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The New England Edition PUBLISHING SINCE 1993

HOME SUBSCRIPTION - $36/YEAR

WWW.1RBN.COM

MARCH, 2017

DAVID S. MORIN

Nashua, NH - On Thursday, January 26th at 7:16 A.M., Nashua Fire Alarm received a call reporting a house fire with people injured at 25 Ingalls Street, located in the city's Crown Hill section. Nashua Engine-4 was the first arriving fire company and reported heavy smoke showing from a one-and-a-half story, single-family home. A working fire was struck, bringing Engine-1 and Ladder-1 to the scene. - See full story on page 16

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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

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March, 2017

MAINE

ROCKPORT MAINE FD

Rockport Firefighters Present Chief with Custom Made Helmet

Rockport, ME - On February 2nd, members of the Rockport FD took some time to recognize the accomplishments of Chief Peasley since taking the reigns of Rockport Fire Department almost three-years-ago. The members acknowledged that as a department, they wouldn't be in the great position they are in today without his amazing leadership. In recognition, Deputy Chief Philbrook presented Chief Peasley with a custom made Chief's helmet!

Milton Firefighter Kyle Corson rushes Lucy the dog to an ambulance for treatment.

ERIN THOMAS

Lebanon Firefighters Credited for The Heart of the Matter Saving Dog in House Fire is a Matter of the Heart Chaplain’s Corner

Pastor Fernando Villicana

Teach me Your way, O Lord; I will walk in Your truth; Unite my heart to fear Your name. (Psalm 86:11) Singleness of heart/purpose is not a foreign concept to the firefighter or EMS worker. The very duties of these occupations cry out for a concerted singleness of our purpose to fulfill the mission. Meeting the immediate needs of the patient is the first responder's mission. Upon arrival of an emergency call, we must be totally focused on the patient as well as our surroundings. It is essential. This essentiality also applies to our spiritual lives. Only when we pursue God with singleness of heart do we experience the fulfillment of His purpose in our lives - to rescue us. Indecision about God is described in the Bible as "doublemindedness" - and doublemindedness is a costly habit. With so much contentment at stake, why do we waver? Why don't we choose God more wholeheartedly? "Unite my heart to fear Your name." This is a prayer for the integrity of a "pure" heart, one that is not only clean, but also decisive. James wrote, "Draw near to God and He will draw near to you...pu-

rify your hearts, you double-minded" (James 4:8). What we need is the courage to pursue God with singleness of purpose. Finally, all of you be of one mind, having compassion for one another; love as brothers, be tenderhearted, be courteous; (1 Peter 3:8). Hereby perceive we the love of God, because he laid down his life for us: and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. (1 John 3:16)

Lebanon, ME - The Lebanon Maine Fire Department was toned out just after 3:00 P.M. on Saturday, February 4th for a fire at a mobile home on River Road in Lebanon. When fire crews arrived, the mobile home was fully involved. It was reported that the occupants were not home at the time of the fire. Additional crews from Rochester, NH and Milton, NH as well Berwick, Maine were called in to help battle the fire. Lebanon firefighters located a dog that was inside the home and passed it to a

JUMP TO FILE #020617115 Milton firefighter, who then rushed it to an ambulance that was equipped with animal rescue equipment. "Lucy" the dog was treated using O2FurLife before being transported to a veterinarian, who expected her to make a full recovery. The home was unfortunately a total loss. The family who lived in it did not have insurance and lost

everything in the fire. Chief Dan Meehan announced that Lebanon Fire and Rescue would be taking collections for the family at Central Fire Station, located at 3 Upper Cross Road in Lebanon, where they would accept clothing, household goods and monetary donations for the family, including two children, ages one and seven. The Red Cross also responded to assist the family with a place to stay for the evening. - ERIN THOMAS

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Congratulations to Lisbon Life Squad Lisbon, New Hampshire


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March, 2017

MAINE

Advertising Index

A guide to finding great companies

Company

1st Priority

Armor Tuff Flooring

Page 8,36

41

Dingee Machine Co.

Firematic

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

34

Choice Marketing

FDIC

PATCH OF THE MONTH

27

Apparatus For Sale

EJ Boughton Co.

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

42

36

29,35

Five Star Fire

Greenwood Emergency Kimtek

44

2

14

Mid Atlantic Rescue

37

NE Fire Rescue & EMS

23

Minuteman Fire & Rescue

New England Fire Equip.

43

7

New England Marine

27

Shaker Auto Group

31

Professional Vehicle Corp.

Spotted Dog Technologies Sprint

Task Force Tips

Utility Communications Waterway Zodiac

Barrington, NH provided RIC during the incident.

5

ERIN THOMAS

3

Bangor Fire Department is located in Penobscot County, Maine.

EUGENE WEBER JR.

ON THE LITER SIDE If you have photos you would like to see in our “On the Liter Side” feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

33

Berwick, ME Engine-4 assisted with water supply on Grey Birch Lane.

ERIN THOMAS

21

Multiple Crews Battle Structure Fire in Lebanon

9

11

17 40

CORPORATE INFORMATION

1st Responder News (ISSN 1525-1683) - New England edition - Vol. 21, No.3 - is published monthly, 12 times a year for $36 per year by Belsito Communications, Inc., 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. Periodicals Postage Paid at Newburgh, NY and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street, New Windsor, NY 12553. No financial responsibility is assumed by this newspaper to publish a display, classified, or legal ad or for typographical errors except of reprinting that part of the ad which was omitted or in e r r o r . A division of: Omissions or errors must be brought to the attention of the newspaper during the same month of publication.

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Sabattus, ME - After a busy morning on February 22nd, Wales F.D. members washed and then dried clean gear on their homemade gear drying rack! WALES MAINE FD

Lebanon, ME - Lebanon Maine Fire & EMS was toned out for a structure fire on Gray Birch Lane at 10:21 A.M. on February 1st. A first-alarm was immediately called by Lebanon Ambulance-2 as they arrived first on-scene and witnessed a heavy smoke condition. Mutual Aid responded from Acton, Alfred, Berwick, North Berwick, South Berwick and Milton. Crews from Barrington, NH were also on the scene for RIC. The fire was believed to have started in the kitchen. Crews on-scene helped an elderly female occupant to a neighboring home during the incident. Despite their rescue efforts with oxygen and CPR, firefighters were unsuccessful in reviving a dog that was found in a kennel inside of the residence. Grey Birch Lane was shut down during the incident due to the condition of the road and the set up of water supply lines. The last units cleared the scene at approximately 2:30 P.M.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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March, 2017

1 ARDMORE STREET • NEW WINDSOR, NY 12553

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

In memory of those who gave all

1st Responder Newspaper honors and remembers emergency responders lost in the line of duty

New York: Arthur "Art" Brault, 54 Rank: Fire Chief Incident Date: December 20, 2016 Death Date: December 20, 2016 Fire Department: Cumberland Head Volunteer Fire Department Initial Summary: After responding with his fire department to a structure fire earlier in the evening, Fire Chief Arthur "Art" Brault was discovered by his wife deceased in bed when he did not turn out for a second structure fire alarm call.

