent for about three hours until the fire could be placed under control. - BILL TOMPKINS

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

VENDOR SPOTLIGHT

New Jersey

KIMTEK Announces Upgrades with Mercedes Booster Hose and Draft Kits Newark and Irvington Fire were alerted to this fire by multiple 911 calls and operated together with additional mutual aid units.

CJM PHOTOS

Two-Alarm Fire Destroys Three Buildings in Irvington Irvington, NJ - A few minutes before 8:00 A.M. on Wednesday, Janaury 31st, Newark and Irvington Fire Departments were alerted to a reported structure fire on S. 20th Street. On arrival, firefighters were met with heavy fire conditions consuming three structures. Newark and Irvington Fire Departments began an agressive offensive attack on Exposures "B" and "D" while setting up outside lines on the main fire building. Mutual aid was requested to the scene and for station coverage while Irvington

JUMP TO FILE #013118102 firefighters were committed to this fire. The fire was brought under control by 10:00 A.M. The Red Cross was notified for three occupants that needed relocation assistance, and one firefighter was transported to the hospital for an undisclosed injury. - CJ MELHORN

Boostlite® and Draftlite® become standard equipment on select FIRELITE® skid units

January 17, 2018--Orleans, VT KIMTEK Corp, makers of MEDLITE® and FIRELITE® Transport skid units for off-road rescue and wildland firefighting, today announced a new relationship with Mercedes Textiles, Canadian manufacturers of firefighting systems including fire hoses, couplings, adapters, accessories, and fire pumps. KIMTEK has made Mercedes Boostlite® non-collapsible reel booster hose the new standard on all its UTV and Truck FIRELITE® skid units that feature the Hannay 4000 series reels. Heavy duty and kink resistant even at low pressure, Mercedes Boostlite hose weighs an average of 30 lb less than rubber jacketed booster hose. This state-of-the-art addition represents another top-of-the-line fixture to KIMTEK's long list of trusted product offerings available on its skid units, already including W.S. Darley pumps, Hannay reels, Scotty foam systems, and others.

Drafting kit upgrades also in effect KIMTEK has also announced that new for 2018, every KIMTEK FIRELITE® FDHP-300 series truck skid unit will come with a complete Mercedes Draftlite® Kit which includes the Hydro-Wick® hand primer, 20 ft of 1.5” high pressure suction hose, and a HydroWick foot valve with strainer. The Hydro-Wick hand primer is hardplumbed into the stainless steel piping with a separate valve. This kit seamlessly mates to the 5.5, 9 and 13 HP FIRELITE-300 series skid units and assists with drafting from virtually any source of water.

KIMTEK will make the new Mercedes Draftlite Kit available as a stand-alone purchase intended for customers who already own a FIRELITE Transport 300 series or UTV skid unit and want to improve their drafting capability. In this application the Kit's hand primer will include a 1.5" NH (NST) coupling. The Draftlite® kits ship complete

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CJM PHOTOS

Extensive damage was done to all homes involved in the fire.

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Firefighters Extinguish Fire Under Mobile Home in Knowlton Twp. Knowlton Twp., NJ - First Responders were dispatched to a smoke condition in a trailer located in the Riverside Mobile Home Park off of State Highway 46 in JUMP TO FILE# the Township at 4:05 012618112 P.M. on January 3rd. The call was upgraded to a 1st Box Alarm after the arrival of the fire chief, who was the first officer on scene. The first-alarm also included the activation of a tanker task force for a water supply. The fire was located under the home. This required the removal of the metal skirting that was around the base of the trailer. The firefighters were able to quickly put the fire out and check for extension into the structure. Parts of the exterior metal siding on the trailer were cut open to ensure that the fire had not extended up into the walls. Warren County Fire Marshal Joe Lake was on scene looking into the cause of the fire. Responding to the call were the NJ State Police (Washington Station), Knowlton FD (Station 41), Belvidere FD (Station 21), Hope FD (Station 38), Mt. Lake FD (Station 72), Allamuchy FD’s RIC Team (Station 91), Portland PA FD, Warren County Fire Marshal (Station 33), Knowlton Rescue Squad (Rescue 41), and Oxford Rescue Squad (Rescue 39). - RICHARD MAXWELL

Firefighters extinguished a fire under a mobile home off of Rt. 46 in Knowlton Twp. on January 3rd.

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Newark Firefighter Seriously Injured at Multiple-Alarm Fire Newark, NJ - Three Newark firefighters were reported injured, one critically, during a two-alarm fire that consumed a tire shop on December 30th, 2017. Firefighters responded at 9:12 P.M. to 8 Park Ave. after being alerted by police of explosions and heavy smoke coming from the onestory masonry building containing a tire shop. A second-alarm was quickly transmitted as heavy fire and smoke was consuming the contents and threatening the exposures. Members were inside the struc-

JUMP TO FILE #010218148 ture when they were ordered out as conditions deteriorated. The firefighter apparently became disoriented and did not exit. Members of Engine 7 and Rescue 1 immediately re-entered the building and located and removed the firefighter. He was transported to University Hospital and then air-lifted to Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx with reported facial burns and internal

burns to the throat. He was initially listed as critical, but was then upgraded to stable condition. Two other firefighters were also injured, but less seriously. The flames extended throughout the tire shop, but extension to the exposures was minimal. The fire was placed under control before midnight, but several companies remained on the scene in the singledigit wind chill temperatures to monitor the scene.

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Flames Consume Home in Stafford Twp. Stafford Twp., NJ - Just before 7:00 P.M. on January 12th, a number of 911 calls came in reporting a house on fire in the Ocean Acres Section of Stafford Township. 4725 arrived on location first and found heavy fire showing. 4720 arrived on scene and struck the second-alarm. This brought Barnaget FD and Forked River FD (FAST Team) to the scene. Crews pulled a two-and-a-half inch line, along with (two) one-andthree-quarter inch lines into service. The fire was knocked down within 20 minutes and declared under control after 35 minutes. Eagleswood FD also responed to the scene. Mutual Aid from Parkertown and Ship Bottom Fire Departments covered Stafford Twp. as crews remained on scene for overhaul operations. No one was injured and the fire is under investigation by the Ocean Co. Fire Marshal's Office.

