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BEHIND THE DECKS E L E C T RO N I C M U S I C A N D C LU B C U LT U R E

THE RISE OF LIAM DOC


BEHIND

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THE DECKS

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ISSUE 01

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR BEHIND THE DECKS began as a website exploring electronic music and club culture in Scotland. It’s a platform for DJs to share stories about their lives. Scottish producers need a platform to express their thoughts and views. Despite the pandemic forcing the industry to a halt, artists are still active. An increase in mixes, online live streams and radio shows have kept some DJ’s busy. Other’s have locked in on production and continued with their day jobs. The world is changing and, as it does, we must all adapt. When clubs return, there must be changes to ensure equal opportunity for DJs. Scottish promoters need to give women as well as Black and Asian artists more opportunities. I single handily created this magazine to shed light on the lack of diversity within club culture. I want to thank all the artists that I worked with to create this. I would also like to thank my girlfriend for supporting me throughout this project. On the surface, this may appear to be a DJ magazine, yet it is much more. The artists discussed important issues and shared memorable stories. This is the stories they told me. Billal Rahman


ISSUE 01

CONTENTS

THE RISE OF LIAM DOC

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THE POLKA DOT DISCO CLUB

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STAND UP STAND OUT

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IF YOU DON’T KNOW GET TO KNOW

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PROTECTING VENUES

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6 ARTISTS TO CHECK OUT

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BRIGHTER DAYS

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JORDAN LOUISE


THE RISE OF LIAM DOC

“Production changed because the stuff I was making wasn’t aimed at clubs. I was making music to do your dishes to on a Sunday”

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The 27-year-old producer from West Lothian is a resident at Sub Club for RARE and Cabaret Voltaire for FLY Club. He is firmly entrenched within the hierarchy of elite Scottish producers, cementing this recently with a nomination from DJ Mag for Best Breakthrough Producer. Liam has built a reputation for his wild club sets and otherworldly productions. “I get influenced by what’s happening around me and my music-making process is really mood-based. Depending on what mood I’m in will determine which direction the music goes.” Lockdown could be dull in Livingston, however, it gave Liam time to create his upcoming EP K-TOI Trax. A cutting edge six-track masterpiece, which will be released in early 2021 on Shall Not Fade. “It’s a darker sound compared to what people are going to be expecting on the back of my East Coast Edits EP.” Normally, he would be in the studio three times a week, however, when lockdown initially hit, he was in there every day, grafting, feeling there was little he could do besides writing music. “I needed to do something to keep myself going and feel productive as I wasn’t gigging, but it got to a point where I wasn’t making anything decent or finishing anything.” As he dealt with performance issues, he critiqued the standards of his music, bluntly stating, “it just sounded shit”. This led to him taking a step back. “I stopped doing anything music-related for a while and it took a month before I even turned the laptop back on.” The time off allowed Liam to rejuvenate and when he returned, he felt reinvigorated with a fresh set of ideas. “Production 8

changed because the stuff I was making after my break wasn’t aimed at clubs. I was making music to do your dishes too on a Sunday.” Liam began experimenting with his approach to production and started incorporating innovative sampling techniques. “I was recording anything that gave me the slightest hint of inspiration, I was hitting spoons off my radiator for samples, recording conversations on my phone, and constantly hunting on Youtube.” He began listening to retro cartoon theme songs to source distinct sounds to sample. “I was watching ‘Avatar: The Last Airbender’ and I got as far in as the theme song before I whipped out my recorder and had the initial idea for the Shall Not Fade EP.” His sources of inspiration are unconventional but, by stretching the boundaries of his creative instinct, he formulated his latest creation. “The intro music is insane. The music just gripped me. I was looking for a specific sound and knew I found it when I heard that.” His lockdown escapade in the studio has given life to a back log of unreleased music. “I’ve got an album’s worth of material sitting, but whether it will be released or not is a different story, I sit on tracks for a while before deciding what’s happening with them.” Three years ago, Liam made his first mark on Scottish club culture. He began making disco edits with his friend, Chris Roux, label boss of Roux Records. It was around this time that Chris helped inspire Liam to create his signature edit ‘Voices Of East Harlem’, the lead track from his East Coast Edit’s EP. “I used to mix with him before he moved to Australia.

