Page 1

DUMP THE TRUMP! HOW TO BREW BEHEMOTH’S POLITICAL HOP BOMB IPA see page 55 >>>

INCLUDING

ISSUE 45 WINTER 2018 PRICE $9.95 (NZ $11.95)

Flying colours

WHY RED, BROWN AND AMBER ALES ARE TURNING HEADS

AUSTRALIA’S

BEST BEER VENUES

WHICH 65 VENUES MADE OUR LIST?

BEERS & CIDERS

TASTED WWW.BEERANDBREWER.COM

PLUS! BREWING EQUIPMENT | SQUID INK AND CRICKETS - OUR MOST CREATIVE BREWERS REVEAL ALL


CONTENTS

inside...

42

Winter 2018

FEATURES 16 Red, Amber and Brown Ale – Something for everyone There is so much room for experimentation in these categories and brewers are really starting to get their teeth into them, as Luke Robertson discovers

24 Top 65 Beer Venues The votes have been cast and we have your Top 50 Beer Venues decided, as well as the 15 best regional places for a beer. Find out what our expert panel has chosen

32 Brewing Equipment Part 1 In our first instalment of this series, we look at each of the bits of kit that brewers need to make successful beer and why they chose what they did

40 International and Imported Beers What can we be drinking and what can we be learning from the rest of the world’s brewers?

42 Creative Brewing Ingredients Creativity is good for the training of brewers and the broadening of beer’s overall appeal

4  www.beerandbrewer.com

HOMEBREWER 46 Welcome 47 Letters 48 Q&A US correspondent John Palmer takes a look an exciting new IPA

50 Jake’s Brewlog In a new addition to the Homebrewer pages, Jake Brandish takes a closer look at red ale

52 Pinks Boots Society Homebrewer looks at the amazing and unique beers brewed for International Women’s Day

“You want the added flavours to be apparent halfway through the beer, not beating you over the head from the first sniff.” Rhys Lopez

55 Recipe Andrew Childs drops a hop-bomb in our first recipe of the issue

56 Australian National Homebrewing Conference Preview Everything you need to know about the sixth ANHC

61 Coopers Recipe Coopers take a look at Trappist-style Belgian brown ales

62 Education – Yeast Jake Brandish investigates that allimportant fourth brewing ingredient

32


24

REGULARS 6 The Brew What’s in store for beer lovers?

8 News What’s been happening in the beer industry recently?

12 World News

Tales from across the seas

14 Bits & Bobs 15 New Venues 64 Entertaining – Food Dan Toombs, The Curry Guy, brings us British Indian dishes to enjoy

68 Tasting Note Stouts and porters are the beers of choice this issue, as well as a host of new releases

79 Directory 82 A Pint With… Steve Jeffares, co-founder of Stomping Ground, The Local Taphouse and GABS

We have an astonishing number of new entries in this list, but it also features some old favourites and a serious reshuffle at the top of the table

16

22

52

WINTER 2018  5


RED, AMBER AND BROWN ALES

16  www.beerandbrewer.com


RED, AMBER AND BROWN ALES

Something for everybody RED, AMBER AND BROWN ALES CAN BE A PLAYGROUND FOR MODERN BREWERS. AS LUKE ROBERTSON DISCOVERS, THERE ARE INTERPRETATIONS APLENTY FOR THESE CATEGORIES, WHICH ARE NEWER THAN ONE MIGHT THINK

C

olour is a funny thing in the beer

is Modus Operandi on Sydney’s Northern Beaches.

world. A lot of people drink with

Like Morrison, Modus’ Red Ale is unchanged since

their eyes and shy away from

its launch in 2014. However, its Red India Pale

anything much darker than a pale

Ale, known as Former Tenant, is a different beast

lager. Throw in the warm climes of

altogether. It may be similar in appearance to the

the Australian continent and selling

Morrison’s Irish Red, but it’s much stronger (7.8%

people on a red or brown ale probably isn’t the easiest

ABV compared to Morrison’s 4.8%), and has a load of

thing. While they don’t pack the roasty heft of a

New World hops. Co-founder Grant Wearin explains

stout, or palate weight of a big Russian imperial stout,

that even though it’s a big beer, like the Morrison

the dark tints still make a few punters wary.