New Jersey: Louis Kelly, 70 Rank: Deputy Fire Coordinator Incident Date: December 8, 2016 Death Date: December 16, 2016 Fire Department: Union County Fire Office of Emergency Management Initial Summary:Deputy Fire Coordinator Kelly responded to a multi-alarm residential structure fire in Clark, NJ. He arrived on scene and assisted with operations at the Incident Command Post. While on scene, he suffered a medical emergency and went into cardiac arrest. He was immediately tended to by emergency responders, who performed CPR and utilized an AED to regain his pulse and breathing. He was transported to a local hospital for treatment, and while still hospitalized the following week, his condition deteriorated and he passed away. North Carolina: Donald “Reid” Key II, 31 Rank: Lieutenant Incident Date: December 25, 2016 Death Date: December 27, 2016 Fire Department: Whispering Pines Fire Rescue Department Initial Summary: On Sunday, December 25, at 1617 hours, Station 51 was dispatched to an Automatic Fire Alarm (AFA). Lieutenant Key responded as the Driver of 516 (Tanker); however,

was cancelled upon arrival by the Chief who had confirmed the AFA was accidental and no assistance was needed. Upon returning to the station, Lieutenant Key assisted several fellow firefighters with washing, cleaning equipment, repacking hose on 511 (returning from 2nd alarm structure fire). Later that evening after returning home, Lieutenant Key began experiencing a headache. The next morning (12/26/2016), the headache worsened, at which time Key’s wife drove him to Moore Regional Hospital in Pinehurst, NC. After being evaluated, Lieutenant Key was airlifted to UNC-Chapel Hill Hospital where he arrived midday (12/26/2016). He passed away at approximately 1345 hours on 12/27/2016. The nature and cause of fatal injury are still to be reported.

Michigan: Fred A. Newton, Sr., 66 Rank: Captain Incident Date: December 27, 2016 Death Date: December 27, 2016 Fire Department: Somerset Township Fire Department & EMS Initial Summary: While preparing to leave the fire station upon completion of his shift which included responses to three emergency incidents, Captain Newton went out to the station parking lot to start and warm his car. At 0815hrs, as other members of the fire department arrived at the station, they noticed Newton was in his car and had perhaps fallen asleep while the vehicle was still running. When a firefighter went outside and knocked on a window of the vehicle there was no response. He then opened the door and noticed Captain Newton was not breathing. Emergency dispatch was notified and the EMS crew at the station immediately began to render assistance, including ALS procedures, and transported Newton to the hospital where he was pronounced deceased.


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CONNECTICUT

Firefighters Battle Commercial Building Fire in New Britain New Britain, CT - On February 26th around 6:30 A.M., firefighters arrived at 270 Fairview Street with fire showing from two windows of a onestory, brick, commercial type building. Firefighters had to work JUMP TO FILE# around a live power 022717129 line that was down across a steel fence and into the lot. Working around that obstacle, firefighters still made a quick knock down of the heavy fire and had the blaze under control within 30 minutes. - MICHAEL CARENZA JR.

MICHAEL CARENZA JR.


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

HE HE ER ERO ROES RO OES ES

CONNECTICUT

INK INK

1st Responder Newspape er features EMERGENCY SERVICES RELA ATED TATTOOS

WESTPORT FD

FF James Branson and members of Westport FD celebrate his return by taking down the “Blue Star" flag.

Spelter, WV - Trevor Vance is a 19-year-old firefighter from West Virginia who has been serving his community since he was just 15-years-old. He is currently a firefighter at Spelter Volunteer Fire Department in Spelter, West Virginia and decided to get this tattoo done approximately two years ago. When asked what inspired him to get the tattoo, he said "being a firefighter is a brotherhood, so I thought to myself, why not get a tattoo that will be there forever and remind me of what I have been through and who I've been through it with." Trevor also said that the tattoo lets him show off what he's so proud of doing.

Would you like your emergency services related tattoo featured here? Contact Lindsey at

Lindsey@1strespondernews.com

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Westport Firefighter Branson Returns Home from Deployment Westport CT - The beginning of February was a very special time for the Westport Fire Department as Firefighter James “Doc” Branson returned home from a 375-day deployment with the United State Marines. Firefighter Branson was deployed to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan as an advisor with Security Cooperation Team-Jordan. FF Branson is a Navy Corpsman and worked as a medic for the Marines. He was a medical advisor to the Jordanian Armed Forces and helped train some of the first tactical medics in the Jordanian Armed Forces. Westport Fire Department celebrated his return by taking down the “Blue Star Flag,” which flew at Westport Fire Headquarters during his time overseas.

JUMP TO FILE #020717112 FF Branson returned to duty with the department during the second week of February, saying “I am excited and thankful to be home with my wife and family, which includes my brothers and sisters at the Westport Fire Department.” “Looking up and seeing that flag reminded us of James on a daily basis and of the sacrifices he was making for us all. We are blessed to have him home again,” said Chief Andrew Kingsbury. The Service Flag, also called the "Blue Star Flag," is an official banner authorized by the Department of Defense for display by

families who have members serving in the Armed Forces during any period of war or hostilities the United States may be engaged in. The Service Flag may also be displayed by an organization to honor the members of that organization serving during a period of war or hostilities. Each blue star on the flag represents a service member in active duty. Since 2001, the Westport Fire Department has had six members serve on active military duty. Lowering the flag marks a significant passage of time for the Department.

- WRITTEN BY MICHAEL KRONICK/PROVIDED BY BERNIE MEEHAN

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

MICHAEL CARENZA JR.

Three-Alarm Fire Strikes New Britain During Blizzard BRANFORD FD

Magnified Sunlight Causes House Fire in Branford Branford, CT - On February 4th, the Branford FD responded to reports of a home filling with smoke in Indian Neck. Upon their arrival, firefighters quickly discovered and extinguished a smoldering fire in a living room couch. The fire started after sunlight coming through a rear slider was magnified through a glass ball left on top of the couch. Thankfully, someone was at home and smelled the smoke or the incident could have been much worse. Cars 6 and 1, along with Engines 1 and 9, Truck-1 and Medic-1 responded to the alarm.

D ID YOU K NOW

New Britain, CT - On February 9th at approximately 2:00 P.M., just as the heavy snow from the Northeast Blizzard was starting to wind down, firefighters were dispatched to 116 West Street for a reported structure fire with people trapped. Before the fire department's arrival, a group of civilians placed a ladder to the third-floor of the threestory brick building, rescuing several residents. As fire and police units arrived, additional ladders

JUMP TO FILE #021017108 were placed and more trapped residents were rescued. Approximately 12 residents were rescued from the building. Some fire companies were delayed because of cars blocking the streets from the heavy snowfall. Interior firefighters who were working in extreme conditions had to

eventually pull out due to very strong winds feeding the fire beyond control. Every engine company was utilized as the fire continued to burn for several more hours. Mutual Aid was provided by the West Hartford, Hartford and Meriden Fire Departments. Four people were injured, including one firefighter who was taken to the hospital. - MICHAEL CARENZA JR.

?

Fire Fighting was actually a sport at the 1900 Olympics in Paris.

MICHAEL CARENZA JR.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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PAGE 12

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

PATCH OF THE MONTH If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

CITY OF HARTFORD FD

Hartford FD and CERT Find Way to Help Community Despite Snowstorm The Baltic Fire Department is located in New London County, Connecticut.

EUGENE WEBER JR.

Hartford, CT - A snowstorm on February 9th brought many challenges to the City of Hartford, but the "no excuses, just results" attitude of the Hartford Fire Department once again prevailed. The program manager (Mrs. Corrigan) of the "No Freeze Program" in Hartford was stuck at home in Wethersfield due to the snow, making her unable to drive to Center Church, located at 60 Gold Street, to open the doors for those in need.

JUMP TO FILE #021017119 Fire Chief Reginald Freeman promptly authorized LT. Lionel Thompson of the Special Services Unit to pick up Mrs. Corrigan from her home and safely transport her to the church. Unfortunately, the cooks for the program could not make it in either, so volunteers from the Hartford CERT (Commu-

nity Emergency Response Team) went to the church and helped prepare meals for those in need, including CERT lead, Mrs. Rhonda Leonard. Thanks to the kindness and determination of all those involved in getting the church opened, over 30 people in need that day were able to have warm shelter and a hot meal. - CITY OF HARTFORD FD

CITY OF HARTFORD FD

Hartford Lieutenant Retires After 22-Years of Service

Hartford, CT - On January 31st, Fire Chief Reginald D. Freeman and the Hartford Fire Marshal's Office thanked LT. Martin Jones for 22-years of dedicated service to the Hartford Fire Dept. and the City of Hartford. LT. Jones led as the senior Fire Marshal in the office and was instrumental in mentoring and coaching other Fire Marshals in the office with less tenure. May you and your family enjoy a well deserved retirement Martin. Your fire department family salutes you!

