Page 1


VOLUME

1

OF THE

"OVEN AND RANGE"

SERIES.

AMERICAN PASTRY COOK SEVENTH EDITION. A

Book

of perfected Receipts, for

of the Hotel

making

all sorts of articles

required

Pastry Cook, Baker and Confectioner, especially

adapted for Hotel and Steamboat use, and for Cafe's

and Fine Bakeries.

JESSUP WHITEHEAD.

CHICAGO: JESSUP WHITEHEAD & 1094.

Co.,

PUBLISHERS.


Entered according to Act of Congress, In the

office

of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D.

Right of Translation reserved.

C


AGRIC.

LIBRARY

ADVERTISEMENT. BOOK

is

especially adapted

THIS Confectionery-Cafe's, respect

it

enters

upon a

which are

use

in

Hotels,

Boarding-Houses,

Restaurants and Eating-Houses generally, in which field

hitherto

unoccupied.

The

quantities of the

what experience has taught the author are

receipts are calculated for

average orders of about

for

fifty

really only about

persons

choosing from

In

thirty portions.

many

a

bill

of the

of

the,

fare, but

more import^

ant matters, such as Puff Paste, Bread and Rolls, Cakes, Ices, Creams, and

Pie Mixtures, and in Cold Meat Dishes, Salads, the standard of one

Corned Beef management, and

pound or quart used

receipts equally useful for private families,

will be

found to make the

and the trouble of dividing the

larger quantities in other cases will probably be fully repaid

conciseness of the

directions, the

absence of

all

by the simple

technical jargon, and

professional knowledge of the art of cookery imparted in every page.

book

is

unique also in having

in regard to cost, to

fov

pleasure

the articles directed

and those who are concerned in cooking for

same author, in which for six or eight. in private

It

all

is

first

be made graded

profit.

printed another book has been issued by the

of the receipts are reduced to the guage of meals

especially adapted

houses, and

includes

to teach

cooking as a trade for

everything likely to be of use for

the purpose, arranged in order from the cheapest meals

and suppers.

to

The

meet the requirements both of those who do cooking

Since the above was

women

all

the

It is called the

up

to party dinners

CHICAGO HERALD COOKING SCHOOL.


Introductory in the National Hotel Reporter. For any apparent presumptuousness there may be in spreading these cooking receipts and instructions before the professed cooks of the country in the most widely circulated and most influential hotel journal, I have to offer as apology that I was long ago imall the expressed with the singular fact, that among cellent cooks, hardly any coiild be found who worked This was especially the by any rule or measure. case with American cooks. They knew how themselves, but could not have given exact instructions even to their sons without first instituting a series of experiments, and their knowledge perished with them. I simply set to work to reduce my portion of the general knowledge to exact figures, and the merit claimed therefore is not for very extraordinary that skill, but rather for the painstaking industry has never allowed a receipt to be put away marked 0. K., without being satisfied that it was quite reliable.

Another consideration offered and others, who buy for cooks

is,

that the stewards,

to use, not being, in

the great majority of cases, practical cooks themselves, are apt to consider many of the demands of the cooks for certain kinds of materials necessary to good work, as but unreasonable whims, not worthy of notice, and it is difficult to see how the requisite explanations are ever to be made, unless through some such means and medium as the present,

W.

J.

Daily National Hotel Reporter, Oct., 1878.

RECEIPT OR RECIPE?

ten with the word recipe, according to the observed practice of the majority, but after all it was decided to

change

and

it,

for reasons

perhaps as immaterial

as the difference bet ween the two words in question.

the minority side having been taken,

Still,

it

seems

best to state the case.

A

man, wise in the ways of bread making, an old Yankee farmer's house instructing his housekeeper in the best methods of making homemade Boston brown bread, and used the word recipe The old man was not illiterate, but exfrequently. cessively old-fashioned, and the trisyllable annoyed city

was

at

He laid down the Churchman that past bearing. he had been reading, and leaned back and listened. Then he began to reThen he took off his glasses. monstrate. "Oh, don't bring those affected city " he rewords among us plain people. 'Recipee,' him

"My parents peated, with immeasurable contempt. my neighbors all say receipt, always said receipt what would they think of us if we should go among ;

them putting on such

As

I

overheard

followed,

airs as that?"

this,

aimed at

and a cutting

city

affectations

phillipic

which

in general,

my

power of high-sounding recipe to soothe the savage breast was considerably weakened. A long time after, and at a very distant place, a lady school faith in the

teacher was heard to say: "lam so glad if receipt is the right word instead of recipe the latter seems so ;

Which

Worcester says that a recipe is a also, that it is a formulary or receipt for cooking is

right ?

;

prescription for in medicine.

mixing certain

articles, particularly

Webster, also, makes recipe and re-

synonymous terms, and attaches to the former a particularly medical meaning that is The French nowhere made to belong to the other.. recette, which appears to be the original of our receipt, is pronounced like it; and yet all the translated French books have recipe instead. Of half a dozen ceipt appear nearly

different articles on the grocer's shelves, four have recipes printed on the packages while others give reOf six persons talking together, four or five ceipts.

The label on the receipt. you that the sauce beside your plate was prepared from the receipt of a nobleman of the But the nobleman's only authoritative county.

much

like

familiar

When it is

I

a stranger in a foreign dress among our

English words of the same dimensions. have taught my pupils to indite and recite,

troublesome to

side is another is

adver-

Ssed as containing so many thousand receipts. Still another more recent and even more compendious

London book, uses the other word. Both words are right, but which is the better ? Several hundred pages of the matter which it is proposed

to

publish in this column, had been writ-

that rec-

and then,

of the Harpers published the most polite cook-book It made extreme correctness

that has yet appeared.

It

By its

all,

them from making two syllables of and pipe." This was another blow at the aristocratic trisyllable, but it seemed hard to have to descend from the lofty heights where it prevailed to the level of the common. Fortunately, just at that time, the great house

a special feature.

and very compendious work which

at

ripe, wipe,

will say recipe, the rest

later

way

again, to stop

bottle tells

English cook-book uses recipe.

make them understand

ipe is not to be pronounced that

It

was typographically

hyphenated every cocoanut

It split hairs

perfect.

on

tea-

Noah Webster whithersoever he might lead. It was "the glass of fashion and the mould I mean mold of form," and with all this it spoonful.

It followed

adopted receipt instead of recipe. There was no more room for doubt. Higher precedent there could not be, and so, if the reader pleases,

column is concerned, we will render unto the doctors the Latin trisyllable which is their, as far as this

and use only the humbler but

safer English receipt.


NOTES TO THE SECOND EDITION.

The "American Pastry Cook" having met with so reports connected with the circulation of the pastry favor that a second edition has become neces- book as far as it has gone already, the anxiety

much

being

me

make a state- expressed in numberless instances to obtain more ment of the simple origin of the book, as much as books of the same sort. The careful plan adopted of anything in acknowledgment of the kind encourage- making the work reliable in every particular has ment of a great number of friends who bought un- prevented its being written and finished in haste. sary,

it

may perhaps

be allowed

to

doubtedly without any thought of using it. All such books, if worth considering at all, have had a motive, either to introduce foreign methods, found a new school of cookery, teach new extremes of or-

Little Desserts. This book has been taken up with avidity by many outside of hotels, seeking

namentation, or put into practice the theories of instructions how to make nice sweet dishes, some of whom seem to think they know all they need to great chemists or of new idea doctors Leibig,

Graham, the vegetarians and the like. The '-Oven learn of meat cooking when they can broil and fry, and Range series was not so deliberately planned but who acknowledge the difficulty that prevails and if a motive may be claimed in this case it is to everywhere when well-to-do people ask why they make good cooks, such as are always wanted, and cannot have at least a few of the dainty trifles at to raise the occupation of cooks in America at least their private tables that thoy have enjoyed in such '

to the dignity of a

When, a good

recognized trade.

many

ago, I

used

to find

myself in positions on sea and river, in hotels and retaurants where the assistants always coming and going were generally willing enough while they years

stayed, but could not do good work, I began to see the absurdity of knowing what I wanted done and

yet being unable to ma!;e others understand, and I

profusion at a few very good hotels. because pastry-cooking cannot be

It

is,

briefly,

picked up like meat frying, but must be learned. In order to help the matter I will suggest things to be tried. Let those who would not have pies every day and only pies, practice the different

cream

fillings

and make

of delectable forms of pastry of them. I have called some of these conserves because the

all sorts

word cream is worked to death. The articles alludbegan pencilling down weights, measures and direced to are pineapple cream or conserve, apple cream, tions for them to work by not pastries alone but a little of everything and hanging these directions orange conserve or tart filling, lemon conserve or OB the nails along with each assistant's portion of lemon honey, transparent pie mixture, cocoanut and the bill of fare for the next meal. All coo^-s that lemon pie mixtures, pastry cream or custard, chocoare worthy of being called such are emulative and late cream, cheese curd mixtures, and many more that are in the book but which need not be named. try to excel. They "hit it exactly" in making a Let it be observed that all of the receipts for makare elated and dish, sometimes, wish they highly them are perfectly reliable and they can be ing could always have such "good luck." In my own taken up and used any time without fear of failure. whenever of us "hit it practice any exactly" I This will be found a perfect little mine of good simply penciled dosvnhow it was done, and kept on When they are understood make tarts in and until I was in a great things. changing improving measure independent of the circumstances of the patty pans of them, then covered tarts, then cheese boys "jumping out;" anybody smart enough to cakes, apple shortcake, Napoleon cake, Saratoga work by written directions could make what I told shortcake, apple turnovers, mince patties, using the different creams or sweets at different times. Then them. These were and receipts as necessarily correct

of great value.

necessarily plain,

and

and they were In course of time there were some

make

reliable,

lemon

the open tarts with pies;

meringue on top

like

make apple shortcabes with meringue

hundreds of them and they made a bulky package. or frosting on top or between the layers, and so you Is there any wonder that the thought occurred that can keep on indefinitely. Tlien take notice of the fruit charlottes, the apple they would be more useful in print? Is there any need to explain further why the writer has confi- and peach charlottes and friar's omelet. Since the dence in his book ? Those exact and plainly word- book has been published I have seen two of the most ed receipts, with others of course added, form the accomplished French cooks of this part of the Oven and Range" cook books. There has been country practicing those articles with others from it '

nothing but pleased surprise, kind words and good

with evident interest and satisfaction

for it does


THE AMERICAN PASTRY man

not follow because a

is

a splendid cook already everything that is

that he

must have practiced

fcnown;

we

are

About Whipped Cream.

varieties

to the

be paid

should

attention

in

of boiled custards

many

There are

cups.

tapioca custard, rice, farina, sago, manioca, granula cocoanut, chocolate, caramel, wine, and plain cus-

The

tards flavored.

proportions to

And

tinually inventing some new combination. we have not yet mentioned the ice creams.

learning or trying some old

all still

favorite for the first time.

Then,

COOK.

receipts give you the exact so that everybody likes

make them

nection with the Bavarian and

In close

con-

creams the

Italian

pure whipped cream regarded as most

delicious

among desserts has to be considered. Those creams when genuine are made of pure cream whipped to and stiffened with gelatine. The amount of gelatine required ounce to a quart of cream when it

froth

is

half an

only

fill a is but to them ice cold. you them, and There are custards with whipped cream on top, and charlotte russe, or be a simple cream in a mold, with frosting browned over, and custards baked but if strawberry juice and pulp is to be added and steamed. Then remember the different dishes or maraschino or wine then an ounce to a quart made with cake and custard, the floating islands, will be needed. If you put pure cream in a deep

to serve

they direct

the gipsey pudding and then the different ways of pan, set it on ice and be at with the wireegg-whisk it will become thick and firm enough to fill small making a charlotte russe. I write these lines in the interest of people who charlottes without anything added at all, except, of

want nice things on

their tables

and not caring par- course, a

to know how it is that ticularly about the cost wish cooks in general have such a very limited know-

little

down again

go

When

sugar and flavoring, and as long as

it is

the greater firmness

not

will

it

kept cold. is

wanted so

that

it

utmost pains ledge of this line of business. As the has been bestowed upon the book in the hope to

can be turned out of a mold the half-ounce of gelatine to a quart must be dissolved in a little warm

no supply this deficiency of knowledge I can do than point them and their cooks to these pages.

milk and poured into the cream

they are the blanc manges, the Bavarian, chocolate, Roman and all that line. Most of the

have about given up the use of

while

you are

whipping it light. But there is so much difficulty in most hotels in Then there are the molded creams, which to know how to make perfectly is a pleasing art in itself; getting cream for the pastry cook to use that I

less

strawberry,

it

It is

altogether.

not always the question of cost that makes the difficulty but the actual scarcity of cream and the

menus have Bavarian cream in some form or under some name as Bavaroise auxfraises greater need for it in other ways than in the pastry, or o herwise, so the receipts for the made creams and charlottes (with strawberries) or au chocolat, and many of the diplomatic and court banquets will be found to call for no cream, but use milk infinest foreign

can be easily made and

stead,

are simple when once learned. I have always found that something of the sort is highly appreciated at the end of a dinner, particularly whea there is no

cream

show the same.

all

They

icecream.

While claiming to excel in making these creams myself and having made others working under me excel in the

same

must own that

line of articles, I

common

They can be made is

never observed.

so good that the lack

The

difficulty

does

of

not

when

parties in private houses advise the use of pure cream when possible, although it is valuable to know how to do without.

so generally exist

are to be given and

I

Individual Charlotte-Russe. dainty of this sort

sold at the

A

favorite

city

confec-

expression, touch with a ten-foot pole these so-called creams as they But they are commonly made by unskillful cooks.

made in a paper case, size and shape of a common tin cup of the half pint size. A

are served daily in great perfection at a few of the very best Chicago hotels. Everything necessary to

sheet of sponge cake is baked on paper, taken off and cut in pieces that will just fit inside the cases,

I

would

not, to use the

be said about them has been set

down

in the di-

rections in the book.

The puddings alone

will furnish

a

change

variety that may surprise many who try them, some are so little like pudding they seem to

serve a finer name.

Where

all

are

good

and and

it

deis

little

is

tioneries that is

a bottom piece is put in and then the charlotte, is filled with a spoontnl of whipped cream, sweetened and flavored but whipped up without gelatine.

But they are made for fine parties in paper cases of the shape of small tumblers, wider at top than at bottom so that they can be taken out of the

when

pattern with straightThese are lined with either cake

served, as the

scarcely fair to single out any, yet, to point the meaning I wi'l instance the birds-nest pudding as

case

being almost a dish of baked fruit, and, not least, there remain the fritters both plain and with fruit,

or lady fingers, but to give them firmness enough to be removed from the cases a little gelatine has to be added to the pure cream, as explained in the

and

sides cannot.

and pastry and fruit, and compotes, and every note about whipped cream. But another way most suitable making little desserts is con-

meringues of cake and frosted over,

up

truit

jellies

one who delights in

of all

when

these


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

COOK.

charlottes are to be served at ball suppers, as say in such matters as these exactly where old patbe held in gloved fingers, is to make them terns are departed from and originality begins. It can they in handsome ornamented paper cases, size of small is true, however, that these are all newly adap. tumblers which may be bought ready made for the ted to hotel use being on the whole an invention of purpose in some places or otherwise can be made of a set of ways of serving a magnificent array of ices in little

unruled paper at home. The lining sometimes of white cake and another time

where the resort to molds and brick shapes was not possible with the small number of hands low, and either pure whipped cream or any of the employed and perhaps the comparative scarcity of made creams can be used for filling. The same ice. I keep up a constant run of novelties by servsort of charlottes are held in high favor at hotel ing two kinds at once in the same saucer or glass dinners when they are formed in deep muffin rings and making ices of almost every kind of sweet and fine

without bottoms, kept very cold and of the rings

when

served.

I

be

may of

slipped

have practiced

places

yel-

out that

fruity material.

In order to do this without

mak-

ing incongruous mixtures less acceptable than common ice cream the greatest care and skill must be

more than any other way. A cup of pure thick cream when whipped fills about eight of these small exercised both in compounding, coloring and freezEven if we make the o'd foreign favorites charlottes, so that a calculation can be made of ing. how much will be required. they have to be supplied with plainer names for hotel bills of fare.

Take

for instance "tutti-frutti;"

practice in all the best hotels to serve the puddings in individIn the receipts in this book it will be ual forms.

when

found that the baked puddings are all directed to be cooked first by boiling the main ingredients together then adding the eggs and then to be baked

hotels

only a short time. This baking is done in white bowls that hold from a cupful to a pint and the puddings are served in the same bowl set in a plate and an individual pitcher of sauce with it, if the

of even the terms attached in this book to the

Individual Puddings.

It is the

the hotel keeper has ice cream provided he of course wants the guests to know it and get the good of

it,

but not one in a hundred of them that come to

knows what

tutti-frutti is

much disappointment may be I

by that name, and on that account.

felt

would not be understood as advising

eral combinations.

the

use sev-

That

is a matter of indiffertwo fancy ices at once, perhaps a pale green grape ice and a deep colored pudding needs a sauce, for family dinners granite frozen custard call it ice cream in the style of your ware or tin dishes are in use with an outside silver- hotel or of some other famous one. In regard to plated dish to hold it and a plated ring to drop the tutti-frutti receipt in the book it ought perhaps

over and cover the rim.

Custard puddings,

mac-

ence.

When you have

aroon, brandy, cabinet and a number of others described in the book can be cooked in the cups and

be said that the outer coating of orange ice is not necessary for common dinners, it is an extra touch for a mold or bombe. This sort of frozen

then turned out in the saucers

pudding can be dished out of ^he freezer with or

to serve.

steamed puddings can be cooked in molds and turned out on saucers.

Boiled or

individual tin

to

without a white ice like a frozen sauce at the

The sense of some of these extras

is

never

side.

appar-

An improved way of cooking steamed apple roll ent until you have a table decorated with crystal, and other fruit puddings of the same sort is prac- china and flowers to supply. The best workmen ticed in places where the steaming facilities are after they have made the three creams or fruit good. Tke pudding is not a roll at all and no ices for Neapolitan and frozen them in brickcloth is used, but a crust rolled out is laid on the shaped or Neapolitan molds take them out a good bottom of a pan, then a layer of chopped apples, while before dinner time, wrap each form after it another crust, more apples and a third crust on top, is taken out of the mold in manilla paper and put then it is set in the steamer, cut out slices or them in a large freezer well packed with ice and squares. It is but little trouble and does just as salt and keep them there frozen and dry until they A light dough made with plenty of baking are wanted. This saves hurry and melting by well. powder and no shortening whatever is employed in handling while dinner is going on. Line your some of the paying restaurants for steamed apple brick molds with manilla paper, or at least the bottom and top, before putting in

roll.

It is easier to

take the cream out

the

ice

cream.

and

also

makes

Ices. Let none be deceived about the ices in the lids fit tighter. book because they are offered without the im. Bread. A good deal of wholesome enthusiasm poseiveness of tremendous French names. There is no finer assortment of ices known than these in the has been evoked by the contents of the "book of following pages. The changes and combinations breads;" the slight drawback has been that those possible with them are practically endless and one who followed out the proper method of wording who is master of them need have no fear of ever the dough have been surprised by their bread bethis

'

"getting

left

in a competitive trial.

It is

hard

to

coming

too light;

that

is

of being

ready

to

bake


TEE AMERICAN PASTBY COOK. But when suet Is used it before (hey that you have enough. it could be and were ready for it. It is stated in the directions will be found best to mix up with water slightly warm to spread and be Ibat under proper methods the dough needs no that the suet may be soft enough rise al- flaky under the rolling-pin, and then let the paste coaxing, no setting under the stove, it will most anywhere. A hint may be taV.en from the stand in a cold place until wanted. Good cooking and other pie fruits can be put in the pie management of Vienna bread, the dough for which apples then well kneaded, made into raw and a little sugar sprinkled over, then a top is made before they believed

light once, loaves, cut across Lie tops

and baked very soon crust put

much proof

after without being allowed to

or

get It is put into an oven rising in the loaf shape. that is very hot at first but bui t with a low roof so

on.

These after

all,

are the real American

our open pies with fine high puff pa~te edges

pies;

are tourtes, flans und vols-au vent.

Strawberry Shortcake. Some dissatisfacfills the oven with steam which the baking is finished. Ovens not spe- tionhas been expressed at the strawberry shortcaRe left in this book in an unsettled cially built for Vienna bread have a steam pipe question being But it is a fact as everybody knows condition. leading into the oven to serve the same purpose, and rotary ovens have wet bricks thrown into the that when strawberries first come in all the con" However interest- fectioners' windows display different kinds of straw" fire to fill the oven with steam. that the bread crowded in

in

will generally be found too much stock yeast in very small houses, some starting may be obtained from

ing the subject trouble to

but

a

it

make

friendly ba A er or else dry yeast cakes must be used to start the ferment. An attempt to do too

very apt to end in weariness. But &\\ pastry cooks ought to make stock sometimes, to keep in practice, even if they are using the com-

much

is

pressed in a regular way. Attention is particularly called to in this book of taking a piece of light

the rolls or bread

to

make

various

the

method

dough

from

light

fancy

breads, muffins, waffles and the like. It not only makes the directions short and plain but makes it

berry shortcake that are anything but the true ar" tide, being sometimes squares of sweet cake with strawberries on top and whipped white of egg on that as little like the proper thing as it possiI have no hesitation now in saying bly can be. these are all wrong and the only genuine article is

made

as I was schooled int3 making it myself years ago by the wife of the present Secretary of the In. terior, one of the most critical judges of cookery, as she

is

herself one

Plain Covered Pies-

It

has happened sev-

eral times

during the introduction of the first edition that I have had to hear unfavorable com-

most

accomplished

in the land.

directed in the preceding note for covered pies, only using fresh butter Roll out nearly to rub in the flour instead of lard. as thick as for biscuits, place on jelly cake pans

easy to turn out a great variety with but little extra trouble over common bread. One setting of and bake.

sponge does for everything.

of the

among all the ladies Make the short paste as

cooks

Cover the strawberries with

powdered

sugar in a bowl and shake them up to mix. Split the short cake, spread strawberries on both halves and place one on top of the other. There will be strawberries, of course, on top as well as between.

Serve a pitcher of cold sweet cream at the side. ments upon the pies and pastries of some gener- There should not be baking powder or any other ally good workmen, in the form of a hope by the sort of rising in this cake but the cold butter alone, steward, clerk, or proprietor, as the case has hap- which makes it light enough. pened to be, that the book would give them a hint to

make

the old fashioned covered

pies,

and

not

the heavy and greasy ones they were making. It is much to be feared that our book has fal'en short of its duty in this particular; over and over that puff paste is

perfect or nearly so.

rooms are so hot

still it

has been

said

not good unless it kitchens and pastry

is

Some

impossible to make fine paste in them, and, after all, the greater number of people are as well or better pleased with good short it is

Take two cups of lard to seven cups of or a pound of shortening to two pounds of flour flour and a little salt and rub them together dry, wet them with ice water, mix up and give the lump of paste two or three rollings in order to make it fla'^y. The same sort of paste but more crisp and dry can be made with suet chopped expaste.

tremely

fine,

weighing or

otherwise making

sure

City and Country Pastry Cooks.