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March, 2018

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IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

JOHN M. MALECKY

The Robertsville Fire Company in Marlboro Township has two 2016 Pierce Arrow XT pumpers with 2000-GPM pumps and 750-gallon water tanks. Engine 28-2-74 (left), has a 20-gallon Class “A” foam tank and 250-gallon Class “B” foam tank. Engine 28-2-75 has a 20gallon Class “A” foam tank, 40-gallon Class “B” foam tank and a 10-KW generator. They were sold by Fire & Safety Services.

JOHN RIETH

Hazlet Fire Co. 1 uses this 2017 KME 2000-GPM/1000-gallon tank.

Harmony Twp. Vol. Firefighters Kyle McKenna and John Latorette, wearing protective ice rescue suits, pull a white tailed doe to safety in the boat after she became stuck on a frozen pond. RICH MAXWELL

Harmony Twp. Firefighters Rescue Deer Stuck on Frozen Pond Harmony Twp., NJ - The Harmony Twp. Vol. Fire Department was dispatched to a unique Tech Rescue on Thursday morning, January 11th. The residents of Fohr Spring Farm, located on Allens Mills Road, had called the Warren County Communication Center requesting help for a white-tailed doe that had worked her way out onto the snow and ice covered pond on their property and was stuck. Fire Chief Wes Garrison was the first to arrive on the scene. What he found was a deer that appeared to be in distress laying down and not moving on the snow covered ice, roughly 50-feet from shore. He contacted responding units, advising them what equipment was required to make the rescue. While two firefighters were donning their ice rescue dry suits,

JUMP TO FILE #012718100 two other firefighters carried the jon boat down to the pond. Several other firefighters were preparing ropes to pull the flat bottom boat across the ice. Once everyone was in their spots and ready, Firefighters John Latorette and Kyle McKenna pushed the jon boat out onto the ice and climbed in. Firefighters and State Troopers were on the opposite side of the pond pulling the boat out to the deer. As the boat approached the deer, she did not move. John and Kyle were able to pick the deer up and put her in the boat with them, without any struggles. The deer was exhausted from trying to stand up on the ice and cold from being stuck out there for

several hours, maybe even overnight. Once the deer was in the boat, the rope crew pulled the boat the rest of the way across the pond to shore. The doe was safely carried to shore and placed in a dry area on the grass. One of the firefighters retrieved a blanket from the rig and covered the deer with it in attempts to warm her up. Chief Garrison said that this was a first for the for the Fire Company, rescuing a deer from a frozen pond. Harmony firefighters routinely practice for water and ice rescues utilizing their water rescue unit. Responding to the incident were the New Jersey State Police (Washington Station), and the Harmony Twp. FD (Station 23). - RICHARD MAXWELL

NJ Forest Fire Service's Water Tender A20 2011 Freightliner/1983 Amthors/2012 NJFFS Div. A shop/1200-gallon/250-GPM pump.

JOHN RIETH

JOHN RIETH

East Brunswick Fire District #1's 2017 Pierce Arrow XT 2000/920/50B/30A Job #31094.

RICH MAXWELL

Harmony Twp. Vol. Firefighters Kyle McKenna and John Latorette, along with the State Troopers, pose for a photo with the rescued doe.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

WORKING FACES

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Working Faces” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

March, 2018

PAGE 33

LITTLE BIG GUYS If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

In Cumberland County, the Rosenhayne Fire Company in Deerfield Township operates Mini 2906, a 1985 Chevrolet/Pierce which formerly saw service with the Greenwich Fire Department, located in the same county. It has a Waterous CPK-3, 400-GPM pump and 250-gallon water tank. Other features include a one-inch hose reel, 1 ¾-inch rear pre-connect, three-inch supply hose, TFT Pro Pak foam unit, foam pails, four-ton front winch, John Deere 3200-watt generator, two floodlights, one tripod light, cord reels, chain saw, shovels and forcible entry tools.

PROVIDED

Fire Inspector Mark Sylvester and Firefighter Kyle Boylan teaching fire safety to children at Netcong Elementary School.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Rosenhayne's Mini 2906, 1985 Chevrolet/Pierce 400/250 with 3200-watt generator and four-ton front winch. It formerly saw service with the Greenwich FD, Cumberland County.

RICH MAXWELL

High Bridge Station 14 Volunteer Firefighters cleaning up the rigs after taking Santa around town and delivering gifts in December.

Right/rear view of Rosenhayne's Mini 2906.

RICH MAXWELL

Pictured here at a fire scene in Franklin Twp. on December 31, 2017 is Quakertown Vol. Fire Co. Lt. Dylan Desaulniers. He moved up to the rank of Captain of Fire for 2018. In addition to his fire certifications, Dylan is also certified as a New Jersey Emergency Medical Technician. Captain Desaulniers has been a member of Quakertown for 4 years, bringing with him experience from the Clinton F.D. and Pattenburg Fire Co., both of which are also in Hunterdon County.

