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The New Jersey Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

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FEBRUARY, 2017

RON JEFFERS

North Bergen, N.J. - A fast moving fire consumed a one-story, 75x200 furniture store and warehouse at the corner of Kennedy Boulevard and 13th Street on December 21st. North Hudson Regional Fire Control dispatched a full assignment to that location shortly before 11:30 A.M.

- See full story on page 26

In Memory of Bob Freeman See Pages 7 & 38


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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Working Structure Fire in Vineland Destroys Three Vehicles Vineland, NJ – A fire in a three-bay garage heavily damaged a building and destroyed three vehicles on December 22nd. Engines 11, 31 and 62, along with Tower-6 and Vineland EMS were dispatched at 1:39 P.M. to the 300 block of N. Orchard Rd., for a structure fire. Chief Robert JUMP TO FILE# Pagnini responded 122216116 and while en-route, could see a large column of smoke, at which time he declared a working fire. The working fire box brought Engines 42, 33 and 2901 (Rosenhayn), as well as Ladder-2 to the scene. Malaga (Station 43-4), covered Station-3 and Forest Grove (Station 43-5), covered Station-6, both from Gloucester County. An off-duty platoon was recalled to man Station-6 along with Forest Grove E-62, under the Command of Lt. Paul Harvey, was first-in and found a three-bay, wood-frame garage, approximately 40x50, with a large attached lean-to, heavily involved. Lt. Harvey had his crew stretch a two-and-a-half inch line to the "A/D" corner, while the engine connected to a hydrant in front of the property. Additional companies arrived and pulled (two) one-and-three-quarter inch lines, followed by another two-and-a-half inch line with a blitz-fire nozzle. The building, the lean-to, and the immediate area around the building were crowded with many different types of equipment, materials and vehicles, making firefighting efforts difficult. The building was used as a garage, for storage and as a workshop. Numerous explosions were heard during operations and were attributed to aerosol cans, propane cylinders and tires. Firefighters finally got the upper hand and Chief Pagnini declared the fire to be under control at 2:28 P.M. Crews remained on the scene doing extensive overhaul until 5:18 P.M. Approximately 25 fire and EMS personnel responded to the blaze, along with the Cumberland County Fire Police. The blaze appears to have originated in the "D" side lean-to area, and the cause is under investigation by the fire department.

E-62's crew prepares to attack the flames.

JOHN W. CARR

- JOHN CARR

Battling the blaze from the "D" side.

JOHN W. CARR


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ADVERTISER INDEX Company

1st Priority Vehicles

Page

7,26,32,33

Absolute Fire Protection Co.

11

AGIN Signs

62

Armor Tuff Flooring

22

Apparatus For Sale

62

Associated Auto Body

62

Bagole-Friedman

Blaze Emergency Equipment

46

19

Campbell Supply

1,5,55

Choice Marketing

25

Choice Clean Gear

61

Defender Emergency Products

23

FDIC

63

Fail Safe

24

Finley Fire Equipment FIRE 2017

Fire Flow Services

Fire Officer Training

Fire & Safety Services Kimtek

37 41

North Plainfield, NJ - On November 30th, units were dispatched to 345 Green Brook Rd. for reports of a working fire. Upon arrival, heavy smoke and fire was found coming from the attic of a house. Mutual Aid from Plainfield was dispatched to the scene while Watchung stood-by at NPFD quarters.

21

15

Robbie Conley Architect

29

PL Custom

17

Safe-T

49

Specialty Vehicles

31

Spectrum Communications

35

Spotted Dog Technologies

39

45

3,47

T-Mugs

13 60

UAS Fire Consulting LLC.

42

VFIS

14

Valtek

CORPORATE INFORMATION

20

1st Responder News (ISSN 1525-1683) - New Jersey edition - Vol. 24 No. 2 - is published monthly, 12 times a year for $36 per year by Belsito Communications, Inc., 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. Periodicals Postage Paid at Newburgh, NY and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. No financial responsibility is assumed by this newspaper to publish a display, classified, or legal ad or for typographical errors except of reprinting that part of the ad which was omitted or in error. Omissions or errors must be brought to the attention of the newspaper during the A division of: s a m e month of publication.

845-534-7500 • (fax) 845-534-0055 Info@belsito.net

Firefighters Battle Attic Fire in North Plainfield

1,58,59,64

27

The Fire Store

Seaside Park, NJ - The 2016 Ship Bottom Christmas Parade was held on December 3rd, where hundreds of people lined up along Long Beach Blvd. to watch. Police, Fire and EMS personnel throughout all of Ocean County took part in the annual parade.

EDDIE PFEIFER

53

New Jersey Fire Equipment

Task Force Tips

Annual Ship Bottom Christmas Parade

43,62

Long Island Mega Show

Tasc Fire Apparatus

ROMAN ISARYK JR.

JASON BELL

Vehicle Fire Knocked Down Behind NYSC Springfield, NJ - Springfield FD's Unit-2 and Engine-2 responded on December 20th to the parking lot behind NYSC (New York Sports Club), for a reported vehicle fire. Springfield PD arrived on-scene and confirmed the working fire. Unit-2 arrived on-scene, advising of heavy fire in the engine compartment. Engine-2 arrived and pulled a one-and-threequarter inch attack line, making a quick knock of the fire. All units were back in service within one hour.

EDWARD J. MCMAHON

Santa Comes to East Greenwich!

East Greenwich, NJ - On December 10th, Santa came for his traditional visit to East Greenwich Township! He was escorted around town by members of East Greenwich Twp. Fire and Rescue. Santa made sure to go by every house in the township and hand out candy canes to kids of all ages. Santa came back on December 13th to East Greenwich Twp. Fire and Rescue for a special visit to the members and their families. Santa was there to hand out presents to the firefighter’s children and to say a special thank you to the families for the time firefighters spend away from them so that they can respond to emergency calls and for training.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1 Ardmore Street • New Windsor, NY 12553

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In memory of those who gave all

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

Montana: Darryl Elden “Poor Boy” Vielle, 51 Rank: Crew Boss/Engine Boss Incident Date: November 30, 2016 Death Date: November 30, 2016 Fire Department: Blackfeet Forestry and Fire Management Initial Summary: While serving on the Maple Spring wildfire in North Carolina, Blackfeet Nation Fire Management Crew Boss/Engine Boss Darryl Elden “Poor Boy” Vielle was found deceased in his motel room on the morning of November 30, 2016. The Blackfeet Forestry and Fire Management crew has been supporting firefighters in North Carolina since November 10th.

Michigan: Thomas Gary Walker, 70 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: November 27, 2016 Death Date: November 27, 2016 Fire Department: Otsego County Fire Department Initial Summary: Later in the day after responding with his fire department to an early morning carbon monoxide alarm, Firefighter Walker collapsed at home and was transported to the hospital where he was pronounced deceased from a nature and cause of fatal injury still to be reported.

Washington: Charles “Doug” Archer, 49 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: November 28, 2016 Death Date: Pending Fire Department: Spokane County Fire District 8 Initial Summary: After responding with his fire department to a residential fire and an aid call, Firefighter Archer returned to his residence to rest where he succumbed in his sleep. South Carolina: Jeffery A. Worsham, 45 Rank: Assistant Fire Chief Incident Date: December 2, 2016 Death Date: December 10, 2016 Fire Department: Whitesville Rural Volunteer

Fire Department Initial Summary: After responding to a motor vehicle accident call with the Whitesville Fire Department and then returning home, Assistant Fire Chief Jeffery A. Worsham was found in the morning by his spouse in cardiac arrest. The Whitesville Fire Department responded to Chief Worsham’s residence where he was treated and transported to the hospital but succumbed to his injury several days later. Ohio: Ruben E. Mast, 43 Rank: Firefighter Incident Date: December 19, 2016 Death Date: December 19, 2016 Fire Department: Wayne Township Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: Firefighter Ruben E. Mast was responding to an alarm in his privately owned Ford F-250 pickup truck when he lost control of the vehicle and struck a guardrail before overturning. Mast was reported to have been ejected from the vehicle. He was transported by Wayne Township Volunteer Fire Department and Smith Ambulance to Union Hospital in Dover, where he later succumbed to his injuries.

Oregon: Ray Rubio, 52 Rank: Firefighter/Smokejumper Incident Date: November 23, 2016 Death Date: December 19, 2016 Fire Department: Redmond Smokejumpers Redmond Air Center Deschutes National Forest Initial Summary: Firefighter/Smokejumper Ray Rubio passed away in the Grandview Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama, from injuries he suffered in a fall on November 23, 2016. Rubio, a Smokejumper (RAC 95) with the Redmond Air Center (RAC) - Deschutes National Forest, had been assigned to the Southeast during an outbreak of multiple large fires in the region. Firefighter Rubio was reported to have been in travel status on his way home to Oregon and staying overnight in Birmingham at the time of his injury.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

A Dedicated Fire Chief Right to the End UPS & DOWNS

Notes from Ron Jeffers

Lou Kelly, 70, loved being a firefighter and he dedicated his life to serving in this noble profession. There was no formal retirement from duty. When he retired from the Elizabeth Fire Department as its chief, he continued to serve as a Union County Mutual Aid Coordinator (MAC-7). While operating at the command post of a fire in Clark on December 8th, Chief Kelly experienced a medical emergency and went into cardiac arrest. Eight days later, the tough, old fire veteran passed away in the coronary care unit at Rahway Hospital. Kelly served the people of Elizabeth as a firefighter for 34-years. He was Chief of Department from 1999 to 2003. He was known as a hard, but respected and fair boss. Despite a tough exterior, he had a soft inside. He loved and respected his work, and extended that respect to the fire service in general. Chief Kelly had many battle stories under his belt. There was plenty of fire action in Elizabeth and neighborhood communities, especially in what was known as the “War Years” of the fire service. After his formal retirement from the E.F.D., MAC-7 could be heard on the air, over the county frequency, responding to mutual aid fires or on a cover assignment. The chief was instrumental in organizing and deploying the largest Union County mutual aid fire response to New York City after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Chief Kelly was a strong fighter, continuing his battle in the hospital. He hung on for eight days and conducted business. On his final days in the hospital, he tied up loose ends. He called family and friends. In ad-

RON JEFFERS

Ret. Elizabeth CoD, now serving as Union County Mutual Aid Coordinator (MAC-7), died on December 16th from complications of a heart attack that occurred while he was operating at a two-alarm fire in Clark on December 8th.

dition, he made a list of the nurses and medical technicians that helped him. He ordered Christmas gifts online for his family. Chief Kelly also issued one last request. “In the event that I do not get well, MAKE SURE all donations (in lieu of flowers) are directed to the NJ Firemen's Home and the St. Barnabas Children's Burn Camp.” A leader to the end, with his final orders. On December 20th, hundreds of

area firefighters, police officers, emergency medical personnel, family and friends, gathered at St. Genevieve's Church in Elizabeth, for a funeral service and Chief's Kelly's last run on a fire engine. Union County Mutual Aid Communications called MAC-7, but there was no answer. MAC-7 had answered his final alarm. MAC-7 may have answered his last alarm, but his knowledge, wisdom and love of the fire service has

