Page 1

The New England Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

HOME SUBSCRIPTION - $36/YEAR

WWW.1RBN.COM

MAY, 2016

BRIAN BLACKDEN

Concord, NH. On March 29, 2016, at approximately 9:00 a.m., a structure fire was called in almost directly across from Broadway Station #4 at #22 Broadway in Concord. Almost immediately, facing high winds, a second alarm was struck bringing in area departments from approximately eleven other communities. - See full story on page 8

Join our Team of Dispatchers Paging with a Rewards Program! Visit our website to fill out an application.

www.1rwn.com


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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

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May, 2016

VERMONT

GREG RAMSDELL

GREG RAMSDELL

Vehicle versus pole with rollover and entrapment Alburgh, VT. On April 3, 2016 at approximately 3:15 p.m., Alburgh Fire and Rescue and Isle Lamotte Fire Department responded to a rollover at the intersection of Route 2 and West Shore Road in Alburgh. Upon arrival of Alburgh’s first due engine, the car was rolled over on the driver’s side with one pa-

JUMP TO FILE #040316157 tient trapped in the car. Alburgh firefighters had to extricate the driver from the car. The car was travelling southbound, failed to make a curve at the intersection, struck and broke

a pole, and came to rest on the driver’s side. Firefighters extricated the driver from the wreckage and transported the elderly male to the hospital. Vermont State Police are investigating.There were no other reported injuries. - GREG RAMSDELL

Pickup truck rolls several times

Swanton, VT. On March 29th at approximately 11:25 a.m., Swanton Fire Department, Missisquoi Valley Rescue, and Vermont State Police responded to Route 105 and Russell Road in the Town of Swanton. AmCare Ambulance was on the scene and transported the patient, who was reported to be in critical condition. The truck was traveling eastbound on Route 105, lost control on a curve, traveled over 300 feet, and coming to rest in a meadow on it’s side. There were no other injuries.VSP is investigating the accident.

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PAGE 4

May, 2016

VERMONT

Advertising Index

A guide to finding great companies

Company

1st Priority

Armor Tuff Flooring

Page 8,30

41

Chimney Scrubber

42

Bert’s Emergency Vehicles

35

Choice Clean Gear

Fail Safe Hose Testing

21

43

22,41 10

Firematic

48

Fire Plates N’ More

Swanton 13E2 and VSP on the scene of a recent rollover

GREG RAMSDELL

5

Flash Fire Industries

39

Greenwood Emergency

2

Kimtek

17

Minuteman Fire & Rescue

47

New England Marine

27

New England Fire Equip

One car rollover sends out first responders

Swanton, VT. On March 19th at approximately 12:15 p.m., Missisquoi Valley Rescue, Swanton Fire Department, and Vermont State Police responded to the Maquam Shore Road just south of Janes Road for a one car rollover. The car was travelling south on Maquam Shore Road when the operator lost control of the car, traveling approximately 200 feet before coming to rest on it’s side. The operator recieved minor injuries and there was no transport. The accident is under investigation by VSP.

33

Foremost Medical Equip.

3

Professional Vehicle Corp.

12

Ragtop Industries

17

Quinsigamond College

26

Shaker Auto Group

Swanton 13T1 on the scene at a recent accident

GREG RAMSDELL

31

Shipmans Fire Equipment

15

Spotted Dog Technologies

9

Swissphone

23

Utility Communications

11

Task Force Tips

7

Valley Fire Equipment White Eagle Motors

GREG RAMSDELL

29

Five Star Fire

Waterway

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

13

Apparatus For Sale

EJ Boughton Co.

APPARATUS IN ACTION

27

Autotronics

Choice Marketing

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

29

19

24,25

Missisquoi Valley Rescue and Swanton firefighters on the scene of a rollover on March 19th

GREG RAMSDELL

CORPORATE INFORMATION

1st Responder News (ISSN 1525-1683) - New England edition - Vol. 21, No.5 - is published monthly, 12 times a year for $36 per year by Belsito Communications, Inc., 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. Periodicals Postage Paid at Newburgh, NY and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. No financial responsibility is assumed by this newspaper to publish a display, classified, or legal ad or for typographical errors except of reprinting that part of the ad which was omitted or in e r r o r . A division of: Omissions or errors must be brought to the attention of the newspaper during the same month of publication.

845-534-7500• (fax) 845-534-0055 Info@belsito.com

BURLINGTON FIRE DEPARTMENT

Basement fire in Burlington

Alburgh on the scene of a rollover on April 3, 2016

GREG RAMSDELL

At 10:48 p.m. on March 3rd, the Burlington Fire Department responded to report of smoke detectors sounding and an odor of smoke in the building at 42 Grant Street. Two minutes later, Engine Co.1 reported smoke coming from a two-story wood-framed, four-unit residential apartment building. Firefighters quickly located a fire in the basement and knocked it down.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1 ARDMORE STREET • NEW WINDSOR, NY 12553

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CORRESPONDENTS

Robert Allen • Nate Arnold • Patrick Belliveau Alexys Bergeron • Brian Blackden • David Bryce Michael Carenza • Kevin Cooney • Michael Curtin Damien Danis • Tim Delaney • Paul Dolnier Olivia Drake • Holly Edwards • Kenneth Erickson Ryan Flaherty • Jim Fortin • Gary Fournier • Gino Gatto Karen Halstead • Brian Hardy • Jay Heath • Roger Hildebrand Christopher King • Chas Konarski • Rick Kulmann Kenneth Leger • Peter Lobo • Paul MacCallum Bernie Meehan • Robert Moran • Robert Noll Jake O’Callaghan • Tyler O’Neil • Peter Ostroskey Reg Patchell • Edward Prescott • Greg Ramsdell Domenic Riccio • Dave Safron • John Sjostedt Ken Snyder • Robert Sprague • Christopher Tracy Pat Travers • Alan W • Jack Webb • Evan Webster Nick Zabawar • Tom Zotti

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

In memory of those who gave all 1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

Kentucky: David W. Conley, 48 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: February 10, 2016 Death Date: February 10, 2016 Fire Department: Olive Hill Fire Department Initial Summary: Lieutenant Conley fell ill from an apparent heart attack while on-duty at the fire station. Conley was treated by fellow responders and transported to the hospital in Morehead, KY, where he succumbed to his injury.

ambulance. Within two minutes of going into the bay and while on the bay floor, Larlee fell ill. Captain Larlee was treated by fellow first responders, but passed away at the scene from injuries sustained.

Pennsylvania: Earl J. Shoemaker, 68 Rank: Firefighter/Safety Officer Incident Date: March 12, 2016 Death Date: March 12, 2016 Fire Department: Eagle Fire Company #2 – Hanover Fire Department Kansas: Daniel F. Cool, 71 Initial Summary: Firefighter Shoemaker was reRank: Assistant Fire Chief sponding to the scene of a house fire on the 500 Incident Date: February 11, 2016 block of Pumping Station Road when he became ill. Death Date: February 14, 2016 The mobile air unit apparatus he was operating left Fire Department: Olive Hill Fire Department the roadway (Brunswick DR) and came to a stop Initial Summary: Assistant Fire Chief Cool re- several hundred feet away. Shoemaker, alone in the sponded to an emergency incident on the morning apparatus at the time, was rescued by local residents of February 11th. Later that day, he attended a train- and fellow first responders. He was then transported ing meeting and collapsed suddenly from a heart at- to the hospital where he was pronounced deceased tack. Chief Cool was admitted to St. Francis from a cardiac related injury. Hospital in Topeka, KS, where he succumbed to his injury early in the morning of February 14th. South Carolina: Christopher Gene Ray, 42 Rank: Firefighter II California: Shawna Lynn Jones, 22 Incident Date: March 20, 2016 Rank: Inmate Firefighter Death Date: March 20, 2016 Incident Date: February 25, 2016 Fire Department: Conway Fire Rescue Death Date: February 26, 2016 Initial Summary: Firefighter II Ray was operating Fire Department: CAL FIRE on the scene of a working residential structure fire Initial Summary: Inmate Firefighter Jones was when he was struck and killed by a fire engine. Acworking as part of a hand crew in a steep ravine on cording to a preliminary description of the incident a fire in Agoura Hills-Malibu, California, when a from the South Carolina Highway Patrol, Ray was large rock fell about 100 feet from the hillside above riding on a Conway fire engine when he fell off and and struck her in the head. Firefighter Jones was was struck as the fire truck reversed over him. The treated immediately on scene by her fellow fire- incident remains under investigation by local and fighters and quickly hoisted into a Los Angeles state authorities. County Fire Department helicopter then airlifted to UCLA Medical Center, where she succumbed to her Texas: Marco Davila, 45 injuries the following day. Thanks to firefighters on Rank: Driver/Engineer the ground combined with air attacks, the fire was Incident Date: March 23, 2016 brought under control and no structures were lost. Death Date: March 23, 2016 Investigation into the cause of the fire continues by Fire Department: Dallas Fire-Rescue Departlocal and state authorities. ment Initial Summary: Driver/Engineer Davila fell ill Maine: Peter Larlee, 57 while exercising at his residence several hours after Rank: Captain coming off of his shift at the fire department and Incident Date: March 2, 2016 within 24 hours of responding to an emergency reDeath Date: March 2, 2016 sponse incident. Davila succumbed at the hospital Fire Department: East Millinocket Fire Depart- several hours later from a nature and cause of fatal ment injury still to be determined. Initial Summary: Within one hour of responding to a medical emergency, Captain Larlee went into the fire department's engine bay to fix a mud flap on an