JOHN M. MALECKY


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Pascack Valley Firemen Working with the Next Generation Bergen County, NJ - The Pascack Valley Volunteer Firemen’s Association (PVVFA) is taking steps to prepare its next generation of Firemen, its Junior Firefighters, for the challenging task of protecting life and property from the ravages of fire. Junior Firefighters are youth aged 15-17, who drill on the seven basic Firefighting Tasks: Engine Co. Ops (stretching & operating hoselines), Forcible Entry, Search & Rescue, Laddering, Ventilation, Overhaul and Salvage. Junior Firefighters may not operate inside the fire building or operate power tools on the fireground. They do, however, assist their respective Fire Departments by performing tasks outside the fire building such as stretching supply lines, setting up air cylinder replacement stations, operating hand-lines to protect exposures (buildings adjacent to the fire building), and providing fire scene illumination using apparatus mounted power lines and portable lights. By performing these firefighting tasks they free up regular Firemen for tasks inside the fire building. At this time of reduced membership in all Volunteer Fire Departments nationwide, this is a big help. Under the leadership of Chief Tom Derienzo of the Park Ridge Fire Department, Junior Firefighters from the PVVFA’s nine member Fire Departments (Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Old Tappan, Park Ridge, River Vale, Twp. of Washington, Westwood and Woodcliff Lake), have the opportunity to drill (train) following the lesson plan of the nationally recognized Firefighter I Course. Chief Derienzo is a certified instructor at the Bergen County Fire Academy and with the assistance of other instructors from the Academy and the PVVFA’s Junior Firefighter Training Officers, he is preparing these young Firemen for the next step in their Firefighting career. To date, the trainees have been drilled on the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and introduction to “the mask” (the Self Contained Breathing Apparatus) which allows Firemen to enter and operate in the smoked filled environment of a structure fire. Further drills will continue familiarity with “the mask”, stretching and operating hose-lines, carrying and throwing portable ground

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JUMP TO FILE #012218103 ladders, and the use of hand tools in performing forcible entry, ventilation and overhaul. By instructing them in the physical skills and knowledge they will need to master, the PVVFA hopes to give its Junior Firefighters a head start on successfully completing the challenging Firefighter I Course so that upon reaching age 18, they may become full-fledged interior Firemen. Any able bodied youth age 1517 with a strong commitment to help his fellow residents, and a willingness to work hard, who has an interest in becoming a Junior Firefighter should contact his local Fire Department for information on its Junior Firefighter program. - BILL AUTH

Chief Tom Derienzo of Park Ridge FD gives the trainees step-by-step instructions on how to don "the mask".

PAUL DANSBACH


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

BUDDY SHOTS

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ACTION SHOTS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Buddy Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Action Shots” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

MARTY PELTA

Paterson FD Chief of Department, Brian McDermott (still using his Deputy Chief's helmet shield, as his new one hasn't arrived yet), stops to get a quick shot with his dedicated firefighters. (L to R): Firefighter Kirk Wooten, Chief McDermott, Deputy Chief Kevin Hancock, and Firefighter Janice Miller.

RON JEFFERS

North Hudson firefighters quickly knocked down a fire in a onestory commercial building at 210-43rd St., Union City, on the evening of January 17th in 28-degree weather.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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NJ EMS Volunteers Seek Support for 9/11 Monument Sayreville, NJ – EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) officials are requesting financial contributions for the group’s 9/11 memorial honoring emergency medical services personnel throughout the country who responded that fateful day. Featuring a piece of World Trade Center steel, the Keansburg monument will be the country’s first dedicated exclusively to EMS individuals. “It’s a part of all of us,” EMSCNJ President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. said. “The EMS effort on 9/11 and for weeks afterward, in New York, Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania was unprecedented. Those who answered the call that day, without hesitation, deserve our respect and recognition,” he said. “Those who perished, in particular, must not be forgotten.” Displayed alongside Keansburg’s 9/11 memorial, the monument will honor the dozens of EMS personnel who died Sept. 11, 2001, as well as the countless New Jersey EMS volunteers and responders from several states who pitched in to help that day and in the rubble for weeks afterward, Walsh said. The view from the nearby Raritan Bay coastline dunes is the Manhattan skyline, which will help visitors appreciate the memorial’s significance, he added. The monument’s placement will be in direct sight line to where the Twin Towers stood. EMSCNJ and Keansburg officials broke ground for the monument Sept. 10, 2017 before a crowd of more than 100 people, including Congressional, State and local dignitaries. A September 2018 dedication is in the works, Walsh said. With its steel beam representing the spirit and resilience of the EMS responders, the memorial will include information about the attacks, and a seating area for quiet reflection, he added. More than 400 ambulances responded to either Liberty State Park or the Meadowlands on Sept. 11, 2001, Walsh said. From there, many EMSCNJ member ambulances were sent to Chelsea Pier for standby. Others were paired with FDNY EMTs to respond to 911 calls in New York City. For weeks afterward, some volunteers continued assisting efforts at Ground Zero and others helped answer 911 calls in and around New York City. During that time, volunteer EMS crews continued answering calls for

JUMP TO FILE #013118101 help in their own New Jersey municipalities. New Jersey’s EMS volunteers answer hundreds of thousands of calls annually throughout the state. Some have been volunteering for decades. The 89-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council (NJSFAC), doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 300 EMS agencies throughout the state. Donation checks should be made payable to “NJSFAC 9/11 Memorial” and mailed to Treasurer Ken Weinberg, PO Box 347, Pittstown, NJ 08867. - SYLVIE MULVANEY

EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) and Keansburg officials broke ground Sept. 10, 2017 for a memorial dedicated exclusively to all the EMS personnel who responded on Sept. 11, 2001. Flanking the piece of World Trade Center steel that will serve as centerpiece of the monument are (L to R): EMSCNJ Central Area Vice President John Butterweck, Executive Director Edward Burdzy, former President Howard Meyer, Treasurer Ken Weinberg, past President Barbara Aras, current President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. and Keansburg Mayor George Hoff. More than 100 people attended the ceremony, including Congressional, State and local officials (background). EMSCNJ


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES

To see your “Faces” in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com, email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com or mail them to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553,

RON JEFFERS

On the morning of January 27th, available members of the Cliffside Park F.D. assembled for a department photo. This was the first January photo where the sun was shining. When the first photo was taken several years ago, it began to snow! One year, the photo was canceled due to a commercial building fire. This year, two alarms were transmitted before the photo could be taken.

JAMES WOOD SR.

Chief Kenneth Friedman of the Wallington F.D. was sworn in on January 6th for a second time as chief of the department. Chief Friedman was Chief in 2006, and he is also the fourth generation of firefighters in his family. Standing with him is Mayor Mark Tomko (also past chief), wife Sue, daughter Madison, and son Drew.