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He’d turn up to the studio with his sunglasses on and a box of disco records, we would mix for hours.” At the time Liam admitted he could barely mix but learned from Chris. “He taught me everything I know about mixing vinyl and how to blend. Big respect for Mr Roux, he’s the don.” Liam smiled as he reminisced on his last set in Sub Club. “The vibe was insane. RARE know how to throw a party.” It was the launch party for his East Coast Edits EP on Denis Sulta’s Silver Service label. There was an ensemble of selectors present, spinning records in a free for all behind the decks. The lineup included; Denis Sulta, Éclair Fifi and Kamus, as well as PinballSpider and Willy. On the run-up to the East Coast Edits release, the promotional company the label used emailed the tracks out to other DJ’s. “Gerd Jansen, Honey Dijon and Joe Goddard had downloaded it and left amazing comments, which felt huge for me. One of the first records I ever bought was by Joe’s band, Hot Chip.” Liam’s tone was exuberant as he revealed how honoured he was to gain the respect of artists he idolised. He laughed as he recounted the story of Gerd Jansen playing “My Love Is Free”, the lead track from the Silver Service record, at the first socially distanced rave in Europe. “It was insane, someone tagged me on Twitter and initially I didn’t even click that it was my edit! I was watching the video thinking I recognise that song.” As his profile increased, he was noticed by some of his inspirations. “Groove Armada followed me on Twitter. I was buzzing with that” he laughed. What they don’t know is his iconic track ‘Voices of East Harlem’ 10

was created in his mum’s kitchen. After he booked Big Miz for the first Eyeangle Records night at the notorious Club 69, he passed on some tunes to the Glasgow superstar. “I felt the turning point for me was when Big Miz played Voices of East Harlem.” That was the first time a DJ with a reputation had played his music. “The next night I got tagged in a video of Miz b2b Sulta in Southampton, they were playing my edit in this massive warehouse in front of thousands of people. It was crazy. I woke up to a friend request from Denis Sulta and he got in touch and signed it from there.” The EP received critical acclaim and was featured in Rolling Stone magazine, which catapulted his career into another stratosphere. During lockdown, he featured on several charity VA releases including on Roux Records. The track “It’s Not Right But It’s Ok (I’m Gonna Be In Isolation From Today)” received an amazing response and Liam donated all proceeds from the track to the NHS. “When I started making music, I used to upload everything, but I’ve been a lot pickier lately, I feel my recent tracks have found a voice that resonates with me.” Liam is humble and sincere. His generosity is evident through his charity club nights for Choose Life, raising funds for the Scottish Association for Mental Health. There is a reason that Liam Doc is a resident DJ at two of Scotland’s prestigious clubs, not just for his noble character, but for his all-around diverse skillset. He is recognised as one of Scotland top DJs and producers and it’s only a matter of time before he takes the rest of the world by storm. e on

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“The next night I got tagged in a video of Miz b2b with Sulta playing my edit. I woke up to a friend request from Denis Sulta and he got in touch and signed it�

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMMA HUSSAIN

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THE POLKA DOT DISCO CLUB

“We wanted to create a platform and provide women with a chance to inspire others”