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

NEW HAMPSHIRE

BRIAN BLACKDEN

Second alarm across from fire house

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Concord, NH. On March 29, 2016, at approximately 9:00 a.m., a structure fire was called in almost directly across from Broadway Station #4 at #22 Broadway in Concord. Almost immediately, facing high winds, a second alarm was struck JUMP TO FILE# bringing in area de- 033016106 partments from approximately eleven other communities. The rear of the building was clearly the most active fire damaged area with heavy smoke damage throughout. The Concord Fire Department responded rapidly and stopped the fire with mother nature’s winds against them, and the fire was deemed under control within thirty minutes. Some residents of the building escaped out windows and a good Samaritan used his pickup truck to assist in the rescue by backing up to the home to aid in rescue. One resident was overheard stating he was able to get out with his work clothes even though most of the damage was on the other side of the structure. It was reported by other press officials that eleven people were living in the building. Seven area local departments responded to the scene while four others provided station coverage with apparatus and ambulance crews responding to other situations in the city. Assisting were Bow, Allenstown, Boscawen, Hopkinton , Chichester, Hooksett, Pembroke, and station/city coverage was provided by Penacook Rescue, Epsom, Henniker, and Manchester. - BRIAN BLACKDEN

DERRY FIRE

Smoke pushing from the eaves in Derry The Derry Fire Communications Center received a single 911 call at 3:43 a.m. from the occupant of 5 Dustin Avenue reporting a fire in their home on the first level on March 10th. The occupant also reported that all occupants had made it out of the building, but three cats were still inside. Derry Car 1 with Engines 1, 2, and 3; Truck 4; and Medic 1 were dispatched to the address. All Derry companies were in service and available to respond. On arrival, companies found a moderate amount of smoke pushing from the eaves and windows of a single family split level dwelling. The first arriving engine company made access and found heavy smoke, fire, and heat coming from the basement. An attack line was advanced to the basement for control and extinguishment of the fire. A second engine company assigned to the first floor found heavy smoke, fire and head confined to the bathroom above the seat of the fire located in the basement. A second attack line was deployed to the first floor. An aggressive attack by interior crews quickly knocked down the fire stopping any additional fire spread to the rest of the building. Three cats overcome by smoke inhala-

JUMP TO FILE #031116108 tion were found during a primary search. All three were successfully resuscitated by fire personnel on scene and released to the owners. Additional Derry companies assisted with command and control, sear, ventilation, water supply and the placement of a backup line. Mutual aid to the scene was received by Londonderry and Wyndham. Station coverage was provided by Manchester, Auburn, Salem, and Hampstead. There was significant fire, smoke, and water damage throughout the basement. The first floor sustained heavy fire and smoke damage to the bathroom. Light smoke and water damage was throughout the remainder of the first floor. The home is considered uninhabitable at this time. There were no civilian or fire service personnel injuries. The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but does not appear to be suspicious. There were five adults and three cats displaced. The Red Cross was called to assist the family. - DERRY FIRE


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

RHODE ISLAND

ANTIQUE APPARATUS

If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

TIVERTON FD

Tiverton trains

Tiverton Fire was given permission to conduct training at a house in town that will soon be demolished. It is not often firefighters are able to train on ventilation but today, April 8th, Shift 3 took full advantage of this roof.

NICK ZABAWAR

The East Greenwich Veteran Fireman's Association in East Greenwich, RI, owns several former East Greenwich apparatus. Two of their trucks are shown here. The front truck is a 1964 C model Mack, and behind it is their 1961 C model Mack.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

RHODE ISLAND

PAGE 11

Correspondent Contest Sponsored by Mid-Atlantic Rescue Systems

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

May, 2016

The readers of 1st Responder Newspaper have helped make www.1rbn.com the fastest-growing Fire/Rescue/EMS site on the web. Information comes from our valued correspondents. Each time you post an entry on our website, your name will go into a drawing for a monthly prize. Only web entries are eligible. The prize for our May editions from Mid-Atlantic Rescue Systems is one free admission to their Stabilization University class in Malaga, NJ on May 15th. Our April editions winner of a Viper Wildland Nozzle from KIMTEK was Jeff Goldberg from PA. If your company would like to provide a prize and sponsor our monthly contest, contact Heather at 845-534-7500.

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PAGE 12

May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

If you have photos you would like to see in our Where are they Now? feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Haddam Volunteer Fire Chief Sam Baber drives the com- Falls Village, CT Rescue 1 is a 1979 Ford Saulsbury Brush 3 of the Kent, CT VFD is a 2014 Ford 550/Firepany’s brush and forest fire utility vehicle from Station which originally saw service with Middlebury matic B.R.A.T. 4x4 300/360/10 2. This was formerly a Deuce and a Half military truck. OLIVIA DRAKE

KEN SNYDER

KEN SNYDER

Easter brings third alarm in Danbury

LT MAGYAR

Bog fire with mutual aid in Bethel On a warm early Spring afternoon, the Stony Hill Fire Department was dispatched to a brush fire on Old Hawleyville Rd. Engine 1 and S7 (Lt Banks) determined the fire was on an ad- JUMP TO FILE # 031516121 jacent street. Crews continued in with Bethel FD dispatched as it was in their district. Upon arrival on Limekiln Court, crews were met with a haze of low lying smoke. The southwest wind at 16 mph was fanning the flames of a large fire in the wetlands and cattails between two neighborhoods of large single family homes. Stony Hill Engine 1 stretched a two and a half feeder line into the bog and began fire attack. Due to the size of the fire and unknown extent of available fuels, the incident commander called for multiple mutual aid companies including Dodgingtown with a tanker and pumper, Redding with a brush truck and tankers, Brookfield with a brush truck and EUV, as well as Sandy Hook for a brush truck and all terrain vehicle. Danbury Volunteer companies covered Bethel and Hawleyville covered Stony Hill. With a well coordinated three prong fire attack, crews were able to

confine the fire within an hour and mopped up. Bethel FD EUV was invaluable with getting into the muddy bog and hitting hotspots and assisting to contain the blaze.

The Danbury Fire Department was challenged at a third alarm fire at 111-113 Main Street. The 911 center received multiple calls at 2:26 p.m. reporting a fire on the top floor, and the possibility of en- JUMP TO FILE# trapment. Deputy 032816137 Chief Paul Omasta transmitted the third alarm. Upon arrival, he reported a four story, ordinary constructed apartment building, housing 26 units, and a cafe on the first floor, with heavy fire showing on the A side fourth floor. First due companies Engine 22, Truck 1, and Squad 1, along with Engine 23, initiated search and rescue, fire attack, and ventilation. Two 1 3/4 handlines were stretched to the fourth floor, with members also searching. Truck 1 laddered the roof from Side A to open the roof. Second and third alarm companies; Engine's 23, 24, 26, along with volunteer companies 3, 6, 7, 8, and 10, responded and assisted with various tasks to save the building.

A third line was stretched into the building, and two supply lines were established to feed companies. The initial attack crew made excellent progress with their push and knocked down the bulk of the fire. As the truck crew opened the roof, and interior crews pulled some ceilings, the fire was also knocked down quickly in the attic. Search crews hustled a few civil-

BERNIE MEEHAN JR

ians out of the building, and there were no injuries. Danbury EMS set up a triage and rehab area in case it was needed, and the Miry Brook VFD Womens Auxillary responded with Canteen 13. The Red Cross assisted the residents of the building, and the Danbury Fire Marshals Office is investigating.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

New Britain vacant house fire New Britain, CT. On March 16, 2016 around 2:15 a.m., the New Britain Fire Department was dispatched to 6 Mill Street for a reported house on fire. Companies arrived on scene re- JUMP TO FILE# porting fire 031716101 showing on the B side of a two and a half story wood frame. Firefighters made quick work on the main body of fire, but it took some time to chase down hidden flames within the void spaces of the walls and roof. The house was vacant and no electricity was running to the building. The cause of the fire is being investigated by the New Britain fire Marshals office. - MICHAEL CARENZA JR

MICHAEL CARENZA JR

IN SERVICE

If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

The NE Edition

Name:______________________

Telephone:___________________ City: ______________________

State:_____ Zip: _____________

Haddam Volunteer Fire Company’s 2014 Tanker 2-13

OLIVIA DRAKE

Haddam’s (CT) Rescue 5-13.

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Corps A (1) Gas vs. diesel (2) serviceability and location (3) ability and ease for remount

Corps B (1) Price (2) size for equipment (they carry hazmat gear in addition to the norm) (3) reputation of company and Maintenance/ reliability. Other things to consider may be how the vehicle will be used (consider terrain and weather/road conditions), fuel efficiency and economy of use, structural integrity, inside-box work area (should be big enough to treat a patient and not so big that the members inside cannot be secured during the ride), how available are replacement parts, and what is the anticipated life of the ambulance. While my experience in a volunteer corps may have relied more on riding members’ opinions than a commercial provider might include, it is important to have people involved in the decision who are familiar with the actual working needs and not just theoretical ones. The cost of the vehicle may be limiting and even though it is important to keep it within the budget, it should never sacrifice the safety of the emergency team or patient. Finally, even most used ambulances have value, don’t forget to ask the vendor how much you can get for a trade-in during your negotiations.

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It’s a sad fact but all once-shiny and brand-new ambulances eventually need to be replaced; both highvolume and rural agencies put miles of use on an existing rig, weather conditions and exposure add more than a few blemishes to the body, and continually changing protocols keep adding new equipment which often requires more storage space in the ambulance. So, it’s settled, eventually you are going to have to shop around for a new ambulance. Where do you start? As the former VP and Rig Committee Chairperson at a local volunteer corps, I’ll share the methods we used. We began with a smaller, controlled committee which included riding members and budget administrators and we held an informal general membership meeting to gather recommendations from our riding members. Once armed with a list of requested priorities and knowledge of our budgetary limits, committee members were tasked with finding dealers who serviced our area and we let them know our parameters. The dealers got back to us and let us know HOW they could help us in our quest. A few dealers responded with attempts to change our priorities and those were pretty much ruled out immediately. We also eliminated dealers who had known issues about reliability with timing (consistent delays in manufacture) and difficulty in maintenance (if there was local dependable service). The committee also looked into the overall reputation based on our own and other corps’ experiences. Once we had a manageable list of dealers (approximately three) we made individual appointments for each to bring a rig to our location to inspect, make a presentation, and answer questions. Committee members were required to attend these presentations, we also invited interested members as well; after each presentation we met (without the dealer rep) to briefly discuss our impressions.