PROVIDED

2018 Ocean Grove Fire Officers, (L to R): 1st Asst. Chief Ben Benfer, Chief Joseph SanFelice II and 2nd Asst. Chief Randy Thorne.

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Picatinny Arsenal Firefighter Bryan Senn is assigned to Tanker 22's 2009 International/Pierce 1500GPM/3000-GWT pumper-tanker.

CORINNE SYLVESTER

Netcong Firefighters Brandon Reiss, Shawn Bates and Mark Sylvester at a second-alarm fire in Netcong.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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Video reviews by John Malecky

F.D.N.Y. FIRES OF THE PAST Volume 1 By Fireline Video Productions Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, Suite #4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800-522-8528 e-mail:fire-police-ems.com www.fire-police-ems.com Price: $29.95 (DVD)

This DVD is 60 minutes in length. It was originally produced by Advance Print & Video and is now re-released by Fireline Video Productions. It is an assortment of large and difficult fires which took place from 1989 through 1992. There are nine incidents. Narration is brief and generally states the borough, the year and sometimes the date, the number of alarms, the type of structure or incident, and one or two of the highlights. Sometimes the location, as to the intersection or address, is given. There are two six-alarms, one fourth-alarm, three thirdalarms, one second-alarm and two others not classified, however one is a vacant warehouse in Brooklyn and the other a gas explosion on 7th Avenue underground in Manhattan. So they were both major incidents. Some are apartment houses or warehouses, a cockloft fire, a dramatic rope rescue, wall collapses, rescues made down an aerial ladder, tower ladder streams, ground handlines and master streams. Heavy streams are popular! Many if not most of the incidents are at night. Also, because these fires were years ago, the viewer will see a lot of the older apparatus working. It is a good example of firefighters and the EMS working together. It is not a DVD you would want to miss!

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March, 2018

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From Fire Victim to Fire Defender: A Story 50 Years in the Making What triggered my relentless hunger for anything fire service related? Many of us old-time firefighters get that question a lot. I have served in many capacities in the fire service, UMP TO FILE# from firefighter to J011118100 emergency medical services, rescue captain, and chief of my local volunteer fire department. I am also a fire “buff” (enthusiast) and the official fire photographer for the nation’s largest fire conference—FDIC International. I am currently a fire department dispatcher and 911 call taker. Fifty years ago, on January 11, 1968, it was a cold, brisk, gloomy winter morning much like it has been recently. The night before, on my 13th birthday, some relatives came over our house in Hasbrouck Heights for a small birthday party. My mom, Josephine, managed to bake my favorite cake even though she was recuperating from a cancer operation. I went to bed with a smile on my face and some gift money, with no idea what the day ahead would have in store for me and my family. The next thing I remember was my dad waking me up early; I was an altar boy and had to serve at the 7:00 a.m. mass at my local Catholic church. Dad dropped me off in his 1963 Chevy Corvair, which had little or no heat with the engine in the rear. Father Paterson was the priest that morning, which was great: Not only was he friendly, but he had the record for the shortest mass! As the daily service started, Father Paterson waved me over and whispered: “Do you know where the electrical box is?” He instructed me to go turn on the rest of the church lights, since it was too dark with partial lighting. I found the panel and threw the switches to the position the rest of them were in. I ran back to the church and was met with laughter and complete darkness! I had shut all the switches to the OFF position! Father Paterson was laughing along with the rest, and we couldn’t make eye contact the rest of the service for fear of laughing. Little did I know I would see the priest later that day under much different circumstances. After church I went off to the adjacent parochial school to my eighth-grade classroom. Meanwhile, my older brother, Peter, was at home, getting ready to go to his high school, which was one block from our home and afforded a view of our house because of an open baseball field in between. He went to the kitchen and smelled natural gas. He went to tell our recuperating mother and she rushed Peter out the door to school and called the utility company at 8:15 a.m. By 8:50 a.m., the odor was getting worse, and she called a neighbor, Fred Moll. As he exited his house to

come over, he saw the roof of our house lift off like a flying saucer, followed by a fireball and a deafening noise. Our mother was in that house! My brother heard the explosion as well and could see our house on fire. He ran home. The fire chief of neighboring Lodi pulled up and saw our mother on the ground. Another neighbor, Frank Ercolino, noticing her hair was on fire, threw her down and used snow to douse her flaming hair. The Lodi chief took her in his vehicle to Hackensack Hospital. Our mother had been standing in the center of the house on the ground floor. The house had exploded around her. She fought her way to the front door and smashed through the storm door. She had beaten death’s door twice—once with the cancer and now a second time. As my class started, I remember hearing the volunteer fire department’s horn tower blowing madly. Neighboring fire departments were responding, and the police were inundated with calls of a terrible explosion on the Hasbrouck Heights-Lodi border. With all the screaming sirens, you didn’t have to be a firefighter to know something terrible was happening. I went to the window and saw an ominous black cloud of smoke rising from the vicinity of our house. Later someone reminded me that I said, “Man, that looks like where my house is.” Our teacher shooed us away from the window to resume class, and the PA announcement interrupted with: “Will student Anthony Greco please report to the principal’s office with his coat and his bookbag?” I was thinking, “Oh no, what did I do now? My parents are going to kill me!” When I got to the principal’s office, my uncle Dominick was there. I thought, “Oh, this looks bad. What is my uncle doing here? Did my mom take a turn for the worse?” My