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Frankie Elyse is a BBC Journalist and DJ who also performs alongside her twin sister, Jozette in the DJ and Violin duo KINTRA. The 26-year-old is a trailblazer as she pushes equality within Dundee club culture. The twins formed the Polka Dot Disco Club in Dundee, a women’s only DJ collective. “A series of workshops to encourage and support females looking to DJ.” They noticed similar initiatives were set up in Glasgow and Edinburgh, however, there was nothing similar in Dundee. They created it to “challenge the industry’s gender imbalance.” The workshop serves as a platform to express their creativity through music and develop their technical skills. The Dundee University Student Association kindly allowed the twins to use their space for free. “It was important that the workshops were accessible to anyone regardless of their financial situation.” The twins did not get paid to teach. It was their choice. To enforce equality by bringing change to the disparity. Frankie noted it is intimidating for females to find their place in an industry which is disproportionately full of males. She discovered how gratifying it is mentoring women and developing their skills under her tutelage. “Proud of how far our girls have come and love the bond that we have all formed as not only a collective but as friends.” She wants to empower the women under her wing. “We wanted to make it available for anyone no matter who you are or where you’re from.” The twins created an equal application process for females or female

identifying people to apply. The twins selected enthusiastic women who demonstrated passion but didn’t have the experience. They wanted to give opportunities to women who don’t get them enough. “I was struggling, it’s hard to break in especially for me trying to be pals with guys. It’s quite difficult to become pals with them. A lot of gigs in the underground scene it pals booking pals. I didn’t have many and struggled to get booked in certain places.” She recognised how daunting it is for women to make a dent in a male-dominated industry. “I felt If I had a group of girls, it would make more inclusivity.” Dundee lacked diversity according to Frankie as there are not enough female artists. Frankie understands how critical it is for young women to build confidence. “Once I got into the swing of things, I loved it.” For her, It was a strange sense of responsibility. She commented on how unfamiliar it initially felt, to teach six strangers. Young women that admired her and shared her flair. “I felt that I wanted to do well by the girls. I wanted to teach them well. I think I did, and I loved it.”Frankie has a fondness for disco because it embodies the equality she pushes. “We wanted to provide the girls with a chance to inspire others, create a support network for women to share ideas and meet like-minded music lovers.” For four weeks, with 3-hour sessions, Frankie and her sister tutored young women in the art by developing their talent from scratch. During the first lesson, Frankie doubted herself.

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Jozette reassured her. Despite the momentary lapse, Frankie managed to overcome her uncertainty. She knows how critical it is for women to build confidence. Throughout her final year studying Law with Spanish at The University of Edinburgh, she had her own radio show where she realized that she wanted to be a DJ and work in media. After graduating, she travelled to Ibiza to do a DJ course. “It was great, the course was amazing. That gave me confidence.” Frankie recalled one instance they were performing, and Jozette whacked her with her bow. They received superstar treatment when they played in the Czech Republic. “The best way to stand out is to be unique. Stay true to yourself by doing what you enjoy.” The twin’s collaboration is unparalleled, and they will be releasing their debut EP soon. They play melodic techno because it works in unison with the violin. As she laughed and reminisced, Frankie explained how amazing it was seeing the collective evolve. “I’m grateful to the girls and Dundee Union.” She expressed gratitude throughout her moment of self reflection. “It was good seeing them start from nothing and improving. There is a few of them that weren’t sure of themselves but by the end, they were smashing out belters.” The Polka Dot Disco Club played their first set together right before the pandemic cratered through the industry. The concept was praised yet there was a minority on social media questioning her decision.

“It was good seeing them start from nothing and improving”

“I don’t think anyone has the balls to say it to my face.” The fact critics attacked her on social media reflects the issue at large. Men demeaning women by trying to bring them down. That won’t stop her from fighting. “I wish we didn’t need a collective, but we do because it’s not just about making a group to DJ together. It’s about giving women the confidence.” Solving the gender imbalance within the industry is challenging yet she is doing an admirable job. Her message to men is to make women feel more comfortable and be more inclusive towards everyone. “The scene has improved immensely in the last two years.” It’s refreshing to see more women showcase their skill and sound. However, Scottish promoters have a long road ahead if true 50/50 equality is to be achieved.