Hav-

ing paid attention in the foregoing notes to some things that they in the front of the house have said, it is

in turn to

claim that

it

class pastry

mention

takes a

that

some pastry cooks

much smarter man to be a first-

cook or meat cook either in a country ho.

or a hotel in any small city than it does in a perfectly fitted-up great house in New York or Chicalei

It is argued with perfect justice that in these go. great establishments one man does but one set of duties within certain hours and has everything

properly ada ted for his use, and such a one could not begin to do as well as the general pastry cook in the ordinary hotels of small cities does with all the

and disadvantages he has to contend This thing properly considered by employers would often save them the disappointments

deficiencies

with.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. they experience when, thinking they will be made up and get their work done right, they send for a

go in

then the bread, after

first,

The other

that

sort has a furnace at the

the

cakes.

the

side,

pastry cook from the big city and find that he either cannot or will not try to get along when they have got him. The young men that have

goes into the oven on its way to the chimney in the top. Jt may be known when the oven

and where the

cool corners are

learned and practiced only one department of hotel cooking are not the ones that give satisfaction in

blackens

over

small houses.

have

to

The pastry cooks

invent their

of

these

own ways, and

learn

houses to

do

splendid work under conditions that would make the others afraid to take hold and try. On account of his thus becoming used to

adapting

himself to

the place, the oven, and the utensils the chances much better for getting a great variety of first-

are

class pastry

work from an

eral pastry cook

active,

interested,

who has learned

in hotels of

gen-

when

the fire

hole is

smoke

hot that

made but

is first

disappears and leaves the bricks white when they are hot. When you have an oven built be careful

good bed of sand

to stipulate for a

bottom.

It

holds heat and

is

under the

tile

mak-

essential to the

ing of a good oven. After a few days practice one who has not been used to an ovon learns how long before it is wanted the fire must be started to heat it,

and learns by the

the inside

when

it is

feel

and by the appearance of any pur-

at the right heat for

med- pose.

than from those under the steady routine Hotel keepers should of the great caravansaries

ium

it all

by the

heat

size

encourage the training of pastry

own ways

in their

own

houses,

as

cooks there

other places for them to learn general

About Ovens.

in

work

their

are

no

in.

Jelly Boll

On account

of

the

common

diffi-

culty of getting blank paper to use I have done my part towards abolishing the need of it by baking

sheets of sponge on baking

pans

without

paper.

Very few, however, can manage it quickly enough Brick ovens are indisputably and the cake dries and breats. Newspapers can

the best for hotels, yet, because they are not very often met with, when one is put in, the pastry

not be used for the purpose because they are apt to leave the news of the day impressed on the cake

cook who has been used

in printing ink.

to baking in a portable sheet iron oven or a range or stove, finds it awkward to begin the new way. Good pie baking can be done in the portable ovens for they will bake on

Either thin manilla or blank news

paper should be furnished

By Weight and

to the pastry

Measure.

It

room.

pays

to

have

the bottom, and good use can be made of the top of scales and be exact. The pastry cook does not the fire box to boil jelly and stew fruit when room want the pudding to come out soft and slop ove r on the range is not to be had, but still they are the saucers, nor the lemon pie to be soft and run

very imperfect; they scorch the bread on one side, they are entirely unsuitable for baking cake and will not keep anything hot without drying the bot-

he throws in a lot more eggs if he cooks by guess, because he knows they [[will cook he wants another pudsolid and dry it up. Or, ding to be soft and mellow and he throws in a lot off the crust, so

tom and sweating the top. There is an immense of them in use, although many pastry more butter, knowing that will prevent it being cooks and bakers will not work with them at all. dry and tough. But in most cases the extra eggs The same money that buys them would build a used only to make sure of a doubt do more harm brick oven. Every town has one or more bricklayers than good, and the softness, like custard, that is or builders who can build an oven, and some have wanted can be produced better by adding water or a specialty in that line. It will cost from forty or milk than by butter. The whole course of guess and fifty or work cooking is full of errors. The objection that fifty dollars upwards to a hundred more for an ordinary oven. The patent rotary weighing takes up too much time must bo met by ovens run from five hundred to fifteen hundred placing scales and weights in a position where they

number

dollars.

The

They are

for the

largest

establishments.

floor rotates over the fire,

the heat comes up in the center and around the

through a hole or hub circumference, the door

rarely closed but the articles put in as the bottom passes the door are car. ried around and, if small, when they come to the is

door again they are done.

Revolving ovens carry

are always ready for instant use, on a little shel^ nailed up about breast high at the back or end o^ the pastry table. Spring balances are of no use be. cause they will not weigh by ounces. Common scales with

common

iron weights are by

all

odds

the best, for graded beams take too much attention The scales once placed in to find small quantities,

up and down, baking all over easy reach there is nothing more needed to be done alike. Common ovens are of two patterns. The to get them into use, for the pastry cook is too glad simplest and cheapest has no furnace but the fire is to have "a dead sure thing" on whatever he does, made in the oven itself, on the floor, and when hot and no failures, to neglect the weighing that is enough the oven is raked out and mopped clean made easy. There are certain proportions of ingred. and the articles put in. Only one heat at a time ients in every article that make it so good it is imcan be had and the things that need the most heat possible for it to be made any better even in common the shelves and pans


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. things like batter cakes and biscuits and no person living can guess them and be always up to the highest

Oup and Spoon Measure. Cooks who go

to places

where there are no

pound

is

a

little less

than a level quart.

OATMEAL A level cup is 6 ounces. All that can be dipped up with a cup weighs 7 ounces nearly pound. 3 cups water cooks 1 cup oatmeal.

mark.

to use will find the following table

A

rounded cups are a pound.

scales

useful.

A CUP Means the common size of white coffee cup generally used in hotels, that holds half a

RICE A level cup weighs 7 ounces. All that can be heaped iu a cup weighs 9 ounces. 3 cups water cooks 1 cup rice. CORN STARCH A level cup 3f cooking starch is 6 All that can be heaped in a cup weighs 7 4 cups milk cooks 1 cup starch.

ounces. ounces.

Same as starch. Same as rice. LIGHT BREAD DOUGH A rounded cup FARINA

pint.

"A

WATER

pint

and the standard.

is

A

a pound

the world round"

all

cup being

pint

therefore 8

is

ounces.

MILK, vinegar and most fluids same as water. MOLASSES A cup holds 12 ounces a basting spoon 2 ounces. Thin syrups do not weigh so

TAPIOCA

A pound

without stems about

A

EGGS

cup of eggs broken

is

the

same

ae

5

eggs.

A cup holds 13 A cup holds 9

YOLKS WHITES

yolks whites

pound.

pound. 10 average a pound. When you have a bowl of yolks or whites left over weigh or

WHOLE

BUTTER in solid.

A It

cup of butter is 7 ounces is near enough generally to

butter a pound, either pressed in or melted. LARD Same as butter.

SUET Minced suet a cup is 4 ounces. CHOCOLATE Grated cold chocolate a cup

A

OYSTERS

cup holds a dozen

selects or 2

dozen

small.

A

pressed call 2 cups

a quart.

quarts of tea.

are.

if

fills

heaped cup dry weighs 6 ounces GROUND COFFEE A heaping cup is 4 ounces it makes 2 quarts of coffee. TEA A heaping cup is 2 ounces it makes 4

EGGS

measure and you will know how many there

dough

A

CURRANTS

heavy.

of

weighs from 6 to 8 ounces according to lightness 1 pound makes 10 or 12 rolls3 cups are a pound. RAISINS A heaped cup without stems is 8 ounces.

fill

Six basting-spoons of liquid 1 ounces of melted but-

BASTING-SPOON

a cup.

ter or lard,

It

holds about

same as

size of

an egg, and 2 ounces of

thick molassess.

A pint. is

3

ounces.

TABLE-SPOON

14 times quite

2 tablespoons butter

heaping tablespoon of sugar cup.

full is

a cup or

ounce, melted. A 1 ounce, 6 or 7 fill a

is 1

is

A

SUGAR

heaping tablespoon of starch is 1 ounce, 4 a cup starch can be heaped so much high-

A. level cup of granulated sugar is 7 will fill Although sugar by the grain is heavier er than sugar. A moderately heaped tablespoon of than water the air spaces make it measure lighter. flour is 1 ounce, 3 will fill a cup if fully heaped. a tablespoon. It is near A TEA-SPOON Is A rounded cup is pound Fine icing sugar a cup ounce is but 6 ounces, dry yellow the same. All the enough in most cases to call a teaspoonful

ounces.

sugar that can be scooped up out of a barrel with a cup weighs 9 ounces.

BREAD CRUMBS er so'id

is

FLOUR

of

dry articles rounded up, not including

ground

coffee or tea.

A

APPLES 4 average a pound they lose a third cup of bread pressed in rath A pound is a pressed-in quart by paring. level cup of flour is 4 ounces. A cup BUTTER -Size of an egg is anything from 1 to 2

4 ounces.

A

heaped up with all that can be dipped with it out of a barrel weighs 7 ounces, nearly twice the level full. A quart of flour just rounded over is a pound.

CORN-MEAL

A

cup of corn-meal

is

6 ounces,

3

ounces.

There are 16 cups in a gallon.

A common

wooden

pail holds

2J

gallons

or

10

quarts or 40 cups.

makes another. There should be bils of the minced fruit found in the ice to show what it is, fruit or nuts mixed wiih the cream. Bisque of and that it is not mere'y flavored. Italian bisque has lady fingers crumbled and pineappie ITS one of the favorite varieties, the directions for making it are at Nos. 107 and 93- moistened in wine, mixed in ice cream the same Another example is the bisque of nuts of any way. Nesselrode Ice Pudding and Diplomatic Ice kind at No. 95, and preserved or candied ginger Pudding will be found at Nos. 689 and 690. BISQUE ICE CREAMS

in bills of fare are

Sometimes called biscuit ices have a paste o^

those which


NOTES TO THE FOURTH EDITION. would be most gratifying to me gnarled and twisted branches of mountain trees, grow to be so comprehen- and around a little heap of these the earthen

It

Tortillas. if

these books should

sively

American

cookery of

To

nent.

as to include the best of the

the various peoples on the contilearn all that is charcteristic in the all

cooking pots are ranged. If the family is small, sometimes this smoky process is improved upon

by building a charcoal

fire in

a large earthen pot

cookery of Mexico without departing from my and setting the smaller cooking vessels within it. rule of never putting anything into a book that I In many houses a mud oven is built at one end of had not previously performed myself by the this shelf, or somewhere out of doors. To heat measures and directions given I should have to the oven a fire must be built inside of it, and the go through the experience of a correspondent, a entrance closed with a hot stone. However, as former Chicago chef, and visit the principal cities baked food pies an' things,' according to the of that country. He says Englishman's advertisement enter not into the '

:

" In looking

COOK

over your

AMERICAN PASTRY

noticed No. 626 (Tortillas) a mistake. I have spent the past

I particularly

which I find is two years in Old Mexico, most of the time as proprietor of the Eating House at San Juan del Rio, about 125 miles from the City of Mexico, and have seen Tortillas made in all the principal cities in Mexico and at no place do they use corn meal or boiling water, as there is not, nor never has been, such a thing as corn meal in Mexico, only such as came from the United States to Americans located there. The way they do make Tortillas is as follows Corn is soaked in water 24 hours, then it is laid on a rock and rubbed :

household economy, an oven is altogether a superfluous luxury. " In the center of the kitchen stands its most important factor, the metate, for tortilla-making. It a hollowed stone, the size of an ordinary bread

is

bowl, having two stone legs, about six

one end, which

inches

an angle of 45 degrees. The tortilla-maker kneels on the dirt floor at the elevated end of the metate, and, the corn having been previously boiled in weak lye, and still quite wet, she crushes it into paste with a stone rolling-pin, the mixture gradually sliding high, at

down ceive

inclines

it

at

the inclined plane into a dish placed to reWhen a quantity has been thus crushed,

it.

with another rock shaped something like a rolling it is rolled into balls and left until required. It is pin till it forms a paste, then it is made into flat astonishing what an amount of corn a family of cakes like a hotel pancake, only thin as a wafer, srdinary size will consume in a day, in the form which are made by being patted between the of tortillas, the Mexican staff of life.' <

hands to the proper

size,

As

a proof of the above recipe to any one in Mexico." " friend " Al Rutherford is

coals.

When

then are baked on hot

My

I refer

a meal

is

on the

tapis,

the last act in the

the tragedy, we feel inclined to say, when suffering the after pangs of indigestion is to heat the griddle, or more commonly a smooth

you drama

right, of course.

Then the cook takes a very small printed about flat stone. a corn cake, he lump at once of the prepared corn paste and was content to call a corn cake a tortilla without shapes it into thin round cakes, with a little water caring much about the different method of mak- and much loud spatting of the hands, with a Here is a still more particular description sound exactly like spanking babies. The cakes ing. Still

him.

my

Mexican

Knowing

said just

what

that a tortilla

written by Fannie

is

is

Brigham Ward

to the Spring-

are then baked

brown in a jiffy, and, as a substione might go further and fare a

field

tute for bread,

A is a study, and to do it and all its queer utensils justice would require a column's space. There are no cooking stoves in Mexico, or even anything like the fire-places of our grandmothers' days. One side of the room was occupied by a sort of shelf, built into the wall, about breast high, in the center of which a

great deal worse than subsist on

Republican : " Mexican kitchen

small wood fire " There is no

is

kept burning.

wood here which

housewife would consider

fit

to

a

New

burn

"

find

am

tortillas.

American housekeepers may worthy of imitation in Mexican methods, I

Whatever

else

sure that dish-washing, as that disagreeable is practiced here, will not be one of them.

duty

The Mexican dish-washer does

not bother with a

and thereby saves her arms from scrubbing and her legs from standing but seats herself England serenely on the floor beside a pail of hot or cold only the water. She has no soap, but a little sliced amole table


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. makes a strong

root

lieu of a dishcloth she like

and cleaner suds, and in a tiny broom-brush

ases

our smallest whisk brushes. disagreeable suggestion about it is brooms are exactly like those used

"The only that these dish

hat the foreigners would not recognize it. The Turkish sherbet is nothing but fruit juice and water, only mixed with sugar when the acidreal

ty af the fruit

sherbet

is

makes

it

Turkish lemon

requisite.

simply lemonade, and

all

other fruits

from the 'head of the family' are used in the same way. What we call waterdown to that of the humblest criado (there are ices are the real sherbets frozen both names are few combs used in Mexico) and the fear will inroper for them and there is no room for a distrude that those brooms may sometimes get 3ute. On the other hand the French apply the The dishes name sorbet to sherbets which have liquors added 'mixed,' like Buttercup's babies! are never \\iped, but are turned up to dry, some- to them; sorbet au kirsJi is kirschwasser punch times in a tray or on an adobe shelf, but generally frozen and so on through the list of punches. It to

brush

hair

;

:>

on the hard

dirt floor leaned against the wall.

Strange to say they always come to the table clean and shining. The brass spoons and steel-bladed knives are kept bright enough to see your face in, though no bath -bricks or patent soaps are employed in their polishing nothing but pure unadulterated

dirt.

The

easy therefore to find authority for almost anything in this line of goods with changeable names> for there is no ultimate authority at present to

is

refer

to.

meaning

The popular understanding of a term establishes

it

of the

in each different

country.

whose duty it is kneels upon the ground,

servant,

Ice Cups and Compound Ices. The many them out of doors, up a little fresh earth, and, holding the knife friends who have assured me that they found this or spoon firmly on a stone, polishes at her leisure. book a perfect mine of good things will not now, Despite dirt floors and the absence of all those I am sure, suspect me of undue egotism, when I conveniences which we consider indispensable, I assert that a number of the compound ices have

takes dips

have never yet seen an untidy kitchen in Mexico. never been surpassed in points of luxury or ornaEverything is kept as bright and fresh as hands ment, and, if used in connection with the ice cups and amole can make it, even to the cooking pot- No. 1 1 8, they afford specialties for any occasion of which any one may be proud. These ice cups tery, which is of necessity smoked black whenever used. If we could combine their innate have been adopted by some experts in London, neatness with our improved methods the result as a new thing and a few bills of fare of fine hotels would be that cleanliness which we are told is in this country have "ice cups" called by the " name of the hotel. I wish all my readers to get akin to godliness.' the full benefit of

A

CORRESPONDENT having

experience of

life

Mexican hotels says the first thing to be done while there, according to the custom of the coun " take " coffee and if by any series of try, is to

in

all the recipes that have been perfected for them with an amount of experimental labor that might seem to them incredible if

told.

howls and poundings you can attract the attenCooking in the Mountains. When I first tion of a servant, there being no bells, the uni- went to work in a very elevated town in the versal light morning repast, called desaguno, wil Rocky Mountains, at over 10,000 feet above sea be served in your room without extra charge level, I shared in the common surprise and per" Nothing more substantial can be had for love plexity of all novices in that region of finding that or money" before noon. It consists of a smal many old recipes wouldn't work and times and durations of cooking processes were somehow disarloaf of Mexican bread (resembling a cannon ball) minus butter, accompanied by only a small cup ranged. Without wishing to encourage the telling of coffee or chocolate. Should you be so un of marvelous stories about small variations, it has reasonable as to require a couple of eggs, thej to be conceded that it is more difficult to cook vegemay be obtained for a small consideration from tables well done and to boil beef tender there the astonished host, who marvels within himseli than at the common levels and the most difficulty at the greediness of " Los Americanos." was found in making good cake. All the customary cake mixtures were too rich, they were Sherbets. In regard to disputes which spring all too light and after rising too much in the oven up touching the propriety of the names of certain the cakes invariably went down again, dark and compounds it is necessary to take into considera- sticky, some of the cakes directed to be made tion that the English, French, and Americans with ammonia or baking powder or with whipped too, have in many cases taken up a foreign name whites of eggs to make them light, would rise and applied to something slightly like the foreign and run over, but if those raising materials were original, but so changed to suit their own fancies left out the cakes came out just right and light


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

New Pudding Material. Cerealine is a new that did not meet the difficulty in People to whom I tell it, but who starchy substance made of Indian corn. strong have never experimented for themselves, do not effort has been made to introduce it to general want lo believe that it was the sugar that needed use, and much money spent in advertising, but to be changed in proportions they will stiffen with doubtful success. The article is good, but the cake with more flour or reduce the butter or so much like corn starch and so little better than enough.

many

Still

A

cases.

But after testing it thoroughly I found that any of the other pudding materials that nobody by leaving out a quarter of the sugar, good cake feels the need of it. It is, in the packages, precould be made at the highest point inhabited by cisely like the white mealy part of popped corn. man. The cakes were not as sweet and rich, of It cooks quickly like starch, and can be used in course, as if made by the full pound recipes, but the same way as starch, farina and corn meal. they could be relied upon to be good in all other Manioca is another article, not new, yet but little Most of the cake recipes in this book known, which is one of the most desirable pudrespects. are constructed on the knowledge that sugar in ding materials. It is a fine tapioca, and not fine excess causes the most failures in cake baking rice, and makes the most delicate of puddings and fourteen ounces are named instead of a pound. used in the same manner as sago and pearl taBut at the level of the sea the full pound can be pioca. It is useful to know which of used, if wished. A FEW corrections and substitutions of new the ingredients causes the trouble when there or improved recipes for old ones have been made *v any. for this edition. I have been careful, however, not eggs.

change or disturb any of the special features of the book, which have been the means of bringing me so many kind and enthusiastic letters.

to

In Gauffres, Waffles and Wafer Caisses. reply to requests for further information about the copper patty case frier shown on page 59: It should be bent over so as to hang on the edge of

the saucepan of lard and rest there without holding. The copper head need not be solid, but is

At the

An

Invitation.

All cooks, pastry cooks, con-

and bakers who execute ornamental which they would like to preserve in a

fectioners pieces,

New

Orleans Exposi- picture, are respectfully invited to send phototion some waffle bakers had a booth where they graphs of them to me to be engraved and inserted fried a crisp sort of waffle or wafer, as is described in the next edition of whichever of these books on page 59 for cases, having their waffle irons or shall be reissued first thereafter. My latest pub" coppers as large around as a saucer, shaped indeed lished book, Cooking for Profit," contains a delike a round border mould such as is shown on partment for artistic cookery in which are pictures better

if

hollow.

76, and having long handles bent over to of two prize pieces, one of which took the first prize on the edge of the frying kettle. They dipped at the French Cooks' Exhibition in Paris, the other the irons in cake batter, let them fry in hot fat won a gold medal in London. It seems unforand took off the wafer when done and dusted it tunate that of all the fine pieces exhibited by the with powdered sugar. The price they put upon cooks at their annual banquets in New York and their waffle irons was $15 per pair, but offered to other cities, and of all the elaborate work done sell to hotels at $10. It is not known how low for public and private parties so little is ever seen they would really have sold them, if anybody by those outside who could best appreciate its arhad really wanted to buy. The cook who cannot tistic merits. It is earnestly desired that a collecobtain these utensils can get along very well for tion of pictures of such work may be made, and

page rest

small caisses by merely dipping common tin patty as new issues of these books are made at least once a year, it affords an opportunity to the artists pans of any shape in batter the outsides only dropping them in a kettle of hot lard and letting to place their work in a permanent form to be a fry till light brown and crisp. Take off the shell of batter and dip the patty pans again.

source of interest to

many

readers and of pride

to themselves.

J.

W.

We

are indebted to Mrs. that any impurities will come out by it, boil The Scotch Haggis. Black, of the Glasgow School of Cookery, for the gently from one and a half to two hours. Get following, which may be considered an authentic the stomach bag nicely cleaned by the butcher wash it thoroughly in cold water and bring it to recipe for the famous Caledonian dish ;

:

One

sheep's pluck, a sheep's stomach,

%

Ib.

the boil,

which

will cause the

bag to

contract.

out of the pot immediately, wash and Procure a sheeps pluck and stomach-bag; wash scrape it well, and lay it in the salt and water unthe pluck well, and put it on in a pot to boil, til needed. Mince the best part of the lungs and allowing the windpipe to hang out of the pot so the heart, leaving ovfc all gristly parts grate the

suet, i onion,

%

Ib.

oatmeal, pepper and

salt.