uncle explained that there had been a fire at our house and took me to the scene. 127 Ottawa Avenue. My house. There were fire trucks everywhere. Hoses on the street. Lots of noise. The gas utility company was fervently digging up the street. When I got closer to the house, it appeared to be gone except for one staircase. Parts of the structure had been blown next door. Our refrigerator was lying in the backyard. I had a hard time comprehending what I was seeing. My mom’s new 1967 Ford Fairlane 500 was in the driveway with live wires down on it. I found out later my dad narrowly missed serious injury when he went to move the car—he was in shock on his arrival at the scene and did not notice the live wires. The gas utility had dug a hole about 20 feet down in front of the house and found a cracked pipe feeding gas into the house. A young detective at the scene, also a volunteer firefighter, ordered the pipe handed over to him before the utility could take it away. It was evidence that the leak started outside and filled the house with gas. Later I remember walking into my mom’s hospital room and seeing her all bandaged up. She was going to be okay. That image still gets to me 50 years later. Then reality set in: We were homeless, with just the clothes on our backs. We would split up and stay at my uncle’s and grandmother’s houses for the time being. Then, Father Paterson and Father Kukura showed up and told my father they were taking me and my brother out for a few hours. They took us to a shopping mall and a salesperson at Gimbel’s completely outfitted us from new underwear to shoes to coats and hats. I was confused: Was I living through a tragedy or was it Christmas? The townspeople also pulled together, with fund drives through

the VFW, the mayor’s office, and the Catholic church. I remember sitting in church when they announced: “The second collection is for the Greco family” and 500 people were staring at us. A week later, my dad got a call from Leroy Fisher, the pastor of a Baptist church in Englewood who owned a large excavating company. He volunteered to remove all the debris from the fire scene with his equipment at no charge. A little wary, my dad agreed, and the man showed up with some serious heavy equipment to do the job. The only thing he asked in return was for my dad and uncle to attend one service at his church. They gladly did. My mom recuperated from her injuries, beat cancer, and lived to

PROVIDED

age 84, dying on Christmas Day 2011. My dad died three years after that. They got to see grandchildren and great grandchildren and rebuilt their home on the same lot of their former home—all electric, no more gas for them! You never quite forget an event like my family experienced. To this day it makes me think about fire victims and their losses. Will they be okay? Is there anything else we can do for their family? - ANTHONY GRECO

Anthony Greco is a fire department dispatcher, a 911 call taker, and a longtime volunteer firefighter. He can be reached at hfd911guy@gmail.com.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Two-Alarm Fire Guts Condominium Unit in Raritan Twp. Raritan Twp., NJ – A two-alarm fire ripped through a townhome on Hawthorne Court Thursday evening, January 18th. Firefighters were dispatched to a Level 3 Box Alarm at 9:37 P.M. for a report of a structure fire. Police reported that the garage was fully involved upon their arrival at the scene. West Amwell’s Fire Chief Jeff Ent JUMP TO FILE# was the first officer to 012618109 arrive at the fire, and quickly requested a second-alarm to be sounded for the fire by the Hunterdon County Communications Center. The unit involved was an end unit in a building that has what appeared to be nine units. Each unit is a two-story condo with a built-in garage at ground level. Fire, smoke and water damage extended into the adjacent unit in the building. Flemington’s Tower Ladder 49 was set up in the cul-d-sac in front of the unit on fire, while Raritan’s Tower Ladder 21 was staged in the roadway at the center of the building in the event the fire started to spread to other units in the building. In addition to two master streams, several hand lines were deployed to fight the fire from the side and rear of the unit. Firefighters were still on scene past 1:00 A.M., and were called back around 7:00 A.M. in the morning for a rekindle of the fire in the basement. This was the second of two condominium fires in Hunterdon County on the evening of January 18th. The first one was on Ferncrest Court in neighboring Readington Township at 7:00 P.M., about threeand-a-half miles (as the crow flies) or 12 minutes driving time from this fire scene. Some units that were still on location of the first fire were released to respond to the Hawthorn Court fire scene. Responding to the fire were the Raritan Township PD (Patrol 21), Raritan Township Fire Co. (Station 21), Flemington FD (Station 49), West Amwell Township Fire Co. (Station 26), Amwell Valley Fire Co. (Station 48), Quakertown Fire Co. (Station 91), Three Bridges Fire Co. (Station 33), Lebanon Borough Fire Co. (Station 18), Readington Fire Co. (Station 32), Flemington-Raritan Rescue Squad (Rescue 49), Lambertville New Hope Rescue Squad (Rescue 17), Hunterdon Medical Center Paramedics (EMS 3), Hunterdon County Prosecutor’s Office/Arson Task Force (Patrol 89), Hunterdon County Emergency Management (Station 86), Raritan Township Emergency Management (Station 21), and the Hunterdon County Fire & EMS Coordinators (Station 86). Additional fire companies from around the county were called up for cover assignments for the companies that were at the fire. Mercer County activated their fire task-force for some of the cover assignments in the southern part of Hunterdon County. - RICHARD MAXWELL

A two-alarm fire ripped through a townhome on Hawthorne Court in Raritan Twp. on January 18th, at 9:37 P.M. Police reported that the garage was fully involved upon their arrival at the scene. RICH MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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March, 2018

DRILLS/TRAINING

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

To see your Drills in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

West Milford, NJ - West Milford Search and Rescue recently conducted field training in packaging.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Three-Alarm Blaze in Hoboken JOE SICILIANO

Hoboken, NJ - Hoboken firefighters, with mutual aid from Jersey City, were able to contain a fire that could have easily become a major incident on January 14th. A onestory extension in the rear of 514 Washington Street, a three-story structure with a restaurant on the first-floor, was involved in fire as companies arrived shortly after 6:00 A.M. Typical for Hoboken, because each building in that area was attached to the next with no alleyways or driveways, lines had to be

JUMP TO FILE #011518120 stretched through the fire building and the exposures on all sides. A second-alarm brought all Hoboken companies to the scene in an attempt to hold the flames to the rear extension. A third-alarm was transmitted, bringing Jersey City companies to the scene. A collapse involving an A/C unit forced all members to back out. After about two hours, the fire

was able to be placed under control with only minor damage to the exposure buildings, although two of the exposure buildings had eating establishments and remained closed until they could be cleared by the health department. No civilian injuries were reported. One police officer was treated for smoke inhalation, and several slips and falls were reported due to the ice that formed in the area. - BILL TOMPKINS

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES If you have photos you would like to see in our “Emergency Medical Services” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

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Stafford EMS rehab tent set up during a house fire in Stafford Twp. on January 12th.