Family, fellow firefighters and emergency personnel, and friends say "Goodbye" to one of their heroes, Chief Lou Kelly. MAC-7 has answered his final alarm. RON JEFFERS

been passed on to many who knew, worked and respected him. That knowledge will help provide safety and positive administration for years to come. DOWNS: A fire tore through a vacant dwelling on Telford Ave. in Newark on Nov. 28th. One firefighter fell through the floor while battling the blaze, but was quickly rescued and continued to fight the fire, officials said. UPS: To memorialize Stephen Benish, who was a member of the Cranford Fire Call Dept., the CFD's new tower ladder was dedicated in his honor on Nov. 28th. That date marked the 12th anniversary of his death-killed in Iraq at the age of 20. At 18, he joined the call department and looked forward to becoming a career firefighter. When we were attacked on 9/11, he put firefighting aside to serve his country in the army. DOWNS: An 82-year-old Middletown man suffered second and third degree burns and smoke inhalation after a fire at the Shadow Lake Village complex on Nov. 26th. Three other people were treated for smoke inhalation. UPS: Recent fire department promotions in Vineland are Tony Salter to captain and John Hendershott to lieutenant. DOWNS: On Dec. 6th, a woman entered the quarters of Elizabeth Engine-3 and Ladder-2, on Trumbull St., seeking assistance after suffering from multiple stab wounds. EMS took the woman to UHNJ. UPS: Montclair firefighters and local counterparts teamed up on Dec. 3rd to rescue a man who was trapped as he was removing an underground oil tank from a Linden Ave. yard. The man was reportedly attempting to cut it when he was pinned. Officials said he removed the top portion and got into the tank, and that's when dirt pushed down metal on top of him, trapping the worker. The soil around him collapsed, covering him up to his chest. Rescue operations included attaching “come alongs” and rope systems to pull the metal from the victim. An aerial ladder was used to create a pulley-system. As the metal was being lifted, firefighters placed airbags around the man to protect him. It took about 90 minutes to extricate the worker. Firefighters from Millburn, Caldwell and Cedar Grove assisted. The man was transported to University Hospital in Newark and treated for minor injuries. “Everyone just really did a great job working together to bring it to a good conclusion,” Montclair Fire Chief John Herrmann said. DOWNS: An armed robber stuck a handgun in a Trenton fire captain's face while he was on a call on the dead-end of Cummings Pl. on Dec. 6th. As the captain of Engine-7 returned to his rig to get a piece of paper to leave a note about equipment, he was approached from behind, officials said. The actor pointed a gun at the captain and ordered him to empty his pockets. Another man appeared nearby and the actor said something to that person like, “This guy is not from my hood,” officials said. Both men fled on foot.

UPS: New firefighters in Millburn are Shane McAlinden, Ruben Perello, Julio Carcamo, Mike Adubado and Kevin Maguire. DOWNS: Three Paterson firefighters sustained non-life-threatening injuries while battling a fire in a three-story dwelling on East 18th St., Dec. 16th. UPS: The Boys & Girls Club of Passaic County recently honored “Hometown Heroes.” Paterson FF Luis Vega and Passaic FF Gary Delgado were recognized for their service to the community, as firefighters and as volunteers with The Boys & Girls Club. DOWNS: A 60-year-old man who was critically injured in a two-alarm fire on Bramhall Ave. in Jersey City, Dec. 9th, died later in the day, authorities said. UPS: In Wayne, Firefighter Scott Kooreman was presented with a 40year service award at Company-4's installation dinner on Dec. 2nd. DOWNS: High winds helped to spread a fire at a Townsend St. dwelling in New Brunswick on Dec. 9th, to a neighboring home, authorities said. About 12 people were displaced from the original fire building and six from the exposure. UPS: Firefighters from Bloomingdale rescued a deer that had fallen through ice at a reservoir in Kennelon on Dec. 11th. The Kinnelon FD contacted the Bloomingdale FD, which responded with ice rescue equipment. DOWNS: A house-lifting worker was trapped in shallow water on Dec. 13th, when part of a house had collapsed in Wildwood. The worker was sent into frigid water when part of the waterfront home collapsed on the Jersey shore. A beam from the home struck the worker in the head, sending him into the shallow water below. He was trapped under water for about 15 minutes by a chain wrapped around his leg, officials said. Firefighters used bolt cutters to free the victim, who was airlifted to AtlanticCare Regional Medical Center. UPS: Sea Bright Fire Rescue and Monmouth Beach first responders were among the agencies called in to rescue a hunter and his dog who were briefly marooned on a small island in the Shrewsbury River on Dec. 15th, after high winds blew his boat away. When firefighters approached the island in boats, the man entered the water, where he was aided by firefighter swimmers, and he and his dog brought to shore. DOWNS: A 77-year-old woman was injured when she was trapped in her burning Jackson home on Dec. 15th. Firefighters found the victim inside of the Huntington Dr. house after police officers could not get past the heavy smoke to get inside the house, said police Captain Steven Laskiewicz. Firefighters from Station-54 arrived and located the unconscious woman in a side room, officials said. The woman was taken outside, where firefighters from Station-55 started efforts to resuscitate her. Quality First Aid and MONOC paramedics continued those efforts and she was rushed to a local hospital. - CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

PAGE 9

MEMORIAL BOARD If your department has photos you would like to see in our “Memorial Board” feature please upload them on our website www.1RBN.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Wallington, NJ - The emergency services community was recently saddened by the loss of Wallington FD's past chief, Bill Werner, age 73, of Carolina Shores, N.C. Bill died suddenly on November 19, 2016. After graduating from Lodi High School, Bill enlisted in the Army and served for three years at Fort Bragg, located in N.C. He married his wife Beverly in 1965 and they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 2015. Bill joined Wallington Fire Department's Park Row Hose Co. #3 in 1974 and served a 32-year career with distinction, holding offices of President, Vice-President, Lieutenant, Captain, Trustee, Assistant Chief and Deputy Chief. In 1955, he was elected as Chief of Department. Bill was a delegate of the Wallington Firemen's Relief Association, a delegate of the NJ-NY Firemen's Association, as well as a member of the Department's 60th and 75th Anniversary Committee of Co. #3. He became a life member of Co. #3 in 1999. His life member accomplishments ranged from South Bergen Fire Chief's Assn., the NJ State Exempt Firemen's Assn. and the Wallington Exempt Firemen's Assn.

He was also able to serve the borough of Wallington in the capacity of a Planning Board member. Bill also served in EMS as a member of the Wallington Emergency Squad from 1979-1988, holding offices of President and Vice-President. He was also a life member and past captain of the Wallington Ambulance Corps. Bill was active as an officer in the NJ State First Aid Council's 24th District. His community involvement also brought him into the arena of advanced life support as a NJ-certified paramedic for over 25 years. By 2012, he and wife Beverly relocated to Carolina Shores, N.C., where he became a member of the Calabash Vol. Fire Dept. Additionally, Bill volunteered with the Brunswick County Sheriff's Office. Bill Werner's life indeed embraced the call of service. He touched the mind and spirit of all those who met him, those who worked with him, and those who were aided by him. From eternity, Bill now leads us. May we honor his memory and live by his example. When we do that, we speak hope with strong words and compassionate actions. - CRAIG STEWART

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Multiple Alarm Fire in Orange Displaces 15 Residents Orange, NJ - As the first flakes of the first snowfall of the season began to fall, Orange firefighters faced a three-alarm fire that left 15 homeless. Shortly before 3:00 A.M. on December 17th, Orange firefighters were dispatched to 197 Chapman St. for a report of a fire. Heavy smoke and fire from the second-floor of a vacant, boarded-up, two-and-a-half story frame greeted first-arriving companies. A second-alarm was sounded as residents from the occupied exposure buildings were removed. A push was made on the

JUMP TO FILE #121916105 original fire building, but conditions deteriorated and members were removed. Heavy fire soon had possession of the entire rear of the structure and was extending to both exposures. A third-alarm was transmitted, bringing multiple Essex County units to the scene. Members remained an interior attack on both exposure buildings and were able to halt the spread of the flames. Exposure “B” suffered

extensive damage, mostly to the rear, while the damage to exposure “D” was much less significant. One ladder pipe and several exterior hand-lines in both the front and rear were able to knock down the heavy fire. The fire was placed under control in two hours. The snow covered streets and sidewalks required a supply of salt to help with the slippery conditions. No serious injuries were reported, but 15 residents from the exposure buildings required assistance from the Red Cross. - BILL TOMPKINS

SGT. CRAIG STEWART, NUTLEY PD

Wallington past Fire Chief, Bill Werner, at the Nutley St. Patrick’s Day Parade on Saturday, March 11, 1995.

Visit us on web

www.1rbn.com BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Twenty Residents Displaced by Millville Apartment Fire Millville, NJ – A blaze that caused heavy damage to an apartment house on December 20, 2016 left 20 residents out in the cold. At 11:45 A.M., Millville firefighters were dispatched to the 700 block of North 3rd St. for a dwelling fire. The Cumberland County 9-1-1 CenJUMP TO FILE# ter advised the re- 122016106 s p o n d i n g companies that it was reported to be a stove fire with extension into the cabinets. Chief Michael Lippincott arrived within minutes and found medium smoke showing from the "A" side of a large, two-and-ahalf story, wood-frame apartment house. He immediately declared a working fire and off-duty personnel were recalled, while Millville Rescue Squad was dispatched. The fire was found to be at the rear of the building, so Chief Lippincott ordered Engine-34, commanded by Captain Doug Hallquist, to the "C" side. Within about 10 minutes, Chief Lippincott ordered the second-alarm. Companies responding on the second-alarm were Vineland Ladder-2, Rosenhayn E-2901, as well as Downe Twp.'s E-3922 and Station-13. Laurel Lake covered Millville’s station. Capt. Hallquist and his crew stretched a one-and-three-quarter inch line to the first-floor, where there was heavy fire showing. The crew entered the building and attacked the flames. The fire was already extending to the secondfloor through the open wall spaces created by balloon construction. Ladder-34 set up on the "A" side and began to open up. As additional firefighters arrived, the rear of the building was laddered, opened up and lines were taken to the second-floor. Ladder-2 set up on the "B" side and began to ventilate. A total of (three) one-andthree-quarter inch lines and (one) one-and-a-half inch line were operated. Chief Lippincott declared the fire to be under control at 12:44 P.M. A total of 35 fire and EMS personnel responded to the scene with three engines, two ladders, a rescue and an ambulance. The Cumberland County Fire Police responded to the scene for traffic control. No injuries were reported and all companies cleared the scene at 2:30 P.M. The first and second floors on the "C" side were heavily damaged. The cause of the fire was found to be the result of unattended cooking, according to Chief Lippincott. The Red Cross responded to the scene to assist the displaced residents of the five apartments.

Firefighters working on the "C" side.

JOHN W. CARR

- JOHN CARR

JOHN W. CARR


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

CONNI SPELLMAN

Woodbridge District-1 brought their very own Gingerbread House to the parade!

PROVIDED

Matawan Borough Vol. FD Receives Gift of Pet Oxygen Masks CONNI SPELLMAN

Woodbridge firefighters passed out candy to the kids watching the parade.

CONNI SPELLMAN

Santa and Mrs. Claus ride through in their sleigh. (Santa was played by Avenel Firefighter Earl Runkel, who sadly passed away just three weeks after the parade, on December 29th).