Armed with our checklist and notes, we asked the dealer/manufacturer any remaining (or new) questions, compared what was available to our refined list of priorities, and chose (on paper) which dealer was the most accommodating for our needs. Our next and final step was to present our recommendation to our Board of Directors; after any discussion and approval was granted, we entered into a contract with the dealer of choice. My corps’ top three priorities for a new rig were (1) affordability (2) safety and construction of the unit (3) overall size (to fit our bay and other local access routes). I asked two other agencies what their most recent top three priorities were:

Submitting photos and press releases is EASY!

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Let’s Buy an Ambulance

Prefer emails? Email your press release and photos directly to KEN SNYDER

Tanker 24 of the East Litchfield, CT Fire Department is a 2004 Pierce Dash 1250/2450.

heather@1strespondernews.com


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

APPARATUS IN ACTION

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Danbury Truck 2 in position at a recent boat fire

Bethel Fire Department EUV working at a bog fire

Stony Hill FD E1 being fed by Dodgingtown tanker.

Redding and Sandy Hook brush trucks operating.

PROVIDED

LT MAGYAR

T GALLIFORD

J OLDHAM

Structure fire in East Great Plain District The East Great Plain Volunteeer Fire Department was on the scene of a fire alarm at an apartment complex. Norwich Fire dispatch advised Car 5 that they had taken a 911 call from a homeowner reporting that his breezeway was on JUMP TO FILE fire. Car 5 advised #041416125 dispatch that E52 and ET51 would be responding from the fire alarm as L5 was in the process of resetting the fire alarm. While enroute, dispatch advised Car 5, police on scene reporting a working fire. Car 5 arrived on scene minutes later and reported a single story ranch house with heavy fire showing, and all occupants were out of the house. The fire had extended into the house and the garage that was attached by the breezeway. ET51 arrived as the first responding apparatus, and stretched a one and three quarter inch hand line and started hitting the fire from outside. L5 arrived and their crew stretched another one and three quarter inch hand line to the inside of the house. E52 arrived and layed a five inch supply line to ET51.

Heavy fire showing on arrival from the rear of house.

The fire had extended into the house and was knocked down quickly once the crews got inside. The interior crews opened up the walls and ceilings to check for further extension. The main body of the fire was knocked down in about ten minutes. Car 5 requested two engines from the Yantic Fire Company, and

KEITH MILTON

Engine 3 from the City of Norwich Fire Department. The Mohegan Tribal Fire Department FAST team was on scene. Crews remained on scene for salvage and overhaul. The Norwich FMO along with the Norwich Police are investigating. No injuries were reported.

RICHARD BILLINGS

- KEITH MILTON


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

HEEROES HE ER ERO ROES RO OES ES INK INK

1st Responder Newspape er features EMERGENCY SERVICES RELA ATED TATTOOS

each month in all of ourr editions.

This tattoo is in honor of Paul Mauro, Sr., my father. He was a volunteer firefighter in Hillsborough Township, NJ and is the reason why I became a volunteer firefighter. I've been a firefighter with Toms River Volunteer Fire Co. #2 for over 20 years.The work was done by Jey Collins at Daruma Tattoo in Toms River, NJ. Tom Mauro Firefighter EMT Toms River Fire Co. 2 (NJ)

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May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

RYAN FLAHERTY

Car into utility pole

PROVIDED

Side A

Fire destroys Danbury ranch home At 9:14 p.m. on March 16th, the Danbury Fire Department was alerted to a possible house fire in the area of Great Plain Road and Lakeview Dr. Engine 23 found a small ranch at 14 Greenridge Drive with fire issuing through the roof on the D Side. Engine 23 Lieutenant Jaime Schiller transmitted a second alarm while pulling a line and to going to work. Second due Engine 24 gave 23 their tank water, while pulling a second attack line. Car 30 (DC

JUMP TO FILE #031716100 Meehan) assumed command and set up a rural water supply as this is in an non-hydrant area of town. Engine 10 (Germantown) was instructed to back into the scene and lay 500 feet of five inch hose out to Great Plain Road, where Tanker 10 was set up to be the nurse tanker. Tankers 11 (Beaver Brook) and Tanker 12 (Mill Plain) added to

the tanker operation, while two more tankers sat in staging. Truck 1 and Squad 1 went to work assisting with the fire attack, ventilation, and overhaul. The house was under major renovation and there was no one currently living there. Squad 7 filled air bottles, while Danbury EMS stood by. There were no injuries and the Danbury Fire Marshals Office is investigating the cause and origin.

At around 4:25 p.m. on March 28th, the Norwich Fire Department was dispatched to Washington Street at the intersection of Buckingham Avenue for a car into a utility pole. Battalion 1 and Engine 3 arrived to find a car had driven through the utility pole and sheared it off at the bottom. The female operator was instructed to remain in the vehicle due to live wires that were resting on it. After Norwich Public Utilities disconnected the power, the woman was removed and assessed. American Ambulance transported two patients to Backus Hospital and the road was closed for a couple of hours.

ON THE LITER SIDE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “On The Liter Side” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

- BERNIE MEEHAN

OLIVIA DRAKE

Haddam Vol. Fire Co. Junior Division member EJ Adametz cleans and polishes an engine at Station 1 in Haddam, CT.

COMMAND VEHICLES

If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

KARIN HALSTEAD

Car into the water on Easter night A little after 8 p.m. on Easter night, Sandy Hook firefighters along with Newtown Ambulance and medic were dispatched to Walnut Tree Hill Road near Glen Road for a car down the embankment and into the water. Captain Kevin Stoyak was on scene within two minutes and reported there were four occupants and they had self-extricated. Upon

JUMP TO FILE #032816136 further review Captain Stoyak requested a second ambulance to the scene as all occupants required transport to the hospital. One occupant was taken ALS and the other three were BLS. The section of Walnut Tree Hill

Road between Rivers Edge Drive and Glen Road was closed for just over one hour. A heavy duty wrecker was called in to remove the vehicle from the river. DEEP was notified, but firefighters determined no fluids entered the waterway. Sandy Hook returned to service approximately 21:15. - KARIN HALSTEAD

The chief’s car in Middlefield, CT is a 2014 Ford

KEN SNYDER


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

PAGE 19

CONNECTICUT

PROVIDED

Westport works extrication

Westport firefighters were dispatched to an MVA at the intersection of Post Rd. East and Cedar Rd. shortly after 7 a.m. on April 6th. The initial dispatch was for Engine 5, Rescue 3 and the shift commander. E5 arrived and found two vehicles that were involved in a T bone accident. Both vehicles were occupied. Westport Police were already on scene and providing patient care and traffic control. The driver of one of the vehicles required extrication to remove from the vehicle. Engine 2 was added to the assignment for extra manpower. Extrication was completed at 7:21 a.m. and patient care was transferred to Westport EMS. The occupants of the other vehicle were evaluated by Westport EMS.

WESTPORT FIRE

Westport extinguishes fire on roof Westport firefighters were dispatched to a report of a building fire at 38 Post Road East in downtown Westport shortly after 10 p.m. The fire department response consisted of three engine companies, one truck company and the shift commander. The rescue company was added to the assignment after clearing the scene of another incident. Arriving on scene, Car 3 reported a working fire on the roof of a two story commercial building. Engine 2 deployed multiple

JUMP TO FILE #031316101 ground ladders to gain access to the fire and stretched a two and a half inch attack line to suppress the fire. Truck 1’s tower ladder was set up to assist Engine 2 on the roof. Engine 4 set up for water supply and checked all floors for extension with the assistance of Engine 6 and Rescue 3. Wilton Fire Department assisted as RIT and Norwalk Fire Department sent an

engine and truck company to assist. Westport EMS was on scene as well as Westport Police to control traffic. The quick work of the firefighters on scene extinguishing the fire kept the damage limited to the rooftop HVAC equipment involved and there was no fire extension into the attic. The Westport Fire Department’s Fire Marshals Office investigated the incident. - BERNIE MEEHAN


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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

RYAN FLAHERTY

Smoke showing in Norwich On March 28th at 8:50 a.m., the Norwich Fire Department was dispatched to 5 Joseph Perkins Road for a house fire. Squad A arrived to find a two story wood frame single family residential with smoke showing. The homeowner advised that the whole basement was on fire and that there was still a canine inside. Trucks 1’s crew forced entry while the squad was stretching a one and three quarter inch crosslay to the D side. Engine 3 hit a hydrant on Crescent Street and tied in. The crew from Engine 2 also stretched a one and three quarter inch crosslay from the squad to the B side. Engine 2 found the basement stairs and made their way down in zero visibility with moderate heat. A copper pipe broke and acted like a sprinkler, which knocked down a lot of fire. Truck 1’s driver

JUMP TO FILE #032116102 vented four basement windows. Crews performed the primary search and removed a canine from the second floor. They used the newly donated pet oxygen mask from Shipman’s Fire Equipment to resuscitate the dog. Companies overhauled the basement and had the fire under control in less than thirty minutes. Car 1 had command and Battalion 1 had operations. The Yantic and Mohegan Tribal Fire Departments provided the FAST. East Great Plain provided scene support and the Norwich Fire Marshal’s Office is investigating. - RYAN FLAHERTY

PROVIDED

Danbury tackles fully involved boat fire On April 9th at 7:58 p.m., Danbury Fire Department was alerted to a structure fire at 47 Hospital Avenue, almost across the street from the Danbury Hospital Emergency Department. One of the city ambulances radioed dispatch saying there was a large fire on Hospital Avenue. As Car 30 (Deputy Chief) responded, a large column of black smoke was visible, prompting a request for a second alarm. Engine 23 reported a large boat on fire in a yard, with multiple exposures, and they were going to be fire attack. Car 30 assumed command