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STAND UP STAND OUT PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALESIA MILTON

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The Glasgow Underground with Sean Muyaba

“The diversity you see in club nights isn’t reflected in the people our institutions are giving exposure and it paints our scene in a narrow light”

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Sean Muyaba has been spinning records for three years in Glasgow. The 27-year-old is ready to make a statement within the cities highly competitive landscape. He spent his childhood growing up in the stunning tropical Republic of Zimbabwe. That time helped shape him into who he is today. He spent his coming of age in Scotland, moving to Glasgow in his late teens.“I’m sane with a moderate grip on reality which is good these days.” That’s how he described his mentality during the pandemic that has crippled creatives. It’s difficult being in this situation. The industry is collapsing, but it will not deter him from working at his craft. Sean truly has a diverse taste which explores Acid House, Techno and Italo Disco. He adores old school Chicago House. “I listen in awe because a lot of the songs have now been remixed so when you hear the original, you’re just blown away.” He is right, elusive Chicago sounds captivate our eardrums. “I dabble with other genres. I’ve been known to play funk.” He also enjoys a melodic sound. According to Sean, “the deeper, the better.” His tight mixing is seamless, sharp and energetic. Sean has been featured on Groove City Radio and Clyde Built. Sean is a skilled producer, creating slick and bouncy energetic House infused rhythms. He has a monthly residency on Groove City Radio. He has played in small local venues in Glasgow but has yet to achieve his dream of playing in Sub Club. No one is going to hand you a gig in Glasgow. 20

You need to fight for it. “It’s hard for any DJ to stand out because of all the high-quality work people in Glasgow are producing, however, it is criminal we don’t have more diversity.” It’s difficult for a black man to break out in the electronic music industry. He attended a Black Lives Matter protest in George Square during the height of the pandemic. “I was quite hungover at the time. Physically I was rather hollow but seeing all the people that came out in support was so refreshing and just gave my soul a hug.” The landscape has shifted in recent months as BLM protests have erupted across the globe in response to police brutality and systematic racism. Society is becoming more aware and educated, or at least that’s what social media could fool you into thinking. Racism exists in every single facet of every industry. There is a lack of Black and Asian Resident DJs in all Scottish clubs. “I personally don’t know any non-white residents in the bigger clubs in Glasgow.” That needs to be addressed. He feels when clubs reopen, we have an opportunity to right the wrong by ensuring diversity is reflected within lineups. “Diversity encourages innovation and since the pandemic clubbing is going to need to be innovative when they reopen, or they aren’t going to be relevant.” As a multifaceted DJ and producer, Sean is an innovator. His ideas could lead to diverse progress within our culture. Organisations need to address the lack of diversity within their hierarchy. Black creatives need to breakthrough.

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Especially in an industry which claims to be progressive. That is what the industry needs to kickstart a new era. Club culture in Scotland was built off the music Black LGBT producers in Chicago and Detroit created. We should respect this. “The diversity you see in club nights isn’t reflected in the people our institutions are giving exposure to and that’s just a shame as it paints our scene in a narrow light.” Sean explained why music is a platform to make politically charged statements. “Music’s ability to invoke a strong emotional response makes it the perfect tool.”Music can be utilized into a powerful and influential weapon to bring forth social change. Although Glasgow could improve the diversity of club lineups, Sean praised the cities vibrant industry. “I don’t think it’s all bad, it proves we have a healthy scene and often some of the best events and nights are the smaller ones.” He adores parties in intimate environments, which a safe space for many clubbers. In response to the overarching vileness of racial abuse, Sean was naturally livid. “We really need to stamp that shit out because hate is very parasitic and only serves to infect and ruin everything.” As he pondered whether the movement will result in real changes within society, he exclaimed, “the optimist in me hopes it does!” Sean elaborated and candidly shared his thoughts. ”We as a species have more in common than we do differently.” He is right, humanity, should not be fighting for supremacy because of skin colour. “The more time we spend fighting