Matawan, NJ - On Friday, December 3, 2016, the Matawan Borough Volunteer Fire Department received a generous donation of five pet oxygen masks from the Emma Zen Foundation. This gift will make it possible for Matawan Borough's firefighters to provide life-saving oxygen to pets and other animals overcome by smoke inhalation or lack of oxygen due to house fires, wildfires and/or other disasters. Deputy Chief Richard Michitsch is happy to add these lifesaving tools to Matawan Borough's trucks. “The Matawan Borough Fire Department is responsible for protecting the health, safety and welfare of the Borough residents,” he said. “To better serve the community, the fire depart-

JUMP TO FILE #120916141 ment, in conjunction with the Matawan Borough Animal Advisory Committee, has been provided with pet oxygen masks that will be placed on each of the apparatus, which will enable the department to support the furry family members of our community.” The Matawan Borough Animal Advisory Committee facilitated the procurement of the pet oxygen masks, introducing the idea to obtain them and conducting fundraising to "pay it forward" so that the Emma Zen Foundation can fulfill a future request for equipment. The Emma Zen Foundation is a

non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization based in Anaheim, California, and has provided over 3,000 pet oxygen masks to first responders and firefighting units. The Matawan Borough Animal Advisory Committee, active in the Borough since December of 2015, serves as a volunteer resource for residents' questions on animal issues. For more information about the Emma Zen Foundation, their website is: www.emmazenfoundation.com. The Matawan Borough Animal Advisory Committee can be reached via its Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/matawan animalcommittee/. - RICHARD MICHITSCH

FIREFIGHTER PROFILES If your department has photos you would like to see in our “Firefighter Profiles” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Woodbridge Celebrates 51st Annual Christmas Parade Tradition

Woodbridge, NJ - The writer of this article remembers attending this parade as a child, standing outside in cold temperatures with snow falling; however, this year's Woodbridge Christmas parade was held on a rather sunny day, with temperatures in the 50's and no snow falling, on December 4, 2016. Woodbridge police cars led off the parade as they always do, followed by marching bands from all three local high schools, boy scouts, girl scouts, car clubs and floats. Throughout the two-hour parade, fire departments from towns in Woodbridge Township and Perth Amboy showed off their apparatus. Some companies marched, while others passed out candy to the kids along the route. Even a couple of Sparky's participated! The parade ended with Santa and Mrs. Claus in their sleigh, exclaiming Merry Christmas to all!

Newark, NJ - Newark Rescue-1 Firefighter Tommy Melillo worked his last tour for the NFD on December 28th. Family, friends and fellow firefighters, both past and present, came to the Clinton Ave. firehouse to wish him well in his retirement after having a career with the NFD for over 25 years.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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Two-Alarm Electrical Fire Damages Teaneck Home Teaneck, NJ - An almost century-old house was badly damaged when flames from an apparent electrical issue traveled throughout the basement and up the walls before being extinguished on December 6th. As a steady rain fell, Teaneck fire- JUMP TO FILE# fighters were dis- 120816105 patched to 760 River Road for a report of a fire. First arriving Engine-2 reported a heavy smoke condition in a frame dwelling, with a brick façade built back in the 1920’s. Additional units were called into the scene, including a ladder from Hackensack and engines from both Englewood and Bogota. After some difficulty accessing the basement, lines were stretched and the visible fire was knocked, but the smoke condition intensified from the upper floors and flames briefly broke out by a front porch. Members vented, opened up and were able to contain the flames. The fire was able to be placed under control in about one hour. No serious injuries were reported. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


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February, 2017

Chaplain’s Corner Didymus McHugh

Grief

When was the last time that we thought about grieving? People grieve many changes in their lives. We grieve losing a job, a divorce, death, moving and many other changes. But do we really understand what it is to grieve? They say that there are fiveto-nine stages of grief. The five that are most common are: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression and Acceptance. Some people think that you go from step one through step five in that order, but grief is not that neat and clean, or that predictable. A person can spend a long or short time in any of these phases. They can revisit any phase many times. You can go from denial, to anger, to bargaining, back to anger again, to depression, to anger again, to acceptance and to depression again. It all depends on the individual. Let’s look at the death of someone who died from being sick or old. The family may have been taking care of the individual for years. Even though they understand that the person may be at peace now, it still does not remove the pain. Months may go by until they decide to deal with the person's belongings. People may want this or that to remember their loved one. People may not even touch any of the possessions because it may cause them too much pain. Events that go by may trigger the grieving process again, such as the person’s birthday, the holidays, special landmarks in time or place, a smell that reminds them of the person, or a song. Just like Critical Incident Stress has many triggers, so does grieving; after all, it is a critical incident. Some may just want to sit there and experience the grief because they are afraid that when they stop grieving, they may forget the person. God says that we should love one another. Being there to be with someone as they grieve is a

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sign that you care, even just by helping someone figure out the paperwork, or what to do with the possessions. My friend told me that it was a great help as we cleaned out a relative’s house. We sat there for hours and talked as we went through everything. We figured out where it was to go, who it would go to, and/or if we would throw it out. Once in a while we would start to laugh, seeing things from our childhood that they saved from years ago, and seeing what we had from years ago. It is perfectly fine for someone to mourn. We all need time to process our losses. As I write this, I'm thinking of one of my clients that died, who I knew for about 30 years, and also one of my friend's relatives who died. I'm also thinking of someone who means a lot to me that was recently diagnosed with Leukemia. I, myself, am mourning losses with my friends,

as well as preparing myself for things that are inevitable. I know that I may be devastated when the person passes, but I also plan to remember the person close to me and I plan on honoring the person with my service, thoughts and actions. Children sometimes have a harder time dealing with grief, which people can assist with. There are counselors and also some camps that help, such as Comfort Zone Camps. Comfort Zone is a nation-wide camp that assists children when they have challenges dealing with their own grief. I ask that you be there to grieve with those who mourn, and be patient. It is okay to just be there and be silent when you do not know what to say. It is part of caring for people and being part of a family. We will all grieve at one time or another. Stay safe, Didymus McHugh

D ID Y OU K NOW

?

A Crayola crayon can be used as a candle in an emergency. As the wax melts, the paper becomes a wick and one candle will last about 30 minutes.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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February, 2017

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UPS AND DOWNS - CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

UPS: Hackensack firefighters helped to free a man who got his hand caught in a printing press on Russel Pl., Dec. 13th. Firefighters made sure the power to the machine was shut off and couldn't be restarted, and then they took it apart with small hand tools, Captain Justin Derevyanik said. The victim was freed in about 15 minutes, he said. The victim was then transported to HUMC. DOWNS: A man described as a squatter was killed in a dwelling fire on Sanford St. in Trenton, Dec. 18th. UPS: Newly promoted fire lieutenants in Madison are Kevin Williams, Kyle Wickman, James Blair and Brian Tappen. DOWNS: A two-alarm fire tore through a Bordentown public works garage off of Crosswicks St. on Dec. 20th, destroying everything stored inside. UPS: The Bayonne Fire Department has been awarded a $4,000 fire prevention grant from FM Global to assist the department with fire prevention activities. DOWNS: A fire heavily damaged a Firth St. dwelling in Phillipsburg, located across the street from a town firehouse, Dec. 20th. UPS: Hoboken's newly appointed firefighter is Benny Rotondi, Jr. DOWNS: More than 20 people were displaced due to a fire on North 3rd St. in Millville, Dec. 20th. UPS: A Compassionate Fire Department Award from PETA was presented to the Sayreville Fire Department, which came to the rescue of a young deer that had fallen through the ice in Waterworks Park on Dec. 16th. It took Firefighters Chris Mierzwiak, Ray Deecken and Mike Marcinyck Jr. to pull the deer out of the water using special ice-rescue suits, ropes, a flotation device and a sled. DOWNS: The body of a badly burned man was found inside a 40th Street home in Irvington, Dec. 26th. Four other people who lived in the home escaped, officials said. UPS: Cedar Grove firefighters rescued two cats from a dryer fire at an apartment building on Pompton Ave.,

Dec. 19th. DOWNS: A man suffered serious burns to more than half of his body in a garage fire on Fourth Ave. in Asbury Park, Dec. 24th. The garage contained oxygen and acetylene tanks and was being used to repair vehicles, officials said. UPS: The Trenton Fire Department has added a second deputy chief's position and promoted B.C. Robert Tharp, a 27-year city firefighter, to that position. D.C. Leonard Carmichael will be the deputy chief of operations and Tharp will handle mainly administrative functions, Fire Director Qareeb Bashir said. DOWNS: A Christmas morning fire in a Westfield Ave. dwelling in Elizabeth displaced six residents. UPS: Carmine Ruta has been promoted to fire captain in West Orange. DOWNS: A two-alarm fire on Park Ave. in Paterson, left one person dead and about 20 displaced, Dec. 20th. UPS: Jordan Zales has been promoted to fire lieutenant in Ridgewood. DOWNS: A one-alarm fire displaced 14 people from their East 16th St. home in Paterson on Dec. 26th. UPS: Newly appointed firefighters in Millburn are Joseph Odee, Ruben Perello, Kevin Maguire, Shane McAlinden, Michael Adubato and Julio Carcamo Jr. DOWNS: A propane tank in a garbage truck exploded, sparking a fire that raced through four stores at the Mendham Village Shopping Center, Dec. 28th. The truck uses a propane tank for fuel as a type of green technology, officials said. UPS: Newly appointed firefighters in West Orange are Ryan Ciccaglione, Jospeh DePasquale, Anthony Loretto and Nick Manzella. DOWNS: The cab of an Elizabeth FD ambulance caught fire, Dec. 29th, at the corner of Morris Ave. & Johnson Pl. in Union. UPS: New firefighters in Elizabeth are M. Mulroy, J. Chen, D. Luque, M. Carter, M. Backiel, J. Abella, D. Rosa, M. Diaz, D. McConway, K. Flores, J. Mooney, K. Haszko, G. Martin, K. Moran, D. Jensen, C. Barry, J. Cort Jr., R. Mawer, K. Cowan, B. Butterly and K. Malone.

RON JEFFERS

Santa says "Hello" to a young man wearing his own turn-out gear before the parade commenced.

Santa & Helpers Visit North Hudson North Bergen, N.J. - Santa came to town with the help of the North Hudson Firefighters Association and Fire Officers for their 17th annual parade down Bergenline Avenue on December 11th. The parade started at 85th Street and proceeded south on the avenue through Guttenberg, West New York and ended on 32nd Street in Union City. Children and adults lined the avenue to get a glimpse of Santa and all of the other participants and, of course, a lot of fire trucks. There were clowns, including one on stilts, passing out candy and balloons, plus cartoon characters and march-

JUMP TO FILE #121216107 ing bands. Many observers stopped the clowns to take “selfie� photos, and also with a giant teddy bear pulled by a Cliffside Park chief's car. The chill in the air made it feel like Christmas, and the children didn't mind the cold to get a glimpse at Santa taking up the end of the parade. The Christmas parade is a tradition that was started by the former Union City Fire Department, traveling through that city. It has

now extended to four of the five municipalities, where this main shopping center is located, within the confines of the North Hudson F.D.'s jurisdiction. The parade is preceded by a wrapping party on the following weekend at a North Bergen church. This event is part of the former North Bergen Fire Department's holiday traditions. Firefighters, with their families and friends, gather to wrap acquired children's gifts, which are delivered to area hospitals on the following days by Santa and his helpers. - RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Elizabeth recruit firefighters stand at attention.

RON JEFFERS

A clown character, played by N.H. Firefighter Danny Liberti, passes out candy. He was just as popular as Santa!