Take

it

;


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

10

best parts of the liver, and put all in a large basin. Toast well the oatmeal, and add It to the contents of the basin. Chop the suet very finely, add a middling-sized onion very finely chopped up, two teaspoonsful of salt and a teaspoonful of pepper, a

der control of the artist, who can make them always alike or vary them at pleasure. Cooks

can make

cream, therefore they are to be an artist, and offers a hundred and fifty dollars. Besides that, breakfast cup of the liquor in which the pluck to freeze real cream is the lazy man's way anywas boiled, to moisten, and mix the whole. Now body can pour pure eream cold into the freezer take up the stomach-bag, keep the fat or smooth (if they can only get the cream) with the requiside inside, and fill it up, but not quite full sew site amount of sugar and flavoring, and freeze up the opening, and put it in boiling water to boil it with such ease as to hardly miss the time but to make artificial cream requires one to be gently for three hours. Prick the haggis several times with a darning-needle to prevent it from industrious, and industry is always praiseartificial

The B

artists.

man wants

;

;

;

sticking to the bottom of the pot.

worthy

;

the

B

man wants

to

know

the in-

dustrious way, and says he will pay a hundred

Wanted a

Substitute.

A man

said recently that he would and fifty dollars if I could

make

,

Ills.,

and

a hundred

show him how

to

fifty dollars,

To make will

as

beat up as well.

me

B

in

me

cream without using cream that take good as real cream and that would

ice

would be

pay

direct,

He

did not

but a young

make

it is:

artificial cream, which be 6 gallons of ice cream after freezing,

4 gallons of new milk. 7 pounds of granulated sugar. pound of corn starch.

the offer to

man from

here

4 gallons of

Iowa, a

%

strong partizan of my books, who told him that he could get the information in the American

24 yolks of eggs.

Set half the milk over the fire to boil with all the sugar in it. Mix the starch in a pan with a of B did. not want it that way, however, but of the remaining cold milk, then drop in wanted to pay a hundred and fifty dollars for quart the raw yolks and beat to mix. When the milk some reason or other, and my young man ought on the fire boils, pour about a quart of it into to have been bolder, stayed with him, shown the starch and egg mixture, then turn these him how and collected the money on the spot, into the boiling milk and at once remove the but he hesitated and referred the matter to me. kettle from the fire, for the heat is sufficient to Undoubtedly, the B man is quite right. He is cook the starch and eggs. Add the cold milk in the ice cream business, and the knowledge and strain into the freezer. he seeks will be worth a hundred and fifty

Pastry

dollars,

man and

Cook

at a

much lower

and he ought

to

pay

price.

it,

and

The man

if

he

is

a

of his word, after he has read this article tried directions, he may please send

my

It is required that our artificial cream shall beat up as well as real cream, that is, become light and foamy, increase in volume and fill the

hundred and fifty dollars right straight to freezer. This it will do perfectly, when only the office, where I will duly acknowledge the lightly cooked, as above directed. The boiling receipt with the customary thanks and a hope milk cooks the starch and half cooks the yolks so that they beat up by the motion of the to receive further favors. It will be supposed that a man, who is anx- freezer as light as sponge cake. But to beat up ious to pay a hundred and fifty dollars for a this or any other cream requires rapid motion. substitute for cream, has no motive but to use It is most perfect where the freezer is run by his

a cheap imitation instead of the dearer genuine steam power, otherwise the old fashioned article, but as he is to pay me such a respect- paddle should be used to finish, and when the able fee he shall be defended against such an artificial cream is so beaten up light, it cannot imputation. He cannot get enough real cream for the requirements of his business; what he

be

known from

real cream, that is from goou cream that is neither sour or mouldy, and the two are tried together it will generally

fresh

is not uniformly good; some of it is if on the point of turning sour when it comes; receive the preference by the taste alone. If some, having been kept too long, has a flavor that is not enough, and something that will of mouldiness the larger portion is so thin that beat up better than cream be wanted, then take he can hardly tell it from new milk. This is the whites of the eggs, beat them up stiff when always the way with the products of nature, the cream is nearly frozen and mix them in, they lack uniformity, they are subject to great and continue beating and freezing and the variations of quality and appearance; on the cream will raise the lid presently and foam all other hand, the products of art are always un- over. Please remit.

does get,

just

;


THB AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. To be Tried. a secret worth

It

has been imparted to

me

as

injure a

11

good plum-pudding

and always serve

knowing that a peculiarly deli- very hot, with brandy or rum sauce, cious ice cream can be made of new milk which may be. has rennet mixed with it, as if it were to be made into cheese, but it is not to be allowed to Bakers' Cheap Cup Cakes. become thoroughly curdled. Somebody want4 pounds butter. 6 pounds sugar. ing a specialty in ice cream should try it. Something about milk and rennet can be found in this book, in connection with

32 eggs.

English cheese

2

cakes and cream curd puddings.

About Prepared Almond Paste.

as the case

quarts milk.

2 quarts water. It is

a pity

have to say it, but the ready-prepared almond which can be bought in tin cans at about 25 cents per pound and makes such delicious macaroons, almond icing and almond ice cream, has been unfavorably mentioned by the chemists as being adulterated with prussic acid, which is a poison. However, it is the same poisonous prussic acid which gives the flavor to such fruits as the peach, apricot, cherry and plum, its flavor is strongest in peach kernels, yet these are never known to injure

to

paste,

4 ounces ammonia. pounds flour, or enough to make dough a thinner than pound cake. little Mix like pound cake, adding the milk and water after the eggs, and flour and ammonia or powder last. Weigh off three-ounce cakes in small moulds. 12

Bakers' Lady Finders. i

pound

sugar.

10 eggs. i

pound

flour.

Beat the eggs (not separated) and the sugar anybody, the quantity of the drug being too small to have any hurtful effect; it is prussic together for half an hour, stir in the flour Directions for forming and baking acid which gives the bitter flavor to peach lightly. will be found in this book. This is a harder, which laurel leaves and the leaves, bay leaves, less delicate and more serviceable kind than Almond are so much used for seasoning.

paste,

used at all, should be used sparingly and not with the excess which some pastry cooks practice because they find almond ice cream is a great favorite. Buyers of almond paste should deal only with reputable manufacturers. It is made, when genuine, of a mixture of sweet and bitter almonds, and is not hurtful, but cannot be so low-priced as an imitation flavored with

the receipts in the following pages.

the paste is thoroughly divided amongst the sugar, then use the sugar to make what is

strange dishes that nobody appreciates; this " friend wanted the one receipt for " Popovers

if

these "Notes" are Written. As fast any new thing comes up or any old and wellknown thing is newly found out to be specially good for hotel use, I try to get it into these books as new editions are being printed. The following letter will please some readers, and drugs. pleases me because it shows up what I have alTo Use Almond Paste, shave it off the lump ways contended for, that it is better to have a thinly, mix the shavings with granulated sugar few special good things that everybody likes and roll them together on the slab or table un- than to have a hundred or thousand far-away, til

wanted.

Another Plum Pudding. This receipt makes one good-sized pudding: Take half a pound of breadcrumbs, half a pound of flour, half a pound of beef suet chopped very fine, two ounces of sweet almonds cut in fillets, one pound of currants, one pound of raisins (stoned), eight ounces of lemon-peel cut in thin stripes, two ounces of citron-peel, four ounces of brown raw sugar, the zest and juice of one lemon mix well together with eight eggs and a wineglass of brandy; boil six hours, and hang up in the larder till required; then boil up again for two or three hours an hour or two will in no way ;

Why

as

worse than he wanted the whole book besides, and expense is no object when a man wants a specialty. This receipt can be found in Cooking for Profit and in the new edition of the Family Cook Book, in one of which the man from Ohio had it and now it is in this volume, also. ,

Kans., Dec.

MR. j. WHITEHEAD. Dear Sir: About one month ago

9, 1887.

I

sent for

one of your Pastry Cook books, to find out of what and how to make the so-called Pofovers they are a batter with eggs, and bake in a pudding cup about 3 inches high, when baked they crack open and are hollow in centre and brown

\


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Some Ohio man has made them here from a loaf and serve with other kinds in the and are very often called for. It is not in the cake baskets. American Pastry Book, or, if so, cannot find it. " Can L. E. B., Ogdensburg, writes If you understand what I mean, please lei; me you tell it send C. me use O. what to make of know at once, and if extra charges surplus yolks of eggs? You do not mention but one kind of cake made D. by express. in color.

:

with yolks. I am employed in a fine bakery or confectionery, and some times have several quarts of yolks left over in a week and have to throw

Yours Truly Please attend at once.

N. B.

them away Popovers, or are

German

Puffs.

These

puffs

find,

the culinary curiosities, as they have over, powder nor any other raising material

among

neither

yolks.

them, yet they rise high above the tops of the cups and become quite hollow if not spoiled by too much flour. Good, rich milk should be used to make them. The batter may be kept an hour or two after mixing and little batches of puffs baked fresh as wanted, and the last will be as good as the first. in

2 eggs.

pint of milk or 2 cups. 10 ounces of flour or two slightly rounded i

spoiled."

you were doing

hotel work you would on the contrary, the whites would be left there being so many more uses for the

Ans.

If

The yolk

contains

all

the richness of the

eggs, and gives color, flavor and smoothness to puddings, cream custards and sweet sauces, better

We

alone than with the whites mixed in. use the yolks also in fish sauces, salad dressings, in potato and other croquettes, also minced for an orna-

mental garnish, mixed with flour for "noodles" and with batter for another kind of soup, also thicken soups with them, instead of flour or starch, and steam yolks in bulk like a cake, then cut up and use them as we would chicken meat

We

for patties. rub cooked yolks through a sieve making a sort of vermicelli, to serve with some

cups. Salt, a small teaspoonful.

and we drop them whole, also, into soup to Break the eggs into a bowl, beat them light dish, substitute turtle eggs. We cut them up and mix and keep adding the milk while beating. That with chicken meat, mushroons and sauce to fill takes about five minutes. Add the salt, then the shells of fried bread with, and if there are any the flour all at once and beat it smooth like raw yolks left over after that, we mix them in the

cream.

waffle batter. In a good bakery you will find Bake in cups or deep muffin pans well butnearly as many uses for this the best part of the tered, and only half fill them with the batter. egg, no matter how many may be left over, from Bake in a moderate oven about half an hour.

your using the whites

in meringues, macaroons,

may be mixed with water and used the same as whole eggs. Take a pint Scotch Slices. This favorite kind of cake, measure about two-thirds full of yolks, fill it up and likewise "aniseed slices," "caraway slices" with water and you have a pint of eggs, which is and other names given by different bakers, are a pound, or equal to ten eggs, and the mixture of all made of Scotch shortbread, as follows yolks and water can be used in making almost icing, etc., for the

yolks

:

1

of flour.

pound pound pound

% yz

sort of cakes, the only difference observable oeing that they are yello\\er and richer than if whole eggs are employed. In this way you can

any

of butter. of sugar.

2 eggs.

the yolks in all sorts of small cakes, in French coffee cakes, buns, rusks, tea-cakes, and the sugar until it is partly dissolved, mix all to- n the sorts of sponge cakes and jelly rolls which gether. It makes dough that can be rolled out are made light with powder instead of whipped and will be a trifle lighter for not being kneaded whites. If you make ice creams, they alone

Rub

too

utilize

the butter into the flour,

stir

the eggs in

much.

To make Scotch

:hat is the

or caraway slices,

mix

in a

material

fancy kinds

you can have

should use up all of that and another good

to spare,

tablespsonful or two of caraway seeds, for ani- purpose to put surplus egg-yolks to is to mix them seed slices use aniseed, for German slices use with lemon or orange syrup and a little butter coriander seed. Roll the dough into a long roll, and stir the mixture over the fire until it thickens place on the baking pan and flatten it down to nto a jam, very good to fill tartlets. If after that about an inch thick, bake with a dredging of any yolks of eggs remain on hand, put them in ugar on top. When baked, cut off slices as the lemon and pumpkin pies.


THE

*HOTEL-BOOK> OF

FINE PASTRIES.

PIES, P1TTIES, CSKES, CREflMS,

CUSTSRDS, CHARLOTTES, JELLIES,

AND SWEET ENTREMETS

IN VARIETY;

BEING A PART OF THE .

"OVEN AND RANGE" SERIES

BY

JESSUP WH1TEHEAD.

1804.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK 1.

Angel Food, or 'White Sponge Cake.

in boxes to

surrounding towns, and occasionally to The difficulty such as it is,

the east and south. 11 whites of eggs. 10 ounces of fine granulated sugar be shaken and heaped on a cup. 5 ounces of flour

that

can

a cup moderately heaped.

2 rounded teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. 2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla or lemon extract.

Get two pans together, put the cream into the flour

and mix them by

sifting

of

tartar

out of

pan into the other six or seven times. Whip the whites firm enough to bear up an put in the sugar, beat a few seconds, add the

one

egg, flav-

baking like a meringue in a slack oven and should stay in from 20 to 30 It needs'careful

minutes.

A

large tube

is

deep smooth mold with an unusually the best, but any other will do. The

mold should not be greased, but when the cake is done turn it upside down, the tube or something else holding it up to let the air in, and leave it to Then cover it get cold before trying to take it out. with the plain sugar glaze of the next receipt.

dency to fall in at the centre after baking. The mold not being greased holds the cake up to its shape until cold. The lamb's-wool texture of it be

may ded.

when

oring, then stir in the flour lightly without beatWhen the flour is mixed in fairly out of sight ing. As soon as mixed put the cake in it is finished.

the oven.

makes the caterers say this cake has been more trouble to them than anything else, and leads to the use of special molds to bake it in is the tenthat

all

made

finer

The cake

by

stirring after the flour is ad-

when

will be better

a

day o'd than

baked, but to keep the outside from drying and to make it better eating, as it has no richness in its ingredients, it is always covered with a first

flavored sugar glaze or icing. It may have no direct connection with it, but Sides, who originated

angel food, afterwards lost his reason and was taken to an insane asylum, his wife continuing the business he established.

2.

Pearl Glaze for Angel Pood, etc.

1 capful of icing sugar.

2 whites of eggs. 2 teaspoonfuls of flavoring extract. Mix them together in a bowl. As soon

as

the

sugar is fairly wetted it is ready but may be a whitened by beating one minute. It dries pearl

The rule for angel food in large quantities is pound of sugar, a pound of whites, half a pound of white; takes but a few minutes to prepare. Spread flour and an ounce of cream tartar. it over the bottom and sides of angel food. It also Angel food, as this peculiarly white and light sponge cake is fancifully named has quite a history originated in St. Louis afew years seen oftener in the hotel bills of fare of

to be recorded.

It

gives a rich transparent sort of eatable appearance to the top of a fine jelly cake, and shows up orna-

ments of finished white icing

finely.

with the sugar only slightwetted with water instead of white of egg, when that city than anywhere else. 8. Sides, who kept ly as the sugar dries it is to be spread on pastry, a large cafe or restaurant there invented it and did white. It can also be colored pink, or with chocnot fail to make the most of his discovery, and it or made yellow by mixing with yolk of egg. soon came into such great demand that not only olate, was no fine party supper complete without it but 3. Cake. ago and

is

It does nearly as well

Eight-Egg Sponge

it

was shipped

from London.

coming even For some time the method of mak-

to distant cities, orders

ing it was kept a profound secret but at length the inventor yielded so far as to sell the receipt for twenty-five dollars, having it understood that it could not be made without a certain powder that

could be obtained from him alone.

It

did not take

long to discover that the powder was nothing but cream of tartar and the receipt once communicated

1

pound of

fine

granulated

sugar

2

rounded

cups. 8 eggs. 6 tablespoonfuls of water small \ cup. 12 ounces of flour 3 rounded cups.

Separate the eggs, the white into a bowl, the yolks into the mixing pan. Put the water and sugar in with the yolks and beat them ten minutes, until they are a thick light batter.

Have the

flour

common property. Many of the ready. Whip the whites to a very firm froth, then caterers for parties make a specialty of it, for it is mix the flour with the yolk mixture and stir the still sufficiently difficult to make always alike to whites in last. Bake in molds either large or small

gradually became

prevent

its

tiderable

becoming utterly common, and a con Good for large and small sponge cakes of the cakes are sent out packed fingers.

number

and

lady


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

^!Hf v I

''TDh^'artge'i

WiLtte' Je}ly Roll.

focJd'C^ke'dbes'not answer to roll up,

but nearly the same ingredients put together in another way make a fine roll and also white cake lining for charlotte-russe.

10 ounces of granulated sugar a heaping cupful. 12 ounces of whites of eggs 13 whites. a heaping cupful. 6 ounces of flour 2 rounded teaspoonfuls cream of tartar. Vanilla or lemon extract,

Snow Cake.

7.

14 ounces of granulated sugar. 12 ounces of white dairy butter. about 18 whites. 1 pound of white of eggs 8 ounces of fine flour. 10 ounces of corn starch. Juice of one lemon. ^ cupful of milk.

Flavoring extracts. Little brandy.

Don't beat the whites to a froth. Cream the Put the sugar and white of eggs into a deep pan, butter and sugar together, add the whites a little at with the a pail or brass kettle and beat them together time, then the starch and flour, after that the If beaten wire egg whisk for about 20 mmutes. lemon juice, flavorings and milk. Beat well. rapidly in a cool place the mixture will then be like good cake frosting. Then add the cream of tartar 8. Finest Chocolate Cake. and flavoring and beat one minute longer, next, stir Melt 4 ounces of common chocolate by merely It should be baked imin the flour with a spoon. Lay a sheet of blank paper on the warming it in a cup set on the side of the range. mediately. Make the snow cake mixture preceding, flavor it largest baking pan, spread the cake only just thick with vanilla, and leave out the brandy. six or bake about hide the to strongly eight paper, enough minutes. Brush the paper over with water to get it Pour in the melted chocolate and beat it in just before the milk. off. Spread lemon or orange honey or red jelly on the cake and roll up.

Lady Cake.

5.

14 ounces of granulated sugar. 12 ounces of butter. 12 ounces of white of eggs. 1

pound of flour.

2 teaspoonfuls of flavoring extracts. $ teacup of milk.

The juice of one

the flour.

Don't beat the white of eggs before mixing, but beat the whole mixture thoroughly after the flour is Then mix in the lemon juice and flavoring and in. of

all

the milk.

O.

Wine Cake.

Make the snow cake mixture and leave out the milk. Instead of it mix in at the last nearly a small teacupful of madeira wine, with enough either of red strawberry syrup or of drops of carmine to make the cake couleur de rose, but only pale blush or

peach bloom, not any dull red or purples for cake. The lemon juice is very necessary here; it changes red to bright pink.

small lemon.

Use uncolored dairy butter. Warm the sugar and butter slightly and stir them till white and creamy. Add the egg whites a little at a time and after that

last

Finest

9.

Delicate Cake.

14 ounces of granulated sugar. 12 ounces of butter, 12 ounces of white of eggs. 8 ounces of flour.

8 ounces of corn starch.

Juice of half a lemon. 2 teaspoonfulls of flavoring extracts.

Marble Cake.

10.

Make

either of the white cake mixtures, take out

about half a cupful and color berry or currant syrup. Butter a cake mould, flour

it

light red

it,

with straw-

and shake out the

leaving the mould thinly coated. Drop lumps of cake batter in the mould with a teaspoon, paint them over with a knife dipped in the surplus

flour,

red batter, but without flattening or smoothing or running the lumps together. Drop more spoonfuls of the cake mixture in the hollows and paint them over with the knife blade dipped in red as before, and so fill the mould to within an inch of the top.

There will be fine waving lines of pink through the cake when cut. Chocolate and white can be used in the same way. The snow cake mixture is apt to be too soft to keep form by spoonfuls, unless quite cold.

| cup of milk. 1 bastingspoonful of brandy.

" Luck"

is

the poorest possible ingredient in cake

The same cause will always produce the same effect. The exact proportions that will make a splendid cake one time will make the same every time if put together the same way. The question is

Don't beat the whites to a froth, but cream the butter and sugar together, add the whites by portions, then the starch and flour, and after them the lemon juice, milk, flavorings and brandy. Beat all,

making.

together well.

only to find the right proportions.


THE AMERICAN PASTSY COOK. Turkish Cake

11.

to a friend's in the country to get some Bright fresh eggs," because there are none in the whole

and town good enough. Then they have Julia to dry up the flour, and Betsey to wash and pound the butter, the fruit. Make the lady cake mixture, and add to and Susan and her little sister to beat the eggs, and it 4 ounces of chocolate melted by heat in a cup. it is bad for the poor cat if she gets in the way. Fine

chocolate

cake

with

almonds

figs,

The snow cake mixture

raisins.

will not bear

We

Then prepare 8 ounces of chopped figs. 8 ounces of almonds blanched and

up such impressions someway.

split.

how

8 ounces of seedless raisins.

Flavor the prepared cake batter with vanilla and a little brandy. Dust the fruit with flour and stir it

What makes

us think the ladies cannot

make

when they

the cakes look

But we do know

get to the

fair.

Hickory Nut Cake.

15.

8 ounces of sugar. deli-

cate cakes, for sure, just when they want them is the exhibition they sometimes make at a church fair where everybody contributes cake with their names on. They look awful like a cake hospital.

8 ounces of butter. 8 ounces of whites of eggs (9 whites.)

\ cupful of milk. 1

rounded teaspoonful of baking powder.

1

pound of

flour.

12 ounces of hickory nut kernels. Don't beat the whites to a froth.

Almond Cake.

13.

who live in bakeries don't positively that these things take place, but have picked

fellows

know

Warm the but-

and sugar together and rub them to a cream the Make the lady cake mixture the first receipt of usual way, then add the eggs, then milk, powder, this series and add to it a pound of almonds and the flour. When well mixed stir in the hickory blanched (scalded and peeled) and split. Also use If nuts. Flavorings may be added at option. almond extract and rose extract to flavor with. brandy be used the baking- powder should be left Dust the almonds with flour. The snow cake mixout. ture would be too delicate to bear up the almonds. ter

10.

White

13.

Raisin. Cake.

There

is

one cake marked "presented by Mrs. A.' The top cracked all over, looked

It rose one-sided.