MICHAEL CARENZA JR.

Eight People Escape New Britain House Fire New Britain, CT - On January 18th around 12:50 A.M., firefighters responded to 87 Pennsylvania Avenue to find smoke showing from a two-story, double unit, wood-frame house. Upon their arrival, firefighters discovered fire in the attic. Eight people were able to escape the fire. Although the house did have working smoke alarms, they did not go off because the fire was believed to have started in the ceiling above the alarms before spreading into the attic. The fire was brought under control within 35-minutes and the cause is under investigation.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

CONNECTICUT

PROVIDED

Roxbury Family Displaced After Raging House Fire Roxbury, CT - Just after midnight on February 10th, the Northwest Public Safety Communication Center put out the tones for Roxbury Fire and EMS to respond to East Woods Road for a reported structure fire. Seconds later, an update reported that people were possibly trapped. The automatic mutual protocol was started in order to get additional help moving. East Woods Road is an unimproved dirt road in a remote area of town and an added challenge for firefighters was that the area had just received about 18-inches of snow the day before. The temperature outside was also only about 8-degrees. First arriving Fire Captain Brandon McGuinn, who lives just a few houses away, found a two-story, wood frame house with heavy fire on both floors and already through the roof. There were four occupants of the house who all were able to escape the fire safely. The victims gathered in a car down the street with their dog and awaited on the arrival of EMS to evaluate and shelter them. The first round of Mutual Aid units were dispatched from Bridgewater, Woodbury, Southbury and Washington as Roxbury Engine-12 arrived on

scene. Firefighters led off with a two-and-a-half inch attack line and attempted to knock down the heavy body of fire that had taken over the house. As Engine12 attacked the fire, Roxbury Engine-10 laid a four-inch line up East Woods Road to a wider area and set up for the tanker shuttle. An additional alarm for more tankers was sounded by Command. Roxbury Tanker-11 was initially joined by tankers from Southbury, Woodbury, Bridgewater, New Milford and Washington, but as the night wore on, additional tankers were dispatched from Litchfield, Bantam and Thomaston. Along with the initial two-and-a-half inch line, a blitzfire gun with a two-and-ahalf inch line was also stretched to side-"A" to put a master stream into operation. Those two lines, supplied by a tanker shuttle, proved to be difficult to maintain for long periods of time. Within short order, the fire took hold of the entire structure and within one-hour, the building had collapsed onto itself. There were no injuries reported and the State Fire Marshal's Office is investigating the cause. - BERNIE MEEHAN


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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CONNECTICUT

NORWALK FD CITY OF HARTFORD FD

Firefighter Injured at Morning House Fire in Norwalk Norwalk, CT - The Norwalk Fire Department responded to a fire in a single-family home at Kettle Road on February 13th at 7:55 A.M. Firefighters arrived to find a well-involved fire in the kitchen and the home heavily charged with smoke. Fire crews advanced three hose lines to extinguish the fire that had burned through the kitchen ceiling into a second-floor bedroom and into the rear knee walls of the structure. The bulk of

JUMP TO FILE #021317146 the fire was knocked down within 20-minutes of arrival and crews continued to open up the attic and walls to expose trapped fire. The three tenants of the house were not home at the time of the fire and the homeowners are out of the country. Fire Inspector Luca Feola is working to determine the

cause of the fire. The house was posted unfit for occupancy and the tenants are staying with friends. One firefighter received some burns to his neck while searching the second-floor for occupants during the fire. He was treated at the scene and released. Four engines, two trucks, one rescue and a Command car responded to the fire. - NORWALK FD

CITY OF HARTFORD FD

D/C Russo (Interior Division) converses with D/C Jones (Incident Commander) after exiting the structure.

Hartford Firefighters Save Exotic Birds from House Fire Hartford, CT - Hartford FD personnel were dispatched on the morning of February 7th to a working fire on Oxford Street, where they successfully saved several exotic birds that were trapped on the second-floor. NORWALK FD


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Two-Alarms Needed to Control Nashua House Fire Nashua, NH - On Thursday, January 26th at 7:16 A.M., Nashua Fire Alarm received a call reporting a house fire with people injured at 25 Ingalls Street, located in the city's Crown Hill section. Nashua Engine-4 JUMP TO FILE# was the first arriving 013117100 fire company and reported heavy smoke showing from a one-and-ahalf story, singlefamily home. A working fire was struck, bringing Engine-1 and Ladder-1 to the scene. Firefighters found the home's

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two occupants outside of the structure, both suffering from smoke inhalation and burns. The occupants were treated by firefighters and medics from American Medical Response before being transported to a local hospital for further treatment. Engine-4 stretched a one-andthree-quarter inch line and found heavy fire on the first and second floors of the home. Ladder-2, a tower unit, setup in the front of the building and put the bucket to the roof. Two supply lines were laid from Engines 1 and 2 to supply Engine-4. Deputy Chief MacDonald arrived on the scene, made a quick survey of the incident and struck a second-alarm, bringing Engines 3 and 6 to the scene. Crews found that heavy fire had taken hold of the entire house and a defensive attack was initiated. Numerous hand lines on the ground and over ladders poured water onto the flames. As the heavy fire broke through the roof, master streams from both ladder companies went to work to knock down the blaze. Engine-4 supplied water to Ladders 1 and 2 that were set up on the "Alpha/Bravo" and "Alpha" sides of the building. Engine-3 stretched an attack line to the "Delta" side of the building. Using axes, firefighters made a trench cut on the "Delta" side of the building, stopping flames from spreading into an attached ell. Crews faced balloon construction and very cluttered conditions, which allowed the flames to spread quickly throughout the house. The fire was under control one-and-ahalf hours after the arrival of the first companies. Several more hours of overhaul was needed before crews cleared the scene. The Nashua Fire Marshal's Office investigated the scene for a cause of the fire. Firefighters from Hudson, Merrimack and Hollis responded to the fire while firefighters from Tygnsborough, MA covered the Nashua stations.

DAVID S. MORIN

- DAVID MORIN

Visit us online for more news around the states. www.1rbn.com

DAVID S. MORIN


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

NEW HAMPSHIRE

IN SERVICE

March, 2017

PAGE 17

Enjoy taking photographs? Get the most out of your hobby!

If you have photos you would like to see in our “In Service” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

1st Responder News compensates correspondents for their article & photograph submissions.

Contact Lindsey TODAY for more information! Lindsey@1strespondernews.com JACK STAWASZ

Hollis, NH - The Hollis Fire Department runs this 2002 Pierce Dash, seen here at the annual Old Home Days Parade held in September every year.

845-534-7500 ext. 212


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

NEW HAMPSHIRE

STILL IN SERVICE If you have photos you would like to see in our “Still in Service� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

JACK STAWASZ

Brookline, NH - The Brookline FD still runs this 1969 Chevy, seen here at the annual Brookline Fourth of July parade. B. SPRAGUE

Hampstead Crews Faced with Heavy Fire Conditions on Arrival

Hampstead, NH - Shortly before 4:00 P.M. on January 23rd, the Hampstead Fire Department was toned out for a reported building fire. The first-due officer on scene reported a two-and-a-half story wood frame home, with heavy fire on the first-floor. Due to having no water supply available in the area, several additional fire departments were called to the scene for tankers. The fire was called under control within the hour and the last Hampstead units left the scene around 8:00 P.M. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

RICHARD BILLINGS


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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March, 2017

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MASSACHUSETTS

Harwich Firefighter Graduates from MA Firefighting Academy

JAKE O'CALLAGHAN/CWN

Two-Vehicle Crash in Harwichport

Harwichport, MA - On January 27th, a two-vehicle collision on Route-28, Post Office Square, sent the male driver of a Nissan Pathfinder to Cape Cod Hospital with unknown injuries. The crash occurred around 3:00 P.M. The female driver of a VW Tiguan told Harwich Police that solar glare caused her to strike the other car when she was pulling onto Route28. No charges will be filed. Route-28 was closed for approximately 45-minutes until the scene was cleared.