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Quick Work Saves Classic Cars from Christmas Eve Fire in Belleville Belleville, NJ - At around 7:08 A.M. on a rainy, December 23rd morning, Belleville Companies were dispatched to a Washington Avenue address. Upon arrival, companies were notified of a possible fire at 33 Washington Avenue. Arriving units JUMP TO FILE# saw thick smoke 122516103 coming from a twostory building that houses vintage vehicles for use in movies. As companies made entry from the rear of the building, they encountered heavy smoke. The fire was contained to the rear of the building, which had traveled the wall and extended to some surrounding rooms. Firefighters worked for about 40 minutes to contain the blaze. According to Battalion Chief Buckley, “Not too much damage was done to any of the vehicles.� No injuries were reported. Mutual aid from Bloomfield, Nutley and North Arlington assisted at the scene. - DAMIEN DANIS

DAMIEN DANIS


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February, 2017

DRILLS/TRAINING

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

To see your Drills in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Downe, NJ - On December 27th, Downe Twp. Fire & Rescue participated in a drill with Station-29 from Rosenhyan. They covered vertical roof ops with chainsaws, rotary saws and the ax. Crews then trained on VEIS techniques in a limited visibility space. Crews also practiced stretching and operating a one-and-three-quarter inch line on the 2nd-floor. To create realistic conditions, they used two theatrical smoke machines. The machines made the interior have zero visibility while searching and stretching/operating the hose line. They were also able to use a section of four-inch PVC pipe to channel the "smoke" into the cockloft space, giving the roof crews some realistic conditions.

Tower Ladder-3 in operation as flames traveled up the walls and into the cockloft.

RON JEFFERS

Early Morning Fire in Weehawken

RICHARD LESWING

RICHARD LESWING

Weehawken, N.J. - Several phone calls to North Hudson Fire Control had firefighters looking for a structure fire shortly after 3:00 A.M. on December 14th. Companies were dispatched to 32nd St., near Palisade Ave. in Union City, and follow-up calls reported a fire near Hudson Avenue. Second Battalion Chief Robert Morrison located the fire and reported the correct address as 215 Hackensack Plank Road in Weehawken, near Hudson Avenue. This street is located on the border line and is known as Hackensack Plk Rd. on the township side, and 32nd St. on the Union City side. Flames had blown out a

JUMP TO FILE #121416112 boarded up, first-floor window of the two-story, wood-frame building, and fire was rapidly extending to the upper floor. An occupied dwelling on the “B” side was an exposure problem. That building was evacuated. Deputy Chief Charles Thomas struck a secondalarm and notified Truck-3 to take the front of the building for a tower ladder operation. The building was vacant and previously deemed hazardous with open floors and ceilings, so an outside attack commenced.

The visible flames were knocked down, but fire traveled up the walls to the cockloft. Numerous hand-lines were used as low banking smoke rolled eastward, toward the Lincoln Tunnel. The fire was declared “probably will hold” around 3:45 A.M.; however, units continued to operate due to hots spots throughout the structure. Officials were investigating the cause of the fire, which was believed to be suspicious. The building was damaged “beyond repair,” according to Chief of Department Frank Montagne.

Flames quickly consumed both floors of the Hackensack Plank Road building.

- RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

NEW JERSEY GIGS

NEW JERSEY MEMORIES

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Gigs” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

If you have photos you would like to see in our “NJ Memories” feature, please upload them to our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

Franklin Lakes Asst. Chief Chuck Bohny answers alarms in a 2011 Chevy Tahoe.

RON JEFFERS

This 1922 Ford, that served in Mendham Borough, is part of the New Jersey Fire Museum's collection.

RON JEFFERS

Madison Park Asst. Chief Kent McLaughlin operates a 2006 Dodge Durango.

RON JEFFERS

The Delran Fire-Police operate a 2003 Chevy 2500 model.

The Barnegat Fire-Police use this 2004 Chevy Impala that saw original duty as a police car. RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

This former Lavallette 1967 Mack 750-GPM pumper is also part of the New Jersey Fire Museum's fleet.

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February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

20th Century Firefighting ON THE BOOK SHELF

by John Malecky

20th Century Firefighting As seen through the eyes of Illustrator, William Hicks, Milton Fireman 1899-1942 By Nathan R. Murphy and Lieutenant Brian Doherty Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, Suite 4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800-522-8528 e-mail: support@fire-policeems.com www.fire-police-ems.com Price: $22.00

This is a soft covered book, measuring 9-inches by 11 ½-inches and has 56 pages. From page 6 through 55 there are sketches and illustrations, except for one page which has a photo of a monument dedicated to six Milton, Massachusetts firefighters and two police officers who gave their lives in the line-of-duty to the city. This book is the product of an idea put forth by Lieutenant Brian Doherty to Nathan R. Murphy, encouraging

him to write this book while he secured the rights to use the artwork in the book that was done by Firefighter William Hick, Nathan’s great, great Grandfather. William Hicks was a very talented firefighter and person. He served the city of Milton’s fire department for the first four decades of the 20th century. He was part of the transition of volunteers to career firefighters and from horse drawn to steam engines. He sketched illustrations of all aspects of being a firefighter, from fighting fires, responding to rescues and other emergencies, to firehouse life, social events, duties and what have you. Many, if not most of the sketches are of actual calls with the likes of actual firefighters who responded. Many locations are named and the nature of the call described. The days of old are well represented and it is an education to anyone interested in history. Modern day firehouse life and firefighting are a light-year difference from much of what you will view on these pages. It is an enjoyable look of yesteryear, but sometimes sad when tragedy results. Nathan used this book as an Eagle Scout project. Lieutenant Doherty is the current president of the Milton Historical Society and helped to establish the Milton Firefighter Memorial Archives.

PATCH OF THE MONTH

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the Month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Firefighters Help Save Christmas for Paterson Residents Paterson, NJ - Quick work by Paterson firefighters kept a fire small and thus helped keep multiple residents from becoming homeless just a week before Christmas. Companies were dispatched to 281 Union Ave. at about 8:00 A.M. on December 16th, after a FD unit spotted smoke and requested a Full Box to be transmitted. The JUMP TO FILE# two-and-a-half story 121916108 frame building, with a store on the firstfloor and apartments above, had visible smoke, but no fire showing on arrival. A ladder was raised to the roof in case venting was necessary. The roll-up window coverings on the first-floor were opened and members checked the upper floors, but still no fire was located. Finally, the seat of the fire was found in a rear basement stairway enclosure. A quick knock down held the flames and the fire was able to be placed under control in about 30 minutes. All of this occurred as the temperatures hovered in the teens and a still wind blew across the area. Water quickly froze on the streets and sidewalks. A call for salt from the DPW was necessary. No injuries were reported. - BILL TOMPKINS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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RON JEFFERS

Members prepare to remove Ladder-1 from the front of the building after flames quickly raced to the Kennedy Blvd. side and vented out display windows.

Spectacular Fire Destroys Furniture Store

ON THE LITER SIDE If you have photos you would like to see in our “On The Liter Side” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

RON JEFFERS

Cliffside Park, NJ - Cliffside Park Firefighter Tim Abdalla, a parttime Santa helper, picked up some pizza for Santa and company during their all-day-long tour through town on December 10th. There were no cookies and milk available, so pizza hit the spot!

North Bergen, N.J. - A fast moving fire consumed a one-story, 75x200 furniture store and warehouse at the corner of Kennedy Boulevard and 13th Street on December 21st. North Hudson Regional Fire Control dispatched a full assignment to that location shortly before 11:30 A.M. Chief of Department Frank Montagne was in the area and the first to arrive. There was heavy fire in a rear garage area on the 13th Street side. The chief ordered a second-alarm. About half-a-dozen people inside the building escaped safely. As Engine Co. 1 left their firehouse near 10th Street, they observed the smoke condition. A huge column of black smoke began rising into the sky, visible in Manhattan. Hand-lines and master streams were set up. Tower Ladder-3 was ordered to the 13th Street side, where the bulk of the fire was visible. Engine-1, also on 13th Street, used its deck gun. Numerous hand-lines were also used. There was a truss roof placard visible above the garage doors on the side street. Truckees were performing a

JUMP TO FILE #122216105 trench cut on the roof to the east of the fire, but flames rapidly raced passed them below and they were ordered off of the roof. A thirdalarm was struck. Chief Montagne told the media that within 15 to 20 minutes, the building was fully involved. Heavy fire blew out of the display windows on Kennedy Boulevard. The radiant heat could be felt by spectators on the opposite side of the wide boulevard. The flames also threatened Ladder Co. 1's apparatus, which had its aerial ladder set up. The ladder was bed and the rig moved away from the building, but not before it sustained radiant heat damage to the entire officer's side. A fourth-alarm was transmitted, as Squad-7's squirt apparatus was moved to the front of the building on the boulevard and put into operation. Engine Co. 9, at the corner of the boulevard and 13th Street, utilized their deck gun. A major collapse brought the building down into a pile of rubble.

The adjacent exposure to the south, on Kennedy Boulevard, was a boarded up two-story structure, filled with rubber tires. Firefighters forced entry and an aggressive attack prevented fire from extending into this structure. Several buildings were evacuated as a precaution. Officials said seven families were temporarily displaced. They were taken to nearby Kennedy School for shelter. A 5th-alarm was transmitted, utilizing fire companies from Jersey City and Kearny at the scene. Due to burning overhead lines, there was also a power outage in the area. As the dispatcher notified the incident commander that the fire was now four hours in duration, Deputy Chief Charles Thomas placed the fire under control. Just a frame of the building remained. Several firefighters were treated for non-life-threatening injuries. There were reports of men working on the roof before the fire started. The fire is under investigation by the township's fire prevention bureau. - RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

North Hudson, NJ - Six Union City Motorcycle Squad police officers led the North Hudson Firefighters and Fire Officer's Annual Santa Parade down Bergenline Avenue on December 11th, equipped with their Christmas detail helmets!

Flames threatened the boarded up building to the south containing rubber tires.

RON JEFFERS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

PAGE 27

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Beachwood FD Helps Santa Deliver a Very Special Surprise Beachwood, NJ - On December 18th, the Beachwood Fire Department had the honor of assisting Santa in delivering a very special package to Longboat Avenue. E-4/Spc. Raymond Kanoc of the JUMP TO FILE # United States Army 122116111 has missed the last three Christmases with his family. His little sister wrote Santa, asking for the most important thing on her Christmas list....her brother to be home with her for Christmas. Santa, along with the Beachwood Fire Department delivered! Raymond was brought home on one of their engines to the surprise of his family and to the delight of his sister, who described it as the "best present ever!" Raymond's grandfather, Leonard Saia, is a retired Battalion Chief with the Pa-

terson Fire Department, making this extra special, as we are all "family" in the fire service. “You don’t see it in the video taken, but some of our guys wiped a tear from their eyes. It was a very good morning for us,” Beachwood Fire Chief Roger Hull said. “It was an honor to be asked to do something for a soldier. I come from a military family and a lot of our guys do. We’re big supporters of the military, the police, other fire departments, EMTs. We’re a big family. I know it sounds like a cliche and it’s repeated, but every freedom we have is because of the soldiers,” he added. Awesome job by the Police Department and First Aid members who assisted in this special moment with a full emergency services escort! - BEACHWOOD FD

BEACHWOOD FD

WORKING FACES If you have photos you would like to see in our “Working Faces” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

East Orange Blaze Claims Life of Elderly Woman

ANTHONY FRITZ

Piscataway, NJ - The New Market Fire Department would like to welcome it's new Chief of Department, Buddy Previtera!