Like

preceding, with a

pound of sultan* like all splits and gullies, and in the high side a and flavor with crater opened and the lava kept rising and running lemon and extract of nutmegs. This is best baked and never would get cooked and stop, though all the in shallow pans in sheets; but of that more further rest of the cake was done hard long ago, and began on. That cake was poor, had to smell unpleasantly. too little butter and too much eggs, milk and flour, And it is for these church fairs or other public and probably was not put into bake for some hours festivals the dwellers in the world of private houses after the batter was mixed. There is another It rose and rose, flattry to succeed and show their best, if ever, but they "presented by Miss B." seem to always fail. topped and even, but never got above the edge of the cake mould. It leaked over the top and hung 14. Queen Cake in strings, and fell on the stove bottom and made a smell, and when it got tired of that it just sunk Made with the lady cake mixture, No. 5, except down and down again. That had too much sugar. the

seedless raisins instead of almonds,

the milk.

pound of the greenest colored candied pound of almonds, blanched and split. \ pound of sultana seedless raisins. 1

citron.

| cup of sherry or maderia wine. The citron to be cut in fine shreds and floured to-

gether with the almonds and raisins before mixing in. This mixture also makes small queen cakes,

baked are

in little patty-pans,

among

In a city that we know of there is an entire side of a building in a fashionable neighborhood painted in large letters with the words "celebrated

dream cake." Evidently it was the aim to rival the fame of "angel food," and this is certainly

and these frosted on toy better eating, although scarcely

the finest possible.

is

at these times they

saw it, because it makes such a nice steady heat to bake a cake with; and they send a boy on a horse

so

extremely

white. 1

make the master of the house buy a cord of hickory wood and hire a man to It

Dream Cake.

IT.

1/2

pound of granulated sugar pound of butter 1 cup.

12 whites of eggs Yz pint of

milk

1^

2 cups,

cup.

1 cup.

2 rounded teaspoons baking powder


THE AMERICAi* PASTRY COOK.

10

1

Havana Cream Cake.

30.

1 rounded teaspoon cream tartar. Vanilla or lemon extract.

pound good weight of flour 4 cups. powder and cream tartar together

Sift the flour,

three or four times over.

Soften the butter and stir it and the sugar together until white and creamy, gradually stir in the milk, tepid, and a handful of flour to keep

8 ounces of fresh grated cocoanut.

pound of

1

sugar.

4 large oranges. 2 lemons. 4 ounces of butter.

6 yolks and 2 whole eggs. Grate the rinds and squeeze the juice of the to the whites froth, separating. Whip and add part whites and part flour until all are in oranges and lemons into the sugar and bring it to a Bake either boil, making a flavored syrup. Throw in the butand flavoring extract at same time. and frost over ter, then the cocoanut, and boil 5 minutes. Stir in in cake moulds or shallow

them from

pans

when

the eggs and cook slowly snow cake.

done.

till

Spread between

thick.

layers of

Kossuth Cakes. Then

are

the

exclaim

when

they strange way they drops large and thick, hollow out burn up a cake in the stove. Once we heard the bottoms, put in whipped cream or pastry they a lady sing, "Gee woicks gee whilikens, the dorcream, place two together and with a fork dip drotted thing's gone blackernaniggcrbaby!" That them in melted sweet chocolate or chocolate icing was at the toll house at Shippingsport near Louisand set on tins to dry. of Baltimore specialty ville, as we were going through the locks twentyconfectioners. Sell at about a dollar a dozen. seven years ago last anniversary, and anybody could know it was a cake burnt up by the black smell that

Make sponge

A

Ordinary White vake.

18.

pound of

1

came across the canal. Now one of us fellows would only have remarked dam kind of quietly and

sugar.

8 ounces of butter, melted.

In fact, you have to bake these lighted our pipe. white cake sheets with scarcely any color at all to look well with colored creams between and icing on

10 whites of eggs. 1 cupful

of milk.

2 teaspoonfuls of

baking powder. pounds of flour. Beat the sugar, melted butter and white* all together a minute or two, add the milk, powder, flour and flavor.

top.

1

we had

Glazed Cakes.

21.

We use the term for cakes glazed over with boiled make a

make cakes in some place where people took notice and made remarks and said we did not know much about making good

icing.

things in hotels nohow, and if they couldn't do better they would sell out, we should want to make

belongs to these; they are better to cut, better to look at and better to eat than the common, and

Now,

the

if

snow cake

ting,

bake

it

to

as beautiful

icings of different colors to the usual iced or frosted

from

All the richness of cream candy bon-bons

and white as cotton bat- after a very

thin in jelly cake pans, spread

distinction

cakes with raw sugar

little

practice are quicker

made and dry

some of immediately.

the richest confections between the cakes, and ice the top, having the cake and the icing so near alike

2.

Yellow Glaze or Boiled Icing.

in whiteness as to be hardly distinguishable apart.

Pistachio

10.

1

Cream Cake.

8 ounces of pistachio nuts, blanched and chopped. 8 ounces of sugar.

for color-

ing.

3 jelly cake sheets of snow cake. Boil the sugar and water to thick syrup, throw in the butter, then the pistachio nuts, boil five

minutes; then off

when they

stir in

thicken.

the white of eggs and take it Color it a little deeper than

pistachio green. Spread this the three sheets of cake.

when

Flavoring extracts. Boil the sugar and water, without stirring, for 5 minutes or more, or till a drop of the syrup in coid water sets so that it can hardly be flattened between

cupful of water. 2 ounces of butter.

Whites of four eggs. Green juice from pounded spinach leaves

pound of granulated sugar.

^ teacupful of water. 6 yolks of eggs.

cold between

A deep bowl-shaped saucepan holding one quart should be used. Have the yolks slightly beaten ready in a bowl. Pour the the finger and thumb.

bubbling syrup to the yolks quickly while you Return to rapidly beat them with an egg beater. the fire and keep stirring while it cooks a minute or two. It will then do to pour on sheets of cake and the syrup was at the right point as soon as cold.

nd dry

it

will set

hard


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. But

is

it

just as

it

it

is

is

becomes

The above is does not make syrup

by beating the glaze cooling, and add the flavoring too thick to beat.

better to finish

rapidly while

the easiest of the kind to make, as it so much difference what point the

boiled to

it

will dry

on the cakes anyway.

White Glaze or Boiled

23.

Boil the sugar and water to a point thicker than till the drop in cold water

sugar and water

these

syrups

2G. Chocolate Glaze without Eggs. pound of

sugar. teacupful of water.

common chocolate, grated. together almost to candy point, flavor with vanilla when partly cooled, beat a short time, spread over the cake.

for the yellow glaze, or

After the

thing for ornamental baskets and pyramids.

Boil

Flavoring extracts.

brittle.

Besides, small cakes,

4 ounces of

1 pound of granulated sugar. ^ teacupful of water. 4 whites of eggs.

hard and

pretty stack.

such as sponge drops, can be dipped in the icings while hot and another assortment made, just the

1

Icing.

'

sets

make a very

II

mixing of the should never be

first

makes them turn to sugar. Don't beat the whites any more than enough to mix them. Pour stirred

the bubbling syrup to the whites, beating all the Set on the fire again and beat for a minute

all

of fruit juice and sugar boiled

Colored syruf

down

thick enc ~gh to bubble and rise in the saucepan can be used instead of icings to cover cake with a glassy surface.

27.

Items about Puff Paste.

while.

two while

or

it.

cooks.

It is

extremely liable to

When

puff-paste has been rolled out

up again 4 times

burn on the bottom.

Then set the saucepan in a pan of ice-water, and beat the icing with a Dover egg beater till it becomes It will be of a dazzling whiteness at last. thick.

and folded

quires of tissue paper piled alternately a yellow sheet with a white sheet a sheet of butter and a sheet of paste, all of it

lies just like 2

Can be

the same evenness and regularity from bottom to top. It is hard to get butter and dough to lie so equally,

24.

what has to be tried for, and we have to make them come so. If baked then the sheets of paste or dough would be as sharp as knife blades, and might cut the mouth of the rash person

flavored to suit the fancy. If boiled to right point sets hard as soon as spread or poured over the cake.

Rose Glaze or Boiled Icing

1

.

but that

is

show how

to

who

the white glaze and color and flavor to suit, just as it begins to be so thick as to be hard to beat.

should try to eat them, the butter having all run out into the baking pan. One more rolling and folding makes the layers two-thirds thinner, and

25. Chocolate Glaze or Boiled

layers thin

Make

eatable,

Icing.

and another rolling after that makes the enough to be blown away with the

breath. 1

pound of granulated

sugar.

teacupful of water. 3 ounces of grated chocolate. 4 whole eggs.

the

common

sort.

Vanilla flavoring extract.

The reason of these unfinished sheets of paste being so sharp edged and continuous, is, there is no shortening rubbed into the flour when fine puffpaste

Boil the sugar and water together in a deep saucepan for five minutes, add the chocolate. When a drop in cold water sets hard almost as

is

wanted

the layers of

dough are nothing Rubbing part or all of the the flour dry makes short-paste,

but flour and water. butter or lard into

but not the marvellous, flaky, high-flying puff paste.

candy stir in the eggs rapidly, beating all the while- Those who get their first instructions in home places Let cook about five minutes more with constant never want to believe that. Some people say it is a matter of light touch, a Flavor with vanilla. Beat more or less stirring. while cake.

it is

cooling.

Spread or pour

it

over sheets of peculiar temperament, a something inherited that makes certain individuals always and easily successes at making puff-paste and others always fail-

The confectioners, too, like us to make these glaze cakes for their windows and show cases; they

ures.

They say women make

There

is

no grounds

better paste than men.

for such a distinction.

The

take pleasure when the cake is as white as the it is a matter of sense and study, of icing, probability is, and red jelly between the layers, in giddy person putting them in head work more than hand work. the front rank. Having 3 or 4 different kinds of does not make fine paste, but is is not their hand

A

glaze and sheeti of the whitest cakes only about a third of an inch thick to cover with them can

It is cause and effect that's giddy, it's their head. Some you again, and some cannot see their relation. cut them when set in squares or diamonds and people cannot place rolls in straight rows in the pan, triangles, red, white, yellow and chocolate, and they nor lay strips on pies diamond-wise.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

12

when a fresh cub comes They make a great fuss the people who make be pastry cook's boy, if he has verses do about the beauties of milking the cows; been one of those young ones that stand with their as if there were no flies and cows didn't kick It is It

makes

all

the difference

in the kitchen to

!

make much more charming to be working the butter. We have seen them at summer resort houses. They go amusing green and awkward. where the spring water runs cold, and work the

chin on the kitchen table seeing their mother pies.

The

others are

pour a pint of water into a big pan of flour lump of butter in a trough till it is just perfection and then go feeling around for the lumps it makes, to make puff paste with though no dairy maid ever and pick them out one by one. They could not will let her fresh lump of butter go for such a purwork the lump of dough they get that way without pose. We have to work the butter as well as the a sledge hammer, and pie dough has to be about as time allowable in the crowded forenoon permits by The way is to pour the water in a pounding it in a wooden bowl with a potato masher soft as mush. hole made in the middle of the flour, and gently stir Cold butter that is not so broken and made pliable is as bad as warm, for it will not be pressed out it round with two fingers till it has gathered in flour by

They

will

enough

can be lifted out of the pan on to the rolling, but cuts its way through in lumps everybe worked smooth and fit to roll out. where. We have another newer and entirely different best puff-pa^te is that made in 10, 15 or 20 way of making fine leaf paste, but like this common so

it

table, there to

The

minutes, according to the quantity,

when one has no way

time to spare for packing it between pans of pounded ice, or for other foolishness, when the butter has

been worked smooth and pliable beforehand, and lies

ready in a pan of ice-water

when

stands ready to mix with, the flour

is

the ice-water

the best for meeting all the varied requirements and this is the formula.

of hotel work,

38,

Puff Paste.

cold and the

is hot and waiting then you turn out paste that puffs and rises high and dry and wholesome. The reason is the ingredients don't have time to get

oven

1 pint

Flour

of water (2 coffeecupfuls.) all the water will take up.

Butter from \\ to 2 pounds. Mix the flour and water to soft dough. Roll it and is an there immense amount soggy, of labor and trouble saved over the ice packing way. out about an inch thick. Take half the butter and it in lumps the size of eggs upon the sheet of Still, of course, the same method is not practicable drop dough, the width of two fingers between each lump. in

warm and

every place.

Sift

When

a

flour over, press the butter into the

little

the plain, soft flour and water dougn nas been rolled out as if for cutting biscuits out of, but instead is covered all over with the required amount

dough

of butter in lumps, and then the dough is folded over it, the cTsential thing and the only difficult one is to get the dough and butter to roll out again and

fold over in three again,

again at even pace. Soft butter will give way under the rolling-pin and leave its place, burst through, or

rolled out to square shape and turn the broad side towards you after folding. Roll and fold till you

slightly,

then fold the dough over in three.

Roll out to the same thickness as before, distribute the remaining half of the butter over it, dredge, and

and count that one

fold

the former folding with only half the butter in counts nothing, or "half a turn." Always keep the dough

have counted 6 times. Use plenty of flour under and over until the last rolling when the surplus dough may be mixed very soft to match it, and good should be swept off. It is then ready for use. With the flour and water expaste may be made. After a few trials neither butter nor flour need be tremely cold, the butter often hardens in the paste instead of softening that is success, whether done weighed the rule of butter size of an egg two in one or two hours in an ice-chest or in ten minutes fingers apart is all that is wanted, and the amount on a cold table. There is another difficulty in the to be made can be governed by the cups or dippers out at the ends. soft butter, but

way

It is

when

of no use trying with really is of medium firmness the

it

of even distribution

worked and

the

more the dou^h

is

tougher it beomes and To oversprings back, while the butter does not. come that, the paste is allowed to rest awhile after about three rollings, but it is better in warm rolled

of water used.

the

Lard

30. Then

there

is

for Puff-Paste.

the question of expense.

They hate

weather to get along without such an interval, by to furnish first-rate butter enough to make good not kneading the dough at all, and having it soft puff-ppste people are fond of pies and pastries, and The experienced workman it costs like sixty. There is little use in making enough at the start. goes through a certain routine every day that meets paste as rich as it can be made anyway, except when all exigencies, and his work is always alike, while it is for fancy articles the tall puffed up edges of ;

others talk about the luck and havinrr for fine paste.

*.

light

hand

pies are oftenest thrown away with all their fine butter in them only because people cannot eat


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. everything, and the middle of the pie goes first. Butter that is only just a little off does well enough* but butter that is bad spoils the whole article, filling

Good lard is far better than clear through. poor butter to make good eatable white and light pastry, and some sorts will make just as tall puffand

all,

13

Some years ago about the close of the war the writer had a friendly contention with a fine cook

who made splendid pastry, as to whether as fine puff paste could not be made by the old-fashioned way by this following. It was finally decided, after both ways had been tested to the utmost, that there was no difference in the results, but

just explained, as

paste as butter will. Oily and grainy lard will not ; it has to be the firm, tough tenacious kind of dried out lard. The very best everyday kind of paste is

favor of the old way.

made with half butter and half good firm lard. Then a little salt must be strewn over the lumps of

his trade will practice both.

laid after they are spread

alone carries

salt

on the dough.

Butter

there are certain every-day

work considerations

in

The leaf paste is fine for The workman who would be perfect in

fancy tarts.

It's

bad to have a

fel-

low come along and beat you.

enough.

33, French Puff Paste or Feuilletage. Compressed Lard.

31.

have the butter very firm and from water, and those who wish to have very

It is requisite to

The most wonderfully

light

and

tall puff-paste,

that beat butter pastry all hollow, used to be made in the times when lard oil was used in immense

quantities before kerosene came in, of the stearine lard, the residue left after pressing out the oil. This

was

as hard as tallow, but of a different texture.

the greatest enemy to puff-paste, and stearine Then we had vol-au vents that a contains none.

Oil

is

small goose could be hid in, that rose several inches high of their own lightness. '

It looks like the

sweet fresh suet that comes in so

plentifully with the fat loins of beef ought to be better far pastry than strong butter and miserable oily lard,

and so

it is,

and comes next to the stearine

lard mentioned above, but can only be used after going through a particular process. People try to

free

superior pastry will use the very finest flour. Weigh your butter and flour in equal proportions, cut the butter into thin slices, take a little flour and roll it with a slice of butter into flakes, proceed thus until all the butter and flour are rolled together; gather the flakes into a heap, and sprinkle them with water, about a gill and a half is required for a pound of paste. Make into a smooth paste with the

hand, and then roll it out to the thickness of half an inch. If a pound of paste, divide it into four parts, flour the board and roll out each part as thin as a wafer, fold over four or five times, and use as reBake as soon as possible. quired. Then try this, and hold fast that which you suc-

ceed with the best.

34.

Fine Leaf Paste.

use melted suet or tallow or drippings, and they mince raw suet and then pound it fine, but however short paste these may make they will not produce puff-paste. The suet or tallow is always composed of hard grains that cut through and destroy

good

the flakes.

The proper

trade secret; a

process is something of a for those who work for

good thing

themselves to save butter by.

Ten-Minute

Paste,

pound of cold pound of cold

1

1

butter. flour.

^ pint of ice-water a coffecupful. Cut the butter into pieces size of walnuts and put

them in "a vessel containing broken ice and water some time before using, to become very hard and cold.

32.

To Prepare Suet

for

Making-

Puff-Paste. Cut the suet very small, leaving out all dark meat stained pieces, and set on the side of the range in a boiler with plenty of hot water.

pan and lay aside a handful in the lumps of butter, mix them with the dry flour, pour in the ice water and Sift the flour into a

Throw

to dust with.

The

shake altogether, merely getting the flour dampened to the lumps of butter, without kneading

and stuck

must not few hours. Then pour water and all into a large strainer with a bottom of perforated tin a gravy strainer and rub the fat through with a potato masher. Get a pan of broken ice and water and a little salt in it, and

or pressing. Scrape out the contents of the pan on o the table well floured, press it up togecher and hen roll it out with all the force necessary to break

dip the strained fat by lacllefuls into it, stirring the ice about at the same time. The fat sets instantly

and count

on

roll

suet

boil but steep in scalding water for a

falling into the cold water in crumbs like meal. Gather it by straining, press it together and pound it with a masher in a bowl as you would butter. Salt it

for use.

he lumps of butter, and spread sheet.

Now

loosen

and

it

all

out to a thin

from the table with the

up like a roly-poly pudding, out again to half an inch, fold over in three like ordinary paste and count 2, and so ^alette knife 1.

ose

it

it

and fold in three till you have connted 6 foldBut when half done it should have an interof 5 or 10 minutes to stand in a cold place and

ngs. nal

roll

Roll

its elasticity.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

14

Lemon

35. 1

Best Hotel Kind.

Fie.

pound of white

Lemon

38.

Butter Pie or Tart. Richest.

sugar.

5 lemons. 1

quart of water or milk. 2 ounces of corn starch. 1

pound of

sugar.

5 lemons.

4 ounces of'butter.

15 yolks of eggs or 8 whole eggs. 1 ounce of butter.

8 yolks of eggs.

1 whole egg. Put the sugar in a saucepan, grate in the lemo n Make a boiling lemon syrup of the sugar, grated rinds the yellow only and squeeze in the juice rinds and juice of the lemons no water needed without the bitter seeds. Pour in the water and set and throw in the butter. When that is melted stir Mix the 2 tablespoonfuls the saucepan on to boil. in the eggs. Let simmer on the range about 10 cold it into a little the starch with of water, pour minutes. saucepan when the syrup is boiling and immediately

take

it

Then mix

off the fire.

in the yolks slightly

Make

the pies small, the paste rolled very thin,

and bake dry. beaten and the butter. They are not to be cooked in it. Bake in pie pans lined with puff-paste rolled Sift powdered sugar over the pies when out thin. done, or else meringue over with the white of eggs

Lemon

39.

Good

and sugar.

Can one advocate

simplicity and short bills of fare and a few things well cooked, and then give six ways of making lemon pies and other things similar? Yes. Not for one person to make the same thing

Butter.

Baker's

Way.

for pies, jelly cakes, tarts, turnovers, etc.

5 or six lemons. 1

pound of

sugar. cupful of water. 2 ounces of butter. 1

2 ounces of flour.

ways so much as for six persons to pick out the 6 eggs. method that suits their particular circumstances and Set the water on to boil with the grated lemon And as with pie mixstyle of table they cook for. rinds and juice in it, and the butter. Mix flour and For ture so with many other things in this book. sugar together dry, beat them in the boiling liquor the cheapest covered lemon pie of the great bakerthen add the eggs and stir over the fire 10 minutes. ies see No. 263. six

Club House

36.

Lemon

20 ounces of sugar. 9 large lemons.

6 ounces of

1

Place the sugar in a large bowl and grate the lemon rinds into it, using a tin grater, and then squeeze in the juice. Beat the yolks of eggs light and mix the cream with them; pour this to the just

before

filling

the pie

them

in,

No

Lemon

Pie.

Southern.

2 pounds of sugar. 1 pint of water. 9 lemons. 2 ounces of butter.

12 eggs. Cut 3 of the lemons in thin slices and keep them to strew in the pies when filled. Grate the others into the sugar, squeeze in the juice, add water, make the mixture hot to draw the lemon flavor, then mix in

the eggs well beaten. Let the lemon slices float in the pies; bake, and sift powdered sugar over when

done.

Mix

all

acid.

the ingredients together cold.

lemon mixture

The

imita-

very close, and the pie is better than the real that is sometimes made with tion of

is

bitter lemons.

41.

acid kind.

37.

rounded teaspoonful of tartaric

2 tablespoonfuls of lemon extract. 5 eggs or ten yolks for richer color.

and whip the 6 whites to a froth green needed for this rich meringue

crusts with the mixture stir

bread or cracker crumbs.

]

6 whites.

lemon and sugar, and

Tarts without Fruit.

quart of water. 1 pound of sugar.

1J pints of rich cream. 18 yolks of eggs.

and

Lemon

4O.

Pie.

Peach Flan.

Said to have been for a few years a specialty, the peach season, at a since burned down.

large hotel

at

in

Put-in-Bay,

Cover a shallow baking-pan with bottom crust of good pie paste, nearly cover that with quartered peaches in the same style as bakers' apple cake then fill up with custard made the same as fer custard pie and bake slowly. Cut in squares when done and serve instead of pudding. It is necessary to place the pan in the oven before filling and add the custard by means of a long handled dipper.

When they are soft, ripe peaches they need no previous cooking, but if hard must be stewed first


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 4S. Imitation Lemon

Pie.

Acid

Pie.

literature

tocratic,

buy a rare 6 ounces of bread or cracker crumbs. 1

pound of sugar. 1 rounded teaspoonful of tartaric acid. 2 tablespoon sful of lemon extract.

lemon mixture

better than the real

is

cheap and common cents

you can

the best thoughts imitations not to be

detected of the rarest gems for a dollar or two the ideal hotel pie is only for the few.

1

tion of

is

classic for ten

of the best writers for a nickel

quart of water.

5 eggs, or 10 yolks for richer color, Mix all the ingredients together cold.

