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MARCH, 2016

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On February 5th, a crane collapsed on 40 Worth Street (Esq. West Broadway) in the Tribeca in Lower Manhattan. The New York City Fire Department (Fdny), the department of buildings, and Emergency Management went immediately to the scene. - See full story on page 9

- Page 6


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March, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

JOHN HOPPER

Garage fire in Queens

On Thursday, February 4, 2016 at approximately 6:00 p.m., Queens dispatchers started receiving numerous calls for a garage on fire at 62-01 60 Street at 62 Avenue. Ladder 140 arrived on scene and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire in a one story 15x20 garage in the rear of a private dwelling on 60 Street. The fire started in a car in the garage and was quickly knocked down and the incident was placed under control with an approximate ten minute duration.

STEVE WHITE

Two maydays at Staten Island blaze Staten Island, NY. On February 1st at 9 p.m., FDNY firefighters were alerted to a structure fire at 1053 Sinclair Avenue in Staten Island. Crews arrived to find heavy fire in the basement of a two story 50x30. All hands were needed on arrival with an extra engine and truck. At 9:19, DC08 ordered a

JUMP TO FILE #020216104 second alarm for heavy fire in the basement. A mayday was transmitted and command ordered a 10-66. with a third alarm assignment. At 9:26, DC08 reported two firefighters recovered. EMS re-

ported two firefighters are yellow tags and transported to Staten Island North Hospital. Chief of Departement James Leonard was also enroute. At 10:13 p.m., the fire was probably will hold. Car 3 reported the fire under control at 11:00 p.m. - STEVE WHITE

ON THE LITER SIDE If you have photos you would like to see in our “On The Liter Side� feature, please upload them on our website, www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JOHN HOPPER

Bronx companies quickly knock top floor fire On Thursday, February 4, 2016, Bronx companies turned out to 940 Grand Concourse at East 163 Street for a report of a fire on the top floor of a multiple dwelling. Battalion 17 arrived on scene and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire in the bathroom of a fifth floor apartment, some fire extended to the cockloft but was quickly knocked down. One line was stretched and put into operation and all searches were found negative.

PROVIDED

Unknown why identification was blanked out, this is how apparatus was shipped to NYC as in this 2014 KME engine photo. This policy is no longer in effect.


1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

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March, 2016

STEVE WHITE

ALLEN EPSTEIN

Two alarms needed in two story commercial On January 31st, FDNY firefighters were dispatched to 65 Street and Bay Parkway for fire in a two story commercial. Crews found fire on the first floor in a two brick commercial. Two alarms were needed at the location and three hose lines were used to extinguish the fire.

STEVE WHITE

Injured Staten Island firefighter leaves hospital

Injured FDNY Probie Firefighter Lawrence Wasser from 82 Truck in Staten Island leaves under his own power to the applause of his fellow firefighters. Firefighter Wasser, who had the can position, fell through a hole in the floor and called out a mayday. He was rescued by Squad 1 and Rescue 5 firefighters. The incident was at 3-3 Box 4311 at 1053 Sinclair Ave.

ALLEN EPSTEIN

Manhole fire extends to two cars On January 27th, FDNY firefighters were dispatched to 76 Street and 45 Avenue in Queens for a manhole fire. Heavy fire was venting from the manhole upon arrival. Battalion Chief 46 used two and two and special called a fire and ice unit to the scene. One hose line was used to extinguish the fire.


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March, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