East Orange, NJ - A spectacular three-alarm fire consumed two structures, leaving one dead and two hospitalized on December 11th. Shortly before 5:00 A.M., EOFD units were dispatched to 60 Midland Ave. for multiple reports of a fire. On arrival, a large two-and-ahalf story frame was found completely engulfed, with several residents out front after escaping the flames, some by jumping from the upper floors. The fire was spreading to a similar structure under construction on the “B” side and three other homes on the “D” side were smoking, with the siding melting off. A second-

JUMP TO FILE #121216108 alarm, followed by a third, was transmitted. Lines were quickly stretched to hold the blaze to just the two structures, which were soon beginning to collapse. Two ladder pipes, a squrt and multiple lines were put into operation and were successful in halting the fire spread. The fire was able to be placed under control in about two hours, but companies remained at the scene wetting down the hot spots in the pile of rubble, as investigators searched for victims and

the cause. Initial uncertainty as to how many residents were unaccounted for took a while to sort out. Two were in the hospital, one in serious condition. Six had escaped with minor or no injuries, but later in the morning, the body of the home owner, a 72-year-old woman, was located in the debris. The Essex County Prosecutor's Office was summoned to investigate due to the amount of fire on arrival, and the loss of life. Initially, the fire is believed to have originated in the first-floor kitchen, but no cause has yet been determined. - BILL TOMPKINS


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February, 2017

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HE HE ER ERO ROES RO OES ES INK INK

1st Responder Newspape er features EMERGENCY SERVICES RELA ATED TATTOOS

RON JEFFERS

Diane Pinto, left, received the George Welch, Jr. Memorial Award for her years of dedicated assistance making the North Hudson Santa-toy detail a success.

Firefighters Christmas Tradition Continues

Rachelle Lutz has been an EMT for 17 years and is currently in Paramedic Class. She has been a firefighter for 19 years, and is a state Certified Firefighter-1. Rachelle currently runs EMS with Jeannette EMS and Irwin VFD EMS. She is also a firefighter with North Irwin VFC. When asked what inspired her to get the tattoos, she responded "I got the star of life one in 2013 after 13 years of certification. The Maltese Cross one was just done in June of 2016, the same day I received my certificate for passing the state Firefighter-1 exam! If you look, behind both are tendons and muscle (tattoos). This symbolizes that these two things, Firefighting and EMS are a part of me...of who I am. I have tried to get away from the field, but have always been drawn back to it. My entire family is involved. I have two uncles who are paramedics and have served as officers in the fire department as well. My aunt is a Paramedic and a junior coordinator at a fire department. My mother took the EMT with me, but is no longer active. She is a nurse. My great grandfather was a founder of a fire station. I also have cousins involved in the fire department and/or EMS. The heart shape is simply a symbol of my love for the field. The EKG lines are important. The one is my husband's rhythm, and the other is mine. He is a Paramedic and a Firefighter-1 as well. In fact, we tested for the state exam together."

North Bergen, N.J. - On the evening of December 17th, North Hudson firefighters, along with families and friends, assembled in a church basement on Kennedy Blvd., to wrap gifts for Santa's visit to area children spending the holiday in local hospitals. This marked the 29th such meeting that was originally a North Bergen Fire Department event before the regional department was organized in 1999. Two township firefighters, the late George Welch, Jr., and Jim Lemke, a retired North Hudson captain, started this event in 1987. Captain Lemke addressed the assembly before the wrapping com-

JUMP TO FILE #121916120 menced and expressed his appreciation to all that have made this holiday tradition a success for so many years. Speaking of the project and children, Lemke said it was created to “brighten their day.” “People out there care about the situation you're in,” he added. Under the supervision of Firefighter Rich Nicols, the gifts were wrapped and placed in proper categories for Santa's run. The gifts were donations from families and local businesses. When that detail

was complete, refreshments were served and the children were entertained by Matt Cadabra, along with his puppet and rabbits. He held their attention for almost an hour. Every year, the holiday committee selects a person who puts out extra effort to make sure Santa's detail is a success. This year, the George Welch, Jr., Memorial Award was presented to Diane Pinto for her yearly dedicated assistance. Before the event was over, Santa made his appearance and gave all of the children a little gift and holiday cheer. - RON JEFFERS

Would you like your emergency services related tattoo featured here? Contact Lindsey at

Lindsey@1strespondernews.com

All ages got involved in wrapping gifts.

RON JEFFERS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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Crews Respond to Electrical Fire in Hackensack Hackensack, NJ - On Thursday, December 22nd at 7:22 P.M., members of the 4th-Platoon responded to 400 Main Street for activated fire alarms. First arriving companies found light smoke coming from the E. Ward Street side of the building. Com- JUMP TO FILE# panies began 122316101 searches, ventilation and fire attack on the first-floor. Command requested Engine-1 to feed the sprinkler system and requested a second-alarm, bringing an Englewood truck to the scene and a Teaneck FAST team. Companies found fire in the walls on the first-floor, caused by an electrical problem. Companies checked for additional extension. The fire was brought under control in 30 minutes. Additional recall members, along with Bogota and Ridgefield Park, answered additional alarms in the city during the fire. No injuries were reported. - JUSTIN DEREVYANIK

DRILLS/TRAINING

To see your Drills in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Neptune City, NJ - On October 16th, members of the Little Silver Fire Department received training on the Sterling F4 personal escape system. This equipment allows firefighters, who may become trapped on an upper floor, the option to escape by using this system. Participants attended a classroom session, skills stations and then performed nine bailout jumps at varied levels of difficulty. The training was held at the All Hands Fire Training Center, located in Neptune City.

BOB LONG

JUSTIN DEREVYANIK


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February, 2017

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LHPD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

PROVIDED

President Judson Moore (L), presenting Firefighter Shaun Diabik a Hero’s award and certificate for his life saving efforts during the NJ State Fire Chief’s Convention, held in Wildwood, N.J. on September 15, 2016.

Firefighters Presented with Hero’s Award Wildwood, NJ - During the New Jersey State Fire Chief’s Association Convention, held on Thursday, September 15, 2016 at the Wildwood Convention Center, President Judson Moore presented a Hero’s award and certificate to firefighters Chief Dan Tomalin of the Princeton Fire Department, Firefighter Shaun Diabik of the Lawrence Township Fire Department and Firefighter Mark Lenarski, Jr. of the Slackwood Fire Company. During the early morning hours of July 4, 2015 at approximately 7:00 P.M., Tomalin, Dlabik and Lenarski were attending an outdoor picnic at a friend’s house. Dlabik was made aware of a child at the bottom of a swimming pool at the deep end. Firefighter Dlabik immediately alerted others at the party, dove into the pool and retrieved the unconscious

and apparently lifeless body of an 8-year-old male child. Tomalin and Lenarski assisted with the rescue and assessed the victim to be unconscious, unresponsive, pulseless and apneic. They immediately initiated CPR. The victim was eventually stabilized, but listed in critical condition. Over the following months, the victim made a full recovery. If it were not for the professionalism, alertness and perseverance of Chief Tomlin and Firefighters' Diabik and Lenarski, this victim would not have survived this life-threatening event. Because of their heroic actions, a life was saved and they distinguished themselves as keeping with the highest traditions of the fire and emergency medical services.

Long Hill Police visit North Plainfield Fire Headquarters near the end of No Shave November to commemorate their joint effort to combat cancer.

North Plainfield Firefighters Join Long Hill Twp. Police Officer’s “No-Shave November” North Plainfield, NJ - On November 1, 2016 police officers from the Long Hill Township Police Department began their effort to raise money by participating in No-Shave November. The officers started to grow mustaches and/or beards in support of one of their own officers who is currently fighting cancer, as well as other members of their extended family, who are also battling the disease. At the same time, members of the North Plainfield Fire Department, North Plainfield Professional Fire Fighters IAFF Local 2958 and North Plainfield Professional Fire Fighters IAFF Local 2983, also pledged to participate in No-Shave November and to donate the funds

JUMP TO FILE #120416133 raised to the Long Hill Township Police Department’s No-Shave November team. Many police officers from the Long Hill Township Police Department participate in the annual North Plainfield Fire Department’s St. Baldrick’s Fundraiser (a charitable event that funds childhood cancer research), which takes place every March. “We appreciate the opportunity to give back,” stated North Plainfield Fire Captain Robert Beattie, who is also the St. Baldrick’s event organizer for the North Plainfield Fire Department. “It’s both fun

and rewarding to support each other’s charitable fundraising efforts and I look forward to that continued partnership,” said Long Hill Twp. Police Sergeant Aaron Buerstetta. Money raised also funds programs that include the American Cancer Society, Prevent Cancer Foundation, Fight Colorectal Cancer and St. Jude's Children’s Research Hospital. The Long Hill Township Police Department had set a goal of $2500 and already surpassed that goal by raising $3455 as of November 28, 2016. For more information, or if you would like to make a donation, you can visit their team page at https://no-shave.org/team/LHPD. - ROBERT BEATTIE

OLD & NEW

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Old & New” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

- JUDSON MOORE

Visit us on the web! www.1rbn.com

DAMIEN DANIS

Lodi, NJ - Lodi Fire Dept. Hose Company-2 recently replaced their Engine #614, a 1990 Seagrave, 1500-GPM pumper (right), with a 2016 Spartan/ERV 2000-GPM model.


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IN MEMORIAM February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

RON JEFFERS

Robert J. Freeman

Robert J. Freeman, 59, of Manchester, passed away December 29, 2016.

Surviving are his wife Susan J. Scott Freeman, brother Gary Freeman, sister-in-law and brother-in-law Diane and Martin Ettinger, nephew Benjamin and his wife Yoon Ettninger and niece Lauren Fischer and her husband Casey. Robert had many other relatives and friends. He will be sorely missed by all who knew him. With 40 years of experience, Mr. Freeman is internationally recognized as an expert in emergency response systems and vehicles. He was also appointed to the Board of Advisors of the Henry Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences at the University of New Haven, CT. Prior to founding First Priority Emergency Vehicles, Mr. Freeman was the Director of Emergency Medical Services at UMDNJ University Hospital, managing the state's largest pre-hospital care system. Mr. Freeman earned a BS degree in fire science technology from Jersey City State College and an MS degree in public administration from Rutgers University Graduate School of

Management. He was a firefighter for the Roselle Fire Department, an EMT for the Roselle First Aid Squad and the Mobile Intensive Care Director - M.E.T.S - Union Hospital.

“Bob Freeman was a leader, mentor, inspiration and friend to many people throughout the US, across the globe, and most importantly to the many professionals at First Priority. He had an incredible life and created a lasting legacy that will endure for generations,” said Daniel Huang, First Priority’s Chief Operating Officer.

“Bob Freeman was much more than the President of First Priority, he was an inspiration to all who knew him. He selflessly dedicated his life to the service of others. Bob was my leader, my mentor and my friend. Everyone at First Priority is absolutely committed to paying tribute to Bob by upholding the values he instilled. We will be guided at any turn by simply asking ourselves ‘What Would Bob Do?’,” said Greg DeForge, First Priority’s Vice President of Sales & Marketing.

DID YOU K NOW The first known female firefighter in the U.S. was Molly Williams, a slave from New York, who fought fires side by side with men in 1815.