Harwich, MA - Harwich Firefighter Jeff Erving recently graduated from the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy 50-day recruit training program along with 34 other firefighters from 16 JUMP TO FILE# fire departments 021017128 across Massachusetts. “This rigorous professional training provides our newest firefighters with the basic skills to perform their jobs effectively and safely,� said State Fire Marshal Peter J. Ostroskey. Firefighter Erving began his career at the Harwich Fire Department as a provisional firefighter and was appointed to a full time position in August after Firefighter John Ayer retired. Firefighter Erving previously worked as an oncall firefighter with the Brewster Fire Department and is currently enrolled in the Paramedic program. Upon returning to Harwich, Firefighter Erving will be assigned to Group-2 under the supervision of Captain John Clarke. Training is continuous within the fire service and the Fire Academy gives new firefighters a foundation to build upon throughout their careers. - HARWICH FD

PROVIDED

Chief Norman Clarke presenting Firefighter Erving with his appointmentlast August.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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MASSACHUSETTS

Van Catches Fire After Colliding with School Bus in Whitman Whitman, MA - At approximately 10:15 A.M. on the rainy morning of Tuesday, January 24th, the Whitman Fire Department responded to the report of a motor vehicle accident involving a school bus at the intersection of South Avenue and UMP TO FILE# Franklin Street. J020317101 Ambulance-248, Engine-243 and Car-3 responded. A Hanson ambulance was near the scene, saw the MVA and stepped out to assist. They noticed that the van had caught fire in the engine compartment and quickly grabbed the small extinguishers located in their ambulance, enabling them to knock down the fire. The school bus was unoccupied at the time of the collision. The occupant of the van was transported to a local hospital with reported minor injuries. The cause of the motor vehicle accident is under investigation. - PAT TRAVERS

Read more news around New England on our website! www.1rbn.com

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM

PAT TRAVERS/NEFIREPHOTO.COM


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

Vehicle News Waltham, MA - Waltham FD took delivery of a 2016 Seagrave Attacker II rescue unit on January 24th. It has a walk-through body with a Cummins ISL-9450 HP, an Allison transmission and 35-KW onan PTO. Also included is a portable electric winch, capable of being mounted in four positions on the truck. Waltham Captain Paul Quaranto, Lt. John Babstock and Firefighter Greg Davis were instrumental in putting the specifications together.

JAKE O'CALLAGHAN/CWN

PETER LOBO

Space Heater Causes House Fire in Chatham

Chatham, MA - At approximately 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, January 25th, Chatham Fire and Rescue responded to a house fire at 2388 Main Street (Route-28). The house contained three apartments. A smoky condition confronted firefighters upon their arrival. One female occupant of the house was taken to Cape Cod Hospital for evaluation. Mutual Aid from Harwich Fire assisted at the scene. Chatham Police were able to keep Route-28 open with one lane during the incident. It was believed that a space heater may have caused the fire.

PETER LOBO

PETER LOBO


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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PAGE 24

March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

JAKE O'CALLAGHAN/CWN

MVA in Harwich Injures One Harwich, MA - At approximately 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, January 26th, a two-vehicle crash occurred on Route-124 at the exit ramp near Headwaters Drive. Harwich Police and the Mass. State Police responded to the scene and found that one person was injured. Harwich Fire and Rescue transported the driver of a Saturn sedan to Cape Cod Hospital with unknown injuries. Rush hour traffic in the area of the accident was backed up to the traffic lights at Queen Anne Road and Route-124 while crews worked at the scene.

PETER LOBO

New Waltham Firefighters who were sworn in at City Hall on February 3rd include Chief Paul Ciccone (center), Michael Carroll, David Castagno, Michael Leone, David Valego, Zachary Cardosa, Patricl Losi and Stephen Porter.

A Good Job VIDEO REVIEW

Video reviews by John Malecky

A Good Job Stories of the FDNY HBO Documentary Films Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, #4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800-522-8528 e-mail: fire-police-ems.com www.fire-police-ems.com Price: $19.00 (DVD) This is a 60-minute DVD comprised of a large group of interviews with FDNY firefighters of many ranks, both active and retired, about the memories of their careers, including the good times, the bad times, the happy and sad moments, times of transition and the personal effects that the ordeals and experiences left on them. The interviews are done by Steve Buscami, an award winning actor and director, who prior to his acting career, had taken the test for firefighter in 1976 and spent four years at Engine-55 in the Little Italy section of Manhattan. Steve returned to Engine-55 after 9/11 to lend a hand on “the pile," in search of missing members. The interviews address “the war years,” named for the fires in the 1960’s and 1970’s, including the Madison Square Tragedy

which claimed 12 firefighters in 1966 and the Waldbaum’s roof collapse in Brooklyn in 1978, which claimed six members. The advent of female firefighters, black firefighters, self-contained breathing apparatus and new bunker clothing is discussed. Two retired female firefighters, including a battalion chief, give details of their indoctrination and treatment when women first got assigned to stations. The Happyland Social Club fire in 1989 is discussed and of course, the World Trade Center in 2001. Some of those interviewed lost family members, including two sons of Deputy Chief Ray Downey. The firehouse kitchen is touched on where jokes and horseplay abound, especially with probationary firefighters. Retired commissioner Sal Cassano and retired Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn are interviewed. Dunn could have lost his life at the Madison Square fire with the difference of his order by the deputy chief and the order given to Engine-18. If those orders were reversed, we would never have benefited from his textbooks, one of which was “The Collapse of Burning Buildings!” I believe this video will keep your undivided attention for it's duration and help both firefighters and non firefighters to appreciate what working in a burning building is like, realizing that the horrors of the job can stay with the person for many years to come.

PETER LOBO

Waltham Firefighters promoted on February 3rd include Chief Paul Ciccone (center), Matt Cunningham to Lieutenant, Scott Lawson to Lieutenant, Brian Kiernan to Lieutenant, John Bonadio to Captain and Tom Ferrick to Captain.

Waltham FD Holds Ceremony for Promotions and Inducts Nine New Firefighters Waltham Fire Dept. inducted nine new firefighters and promoted five current firefighters during a ceremony held at Waltham City Hall on February 3rd.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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MASSACHUSETTS

WSFD firefighters are silhouetted by the fire as they wait for water in their attack line.

NATE ARNOLD

Fire Levels Vacant Clubhouse in West Springfield West Springfield, MA - Just before 2:00 A.M. on February 14th, West Springfield Police Department units were on routine patrol in the south side of the city when they found an abandoned building, formerly belonging to the West Springfield Boat Club, fully engulfed in flames. Although West Springfield firefighters arrived on the scene within minutes of the call from the PD, there was little that could be done to save the building, as the fire had taken total possession of the singlestory structure. There was also a

JUMP TO FILE #021517112 delay in getting hydrant water, as the nearest hydrant had an anti-tamper device attached to the bonnet that required special equipment to unlock, which is only carried in the Deputy Chief's response vehicle. To complicate matters even further, recent snowstorms had dumped more than one-foot of snow on the region and due to the vacant status of the clubhouse, the property around it had not been

plowed. Once a positive water supply was established, WSFD firefighters opened up an apparatus mounted deck gun, ladder pipe and several hand lines to knock down the fire. The clubhouse was deemed a total loss and the cause of the fire is under investigation by the West Springfield Fire Department and the State Fire Marshal's Office, but will likely remain undetermined due to the fact that the clubhouse was leveled by the fire. - NATE ARNOLD

K. LEGER

Cooking Mishap Likely Cause of Blaze in Fall River Fall River, MA - At 6:06 P.M. on February 16th, the first call was received reporting a fire at 488 Ridge Street, a threedecker structure located in a densely packed neighborhood in the city's south end. Engines 2, 4, 5, along with Ladders 2 and 4, Rescue-1 and Car-3, were dispatched to the scene. District Chief Jeff Bacon arrived and established Ridge Street Command and reported heavy fire showing from the first-floor of a three-story wood frame. The structure was located in the rear yard of two other triple-deckers, so aerial operations were out of the question. Crews from Ladders 2 and 4 used a 50-foot bangor ladder to access the roof. Engine-4 took the hydrant and fed Engine-5 while both crews stretched the leader lines into the rear yard to attack the rapidly intensifying fire. The occupant reported that she had food cooking on the stove when the fire started in the kitchen and immediately evacuated the home and called the fire department. Firefighters made an aggressive interior attack and knocked down the heavy fire in the kitchen and living room. Command called for a second-alarm and Mutual Aid to cover because of conditions on arrival and the location of the building. Special Services arrived to provide rehab and lighting for the scene. The Red Cross was also called in to assist seven people who were displaced by the fire.