Irish Red, balance is still key to the final product. He

Fortunately we have determined brewers making

explains that while many focus on the aroma of the

excellent and varied versions of reds, ambers and

beer - the result of generous amounts of Mosaic and

browns, and they are finding favour with a wider

Galaxy as a dry hop component - people might be

audience. And because these styles of beer are very

surprised to learn that it has nine different malts.

much up for interpretation, brewers can find their

Wearin says the combination of malt is crucial to

own niche and build their own preference in to the

achieving the right balance.

final product. In Launceston, Tasmania, Paul Morrison of Morrison

“We want it to be layered, complex and we want to support a really heavy hopping regime, and we don’t

Brewery says they strive for balance in everything

think we can achieve that with a more simplistic

they do and put a large focus on traditional styles.

grain bill,” Wearin says.

Their Irish Red Ale, he says, is their biggest seller and

Like their red cousins, brown ales also offer a chance

it was the beer that inspired Morrison to move from

to play around with personal preference for hops and

homebrew to commercial brewing in 2011.

malt flavour. At Beer Farm, in Western Australia,

“The recipe we are using now since homebrewing

head brewer Josh Thomas says his team approached

hasn’t changed,” he says. “It’s still the original recipe.

theirs with an English influence in mind, and recalls

We brew beer that we like. We don’t necessarily brew

examples such as Newcastle Brown Ale as its main

beer for the market; so as long as we are happy with it

inspiration. It uses a combination of six malts and

then that’s the most important thing.”

classic English hop varieties East Kent Goldings and

Morrison uses a combination of Crystal and Munich

Fuggles. Taking a slightly different approach is Chris

malts, with a touch of roasted malt for colour, plus

Farmer of Mr Banks in Victoria who uses four malt

English hops, and Irish yeast with a warm ferment to

varieties, alongside modern US and Australian hops.

bring out esters. He says for him the approach is all about building up “layers” in his flagship beer. Another brewery that has a red ale as their flagship

Food Everyone we spoke to leaned towards pairing cheese and meat with these beers. Sticky ribs came up more than once, and the rich malt characters you’ll find in each example will work beautifully with a sweeter rib sauce. Cheese platters were also a common suggestion - washed rind, or just plain cheddar were favoured by the brewers here. Beer Farm, being an actual farm as well as a brewery, says it sometimes makes its own jerky and serves that alongside the Brown Ale. Given that the cattle are reared onsite, and fed spent grain, it makes sense to have the final product side by side with a malty brown.

Both brewers, however, speak to the beer being approachable and easy drinking, despite the colour and number of ingredients.

WINTER 2018  17


BREWING EQUIPMENT

Getting tooled up THE LIST OF EQUIPMENT NEEDED TO BREW BEER AT A COMMERCIAL LEVEL IS A CONSIDERABLE ONE. IN THIS FEATURE, BEER & BREWER EDITOR CHARLIE WHITTING EXPLORES EACH BIT OF KIT IN TURN

32  www.beerandbrewer.com


Brunswick Bierworks

BREWING EQUIPMENT

W

e’ve all been on brewery tours, strolling around the gleaming steel containers where the magic happens. And for all the knowledge, skill and creativity that

brewers possess, their beers are nothing but ideas unless they have the tools to make them. The equipment that a commercial brewer installs will determine how much beer they can produce, how consistently they can maintain standards and how much time and energy it will take to make each batch. In the first instalment of this two-part feature, we will analyse each piece of equipment that goes into a successful brewery: What are they for? What should buyers look for? And what advances are being made?

DO YOUR RESEARCH You wouldn’t buy a car or a house without conducting enquiries and, given the cost of brewing equipment, you should absolutely do the same here. All going well, this equipment should be with you for a long time, so it’s not worth cutting corners on such a huge investment. If it looks too good to be true, it may well be. Talk to potential suppliers, find out what accreditation they have, what warranties they’re willing to offer and what testimonials they can provide. “Ensure that equipment has Australian support before, during and after the installation to ensure that parts, maintenance and warranty allow your success,” says Julian Sanders, founder of Spark Brewing Systems. “If brewers can focus on selling beer and work with people with a strong track record, they are likely to succeed. Nominal (batch) volume of a tank should be significantly less than its total capacity.” Don’t just talk to suppliers though – the brewing industry is a network full of friendly, knowledgeable people. Use them. Most brewers agree that with the benefit of hindsight there are things they would’ve done differently. No one can predict what will happen with their own brewery, but they can make educated guesses by talking to other brewers and learning from their mistakes. If you are considering purchasing a mash tun, for example, talk about it with people who have bought that model. If you are thinking of starting a brewery from scratch, ask for advice from people who have already done so. They might highlight a short cut or a potential problem that you’d not thought of. Use their hindsight to look forward. “The most important thing that brewers can do before buying any equipment is ask questions to other brewers who have the same equipment or used the same supplier,” advises Glenn Harrison, brewery operations manager at Napoleone Brewing. “This industry is a very helpful and honest industry, so it is usually not hard to find others that can help. Ask your