Students and teachers of Fairview PS # 3, and Fire Official Dennis Licameli and Fire Inspector Pat Buglione, with their 2016 trophy.

Fairview Students Recognized for Fire Prevention Fairview, N.J. - The borough Fire Department and the Fire Prevention Bureau held their annual fire prevention contest for local 3rd grade students in the Fall. The 2016 theme, that came from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), is “Don't wait, check the date.” Replace smoke alarms every 10 years. In addition to creating fire prevention posters, the students were asked to have their parents check the age of their home smoke alarms and replace them if necessary. The grand prize winners received a ride on a fire truck through town and a class trophy. All participants were honored with a pizza party at their school with firefighters.

JUMP TO FILE #120116106 The 1st place winning poster at Public School No. 3 was submitted by Christopher Mejia Benal, Rudy Garcia Popoter and Kyle Galosic, of Ms. Olson's class. Ms. Huelt's 3rd grade class at Academy of Our Lady of Grace, 1st place winner was Jaela Rodriguez. A ceremony was held on the evening of November 29th at the local American Legion Hall on Anderson Avenue. Proud parents and teachers were in attendance with several firefighters and Fire Chaplain Fr. Peter Sticco. The winning posters were on display

along the walls of the hall's meeting room. Fire Inspector Pat Buglione presided over the ceremony and, along with Fire Official Dennis Licameli, presented the students and teachers of P.S. # 3 and Academy of Our Lady of Grace with their trophies, to be displayed at their respective schools. Photos were taken with first-place and runner up winners with the trophies. Firefighters treated the guests with refreshments after the awards were presented, as the children beamed with joy over their accomplishments. - RON JEFFERS

? RON JEFFERS

Students and faculty with Fire Official Licameli, Fire Inspector Buglione and Fire Chaplin Fr. Peter Sticco.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

WORKING FACES

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Working Faces” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

LITTLE BIG GUYS If you have photos you would like to see in our Little Big Guys feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

In Gloucester County, Deptford Township’s Quick Attack-99 is a dry chemical unit with foam delivery capabilities. It is a 2016 Ford F-450 4x4, with five seat cab and Knapheide body. It was converted by the fire company. Features include 120-pound Ansul Purple K dry chemical unit, with a 100-foot reel, 200-gallon tank of AR-AFFF foam concentrate, a Stang monitor, National Foam Gladiator nozzle, Akron Stream Master monitor, three-inch and five-inch supply line, a one-and-a-half inch dead load, a manifold, SCBA compartment, Honda 2-KW portable generator, two GFE extendable floodlights, an electric cord reel hand tools and a chemical index.

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Belleville, NJ - Belleville Battalion-1, BC Buckley, directs the fire attack at a working fire on December 24th.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Deptford Twp. Quick Attack-99, 2016 Ford F-450/Knapheide, with 150-pounds of Purple K and 200-gallons of AR-AFFF foam concentrate. The unit was converted by the fire company.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Right/rear of Deptford's Quick Attack-99 shows Akron monitor, floodlights and reels for electric cord and dry chemical. The Stang monitor is midship.

Visit us on the web! www.1rbn.com


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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MEMORIAL BOARD If your department has photos you would like to see in our “Memorial Board” feature please upload them on our website www.1RBN.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Woodbridge Twp., NJ - The residents of Woodbridge Township, along with the Avenel FD, are saddened to announce the passing of Earl Runkel. Earl, a firefighter from the Avenel FD, passed away on December 29th at the age of 72. Earl was well known in Woodbridge Township for his cowboy hat and beard, as well as his big smile and generosity. Earl played Santa in Woodbridge Township functions for over 25 years, including this past year's Christmas parade. He was a member of the Avenel FD for over

40 years. He served as President of the Fire Company in 1979 and 1980. He was Chief of the Department in 1987 and 1994. Earl was a Fire Commissioner from 1996 until October of 2016. He also served as President of the Woodbridge Fire Officers Assoc. in 1998-1999 and 2014-2015. He is survived by one daughter, two sons, four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Earl was active until his passing and his loss is a big one for Avenel and Woodbridge Township. - CONNI SPELLMAN

MIKE RUSSELL

Where to Begin: Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Your Fire Department

CONNI SPELLMAN

Earl on-scene of a fire in an auto body shop in 2008.

Innovation. Tradition. Solutions. Small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) are being deployed for a variety of fire related operations. Today, fire chiefs and incident commanders in rural, suburban, urban and industrial landscapes are looking to use this technology to their advantage. There are many questions surrounding the certification, regulation and use of sUAS. Check here and see how we can help.

UAS Fire Consulting LLC www.uas-fire.com

The new year has rolled in and your fire department has started the dialogue to consider incorporating unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), often referred to as “drones”, into departmental operations. Your officers and firefighters have witnessed some of the benefits of using UAS during departmental operations because a local hobbyist has volunteered to fly his aerial vehicle over your fire scenes and has shared the videos in real-time with the chief. So, where do you go from this point? The first step is to immediately stop what you are doing. While the intentions of the hobbyist may be sincere and much appreciated by the fire department, they go against federal regulations and can land both the fire department and the hobbyist in serious trouble, including fines adding up to tens of thousands of dollars, if not more. The same holds true for any firefighter who may be using his or her personal UAS on scene for the benefit of the fire department. The bottom line is, this is not allowed within the scope of federal UAS regulations. Fire chiefs have recognized the value of using UAS during departmental operations. Whether it’s for scene size up, hazmat conditions, search and rescue, or large scale incidents, the benefits of this technology are certainly notable. The decision to acquire a UAS is not one that should be entered into lightly. For any fire department, this process should be initiated with a strategic-level needs assessment that evaluates a variety of factors, including types of calls, number of alarms, manpower and

JUMP TO FILE #121216109 budget. The appropriate UAS platform and accessories must also be matched with the department’s operational needs. Fire departments need to conscientiously and sensibly establish comprehensive and risk adverse UAS programs along with substantial educational and training protocols for the utilization of this technology as a practical and sustainable tool. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established separate guidelines for the use of UAS by public organizations as compared to hobbyists and commercial entities. As public organizations, fire departments need to follow the procedures set forth in this category by the FAA in order to deploy UAS legally and safely during departmental operations. Through the FAA, public agencies can apply for a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) in order to seek approval to conduct UAS operations in the nation’s airspace. This approval follows a lengthy all-inclusive operational and technical preparation by the fire department and an equivalent review by the FAA. Fire departments may also utilize elements of the newly designated FAA small UAS rule (Part 107) to become properly certified to fly for their department’s aerial vehicle. Attaining this certification, which must be renewed every 24 months, requires becoming proficient in general aeronautical knowledge. This includes being able to read visual flight rules (VFR) sectional

charts in order to recognize various airspaces and their limits; the understanding of weather phenomena and their effects on your UAS in flight; and specifics about the Part 107 regulations that you will be flying under. Depending upon the individual, preparation for this test could take more than 20 hours of study time. All of these details illuminate the fact that fire departments are not permitted to simply go to a store, purchase a drone, and deploy it during their calls. It is an exciting time in the world of unmanned aerial technology. Use cases are presenting themselves at dizzying rates as the aerial and imagery technology continues to rapidly advance. In this blur of progress it is essential for fire departments and other public agencies to remember that they are being closely scrutinized by the public. Your department needs to ensure that it has developed and implemented a comprehensive UAS program that encompasses regulatory compliance, ground safety, executive management and operational training. Much consideration needs to be made by your department and municipality in regard to budgeting and vendor management, as well as designing appropriate policies, standard operating procedures and emergency safety protocols. In the end, the essential objective is to be able to deploy your UAS in a safe and responsible manner in order to aid your department in effectively saving lives and property. - MIKE RUSSELL


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Leather Helmet Society Holds Holiday Outstanding Service Awards Luncheon Manchester, NH - Members of the Leather Helmet Society, (LHS), of Manchester, N.H. gathered at Ollie’s Restaurant for their annual Christmas and Outstanding Service Awards luncheon on Sunday, December 4, 2016. The 2016 LHS Outstanding Service Award recipients are Scott Wentworth, Damien Danis and Nat Whittemore. Scott Wentworth – Captain – Truck 1 – Belleville, N.J. FD – 25 year career in the fire service with this department. He is also a 22 year member of the N.J. Metro Fire Photographers Association and current President of this fire buff organization. Damien Danis – 25 year member of the Saddlebrook, N.J. FD. Currently holds the position of Engineer on Engine 2. He is also a 25 year member of the N.J. Metro Fire Photographers Association and has held several leadership positions in this well-known club. Both Scott and Damien have provided valuable assistance for many years as presenters and A/V technicians to the Leather Helmet Society’s annual fire ground show here in New Hampshire. We appreciate that help and cherish our great friendship with these broth-

JUMP TO FILE #120916137 ers.

Congratulations to both of the 2016 LHS Outstanding Service Award recipients, we thank you for your commitment and dedication to the fire service and your community. Nat Whittemore – Videographer – 51 year career with WBZTV in Boston, Ma. – Now retired, a distinguished career in the world of television as a cameraman for Channel 4, a leading station in the Boston/New England market. He has covered many fire and police stories throughout the city over many decades and this past October was one of three who shared the first ever Pioneer Award from the Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame. Nat was given Honorary Membership with the Leather Helmet Society as a thank you for his contribution of video coverage to the fire service. A great fire buff and friend with many stories to share. A great gathering was had of members and guests, totaling 28, for fellowship and much laughter! - CHARLIE TENTAS

(L to R): Scott Wentworth, Nat Whittemore and Damien Danis.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

A New Years Wish STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

Well, it's the beginning of another year and hopefully your resolution is to make it a safe one for you, the members of your department and the fire service in general. There was no final figure for Line-of-Duty deaths in 2016 as I prepared this article, using the USFA as my source, but the figure on December 14th was 82. We can and must do better in the reduction of this annual toll of lives taken in the line-of-duty and it will require a total commitment from all in the fire service. Staying out of harm’s way is not easy as we go about the performance of our duties with all of its inherent dangers. There exists tremendous potential from all forms of hazards that we encounter and are exposed to on a daily basis that can result in serious injury or death, even when we are observing caution. Imagine what can occur when you are not concentrating, relaxed, and lowered your guard, or do something just plain dumb. One must maintain the proper attitude relative to safety in order to remain safe and stay alive, and if you don’t, you can easily become a statistic. So, what can we do to help reduce this annual loss of life? You can start out by maintaining, or getting in good physical condition, since the leading cause of firefighter deaths is still heart attacks. Remember, round is not a shape unless you are a ball, so get in shape! It will enable you to perform at high physical stress levels, with less risk of a heart attack. Cigarette smoking is another major contributing factor for heart attack, so if you smoke, do your best to kick the habit. Believe me, I have heard all the stories and glories about "eating smoke at a fire, so why should I quit smoking??" Well for starters, the days of the smoke eater are long past and you should be using SCBA. Secondly, if there is one habit that contributes to almost every medical ailment known to science, it's smoking. Some fire departments have a no smoking policy that they have had in place for many years and in these departments’ retirement and pension, benefits hinge directly to this no smoking policy, especially should heart and lung medical illnesses arise. It might be the perfect time for the entire fire service to incorporate this, or a similar policy. In conjunction with a no smoking policy, it may also be time the fire service begins en-

forcing a physical agility standard on an annual basis that requires all firefighting personnel to meet the standard or confront dismissal from the department. It may appear as an unreasonable option, but it may just be what is needed for some individuals to finally decide to take the necessary steps to keep his/her position, while improving and maintaining their health. Many career departments have volunteer participation physical agility programs, and if they have full compliance programs, they generally do very little policing of those who fail to meet the standard. In the volunteer service, where recruiting new members is becoming more difficult and getting a crew out during the week is difficult, the last thing you want to do is stop anyone from responding, so we sometimes look the other way. Another key factor relative to heart attacks in the volunteer service is that many members are much older than in the career departments. Many career firefighters have retired by the age of 55, whereas in the volunteer fire service, a member may continue active into his/her 70’s. With the increase in age also comes the increase in the potential of having a heart attack while performing stressful activity. It's tough to hold back some of the old dedicated members, and surely they would be missed, so it is incumbent for the department to make sure these members have a minimum medical examination and get plenty of monitoring and rehab when assisting at the emergency scene. Even then, there still remains the increased risk. If we can reduce the annual stress related line-of-duty deaths, we will have taken a major step in decreasing the annual death toll. We will not have eliminated LODD’s, but we will be moving toward a goal of reducing the annual death toll. Motor vehicle and apparatus related deaths need to be reduced. Risk management has to be reviewed and some logical determinations made by command officers, as to how much risk will be taken on the fire ground in order to save what? I realize the saving of life is our most important mission, and that includes our own personnel, but after that, almost every material item can be replaced. The life of a firefighter caught in a collapse, trying to save property from further destruction by fire, is too high a price to pay. So, as we enter this New Year, let us all resolve to do all we possibly can to reduce the annual death and injury toll. It can be done! Till next time, stay safe and God Bless!