JUMP TO FILE #041016100 and radioed to Truck 2 to take a position behind Engine 23 to protect the largest exposure, a four family house. Exposures on Side B were a small house, Side C were two sheds, and Side D had the large house, only feet away. Siding was already melting off all four exposure buildings. Engine 22 laid a five inch supply line from Virginia Avenue approximately 500 feet away. Engine/Tank 10 (Germantown) pumped this line

from the hydrant to Engine 23. Meanwhile, personnel from Engine 24 and Squad 1 pulled additional handlines, and checked for extension into all exposure buildings. In short order, the fire was knocked down, with only cosmetic damage to the adjacent structures. Two small dogs were lost in the fire, and it is under investigation by the Danbury Fire Marshals. Danbury EMS stood by the scene, and there were no reported injuries. - BERNIE MEEHAN

The “heart” of the matter...Is physical fitness in the forefront of your department? FIREFIGHTER FITNESS Lori Ann Hodgkinson

Each year, we review those all too familiar statistics reaffirming that the number one cause of premature death in the fire service is heart disease. It’s always alarming, yet never a surprise. Although more and more departments are implementing fitness and wellness programs, the reports continue to come in. I am thrilled with the growth of physical training that continues within the fire service. That being said, I can’t help but ask, “Are we doing enough?” I am continually met with responses like “you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make ‘em drink”. I know all the limitations legally and otherwise, that sometimes prohibit just how much we are able to require. So being my stubborn self, I just have to ask, “if we can’t make ‘em drink, maybe it’s the “leading to water” part that needs a bigger push. We need to ask ourselves, are we doing enough leading? Yes, the opportunities to get and stay fit (and well) within the fire service are more available than ever. That’s great news. Now look within your department and see what per-

centage of your membership is taking advantage of what’s provided. Additionally, which sector of your department is participating in your fitness program? Are the services being utilized by those members who need it most? Conversely, is it predominantly being utilized by the healthiest and most fit individuals who would be physically active regardless of whether a department program was present? I’ve written numerous times about “no exerciser left behind”. Is your department doing all it can to reach out to those who have the greatest need? Unfortunately, it’s quite possible we have gotten caught up in the legal aspect and approached fitness as “legally we have to provide it…it’s up to each individual whether or not they choose to take advantage of it.” Hey, I get it. I truly do. Again, I am not suggesting we “mandate or make it happen”. I am, however, suggesting that we do more to present the opportunities making it as accessible and doable to all individuals at all times. Fitness is often an entity of opportunity. I have found that striking while the iron is hot is a key factor in participation and continued compliance. Often the department work I do is performed on an annual basis. Medical clearance is obtained annually, along with fitness assessment

and exercise prescription. That is a great thing. It was a long time coming and I am grateful for the progress that led to its establishment. This process has reached many and the programs continue to grow. To bring this forward to reach more and more members (especially those in need), we have to do things to keep physical fitness (wellness) in the forefront all year long. We do provide fitness assessments and exercise prescriptions periodically to catch those who may have resisted or have fallen through the cracks at year’s onset. This is done at the member’s request. It certainly helps, but I believe we need to do more. Here are just a few ways that I continue to recommend in order to keep Fitness in the Forefront. Utilize your newsletter-Add a fitness section to your newsletter. If you don’t already have a newsletter, put together some fitness facts and distribute it monthly. Remember to include information regarding how to get started in the department physical fitness program for those who are not yet participating. Utilize your website-devote a section on your website to fitness. If possible make it interactive so that personnel have a place to go and exchange information. Again, post dates and times that fitness assessments, orientations and exercise prescriptions will be available. Utilize your meetings, classes

and drills-Occasionally, begin scheduled meetings with a group warm-up and stretch or at the very least a short presentation on physical fitness and its importance in the fire service. It can be as simple as providing a single fact/statistic or tip. You already have a group assembled; make it an opportunity to get information out or a message across. Did you stir some interest? Announce how and when members can get additional training. Utilize your bulletin board–Post fitness tips, exercise suggestions or interesting statistics to keep fitness in the forefront of the minds of your members/personnel. You can use humor/cartoons or go the more serious route with firefighter death and injury reports. Once again I urge you to post dates and schedules of fitness activities so everyone is in the loop. Provide workshops–schedule a workshop provided by a fitness professional where members can gain fitness and wellness knowledge as well as practical experience. Organize weekly group workouts–schedule weekly workouts – even if it is just an outdoor walk with or without gear. Provide nutritional counseling– proper nutrition is a key component to any fitness/wellness program. Schedule a session with a registered dietician to provide important usable information to help your members/personnel understand and adopt

good dietary habits. Incorporate smoking cessation– quitting smoking is one of the single most important steps an individual can take to avoid premature death due to cardiovascular disease. Since heart attacks are the leading cause of premature death in the fire service. Why not offer a smoking cessation program? Keeping fitness in the forefront will help to get more and more of your members in action. The desire to get fit can strike at anytime, but if members are forced to wait till the beginning of the year to get involved, they can easily lose interest before they even get started. When physical fitness is highlighted in your newsletter and on your bulletin board, it is more present among your membership. Giving physical fitness a home on your website or regular mention at your monthly meetings will keep it ever present. So, “yes we can lead a horse to water, but we can’t make ‘em drink,” but we sure can do a better job at leading and leading and leading! If it means we lose less of our firefighters, our family and our friends it is surely worth the effort. Okay, so now let’s all get going, let’s go workout, and why not bring somebody with us? Good Luck and Stay Safe! Remember to have your physician’s approval before beginning any exercise program.


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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MAINE

ROCKPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT

Fire in seven unit apartment building Rockland, ME. Firefighters in Rockland were dispatched to a fire in a seven unit apartment building on Main Street with mutual aid from Rockport and Thomaston Fire Departments on March 17th.

AUGUSTA FIRE-RESCUE

Fire in four unit apartment building The Augusta Fire Department responded to Cony Road near Eastern Ave at 5:30 a.m. this morning, March 22nd, for a structure fire in a four-unit apartment building. Upon arrival, fire units found a fire in the kitchen on the first floor. Some of the occupants had made it out safely and others had to be assisted out by the firefighters. Two patients were treated for

JUMP TO FILE #041416116 smoke inhalation. One was transported to Maine General Medical Center for treatment by Delta Ambulance. Quick work by the Augusta firefighters limited damage to the building. The cause of the fire is not known and the Fire Marshal's Of-

fice has been called in to investigate the cause. Damage is estimated at $50,000. Thanks so much to all of the local fire departments that assited or provided coverage. Togus, Chelsea, Winthrop, Hallowell and Vassalboro Fire Departments and Delta Ambulance. - AUGUSTA FIRE-RESCUE

WALES FIRE DEPT

Live forestry burn On the evening of March 31st, members from Wales and Monmouth Fire along with Maine Forest Service participated in a live forestry burn. Wales demonstrated the sweeper nozzles that are mounted on the front of the forestry truck. Crews also did mock drills of spot fires as well. Thank you to MFD for a great training!

DEPARTMENT PROFILE

If your department has photos you would like to see in our “Departmnt Profile” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

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May, 2016

MAINE

Structure Fires 2014, Volume 1 VIDEO REVIEW

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This DVD is 55 minutes in length and covers three fire incidents. The first is the Colby fire, which took place in January of that year and started as a result of an illegal campfire, which spread in the morning hours during Santa Ana winds. It took six houses within the first hour and spread a great distance. This was in the area of Glendora in the Angeles National Forest.

Need I say more? It made for some spectacular fire and firefighting by the L.A. City and County Fire Departments assisted by other agencies. A show called air show took place with Canadair Super Scooper’s (air tankers), which jointed the battle. This is followed by two third alarm fires fought by Glendale and Burbank Fire Departments. Both were pretty much “surround and drown” events. The first was in a large bakery/café, which was two stories in height and the fire was throughout thebuilding. Ladder pipes and street streams operated and truck crews opened up roofs to try and check the spread. Ladder pipes and street streams also operated at a strip mall in which most of the occupancies had been compromised. Fire was through the roof in both incidents. The collection of apparatus is impressive. As I have said in the past, there is plenty of fire for everyone. It is a DVD of interest for those who want to see fire operations.

ANTIQUE APPARATUS

If your department has photos you would like to see in our “Antique Apparatus” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

NICK ZABAWAR

Kittery, Maine once ran this 1975 Maxim as their Engine 5. It now resides in Rhode Island with a private owner. The owner is very active with the truck, taking it to parades and truck shows every chance he gets.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

JIM FORTIN JR

Shrewsbury firefighters make quick knock

The Shrewsbury Fire Department dispatched Engines 1, 2 and 3 to 28 Shady Lane Ave for a possible structure fire at 11:30 on March 13, 2016. Car 30 arrived on scene and found a smoke condition on the second floor on the one and a half story wood frame house and requested the working fire assignment. That brought Northborough Engine 1 to the scene for RIT. Engine 2 arrived, stretched a hand line and secured a water supply. Companies quickly knocked down the fire on the second floor and began overhaul. All companies were clear in about an hour.

PETER LOBO

Truck fire in Falmouth

Falmouth, MA. On April 10, 2016, Falmouth Fire dispatched Engines 23 and 24 to the area of 475 Thomas Landers Road. The Falmouth fire tower notified the dispatcher that there was a loom up in the vicinity of the town dump. Firefighters found two trucks on fire as well as a large area of brush. The fire was knocked down in about 45 minutes.