WINTER 2018  33


IMPORTED BEER

THE QUESTION OF FRESHNESS

WITH THE HUGE RISE IN QUALITY OF AUSSIE CRAFT BEER IN RECENT YEARS, IS THERE ANY REASON TO BUY IMPORTED OR INTERNATIONAL BREWS NOWADAYS? TAM ALLENBY DIVES IN TO THE DEBATE

M

ost craft beer drinkers

in alcohol or really hop-forward, as these degrade

would probably have had a

more severely over time and drinking these fresh is

disappointing experience

important to really appreciate the beer.”

with an imported beer. It’s no secret that – especially

COLD STORAGE

for hop-driven styles – too

Well aware of the effect that export can have on quality,

much time in the warehouse, on the ship or truck, or

many beer importers employ cold storage throughout

time sitting on the shelf can reduce a beer’s quality in

the shipping process to try and negate the decline.

spades, with both hop aroma and flavour diminishing rapidly when exposed to heat, light or oxygen. With this in mind, and with the huge upsurge in quality of locally produced beer in recent years, is there still any point in buying imported? Richard Kelsey, director of retail store Beer Cartel, says he has seen a “pretty dramatic shift” in the

“If a beer is not pasteurised and relies on its hop characters, then we transport and store refrigerated,” says Phoenix Beers’ owner Leif Ryan. However, the last part of the chain – the outlet itself – is out of the importer’s control, with many retailers lacking the space to store everything refrigerated. “Luckily for us, since our beers are from high quality

imported versus local beer landscape in the last three

brewers, they stand up to being stored ambient for a

or four years, and particularly in the last 12 months.

number of weeks without issue,” Ryan adds.

“There is now so much quality beer being produced

Nonetheless, he still recognises that with more and

that Australian beer accounts for over 60% of craft

more Aussie craft beers fighting for space on the bar or

beer sales we make from the 1,000 different lines we

in the fridge, imported beers aren’t exactly on the up.

stock,” he explains. “If we were to go back two years,

But what about less hop-driven or higher ABV styles?

around 40 % of all our sales would have been made up

Bidbeer’s Michael Lonard, an importer that focuses on

of Australian beer.

Belgian ales, says that with the rise of locally produced

“In the past, where the quality of Australian craft beer wasn’t as good as what we are seeing on the market now, we would have said that Australian and

sours and saisons, more and more consumers are seeking out the originals. “Freshness in beer is important in certain styles,” he

imported brews were still relatively comparable. Now

notes. “Some specialty ales will improve in the bottle

the quality of Australian product has increased, we

well past their obligatory ‘best before’ – so not always

will always recommend going with Australian product.

is it a case of ‘fresh is best’, as much as ‘education

This is particularly important for beers that are lower

is best’. Plus, the irony is that IPAs were historically

40  www.beerandbrewer.com


IMPORTED BEER

A fourth option? The curious case of BrewDog Let’s assume for a second that most of the beers you buy come to life in one of three ways: either they’re brewed locally by an independent (or formerly independent) craft brewer; they’re physically shipped across the sea from their country and brewery of origin, or they’re brewed here by one of the bigger multinational brewers as ‘premium international’ beers.

brewed purposely for export and long shelf life, but the Americans now brew a beer that is the polar opposite of that!”