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Brotherhood Ride Founder Travels to N.J. and Honors Fallen Firefighters Wallington, NJ - The Brotherhood Ride aims to provide emotional and financial support to families of the fallen, while making sure that the public never forgets their sacrifices. Riders come from all branches of emergency service to participate, from police officers, to firefighters to EMS responders. Jeff Morse, a firefighter in North Naples, FL, along with his wife, created the group after nine firefighters died in a blaze at a sofa manufacturing plant in Charleston, SC, in 2007. The first ride in 2008, took the group 600miles up to Charleston. It was then decided that this would be a yearly event. Each year, an unsung hero or heroes are selected from around the country and honored by participants riding bicycles to their hometowns and providing financial and emotional support to their families, friends and coworkers. The ride takes place about a year after the honored's death, as a reminder that they have not and will not be forgotten. Past rides have included a three-week tour to Ground Zero on the 10th anniversary of 9/11. Since then, the group has covered more than 7,100-miles through 16 states to honor more than 500

JUMP TO FILE #121516103 fallen firefighters, law enforcement officers and EMS personnel. According to Morse, Elk Lodges, firehouses and EMS buildings have given the riders shelter and food upon their travels. Last year, 56 riders traveled 1,166-miles through eight states over two weeks to honor 37 first responders who died the year before. That's an average 80 to 100 miles a day. Each year brings a new route, with nearly all of the proceeds, minus basic expenses, going to the survivors of emergency responders who died in the line-of-duty. The primary goal, Morse says, is to let those people know "that their loved ones will not be forgotten. Recently, Morse made a trip up to New Jersey to visit Truck Company-201 and give Mrs.Patty Barnas and her son Kevin a check and plaque in her husband's name, Gregory Barnas, who many knew as Captain Greg (Barney). Barnas was killed while fighting a fire when he fell from a roof back in February of 2014. “Barney” was a teenager when he first joined the volunteer department in 1972 as a

junior. He served as a chief and was also a career firefighter in Jersey City, serving as captain of Ladder Co. 6, one of the city’s busiest. Morse also presented Mrs. Woods and her family with a check and plaque in memory of her husband, Firefighter James Woods. Firefighter Woods was 44years-old when he died on December 26, 2014, after completing a 24-hour shift on Christmas day. The 15-year department veteran was feeling tired that day and had gone to lay down at the firehouse, where his body was later found. A ceremony was held in Wallington on December 14th, where the plaques and checked were presented. Among those in attendance were the borough's three fire chiefs, Anthony Rispoli, Ken Friedman and Jacob Hrywniak, along with Jersey City Deputy Fire Chief Mike Terpak and Battalion Chief Rich Gorman. Department members and families were also present. Chief Terpak and OEM Coordinator Richard Gorman also received plaques. - JAMES WOOD SR.

JAMES WOOD SR.

The Barnas family with Brotherhood Ride founder, Jeff Morse.

DRILLS/TRAINING

To see your Drills in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Neptune City, NJ - In September, members of Jackson Fire Station55, along with members of Freewood Acres and Squankum Fire Company's, attended a 20-hour firefighter rescue training class. The operations-level program focused on Rapid Intervention Team rescue techniques, used in the event that a firefighter becomes lost, trapped or in distress. The program ran over four evenings and one full Saturday, and was provided by All Hands Fire Training at their training center in Neptune City.


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FACES OF NEW JERSEY’S EMERGENCY SERVICES

To see your “Faces” shots in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com, email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com or mail them to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553,

EJ RODE

Bogota, NJ - On December 3rd, Hook & Ladder Firefighter Pete Faller received a plaque from Chief Chip Greiner for over 50 years of fire service during the Bogota Fire Department's Chief election.

RON JEFFERS

Cliffside Park, NJ - Cliffside Park firefighters conducted their twoday tour with Santa & Company in December, covering every street in the borough, visiting kids and passing out candy. They also participate in Christmas goodwill for seniors and veterans during the Holiday Season.

DENISE SHIFFLETT

Monmouth Beach, NJ - Fire Inspector Shane Shifflett talks to the local media in reference to firefighter cancer awareness.

RON JEFFERS

Cliffside Park, NJ - Cliffside Park Probationary Firefighter/EMT Bryan Antolos made his first "grab" at a two-alarm fire on Washington Place, Dec. 20th, removing an occupied bird cage.

BEACHWOOD FD

Beachwood, NJ - The Beachwood FD, with the help of Santa, held a Candy Cane Toss on December 18th.


ACTION SHOTS FROM AROUND THE STATE 1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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To see your action shots in the newspaper upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RON JEFFERS

Union City, NJ - On December 22nd, North Hudson firefighters extinguished a fire in a Union City DPW compactor truck in front of Police Headquarters on 38th Street.

RON JEFFERS

North Bergen, NJ - Facing away from extreme heat, North Hudson Captain William Shelton retracts Ladder-1's aerial ladder so that it could be moved away from the flames venting out of a furniture store in North Bergen on December 21st.

JOHN W. CARR

Vineland, NJ – Firefighters responded to a fire in a three-bay garage on December 22nd that heavily damaged a building and destroyed three vehicles.

RON JEFFERS

BILL TOMPKINS – WWW.BTFIREPHOTOS.COM

Belleville, NJ - On December 24th, firefighters battled a structure fire in a building that housed classic cars used for film.

North Bergen, NJ - North Hudson Firefighter Kamil Mizinski of Ladder Co. 1 uses the tiller enclosure as a shield while helping move the rig away from the intense heat and flames on Kennedy Blvd., North Bergen, in December.


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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

EJ RODE

Group of police and fire personnel who went to visit Alex, leaving from the Washington Township Fire Dept.

EJ RODE

Krista and Alex Hammer with Santa, (A.K.A Ken O'Donnell from BFD).

Santa Arrives on Fire Truck to Surprise Sick Child Washington Township, NJ - On December 22nd, young Alex Hammer, who suffers from Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, was surprised by Santa, who arrived on a fire truck that was followed by multiple fire and police vehicles from Bogota and Washington Townships. The visit was set up by Sgt. Jeff Cole from the Bogota Police Department.

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Dunellen Ready For Hell and High Water Author’s note: In last month’s column, some of the information on Farmington’s Utility 1546 was inaccurate. It is a 2008 chassis. Also, the 1999 body was taken off its original chassis by the manufacturer (Mickey Body) and was to be donated to a food bank, but it was too big. It was decided to scrap it. The fire company learned of this and purchased it at the same price that the manufacturer was going to scrap it for. It was then refurbished in 2008. Another author’s note, and this one is sad: I learned as I was writing this column that my good friend of 40 years, Bob Freeman of First Priority Emergency Vehicles, passed away on December 29th, from a fatal heart attack. This news truly shocked me! Rest in Peace, Bob my friend! Getting back to our headline, fire and hell are many times associated with each other. If you are or ever were a firefighter, you can attest to that. So, the Defender Fire Company in Dunellen (Middlesex County) is ready for “hell” with their new EONE e-Max pumper, which they received last year. Specs include a Cyclone II chassis with a Cummins ISL-9, 450-HP diesel engine, the Protech System, a Waterous CXSC, 1500-GPM pump, UPF 750-gallon water tank, a TFT Blitzfire hand monitor, 6,000-watt Will Burt Night scan Chief light tower and an Amkus rescue tool system. Now to “high water.” There is really no other name to call their former military truck but that, and that’s what they call it! Known as Truck-3, it is a 1998 Stewart-Stevenson X-Army M-1079 tactical vehicle. It has a tire deflation system similar to some Hummers. At the rear is an access ladder used to allow rescuees to enter the body, which has benches for transport. People can either climb in from the ground, or the truck can back up to a porch of a flooded house for instance, and the people can enter in that manner. In dealer news, New Jersey Emergency Vehicles has made the following P.L Custom ambulance deliveries: the Warren Township Rescue Squad (Somerset County), received a Classic 170 Type-1 on a Ford F-450 4x4 chassis and the Medford EMS (Burlington County), received a Medallion 170 on a Ford E-450 chassis. Fire & Safety Services reports the following Pierce orders: for Bellmawr (Camden County), an Enforcer PUC 107-foot Ascendant ladder, for Sayreville (Middlesex County), an Arrow XT pumper, for Somerville (Somerset County), a Velocity pumper and for Lakewood (Ocean County), an Enforcer pumper. Pierce deliveries include an Arrow XT pumper and an Arrow XT 75 aluminum aerial to Princeton (Mercer County), an Arrow XT 100-foot platform to Old Tappan and a Velocity pumper to River Vale (both Bergen County) and a Saber pumper to Wharton in Morris County. Absolute Fire Protection reports that they have received an order from Hillside (Union County), for a stock E-ONE, HP-75 foot quint on a Typhoon chassis. It has a Hale 1500GPM pump, 470-gallon water and 30-gallon foam tanks. Please send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH

A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

Edison's Engine-1 is one of three 2016 Freightliner M2-112/Spartan ER pumpers. It is 1500/750 and has a 5-KW generator. It was sold by Campbell Supply Co., LLC.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Dunellen E-2, 2016 E-ONE Cyclone II, eMax, 1500/750 with 6-KW generator. It was sold by Absolute Fire Protection.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Ocean City E-2 is one of two 2016 Pierce Saber 1500/500/20 pumpers. They were sold by Fire & Safety Services.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Dunellen Truck-3, 1998 Stewart & Stevenson High Water Unit.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Pleasant Plains FC E-3051, 2016 Spartan Gladiator/Marion, 2000/750/40 with 10-KW generator.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Washington Township (Hurffville FC) E-1031, 2016 Spartan Metro Star/Smeal, 1500/750 with 10-KW generator. It was sold by New Jersey Emergency Vehicles.

JOHN M. MALECKY

Right/rear of Dunellen's Truck-3 shows access ladder.