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

RIT training for Whitman firefighters

Whitman, Plymouth County, MA. On Wednesday, April 6, 2016, members of the Whitman Fire Department trained on selfrescuing techniques as a part of a department wide RIT training program. F i r e f i g h t e r s JUMP TO FILE were brought #040716102 through several props, which simulate different situations which would cause the firefighter to be entangled in wires due to a collapse, or trapped, with only a small area to exit from. - PAT TRAVERS


May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

PAGE 27

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PETER LOBO

Brandeis University students struck

Waltham, MA. On March 11th, Waltham’s 911 center received a call for a pedestrian struck at South Street and Shakespeare Road. Engine 4, Squad 5 and two ambulances were dispatched. However, it was an accident where a car hit two Brandeis University students and a fire hydrant. The driver was taken to Beth Israel Hospital and the two female students were sent to area hospital in serious condition, one in critical condition. The fire hydrant was sheared off and water flooded South Street.

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Whitman MA former Rescue-1 is a 1988 GMC/FMC.

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Whitman school bus involved in MVA Whitman, Plymouth County, MA. At around 1:30 p.m. on the afternoon of Wednesday, March 30, 2016, the Whitman Fire Department responded to the area of 215 Bedford Street (Route 18) for a reported motor vehicle accident involving a school bus. Ambulance 247, Engine 2, Car 3 and Car 1 responded. Companies arrived to find a school bus versus a car, both vehi-

JUMP TO FILE #033016115 cles had pulled off the main road. The school bus was loaded with approximately 20-students from the middle school. The motor vehicle accident proved to be minor in nature, with no occupants in either vehicle reporting any injuries.

Crews were tied up for an extended period of time documenting patient information. Some parents of the school children showed up at the scene to check on their status. The Whitman Police were assisted by the Plymouth County Sheriffs Department BCI Unit to document the crash. - PAT TRAVERS

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Whitman’s current Rescue 1 is a 2007 Sterling Pierce Heavy Rescue.

COMMAND VEHICLES

If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Waltham Engine 2 is a 2010 Seagrave Marauder II

PETER LOBO

Waltham Ladder 2 is a 2008 Seagrave Marauder II

PETER LOBO

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Whitman MA Car 1 is 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CHAPLAINS CORNER Pastor Fernando Villicana

The Department of Homeland Security: Formed post 9-11 as a counterterrorism measure. Its stated goal is “to prepare for, prevent, and respond to domestic emergencies, particularly terrorism.” This is accomplished (in part) by analyzing and sharing information. This is what we’re going to do analyze and share information from the Word of God to help prepare for, prevent and respond to domestic emergencies (marriages). Philippians 2:2 (Phillips) "Live together in harmony and love, as though you only had one mind and spirit between you." Wouldn’t that be great? If we would do this, we would all be on the same page. Our marriages would flourish. Is that even possible (harmony, love, sharing the same mind/spirit)? The answer is yes! Remember, God would never frustrate himself by asking us to do something that was impossible. Not only is it possible, but it is God’s desire for our lives and He’ll help us get there. The reality is that a lot of families are in disharmony, conflict and disappointment. A lot of people will say, "I feel cheated by my marriage." Maybe you’re like the guy who said: "When I got married, it started off ideal; a few months later it turned into an ordeal, now I'm looking for a new deal." What happened? Well, good marriages and families don't just happen! Ephesians 4:3 "Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit." It takes energy and effort to create/maintain Homeland Security. If you need some work when it comes to unity in your marriage, I've got some good news for you: You don't have to completely change your life around to make your marriage better. Minor changes will make major differences. 2 Keys to Homeland Security. KEY #1 COMMUNICATION Proverbs 13:17 "Reliable communication permits progress." In any emergency, the fire service’s top priority is to maintain good communication. This is why ICS is so important - a common language for all emergency responders. For progress to take place in your marriage, you've got to talk to each other too. I must be concise and reliable. OHRC - open, honest reliable communication permits progress. KEY #2 CONSIDERATION Consideration means you start thinking of “we” instead of “ me.” In an emergency it involves a good size up, getting the whole picture. In marriages it means showing common courtesy, helping each other. Ephesians 4:2 "Show your love by being helpful to each other.” How many have been told “Don’t just say you love me - show you love me” or, “talk is cheap.” We should all make an effort to show our love to each other. James 3:17 "Wisdom shows itself in being considerate." A mark of being wise is being considerate (thoughtful, kind, understanding, selfless…) The Bible says in Romans 15 “We must be considerate of the doubts and fears of others. If we do what helps them we will build them up in the Lord.” These are just two keys to many in assuring Homeland Security.

May, 2016

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

PETER LOBO

Bomb scare in Waltham

Waltham, MA. On March 18th, Waltham firefighters were called out to a suspicious package at Boston's Children’s Hospital Waltham. When it was determined it may have some significants, the State Police Bomb Squad was called in. After further examination, the State Police confirmed it was a make shift device.

MEMORIES If your department has photos you would like to see in our “Memories” feature please upload them on our website www.1RBN.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

K. LEGER

Three alarm, afternoon fire in Fall River Fall River, MA. At 2:24 p.m. on March 22nd. Firefighters responded to 169 County Street for a reported fire on the third floor of a dwelling. Engine 9 reported smoke in the area on approach. Engine 9 arrived to a three and half story, six family unit, with heavy smoke showing from the third floor. District Chief Doug Sullivan, Car 2, established County Street command and called for an additional pump to the scene. The crew of Engine 9 made an aggressive interior attack on the rap-

JUMP TO FILE #032216101 idly spreading fire and made a quick knockdown of the fire on the third floor. Ladder 4 used a 50 foot bangor ground ladder to access the roof for ventilation, because the front of the fire building was blocked by overhead power lines. Command called for a third alarm response because the fire was now in control of the attic. This trig-

gered a call for mutual aid companies to cover empty stations. The fire investigation unit responded to the fire scene to begin origin and cause investigation and special services provided rehab services to crews on scene. Fire units on scene were Engines 2, 9, 12, Ladder 2 and 4 and Heavy Rescue 1 on the initial alarm. Engine 4 and Reserve Ladder 5 responded on the additional alarms. - KENNETH LEGER

1918 Knox Hook and Ladder Easthampton MA. Fire Department

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Sudbury battles second alarm house fire

The Sudbury Fire Department was dispatched to 46 Greenhill Road for smoke inside the house at 4:26 p.m. on March 24, 2016. Police arrived and reported flames were visible from the house. Engine 2 arrived to smoke showing and called the working fire. Companies were met with heavy fire conditions in the basement. A short time later command requested a second alarm bringing Wayland, Framingham and Marlborough to the scene as well as mutual aid cover companies. Crews had the bulk of the fire knocked down in 30 minutes. Companies were on scene into the evening overhauling and a fire investigation team was requested to the scene.


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May, 2016

MASSACHUSETTS

JAKE O'CALLAGHAN/CWN

Crash in Harwichport

PETER LOBO

Third alarm ravages in Waltham Waltham, MA. on March 30, 2016 around 11:30 a.m., a Waltham police officer saw smoke in the area of Rumford Avenue. Upon further investigation, he found the rear porch of 12 Rumford Avenue was JUMP TO FILE# fully involved and 033116100 running up the side of the house. Two engines, one ladder and a heavy rescue responded. Deputy Chief Randy Mullin could see the smoke from several blocks away and transmitted a working fire, which brought two engines and an ambulance Because the fire was located on the Newton city line, Newton Ladder 1 happened to be in the area and could see the heavy smoke and responded to the fire. A second alarm was transmitted right away and a third alarm transmitted within a half hour. Because the house was on the Charles River, Waltham fire resounded with a containment unit. Mutual aid from Weston, Newton, Lexington, Belmont and Boston responded. A preliminary investigation revealed that improper cigarette disposal may have been the cause of the blaze. - PETER LOBO

Harwichport, MA. Around 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 12th, a female driving a Hyundai Sonata sedan smashed into a Ford Transit (a week old) in front of Cumberland Farms on Route 28. The female driver of the Sonata was taken to Cape Cod Hospital by Harwich Fire and Rescue with non-life threatening injuries, thanks in part to the air-bag deployment. The male driver of the Ford was not hurt. Both vehicles were a total loss. Harwich police are handling the investigation into the cause.


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MASSACHUSETTS

APPARATUS IN ACTION

If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Halifax A-2 at the scene of a recent technical rescue

Crews arrived to fire showing from the rear

JOHN SJOSTEDT

JIM FORTIN JR

Fatal at Upton multi-family dwelling The Upton Fire Department was dispatched to 140 Main Street for a reported building fire at 11:45 on April 14, 2016. Companies were updated enroute that police were on scene confirming a working fire and that someone might still be in the building. Engine 1 arrived and stretched a hand line to make an interior attack on the large multi-family dwelling. A second alarm was re-

JUMP TO FILE #041416123 quested, bringing in mutual aid companies. During the primary search, crews found a deceased victim on the second floor. A third alarm equivalent was eventually brought in to the scene. Companies were tied up for a few hours chasing hot

spots and making up. The State Fire Marshal was requested to respond. No other injuries were reported and a cause wasn't immediately available. During the incident, DCR Fire 14-1, Westborough and Sutton crews battled a brush fire in town.

JOHN SJOSTEDT

Halifax, East Bridgewater, and Boston Meflight at the landing zone for a Tech Rescue in Halifax.

- JIM FORTIN

Whitman Ambulance 247 at the scene of a school bus accident

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

PETER LOBO

Gas leak in Waltham

On June 6, a water department employee opened a gate to access a pumping station, when it stuck a power cable igniting an apparent gas leak. Waltham Engine 4 found the gas pipe was burning along with brush and part of an asphalt road. In order to secure the fire and evacuate a large facility of about 100 people; two more engines, a rescue and ladder truck responded. Firefighters had to stand by for about an hour and half while the gas company located and shut the gas off. Once that was done, they quickly extinguished the fire.