ROOM FOR EVERYONE Of course, many larger breweries are sidestepping this ‘freshness debate’ by brewing premium international brands, as well as ‘craftier’ beers, here in Australia under licence. One of the latest to arrive was Goose Island, with two of its beers (IPA and Midway Session IPA) being brewed by Carlton United Breweries/AB InBev at the Cascade brewery in Hobart. “When we decided a year and a half ago to bring Goose to Australia, we basically talked to the brewers in Chicago and they told us that if you want to have hop-forward beers like Goose IPA available in Australia, you’re going to have to brew it locally, to make sure it’s perfectly fresh,” says Adrien Mahieu, High End director for AB InBev Australia. Despite the differing viewpoints on the matter, everyone that Beer & Brewer spoke with agreed that there is room in the market for both imported, international and local craft beer, as long as freshness is taken into consideration. And in the words of Phoenix’s Leif Ryan: “In the end it all comes down to flavour. Whether it’s imported or made here, we just want something that

However, with the news that large Scottish independent brewery BrewDog will open an outpost in Brisbane in the not too distant future, which allows it to retain complete control of its product, has a fourth option emerged? “Australia has long been on the hit list for BrewDog,” explains Zarah Prior, the company’s director in Australia. “The pioneers of craft beer here have long been pushing the boundaries of what beer can be, punching well above their weight when compared against the more developed markets of America and the UK. Australia is also home to (and on the doorstep of) some of the most exciting hop growing regions in the world. From the get-go BrewDog has been striving to shorten the distance between ourselves and the people who drink our beer.” What’s certain is that many in the beer industry will be watching BrewDog’s Australian experiment with interest.

tastes great.” It’s hard to argue with that.

WINTER 2018  41


FEATURE

Pink Boots Brews

TO CELEBRATE INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY A NUMBER OF UNIQUE BEERS WERE BREWED ACROSS THE COUNTRY USING A SPECIAL PINK BOOTS HOP BLEND FROM THE U.S.

N

ew options for

usually do use multiple hops in a brew,

homebrewers always

blends mean that multiple packs of hops are

(and a recipe from Bruny Island Beer Co), let

create a buzz in

not required and opened during a brew – as

us take a look at the Pink Boots Society.

the brewing scene.

homebrewers we are all familiar with using a

Especially when it comes

half pack of hops, then trying to store it and

PINK BOOTS

to hops.

keep it fresh for next time.

Many readers will have heard of the Pink

New varieties always bring a rush of

Many commercial brewers take advantage

enthusiasm, however more recently some

of hop blends for a consistent base and to

hop blends appearing on the market have

accentuate their favourite hop on top.

sparked some interest. Falconer’s Flight

But before we get to the beers they made

Boots Society around the beer scene over the past few years. For those unsure exactly what Pink Boots is,

To celebrate International Women’s

or who it is supporting, we caught up with the

is a great blend that has been around for a

Day (IWD), the Pink Boots hop blend was

Pink Boots Society vice president Zoe Ottaway.

few years, while Fortnight hop blend was

introduced to Australia and five unique, but

released last year and has been embraced by

united beers were brewed across the country.

commercial brewers.

Breweries involved were Boatrocker

But why hop blends rather than single hops?

(Vic), Pirate Life (SA), Little Creatures (WA),

Blends can achieve flavour profiles that

Nomad Brewing (NSW) and Bruny Island

single hops can’t. While brewers can and

52  Home Brewer

Beer Co (Tas).

“Pink Boots is an international notfor-profit organisation here to help support, educate and empower women beer professionals,” says Ottaway. Started in 2007 by American brewer Teri Fahrendorf in the US, the Pink Boots


Society currently serves members

The scholarship program sends

in about 30 countries with about 50

four recipients to the IBA BrewCon in

chapters worldwide.

Sydney with flights, accommodation and

The original Pink Boots Australia board of Jayne Lewis (Two Birds), Kirrily

Successful applicants pay forward their

Waldhorn (Beer Diva), Karen Golding

experience to fellow Pink Boots members.

(Red Hill), Sam Fuss (now Philter) and

This might be done by hosting a brew day,

Tiffany Waldron (Girl Beer Bites, now

organising an industry survey, or leading a

CUB) saw the opportunity for the same

state chapter of Pink Boots.

community here in Australia. “After getting Pink

PINK BOOTS HOP BLEND

Boots Australia off to a

The Pink Boots hop blend

cracking start, we now

was created by the US

have a new board to grow

chapter and YCH Hops

the society further and

during the 2017 Great

into our next chapter,”

American Beer Festival

says Ottaway. “Pink Boots

and included Palisade,

is very active in providing

Simcoe, Mosiac, Citra and

opportunities for women

Loral hops. In Australia,

in beer to meet, learn and network. We

it is being distributed by Bintani, who are

host regular brew days around the country,

donating $5 for every kilogram to the Pink

sensory sessions and tap takeovers.