“I don’t know any non-white residents in the bigger clubs in Glasgow”

because of ideology from a bygone era that was driven by greed and ignorance. The less we are working on all the many other issues we have as a species.” Sean is not fearful of ignorant bigots.“I’m scared of having to fight for a bottle of dirty water in 2 decades than I am of my neighbour because he doesn’t look like me.” In terms of personal experience, he has been quite lucky and has not been subjected to the brutal side of racism. “I’m fortunate that this isn’t an issue in the circles I move in. I have friends that have shared stories you wouldn’t believe happened in Glasgow and sounds like something that would happen in America.” Scotland has a progressive façade in which we masquerade as a left-wing country but below the surface lies racial bigotry.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILL MCGREGOR

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JAY CELINO

“It’s important to remember why I started this. I want to do this for as long as I can”

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IF YOU DON’T KNOW GET TO KNOW Jay Celino is one of Glasgow’s most underrated selectors. His selects are renowned and have been praised by Artwork, Skream and Jasper James. The 28-year-old used to play alongside his friend Jon Jose. They had a radio show on Groove City, where they became acquainted with Attic Room Session owner Jay Gunning. Through the shared love of electronic music, Jay earned a residency with Attic Room Sessions. Jay has been DJ’ing for 5 years and is a resident for EZUP at La Cheetah. He has supported Robert Hood Jamie:3:26 and Eats Everything. He has been exploring electronic music since he was 17. Jay grew up in the West End of Glasgow and attended school with Jasper James. Jay lives in the Southside of Glasgow in Shawlands. He has cultural roots in Africa and Italy, although he has never visited, he loves to travel. His father influenced his sound. “That’s why I’ve got such a broad taste in music.” It was loud and sweaty one night at a Glasgow after party. Jay was amongst some of the UK’s greatest DJs. “Artwork was there. I was playing tunes from my phone and he came over and said, in 2 months I’m running a night in Dalston and I want you to come and play for me.” Jay was shocked.   

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“I’ve never even looked at a set of decks in my life. I do not know how to DJ. Artwork said, ‘you have 2 months’ to practice.” Jay assumed it was a drunken conversation. “The next day Jasper called me and said ‘Artwork wants your number.’ I was like he is actually being serious.” With only a few months to prepare for his debut, he was terrified. After two months of grafting, he travelled to East London to play in The Nest in front of a sold-out crowd. Naturally, he was nervous but calmed his nerves with alcohol. “I was on first. I wasn’t going out to a full nightclub. It built up, so it’s not as intimidating as you would think.” He admitted he was ill-prepared. “I was not ready for it. People seemed to love it because the tunes were decent, but I still cringe to this day about the mixing.” Jay isn’t well known internationally, but he is respected by some of the greatest DJs to ever step behind the decks. He played in front of 4500 people in East Electric alongside Skream, who praised his music taste on Twitter. Despite the impressive resume, Jay has remained humble throughout his career. “It’s important to remember why I started this because I love music. I want to do this for as long as I can.” Good thing because this is just the beginning.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY HENRY CALVERT

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PROTECTING NEIGHBOUHOOD VENUES

“The UK is world-leading in the arts, specifically music. The idea that it’s not viable is nonsense”

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The Managing Director of Sneaky Pete’s Nick Stewart is on the front lines in the fight to prevent grassroots venues from closure. The 40-year-old from Dublin has been running the show at Sneaky Pete’s for 13 years. He is the MVA Scottish Coordinator for Music Venue Trust. MVT is a non-profit organisation which stands for protecting UK based grassroots music venues. MVT is composed of venues which are part of the Music Venue Alliance. “Music Venue Trust is like the civil service for the music venue alliance. It works on behalf of the alliance. I’m keeping in touch with the venues all of the time.” He became involved because his interests align with the aims of MVT. Nick will fervidly fight tooth and nail to prevent the closure of any UK based grassroots venues. Edinburgh’s most iconic club is operating as a bar and serving pizza to function during the pandemic. When the 10 PM curfew and indoor music ban was enforced, Sneaky Pete’s was running on only 20% of their previous income. He confers how difficult it’s been but revealed he remains in good spirits. “If I was pottering around the office trying to think who I’m going to book and not knowing when it’s happening, I would be quite glum, but I’m surprisingly chipper. Simply because I’ve got a job which is to protect venues and stop them from permanently closing.” MVT has been fortunate in Scotland, despite the odds stacked against them.