16

but

So careful and tender leaf paste that

The

imita-

very close and the pie is made with

that is sometimes

green and bitter lemons.

is the good workman of his he slants the knife outwards when

cutting that the paste may be wide and make a broad edge; and that broad edge he notches with a

sharp knife in the places where the pie is to be divided, lest with a rude 'pressure somebody will crush and spoil the flakes in cutting the pie after it is

baked. Greatest country, tallest mountains, longest rivers,

not everyone that calls himself a pastry cook can turn out hotel pies artistically, and however much the casual reader who thinks of pie only as It is

something to eat

may

be amused at the idea

thy table for the hotel pie which do not exist for the private house pie, or the baker's pie, or if they do are so remote

it will take ages of domestic pie culture to bring them in eight. The experienced hotel

now

instantly when he has secured a fully developed hotel or fine steamboat pie maker. Your baker trained to work for the hungry pie eater

rather than for the luxurious admirers

of beaut ifu

The stand

secret of tall

making meringue or frosting and thick on the pies is in the baking.

Whip the whites of eggs to a froth that will not fall out of the bowl or pail when turned upside down, put in about a tablespoon ful of granulated sugar for each white,

stir very little, spread it on the pies are just done and still baking hot without taking them out of the oven, and let them bake with the door open. If made hot enough to brown

when they

the meringue will surely fall and become worse than 5 to 10 minutes is enough to bake the

is

the

nothing.

but the great sign of his standing

is

set

meringue dry and straw-colored.

crust,

Pies.

the

which

pies covers every pie with first sign,

a top

Meringue for Lemon

43.

we as-

sure him there are possibilities of taking high position among the rther things of beauty on the weal

steward knows

biggest pies.

Sift

granulated

up when he takes both hands and cuts off the past- sugar on top of the meringue as soon as spread, bery by pressing against the edge of the plate, whirl, fore baking, to form a rich appearing crust for variing the pie round at the same time. Why should ety. he make or wish to make fine leaf paste to press and Oocoanut Custard Pie. 44. mash in that way? But your first-class pastry cook having made his paste so that the flakes will rise Make a common plain custard of 1 quart of milk, and open as distinct and separate as the leaves of a 6 or 8 eggs and 6 ounces of sugar, then mix in 8 to rose and of a thinness more impalpable than tlia 12 oucces of grated cocoanut. Bake in crusts. 1

,

no matter how rapidly he may work, will roll evenly, throw it on the pie pan lightly, shake it down to

place with a little jar upon the table, take it up on the fingers of the left hand and cut around with a

sharp knife, not leaving the least sign of pressure, These pies finger mark or drag or tear about it.

though having tall flake-piled edges are pretty sure to be almost as dry and free from grease as flaky

and quite wholesome both to eat and to see. If people say that hotel pies are not so we reply that it is because the pastry art is somewhat difficult and biscuits

there are few masters of it, the beginners are slow 1 1 get hold of the fi ie touches and the hotels are full

We don't know anything of half taught beginners. about the private houses, and these remarks make no invidious reflections upon the household pie. With both bottom and top crust rolled thin and powdered sugar on top it ia good. But the hotel pie contemplates life from a different stand point and like all the products of

high art

it is

somewhat

aris-

45. Oocoanut

Pie.

Hotel Ordinary,

1 quart of milk. 6 ounces of sugar. 2 ounces of corn starch. 1

ounce of butter.

8 ounces of grated cocoanut. 6 eggs. Boil the milk,

and

stir

them

in

mix the starch in the sugar dry and the butter and cocoanut, and

then take the mixture from the

fire.

Siir in

the

eggs after it has cooled a little. The eggs should be beaten quite light first. Sift powdered sugar over the pies after baking.

For cocoanut meringue pie make the preceding mixture with 12 yolks of eggs and take the whites to beat up for the meringue. Strew cocoanut on top before baking.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

16

Whito Oocoanut Pie.

40.

Let it cool the fire with constant stirring. beat it light before ling the crusts.

The same mixture as the above made very deliand snow white by letting it become cold and

cate

then stirring in instead of yolks 12 or 14 whites of of eggs whipped to a froth, and a slight flavoring

and oiange. Good to

rose

Sift

powdered su^ar over when

paste lined patty pans for Good to use up white gem-tarts, very light baked. of eggs left over

done

fill

in

And yet some worthy hopefuls having seen pio edges stand two inches high in distinct flakes while weighing next to nothing, will do their brave entoo, and lay a double edge on theirs, making a band of paste to place on the rim of the plate first, washed with egg, and the proper pie crust laid on lop. That is all wrong. We told them they

deavors

could not

Generally

made with

make our

hotel pies.

For

if

the airiest

crust that can be laid on a pie edge will hardly be e*ten is it not folly to double the weight and sub-

Orange Pie.

4?.

and then

up a

the object of using

sur-

plus of perishable fruit. With Peel half the number of oranges required. a very sharp knife slice them across the core, throw

stance?

Puff-paste perfectly

made

will rise

enough from one layer only from an eighth quarter inch thick.

If

it

will not then

when doubled in thickness. Aud, much valuable time is wasted from

it

will

besides,

high a

to

not

how

better work, slices over the bottoms of a useless double edge on the pies. putting of unslices with alternately pans paste-lined pie Strew sugar over and pour over peeled oranges. Apple Cream Pie. Bake slowly 50. that a cooking spoonful of red wine.

lay the

out the seeds,

till

the juice

is

become thick eyrup.

Marlborough Pudding or Cocoanut and lemon juice

may

be mixed

with or

Orango pi. s can be made by the lemon pie receipis, a: d wiih part lemons.

strewn over the above.

Orange Butter

48.

pint of stewed apples. 8 ounces of sugar. 1 cupful of milk.

1

4 ounces of butter. 4 eggs.

Pie.

Little sherry

8 ounces of sugar. 8 ounces of best fresh butter.

Mix

wine and nutmeg.

all together.

Bake

in crusts.

51. Apple Custard Pie or Pudding.

9 eggs. 2 oranges.

Grate the rinds and squeeze the juice of the oranges into the sugar in a deep saucepan, put in the butter and then the eggs slightly beaten. Set the

mixture over the

Pie.

fire

and

stir it till it

becomes thick

and topy, like melted cheese. It may lessen the trouble, and danger of burning on the bottom to set

quart of dry stewed apples. 12 ounces of sugar. 1

3 ounces of butter.

8 yolks of eggs. Juice and rind of

1 lemon and nutmeg. The apples should be stewed with as little water it in a large saucepan containing boiling water. Mash them as possible with the steam shut in. When done beat the mixture with an egg whisk a through a strainer. Cook the pulp over the fire few minutes. The cooking of this mixture causes it with the sugar and butter in and then add the beatto remain light and thick and rounded in the pies en yolks and flavor. Bake in crusts. or tarts after baking, instead of filling and becomAnd where it is so requisite to have the fine flakes ing wixy as it otherwise would do. Bake in a very stow oven or with a pan on the shelf above to ward of puff-paste lie straight and undisturbed care must offtheheiU. be taken in handling the small portions when roll-

4O. Orange Dariole Filling. Richest. Requires deep pans for baking in as ordinary rims 1

pound

it

flows over

of sugar.

8 ounces of butter.

4 oranges. 10 eggs. Grate and squeeze the oranges into the sug&r, add the butter and eggs and cook the mixture thiik over

ing out pie crusts. Green people always will take the trimmings of the last pie and work aud kuead

and pound and press Jit to death. You musn't do Lay the scraps in layers in a pile loose on each other. Cut a chunk square and small from the large piece of paste and lay it on top of the scraps, that.

then roll out to a quarter inch thickness. Now you don't want the bottom crust of the pie to be so thick

nobody wants to eat so much soggy under but you do want that thickness for the edge. So double the sheet of paste over on itself in half, as that

crust


THE AM:EKICAN PASTKY COOK.

17

and with the end of the

They scorch easily should not be set ia. the hottest The juice that can be strained from them place. without mashing makes the brightest jelly when it to prevent Mash the rest through a colander for pies. sticking together. Then open out the co'd. doubled sheet again and you have a hollow thinbotStrawberries should be put in the crusts raw and tomed sheet of pa te just ready to fit the pie pan sugar strewn over. Canned strawberries shouid be and with a thick edge to hold in the custards and strained from the juice and that boiled down with iemon mixtures. sugar to about half, and the fruit returned to it. Peaches use same as apples, also for peach custard The peach kernels stewed with the fruit 52. pie. Apple Pies. rolling pin roll that part that will be the middle of the pie to half the thickness. You will of course have flour enough about

heighten the flavor.

Pare the apples and

Gooseberries green require 12 ounces of sugar to them off the cores into a bright pan or brass kettle. To every pound al- a pound of fruit; they should be partly mashed low on an average a quarter pound of white sugar with the back of a spoon for better mingling with and a cupful of water. Throw in 6 cloves or some the sweet. lemon peel for flavor, shut wi h a tight lid and le; Plums and such large fruits are not serviceable 1.

slice

M*sh through a colan unless cut or broken. A can of currants or whortleApples of poor qua'ity berries will make five pies and the same sized can that turn blue in cooking are often improved by the of plums only two or three. addition of the juice of a lemon. Quinces give an improved flavor to apples stewed stew slowly in the steam.

B^ke

der.

in

open

pies.

2. Apples cored and quartered and stewed in fla with them. Quince pies may be made by grating vored syrup like preserve* without breaking may be the fruit and mixing with sugar, or by stewing filled into shell pies or vol au venta baked separately, sliced quinces wish water and lemon juice and then as explained further on. For every pound of the adding sugar to m ike a thin syrup. Best for shell

apple quarters allow 6 ounces of sugar and half cup of water with cloves and lemon peel. Let the syr-

up

boil first,

in the steam.

them. 3.

ter

make good

pies.

Some

other

varieties can be used like quinces.

Rhubarb should be cooked with only water throw in the apple quarters and shut Simmer half an hour without stirring enough to cover the bottom of the kettle, a half pound of brown sugar to a pound of the stalks

Early green apples.

Mash through

whole.

Bartlett pears

pies.

and ciuKamoi or nutmeg.

Powd

the top and the steam shut in Raspberries, currants, blackberries and all such fruits as are apt to become all juice should have the

Wash and steam them spread over

a colander, a^d sugar,

Bake with a when done.

buttop

same avoidance of water as rhubarb and be cooked Use this way only the best in their own steam. Bananas and Plantains are made into pies in the Pare and core them and slice ripe cooking apples them thin across the core. Fill paste-lined pie pans, South in the same manner as has been directed for about 2 layers deep. Thinly cover the apple slices sliced apple pies, with mace and wine or brandy crust.

4. Sliced

red f-ugar over

apple pie.

with sugar and grate nufmeg over. Put i-i each pie butter size of a walnut and a large spoonful of wa ter. Bake without a top crust slowly and dry.

The apples become transparent and half candied.

added.

Tomatoes can be used in pies

4 ounces of sugar and a

53.

Pineapple

Cream Pie.

quart of pineapple either grated, or chopped and pounded. 12 ounces of sugar. 1

Stew down

cream. 12 yolks of eggs.

down with

little

bruised race ginger.

thick.

Figs either fresh or dried can be made into pies, cut up and stewed in syrup with a lemon or two and

some

butter.

"That was like Macready

1 cupful of

if boiled

Scald and peel and let them drain of half sugar. their juice. To each pint of draied tomatoes allow

at the

Palladium.

Ed.

Forrest he quit the Palladium to go to the Athenae-

C )ok the pineapp'e pulp and sugar together a few mioutes, add the cream and the yolks well beaten,

um, and Ed had been throwing 'em up some jam up punkin pies and a lot of the fellows that get up late bake in thin crusts. The same ingredients all stirr- n the morning after breakfast hours got to coming ed over the fi?e till cooked thick, make a pineapple and saying 'give me a punkin pie and some coffee and I can wait till dinner,' and some of 'em would cream to spread on layer cakes, and fill tarts. eat two regular. So when Ed quit, all the boss 54. Cranberries have a better color cooked with the could find on the town was Macready. He had to To a quart of cranberries allow a half pound go on the night watch and there was about 75 pies sugar. of sugar, and water to cover the bottom of the ves- to make before morning. So Mac. he goes to the sel only,

cook in their

own steam about half an hour.

night head waiter and says he, 'Fruit's

all right

but


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

18

how do you

say,

'Well, the

to

go

work

to

make a punk in

Oustard

58.

pie?

Pie.

Ordinary.

head waiter he growls and eays be 'Oh,

8 eggs. what do you take me for? who's hired night ook 1 quart of milk. you or me?' So Mac goes to work and rolls 6 or 8 ounces of sugar. and the of and cans his out punkin opens pies Nutmeg, lemon or vanilla flavoring. spoons 'em out into the crusts without no sweetenin' Beat the eggs and sugar together add the milk nor nothing and bakes 'em off. And along in tbe and bake in deep paste. lined pie morning the fellows began to drop in and one of gradually, flavor, with high edges. The thicker tbe custard the pans stool to the lunch counter them on the up

here

f

high

gets

and says he

'give

me my two punkin

pies

and

coffee.'

better the pie.

Well, sir, he took a bite and began to oat, and then he stopped with it in bis mouth and studied like, and then he spit it out on the floor and says he

what

punkin pie is that anythe pie business was entirely broke up

in the Halifax sort of a

And

how.

and Macready he got bounced."

Chocolate Cream Pie.

55.

59.

Harvest

1 quart of milk. 8 ounces of sugar.

4 ounces of

without eggs or milk: pint of water. pint of vinegar. 1 pound of brown sugar. 1

1 ounce of butter.

2 ounces of chocolate grated.

thickened, before

of the sugar to prevent burning on the bottom, mix the flour and rest of the sugur thoroughly together

Then add the butter and dry and beat them into it the yolks well beaten and take the mixture immedi-

May be baked

either with

Bake

6O.

Butter Pie.

1 quart of milk or cream. 8 ounces of fresh butter. 1

pound of white sugar.

4 ounces of

flour.

Boil the milk with the butter in

it.

Mix

the flour

and sugar together dry, stir them into the boiling mi'k and take the mixture from the fire as soon as spread over it begins to thicken. Bake like a custard in a crust.

thin crusts of puffthe whites of eggs firm while the pies

from the

Whip

it boils.

or without a top crust.

5 yolks of eggs. 8 whites of eggs and 4 ounces of sugar for meringue, and vanilla to flavor. Boil the milk with the chocolate in it, and a little

paste.

flour.

teaspoon ful of ground cinnamon. Boil the water, vinegar and butter together. Mix the flour, sugar and cinnamon together dry and 1

dredge them into the boiling liquid, beating at the same time. Take it off the fire as soon as partly

flour.

2 ounces of butter.

ately

Pie,

Made

4 ounces of

Fonchonettes au Chocolat.

Vinegar

Pie.

fire.

in

are baking, add the sugar and vanilla ; the pies still hot in the oven and bake with the oven

door open a few minutes.

61.

Corn Starch Oustard Pie or Arrowroot Pudding.

56.

Lemon Cream Pie* 1 quart of milk.

quart of milk. 8 ounces of sugar. 1

2 ounces of starch.

4 ounces of

8 ounces of sugar. 2 ounce? of butter.

1

flour.

ounce of butter.

8 yolks of eggs.

lemon, juice and rind, or lemon extract. Pinch of salt.

1

M\ke

as directed in preceding receipt, without the

6 eggs.

Mix

Lemon

or vanilla flavoring. little of the milk cold.

the starch with a

Boil

the rest of the milk with the sugar in it, stir in the starch, then the butter and eggs, and take it from the

fire

immediately.

Bake

in crusts.

chocolate

57.

62.

Cream Confiture, for Pies and Tarts.

1 pint of

cream.

10 eggs. 1 pint of

red currant jelly.

Warm into it crusts.

the jelly enough to just melt it and beat Bake in thin puff-paste the eggs and cream

Powdered sugar over when done.

1

Cream Curd

Pie.

pound of dry cheese curd (product of 4 quarts

of milk curdled with rennet). 8 ounces of butter.

12 ounces of sugar. 4 whole eggs and 6 yolks. 1 cupful of milk.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 4 ounces of currants-

Nutmeg orange or other flavoring. Mash ths curd through a seive and mix other ingredients. Bake in crusts.

in th

Ginger, cinnamon, or nutmeg. Beat the eggs light and stir them in after every thiugelse is mixed.

68.

Potato Cream

63.

a custard of eggs, a quart of milk, and

and mix mashed pumpkin with it quart of mashed pumpkin is about right.

potatoes.

sugar,

8 ounces of white sugar. 6 ounces of butter. 6 eggs

Mix

the butter with

2 pounds

them while warm, then

64

when done.

Sweet Potato

Pies.

1. Make by the preceding receipt, using sherry wine instead of brandy. They need careful bakiug

1

of dry

mashed squash

a quart.

8 ounces of molasses.

the sugar, milk and flavoring. Separate the egga and beat both yolks and whites quite light and stir them in just before baking. Bake in crusts. Sift

powdered sugar over

to suit

Brown Squash Pie.

69.

cupful of mixed milk and brandy or wine. Bail good mealy potatoes and mash them through I

a seive.

Pumpkin or Squash Custard.

Pie.

Make pound of mashed

1

19

2 ounces of butter. 8 eggs.

Ginger and allspice. quart of milk.

1

Mix the butter with the squash while still warm, hen the molasses and rest of the ingredients. With the right kind of molasses or part black molasses and part sugar, and spice skillfully proportioned this variety proves to be a favorite.

Powdered sugar over. 7O. Allowing that is not strictly in the line of cooked sweet potatoes into the crusts hotel fellows' duty to pass opinions wpon manners strew sugar over plentifully, and broken blades of a-id ways people have but considering the many asmace, and small lumps of butter. In each pie pour that are cast and its of a light color, to be good. Sl'ce

2.

Bake

half cupful of wine.

persions we not ask one

slowly.

like to like pie

65.

Pumpkin Transparent

Pie.

and make

big

and try

Made

without milk or eggs. 2 pounds of pumpkin or 1 quart.

p

Mash

steamed.

66.

it

through a strainer,

and

Pumpkin

Pie,

and turnovers,

and a lot more and tarts like

puffs

You will find if you look tdat Mr. tg'ish? Newcome, in The Ntwcomes, when a b y at college was re.markably fond of raspberry tarts and it mix the sugar took all hi* pocket money and much that he man-

Cheap.

Cliva

those raspberry tarts are not to be confounded for a minute with the indescribab'e English household pie the tar! s were and are neither more nor leps exc?pt

n

size

Clive be

than our American open pie?. Could Mr. for loving them? Why even Amer-

blamed

can collegians are not above such a weakness as that.

cupful of milk.

ground cinnamon. Tarte, tourte, tart

67-

Pumpkin

Pie,

can at

2 pounds of pumpkin 8 ounces of butter. 12 ounces of sugar. 12 eggs. 1

darioles, bouchees, mirlitons,

Flavor,

2 eggs. Little

it

simmer at the side of the aged to get from a friend or two besides to purchase and bake in crusts. them, and there is nothing sardonic in Mr. Thackeray' s statement of that not uncommon trait of his. But

let

thick.

and make

E

the

it

like pie,

good, than to beat about the bu*h hide an inordinate admiration of pie

as the French do,

2 pounds of dry mashed pumpkin. 4 ounces of sugar. 2 ounces of butter. 1

and say you

may

not more American-

flans, vol-au- vents, tourtes, tartelettes

Flavoring either of lemon rind, cloves or nutmeg. The pumpkin must be dry, either baked or

and butter with range to become

friends,

pie

it is

it

under such names as

mod

of sugar. 4 ounces of butter. 1

lo

upon

question

cup of milk.

stewed dry.

pie,

made open

most with only

is

the European for the Amerior is without a top crust

that

strips across.

The

tart

proper

is

not larger than the palm of the hand, and is made n patty pans or small pie pans of any form, ova', oblong, equare or round. People like pie for supper,

and country hotels with the old style of long table But et them on it, but Fashion does not allow it.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

20

you oan circumvent Fashion (and ane will be secret* ly pleased thereby) by serving tarts both for luncheon and supper.

Now

tarts

or tiny pies are tedious to

make

cumbers and advantage must be taken, get the

in

shal-

low patty-pans fastened together a dozen in a bunch. Roll out the paste to an eighth of an inch thickness

I

and cut out flats with a biscuit cutany oval or other cutter that will match your patty-pans. Press the paste with the thumbs to in a large sheet, ter or

the shape, cut off the surplus even

with the edges pie fruit or of

and put in a spoonful of any kind of

the mixtures just preceding, or of the various creams, apple or cocoanut cream etc and you can give pie for supper luncheon and tea and Fashion will r ever .

be the wiser. 'Ihe small tartlets using up the pie paste remainFor some of the pie mixtures such as the choco. ing after dinner and taking but a teaspoonful of filllate cream, puff-paste is not the best. The annexed ing make a de8 rable addition to or substitute for a kind specially made for "small bakings." cake in the baskets for The next are i

larger

supper.

Tart Paste

11. 1

cutters for oyster patties etc

and vol au- vents of birds

pound of flour.

6 ounces of butter.

2 ounces of powdered sugar. 2 eggs. Little salt. cupful of water. The annexed show forms of bouchees and tartlets the butter into the flour, add the eggs, sugar that it might be difficult to make plain in words on. and salt with the water, mix and knead it smooth. The three lower figures are intended to show ly.

Rub

72.

I

Tartlets,

Bouchees and Vol-au-vents.

how

the puff-paste is folded, tie anicle after bakin g-

and the three upper

The

fine leaf paste or puff-paste being ready there nothing easier to make than vol-au-vent tartlets like those shown below. Roll out the paste to about a quarter of an inch in thickness, or even thinner, is

cut out with the double cutter, place the tartlets in pans like biscuits and bake in a brisk oven. They rise to three or four times the

heighth of the paste they are cut from. Lift out the little lid made by the cutter in the middle or else push it down and fill

the cavity with a spoonful of red currant jelly or fruit or preserves.

lemon honey or any kind of

NO. 2.

NO. 1.

N03.

For the form shown in the middle roll out the finest leaf paste to about an eighth of an inch in The tin-smiths make and keep for sale the double thickness. Cut it in squares of about 2 inches and cutters that cut out rings for doughnuts and jum- fold over the four corners to meet in the middle bies, like two of these in the cut with the inside cut- where there should be a drop of water placed to ter on a level with the outside and cutting the mid- make them stick. Stamp out a round piece of pasta 1.

Brush over dle of the paste clear through, but the vol-au-vent like a lozenge and lay on the center. cutters have to be made to order. The inner cut- with a little beaten egg-and-water without wetting ting edge

is

a sixteenth of an inch below the outer the edges of the paste, and bake. The shell can be lid. partly hollowed out when done, and filled with any

and only marks out a


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. kind of mince or sweetmeat.