Whitman Engine 2

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM


May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

PAGE 35

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Tire strikes car in Waltham

Waltham, MA. On March 12, 2016, State Police reported a tire had fallen off a pickup truck in the south bound lane of Interstate 95 and may have hit a car. When Rescue 6 and Engine 4 arrived, they found a car that had it’s windshield torn off. The female driver, who was struck, was driving in the northbound lane. When she was hit, her car crashed into the Jersey barrier and slid 100 feet. Firefighters extricated her and she was transported to Lahey Clinic in serious condition.

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PAGE 36

May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

K. LEGER

City Council Member Cliff Ponte makes his way up the aerial Group 1 makes their way out of the burn building

K. LEGER

Fall River and New Bedford hold joint Fire Ops. 101 drill Fall River, MA. On Sunday, April 10th, Fall River Firefighters Local 1314 and New Bedford Firefighters Local 841 held a joint fire Ops 101 class at the training tower in Fall River. F.R. Chief Robert Viveiros and N.B. Chief Michael Gomes welcomed the mayors and city council members from both cities to the event. After watching a video of a heritage room fire versus a modern construction room fire, the participants had their vital signs checked and were fitted with turn-out gear.

JUMP TO FILE #041016102 They then made their way out to the training tower. They were divided into groups to perform at different stations and rotated through all stations. They started inside the burn building, where they extinguished a live fire while advancing a charged line. Another group climbed the aerial to the roof to perform vertical ventilation, while a third group made their way on air to the top

floor to search for a rescue dummy and drag it to safety. After a rest and some fluids, they made their way over to a motor vehicle, where they used the hydraulic rescue tool to access the interior of the vehicle after removing the doors and roof. The last station involved climbing a 35 foot ground ladder into the open window on the third floor. It appeared that all involved received quite an education.

GLENN PRESTON

Engines 22 and 17 advance lines at what became a three alarm fire on March 25th

- KENNETH LEGER

COMMAND VEHICLES

If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Command Vehicles� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Abington, MA Engine 3, a 2007 E-One Typhoon 1500/780/30F, worked at a recent fire.

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

2016 Chevy Traverse Easthampton Fire Car 1

DAVE SAFRON

Abington, MA Ambulance 4, a 2014 International TerraStar/Life Line ALS Ambulance, at a recent working fire.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

PAGE 37

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PAGE 38

May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

JOHN SJOSTEDT

Kingston MVA, gas main strike

Kingston Ma - Firefighters responded to the Kingston Animal Hospital for a motor vehicle that struck a gas main attached to the building. First arriving companies secured the gas to the building. The building was evacuated and it was determined their was an odor of gas in the building. Eversource was requested to the scene. Firefighters ventilated the building when the without further incident. The operator of the vehicle was not injured.

STEPHEN SWEET

Two alarms in below freezing temperatures in Quincy

Quincy, MA. On March 6, 2016, firefighters in Quincy were dispatched to a fire in the early morning hours during below freezing temperatures at 134-136 Willow Street. It eventually went to two alarms bringing five Quincy engines, three Quincy ladder trucks, and the heavy rescue to the scene. Station coverage was provided by Boston, Braintree and Weymouth Fire Departments. There were no reported injuries and the fire remains under investigation. This was the first of two building fires that day in the City of Quincy.

IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JOHN SJOSTEDT

Holbrook ladder training

Holbrook, MA. Members of Holbrook Fire Department used traffic cones to perform ladder placement training.

NICK ZABAWAR

Somerset, Massachusetts runs this 2009 Pierce Velocity as their Ladder 1. It has a 75 foot ladder. It also has a 1500 GPM pump and a tank capacity of 500 gallons.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

PAGE 39

MASSACHUSETTS

JOHN SJOSTEDT

Man rescued from trench collapse in Halifax Halifax, Plymouth County, MA. Around 9:45 a.m. on March 29th, the Halifax Fire Department received a 911 call reporting a person trapped up to his chest in a trench at 374 South St. An engine and ambulance responded. Companies arrived to find a 50-year old male buried up to his chest in a trench in the front yard of a residence. The worker was approximately eight feet below grade. He was reportedly doing a Title V inspection and was in the trench when it collapsed. The OIC

JUMP TO FILE #033016109 immediately requested the Plymouth County Technical Rescue Team to assist with the incident. Approximately 20-technical rescue technicians from across Plymouth County responded with specialized equipment used for technical rescues. Rescue crews set up shoring in the trench before they could enter to begin hand digging the man out.

Crews rotated in and out of the hole after approximately 20minute work periods. They used small military style shovels and five gallon buckets to remove the dirt from around the victim. A heater was brought in to keep the victim warm, as hypothermia was a concern of EMS personnel. Due to the extended operation, and mechanism of the injuries, paramedics started an IV and gave the victim fluids while he was still trapped. Boston MedFlight was requested to respond, and landed

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

PCTRT member Eric Norlin (Scituate FD) communicates with a member on ground level.

nearby. The MedFlight crew was brought to the scene to observe the conditions and assist with patient care. The victim was alert and conscious, talking with rescuers during the entire operation. After approximately two-hours from the initial 911 call, the victim was carried out of the trench in a stokes basket to an awaiting am-

bulance, which brought him to the landing zone, where he was flown to a Boston hospital. The patient was released from the hospital later that night. No other injuries were reported on the scene. - PAT TRAVERS


PAGE 40

May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

Vehicle News

Westbrook Fire Rescue (ambulance remount)

AUTOTRONICS

Swanzey, NH new to them is this 2000 ALF with a Smeal The Norwalk Fire Department received two KME custom 105' Aerial Quint, EHL, 500 water pumpers for Stations 2 and 4 featuring a newly designed user friendly pump panel and lower hose beds. These KME’s are an addition to our 2011 100’ KME Tiller. NEW ENGLAND FIRE EQUIP & APPARATUS

EDWARD PRESCOTT

Burlington, MA. Ambulance is a 2016 International/Hor- Rehoboth, MA. Engine 2 is a 2016 E-One Custom Ty- Van Buren Police Department (New Ford Police Interton Terrastar ambulance. This ambulance is powered by phoon Pumper powered by a Cummins ISL 400 hp ceptor Utility) a MaxxForce 300 hp diesel engine. diesel engine, Allison EVS 3000 automatic 5-speed electronic transmission. GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

AUTOTRONICS

Ayer, MA - Ambulance – 2016 Ford F-550/Horton ambu- Best Care from Gilford, New Hampshire recently pur- Pawcatuck, CT. Rescue 1 is a 2016 E-One Custom Tylance. This ambulance is powered by a 300 hp 6.7L V-8 chased a 2014 Chevy remount phoon Rescue. This rescue is powered by a Cummins diesel engine. ISL 330 hp diesel engine with an Allison EVS 3000 automatic 5-speed electronic transmission. PROFESSIONAL VEHICLE CORP

GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

South Portland Fire Department (New Spencer Rescue North Berwick, ME. Tank 1 is a 2016 International 7400 Truck) Water Master Tanker. This tanker is powered by a Navistar N10 350 hp diesel engine with an Allison EVS 3000 automatic 5-speed electronic transmission.

Northborough, MA. Engine 2 is a 2016 E-One Custom Typhoon Pumper. This pumper is powered by a Cummins ISL 350 hp diesel engine with an Allison EVS 3000 automatic 5-speed electronic transmission.

GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

AUTOTRONICS

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GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

PAGE 41

MASSACHUSETTS

THEN & NOW If your Department has photos you would like to see in our “Then & Now” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Whitman MA Forest Fire-1, a 1968 Jeep 4x4, was recently replaced. This vehicle is no longer in service. PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Whitman MA recently placed this 1987 Chevy 4X4 with a 225-gallon tank in-service as Forestry Unit 245.

ANTIQUE APPARATUS

If you have photos for Antique Apparatus please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

Fire Attack Engine 4

K. LEGER

Vacant home burns in Fall River Fall River, MA. Shortly after midnight on April 15, firefighters responded to 75 Laurel Street after police officers on patrol spotted a building on fire. District Chief William Pappas established Laurel Command. Engine 4 began the fire attack while the driver from Engine 5 found a hydrant within ten feet of Engine 4 and hooked them up directly to the hydrant. Ladder 2 using reserve Ladder 5 had a mechanical breakdown but was able to allow Ladder 4 to take the front of the building. Ladder 4 used

JUMP TO FILE #041516110 it’s aerial to access the roof for ventilation. The fire building was a one and a half story vacant wood frame dwelling with heavy fire throughout. With the initial interior attack unable to make progress, Command ordered an evacuation of the structure. Command ordered a defensive attack and for the water tower on Ladder 4 to attack the fire from above. Engine 5 relocated to a hy-

APPARATUS FOR SALE

drant a block away and dropped lines to feed the water tower on Ladder 4. Command called for fire investigators to begin the investigation, as well as Fall River Special Services to provide rehab and lighting at the scene. One firefighter was transported from the scene as a precaution, after his SCBA failed during the initial interior fire attack. Fire units were on the scene for several hours battling this blaze. - KENNETH LEGER

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Whitman MA recently retired this 1978 Hendrickson, with a 1994 E-One Glider Kit 1000/500. This engine was formerly Engine 2, most recently Engine 3 and used as a spare. The vehicle will be stripped and placed up for auction at a later date.