201 and 114 FDNY HOUSES FDNY HOUSES by Larry Woodcock

Consolidated house

Ladder 114

Engine 201

LARRY WOODCOCK

LARRY WOODCOCK

LARRY WOODCOCK

Sunset Park, Brooklyn is a neighborhood in the western part of the borough, which is now home to many different nationalities. In its heyday in the early part of the century, Sunset Park was known as one of New York Harbor’s main shipping ports. The Brooklyn Army Terminal, which was designed and built in 1919, is a large complex that consists of warehouses, offices, and docks occupying 95 acres on 2nd Avenue between 58th and 65th Streets. It was added to the U.S. Register of Historic Places in September of 1982. It became the largest military supply base in the United States during war times, supplying its own railroad along with police and fire departments on 95 acres. After World War II, its usage dwindled down and it close in 1970. Close to 40 million tons of military supplies and over three million soldiers passed through the terminal. The city bought the complex from the federal government in 1981 and began a renovation to lease the property to businesses. In the early part of the 19th century, Sunset Park saw an influx of Irish, Polish, and Norwegian families, who flooded the neighborhood, which grew and is currently over 125,000. In the 1980’s a dramatic shift in cultural dominance occurred, bringing many immigrants from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Within a few years, the neighborhood became the location of Brooklyn’s first Chinatown, along Eighth Avenue. Now, the avenue is lined with businesses from restaurants to grocery stores specializing in Chinese goods. 201 Engine and 114 Truck serve this part of Brooklyn is the “Emerald Isle” and “Tally Ho.” This neighborhood was originally

called Gowanus, named after the canal that flows just west of here. It was also considered part of Bay Ridge until the 1960’s when it started to be called Sunset Park. 114 Truck was organized on September 15, 1897 and was at 5209 5th Avenue. Back then; it was the Brooklyn Fire Department and known as Ladder 18. With the merger of the boroughs in 1898 and companies renumbered, they were officially Ladder 114 in January of 1913. Their original quarters was 25x100 at two stories with storage areas for feed and a stable for horses. It also contained dormitories and officers’ quarters. A parlor room, or day room, was added on the first floor to allow firefighters leisure time and rest without having to climb to the second floor. Engine 201 was organized on September 15, 1869. Their original firehouse was on Fourth Avenue between 18th and 19th Streets. In August of 1891, a new firehouse was commissioned at 4th Avenue between 51st and 52nd Streets. In the early days of both companies, their respective districts were large but not overly populated. In fact, some would question the need, but soon, large commercial factories began to appear. Then came the necessary row dwellings and apartment houses to facilitate the constant influx of immigrants,

which were now employed. As the factories closed, many commercial buildings and residential occupancies became vacant over the years and contributed to a heavy workload for both companies throughout the 80’s and into the 90’s. Both companies responded for over 100 years from these locations until the plans for a new firehouse to consolidate the units became a reality in 2005. The fire department acquired a vacant lot next to 201’s quarters and decided to demolish their, badly in need of repair, firehouse and build a three story 13,000 square foot station. From groundbreaking to completion, 201 and 114 and the 40th Battalion moved in, in 2110. On a sad note 201’s previous quarters and 114’s old firehouse were vacated. 201’s was one of the oldest active houses built in 1889 and 114’s old firehouse was nostalgic with engravings of the Brooklyn Fire Department Ladder No.18 on the front façade, along with an open house watch and spiral staircase on the interior. I don’t know if the city has sold off the former firehouse or still owns the building. In the history of 201 and 114, they have a combined eight line of duty deaths and numerous medal recipients, including one of the last Gordon Bennett Medal winners from the truck.

ALLEN EPSTEIN

Front end loader in sanitation yard On February 5, 2016, FDNY firefighters were alerted for a fire in a sanitation yard. Crews arrived to find a front end loader involved in fire in the outside year. One hose line was used to extinguish the fire, with no extension. Engine 206 and Ladder 140 worked the scene.


1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

March, 2016

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NIOSH safety advisory for translucent corrugated roof panels STAYING SAFE