12 eggs.

hand figure roll out the same a the preceding and cut and fold over the same and

A

For the

2.

pinch of palt, coloring and flavoring. off a third of the cream, the thickest, from the the top, and keep it cold to be whipped to froth,

left

Take

then cut pieces out of the four sides to make These leaf tartlets open out and rise while the other

shape shown.

as high in baking as

21

the middle figure.

Fill

is

freezing.

Boil

the rest of the

th e cream with the sugar in it, which prevents burning. Beat the eggs in a bowl as light as if for sponge

hollows with bright frait jelly 3. The three cornered bouchees or tarts have the cake, pour the boiling cream and sugar to them and either mince or salpican, or yellow or red cook about a minute together enough to slightly filiiug conserve or jelly-baked in them. Roll out a sheet thicken but not boil. Strain into a freezer immedi-

of puff-paste and cut out like biscuits, with a large ately, add a few drops of rose extract and some Place a teaspoonful of the filling in each bright red fruit syrup such as the surplus juice from wet the edge of the paste and pinch it up in the crimson straw berries in sugar, or else some drops of

cutter.

shape of a three- cornered hat. Brush over with red coloring, to make the ere >m light pink. Freeze, ogg-and water and dredge with granulated sugar if and when nearly finished whip the reserved cream to froth and beat it in. a sweet tart. Bake in a rather slack oven.

W

When cream thick enough to whip cannot be had Beside the foregoing, other shapes may be made out the whites of the eggs and use the same the out ,et of s an oval with cutkeep by stamping paste ter and doubling the a's over like French split way instead. 75. Grape and Almond Ice. and by doubling over square cuts. These 5 pints of sweet white muscat grapes free from open up like the leaves of a book and jelly or prestems. serves can be inserted in the cavities. rolls,

1 pint of angelica or other

American Popular Ices.

73.

1

The combinations following are not

sweet wise.

1 pint of water.

pound of sugar.

1 large ripe

too dreadfully

lemon.

pound of almonds blanched. Stew three pints of the grapes with the water and cent American variations of the class of European sugar and when tender rub the pulp through a "iced-puddings," and bombes a la Viennoise. They strainer into a freezer, together with the syrup. and the lemon cut in th ck short are popular ices in the sense that they are among Add the wine 1

original in idea to be eminently proper "according to Hoyle," neither arc they copies. They are inno-

make

and hotel tables popular with slices with the seeds carefully excluded, At the last drop in the They are among the super-ex- freeze the mixture. cellences and quiet surprises which give but there, >lanched almonds and after a few more turns of the we are getting beyond our depth what we do want reez^r add the remaining 2 pints of grapes previousthe tbicgs which

high-priced people.

to

say

is

that served individually they can be

man- y made cold on ice. C^ver down the freezer that he ice may become well f ozen. To serve individually make a border of the

aged easily eioughin the hotels which do not employ a confectioner or men specially detailed to

mike

the ices, but where the pastry, cook has to be cream with the spoon in broad champagne glasses or a man-of-all-worfe; while the moulding in <i bombes" fancy ice glasses, and in the middle pile the grape involves a great expenditure of time and freezing and almond sherbet. material. These have all been well tried and often. For fancy moulded creams line the moulds with The simplest and best methods of moulding, froth- the first part and fill the centers with the second. ing, freezing etc. will also

the

commoner

be found explained among

A favorite form

ices further on.

ofbombe

is

frozen in a

mould

in

the shape of a little glass jug with handle and all This is coated inside with a translucent coinpl te.

Hastorskill Ices.

1

syrup ice and the filling is of, for ex. Combinntion of rose pink cream with pale green ample, a maraschino ice cream, or one dotted with ice containing grapes and almonds, Two freezers strawberries. V- hen the bombe well frozen is taken fruit or flavored

'

out of

tequired.

74,

Rose Ice Cream.

quart of cream. 12 ounces of sugar.

1

its

mould and

set

on the table on

napkin, you are, if you please, to knock of the

that

ju$ and dip out the contents.

it is

called a

bomb because

it

its

off

It is

folded

the neck

surmise*

goes off pretty


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. soon amongst a whole table full of people; but the The ice will name dees not suit our bills of fare. go off better when it is not called a bomb.

Niagara

our people's association of ideas.

/ith

inc; is

Monitou Rocky Mountain nd a white cream.

77. Yellow Frozen Custard.

and

vanilla bean

Beat the yolks light and pour the boiling cream to them. Set on the fire again for a minute. The custard will not froth in the freezer if cooked

78.

and strained as soon

Orange and Cocoanut

or

Ice*

it

?hip

pint of port wine, 1 pint of water.

and

it.

Mix

the

till

that

freeze.

ream, then beat reezer,

pound of sugar.

and is as

SOthe sugared kind

it

with a paddle till it fills the foam and white as snow.

light as

Scarlet Raspberry Ice,

3 or 4 pints of Rocky Mountain wild raspberries. 1

4 oranges. 2 lemons.

Red

ioet

is melted. Strain, cool and fla M hen nearly finished freezing the whites to froth and stir them into the

he mixture

Freeze and beat light.

8 ounces of desiccated cocoanut free from oil must be used.

iia

tarch in a ciip with a little cold milk and stir it in 'ake from the fire, and put in the butter and beat

1

1

raspberries

1 tablespoonful of lemon extract. Boil the milk with the sugar in

it

off

scarlet wild

1 ounce of butter. 2 rounded tablespoonfuls of corn starch. 4 whites of eggs.

Vanilla bean or extract to flavor.

as slightly thickened.

Icea.

1 quart of rich milk. 12 ounces of sugar.

12 ounces of sugar. 12 yolks of eggs.

much, but should be taken

Iced pudare noble,

Two freezers required. Ice Cream. Starch White 79.

qu trt of cream or milk.

Boil the cream with the sugar

food; ices, ice-creams,

ley are etherial, they are delicious.

zers required.

jn

it is

Ices.

Combination of rich yellow frozen custard with a Two freepink sherbet with cocoanut and oranges.

1

base,

pounds of sugar.

2 pints of water. 3 whites of eggs. Pick out and reserve about a third of the berries

fruit juice or'coloring.

M-rte a hot syrup of the water and sugar. Slice the oranges and lemons small and throw away the

o be

a bowl with the desiccated

>our

seeds, put the slices in

dropped whole into the

ice at last.

Make a syrup it

of the sugar and one pint of water, hot upon the larger portion of raspberries in

bowl and then rub them through a strainer toge'hoocoanut, pour the hot syrup over them and let steep a short time. Then strain the flavored syrup into a er with the syrup, and use the other pint of water Freeze, and freezer, add the wine and coloring to make it light .0 help the pulp through when dry. pink and freeze. Mike the scalded orange anc idd the whites of eggs beaten to froth when nearly lenvm slices and cocoanut cold on ice and stir them inished and after beating up again drop in the into the sherbet

whennearlj frozen, then pack down whole raspberries and pack down the freezer with more ice and salt to remain till wanted,,

the freezer to freeze the contents firm.

To serve individually place the frozen custard in champagne glasses, spread out to make a border and the sherbet pile up in the middle.

Serve the white cream in glasses or saucers with

he reduce piled in the hollow middle.

And "iced-pu elding" is no better name, although the language containing no other for such a com pound, the English have had to use it. But thei

81.

Broadly speaking

Sydney Smith

in

it

in Ices.

may be

said,

everybody that

likes fruit ices or sherbets likes the frozen pieces of

case is different, they have deep rooted respect fo ancient pudding, and ice cream does not seem to b

degraded by being so calkd.

Frozen Fruit

through them as well. But there are it wcu'd be tedious to point in each case depending upon the degree of sweetness Strawberries containing little or no of the fruit.

fruit scattered

ex

differences

planation of the exact stage of his convalescenc wrote to afriend that he was past the gruel point, pa panada, and had just arrived at pudding. Thackera

which

ice too sugar will freeze in a strawberry water could write of puddings, ns did Herrick, Burns, By- reasonably solid to be good, while sweet Tokay and ron even, and there^is something about solid pudding Muscat grapes, sweet ripe cherries, mellow pears in Shakspeare, but that does not help the mafter and the like will never become too hard because the '


THE AMERICAN PASTBY sugar in them prevents

whether cream or

it.

fruit,

The sweeter an

the harder

it is

COOK.

article,

finished product after

freeze.

the young gentlemen

to

To keep the fruits from this too solid congealing some of the French ways steep them in alcoholic liquers methods which we merely mention for information without believing them necessary to practice In case of a peach ice, then, it may do very well when the peaches are very sweet and ripe to drop th=* quarters in at the end of the freezing without

en summer

I

in the ice after first the

It ia

little

avail that

we make finely fla-

if the transformations possible in the freezing process be not skilfully carried out. In freezing, if you know how, you can transform skimmed milk in-

Ices.

and white cherries in cream.

Red Grape

of

cre^m or custard or sherbet good and

vored

Two

freezers required.

82.

perhaps

cream freezing done properly, none perhaps but those who have to oversee its preparation along with a number of other skill-demanding productions for

semblance of cream, and

to the ice

our hands

but of some easy and perfect process of freezing it such as is condensed and summed up in the idea conveyed by that rate of cheapness. For few know how difficult it is to get the drudgery of ice-

,

Red grape

left

cheap

!

Tahoe

has

take the young ladies out evenings would not wish it quite so

any preparation; but if the peiches instead are inclined to sourness stew them in thick syrup withou the hotel dinner.

brewing the quarters and drop making them cold.

it

who

Ice.

Now when

6 pin a of red Tokay grapes (4 pounds.) 1$ pints of water. f

if you

don't you can

not prevent rich cream from transforming itself into the semblance of skimmed milk.

they get through with that tedious perhaps the inventors will

electric light subdivision

subdivide the artificial ice machines so that ice cream

1^ pounds of sugar. 1 lemon and 1 orange.

can be made in every

little

house in some less clum-

the present with ice and Tae great obstructionist in ice cream making is the lazy yardman, second pastry-cook or other helper who ought to turn the freezer fast and beat in a syrup made cf the sugar and part of the water the cream thoroughly, and we want an electrical or and rub the pulp through a strainer together with chemical machine of some kind to supersede him. the syrup and pour over the skins the remaining Ices. White Mountain portion of water, add the juice of the lemon and reeze as usual. If to line a mould the whites of Sweet peaches and cream (Put that little lady the eggs may be omitted and a little red fruit juice or School marm who once did the copying of some of coloring can be added to make a more positive color, these receipts happened to be a White Mountain but for serving in glasses add the whites whipped she reached this sett she surgirl herself and when firm and beat the ice till smooth and foamy. Gut and placed it over anothname took the reptitiously the orange in strips, without peeling, and strew er sett and called these something else, as if sweet them in the ice, also the reserved grapes and cover and ice-cream was not good enough for the

sy and imperfect

4 whites of eggs. Select about a fourth part of the grapes to be Scald the rest dropped whole into the ice at last.

way than

salt.

peaches

down

83. White Cherry Cream. quart of pure sweet cream. 3 or 4 pints of California white

matter.

1

1

Eed grapes

for White

wax

cherries.

er be told.

pound of sugar.

Two

Mountain

Who,

a boiling syrup of the sugar and water, drop in the cherries and let them simmer in it about 15 minutes, without stirring or breaking. strain the flavored pyrup into the freezer

Which

indeedl

ices is

sett

she chose

something that shall nev-

allow us to ask,

is

runningt his?)

freezers required.

84. Vanilla Ice

pint of water.

Make

Then

for that

White Mountains or Green Mountains either

to freeze firm.

Cream -Best;

quart of good sweet cream. 8 ounces of sugar. 1

either 2 tablespoonfuls of the vanilla bean boiled in a little milk and

Vanilla flavoring

and extract or a

on ice, to be mixed in at last. Add the the milk used to flavor. Use a frepzer tint will hold twice as much or more. quart of cream to the syrup in the freezer, freeze and beat up well, then stir in the cherries and pack Sweeten and flavor the cream aud churn it in a pail set the fruit

down with more

ice

and

salt.

with a whip-churn into the freez?r

Artificial ice ice

cream same

made

voutly to be wished."

half of it

it is

froth.

Pour

it

as rapidly as possible.

one dollar a ton; Then take out the inside beater and with a wooden "It were a consummation de- paddle about four feet bng, made like a spade in We are thinking not of th shape but narrow, beat the ice-cream about 15 min-

at a cost of

price.

till

and freeze


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. utes, or

till it

fills

pack with more

the freezer.

ice

and

Cover down and they've worked up their barrel of flour a day In

salt.

all

Peach

shapes,

and other things in proportion, and hot

weather at that, they don't feel much like spreading themselves on fancy creams and ices, and it's the

Ice. 3 pints of peeled mellow peaches. 1 pound of sugar. 2 pints of water.

sort of frozen

1 large cupful of bright red currant jelly.

tel

S5.

same miserable lemon custard and vanilla custard

and that

any way to put it through at this hoand if the people are asked to

hotel,

The kernels of half the peaches.

visit at the other hotel they are sure to be treated 4 whites-of eggs. to the same old thing again. Well then they go to The peaches should be choice, yellow or red the cafe and fine restaurant where these things are Half of them are to be cat in made fleshed and sweet. specialties, and that's what you ought to be half cooked. pieces as large as cherries, the other doing now Johnny if you knew how. Put the water, sugar, peach kernels and half the But in the first place you don't have ice-cream on peaches on to stew together for a few minutes, mash hand half the time and people as they pass say "oh the fruit with the back of a spoon, put in the currant its of no use, they hardly ever have any there," so jelly and then press all (except the kernels) through they quit coming because they don't like to be disa strainer. Freeze as usual, add the whipped white . appointed, you must keep it if you have to make a of eggs to to the ice and after beating also mix in the pint at a time in a quart cup even, as you easily can

cut peaches. Line the moulds wih the cream and

if you fill

understand

it,

and

it

positively

must be

al-

the center

ways good, always tip-top, if you expect to build up with the peach ice, or serve the cream in glasses or a trade, and it can't be if you make it once a day, saucers as a border with the peach piled in the in the morning, and keep it all day and night; for middle. the goodness of it is its smoothness and creaminess, but that gets away when the cream is kept long

Some Points on Ice-cream and other Ices.

I, Johnny you're, stuck ice-cream saloon, and the

So I said to Johnny said with this miserable

little

Water in freezing else, so that

seventy five dollars you've put in is gone skywards, don't you know it? And you owe a month's rent beside. And here at the same time are your little

dollars that ought to be and your tens and hundreds on the hotel piazzas and riding by and

sitting along

walking right by your forsaken little den, but they won*t come in. Of course they won't. Why should

will

you get

separate

from

clear ice out of

everything

muddy

rivers,

and the water part of vinegar will tree ze and leave the acid part by itself in the center of the barrel; just that way your cream first gets grains of clear ice in it like sand, and by night your customers find rough chunks as big as pipe stems. For the very same reasons good cream cannot be made by letting It wants rapid work. it stand and freeze itself. QUICK FREEZING. Now, Johnny, you begin right. Get you a stout oaken box bound with hoop iron if you can, to pound

know the first rudiments of the the ice small in. It will prove the cheapest way in the ice small to Johnny, don't you remember when you the long run, for you must pound used to turn the freezers for two mortal hours enough do quick freezing and cheap, and no way beats box. it with an old axe head in a deep sight slower than the tick of your grandfather's pounding turn your freezer two hours and do no You in to been done when have may clock, twenty you ought or thirty minutes, wasting ice and salt, spoiling the good if it has only large lumps of ice just touching it they when you don't

business.

cream and wearing out me? And now you'll go up for want of knowing something. Now if you was dead for instance and a smart boy had this instead it would not be this way. here are bigger resorts than this, don't you know? and some where the confectioneries and all are made under the same

with their edges.

It is the salt acting

on the ice

and releasing the cold by melting it that causes your cream to freeze and the quicker the melting takes place through thorough mixing of salt in fine ice the quicker your cream is done, and coarse salt is bet

ter than fine because it won't pack in dead lumps, We are not and because it grinds the ice away. even there extra fine the you, creams and ices are in a side show and are extra caring for strict science, only for the effects as they is done charges, and more so at all commoner places unless appear. So the quickest possible freezing roof, but, let

me

tell

the pastry cook has uncommon ambition to shine. with snow and ice mixed together. And, Johnny, But you take a hotel that's got two hundred summer don't you remember how snorting mad you used to people,

and

there's

two pastry cooks, but

after be

when

I

would come down on you for about tw0


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

25

seconds while you was see sawing away at thatfreez

so soft and foamy, and will increiee in bulk so much and say "why in thunder don't you let the sal it can't be told from cream except by melting which water out?" and when I came again and found the I want to say shows that it isn't the cream itsel water out it was "what in thunder did you let al that makes the quality, since sweetened fruit juice

er

the water out for?"

will do so well, and better yet if mixed with cream have no meringues in the oven like our cherries in cream some way back, but the now and I'll stop to explain. Your cream never method. So having prepared your cream, custard, freezes much except where the brine of the melted or sherbet put it in a freezer large enough to hold

Well, Johnny,

and

salt

rtside

you

ice

I

touches the freezer, as the brine rise

mark rises much water the

will find the freezing

but when there gets to be too

inside;

much and when done.

twice as freezer

strive to

make

the ice

fill

the

The greatest help but not the only material for ice riand the bottom of ihe freez?r begins he purpose is some raw but lighf-beaten white of to melt agiin. You want to keep letting out a little eggs. The French cooks, some of them, use what water from the bung-hole near the bottom of the they call Italian meringue, which is a boring sugar freezing tub but not too much, and always keep push- yrup made of six ounces of sugar, poured into four ing and packing the ice down arourd the freezer to whites well whipped. If anyone who has tri d has ses

and

keep this

it

floats

solid

f

and touching both bottom and sides. In Lund a difference

in effect between that

and the raw

way you can do

freezing in twenty or thirty whites I will not gainsay their word, but, Johnny, y u minutes better than in two hours. The amount of will find the shorter way good enough and it saves susalt you want is about one bucket of salt to five of gar from wl at is already generally too sweet. So when

broken

ice. Half fill your freezing tub with ice your ice is frozen mix in the whipped whites, and if then begin putting in scoopfuls of salt with the it is a patent f.eezer turn it as fast as you can til and it will work itself down. Always finish cfi y u see the white ice forcing its way out at the freezf

first,

ice,

the top with a layer of

salt. Don't you see now er lid. That is if you want that sort, but if it is onwhat an idiot you was not to understand these little ly a demi-glace leave out the whites, like the pink things, and the quality of the cream for two hundred part of our Niagara ices, where the white desiccated

high-toners depending on your ignorance? In order cocoanut can be seen powdered all through as it sometimes in the dead of win- could not be if the sherbet was beaten to whiteness

to get the little brine

ter when everything was too cold I have had to pour with egg. SAVE THE SUOAE hot water on the ice in the freezing tub to start it. And don't make the mistake t fusing too much suThese points apply to all sorts of freezers that use You must make a profit, and sugar is an ex ice and salt. The noted cooks across the sea who gar. in two ways, in its cost at first and then in pense nvented some of the fine ices that you are going to make after awhile Johnny, never patronized our ce and salt for the more sugar^ in your cream the new patent freezers but did and perhaps still do their more ice it will take to freeze it. This you know is for common, though you want to be posted for fanfine work with the old kind turned by hand. cy work too. When you go to Boston or PhiladelCREAM AND ITS SUBSTITUTES. phia, Johnny, you'll find (hem advertising "Vieana And, Johnny, you don't need real cream so much ices," bombes, bisquits glacees, etc. If made "accord-

you need a thorough beating. If a man that knew ing how was to open next door in opposition toyou he might gar as

take milk and you might take cream, and would hear customers say "ah, the cream

to

Hoyle" these Vienna

ices

have a pound of su-

in every quart, of rich cream, and the rule for soon you fruit ices is a pound and a half to a quart. Just next door think of it a cupful of granulated sugar in two

the best, it certainly must be made of the purest cupfuls of thick cream, and the fruit ices and sor When cream, you can taste it, it is so rich!" when in fact se! s all syrups heavier than soda syrups. it would be its foamy smoothness and delicacy that these are well frozen they are more of ftvzen congave them the impression, while your real cream 'ectioneries, or candies made by cold iasteid of is

would be coarse with grains of ice, and heavy with heat then they are light refreshments. They are inIt does not make nearly so much difference ended to be shaped in moulds and to have a good how you make your cream as how you freeze it and deal of solidity. Your rule for common ice-cream keep it. Why you may take a sweet water ice, es- should be not more than half a pound of sugar to pecially a white cherry ice, or a peach ice vill do, each quart of milk and three quarters of a pound to some kind with the sweet pulp mashed in it, and each quart of fruit ice or sherbet, and Johnny, sugar.

make

it

according to directions

it

will be

so white, though I

would not write

it

so in a receipt for

any-

V-


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

28

body, for it might seem stingy, between you and me I think six ounces of sugar to eaoh quart of milk is

and white of eggs in water ices, punches and The effec' of both articles is about the But you same, but gelatine is the most (rouble in milk

so forth.

enough for the ice-cream that is only a light refreshment that people may oat plenty of without hurting have to be very careful ab ;ut the quantity of gelathemselves. They don't want food, but frozen per- tine used for if you don't look out it will set your fume. crvam like b'anc-mange or jelly. One ounce to three I got a lesson in popular ice-cream making when quarts is the higl:est you can use, end it must be I was a boy that has lasted me for comparison of well dissolved in warm milk before putting in. different fellows' wavs ever eince, at a gaily decora OB DINAH Y ICE-CfEAM. ted tent at New Orleans, on the levee and facie g You will see some ice-cream makers put raw yolks Tchoupitoulas street, where their cream was sold of eggs in the cream because, they have found that as fast as tickets for a circus, handed cut in glasses cooking the eggs in it destroys Ihe frothing quality. piled high, three or four colors and flavors, and as I dont like that either, and I compromise by making many men freezing and beating, and as many more a boiled s'arch custard with scant one ounce of gelling and forever yelling out, "Come up with an 8 arch to each quart of milk, and beating two or other freezer on the red/' and "come up with anto a in a three, or at most four quart light

yolks

other freezer on

cream was deep pan and pouring the scalding cus'ard to them It was late ia May, which In If cooks the light, and cheap and plentiful. yolks and makes a custard and all the ice they used had come in ship loads that can be churned to a froth if wanted. from the north. They didn't sit down and see-saw and Johnny, I don't think they used over six ounces Wben you make a custard that way it saves ice to of sugar to a quart. But they had fine flavorings, cook half the milk with all the the yaller."

Their

only

and you don't think they had any wanted any, do you?

real

ANi'IBILIOUS ICE-CBEAM.

enriching ingre-

cream or dients in and pour the other half cold to it afterwards. When you boil milk always boil the sugar in it, and that will prevent scorching on the bottom.