Boots Australia scholarship funds.

We host events within the beer weeks

The Recipe

conference pass covered.

There will be an annual Pink Boots

around the country and hold a scholarship

hop release so we can look forward to

program every year.”

something fresh and new each year.

New England India Saison Ale – All-Grain The entire team at Bruny Island Beer Co. was really excited to be breaking our own rules and using non-Tasmanian hops, but we also wanted to bring something of our own signature style to the party by using Tasmanian and Bruny Island ingredients for the grain base. Using raw wheat and oats grown just up the road from the brewery almost guarantees a hazy beer, and knowing we would be using some pretty amazing US aroma hops made us gravitate towards a New England IPA style. But we wanted to put yet another twist on it and draw attention back to the ‘farmhouse’ part of the story, so we fermented it with a saison yeast. The dryness of the beer, classic saison aromatics and fruity hops really come together to create something greater than the sum of its parts.

Expected Brew Figures OG: 1.048 FG: 1.004 ABV: 5.8% IBU: 38 Volume: 23 litres

Ingredients 4.3kg Joe White Export Pilsner

The International Women’s Day beers will be tapped across the country on various dates so keep an eye on their Facebook page for announcements.

525g Flaked wheat 400g Rolled/flaked oats 87g Pink Boots hop blend (2017 Blend 11.1%AA)* 2 x 11g Safale BE-134 yeast

Method 1. Mash for 60 minutes at 65°C for a light body 2. Mash out at 76°C 3. Boil for 60 minutes (no finings) 4. Add 75g Pink Boots hop blend after flame out and allow to steep for 30 minutes 5. Chill to about 18°C and transfer to fermenter before pitching yeast 6. Ferment for seven days at 19-20°C 7. On day four, dry hop with 6g of Pink Boots hop blend 8. On day seven, dry hop with another 6g of Pink Boots hop blend 9. When gravity tests confirm that fermentation is complete (approx. 10 days), chill beer and bottle or keg. * If you cannot get access to the Pink Boots blend, try creating your own blend of some of the more fruit-forward (citrus and tropical) Australian hop varieties such as Galaxy, Enigma and Melba.

WINTER 2018  53


ENTERTAINING – FOOD

Currying favour INDIAN CUISINE HAS INFLUENCED THE WORLD, NOWHERE MORE SO THAN THE UK. DIVE INTO THESE RECIPES FROM BRITISH INDIAN RESTAURANTS

I

n this book, curry house expert Dan Toombs shares 100 easy recipes from the world of British Indian cuisine.

Dan, who is also known as

The Curry Guy, has travelled around the UK, sampling dishes, learning curry house kitchen secrets and refining those recipes at home. Since his bestselling debut book was published, Dan has been besieged by requests for more curry house favourites that can be made in half the time without needing hours of preparation. He has created recipes that will taste as good as a takeaway. Handy labels are included for quick reference, with plenty of recipes in the ‘30 minutes or less’ category. Dan has also included his best hints, cheats and ingredient shortcuts to save time and money, picked up over the years he’s spent researching the methods and secrets of Indian chefs. And, as we all know, curry and beer are a match made in heaven, so take a look over these recipes and find the perfect dish for you to make at home and enjoy with a beer.

www.beerandbrewer.com 64  www.beerandbrewer.com

This is an edited extract from The Curry Guy: Easy by Dan Toombs, published by Hardie Grant Publishers. It’s available from all good bookstores or online (RRP $24.99).


ENTERTAINING – FOOD

Chicken 65 Serves 6+ Ingredients 1kg chicken breast Rapeseed oil for deep frying 1 tsp black mustard seeds 1 tsp cumin seeds 20 curry leaves 3 green chillies, sliced 12 garlic cloves, finely chopped 10cm piece of ginger, julienned 3 spring onions, roughly chopped 2 tbsp lemon juice 2–3 tbsp chilli sauce of choice (optional)*

FOR THE SPICED BATTER 2 eggs, beaten 2 tbsp garlic and ginger paste 3 tbsp cornflour 3 tbsp rice flour 1 tsp ground turmeric 1 tbsp ground cumin 1 tsp ground coriander 2 tsp chilli powder 11/2 tbsp tandoori masala 1 tsp salt 1 tbsp black pepper *Shop-bought sauces work well.