NATE ARNOLD


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

MEMORIAL BOARD

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Memorial Board” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Remembering Past Springfield FF Robert J. “Bobby” Kennedy Springfield, MA - With heavy hearts, the Springfield FD recently announced that past Firefighter Robert J. “Bobby" Kennedy, 92, passed away peacefully while surrounded by his family. He was the fifth child of Irish JUMP TO FILE# immigrant parents. 021017113 He is predeceased by his parents, Mary Bridget Fitzgerald and Thomas Joseph Kennedy, and six siblings, Mary Ellen, Thomas, Ann, Kathleen, James and Margaret. Robert grew up during the Great Depression in the Hungry Hill section of Springfield. He joined the U.S. Navy and served his country in World War II and the Korean Conflict. In 1953, he married Ann Fitzgerald and together, they raised four children. He was a Springfield firefighter for 31-years and proudly owned and operated Kennedy Termite and Pest Control. Robert was an active volunteer in his church, coordinating bingo, coaching softball and baseball teams in East Springfield and running parish blood drives with the Knights of Columbus. He retired to Cape Cod for 13-years, spending his days fishing and enjoying his grandchildren. He returned to Springfield to be closer to his fam-

GREAT BARRINGTON FD

Great Barrington Firefighter Retires After 20-Years of Service

Past Springfield Firefighter Robert J. “Bobby" Kennedy.

ily in 1998. His love of food was legendary, surpassed only by his love of family. Although he had a tendency to get himself into mischief, Robert was the life of the party. He was a champion of the underdog and a fiercely loyal friend who would give you the shirt off his back. He leaves behind his loving wife of 63-years, Ann, as

PROVIDED

well as his four children, Theresa, Geraldine, John (Beth Kondracki) and Joe (Cindy Matte), 10 grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. The lives of those who knew him have been forever changed and his memory will be cherished always. - SPRINGFIELD FD

ALL IN THE FAMILY

If you have photos you would like to see in our “All in the Family” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Harwich, MA - The Harwich Fire Department held a swearing in ceremony on February 17th at the Public Safety Facility for new Firefighter Christina Brown. Firefighter Brown’s father, Dennis Deputy Fire Chief Robert Brown, pinned her badge on as part of the ceremony.

CRAIG CHADWICK

Great Barrington, MA - When this Housatonic Faithful (and proud Grandfather) joined the fire department, he decided that he would do the job for 20 years. Well, 20 years has come and holding true to his self-promise, GBFD Firefighter Tom Lovett attended his last training on January 30th. This kind man, a voice of reason and experience, will be missed deeply by his firefighter family. Best of luck to you Tom!


March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

PAGE 27

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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

MASSACHUSETTS

DRILLS/TRAINING

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Drills/Training” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Middleboro, MA - In January, Middleboro firefighters worked with students from Middleboro High School as part of a recruit training program. The students donned rescue suits and entered the water, where they learned the techniques used to make cold water rescues.

NATE ARNOLD

Middleboro High School students work together during cold water training. JOHN SJOSTEDT

The students race in the water while learning how to move in the rescue suits. JOHN SJOSTEDT

DID YOU K NOW

Engine-3 on the "A/B" corner of 808 Dwight Street as fire pushes from a vent cut just below Truck1's aerial.

Attic Fire Damages Single-Family Home in Holyoke Holyoke, MA - An attic fire that heavily damaged the upper portion of a two-and-a-half story, wood frame, single-family home just outside of downtown Holyoke, displaced two residents on February 9th and further highlighted the understaffing issue the city's fire department is currently facing. Holyoke firefighters were called to the address of 808 Dwight Street shortly after midnight for a reported structure fire. Once again, as has been the case for the last two years, Engine Company-2, who would have been the second-due engine on this as-

JUMP TO FILE #021217100 signment, was out of service for the night tour due to low manpower. This resulted in calling Engine Company-3 from the Northampton Street firehouse to the scene as the second-due pumper instead of third-due. Eventually, due to the fact that the fire was deep-seated in the attic and difficult to access, Dwight Street Command had to special call nearly all of the city's available apparatus and manpower,

making the fire a second-alarm equivalent. Companies utilized a transitional attack method, attacking the fire from the inside, then backing out briefly to darken it down with a portable monitor before going back inside to chase hot spots and check for extension. The blaze kept 99-percent of the city's apparatus and manpower on the scene for nearly one hour and required both Mutual Aid station coverage, and the recall of off-duty personnel to staff reserve apparatus. - NATE ARNOLD

?

“Jake,” a slang term for “Firefighter,” was first used during the early 20th century in the Greater Boston area. Although it’s origins are recognized as “officially unknown,” many agree that the affectionate term was derived from the “J-Key,” a key shaped like the letter ‘J’ that was used to open the fire alarm box. The firefighters who held the J-key to open the fire box began being referred to as “Jakes”.

NATE ARNOLD


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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Why Isn’t it Okay to be a Fit Firefighter?

It seems almost silly that I’m writing this article. It actually seems like a great waste of time that it even has to be written. However, my inbox continues to fill with questions about why it’s so hard to convince other members of their departments that being fit is really a good thing. It’s almost unreal that in our society we are still convincing people that being fit is good; that our bodies weren’t made to carry hundreds of extra pounds, or that our joints and muscles need to be utilized and trained to work well, or that our organs can only work with our help. Oh and by the way, all of that applies to firefighters' bodies too. We don’t get a “service” discount on that one. As firefighters, why do we create these stigmas when it comes to fitness within our service, and why do we allow them to continue? I suppose it depends on how you look at the bigger picture because about 30years ago, we wore hip boots and long coats. At that time, anyone who wore bunker pants was wrong. Same with Self Contained Breathing Apparatus. I think we can all agree that the level of protection bunker pants provides is far superior to that of hip boots. Wearing your SCBA is much better than eating smoke. In the end, bunker pants are good and so are SCBAs. So, maybe fitness is just as good...maybe even a better thing for the fire service than bunker pants and SCBAs. In part-one of this two part series, I plan to point out some of the common pitfalls that seem to plague the fire service when it comes to fitness and in part-two, I plan to address

some ways to overcome them. Let’s start off with the biggest one of all. Fitness standards will be used as a way to discipline or even replace firefighters, further discourJUMP TO FILE #013017120

aging people from volunteering. It’s very possible that if a department established a mandatory health and wellness program, a person who refuses to participate could be removed from that department. Why anyone would refuse is a mystery to me. It’s a proven fact that participating in a health and wellness program sponsored by your employer is a benefit to the employee, not to mention you'd also have an added benefit, called living a better life. The statement above also applies on the volunteer end; but, if you have an established health and wellness plan, do you really want a person to volunteer who doesn’t want to be a part of it? Our Line-of-Duty-Death numbers should answer that question for you... Then we have the firefighter who still feels that the only reason we want to workout is so we look good at the beach. Well, maybe looking good at the beach isn’t such a bad thing for the fire service. After all, we are constantly in the “public's eye." So tell me, who do you want representing your department? The firefighter who looks good at the beach, or the firefighter who can’t see his/her belt buckle because their stomach is hanging over it. Please realize that the above statements have zero bearing on appearance.