And you need

not go into bankruptcy either Now, Johnny, brace up and go to'wrrk, and when merely because the big hotels are getting what little you get as far as moulding ice creams for party dincream there is to be had and you can get none. ners we will talk again. But that heavy iron scrapThey don't even get enough for coffee, after all. er you have got made by a blacksmith is notjtui table,

Some

restaurant keepers buy the milk, skim it for the cream and trust to selling off the skimmed milk or part of it, so as to get their pure cream for freez-

cm taste iron

people of fine perceptions sides you are liable to drive of your freezer

and

spoil all.

it

in cream, bethrough the bottom

The

largest size flexi-

ing not soured and mouldy as country gathered ble palette knife is the best thing to loosen the frocream often is, but that plan is not practicable for zen cream from the .sides of your old fashioned ice-cream for thousands at a resort. Besides, who freezer, and for the beating up of the cream make

wants cream? you see these resorts getting more yourself a paddle of hard wood as long as a spade, crowded every year and more hotels and larger ones but light and narrow; one that you can stand up being built, and that shows that the people find it wi h and have a good hold on to churn and beat pleasant living at them, but they wouldn't if they had the blues and felt tired and drowsy all the time

with both hands.

as they would be if they were made bilious and dysThere is nothpeptic with double cream and sugar.

Lemon and

ing so bad for the health and spirits as real buttery cream taken at the end of a full meal. Let the count, ry people who have nothing to do but sleep eat the

cream, but you give the resorters light refreshment and if your wares are well made they will come again after they have walked and danced and rolled ten pins.

GELATINE IN CBEAM.

FLAVORING vanilla are the

flavors

each gallon of cream, remembering, however, that there is the common, the doub'e and the triple extract of which latter of course less ought to do.

v-

hen you

get to doing a big business you will have the pleasure of offering y&ur customers acho'ce of as many flavors

of cream

as

flavors except

ItiB reckoned quite a trick too, to put gelatine in your milk cr boiled custard and gelatine is nice enough as fir as that goes, but somehow, Johnny, I find myself always letting it alone, though I don't know what I might do in compe ition with Gelatine gives body to themiik and makes others.

common popular

and lemon is the commonest of the two. Ur-e of them about a large basting spoonful of the extract to

But all there are of soda syrups. lemon and vanilla must be used very

sparingly, a teaspoonful of pineapple, strawberry, pear and the like generally being as good as a large

spoonful of the others, and of rose extract a few may do. Most of the flavorings excepting

drops

cinnamon, and

nutmeg are and butyric ether which is and there is no won. it BO it can be beaten up mo^e light and f:o'hy and obtained from rancid butter the cream with ge'atine in will not melt down so der if the popular taste approves of them only in quickly.

It is

a good enough rule

to

use gelatine

lemon, vanilla, rose,

made from

orris root

very small allowances.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Frozen Nesselrode Pudding.

86.

Glace Nesselrode or iced pudding. made of pounded chestnuts, with

tard

vorings

frozen cus-

fruit

1 pint

Bonanza Punch.

88.

and

fla-

Our own Rocky Mountain punch as made two hundred and fifty.

for

hotel dinners for

10 quarts of water. 9 pounds of sugar.

:

pound of large chestnuts

1

A

27

about 40.

of rich boiled custard.

2 dozen lemons.

cup sweet cream. 2 ounces citron. 2 ounces sultana raisins.

6 oranges.

2 ounces stewed pineapple.

quart bottle of champagne. Grate the rinds of 6 of the lemons and 4 oran-

1

2 cans of pineapple. 1 pint

^ cupful of maraschino. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. Pinch of salt in the chestnut pulp.

Slit the shells

of gin.

1

of the chestnuts, boil them half an

ges into a bowl, and squeeze in the juice of all. Put on about 2 quarts of water, with a lot of sugar in, and the pineapple juice, making a hot syrup of it,

hour, peel clean, and pound the nuts to a paste, and rub it through a coarse sieve, moistening with

and then pour it to the- grated rinds and juice in the Strain into the freezer, bowl to draw the flavor. cream. Then mix it with the boiled custard. Freeze chop the pineapple and put in, add all the rest of this mixture, and when firm whip the cup of cream, the sugar and water, gin and champagne, color it and stir it in and freeze again. Then add the citron pink and freeze. cut in shreds, the stewed or candied pineapple, likewise the raisins, maraschino, and vanilla extract. 89. The Same, Reduced for Fifty. Beat up and freeze again, and either serve in ice cream plates out of the freezer, or pack the cream of water. 2i quarts

a mold, and when well frozen send to table whole, turned out of the mold on to a folded napkin

in

on a

dish.

it

can be sliced into from 12 to 16 portions.

When

chestnuts are not convenient some of the large cafes use the ready prepared pounded aUnonds or

walnuts that

1

small can of pineapple.

^ cupful of gin. 1 cupful of champagne or sweet wine.

Grate the rinds of 2 lemons and proceed as above directed.

the can at the con90. and various additions or

substitutions of green candied fruits are employed to a handsome appearing compound without

make

changing its general character quantity for dinner for fifty.

Should be trebled

in

See No. 320 for another variety recently added, but crowded out of place.

1

6 lemons.

may be bought by

fectioners' supply stores,

Diplomatic Ice Pudding.

87.

pounds of sugar,

2 oranges.

foregoing makes about enough to fill one of those brick molds that have a large and deep stamped fruit pattern in the lid and when frozen

The

firm

2

Kirsch Punch.

orange, and

Bomaine.

2 quarts of water. 3 pounds of sugar. 4 lemons juice only. 1 pint of kirschwasser. 8 whites of eggs. Mix the punch materials together cold ; strain into When nearly frozen whip the 8 whites the freezer.

firm,

mix

in

and freeze again.

Regent's Punch.

91.

quart of rich vanilla custard. cream.

1

1 pint thick 1

cupful of French candied pineapple and cherries,

cut small.

1 1

quart of water. pint of gin.

2 dozen lady fingers.

2 lemons.

Freeze the custard as usual for ice cream; whip the

1

and freeze again. Take two brick molds and put

cream, put ice

it

in

in a layer of the

cream, a layer of lady fingers, then some candied

fruit,

and

fill

the

mold

that way, having ice cream Close with paper and the lid, and

for the top layer. put in the freezing

hours.

Manage

Ntsselrode.

mixture to stay two or three

the same

way

pound of

1 pint

as Neapolitan and

sugar.

of maraschino

or half as

much

kirsch.

4 bottles of soda water.

Grate the rind of a lemon into a bowl, moisten with some gin and rub with the back of a spoon to Add the lemon juice and rest of extract the flavor. the ingredients except the soda; strain into the and freeze as firm as the spirit in it will al-

freezer

low, add the bottled soda and finish the freezing.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY. COOK. Bisque Ice Creams*

931>.

Victoria Punch.

92.

according to

6 or 8 oranges 12 lemons.

size.

1

1 pint of angelica or other sweet win:.

Squeeze in the juice of

all

add the other ingredients and freeze. Then whip the whites, stir in, bat up and freeze the fruit,

again.

Cardinal Punch.

A

survival of the old-time spiced wine called "bishop;" the same was called cardinal when made

The

specialty about in roasting the oranges either before or over the

with the best of red wine.

letting

pound.

4 cups cream.

Grate the rinds of half the lemons into a bowl, add the rum, and rub with the back of a spoon to

and

can pineapple or

2 cups sugar.

J pint of rum. 8 whites of eggs.

93

fruit or

93c. Bisque of Pineapple Ice Cream.

3 pounds of sugar. 2 quarts of water.

extract the flavor.

proportion of the pulp of nuts added are termed bisques,

Ice creams with a

pounded

it is

fire,

Chop the pineapple small and put it in a bright pan or kettle with the sugar and a few spoonfuls of Simjuice or water to dissolve the sugar to syrup. mer

at the side of the

the cream

Whip

range a short time. half froth, then freeze

till it is

it

because the pineapple added before Pound the freezing has a tendency to curdle it. pineapple and syrup through a colander, mix it with first

by

itself,

the partly frozen cream, and freeze again. It can and ought to be managed to have the pine-

apple in syrup prepared beforehand to be cold. In making these bisques it is not best to pound the fruit perfectly fine, but the small pieces about like

them steep in good red wine, which, when grains of wheat should be perceptible and show that If to be the creams are mixed with fruits and not merely is used either hot or cold.

thus flavored,

flavored.

frozen take 1 quart of 1

wine

jelly (calPs foot or gelatine.)

Bisque of Preserved Ginger.

93d.

quart of claret or any good red wine.

1 quart of port.

pound of

1 quart of water.

either preserved or candied ginger.

i cup sugar. Juice of one lemon.

2 pounds of sugar. 4 oranges. 2 tablespoon fuls of whole cloves. Bake the oranges brown on a plate in the oven. Make a boiling syrup of the sugar and water with

4 cups of cream. Cut tne candied ginger into very small pieces. Make a hot syrup of the sugar with a few spoonfuls

of water and squeeze the lemon into it, then put in drop the baked oranges into it, add Cut the oranges the ginger and let it soften and impart the flavor to and press them for the juice, and strain the punch the syrup. Put the cream and ginger and syrup all for together, freeze and beat up. Add the into the freezer. (or white of the cloves in

it,

the wine and let remain until cold.

eggs

jelly

a substitute) and freeze.

If in season for red rasp-

93c.

berry juice add some for brighter color.

Angelica Punch.

93a.

Apricot Ice.

3 cupfuls of apricots cut in pieces. 8 ounces. 1 cupful of sugar

2 cups California Angelica wine. a pint. 2 cups hot water

The

1

2 whites of eggs.

1

pound. cup sugar cup stemmed raisins J pound.

1

lemon.

2

whites

2 cupfuls of water.

The

of eggs and to beat in.

two

tablespoonfuls

the raisins, grate half the rind of the lemon, all of the juice, pour the hot water to

them, add the sugar, and Strain the

and sweetest apricots,

if

the fresh fruit

stir until it is all dissolved.

flavored syrup

thus

obtained into

when finished. Stew the other two cupfuls and the peeled kernels in the water and sugar for a few minutes, rub

of in the ice

squeeze in

a

and rub the most of the raisin pulp through as well. Add the wine and freeze. When nearly frozen whip the two whites and the powdered sugar together till thick, add them to the punch and finish It is like cream. Serve in stem glasses. freezing.

freezer,

ripest

be used, should be kept out, one cupful to be mixed

powdered sugar

Chop

kernels of half the apricots.

the fruit then with the back of a spoon, through a into the freezer along with the syrup.

strainer

Freeze like ice cream and when it is nearly finished whip the two whites to a firm froth, mix them in and turn the freezer rapidly a short time longer. Stir in the cut apricots just before serving. Canned apricots can be used as well, and if in syrup that can be

mixed

in also.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY Cumberland Ices Red cherry

ice

freezers re-

Red Cherry

Ice.

4 pints of sweet red or black cherries. 2 pints rf water. 1

5 or 6 oranges according to size. 1 lemon, juice only, if the oranges are eweet.

4 whites of e

pounds of sugar.

Msh

the fruit

97. Orange Ice. 3 pints of water. 1 pound of sugar.

quired.

94.

29

burnt almond custard shns made into a freezer and freeze as usual and beat light.

Two

with nut cream.

COOK.

raw and thoroughly

so as to break

Make

gs.

a thick syrup of the sugar and very little Peel half the oranges, divide them each in

the slones, and strain the juice through a fin strain- wa<er. Boil the cherry pulp with gome 12 or more by pulling apart by the natural diviser into the freezer. of the sugar and water to extract the flavor from ions and drop ihe pieces of orange in the boiling Grate the yellow zest of the other 3 oranthe kernels, and mash that also through the strain, syrup.

ndd the other pint of water and the sugar and ges into a bowl and squeeze in the juice, then pour Use no egg whites and only beat the ice the syrup from the scalded orange slice? a^so into the bowl through a strainer and keep the pieces on make it even and smooth. to enough ice to be mixed in at the last. Add the water and 95. Hickory Nut Ice Cream. 1 pound of either pecan or hickory nut kernels. lemon jr.ice to the orange syrup in the bowl, strain and freeze. Beat in the whipped whites as usual 12 ounces of sugar. er,

freeze.

and when finished stir in the sugared fruit. quart of rich milk or cream. This ice is cream-white, tinged with the orange burnt sugar coloring. Pick over the kernels carefully that there be no ze t and juice. Use the burnt almond cream for the outside and fragments of shells to make the cream gritty, then 1

1 tablespoonful of

pound them

in a mortar with part of the sugar

a few spoonfuls of milk or other fluid. can be pounded eflectually at a time.

and

Mix

the milk

with the pulp thus obtained, the rest of the sugar and caramel coloring enough to make it like coffee

and cream, and run

it

fill

with the orange

ice.

Only a few

through a strainer

into

freezer.

Chocolate Ice Cream

98.

Use only 3 or 4 ounces of the common unsweete

the en ed chocolate to a gallon of cream or boiled custard. Chocolate cream is generally too strongly flavored for the majority. The foreign vanilla chocolate

it as usual and beat smooth with the pads about ha f sugar and more of course can be used. then pack down with more ice to freeze firm. Line the moulds with the cherry ice and fill the Boil the chocolate in some milk with sugar added, middle with the cream, or, dish the ice as a bord- strain it into the cream and flavor with vanilla be*

Freeze

1

dle,

er in shallow glasses with

the cream piled

center.

Beat the ice cream to make it bright and in the sides. Melted chocolate cannot be mixed at rich colored. once in cold cream, as it sets and makes trouble, must be considerably diluted first.

Cape May Ices. Burnt almond ice-cream and orange

96. Take

1

Almond

pound

ice.

09.

it

Coffee Ice Cream.

Bisque.

of sugar.

Make with pure sweet cream only, and 1 pint of very strong clear coffee to 3 quarts. Sugar as usuBlanch the almonds, split them and put them in al 8 ounces to a quart. The best coffee for this a slack oven to dry and acquire a light yellow col- purpose is made by steeping coarsely ground coffee Put the sugar in a kettle on the fire without in cold water over night and not boiling it at all. or. water and stir it till it is all melted and of the Hot coffee from the urn will answer if taken when 12 ounces cf sweet almonds.

2 ounces of bitter almonds.

any

color of go'den syrup or light molasses. Then put fresh in the hot almonds, stir gently to mix, and pour the

candy on

When

to a large platter.

cold

pound the candy quite

to 3 pints of rich milk, set

boils

it

on the

add the beaten yolks of 10

fine,

fire

eggs.

put

it

in-

and when Strain

it

made and

not inky.

Curacoa and Maraschino Ice Creams. 100. For combinations with strawberry and pineapple Use a cupful of curacoa to 3 quarts of cream

the ices.


THE AMERICAN PASTBY COOK.

30 or custard.

Color the cream cafe-au-lait with 2 oun-

ces of sugar burnt to the color of golden syrup and then dissolved in milk. Beat the ice cream to make

Use the same proportion of marait gold color. schino in pure cream and beat the ice cream to whiteness,

Strawberry

3 pints of water. Cover the strawberries

a boiling syrup of the sugar and 1 quart of water and throw in the pieces of pineapple previously crt in large dice. Let boil a few minutes and then

Ice.

strain the flavored

with the sugar and

let

form a thick red syrup Pick out a few of the berries to be mixed in the ice

them remain some time

to

the rest through a strainer into the Freeze and add the water.

freezer with the syrup

without

2 quarts of water. 6 or 8 whites of egga.

Make

red ripe and sweet.

2 quarts of strawberries 2 pounds of sugar.

Rub

Pineapple loe.

Strain the juice from the cans into the freezer.

101.

at last.

1O5.

2 cans of pineapple. 2 pounds of sugar.

much

beating

if

a crimson ice

is

syrup aleo into the freezer.

Add

the other quart of water and freeze. Strew some sugar over the pieces of pineapple and set them on ice.

When

the syrup is nearly fiozen add some red fruit or coloring to make it rose p'nk, and the whipped whites, beat and freeze again. Throw the juice

pieces of pineapple on top, cover

main wanted, and

till

down and

time to serve, then mix them

let

re-

in.

add coloring if necessary. Throw the reserved berThe canned pineapple is generally riper and ries on top of the strawberry ice in the freezer and sweeter than the fresh fruit that is sent to Northern mix them in when the ice is to be served. markets.

Currant

When

the latter

is

used

it

should be cut

up, have hot syrup poured over and allowed to steep till cold. Two cans contain about 1 pounds of

Ice.

Make currant water ice the same as the strawber- pineapple. The juice of 1 or 2 lem ns is sometimes added to a pineapple ice when the fruit is very ry ice preceding, except that no whole fruit need be saved out. Cooked or canned currants are not sweet. and of poor color, and only the best and ripest of the fresh fruit should b

suitable, being too gelatinous

for this purpose.

The most luscious cur-

employed rants do not grow in America.

103. The ficial

n

hotel pastry cook has very little need of artiThe rich colors of the various fruits

coloring.

their season

may

be preserved with but slight

Pineapple Water Ice or Sherbet. The same proportions as the preceding receipt Chop the pineapple small, scald it in the boiling syrup, then pound it through a strainer with the syrup and remaining quirt of water into a freezer. Freeze, add 4 whites of egga and beat it perfectly white.

by taking the surp'us ju<ces and boiling them with plenty of sugar, often in the same kettle 107. Pineapple Ice Cream. the fruit was cooked in for pie ', and straining the Make the same as directed in the preceding resyrup into bottles. Such syrups will keep a long time and while the writer is well aware that any ceipt wi<h 2 quarts of rich cream instead of water, elaborate process of the sort would never be put in and use no eggs. Pineapple syrup or pulp poured The cream practice in hotel work, he can recommend the in'o cream will immediately curdle it. seizing upon such things as come to hand this way must be nearly frozen first and then the pineapple as positive labor-saving expedients. A bottle of added to it and the freezing finished. strawberry or raspberry syrup put away at an odd time comes splendidly in place to mix with a freezer Frozen Cocoanut Custard or Cocoanut of cream in the winter or spring. Ice Cream. 108.

^rouble

1O4. Strawberry Ice Cream. 2 quarts of strawberries 2 pounds of sugar.

red ripe and sweet.

3 quarts of milk. 18 ounces of sugar.

15 yolks of eggs.

1 pound of desiccated cocoanut the sugared kind 2 quarts of cream. free from oil and rancidity is best. Cover the fruit with the sugar and mash them Make the cus'ard as usual and stir in the cocoa. together and rub the fruit aad syrup through a nut while it is still warm after straining. Freeze and A little lemon or orange flavoring seive into a bowl, adding a cupful of water to the beat as usual.

pulp at last. Half freeze the cream by

can be added. itself

and then add the

strawberry syrup and finish the freezing as usual.

The ordinary ice cream or starch custard can be used the same way as well*


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Concord Grape

1O0.

A

Ice.

reddish purple, useful for combinations and for

Neapolitan or tri-co'ored ices. 4 ounces of ripe Concord grapes 1 pound of sugar.

31

the bill of fare, and the young ladies said, oh, dear! But the brig dier general siid he had half a mind to try it and tee what frozen pudding wa', and the old lady said he needn't be a bit afraid for everyhing they made there was good. But while they were talking the judge, who was wanted at the

a cupful.

courth.-use a*ain, v had

1 quait of wafer. Juice of one lemon.

had

l;is

brought

and he

in,

spoke up and naid thfy couldn't fool him, it was ice Mis-h the grappa and sugar together raw, add the cream. Then the young ladies said again how very, lemon juice and water, strain into a freez r with very ridiculous, and they might brirg them a little,

The ice please. And it ended badiy, for through this unthe pulp obtainable, and freeze at once. becomes lighter colored the more it is beitea. The wonted advertising of the article it gave out and lemon juice he'ps to brighten it. The grapes should there was not over half enough to go round. But, all

not be scalded or cooked.

begging the judges pardon,

now what was

Wild Plum

11O.

in its turn as pineapple or

pound of sugar. quart of water.

cream,

Frozen Tapioca Custard.

3 quarts of milk.

20 ounces of

sujrar.

6 or 7 ounces of tapioca 2 ounces of butter.

yellow.

1

ice

The

lemon

plums must not be cooked, however. 1 pound of wi'd plums ripe and sweet, red or 1

was not

Ice. .

As good

it

it ?

12 yolks or 8 whole eggs.

Flavoring. 4 whites of eggs. 1 cupful of thick cream to whip in at last. Mash the plums and sugar together in a bright The pearl tapioca is the most suitable. If the and and rub the add the wafer pyrup pulp pan, large grained sort is used crush it on tli.e table with through a strainer into a freezer. Freeze, add the the rolling-pin and then sift away the dust. It makes the whipped whites and beat up as usual.

a cream- white boiled red

that

ice,

may

be colored with a

little

plum syrup or otherwise.

Wild plum ice cream of sweet pliwms may also be m<ule by the directions given for pineapple ice

The

cream.

flavor is very good.

111. The cook wanted

He knew

it

make a

tapioca custard ice on the bill of fare both' red

was good, for sometime ? the tapioca cup-custard had become half frozen where it was set in ice to get cold, and it was extremely rich. He knew there was such a thing as iced pudding, but then

it

cook for 15 minutes.

and when nearly finished add the cup of cream whipped to a froth, and beat well.

Frozen Bice Custard.

1

it

Same

and cook

three-fourths of the year,

days, and the repeti'ions she; bet became extremely

on the

tiresome.

So he con-

If

May

made with

be

rice

through a colander.

Steep the sago i* cook in a few minutes.

as the tapioca custard. first

115.

it

will then

Apple

Ice.

bill

a sort of habit, and to have left out the ices would have seemed as strange as to have left out coffee or bread. And when the young colonel, who was al

remarked sig n'ficantly that if there was one thing he did love it was ice cream, and if there was one thing he did despise it was cold pudding, everybody looked at

ways ready

Same

it

6 ounces of rice in

in the milk.

Frozen Scgo Custard.