Recipe Slice the chicken breasts into small bite-sized pieces (tikka). Mix all of the batter ingredients into a paste and rub it evenly into the chicken pieces. If time permits, let this marinate for about 30 minutes or overnight, but this isn’t crucial. When ready to deep fry, heat your oil in a large wok. The oil should be at least 10cm (4in) deep. The oil is ready when a small piece of chicken sizzles immediately upon putting it in the oil. If using an oil thermometer, aim for 190ºC. Fry the chicken in batches until the exterior is nice and crispy and the meat is almost cooked through. This should take about two to three minutes per batch. Place the finished chicken pieces on a wire rack to rest while you fry the remaining batches. The frying can be done ahead of time. Store the fried chicken, covered in the fridge until ready to use. Once cooled a bit, remove all but about 3 tbsp of the oil from the wok. Place over high heat and toss in the mustard seeds. When they begin to pop, reduce the heat to medium-high, add the cumin seeds, curry leaves and green chillies and fry for a further 30 seconds. Stir in the garlic and ginger and fry until fragrant and soft – about one minute should do the job. Tip in the chicken and spring onions and stir well to coat. Fry it all over high heat until the chicken is completely cooked through. Squeeze the lemon juice over the top and add chilli sauce, if using. Give it all one last good stir, check for seasoning, adding a little more salt if needed, and serve.

WINTER 2018  65


RECIPES

RECIPES

Vintner’s Lager

Hoptoberfest Hazy German IPA – All Grain Recipe

THE TEAM AT COOPERS HAVE DELIVERED THE PERFECT FRUIT-INSPIRED HOMEBREW RECIPE FOR A SUNNY SUMMER AFTERNOON

Y

ou know the dilemma… it’s a beautiful sunny afternoon and you just can’t work out if it’s a beer day or a wine day? Well hey, why can’t it be both? And no, we don’t mean mixing your bevvies – we mean a drop of cheeky, fruit-inspired Vintner’s Lager. Highly sought after Nelson Sauvin hops give this brew a

Expected Brew Figures OG: 1.057 FG: 1.012 IBU: 12 ABV: 5.9% Volume: 22 Litres

quirky wine character reminiscent of a crisp Sauvignon Blanc. But this

Ingredients

ain’t no wine – it’s still very much a bold malty beer that uncorks a

1.7kg Thomas Coopers 86 Days Pilsner

slightly sweet biscuity backdrop for the hops to show off their white

1.5kg Light Dry Malt Extract (LDME)

wine, rockmelon, and tropical fruits traits.

250g Caramel Hell Grains (cracked) 25g Nelson Sauvin Hop Pellets 25g Enigma Hop Pellets Saflager S-23 Dry Yeast

Method 1. The day before brew day, soak the cracked grain in a small mesh bag in a pot with about 3 litres of cold water. Fit the lid and sit it in the fridge overnight. If the grains have not already been cracked, place them in a plastic zip-lock sandwich bag and crack them using a rolling pin 2. On brew day lift the mesh bag with grains out of the pot and allow the liquid to drain out before discarding the grains 3. Place the strained liquid onto the stovetop, bring to the boil then add 12.5g of each of the Nelson Sauvin and Enigma Hops and boil for 5 minutes 4. Take off flame and cool the liquid by placing the pot in a bath of cold water for about 15mins with the lid on 5. Add all the fermentable ingredients and the cooled liquid to your fermenter then stir to dissolve. Don’t worry if lumps of Light Dry Malt Extract remain as they will dissolve over the course of several hours 6. Top up with cold water to 20 litres and stir thoroughly with your sanitised brewing spoon 7. Check the temperature and top up to 22 litres with warm or cool water (refrigerated if necessary) to start the brew at 18°C 8. Sprinkle both the Safale S-23 and brew can yeast then fit the lid 9. Place your fermenter in a location out of direct sunlight and ferment at 15°C. Fermentation should take around 10-14 days 10. At day 7, add the remaining hop pellets to the brew by wrapping them in a hop bag (or a mesh cleaning cloth pulled straight from the pack if you don’t have one) and place directly on top of the brew then re-fit the lid