Take a moment and picture this...you just called a Mayday from a collapse. Which of the above firefighters would you want on your Rapid Intervention Team? A firefighter fitness "hater line" that I just can’t seem to wrap my head around is when someone says "you shouldn’t workout on-duty, or at the firehouse because you might be “tired” from working out when a reported fire comes, impairing your ability to respond." In that case, I suppose we should never stretch lines, or put up the ladder, or do any form of training while on-duty because what if a reported fire comes in and we’re tired? It makes no sense to me at all. We are not “working out” at work. We are training our bodies to do our job. We just have to be smart enough to not deplete our entire tank, same as how we watch the air gauge in our masks while entering a commercial structure. In part-two of this series, I will better explain how to create a fitness culture within your department and trust me, the "quick-fix" haters won’t like this one either simply because it won’t cost $29.99, nor provide free shipping, nor promise you the ultimate weight loss or fitness solution specifically designed and doctor approved for firefighters. At the end of the day, don’t let any haters keep you down, just let them keep on hating! Every new change that was brought to the fire service was met with resistance and every new change that comes along will be met the same way, fitness included. - ROBERT “PIP” PIPARO

PROVIDED

MASSACHUSETTS

K. LEGER

Very little damage was done to this apartment with the exception of the third-floor where the fire was found.

Early Morning Fatal Fire in Fall River

Fall River, MA - A 60-yearold female was the first fire fatality of 2017 in Fall River. Firefighters responded at 4:30 A.M. on February 10th to 356 Globe Street in the city's south end for a reported smoke detector activation with an odor of smoke in the dwelling. Car-3, under the Command of District Chief Jeffery Bacon, arrived on scene within minutes and reported nothing showing. Chief Bacon made his way into the apartment and reported an active fire on the third-floor with a possible victim. Without the protection of a charged hose line, Bacon was able to get about five-feet into the apartment before being forced to retreat due to the high heat conditions. Engines 2, 4 and 5 along with Ladders 2 and 4, Rescue-1 and Car-3 were dispatched to the

scene. Upon arrival, the crews from Engines 4 and 5 made an aggressive interior attack and conducted a primary search with the members of Rescue-1. An unresponsive female was found and removed to awaiting paramedics who immediately began life saving measures. The victim was transported to a local hospital but after a long battle in the emergency room, she succumbed to her injuries. Investigators believe the resident attempted to fight the fire when she was overcome by smoke inhalation. The building sustained minimal damage and proves that modern structures and furniture burn hotter and give off more toxic gasses than ever before. - KENNETH LEGER


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MASSACHUSETTS

GOSHEN FD

Vehicle Crashes and Rolls Down Pittsfield Firefighters Embankment in Lithia Battle House Fire PITTSFIELD FD

Pittsfield, MA - On the morning of January 15th, Pittsfield FD's "D" group worked in freezing conditions to get a well-advanced, fast moving fire under control on Dalton Avenue. Firefighters were able to save a large portion of the building and no lives were lost thanks to the honorable efforts of an upstairs tenant. Mutual Aid companies were also on the scene to assist.

Lithia, MA - Goshen firefighters, along with both Highland Ambulances and two MA State Police units, responded to the report of a motor vehicle rollover with entrapment on Route-9 near Sears Road at 3:15 P.M. on January 15th. Upon their arrival, crews found a female passenger who had already self-extricated by crawling out of the vehicle's rear window. The driver, who was more seriously injured, was removed by bystanders through the passenger side

JUMP TO FILE #021017116 door. Both occupants were transported to Berkshire Medical Center in Pittsfield for further treatment. The vehicle was traveling eastbound when it left the roadway and hit a snowbank, causing it to become airborne. After shearing a utility pole at its base, the vehicle landed sideways on its wheels in the shoulder of the street approxi-

mately 25-feet away before rolling down an embankment onto its roof. Traffic was reduced to one lane while emergency crews worked at the scene. A tow truck from Leibenow's in Cummington was able to right the vehicle and tow it away. Crews from National Grid replaced the utility pole while a team from Verizon was dispatched to repair damaged phone lines. - GOSHEN FD

JOHN SJOSTEDT

MVA in Kingston Leaves Three Injured and One Dead Kingston, MA - Firefighters were dispatched to an MVA with multiple injuries on February 5th. First arriving units found a vehicle on it's side in the woods. It was determined that the vehicle had left the road and traveled approximately 50-feet into the woods. Mutual Aid ambulances were called in from Duxbury, Pembroke and Plymouth. Three patients were extricated from the vehicle, two of which were transported by ground to South Shore Hospital. The third patient was transported to the Kingston Intermediate School Landing Zone, where Boston Medflight took over care and transported the patient to Mass General Hospital. A fourth person was found deceased in the vehicle upon firefighters' arrival.

CHARLTON FD

Charlton Crews Extricate Driver from Vehicle After MVA

Charlton, MA - Charlton crews responded to the intersection of Route-20 and N. Main Street just before noon on January 26th for reports of a two-car MVA. Upon arrival, crews determined that the driver of one vehicle was entrapped. The firefighters used electric spreaders to remove the door from the vehicle which allowed them to extricate the driver. The patients were then transported to local hospitals by Charlton and Sturbridge ambulances.


1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

VERMONT

GREG RAMSDELL

Firefighters Respond to Lake Champlain for Reports of Windsurfer Through Ice

Swanton, VT - On January 16th at approximately 11:18 A.M., the Swanton Fire Department and AmCare Ambulance (in place of Missisquoi Valley Rescue Unit-2), responded to Maquam Shore Road for a possible windsurfer through the ice on Lake Champlain. Firefighters went out on the ice and made contact with the windsurfer. He was confirmed fine and had no injuries. His sail had broken, but he was able to make it to shore safely.

PATCH OF THE MONTH

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com.

GREG RAMSDELL

Head-On Collision in Swanton Sends Two to Hospital

Swanton, VT - On February 3rd at approximately 8:08 A.M., Missisquoi Valley Rescue (MVR) Units 1 and 2 along with the Swanton Fire Department, Vermont State Police (VSP), Swanton Police Department and the US Border Patrol responded to Route-78 near the Blue Ford Motel for a head-on collision involving two vehicles. One person from each vehicle was transported by MVR Units 1 and 2 to a local hospital. One of the patients was transported for a knee injury and lacerations to the hand while the other was transported for unknown injuries. The roads were extremely slippery at the time of the incident which may have contributed to the cause of the crash. Firefighters stayed on scene to contain leaking fluids. The accident remains under investigation by VSP.

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1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

March, 2017

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March, 2017

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RHODE ISLAND

DRILLS/TRAINING

If you have photos you would like to see in our “Drills/Training” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Portsmouth, RI - On January 19th, the Portsmouth C-Platoon conducted refresher training inside the station on ice rescue equipment. No ice... no problem! Ice rescues are a high risk/low frequency event for responders. It is imperative that firefighters maintain proficiency so they may execute a successful ice rescue safely and without responder causalities. When not responding to calls, training like this is a daily event for Portsmouth firefighters and members of surrounding departments.

PORTSMOUTH FD

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Does Social Media Belong in Today’s Fire Service?