Chief Henry Campbell

On November 20, 2015, NIOSH issued a safety advisory for the fire service. This safety advisory was issued after a firefighter fell through a corrugated roof panel and subsequently died from his injuries. The following information is taken directly from the NIOSH safety advisory and can be downloaded from the NIOSH web site and printed for distribution and posting: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2016-110/pdfs/2016-110.pdf Please inform your membership. Translucent corrugated roof panels may contribute to increased fall risk during roof operations. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that all fire departments immediately take the following actions to reduce the risk of firefighters being injured or killed while operating on roofs that contain translucent corrugated roof panels: • Ensure that all firefighters, company officers and chief officers are aware of and are trained to recognize translucent corrugated roof panels. • Establish policies and procedures to ensure that firefighters do not walk or stand on translucent corrugated roof panels. • Ensure firefighters immediately inform the incident commander and other firefighters when translucent corrugated roof panels are identified. • Ensure firefighters follow safe roof operating practices including sounding the roof, having enough ladders for safe exit and always wearing the proper PPE, including self-contained breathing apparatus. The NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program is currently investigating a July 15, 2015 firefighter line of-duty-death that illustrates the hazard to firefighters when operating on roofs containing translucent corrugated panels. These panels are designed to transfer natural light and heat into a building's interior and in some cases may be painted or tinted to blend in with the existing roof. These panels are designed in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors and may be difficult to recognize, especially at night. Preliminary findings indicate that these panels are typically not designed to be walked upon, will not support the weight of a firefighter (with or without personal protective equipment and tools), and may degrade when exposed to UV, water and other chemicals. These roof panels can be found in a variety of buildings including, manufacturing facilities, warehouses, storage buildings, restaurants, carports, canopies, barns and covered walkways in both commercial and residential settings. Circumstances of the incident under investigation by NIOSH On June 28, 2015, at approximately 9:30 p.m., a 46-year-old career firefighter/engineer was seriously injured, and eventually died, when he fell through a translucent corrugated roof panel while his crew was searching the roof for fire extension from an exterior

dumpster fire. The fire department was dispatched for a report of a multi-family commercial structure fire. The first arriving crews found a fire burning in a dumpster located against the exterior wall of a 300 feet x 60 feet, one-story, metal frame commercial building located in a warehouse district. The first arriving crews pulled the dumpster away from the building and quickly extinguished the fire using tank water. Scorch marks on the exterior wall near a window raised the possibility of fire extension inside the building. The incident commander directed crews to force entry into the building and search for fire extension and occupants. He also directed a truck company to ladder the roof and search for fire extension. Four firefighters climbed onto the roof, where one used a thermal imager to check for signs of fire extension while the other three, including the firefighter/engineer, sized up the roof conditions. While operating on the roof, the firefighter/engineer stepped on a translucent corrugated roof panel and fell approximately 17 feet onto a concrete floor. The firefighter was seriously injured and died 17 days later on July 15, 2015. This fire department experienced a similar incident in 2012 in which a translucent corrugated roof panel broke under the weight of a firefighter who fortunately did not receive a serious injury. A NIOSH investigation report of this fatality providing additional details about the incident and recommendations for preventing falls through these types of roof panels will be available at a later date. NIOSH would like to bring this information to the attention of all U.S. fire departments; firefighters; fire service trainers; building officials; local, city and state authorities having jurisdiction and building code organizations. Translucent corrugated roof panels are widely used across the United States. Fire departments should identify structures within their jurisdiction that have translucent corrugated roof panels and include this information in pre-incident plans. This information should be shared with mutual aid departments and added into the caution notes of CAD dispatch systems where possible. Incident commanders should strongly consider the risk benefit analysis of permitting rooftop operations on identified buildings. Firefighters may not be aware of and may not fully appreciate the hazards and risks associated with these panels. Firefighters should always inform the incident commander and other firefighters when translucent corrugated roof panels are identified and should not walk or stand on them. Firefighters should constantly sound the roof to gauge structural integrity and changes in roof construction. Translucent corrugated roof panels can be difficult to identify and seldom have frames or other features that identify their location. References NIOSH [2004]. NIOSH ALERT: Preventing Falls of Workers through Skylights and Roof and Floor Openings. Cincinnati OH. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2 0 0 4 - 1 5 6 . http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2-004156/ Till next time, Stay Safe and God Bless!

ALLEN EPSTEIN

Car fire at LaGuardia Airport On January 17, 2016, FDNY firefighters were dispatched to 94th Street and the Grand Central Parkway at LaGuardia Airport for a car fire. The car was located in front of Terminal C for American Airlines. Engine 316 and Ladder 154 quickly worked the scene. No damage was visible to the building.

ALLEN EPSTEIN

Second floor of private house On January 17, 2015, FDNY firefighters were dispatched to 224 Street and 130 Avenue in Queens for fire in a private house. Crews found fire on the second floor and used two hose lines to extinguish.