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March, 2018

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ALL IN THE FAMILY

If you have photos you would like to see in our “All In The Family” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RICH MAXWELL

Raritan's Tower Ladder 21 is set up in the parking lot during a Level 3 Box Alarm fire at a Ferncrest Court condo in Readington Twp.

Firefighters Confine Working Townhouse Fire to One Unit in Readington Twp. Readington Twp., NJ - A fire that was reported to have started in the bedroom of a second-floor condominium unit on Ferncrest Court Thursday evening, January 18th, was contained to that single unit. Firefighters were dispatched to a Level 3 Box Alarm at 7:00 P.M. for a report of a structure fire. Police reported flames coming from the bedroom upon their arrival at the scene. The unit involved was in the middle of the second-floor of a twostory building that houses six units in total, three on the ground floor with three on the second-floor. There was smoke and water damage into the two adjacent units on the secondfloor and water damage to the lower units in the building. Raritan’s Tower Ladder 21 was set up in the parking lot in front of the unit on fire. Firefighters battled the blaze with several handlines from both the

JUMP TO FILE #012618110 interior and exterior, bringing it quickly under control. Due to their firefighting efforts, they were able to contain the fire to the middle unit on the second-floor. There was extensive fire damage to the interior and exterior portions of the building. This was the first of two condominium fires in Hunterdon County on this evening. The second one was on Hawthorne Court in neighboring Raritan Township at 9:37 P.M., about three-and-a-half miles (as the crow flies) or 12 minutes driving time from this fire scene. Some units were that were still on location were released to respond to the second fire scene. Readington Township PD (Patrol 22), Three Bridges Fire Co. (Station 33), Readington Fire Co.

(Station 32), West Amwell Fire Co. (Station 26), Raritan Township Fire Co. (Station 21), Amwell Valley Fire Co. (Station 48), Flagtown Fire Co. (Somerset County Station 36), Neshanic Fire Co. (Somerset County Station 48), Quakertown Fire Co., EMS Division (Rescue 91), Whitehouse Rescue Squad (Rescue 22), Flemington-Raritan Rescue Squad (Rescue 49), Lambertville New Hope Rescue Squad (Rescue 17), Hunterdon Medical Center Paramedics (EMS 3), Hunterdon County Prosecutor’s Office/Arson Task Force (Patrol 89), Hunterdon County Emergency Management (Station 86), Hunterdon County Fire & EMS Coordinators (Station 86). Other fire companies were called up to cover the firehouses that were at the fire. - RICHARD MAXWELL

PROVIDED

Pictured is Wenonah Fire Chief Drew Sole and his son Ryan at the January 2018 Wenonah Boro reorganization meeting. Ryan was recently appointed to 1st Lieutenant of the Wenonah Fire Company (Station 13-1) in Gloucester County. Chief Sole, entering his 25th year, announced that he will be retiring his position at the end of the year. Thank you Chief Sole for your years, service, and dedication to Wenonah Boro.

DID YOU K NOW

?

Paramedics always notice how IV-friendly your veins are, even if you are not their patient. You think he’s looking at you in a romantic way? He’s probably thinking about how Ladders remain at the rear of the condo building during a Level 3 Box Alarm fire on Ferncrest Court in Readington Twp. on January 18th. RICH MAXWELL

your veins would be great for a 14-gauge needle.


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EMS Council of NJ Installs Officers for 2018 Sayreville, NJ – With help from two organization past presidents and New Jersey Office of Emergency Medical Services Director Scot Phelps, EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) officers recited their oaths of office for 2018 on January 21st at JUMP TO FILE# the Middlesex 020218104 County Fire Academy. Past Presidents Charles E. Willer and Sue Van Orden were on hand to swear in some of the officers. This year’s executive board members include: President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. (Neptune) Northern Area Vice President Cyndy Reardon (Bloomingdale) Central Area Vice President John Butterweck (Morganville) Southern Area Vice President Phil Wien (Maple Shade) Treasurer Ken Weinberg (Pittstown) Assistant Treasurer Leroy Gunzelman (Somerville) Council Secretary Barbara Platt (New Egypt) Membership Secretary Paula Weiler (Englewood) The 21 district vice presidents for 2018 include: District 1 – Anthony Murtha (Spring Lake) District 2 – Kari Phair (Springfield) District 3 – John Tymon (Ridgefield Park)

District 4 – Ernest Bubier (Salem) District 5 – Marylyn Kampo (Somerset) District 6 – Barbara Flowers (East Hanover) District 8 – Karen Johansen (Morristown) District 9 – Steve Kurs (East Windsor) District 10 – Andie Hutchins (Phillipsburg) District 11 – Paul Kennedy (Keansburg) District 12 – Edna Deacon (Mine Hill) District 13 – Eric Rudd (Belvidere) District 14 – Alfred Low-Beer (Kendall Park) District 15 – James Ambro (Nutley) District 16 – Kim Iadanza (Tinton Falls) District 17 – Mary Claire Shiber (Wayne) District 18 – Alison Wallin (Demarest) District 20 – Vikki Castellano (Oakland) District 22 – Rich Litton (Moorestown) District 23 – James McAlister (Freehold) District 24 – Tarcisio Nunes (Lyndhurst) The 89-year-old nonprofit New Jersey State First Aid Council, doing business as the EMSCNJ, represents 20,000 EMS volunteers affiliated with nearly 270 EMS agencies throughout the state.

New Jersey Office of Emergency Medical Services (OEMS) Director Scot Phelps, right, shares a laugh with EMS Council of New Jersey (EMSCNJ) President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. while administering the oath of office Jan. 21. Walsh’s wife, Missy, holds the Bible. EMSCNJ

- SYLVIE MULVANEY

EMSCNJ

Charles E. Willer, a past New Jersey State First Aid Council (NJSFAC) president, left, poses with executive vice presidents (L-R) Cyndy Reardon (Northern Area), John Butterweck (Central Area) and Philip Wien (Southern Area) after administering the oath of office.