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“We are having a degree of success so that feels good.” He is scrapping to prevent permanent closure to helps ensure club culture is preserved. COVID-19 has devasted the global economic landscape and collapsed entire industries. The industry has been gripping with the reality that live entertainment will never be the same. Socially distanced and seated outdoor performances might become normal. However, it is not a viable option as capacity is slashed. “There are ways to make it relatively safe and it’s certainly true to say that shows have not been one of the strong drivers for an increase in rates of COVID.” However, he admits it is not his role to say. He is quick-witted and charismatic. Nick is a champion of arts and culture, by defending workers rights and protecting venues. “The UK is world-leading in the arts, specifically music. The idea that it’s not viable is nonsense.” Sneaky Pete’s play a key role in safe guarding the future of music in the capital. As an institution, they are one of the most forward-thinking establishments. Nick views himself as a local authority arts worker focused on talent development and cultural arts association. Edinburgh is lucky to have someone who cares as much as he does. If a plan is developed which involves a vaccine and mass testing, there is a pathway to the reopening of music venues. Venues hold cultural signifcance within our cities. When they do eventually return, Nick will be leading the charge.

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6 ARTISTS TO CHECK OUT THIS MONTH Focusing on the next wave of underground talent in the industry. Here are some of the brightest young DJs in the UK. Ranging from prolific producers who have performed in Scotland’s top clubs to newcomers trying to establish themselves. Here are our picks for artists to check out this month.

Photography by Thomas Neate, Teo Campbell, Harrison Spence and Liam Mackel

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KAI KASPAR The 24-year-old producer from Glasgow is based in Dundee. His sharp production packs a fresh fast-paced, exciting and high energy rhythmic boom. He has supported Patrick Topping, Hammer and Folamour. As well as having warmed up for Mall Grab alongside the elite collective All Good Dundee. 30

Kai held down a residency in the Reading Rooms before it’s closure. His style is unique as all of his tracks sound different. His music fits distinct moods and explores contrasting vibes. He is climbing the ladder of elite producers. Check out his latest track ‘Call Me’ on Soundcloud. It’s a banger.

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KAMUS The young producer’s technical wizardry is unparalleled. His high caliber production is rare. The 20-year-old selector from West Lothian is a protege of Liam Doc. His production has been supported by DJ Haai. He has made appearances on Rinse France alongside PinballSpider. The duo collaborated for a track

which was premiered on Mixmag earlier this year. Kamus operates at a different stratosphere. His tracks ooze of idiosyncratic electro and soft percussive infused techno. The innovative creator is by far the greatest producer at his age. His next release is out on Or:la’s label Céad next year.

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CASPER The Livingston based selector is the next best thing to come out of the purgatorial town. His trademark production is infused with a flurry of dark cutting-edge vocals. Casper is a diamond in the rough among West Lothian producers. His tracks will send shivers down your spine. 32

The scary thing about him is he is only going to get better. His debut EP will be released next year. Casper has performed in Cabaret Voltaire alongside his brother, Callyt. The brothers based in West Lothian have collaborated for a track which was released earlier this year on Moskalus.

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AOIFE The 24-year-old from Belfast is based in Berlin. Aoife has been championed by the likes of Elliot Adamson and Meg Ward despite the fact she has been DJ’ing for one year. She has been featured on Rinse FM alongside her Newcastle comrade. She explores electro and explosive techno.

The selector works for the infamous record label Ape-X which throw some the best club nights in the North East. Aoife is immersing herself in Berlin techno culture and slowly focusing on her raw prouduction as she gears up for her debut track in 2021. Check out her latest mix.