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March, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

ALLEN EPSTEIN

JOHN HOPPER

ALLEN EPSTEIN

Two car MVA in Queens

On January 28th, FDNY firefighters were dispatched to 64 Street and Metropolitan Avenue in queens for a two car MVA. Crews responded with Engine 291 and Ladder 140 and found two minor injuries. Two patients were removed and transported to a local hospital for treatment.

VIDEO REVIEW JOHN HOPPER

All hands basement fire in Manhattan On Wednesday, January 13, 2016, Manhattan companies turned out to 318 West 113th Street for a report of fire in the basement of a multiple dwelling. Ladder 26 arrived on scene first due and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire in the basement of a four story 20x60 brownstone. Two lines were stretched and put into operation. The main body of fire in the basement was quickly knocked down. All searches were found negative and the fire was placed under control with an approximate 45 minute duration.

Video reviews by John Malecky

Let’s Roll Engine 15 Media Group Available from: FSP Books & Videos 188 Central Street, #4 Hudson, MA 01749-1330 1-800522-8528 E-Mail: support@firep o l i c e - e m s . c o m www.fire-police-ems.com Price $14.95 (DVD) This DVD gives an account of six Los Angeles firefighter, who peddled 3300 miles within 45 days from their city to New York City to help support two foundations benefitting those who died on 9-11-01. Their quest was not only to recognize and remember the 343 New York City firefighters, who

Let’s Roll

gave their lives but all those who died that day. Accompanied by a camper bus, a videographer who rode on a pickup truck tailgate to visualize the many aspects of the trip and the support group, these men withstood all kinds of weather, individual injuries and group conflicts at times to accomplish their mission. The video brings you through many stops throughout the trip, the many bicyclists who joined them when riding through and the hospitality shown them in many different ways. One thing realized is that when you become a firefighter you join a brotherhood, which is recognized wherever you go. I say the word brotherhood, but extend that meaning to the

many female firefighters as well. The video has to be seen to appreciate the team’s efforts and reception in all of the stops along the way. In Albuquerque, NM one of them noticed that there was a pole hole in the restroom so that firefighters could hit the floor safely if they were using the room when a call came in rather than running to one in another room or taking the stairs. Their stops included Shanksville, Pennsylvania where one of the planes landed that fateful day and to the Pentagon where another one landed, before ending expedition to New York City.


1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

JOHN HOPPER

Boiler fire in Bronx basement On Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at approximately 8:40 p.m., Bronx companies turned out to a report of a boiler fire in the basement of a private dwelling at 2203 Turnbull Avenue. Battalion 20 arrived on scene and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire in the basement of a 20x40 private dwelling. Two lines were stretched and the main body of fire was quickly knocked down, while all searches were found negative. The fire was placed under control with an approximate 20 minute duration.

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ALLEN EPSTEIN

Fire in three Queens buildings On January 20, 2016, FDNY firefighters were dispatched to 118 Street and Jamaica Avenue in Queens for fire in a two story private house. Crews indicated that fire extended to exposures two and four in the cockloft. Four hose lines were used to extinguish the fire.

STEVE WHITE

Second alarm at Pregnancy Care Center A second alarm fire broke out in the Pregnancy Care Center of New York located at 38 10th Street in New Dorp, Staten Island on January 7th. The fire started around 12:24 a.m. and was under control at 1:22 a.m. with two firefighters suffering minor injuries.

STEVE WHITE

Richmond weathers storm Richmond Engine Company 1 firefighter/EMT's weathered the recent Storm Jonas on the weekend of January 23rd, when New York City was pummeled with over two feet of snow. During the storm, firefighters made sure that Richmond Engine Company 1 was plowed and shoveled out and assisted FDNY paramedics on multiple medical runs.