Today, almost everyone has a smart phone and endless opportunities to record life in real time, the good and the bad. Fire departments must now embrace the social media world in which we live. But what role does social media play in the fire service? Most fire departments now have an SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) or SOG (Standard Operating Guideline) addressing social media. But is social media helping or hurting your department? Herein lies the problem. Does the SOP or SOG truly guide the fire service to use social media to their advantage? Public Relations is something the fire service has definitely not mastered. As a rookie volunteer firefighter in the early 90’s, one of the first things stressed to me was “Never take any pictures because you will end up in court." The truth is, I would end up in court with or without the pictures and it would be much more difficult to convey accuracy without pictures to support and recreate the scene. Several departments have now used social media, such as Facebook and Instagram, to propel their departments to a new level. This allows fire departments the ability to reach a new generation of firefighters because the new generation is definitely connected by technology and social media. Some departments have even utilized social media to enlist community support to obtain new apparatus, afford pay raises, and seek potential new personnel. Social media has also heightened public awareness of the dangers involved with firefighting and virtually taken viewers into the fire via social media. Scott Ziegler, a firefighter with Detroit Fire Department, wore a helmet cam for a year while employed as a firefighter with Highland Park, Michigan Fire Department. Scott then appeared on national news, giving the nation a glimpse into the lifethreatening experiences a firefighter faces every day. Am I implying that all social media, or even news media coverage is good? Absolutely not! The key is to train staff about social media etiquette and how to embrace the photographers on the side lines of the scene or during an incident. Yes, you read that correctly; “photographers on the side lines". I recently traveled to California to experience fire photography as a fire chaser, known as buffing. I had the honor of working side by side with two Southern California fire photographers, Tod Sudmeier (@epn564) and Brandy Carlos (@epn106). I was amazed at how many fire departments not only welcomed our presence, but they actually encouraged us to get close to the action. Of course, we followed the safety rules outlined by each fire de-

BRANDY CARLOS/@EPN106

Chief Joel Miller, Federal Government Fire Chief, fire department social media consultant and owner of the world’s largest Fire Instagram page (@chief_miller).

partment, such as wearing wildland firefighting gear as we stood on the front lines, streaming live footage via Periscope and Facebook Live to hundreds, even thousands of viewers around the world. We each shared awesome pictures capturing the action in real time on some of the world’s largest fire service based social media sites. Social media has even helped the fire service recruit some of the best candidates for the job simply due to the awareness and visibility, triggering an increase in applicants. Los Angeles County, Los Angeles City and Cal Fire are some of the most recognizable departments in the world, partially due to social media and dedicated fire photographers. Social media also raises community awareness of the great service their tax dollars are paying for. Shortly after my California experience, again with California fire photographers Tod Sudmeier (@epn564) and Brandy Carlos (@epn106), we traveled to Detroit, Michigan. Detroit is one of the country’s most deprived cities and busiest fire departments. They are confronted with a high number of arson related fires. I found that the Battalion Chief would be the one to set the temperature as to how well received the fire photographers were on scene. I made calls where the Battalion Chief himself would be snapping shots as much as he could. Most Battalion Chiefs welcomed us as we followed their rules and stayed out of harm’s way. Real-time live broadcast from DFD went out around the world via social media. The world saw top notch firefighters doing an amazing job, despite the struggles

their department has experienced in the way of equipment and manpower. We later responded to a call with DFD where the Battalion Chief was anti-fire photographer and anti-social media. As one photographer was streaming live to viewers world-wide (while obeying all the rules and respecting the firefighters on scene from a safe distance outside the hotzone), the Battalion Chief began yelling at him. The photographer, a retired firefighter himself, chose to cut the live feed as to not reflect negatively on the fire department. After all, it was the firefighters that we were there to represent and they deserve the utmost respect. Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident and the photographer has felt it necessary to cut live feed on other occasions at different locations. Realistically, we live in a world where everyone is at the mercy of social media. Fire departments need to embrace the professional fire photographers, as their goal of honoring the fire service is the one true defense guarding fire departments from the negative effects social media can bring. Your department can either stand by and become a casualty of social media, or your department can choose to prepare staff and public relation officers on how to use social media to propel your department to the next level. Social media is here to stay. I encourage each of you to choose a direction and develop a plan for the role social media will play in the success of your department. The choice is yours, make it a good one! - CHIEF JOEL MILLER


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

RHODE ISLAND

PATCH OF THE MONTH If you have photos you would like to see in our “Patch of the month “feature please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

PORTSMOUTH FD

Union Fire District is located in South Kingstown, Rhode Island.

RICHARD COLLINSON

ON THE LITER SIDE

If you have photos you would like to see in our “On The Liter Side” feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Lindsey@1stResponderNews.com

Portsmouth Firefighters Rescue Woman from House Fire Portsmouth, RI - Firefighters responded to 98 Hargraves Drive at 3:20 P.M. on February 1st following a 911 call reporting a kitchen fire. Firefighters arrived one-minute later to find smoke coming from the home and an elderly woman trapped at an open window on the second-floor. Crews threw a ground ladder to the window and moved the woman to a nearby balcony while other responders extinguished the fire. The woman was removed from the house and treated for

JUMP TO FILE #020317114 smoke inhalation before eventually being transported to Newport Hospital by Tiverton Fire Department ambulance with non-lifethreatening injuries. A second occupant was treated at the scene for minor burns to the face and hands, but refused transport despite medical advice. The fire spread from the stove top to adjacent cabinets and walls,

causing smoke damage throughout the home. Portsmouth Police redirected neighborhood traffic during the incident. The RI Fire Marshal's Office was at the scene investigating and Naval Station Newport Fire Department covered the station during the fire. Chief Michael Cranson thanked the Mutual Aid partners who responded to assist during the fire and commended all on a job well done. - PORTSMOUTH FD

PORTSMOUTH FD

Portsmouth, RI - The Portsmouth FD proudly posted this fire helmet photo on their Facebook page two weeks before the New England Patriots defeated the Atlanta Falcons at Super Bowl 51!

Visit us on the web!

www.1rbn.com

PORTSMOUTH FD


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March, 2017

1ST Responder Newspaper - NE

NEW ENGLAND APPARATUS OF THE MONTH A look at what’s new with apparatus around the states with John Malecky

Dear Readers, Greenwood Emergency Vehicles has delivered the following: in Massachusetts, an E-ONE Cyclone II 100foot platform to Webster. Features include a Cummins ISX, 500-HP diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS transmission, Hale Qmax 2000-GPM pump, electronic stability control, Rolltek/4 front protection system and a 15-KW Smart Power hydraulic generator. Southborough received an E-ONE Typhoon pumper with a Cummins ISAL, 450-HP diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, FRC in control pressure governor, E-ONE 1500GPM pump, Trident air primer, UPF 1000-gallon water tank, 20-gallon Class “A” foam tank, 30-gallon Class “B” foam tank and an FRC Turbo Foam System. Newton received an E-ONE Cyclone II custom heavy rescue with a Cummins ISL, 350-HP diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Onan 25-KW PTO, hydraulic generator and a 12,000-pound Warn winch. Nahant Ambulance received a Horton ambulance on a Ford F-550 chassis powered by a 300-HP 6.7 V-8 diesel engine. Manchester, NH received an EONE Typhoon pumper with a Cummins ISL, 450-HP diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, electronic stability control, Hale Qmax 2000-GPM pump, UPF 750-gallon water tank, 30-gallon Class “A” foam tank, 40-gallon Class “B” foam tank Hale Foamlogix 5.0 system and Hale EZ Fill Foam System. Minuteman Trucks has delivered a Road Rescue Ultramedic Type-1 ambulance to the Naples, Maine Fire Rescue Department. It is on a Ford F550 4x4 chassis. It has a cab roof mounted remote control spotlight, Whisper Quiet Sound Dampening/thermal insulation, SCBA mounts and ALS cabinets at the head and foot of the squad bench. Minuteman Trucks has also made the following Pierce deliveries: in Massachusetts, Duxbury received a