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

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PAGE 42

May, 2016

STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

From dispatch to return to station at the conclusion of the incident, one must maintain a constant vigilance relative to a safe response, be it on apparatus or ones personal vehicle. Each year firefighter/EMS personnel are killed in motor vehicle crashes with slightly under half of these deaths occurring while responding. I mention only deaths, but how many more were injured? How many civilian injuries and deaths? What was the loss in apparatus and operating expenses? How was the local responding departments insurance impacted? Response can be very deadly and very expensive. Responding to the scene of an emergency, whether driving your personal vehicle or driving an emergency vehicle, requires careful thought and control in order to complete a safe response. In either response mode, you are of no value if you don’t arrive safely. You may further complicate the initial response if you are involved in your own emergency and will now require assistance! The response begins with your size-up, the day of the week, time of day, weather conditions, and vehicle conditions. Is an alternate response route suggested due to prevailing conditions? Do you know where you are going? If not, find out before starting out as you will have other responsibil-

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

Apparatus and Personal Vehicle Response Safety ities and concerns, and the added anxiety that comes with not being sure of your destination will detract you from those responsibilities. When responding in your personal vehicle remember you are not an Emergency Vehicle, rather just another vehicle sharing the road with no special privileges. You must comply with all traffic regulations whether responding to the fire station or directly to the scene of the emergency. The blue light identifies you as a volunteer member of the Fire/EMS department responding to an emergency call. If the driver in front of you is kind enough to yield the right of way, be thankful, the next one may not. Be patient, no matter how important you think you are. Responding with your personal vehicle or driving apparatus, do not pass through red traffic lights, stop signs, do not cross traffic lines or pass unsuspecting motorists, and do not exceed the speed limit. Yield at all yield signs and yield whenever the other driver fails to do so. Should there be a crash, you will be judged by what action you took to avoid the crash, even if you had the right of way. I am oft reminded of an old verse “ Here lies the body of Robert Gray, He died maintaining his right of way, He is dead, just as dead, As if he had been wrong!” Reckless driving of your personal vehicle or an emergency vehicle can lead to accidents, and accidents can lead to injury and death. No matter the consequences of injury and/or death, ultimately there will be lawsuits and trials

and it is always more difficult than you think to exonerate yourself in a court of law. Responding while driving an emergency vehicle includes all of the above, and requires additional considerations, skill, and proper mental attitude. Emergency apparatus drivers should be selected upon satisfactory completion of an emergency vehicle operators training program. Just because someone drives a truck for a living does not qualify him or her for a position as an emergency vehicle driver. Mental attitude is as equally important as mastering the driving skills. Some drivers get behind the wheel of an emergency vehicle and think they “own the road,” driving to out race the speed of the siren. They are asking for trouble, an accident waiting to happen, a seat behind the steering wheel is not for them. Emergency vehicle response requires maintaining the apparatus in good mechanical condition, all equipment secured and stored properly, and warning lights and audible sounding devices operating properly. The response begins with dispatch, ensuring all personnel are onboard, in full protective gear, and all secured with seat belts, including you. A slow, cautious exit from the station, which may require personnel to stop vehicular traffic in the street and if so, stopping for them to board and fasten seat belts. Now as you begin your response with your valuable cargo, being alert and driving with caution will be your major con-

cerns. Red warning lights must be on and you must be sounding an audible warning device to be in an Emergency Vehicle mode. Should the response not warrant “lights and siren” then, you are not considered an emergency vehicle and are required to comply with all traffic laws and regulations. When responding as an Emergency Vehicle with “lights and siren” you may cautiously violate some traffic regulations. You may cross traffic lines and lanes, pass through red traffic signals, and exceed the posted speed limit. My recommendation is DON’T. Never exceed the speed limit while responding; should you be involved in a crash, it will be used against you. Excessive speed does not help to reduce response time; it only increases the risk for crashes, resulting in injury and death. Always stop for red traffic lights and stop signs, looking in all directions before continuing ahead. Look twice! Anticipate vehicles passing vehicles that have stopped to yield you the right of way. Be alert for children playing and their increased excitement as you pass and the potential for them to do the unexpected. Scan all sides of the street for vehicles that may be entering the roadway from residential driveways, shopping malls, etc. Almost everyone is in a hurry today with the radio blasting, preoccupied while they eat, drink, do their hair, read, talk on a cell phone or a myriad of other things. The one thing they may not be doing is paying attention to their driving, adding to your responsibilities for a safe response.

Upon your safe arrival at the scene of the emergency (turn your siren and unnecessary lights off!), locate your emergency vehicle according to need, department SOP’s, or as directed by an officer. If at all possible, try not to block the road unless that is the intent. Additional apparatus/ambulances may be required and the closer to the scene they can locate, the more efficient. All apparatus should be chocked once at its final destination. Should you have responded to the scene in your personal vehicle; park it out of the way, preferably a half-block or more away. Returning to quarters is done in full compliance with the traffic laws. No lights, no sirens, and no needless haste, with all passengers riding with their seat belts fastened. When approaching quarters you may wish to turn your warning lights on, come to a complete step and permit personnel to disembark and control street traffic to facilitate your backing into quarters. Once the apparatus/ambulance is safely in quarters, it is time to prepare for another safe dispatch. One final subject is BACKING UP. Extreme caution and a guide are required when backing up. Never back up if it can be avoided, many fender bender type crashes occur when backing up, some resulting in injuries and deaths. Remember, whether driving for pleasure or driving an emergency vehicle, driving is a full time chore, requiring your full attention.


May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

PAGE 43

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PAGE 44

May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

New England Apparatus of the Month

Dear Readers, For the past 20 years, I have been writing an Apparatus of the Month column for the New Jersey edition of 1st Responder Newspaper. A am a retired battalion chief from New Jersey and write apparatus delivery columns for multiple trade journals. In addition, I am an apparatus buff. Recently, 1st Responder News decided to expand an apparatus column to the New England edition and asked me to spearhead this mission. I certainly accepted this assignment. Please enjoy this new column. Those in a position to plan or purchase a new ambulance or piece of apparatus can read about a product your department may want to buy and you will be able to see many products by way of this column. So here we go with dealer news... Professional Vehicle Corporation reports the delivery of an AEV Type III ambulance to Warren Rescue of the Town of Warren, Maine. It is mounted on a GM, G4500 cutaway chassis with diesel engine. Greenwood Emergency Vehicles has made the following E-ONE deliveries. In Massachusetts, a Typhoon pumper to Rehoboth featuring a Cummins ISL, 400 hp diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Hale Qflo 1260gpm single-stage pump, UPF 1000 gallon water tank, 30 gallon Class “B” foam cell, Akron 125 gpm foam eductor system and an Onan 6 kw hydraulic generator. Also a Typhoon pumper to Northborough featuring a Cummins ISL, 350 hp diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Hale Qmax 1500 gpm pump, FRC InControl Pressure Governor, UPF 980 gallon water tank, 30 gallon Class “B” and 20 gallon Class “A” foam cells, Trident air primer, Foam Pro 2002 foam system and a Smart Power 10 kw hydraulic generator. In Maine, Eddington received a pumper on a Freightliner M2 chassis. It features a Cummins ISL, 400 hp diesel engine, with Allison 300 EVS transmission, Hale Qmax, singlestage 1500 gpm pump, Class 1 TPG Pressure Governor, UPF 1750 gallon water tank and a Trident air primer. North Berwick received a Water Master tanker on an International 7400 chassis. It is powered by a Navistar N10, 350 hp diesel engine with an Allison 3000 EVS transmission. Features include a Hale MPB 1000 gpm single-stage pump, Class 1 TPG Pressure Governor, Moro PM vacuum pump, 3000 gallon aluminum water tank and a Trident air primer. In Connecticut, Pawcatuck received a Typhoon rescue powered by a Cummins ISL, 330 hp diesel engine with an Allison 3000 EVS transmission. It has an Onan 25 kw PTO hydraulic generator. They have delivered the following Horton ambulances in Massachusetts: (all feature the Horton Occupant Protection System and the 14G Intelliplex System), to Ayer, a Type I on a Ford F-550 chassis powered by a 300 hp, 6.7L V8 diesel engine, and featuring liquid spring. Burlington received a medium duty Please send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

APPARATUS OF THE MONTH

A look at what’s new with apparatus around the state with John Malecky

Northborough (MA) Ambulance recently purchased a 2016 International/Horton Terrastar ambulance. This ambulance is powered by a MaxxForce 7, 300 hp diesel engine. GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

Warren Rescue in Warren (ME) recently bought a 2015 G-4500 Chevy Type III ambulance

PROFESSIONAL VEHICLE CORP

Mechanic Falls (ME) recently purchased a Smeal Pumper, Spartan Metro MFD Cab, 1000 water, 20 foam

NEW ENGLAND FIRE EQUIP & APPARATUS

Golden Cross from Claremont (NH) recently purchased a 2016 Ford Transit van

PROFESSIONAL VEHICLE CORP

S. Londonderry (VT) Champion Hose Co. purchased a Smeal Rescue pumper, Sirius chassis, 1000 water, 20 Foam, Foam Pro

NEW ENGLAND FIRE EQUIP & APPARATUS

Eddington (ME) Engine 323 is a 2016 Freightliner M2 Commercial pumper. This pumper is powered by a Cummins ISL 400 hp diesel engine with an Allison EVS 3000 automatic five-speed electronic transmission.

GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

on an International TerraStar chassis. It has a MaxxForce, 300 hp diesel engine. Also, Northborough received a medium duty on an International TerraStar chassis with a MaxxForce 7, 300 hp diesel engine. New England Fire Equipment & Apparatus Corporation delivered a 2000 ALF quint with a Smeal 105 foot aerial, EHL and 500 gallon water tank to Swanzey, NH. Other Smeal deliveries include to Champion Hose Co. of S. Londonderry, VT a rescue pumper on Sirius chassis with1000 gallon water and 20 gallon foam tanks and a Foam Po system,

In Maine, Mechanic Falls received a pumper on a Spartan MFD chassis with a 1000 gallon water and 20 gallon foam tanks. Smeal orders include to Scarborough Maine, a top mount CAFS pumper on a Spartan Gladiator LFD chassis with a 1000 gallon water and 30 gallon foam tanks and for Littleton, MA a rescue pumper with Sirius LFD chassis, 750 gallon water tank and rescue body. Minuteman Fire Trucks has made four Pierce deliveries. Three of them are in Massachusetts. The first is to Northfield, a rural community. It is a Saber FR with long stainless steel body and is pow-

ered by a Cummins diesel. Features include a Waterous 1500 gpm pump, Husky 12 foam system, 1000 gallon poly water tank, a compartment for storing a portable water tank while allowing for storage ahead of the tank for electrical components in a lift-up compartment, speedlays with poly trays for easier deployment, ladder rack for 61 feet of portable ladders, Harrison 3.6 kw generator, Whelen scene lights, On Spot tire chains, a back up camera and seats belts with dual retractors. Next is a mini pumper to the Boxborough Fire Department. It has a Ford F-550, 4 x 4 Super Cab, a Power Stroke 6.7L diesel engine which provides heat to the pump compartment, a Waterous 275 gpm diesel pump run off of the main fuel tank, 310 gallon water and 10 gallon poly foam tanks, a top compartment for Stokes storage, telescoping floodlights and a portable winch. Next is a pair of Impel pumpers

with raised roof cabs for the Town of Hingham Fire Department. They are their first two Pierces. They have medium stainless steel bodies, Cummins ISL diesel engines, Allison 3000 EVS transmissions, Waterous 1250 gpm pumps, 750 gallon poly water tanks, foam eductor, Galvannized frame rails, stainless body and body sub structure, stainless steel fuel tanks and the Minuteman Fire & Rescue Apparatus “New Englander Package” to mitigate corrosion. Other features include custom Hurst Tool mounting, hydraulic ladder rack, Whelen brow and scene lighting and a booster reel. Last is an Arrow XT rescue pumper for Lewiston, Maine. It has a Detroit DD13 diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS-P transmission, TAK-4 suspension, Waterous 1500 gpm pump, 750 gallon poly water tank, Husky 12 foam system, Westerbeke 8 kw generator, hands free SCBA holders, Whelen spot/flood, scene and brow lights and hot dipped Galvanized frames.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

May, 2016

PAGE 45

MASSACHUSETTS

JOHN SJOSTEDT

Duxbury brush fire

Duxbury MA. Firefighters responded to the Blakeman's area of Duxbury Beach for a beach grass fire that was threatening a house. Firefighters quickly got around the fire, and brought the fire under control. Companies were tied up for an extended period of time wetting down the area.

K. LEGER

Seven transported after fire in Fall River Fall River, MA. Shortly after 5:00 a.m. on March 31, firefighters responded to 83 Quarry Street for a reported still alarm from a third floor resident. District Fire Chief Douglas Sullivan arrived on scene to a three and a half story, six family, wood frame dwelling, with fire showing from the third floor. The crew of Engine 9 began an aggressive interior attack while Engine 2 secured a hydrant and supplied Engine 9. The crews of Ladder 4 and Heavy Rescue 1 conducted a primary search of the third floor, which proved negative. Command called for an addi-

JUMP TO FILE #033116121 tional engine company to the scene and mutual aid to cover empty stations. During the battle, command ordered the evacuation of all personnel from the fire building and to conduct a roll call to ensure all members were accounted for. Command then switched to a defensive attack from the exterior. Firefighters set up Blitzguns and hand lines to fight the fire, while the crew of Ladder 2 used a ground ladder and a roof ladder to

make the roof to ventilate. Meanwhile EMS units on scene were dealing with seven residents, who were suffering from smoke inhalation. EMS command requested multiple medical rescues to the fire ground to transport the injured to local hospitals. Fall River Special Services arrived on scene to provide lighting and rehab to firefighters. Command called for the fire investigation unit and also requested Red Cross to provide for the residents, who could not return to their homes. - KENNETH LEGER

STEVEN HEATH

Kingston jaws training Kingston MA. Members of the Kingston Fire Department conducted unique training using the Jaws of Life.

COMMAND VEHICLES If you have photos you would like to see in our In Service feature, please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com

GLENN PRESTON

Third alarm for boat fire between buildings

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

Whitman MA Car-3 (Shift Commander) is a 2014 Chevrolet Tahoe.

On March 25, 2016, Engine 22 and Ladder 4 were dispatched for a car fire. Upon arrival, Ladder 4 reported a large well-involved (land-stored) boat. The trailered boat was attached to an RV and located between two buildings. Ladder 4 struck Box 2136 on arrival, reporting a fully involved boat with exposure problems. The well involved boat on Winthrop St., in the Roxbury section of Boston, quickly spread to two three-story frame buildings. Fire went up to floors two, three and the attic. A second alarm was promptly struck, followed by a third alarm. No injuries were reported and the fire was knocked down within less than an hour. An aggressive interior attack and exposure protection contributed to a good stop, containing the fire to two buildings.


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New England

VENDOR SPOTLIGHT First Priority Emergency Vehicles Expands Operations Nationwide

First Priority Emergency Vehicles, one of America’s leading designers, manufacturers and distributors of a comprehensive array of firefighting, medical, rescue, public safety and mission-specific vehicles and equipment, has expanded its operations from 3 facilities across New Jersey to major new sales and production facilities in North Carolina, California and Texas.

With a significant nationwide distribution and service capability, First Priority provides comprehensive vehicle and apparatus solutions for federal, state, and local agencies and fleet customers nationwide.

Whether the need is a patient transport ambulance, a critical care unit, an advanced life support ambulance in the emergency medical service or a fire pumper, aerial ladder/platform, rescue truck in the fire service, First Priority has the solution. For nearly 20 years, First Priority has distinguished itself from the competition by offering vehicles that are best suited to each client's exact mission and offers both stock designs as well as fully customized emergency vehicles to suit a wide variety of budgets.

By maintaining a firm understanding of the most current automotive, emergency, safety and fuel technologies, First Priority has the expertise, reputation, experience and resources to ensure their customers receive high quality vehicles and transportation solutions for emergency response, mission specific purposes and general departmental

functions.

First Priority applies its significant production experience and technical knowledge to remain at the forefront of the specialized vehicle industry.

The company takes a collaborative, consultative approach to its clients' needs and identifies cost effective solutions to produce high-value vehicles, products and solutions. Robert J. Freeman, President of First Priority Emergency Vehicles, states “Across the nation, First Priority products are used daily by American heroes in their life saving and property preserving missions.

First Priority is consistently recognized by first responders across the US and worldwide for technical innovation and functional design.

We are grateful for their sacrifices and proud to partner with them by providing the tools necessary to ensure the public safety of our nation and its families.” First Priority is a proud recipient of the prestigious President’s E-Award for its contribution to the American economy through exporting of premium-grade American made products worldwide. For additional information, visit First Priority at www.FirstPriorityGlobal.net and by phone at (800) 247-7725.

1st Ambulance Service in U.S. to embrace innovative crossover ambulance

-Continued from last month

Lyons Ambulance Service of Danvers, MA can trace its roots back to horse and carriage days. While 1904 marks the company’s official inception, the entrepreneurial Lyons family started out in the livery business in the 1890’s. Kevin Lyons is the fourth generation of family members at the helm of Lyons Ambulance Service. Headquartered in a restored fire station, Kevin Lyon shares his insights about the evolution of ambulance transportation and the innovative new crossover ambulance conversion he’s embraced to enhance the safety and fuel economy of his fleet.

How did establishing your headquarters in a historic fire station come about? The four story building was built in 1850 and served as a shoe factor until the 1920s when the town purchased it and convertedit to a fire station. The town had been trying to get a new fire station buildt for many years. It went out for public bid and I was the only bidder. That gies you an idea of the condition. It cost more to restore than to buy. We moved in Mother’s Day of 1997. What’s the size of your fleet and the area you serve? We have 21 ambulances; a mixture of Type II, Type III, one Type 1, plus 12 wheelchair vans. We serve the north shore of Boston between Boston and the New Hampshire border and respond to between 40,000 to 50,000 calls per year.

What do you like about the composite interior? It looks good and it looks like it’s going to be very easy for upkeep. It’s also really light so it’s not taking up usable payload. The fact that the interior and cabinets are designed to

Late 1920’s fleet

make use of the ribs and contours of the van maximizes interior space.

Are you seeing fuel savings? It’s giving me better fuel economy than with typical Type IIs, and significantly better than a Type III. Everybody who gets in it is amazed by how much interior space there is. It’s comparable to one of the smaller, box ambulances. Initial costs are certainly more economical than the purchase of a mini mod, and they don’t have any advantage storage-wise. Can it compete with a full size modular? It can in some instances. I would certainly look at it. It would make a good ALS transfer truck where most times that’s done in a modular. There are certain instances where you would not be able to us it, but I think that most ambulance services could work around it. We transfer a lot fo patients to tertiary care facilities. The ProMaster would be ideal for these types of transfers. Although it can’t accommodate a CPR seat, these are not as efficient as a chest compression apparatus. Even with the cost of this apparatus; it’s still less expensive to have a Crossover Ambulance on a ProMaster than a box ambulance with a CPR seat. The fuel economy alone makes that an easy decision, but you also need to look at the physical demands CPR puts on your staff.

What ergonomic features are notable? My staff really notices the ergonomics and comfort of it to work out of. The cab is much more comfortable and user-friendly. The interior setup is designed to have everything easy-toreach. The stair chair on the side is much easier to access instead of having to climb into the back.

Being front wheel drive, it handles very well. It only took me about an hour to get the feel of it. I drove that van with no weight in it at all and it handled well even in snow and ice.

What advice would you have for other ambulance services looking to make changes to their fleet? Take a good look at everything that’s coming out. Really look at the specifications on the chassis and what converters are doing with them. Malley is the only one with an ambulance conversion on a ProMaster. I had never heard of Malley until about this time last year when I saw a Malley sticker on an ambulance and Googled the company. I’ve purchased trucks out of Canada before. I contacted the company and Terry Malley got back to me personally. It’s nice having the ownder of the company phone. There’s a real connection. It makes a difference. See ad on pages 24 and 25


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May, 2016

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May, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

Profile for Belsito Communications Inc.

1st Responder New England May Edition  

1st Responder New England May Edition