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1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY


1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

March, 2016

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FDNY

FDNY

Fatal downtown crane collapse On February 5th, a crane collapsed on 40 Worth Street (Esq. West Broadway) in the Tribeca in Lower Manhattan. The New York City Fire Department (Fdny), the department of buildings, and Emergency Management went immediately to the scene. So far, casualties are confirmed as a deceased person,

JUMP TO FILE #020516123 two with serious injuries and one with minor injuries. Mayor Bill deBlasio arrived at the scene shortly after, where he led a press conference to inform New

Yorkers on the disaster. Law enforcement agencies advised residents to avoid the area as long as possible, and the NYC Human Resources Administration reports that one office is closed in the area until further notice. - FDNY

FDNY

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

Quarters all plowed out FDNY

STEVE WHITE


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March, 2016

1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

JOHN HOPPER

Fire in a Bronx multiple dwelling

JOHN HOPPER

Fatal all hands in the Bronx On Saturday, February 6, 2016, Bronx Fire Alarm dispatchers started receiving multiple calls for a house fire at 934 East 228 Street between Paulding Avenue and Bronxwood Avenue. Battalion 15 arrived on scene and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire in a two story flat roof private dwelling.

JUMP TO FILE #020816104 The main body of fire was located in the basement and extended upward to the first and second floor. Multiple lines were stretched and put into operation.

Primary searches were found negative, but a secondary search located one 10-45 Code 1 (deceased). The fire was eventually knocked down and the incident was placed under control with an approximate one hour duration.

On January 13, 2016 at approximately 9:15 p.m., Bronx companies turned out to 545 Saint Pauls Place for a report of a fire in a multiple dwelling. Battalion 26 arrived on scene and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire on the fourth floor of a five story 50x75 occupied multiple dwelling. Division 6 arrived on scene shortly after and put all hands to work. One line was stretched and the main body of fire was knocked down quickly. The fire was placed under control with an approximate 30 minute duration.

- JOHN HOPPER

APPARATUS IN ACTION If you have photos you would like to see in our Apparatus in Action feature please upload them on our website www.1stResponderNews.com or email them to Heather@1stResponderNews.com.

JOHN HOPPER

Fire found on all floors in Queens

Operating during the storm

STEVE WHITE

On Thursday, February 4, 2016, Queens dispatchers started receiving calls for a fire in a private dwelling 45-52 Kissena Boulevard at Geranium Avenue. Ladder 129 arrived on scene first due and transmitted a 10-75 for a fire in a two story flat roof private dwelling. Battalion 52 arrived on scene and put all hands to work. Two lines were stretched and put into operation. Fire was found on all floors from the basement to the second. An extra engine and truck were requested. The fire was eventually knocked down and the incident was placed under control with an approximate 45 minute duration.


1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

NYPD officers rescue woman from car crash in Pennsylvania Police Officers Benny Colecchia, Daniel Rich and Matt Wicelinski were traveling to Canton, Ohio on the morning of January 14th to attend a memorial service for Canton Police K9 Jethro, who was shot and killed by a JUMP TO FILE# 011616101 suspect. As the officers were driving, they observed an ambulette overturned on icy Interstate 80 in Clarion, Pennsylvania, trapping a woman in a wheelchair. The officers were able to get into the vehicle by using a LifeHammer to break a window. Once inside, the overturned vehicle, Officer Colecchia used a knife to cut the woman free from her wheelchair and Officers Rich and Wicelinski carried her from the crash site so they could administer first aid. They stayed with the woman until local emergency crews arrived. - DAVID BURNS

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PROVIDED

Officers involved

NYPD

1st Responder News Correspondent, Richmond Engine 1, Chief Steve White after doing a "24" during the stowstorm.

MEMORIES

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FDNY

Teaching compressions

RUSSELL CURLEY

FDNY Ladder 127 had a 1955 FWD 75 foot tiller ladder. Back in the day, they were wooden ladders. We inadvertently printed 1936 FWD 100 foot tiller ladder in our January edition.

The FDNY Mobile CPR Training Unit was on hand during New York City Department of Parks & Recreation Winterfest in the Bronx, teaching compressions only CPR to attendees. Out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest is responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths a year nationally, and CPR, or Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation, is a lifesaving technique that helps increase survival rates for victims of cardiac arrest. It works by maintaining blood

JUMP TO FILE #021116108 flow to the heart and brain until help arrives. The Be 911 Compressions Only CPR program, taught by certified FDNY EMS personnel, equips New Yorkers with the skills to act in the event of cardiac arrest by offering free instruction across the five boroughs - FDNY


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1ST Responder Newspaper - FDNY

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