PART 2 BREWING EQUIPMENT – CHANGE YOUR THINKING

see page 46

INCLUDING

11. On day 10 check the specific gravity. The brew is ready once the specific gravity has stabilised over a couple of days and is between 1.006-1.010 12. Allow your beer to bottle conditions for at least 2 weeks, but it will benefit from at least 8 weeks

Hoptoberfest Hazy German IPA WE HAVE BEEN FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO HAVE ANDREW CHILDS CONTRIBUTING RECIPES FROM HIS BEHEMOTH /CHUR BREWING RANGE FOR SOME TIME. THIS HAZY GERMAN IPA IS ANOTHER MOUTH-WATERING RECIPE TO FIT ANY SEASON. ENJOY!

W

e have brewed a few Hazy IPA’s this year. We love brewing them and I love drinking them. This one is a lot different from the others as it uses a couple of new German hop varieties.

Expected Brew Figures OG: 1.067 FG: 1.019 ABV: 6.3% IBU: 33 Volume: 23 litres

Ingredients 4.65kg Weyermann Pale Malt 650g Weyermann Pale Wheat 600g Rolled Oats 150g Weyermann Munich 2 200g Hallertau Blanc 125g Mandarina Bavaria Wyeast 1318 London Ale III

METHOD 1. Break the smack pack and allow it to expand 2. Mash all malts at 69°C 3. Sparge and bring to a boil

PART 2 BREWING EQUIPMENT – CHANGE YOUR THINKING

They are fruity and herbal. If this sounds a bit out there, go

4. Boil for 90 minutes

ahead and substitute a couple of US, Aussie or NZ varieties to

5. At the end of the boil add 100g Hallertau Blanc and 75g Mandarina Bavaria and whirlpool for 15 minutes

this recipe (you can then make up your own name).

Now there is a bit of science to this haze craze but the main thing is using wheat and

oats, not fining or filtering, playing with water chemistry (go light on the gypsum), only use hops in the whirlpool and dry hop once during ferment and once after. It uses a lot of hops but only gets a little bit of bitterness. Which makes them juicy AF! This beer is nothing like a usual Oktoberfest beer but bugger it, I liked the name. Hopfen und malz, gott erhalt’s (Hops and malts God bless them).

6. Cool to 20°C and add yeast 7. Ferment at 18°C 8. 80% through fermentation add 50g Hallertau Blanc and 25g Mandarina Bavaria 9. Do a diacetyl rest at 22°C towards end of fermentation

ISSUE 43 Summer 2017 PRICE $9.95 (NZ $11.95)

10. After Fermentation add 50g Hallertau Blanc and 25g Mandarina Bavaria

CRAFTY

Canners

11. Bottle or keg as usual then enjoy with mates!

BEERS & CIDERS

Get some cans in your hands this summer

TASTED 60  Home Brewer

SUMMER 2017/18 61

ISSUE 43 Summer 2017 PRICE $9.95 (NZ $11.95)

Awards BEER & BREWER

CRAFTY

BEERS & CIDERS

TASTED

Canners

Get some cans in your hands this summer

Awards BEER & BREWER

A shout out to the very best in Australian brewing

A shout out to the very best in Australian brewing

CHARLIE BAMFORTH WWW.BEERANDBREWER.COM

see page 46

INCLUDING

CHARLIE BAMFORTH

THE POPE OF BREWING COMES TO TOWN

PLUS! SESSION ALES | A PINT WITH... TAJ BURROW | LAGER – IT AIN’T ALL BAD WWW.BEERANDBREWER.COM

THE POPE OF BREWING COMES TO TOWN

PLUS! SESSION ALES | A PINT WITH... TAJ BURROW | LAGER – IT AIN’T ALL BAD

BEER & BREWER PRINT + DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION BUNDLE Subscribe now from only $34.99 (inc GST)* Receive hard copies of our magazine delivered to your door PLUS digital editions of our magazine delivered to your inbox so you can read Beer & Brewer any time anywhere! 1 Years (4 Issues) - $34.99 2 Years (8 Issues) - $62.99 3 Years (12 Issues) - $89.99

TO SUBSCRIBE VISIT shop.beerandbrewer.com

*Rates quoted for Australian subscribers, additional costs apply for New Zealand and Rest of World.

Beer & Brewer Winter 2018 Teaser  
Beer & Brewer Winter 2018 Teaser