JOHN M. MALECKY

First Choice Fire Apparatus received an order from the Cardiff FC in Egg Harbor Township (Atlantic County) for an E-ONE all aluminum Typhoon rescue pumper. It will be a a long cab with 12-inch vista raised roof and barrier free cab doors. The front bumper will have a 24-inch extension with single one-and-three-quarter inch pre-connect center mounted. The wheelbase will be 195-inches. It will have a Hale, single-stage 1500-GPM pump, carry 750-gallons of water, have a 10-KW Harrison hydraulic generator, booster reel with 200-feet of one-inch hose. The body will have 26-inch full height & depth compartments on both sides, with coffin compartments above. Ground ladders will be in a center mounted tunnel accessible from the rear. All compartments will have non-painted ROM roll-up

doors. The hose bed will be capable of holding two 200-foot one-and-threequarter inch pre-connects, one 200foot two-and-a-half inch pre-connect, 300-feet of three-inch and 100-feet of five-inch supply line. The right/rear coffin compartment will have three hydraulic reels and feed down through the R-3 compartment and an air reel that is accessible from the R-2 compartment. It will have Whelen P-2 12 volt scene lighting on the front eyebrow and the body corners on both sides. Blaze Emergency Equipment received an order from the Plainsboro Fire District (Middlesex County), for a Sutphen wetside tanker on a Kenworth T-800 chassis. Specs include a Cummins ISX 15, 500-HP diesel engine, aluminum body, Hale Qmax singlestage 1500-GPM pump, two crosslays,

poly 3500-gallon water tank, three 10inch Newton electric Kwik dump valves (left, right & rear), and four exterior SCBA cylinder compartments. First Priority Emergency Vehicles has received two KME orders from Bergen County. This first is for Rochelle Park and will be a Predator pumper with MFD chassis and 10-inch raised roof cab with right seats. Specs include a Cummins ISX 12, 500-HP diesel engine, Waterous CMU V20, 1500-GPM two-stage pump, top mount pump panel, six-inch front intake with 180-degree swivel, driver and officer side three-inch full flow discharges and officer’s side four-inch discharge, (two) two-and-a-half inch rear discharges, three-inch deck gun discharge, (two) one-and-a-half inch speedlays forward of the pump, oneinch booster reel mounted between the

frame rails in the rear, poly 750-gallon water, 25-gallon “A” and 75-gallon “B” foam tanks, 3/16-inch aluminum medium Flex body with 29-inch compartments, painted, hinged compartment doors, driver and officer side full height/split depth compartments, ladders stored on a Ziamatic single arm hydraulic ladder rack on officer’s side, two 12-foot hard suctions on driver’s side and 12-volt scene lighting. The second is a 109-foot aerial ladder quint for the Township of Ho-Ho-Kus. It is mounted on a Severe Service chassis with long four door 141.5-inch cab having eight seats, 10-inch raised roof and side curtain and frontal air bag system. - CONTINUED ON PAGE 55


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH - CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54

Specs include a Cummins ISX 15, 600-HP diesel engine, Hale DSD 1500-GPM single-stage pump, special low profile side mount pump panel with transverse storage above, threeinch full flow LDH discharge on officer’s side, (two) one-and-a-half inch front bumper discharges, 300-gallon poly water tank, stainless steel aerial body, rear wheel well compartments for 21 spare SCBA or hand extinguishers, 109-foot steel aerial ladder, with 750-pound tip load and 1500GPM pinnable, prepiped waterway, four “H” frame outriggers with 14foot spread, 210-feet of ground ladders, Harrison 10-KW hydraulic, PTO generator, two Hannay electric cord reels, Hi-Viz, 72-inch LED 12-volt brow light, FRC 12-volt fixed lights on the side of the cab and on the body. The have delivered to the Whitehouse Rescue Squad in Readington Township (Hunterdon County), a walkaround rescue on a Predator Panther chassis. Specs include an 148.5-inch LFD cab with 22-inch raised roof, six seats, side cab compartment on driver’s side between front and rear doors and a transverse compartment behind the ear cab doors, overhead interior EMS compartment on rear cab wall, 3/8-inch painted steel front bumper with reel storage with full width lid, frontal and side curtain rollover air bag system, Cummins ISL-9, 450-HP diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, 10 FRC lights (two each brow, side of cab and six on side and rear of body), 3/16inch aluminum body, 140-inch deep rear compartment with an Extenda Bed 3000-pound full length roll-out tray, Amdor roll-up compartment doors, full length roof top compartments with lift-up doors, winch receivers on all four side of vehicle, cribbing compartments on each side under body, four multiple cylinder storage compartments in the rear wheel wells for 11 cylinders, ground ladder storage under the walkway, two utility air hose reels, two electric cord reels, Onan 35-KW Protec PTO gen-

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erator and Command Light Knight 2 light tower with six FRC light heads. Campbell Supply Co., LLC has received an order for a Spartan ER pumper from Millburn in Essex County. They have delivered two Spartan ER pumpers. One went to the Kingston Fire Company in South Brunswick Township (Middlesex County). It has a Metro Star chassis with Cummins ISL-9, 450-HP diesel engine, Waterous 2000-GPM pump, Pro Poly 750-gallon water and 50-gallon foam tanks, 95-GPM Akron bypass foam educator, Smart Power 6-KW hydraulic generator and Will Burt Night Scan Chief. Roselle (Union County), received a pumper with a Gladiator LFD chassis, Cummins ISL-9, 450-HP diesel engine, Hale Qmax XS, 1500-GPM pump, Pro Poly 500-gallon water and 40-gallon foam tanks, Foamlogix Class “B”/Hale EZ foam fill system and a Smart Power 6-KW generator.

PAGE 55

February, 2017

BUDDY SHOTS If you have photos you would like to see in our “Buddy Shots” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

RICHARD LESWING

Downe, NJ - On December 27th, Downe Twp. Fire & Rescue participated in a drill with Station-29 from Rosenhyan and made time for a quick buddy shot.

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

Vehicle News

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

Plainfield has placed into service a 2016 E-One Cyclone Elizabeth Engine Co. 8 has been assigned a 2016 Pierce Wharton Engine-320 now sports a 2016 Pierce Saber model 95-foot platform with LED lighting, including aer- Arrow XT 2000-GPM/700-GWT/50-GFT (Class "B") 2000-GPM/750-GWT pumper, sold by Fire & Safety Servial ladder walkway lighting. It was sold by Absolute Fire pumper, sold by Fire & Safety Services. ices. Protection Co.

RON JEFFERS

RON JEFFERS

River Vale has received a 2016 Pierce Velocity 2000- Elizabeth Engine Co. 2 will be assigned a 2016 Pierce GPM/850-GWT pumper, sold by Fire & Safety Services. Arrow XT model 2000-GPM/700-GWT/50-GFT pumper with 10-inch raised roof, sold by Fire & Safety Services.

If your department has a new vehicle you would like featured in “Vehicle News,” send a nicely posed and lit photo with text to news@1strespondernews.com


1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

PAGE 57

Ridgefield Park Swears In New Fire Officers Ridgefield Park, N.J. - On the evening of December 13th, new fire department officers, from Lieutenants to Chief of Department, were sworn in at Village Hall. Before the ceremony started, JUMP TO FILE# Mayor and Fire 121916123 Commissioner George Fosdick, a retired history teacher, mentioned to the assembled firefighters, officials, families and guests, that he just returned from the Pearl Harbor memorial ceremony. He noted that there are only three civilians in the history of the United States that received the military's Purple Heart. Those three were firefighters that performed their heroic duties on December 7th, 1941. Outgoing Chief Michael Lauer submitted his annual report to the Mayor and Board of Commissioners. “Tonight's report also brings a closure to my six years as a chief officer in the Ridgefield Park Fire Department,” he added. The department has answered some 400 alarms for the year, which included 55 fires, 70 hazardous conditions and 63 assistance to other government agencies. “I would not have been able to perform my duties as chief without the support of the department, my friends and especially my wife, Margaret,” Chief Lauer said. James VanDerTulip was sworn in as the new Chief of Department by Mayor Fosdick. As assistant chief, VanDerTulip attended an intense, three-day training exercise in Atlanta, covering railroad catastrophes. Rail traffic through the municipality has always been a deep concern. Sworn in as assistant chiefs were John Antola, Jr. and Rodney Wagner. Antola has an engineering and fire underwriting background. Wagner is a career fire dispatcher in Hackensack and he is leading the department's 125th anniversary celebrations for 2017. After the new officers were sworn-in, Commissioner Anlian was first to speak. He thanked the volunteer firefighters for their dedication and their family's support, allowing them to do what they do for Ridgefield Park. The other commissioners reflected the same message. Mayor Fosdick told the assembly that what you see here is a community of men and women who volunteer their time to serve neighbors, friends and strangers. He said they all have to be prepared. “It doesn't stop!”

James VanDerTulip, right, is sworn in as the new fire chief by Mayor and Fire Commissioner George Fosdick.

RON JEFFERS

- RON JEFFERS

Chief Lauer's wife, Margaret, pins the ex-Chief's badge on his uniform.

RON JEFFERS


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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

FIRE & SAFETY SERVICES 800-400-8917

South Plainfield, NJ

www.f-ss.com

If You Can Dream It - We Can Build It

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

ALL IN THE FAMILY

BUDDY SHOTS

If you have photos you would like to see in our “All in the Family” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Buddy Shots” feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Piscataway, NJ - Members of the New Market Fire Department pose together for a Christmas photo. ANTHONY FRITZ

SAFD

South Amboy, NJ - Recently, Independence Engine Co. held an extrication drill for the South Amboy Fire Dept. to keep everyone sharp on their extrication skills. It also kept these two brothers sharp in looking out for each other and continuing in their grandfather's footsteps. Firefighter/EMT Ryan Trapp and Junior Firefighter Brandon Trapp were inspired by the work that their late grandfather, Thomas Krygier Sr., had accomplished during his time of service. They continue to further themselves in the fire service to continue both their education and his legacy. Krygier, who was also a member of Independence, had served 50+ years in the Company. (L to R): Firefighter/EMT Ryan Trapp of Enterprise Truck-8 pictured with his younger brother, Junior Firefighter Brandon Trapp of Independence Engine-7.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

DRILLS/TRAINING If you have photos you would like to see in our Drills feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

Chief Pecorelli with his wife, Felicia.

CONNI SPELLMAN

New Fire Chief Sworn in for Mountainside FD

Mountainside, NJ - The beginning of 2017 brings new officers to the Mountainside Fire Department. During a recent council meeting in Borough Hall, the new fire chief was sworn in for 2017. Anthony Pecorelli, a 13-year veteran of the fire department, is serving his first term as Chief.

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WWW.ALLHANDSFIRE.COM

Neptune City, NJ - In October, the rope rescue manufacturer, Petzl, held the very first "Train-the-Trainer" class for their new EXO-AP firefighter escape system. Two members from All Hands Fire Equipment & Training joined a small group of instructors from across the United States and Canada in the session. The two day program was held at Petzl's state-of-the-art training center in Salt Lake City, Utah. The training focused on the new EXO-AP descender, training techniques, as well as other Petzl products and rescue techniques. All Hands Fire Equipment & Training is an authorized Petzl EXO and EXOAP dealer and trainer. For details, or to schedule a class, contact Training@AllHandsFire.com.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

February, 2017

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February, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NJ

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