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JAYNE VERONICA The Irish DJ has a flair for furious fist-pumping techno. Her sets are super charged with acid and trance which shaped her sound. She is heavily influenced by Charlotte de Witte. When she isn’t spinning tunes she works as a personal trainer. Her selects

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won’t go lower than 130 BPM. Leaving dancefloors in ruins with fierce selects. The 23-year-old is looking to leave a dent on Irish club culture. She will be dropping her debut EP in 2021. Expect it to be raucous raw and untamed techno.

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ADELFI The sisters from the Scottish Borders are on the hunt for a residency in Edinburgh. The Greek word Adelphi means sister, which inspired the duos name. They developed their skills throughout the lockdown with regular mixes. They have been gearing up to make their

debut and, the lockdown won’t stop them from building a reputation. As siblings, they play off one another, through their elusive mixing. The duo has yet to perform live but, expect the skilled sister act establish themselves as a force behind the decks.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN ROSS

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ALYS HARDY

“I have experienced a lot of men being quite condescending. Bewildered by the thought that a female could have the same mixing abilities�

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BRIGHTER DAYS Alys adores being amongst the atmosphere of a crowd. She is drawn to creating and sharing music. “Dancing heals the soul and I think DJ’ing facilitates that in a contemporary way.” The 21-yearold singer songwriter and DJ from Cardiff is based in Edinburgh. The absence of clubbing has challenged her. Clubbing is a form of escapism, it’s something that Alys seeks. “I miss going out and just cutting about, bumping into people, boogies, smoking areas, afters.” Both of her parents are musicians, which shaped her identity. “I was raised to their music really, I remember being in my dad’s studio and marvelling at what was being created, and my mum singing me the songs she wrote before bed.” That has motivated her to maximize her skillset. Her influences are Amy Winehouse, Nina Simone and The Beatles. Gender equality is important to her. She admires the female DJ collective, Miss World. The feminist collective embodies what Alys represents. “I have experienced a lot of men in the industry being quite condescending, bewildered by even the thought that a female could have the same mixing abilities.” Alys is wrong, women don’t just have the same abilities, in most cases, their skills are superior. “A change in this attitude will come with a broader and more representative scene of female artists. We need to normalise change into a more gender-balanced industry.” She has a vision for the future of nightlife. 38

Scottish promoters should commit to putting forth 50/50 lineups and make a concentrated effort to give opportunities to Black and Asian artists. She feels clubbers must have a safe space. Alys is also a firm supporter of Welsh Independence. Escaping one’s past to create a better future is imperative. She envisions a world where no one abuses their power in the industry. “To feel free and secure and able to enjoy the club experience you have to feel safe.” Alys is a member of the LGBTQ+ community and understands how the community feel a sense of belonging in clubs. “Any allowance of people being taken advantage of, or even mistreated should not be tolerated.” Unfortunately, it’s not always the case. “Some of the things I have seen and experienced have been horrific.” The return of clubs and subsequently, the creation of safe spaces is key especially, for those who have been subjected to personal traumas. “The world can be heavy and sometimes losing your head, sets you free, and this should not have to come with any costs. Dancing is vital.” There are influential figures who have abused their control within Edinburgh club culture. Not for much longer. With characters such as Alys spearheading progress, perhaps we can make our industry change for the better. “There is a lovely community of artists in Scotland, but moving forward, we must work together and pool our passions, to create the future we desire.”

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BEHIND THE DECKS E L E C T RO N I C M U S I C A N D C LU B C U LT U R E

ISSUE 02

SPRING 2021

ISSUE 03

SUMMER 2021

ISSUE 04

AUTUMN 2021

ISSUE 05

WINTER 2021

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Profile for BEHINDTHEDECKS1

BEHIND THE DECKS: ISSUE 01  

The inaugural winter magazine features an exclusive interview with Liam Doc. Plus interviews with Frankie Elyse, Sean Muyaba, Jay Celino and...

BEHIND THE DECKS: ISSUE 01  

The inaugural winter magazine features an exclusive interview with Liam Doc. Plus interviews with Frankie Elyse, Sean Muyaba, Jay Celino and...

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