Dash CF, PUC 189 pumper with a Cummins ISL, diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, stainless steel body, 1500-GPM pump, 750-gallon water tank, Husky-3 foam system and a 3.6-KW Harrison generator. Dennis received an Arrow XT pumper with medium rescue body of stainless steel, Cummins ISL diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Hale 1500-GPM pump, 500-gallon water tank, Husky-12 foam system, hydraulic ladder rack, custom EMS cabinets, Westerbeke 10-KW generator with XRT hydraulic tool system, two each electric cord and hydraulic reels, Whelen scene lights and pre-connected hose line on an extended front bumper. Cambridge received an Enforcer, PUC 189 pumper with Cummins ISL diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, 1250-GPM pump, 500gallon water tank, Husky-12 foam system, stainless steel body, front bumper turret with enhanced pump & roll and a 250-gallon foam tank. Hadley received an Arrow XT PUC 189, rescue pumper with stainless steel body, Detroit DD13 diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS transmission, 1500-GPM pump, 750-gallon water tank, Husky/Hercules foam system, Harrison 6-KW generator, Hi-Viz brow light, Whelen scene lights, Will Burt Night Scan, cord reels, oil absorbent hopper, low crosslays remote controlled deck gun, passenger side camera with pump panel mounted display (allows operator to view fireground front opposite side), and St. Pierre tire chains. Springfield received a Velocity PUC 189 pumper with stainless steel body, Detroit DD13 diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS transmission, 1500GPM pump, 750-gallon water tank, Husky-12 system, 20-gallon foam tank, low hose bed and a new style front intake. Tewksbury received an Enforcer PUC, 107-foot Ascendant aerial with a Cummins ISL diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, 1500-GPM pump, 500-gallon water tank, Husky-

3 foam system, On-Spot chains, Whelen scene lights, 22-inch extended front bumper, 182-feet of ground ladders, inside/outside access EMS cabinet, 750-pound aerial tip load, 1500-GPM store front Blitz option for aerial waterway, enclosed speedlays and enclosed pump panel. In New Hampshire, Nashua received an Arrow XT pumper with stainless steel, medium body, Cummins ISL 9, 400-HP diesel engine, Allison 3000 EVS transmission, Waterous 1500-GPM pump, 750-gallon water tank, external Elkhart inductor with 40-gallon Class “B foam tank, New York style low hose bed and a Harrison 3.6-KW generator. Keene received an Enforcer pumper with aluminum, medium body, Detroit DD13, 500-HP diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS transmission, Hale 1500GPM pump, 1000-gallon water tank, Husky-3 system and custom EMS compartments. Meredith received an Arrow XT pumper/tanker with aluminum body, Detroit DD13 diesel engine, Allison 4500 EVS six-speed transmission with Prognostics, Waterous 1750-GPM pump, 2500-gallon water tank, Husky3 Class “A foam system with four discharges, 20-gallon foam tank, air horn control at pump panel, side and rear cameras, Whelen scene lighting 10inch dump valves (right, left and rear), Zico tank and ladder rack. Windsor, Vermont received a minipumper with utility body and skid. Mounted on a Ford F-550 chassis, it has a Ford, 6.8L engine, automatic transmission, aluminum body, Darley 200-GPM pump, 300-gallon water tank and a transverse compartment. Showhegan, Maine received an Enforcer, 107-foot Ascendant aerial with PUC 1500-GPM pump. It has a Detroit DD13 diesel engine, Allison 4000 EVS transmission, 500-gallon water tank, Whelen scene lighting, 750pound aerial tip load, 1500-GPM ladderpipe, 30-degree store front Blitz ladderpipe, 139-feet of ground ladders, three enclosed speedlays and an 8-KW generator.

Newton, MA - The City of Newton recently received this 2016 E-One Custom Cyclone II Heavy Rescue, sold by Greenwood Emergency Vehicles.

GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

GREENWOOD EMERGENCY VEHICLES

Manchester, NH - The Manchester FD recently received this 2016 E-One Custom Typhoon Pumper, sold by Greenwood Emergency Vehicles.

Windsor, VT - The Windsor Fire Department recently received this mini-pumper, sold by Minuteman Fire & Rescue Apparatus, Inc.

MINUTEMAN FIRE & RESCUE APPARATUS, INC.

Please send any comments or news tidbits you might have about Apparatus of the Month to us at 1st Responder News, 1 Ardmore Street. New Windsor, NY 12553. Or you can e-mail them to Apparatus@1stResponderNews.com.

MINUTEMAN FIRE & RESCUE APPARATUS, INC.

Skowhegan, ME - The Skowhegan Fire Department recently received this aerial truck, designated as Truck-11 and sold by Minuteman Fire & Rescue Apparatus, Inc.


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The After Affects of LODD or Injury STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

Who else is affected when a firefighter gets injured or killed is a question many of us in the fire service tend to avoid, or not dwell upon. Unfortunately, that doesn’t make the realities and pain of life go away and all emergency service personnel should realize that the death and/or injury of a firefighter will have far reaching impact in their family, department and community. The injury that befalls a firefighter can be a lasting and traumatic experience; in some instances, it may require extensive long-term medical treatment and care, maybe disfiguration, paralysis, or living the rest of one’s life with a permanent disability. It can be a very high price to pay, especially if the injury could have been prevented. The ultimate price would be the death of a firefighter as an immediate result of performance of duty, or at a later date from complications from injuries sustained while in the performance of duty. Needless to say, death is final, the last whistle has blown and the game has come to an abrupt end. Spouses, families, friends, department and community will be heartbroken and saddened, and they may be devastated by the loss of a brother/sister firefighter. With the sadness brought about by death or injury, in the days and years ahead there will be many problems and issues that will have to be addressed and overcome, and in most instances, they will have a lasting impact on the family, department and community. We can evaluate this impact in the form of physical, financial, emotional and psychological stress. The physical damage will be in the form of the injury, medical care needed and potential for rehabilitation. Many firefighters think small when they think of injuries; a cut, broken bone, sprain, minor burn, or some form of injury that will be short-term and soon forgotten. Unfortunately, there are other forms of injuries that may render the firefighter incapacitated for the rest of their life, placing a tremendous burden on family, friends and the department to always be there in support. Some victims and their families may have tremendous difficulty in handling the emotional and psychological trauma that can accompany long-term injury and potential confinement to bed, a wheel chair, or walker, and

the endless medical appointments and treatments. Included will be the additional stresses in providing home care and transportation for an incapacitated individual. It will not be an easy task, and it will be fraught with deep mixed emotional feelings and at times, frustration and “Why me?”. What about the financial and economic aspects of being injured? Who will pick up the bills, both medical and living expenses? In most instances, it will be the department's insurance carrier, or the local municipality, or state government through Workers Compensation, Volunteer Benefits Law, or the state pension system. What about future educational requirements for children and all those little extras one gets accustomed to, where will the extra cash come from? In most instances it stops and may bring about a change in lifestyle for the family. The department will suffer for a variety of reasons, including saddened and weakened morale, increased costs for liability and workers compensation, increased workload, and additional operating costs. Some of these will also trickle down to the community, as any financial increases for the department will inevitably be passed on to them. The department and the community will be effected by the loss of services. In the death of a firefighter, much of the impact and burden mentioned previously will be similar, but nothing will replace the fallen firefighter. There will be the mourning and wake, generally followed by a departmental funeral attended by colleagues from surrounding jurisdictions, all of which is quite ceremonial and impressive. More importantly, it doesn’t bring you back to life. Neither will all the benefits that come with dying in the line-ofduty. And remember, you don’t get the benefits, your survivors do as they will surely need them. These benefits have greatly increased over the years, but they still aren’t worth dying for. Practicing firefighter safety and maintaining an attitude to stay safe will help keep you out of harm’s way and extend your life and career. Remember, death is forever and much longer than life, so do your best to live a long, healthy life in the performance of your duties by looking out for your personal safety and the safety of your fellow firefighters. When you do, you will also be looking out for those silent partners consisting of family, friends, department and community, to whom you mean so much. Till next time, Stay Safe and God Bless!

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