EMSCNJ

During the installation program, EMSCNJ President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. presents appreciation awards to (L-R) Andrea Novak, Sue Abernathy and Claudia Tirello to thank them for their many years of tireless, dedicated service to the organization, particularly during the annual conventions and mid-year meetings.

EMSCNJ

NJSFAC Past President Sue Van Orden swears in Treasurer Kenneth Weinberg and Assistant Treasurer Leroy Gunzelman.


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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Welfare Check by Relative Finds Totowa House Fire Totowa, NJ - A relative checking on the well-being of a woman who did not answer a phone call found the woman unconscious in her car, and the home on fire in Totowa on December 31, 2017. After receiving no answer to phone calls, a woman drove to her sister’s JUMP TO FILE# house at 8 Patriots 010218150 Trail in Totowa. Upon opening the front door, flames were visible inside, and her sister was not. Totowa FD was notified and dispatched, and on arrival, heavy fire was showing from the rear of the home. Firefighters began a search, but soon found the woman in her car in front of the home with her small dog. She was unresponsive and the window needed to be broken to remove her. She was transported to Saint Joseph’s Medical Center for smoke inhalation. The fire was knocked down in about 30 minutes and companies opened up and ventilated. No additional injuries were reported and the cause is being investigated. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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Dump Truck Rolls Over in Pittstown Section of Franklin Twp. Franklin Twp., NJ - A single axle fully loaded Ford dump truck rolled over in the intersection of Pittstown Rd. (CR 513) and Bloomsbury Rd. (CR579) around 11:30 A.M. on January 25th, spilling the entire load of JUMP TO FILE# gray stone onto the 012618100 roadway. Luckily, the driver escaped uninjured from the crash. The truck was traveling south on Bloomsbury Road just before rolling over in the intersection of Pittstown Road, coming to rest on the driver’s side. Pittstown Road was closed between Everttstown Road and White Bridge Road until the scene was cleaned up. The roadway was opened back up at 12:35 P.M. There was a small fluid spill which was handled by the firefighters on scene. Responding to the crash were the Franklin Township Police Department (Patrol 91), Quakertown Fire Company (Station 91), and the Hunterdon County Highway Department. - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL


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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Some Vehicles From Hudson County This month we have selected some trucks from Hudson County. Recently we featured updates from Jersey City which is in the same county. This month we only have one from their police ESU. Most of the vehicles are from Hoboken, who received three EONE’s in two orders and also an ESU truck for their police. Amongst the Hoboken units is a rescue pumper for Engine 4. They have placed their former heavy rescue (which did not have a pump, water tank or ladder complement) in reserve and the new vehicle will do double duty so to speak. Also featured is a new pumper for Secaucus Engine 4. They have since received a newer pumper for Engine 3, but it has not yet been photographed due to winter conditions. Also, West New York’s newest ambulance is featured. East Newark has received a 1989 Hahn Model 92 1750/500 pumper which originally served with Paramus in Bergen County. Defender Emergency Products is expecting delivery in early April of a Rosenbauer Commander Classic rescue pumper for Hopewell Boro FC in Mercer County. Features include an EXT extruded aluminum body with lifetime warranty, Hale 2000-GPM pump, 1000-gallon water and 40-gallon Class “A” foam tanks, Command Light and Hurst reels. Fire & Safety Services reports the following Pierce orders: an Enforcer 100-foot ladder for Berlin (Camden County), an Enforcer PUC pumper for Green Creek in Middle Township and a Peterbilt dry side tanker for the Ocean View FC in Dennis Township (both Cape May County), and an Enforcer pumper for the Keasbey FC (Middlesex County). Pierce deliveries include an Arrow XT mid-mount platform to Paterson (Passaic County), a Velocity PUC pumper to Town Bank FC in Lower Township (Cape May County), and an Enforcer pumper to Maplewood (Essex County). New Jersey Emergency Vehicles has delivered a P.L. Medallion ambulance on a Ford E-450 chassis to the Lodi Volunteer Ambulance in Bergen County. Also, the North Plainfield Fire Department (Somerset County) received a P.L. Custom Classic Type 1 ambulance on a Ford E-450 chassis.

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH

A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

John M. Malecky

Hoboken Police ESU-2, 2017 Ford F550 XL/EVI. It has a 6-ton winch. It was sold by Campbell Supply Co., LLC.

John M. Malecky

Hoboken L-1, 2016 E-ONE Cyclone II 100-foot with 5-KW generator. It was sold by Absolute Fire Protection.

Jersey City Police ESU-1951, 2005 Ford F-550/Supreme Dive Unit.

John M. Malecky

Hoboken E-1, 2017 E-ONE Typhoon, 1500/500. It was sold by Absolute Fire Protection. John M. Malecky

Secaucus E-4, 2016 Pierce Arrow XT 2000/750/20A/40B. It has a 6-KW generator. It was sold by Fire & Safety Services.

John M. Malecky

Hoboken E-4 2017 E-ONE Typhoon eMAX, 1500/530. It has a 6-KW generator. It was sold by Absolute Fire Protection.

John M. Malecky

Please send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

John M. Malecky

West New York EMS-20, 2016 Ford E-350/Braun Signature ambulance. It was sold by First Priority Emergency Vehicles.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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March, 2018

Clinton Holds 10th Annual Town Yuletide Bonfire, That Almost Wasn’t Clinton, NJ - On January 27th, the town held its 10th annual bonfire, burning old Christmas trees that residents put out to the curb and were collected from all over town. The event took place at JUMP TO FILE# Hunts Mill Park off 012818107 of Haver Farm Road. But this annual tradition almost did not happen this year because the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection had decided that the burning of old Christmas trees was a concern when dealing with air pollution. Apparently, the trees fell into the category of rubbish. This decision also affected numerous towns all over the state who also hold annual Christmas tree burning events. After several months of back and forth communications with the DEP, a posting was made on December 9th to a community Facebook page that deals with Clinton. It asked for people to call or email the DEP Commissioner if they “…want to make a difference in helping us continue the tradition…” After a deluge of phone calls to former DEP Commissioner Bob Martin by residents, he issued an Administrative Order allowing all municipalities across the state to continue with their traditional postChristmas tree burning bonfires. So, back to the bonfire... This year’s event attracted hundreds of residents. The scouts helped out by guiding cars to parking spots in the park. Activities at the park included free horse and carriage rides, and hot chocolate and cookies to drink and eat. People also had the opportunity to roast marshmallows over an open fire. Everyone was either standing or sitting on rows of hay bales gathered around a small pile of trees, waiting for it to be lit. St. Anne's Pipes & Drums marched in playing their bagpipes to the crowd’s delight. Under the direction of Deputy Fire Chief Jeff Hedden, two of Clinton’s firefighters set the pile ablaze at 6:17 P.M. As the fire would start to die down, firefighters would throw more trees on it. They also monitored the size of the fire and any embers that could be of concern. The pile of trees waiting to be burned provided a lengthy supply to keep the fire going. Onlookers watched as the fire roared, taking photos and videos with their cell phones. They also experienced firsthand the intensity of radiant heat from an open fire. The Clinton Volunteer Fire Department and the Clinton First Aid and Rescue Squad had several crews and rigs standing-by at the event. After all was said and done, a good time was had by all. - RICHARD MAXWELL

RICH MAXWELL

One of the two Clinton firefighters that set the pile of old Christmas trees ablaze for the 10th Annual Town Yuletide Bonfire on January 27th.

RICH MAXWELL

Clinton firefighters tend to the bonfire during this year’s 10th Annual Town Yuletide Bonfire held at Hunts Mill Park.

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March, 2018

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Enjoy taking photographs? Get the most out of your hobby! 1st Responder News compensates correspondents for their article & photograph submissions.

Franklin Twp. First Responders were dispatched to a car pole crash with entrapment on January 27th.

Contact Lindsey TODAY

Car Crashes Through Utility Pole & Rolls Over, Trapping Driver in Franklin Twp.

for more information! Lindsey@1strespondernews.com

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MVA in Paramus on Route 17 Paramus, NJ - Paramus First Responders removed the sole occupant of a car that overturned on Route 17 Northbound at Midland Avenue early on Sunday, January 21st. The driver was transported by ambulance to the hospital, but the injuries were reported to be minor.

RICH MAXWELL

Franklin Twp., NJ - A Toyota Corolla ran off the road on January 28th, smashing a utility pole into three pieces and bringing power wires down onto the roadway. The car then rolled over on to the driver’s side, trapping the driver inside the vehicle. The crash occurred on Asbury Bloomsbury Rd., a little over a half mile west of Old Main St., in the Asbury portion of Franklin Township. First Responders were dispatched to the scene at 8:25 A.M. The male driver had to extricated out of the vehicle by the fire department cutting the roof of the car open. Once the driver was freed from the car, he was transported to St. Luke's Warren Campus in Phillipsburg by the Franklin Township FD EMS Division along with the Paramedics. In addition to parts of the pole landing in the roadway, a power

JUMP TO FILE #012718104 transformer that was mounted on it broke open, spilling oil on the road surface. Warren County Hazmat responded to clean up the scene. The road was closed between Old Main St. and Butler Rd. for a couple of hours while the scene was being cleaned up and repairs made to the utility pole. Responding to the crash were the New Jersey State Police (Washington Station), Franklin Township FD (Station 57) and their EMS Division (Rescue 57), Paramedics from Hunterdon Medical Center (EMS 4), Warren County HazMat Team (Station 22), and Jersey Central Power & Light to repair the pole. - RICHARD MAXWELL


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

TOOLS OF THE TRADE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Tools of the Trade” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Tewksbury Twp., NJ - Well it's not really a Black Hat wanting a promotion to a White Hat...it demonstrates what happens when you get hit with a stream of foam, it sticks! At a three-alarm house fire on January 31st, one of Oldwick Volunteer Fire Company's firefighters (Hunterdon County Station 24), found that out during the overhaul operations. Plus, the freezing temperatures helped a little too.

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March, 2018

ICE RESCUE

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BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Old Mill Building Burns in Paterson

RICH MAXWELL

Paterson, NJ - In the frigid cold temps on December 27, 2017, as companies were picking up from a previous second-alarm, several reports were being received of a working fire at 29 McBride Ave. Ext., in the Great Falls District of the city. First-alarm companies, which included mutual aid units already in on standby, arrived to a long vacant two-story mill building with heavy fire in the “A/B” corner. This structure has been the scene of several previous fires and due

JUMP TO FILE #010218127 to the compromised structure, operations immediately went defensive. A column of black smoke was visible for miles. A second-alarm was sounded as lines were laid in for master streams. Being vacant for so long, there was not much inside of the building to burn, and quickly the two ladder pipes, one deck gun and several handlines

had the column of black smoke turn white. The fire was kept to the corner of the structure and never threatened nearby buildings. Ice coated the streets, sidewalks, railings, trees and rigs, making any movement difficult. Several slips and falls occurred, but no serious injuries were reported. Little Falls, West Paterson FD and Clifton worked at the scene. The cause is being investigated, but vagrants are suspected. - BILL TOMPKINS


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Church School Damaged in Clifton Multiple-Alarm Clifton, NJ - A section of the school portion of Saint Philip the Apostle Church was left charred after a two-alarm fire on January 11th. The fire, which started shortly before 2:00 A.M. at 797 Valley Road, was venting heavy smoke when firefighters arrived. JUMP TO FILE# The smoke was 011118122 coming from a oneand-a-half story building in the rear of the church complex, making access a challenge. Apparatus had to respond in from several different directions to reach the fire area. A second-alarm was transmitted to overcome the problem. The fire was located in the ceiling above a hallway and reportedly covered an area of about 40-feet. The visible fire was quickly extinguished, but smoke extended throughout the interconnected buildings and extensive ventilation was required. The fire was placed under control in about one hour with no injuries reported. The initial cause is believed to be electrical. School classes were canceled for the rest of the week. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

March, 2018

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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1st Responder New Jersey March Edition