114.

and two kinds on Sun. cold milk cf ice cream and lemon

of fare frozen tapioca pudding. But the people who ate the dinners were not tired of ices, and the eating of them had become it

it

flavored with stick cinnamon.

might be taken to mean only pudding cooked pass and besides iced pudding should previously

be of two parts, cream and fruit. This was at a Sulphur Springs down in a warm State where they had ices of some port for dinner every day during

Wash

as the preceding.

several waters

iced over like cake,

cluded to put

Stir in the butter, then the

beaten yolks and take the custard immediately off the fire, cool, flavor with vanilla or lemon, and freeze like ice cream,

to

but the appearance of

him

Steep the tapioca 2 hours in a quart of milk cold, but set it in a warm place. Boil the rest of the milk with the sugar in it, then add the steeped tapioca,

to penetrate a witicism,

To be served

in combination with a frozen custard

such as the preceding three. 20 ounces of cored and sliced apples. 12 ounces of sugar. 1 1

quart of water. lemon.

for this pu^p-se only ripe and sweet apples. a boiling syrup of the sugar and a cupful of water and throw in the apple quarters or slices and

Use

Make


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

32

COOK.

simmer slowly til; tub with a table oloth and leave them to freeze. In Strain out the from 15 to 30 minutes the glasses or moulds will dene without stirring or breaking ap pics and set them on ice. Add the balance of the have a coaling of ice inside perhaps an eight h-of-anthe lemon -ccver with a lid and

water

Tliis

syrup and freeze it wiihout much beatthrow in the apples and finish the freezing.

inch

to the

ing, then

makes

The apples should not be

a whitish ice.

thick.

The unfrozen syup shorld then be

poured out and the glasses returned to th^ freezing mixture for the inside c ating of ice to freeze per-

The freezing mav be fectly dry and crystalized. hastened by gently stirring the freezing mixture among the tumblers with a stick and by turning the

frozen very hard.

Frozen Compotes of Pears and Oracges.

For the same purposes as the apples preceding, tumblers with the fingers. When it is time to serve wipe the outside of the can be prepared in the game way. The object if or mold with a cloth dipped in tepid water stewing the fruit in thick eyrup is to prevent it from glass and turn out the shell of ice. Fill it with a curacao of The out then can be dilushape. syrup breaking or caramel or nut ice cream or any tther of differtei as desired.

The quantities

ent color from the cup itself, or with a puie froth d cream swee'ened and flavored and frozen in the same

in all these receipts are calculated

for the average or probable orders of

50

j

ersons

ice

having a varied bill of fare to cboose fiom. When two ices are to be served in combination the quan. lities of each of 'course are reduced in proportion

A

set in

a aorbetiere

miy be made with the green pyrup of pounded muscatel grapes, with Concord Observe that the less sugar grapes, cherries, etc.

liberal rule is to provide a quart before freezing

these syrups contain the easier the cup shapes will be to freeze and the slower to dissolve. They last longer

10 persons, and the freezing process should increase its volume considerably. for every

on the table than the

Lemon Ice.

lit.

cup

Different colored cups

ice

creams they are

filled with.

cream in shape of eggs : A small number party table can be made without moulds by using egg shells of the largest sort. Procure some broad rubber bands from the stationers, euch as are Ice

for a

8 lemons. 3 pounds of sugar. 3 quarts of water.

used for binding bundles of letter, etc and half an inch in breadth Emp'y the eggshel's by making a hole at each end. Fill them with ice cream, soft and a in the Make of the squeeze juice. boiling syrup Draw the rubber bands over just freshly frozen. sugar and half the water and pour it hot to the them so as to close the holes, brush over with melted lemon zest and juice and let remain so till cold. 8 whites of eggs.

,

Grate the rinds of the lemons into a bowl aid

Then add the

rest of the water, strain the

into a fieezer, freeze as usual,

and

at last

butter besides to close a'l crevices against the salt,

lemonade them drop them in the freezing tub and cover with add the the finely pounded ice and salt.

whites whipped to a firm froth, beat and freeze ogain scalding draws the flavor of the lemon; ii should

The

110.

A more elaborate form of the foreand fewer lemons shou'd Fill the shells with a white ice The ice is perfectly going egg shapes. cream only partly frozen and fluid, close with the rubber bands and butter and immerse them in the

never, however, be boiled

Surprise ices

:

be used when they are large. white.

118.

freezing mixture about

Saratoga Ice Cups.

cream

to

form

inside.

15 minutes for a shell of

Then wash

off

the outside,

For the following very easy method of serving remove the bands, pour or scoop out the cream that remains unfrozen in the middle, and place the shells a sufn there should be ices ornamentally

provided

in a freezer well

of tin drinking cups made like ta)l tumbler glasses, to serve as molds. They need have cient

number

no rimmed

them of.

edge.

better tha

Their

gl saes

slight flexibility

will

ice

and

ealt to freeze

dry

crystalized, as already directed for ice cups. After that fill with chocolate ice. cream or yellow

makes

frozen custard.

o get the shell of ice out

The ccmmonest thin tumblers

packed in

and

answer how

The variations are

endless.

13O. Biscuit Ices or Ice Cakes.

ever.

BISCUITS QLACES. Take 4 dozen tumblers and set them in a freezing extra sweet and rich, in little paper cases and fine unded mixture of ice p well Ices, extremely mixed with salt and a little brine from the freezing made to imitate cakes, sometimes with a brown crust The freezing mixture may be in a common on top as if baked. Very handsome little rice paper tub. washtub, or wooden bos, and no deeper than the cases can now be procured for this and similar pur. Fill them with any kind of ice or with a Fill the glasses with thin strawberry, poses. tumblers. pineipple or lemon syrup, or with any of the prep- number of different varieties. There is no rule as j

arations for fruit ices.

Cover over the top of the

to

kinds but nut creams, caramel, chocolate and


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

that

by a method allowed by good taste. We have nvenfed dishes fo attractive that they unceasingly renew the appetite yet they are at the same time

over to give the brown appearance, then place the ice biscuits in a freezing box to remain till time to

so light that they flatter the palate without loading he stomach. We have arrived at such a point, that

strawberry ice creams, and the sponge ices to be mentioned further on, are the most suitable Smooth over, roll

some macaroons

to

powder and

sift

Small quantities of ice creams, etc., for biscuits glaces and for lining a mold, can be frozen wi'hout the trouble of the regular packing of a freezer for each

;

f the calls of business did not force us to

serve.

Hnd

of ice

snd

in

and

any sort of deep tin vessel set in a tub by rapid stirring with a spoon or

from

here would be no fixed data for finding what time

might elapse between the first glass of Madeira and ,he last tumbler of punch." Gastronomy 1825.

salt,

is kept in motion with the quart in each can generally be frozen in 10 or 15 minutes,

paddle while the vessel

A

other hand.

"Although this kind of .bought hat, in

it

best to

(his

empt made Ices for biscuits glaces that are made with 1 pound pounds of sugar to a quart have a glossy ap-

or 1J

pearance when well worked

and draw from the

freezing

I

ox:

a simple and eay matter to mold that can have the I'd pu

It is

freeze ice cre,>m in a

ice is

describe

seldom served ;

I

have

it is

just possible mny see an a'-

transition period, we improve the indiffevent quali'y of

to

he refreshments now served

hen such

it

at evening parties

;

and

delicate preparations as these Iced Froths

will be in request.

They are

cool to

eat without

freezing the palate; they are perfectly whoiesome and suited to the weakest digestion." Jules Goujjfe

spoon like pulled candy.

A

re

the table, or the want of sleep interpose, the duraion of our repasts would be almost unlimited; and

1865.

and dropped into the freezing tub from 'Even if we do the same things as the ancients cream freezer has just been removed. did, we do them in a different manner." Savarin'a freezing box involving the use of a larger amount Preface.

on, be sealed

which the

A

ice

of freezirg material

some

articles.

is,

An empty

however, indispensable for ice cream freezer with the

122.

picked around and on top wish ice and salt, is an example of what is wanted. A glass of cream placed inside might be frozen solid in an hour cr

Iced Froths.

lid on,

But something more spacious can generally be improvised, such as a broid and shallow boi'er set in a tub. The article must have a lid that will ad-

MOUSSES GLACEES.

two.

mit of ice and

salt

all

being packed

over

it

without

to the contents.

danger

These ices often appear in the menus of banquet

;

served at Delmonico's

the froth is piled in variously flavored; which are then set in a freezing box where

Preface.

glasses it

is al-

without any mmipulation. Double cresm must be used that is cream skimmed from the top of cream. It should be cold to froth easily.

lowed

"Now I have lived long enough to know that each generation says the same thing, and is laughed at ft r its Savarin pains by the generation following."

They are whipped creami

to freeze

;

Sweeten and flavor it like any ice cream preparation, and churn it in a pail with a whip churn, such a*

may be procured at any tinners, or with a Dovei the froth, have adhered closely to one of the highest egg beaier in a shallow bowl; take off it on a fine seive to drain, and when all ia principles of the best cook wh'ch the present ege, or place firm pile it in the glasses it is to be frozen perhaps that of Heliogabalus hath produced. This whipped and served in. greit man, as is well known to all luvers of polite Maraschino, chocolate, coffee, strawberry, lemon eating, begins at first by setting plain things before but need to be mor his hungry guests, using afterwards by degrees, as and vanil'a creams are suitable their s omachs may be supposed to decrease, to the highly flavored than the ordinary ices. It will be found a great aid if all the operations of sauce and these

We

very quintessence spices. By inear s we doubt not but our reader may be rendered

can be performed in a cold place.

desirous to read on forever, as the great person just

above mentioned to eat ."

Fielding

"There

13

supposed Preface

have made Tom Jones

to

to

persons 1

751.

no doubt the delicacy of cur manners could not suffer the Roman practice cf using vomi toris, but

is

we have done

better,

and reach the same

For the pastry cook who makes sponge cake fre the abtruseness from two o* quently, it will remove three examples following to observe that they are flouf nearly the same as lady-finger batter before the is

added.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Vienna Glace Biscuit, or Ice Cake. 133. 1 1

pouud of sugar. sma ! cup of water 1

nearly

was 3 decil de creme doublo, trois quarts de litre de sirop a 25 dsg., 15 jaunes d'oeufs, 1 orange zeste approximately a pint of double cream, a pound of sugar and a half a pint of wa?er, 15 yolks, and <r

pint.

8 yolks of eggs. 1 pint of double cream.

2 tablespoonfuls of vanilla extract. Make a boiling syrup of the sugar and water. Beat the yol's light in a deep bowl, pour the boiling syrthe bowl set up to them and continue beating, with

ange flavor,concocted together by the Italian method, i. e. the boiling syrup poured <o the yolks, and the mixture beaten up like sponge cake batter, the

whipped cream incorporated with product frozen quickly.

Whip other,

till

the mixture

and add the

flavoring.

is

Sift

:

;

let

biscuits in the freezing case for 2 or 3 hours.

to rest

bids

and no bottom instead

common

and French

in Italian

syrups of varying density instead cookery of sugar in making numerous other articles, as well of using

is a remnant especial varieties of cakes, of ancient times, for the Ita-iaas and the French

as

of box.like

with one lid

;

the rim of the lids have thick wire soldered on

much so

li^ht

Neapolitan molds These are in the form of a cigar box or briok can be made much longer if desired. powdered maca- If ordered from a tinner have (hern made wiih two

roon over the rice paper cases, nearly fill them with the preparation, powder over the tops and set the

The practice

and the

135.

cold and very light. the cream to froth and lightly mix it with the

in ice water,

it,

upon another wire soldered on the box

the same as ice cream freezer lids are made.

Neapolitan is the English word, Napolitaine is the French. These are among the words that break us all

up with our

bills

of fare.

their

136. Neapolitan Ices or Ice Cream.

cooks long before the art of making dry Th*y used syrups crystalized sugar wai kaown.

were

fine

Prepare three ice creams, or creams and fruit ices and honey,and the handicraft transmitted from father or spocge ices, of different colors and flavors, and fill the mold (already made freezing cold) with them to son has not been wholly revolutionized by the in equal layers. This is best done by filling one newer product. of the lids higher than iis rim and leveling it off, Spongada, Fromagre Glace, or Sponge then pushing the mold down into it and then adding the other two layers as evenly as possible. Ice. Put on 134. the top lid, draw half a dozen rubber bands around Sort of frozen " Tom and Jerry "needs no milk each mold to keep the lids in place, fill the interor cream. stices with butter and then place the molds in the 24 yolks of eggs. freezing tub and cover them with pounded iceand salt. Let them remain 2 or 3 hours to harden.

6 whites of eggs. 2 pounds of sugar. 1 pint of water.

1 pint of kirschenwasser, or half as

chino, curacoa, or a

little

Some

re-

gard should be had to the compatibility of flavors chosen as, for instance, lemon and chocolate do not

much maras-

peach brandy.

and cinnamon and and an almond flavored caramel cream is with red grape and white cherry ices.

taste well together, but chocolate

vanil a do,

Make a boiling syrup of the sugar and wa'er and suitable pour it to the yolks previously beaten light. Beat the Ices are said to have been introduced into France mixture till cool, pour it into a freezer and con'ioue from Italy by Catherine de Medici. the wire the freezer egg whisk, turning beating with with the other hand, till it is pretty well frozen, Italian Fruit Ice Cream or Iced Plum then add the liqueur a little at a time, and then

13T.

the whites of eggs whipped firm. It looks like a very spongy cake. Can be be put in paper cases large or small, or filled in a frozen charlotte.

Pudding.

TUTTI FRUTT&

Make

a quart, of rich yolk-of-egg custard, color it cafe-au-latt with two ounces of sugar burnt to molas-

Another variety of the foregoing may be made by ses color and dissolved in milk, flavor with a quarter quarts of syrup with chocolate dissolved pint of curacoa, strain, freeze and b?at up thoroughly. in it, and when nearly finished add 12 whites of eggs Fill a quart measure with a mixture of different

freezing 2

whipped

light,

The receipt

and beating

all together.

for glace a la crems Napolitaine origi-

nally promulgated by M. M. Bernard and UrbainDubois from the royal palace at Vienna, perhaps thirty years ago, had no reference to the brick shape of tri-colored ices of the present fashion. It

some

kinds of sugared fruits, candied dates, preserved wa'er melon rind, candiei citron, seedless raisins previously steeped in a liqueur, figs cut in pieces,

some blanched almonds or anything; of the

sort that

Mix these fruits with the frozen custard and pack down with ice and salt to remain while is

good.

you prepare the molds.


THE AMEBICAN PASTRY COOK.

ai?d smooth, Ihen

up white

spread

it

it

1 quart of port or

evenly over the

1

Imbed insides of 2 or 3 melon molds to coat them. ihe molds in the freezing mixture and when the coating of orange

frozen firm

fill

up with the

6 oranges juice only. 8 ounces of blanched almonds.

ice also on top, put on secure with a number of rubber bands,

lids,

close all spaces securely with butter

8 ounces of musca'el grapes.

and place the

4 ounces of

molds in the freezing mixture to remain 2 or 3 hours. When to be served wash the outsides with a cloth dipped in tepid water, carefully turn out the tutti on

to

it

can be served individually in

Or

same as Neapolitan

slices the

ices.

cut small.

Cloves and cinnamon, and little coloring. Make a hot syrup of the sugar and water and

pour

serve.

figs

4 ounces of seedless raisins. 8 whites of eggs.

a folded napkin on a dish, lay a decoration of gelatine paste upon the white surface and

frutti

any sweet wine,

quart of water.

2 pounds of sugar. 2 lemons juice only.

tutti

Spread the orange

frut'i.

the

ice is

Turkish Sherbet.

130.

also 2 quarts of orange ice in another freezer,

Make

add the white of eggs in the usual manner and beat

over the raisins and

it

figs

and 6

cloves

and a

small piece of cinnamon in a b >wl. When cool co'or pink, add the orange and lemon juice and wine, Take out strain, and freeze it in the usual manner.

cream molds, except the half melon the fipices and add the scalded raisins and figs and because the pressure the grapes and almonds to the sherbet at last. shape, require a lid at each end of air renders it difficult to withdraw the icei from Collet, a French captain and refugee, made a small a tall shape tightly soldered at the top. fortune in New York about the year 1816 by making ices and sherbets. Says the Chronicler: "The women Gelatine Paste for Ornamenting Ices Nearly

all ice

Make it

manner, then reduce more than half, color it as again, flavor, and cool it on large plat-

clear jelly in the usual

by slow boiling

desired, filter

etc

to little

S'amp out leaves, fern leaves, flower shapes, and have them ready to place on the molded

ters. ,

particular, never

in

138.

ices as soon as they are

turned out.

beverage of sweet fruit juice mixed with water and cooled with a handful of mountain snow, it has

come

to stand for

anything from flavored sugar and

water and lemonade to frozen champagne punch.

199.

London Sherbet.

If sherbets

4

any sweet kind.

ranges. 2 lemons. i

8 ounces of sultana seedless raisins. 8 whites of eggs.

have any distinguishing feature in it is the admixture of jelly,

Mention has already been made of

gela-

Either gelatine dissolved or fin. ished table jelly can be added at option to the sherbets preceding, but in that case leave out the whites tine in ice cream.

of eggs

which are the substitute

for calf's foot jrliy.

According the lexicographers the word punch is derived from East Indian pantsh, five, having reference to the five ingredients of punch water, spirit,

punch

port or 2 pounds of sugar.

pleasure, be-

either calf's foot or gelatine, recommended by some to give smoothness to the drink and substance to

sugar, lemons

3 pints of water. 1 pints of wine

new

their composition at all

the ice

There are few terms of more uncertain meaning than the word sherbet. At first perhaps a simple

tired of this

ing especially astonished that they could be kept so cold at a summer heat of ninety degrees."

to

and

tea.

But that

is

the old-fashioned

be drunk hot.

131* Roman punch is lemonade with rum

and good and whipped whites of egg, and frozen. But almost every one adds to if, orange juice, wine or brandy or maraschino and sometimes spices and flavors. These are not essenessentially a strong

in

it

Nutnipg.

Red fruit juice or other coloring. a syrup of the sugar and water and pour it hot upon the oranges and lemons all cut up in a

tial

Make

results

bowl, and the raisins and half a nutmeg with them. When cool strain the syrup into a freezer, add the

about as the composition of Roman punch. Ag in, the caterers who have had the privilege of setting

ingredients but only individual fancies, but it that there is nothing that cooks in hotels

have to make that there

are

such various ideas

to make it pink, and freeze and the fashions mate other punches "a 1* Romaic*," up with the whites of eggs as usual. Add the which are not Roman punch but are made in he fruit slices at last and mix them in without break- same manner with white of egg", or Italian mering. Only good thin-skinned fruit can be used this ingue, (which is boiled icing and acts the same as

wine and coloring beat

way.

'

Exclude the seeds

lest the

sherbet be bitter.

the whites)

and

frozen.

Rum

punch becomes Ro-


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

36

man punch by

being put through the process just

The places where Roman punch, or

mentioned.

something that passes for it is served wilh the des. sert in place of ice cream are far more numerous than where trees

it is

served as a course between the en

and the game.

Roman

132.

Punch.

beat up.

Strawberry Punch.

135.

Imperial Punch.

13G.

3 or 4 oranges juice of 8 whites of eggs.

all, zest

of

2 pounds of sugar.

1.

3 pints of water.

Half pint of Jamaica rum. Half pint of angelica or other sweet wine. Grate the rinds of 3 or 4 of the lemons and their size

to

and water and juice of fruita to add the whipped whites and

of 3.

-juice of all, zest

2 oranges, according

the sugar

Prepare strawberry syrup as directed for strawberry ice and add to it a pint of sweet wine and Color bright rose. freeze.

2 pounds of sugar. 3 pints of water. 6 or 6 lemons

Mix

gether, strain, freeze,

and

a bowl and squeeze in the juice of

1 ripe pineapple.

1 or

ripeness, into without the

all

4 oranges juice of 4 lemons juice of 1 nutmeg.

of 2.

all, zest all, zest

of 2.

8 whites of eggs.

1 pint of equal parts of maraschino, noyeau, a hot syrup of the sugar and a pint of seeds. and curacao. water, and when it has cooled a little pour it to the kirsch, 1 pint of champagne. Add the zests and juice, and let remain till cold. Grate or mash the pineapp^, add the zests and wine and the other two pints of water, strain into a freezer, freeze, add the whipped whites, and a juice of the lemons and oranges and pour on them few minutes before serving put in the rum and beat the hot syrup made of the sugar and water. Let Then strain and press the syrup stand till cold to mix.

Make

2. To make a more expensive quality of punch use good French white wine instead of water, except water enough to dissolve the sugar. Rub the

orange and lemon zests on lumps of sugar and the flavored syrup made with it need not be made hot.

A

larger

rum

number of lemons

is to

be needed, and the

be added at last as in the other case.

Russian Punch.

133. 1

will

quart of black tea

made

as for drinking, (1 oz.

in a quart of water.) 1 pint

of water.

1 pint of port wine.

Half pint of brandy, 1^ pounds of sugar. 3 lemons. Little

caramel

to color.

from the pineapple, freeze and add the whipped whites as usual, and a little while before serving add the liqueurs

and champagne.

13T.

Kisses.

Not dictionary kisses. Unfortunately perhaps for the succintness of the following disquisition the dietionaries describe another kind of kisses which ia some people's minds may possibly intrude and get mixed up with these. But they ought not, for it is not likely that the two varieties have any qualities These kisses that we are going to tell in common.

you how to make are soft, tender, sweet, fragile, round, plump, smooth, delicate, nice, light, and they are hollow. That is to say, they should be so if perfectly well made, but some people go on trying all On their lives and never produce a perfect kiss.

Cut the lemons in small

slices in a bowl, make a second thoughts, for fear of the idea of the dictionand water and pour over ary kiss perhaps we had better call these trifles by them and let stand till cold. Then add the tea and their Freuch names. And you may find one of them liquors and strain the punch into a freezer and if you will look in Mr. Thackeray's book, Pendenms. freeze as hard as the spirit in it will allow. Keep It must be about the middle of the first volume and the lemon slices on ice and mix them in the frozen found because the French words are in

boiling syrup of the sugar

aan easily be

punch

at

last.

Use carmel

if

134.

This should be light ale colored.

necessary.

Maraschino Punch.

italics.

Mr. P. comes

to

Clivering Hall

and he

young-one sitting on the carpet with his face smeared all over "with the species of

finds the Claveri gs' r

lather contained in the confection called meringues a

2 pounds of sugar.

la creme."

3 pints of water.

kisses filled with

2 lemons- juice only. 2 oranges 1 pint of

juice only.

maraschino.

6 whites of eggs.

That

is

one

sort.

Those are our egg

whipped cream. So of course they have to be made hollow, and few beside first rafe workmen can make them so. But there are numerous varieties of the kiss-meringue, and they that can

make them

are generally proud of their knowledge.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY plenty of people will make cake icing and drop lumps of it on pans or on paper and bake them and call them kisses or meringues hard, rough and

Now

;

COOK.

37

They can be lifted off the paper when cold. Tha boards prevent a crust forming on the bottom and the soft remainder inside can be scooped out. Fill

cracked open little lumps of sugar as they are, as directed in the next receipt. 14O. and many a country baker exhibits the same thing in his window, never seeming to know that there is Easier Meringue Puffs

An

Way.

a trick and touch beyond that, with the same mate-

makes the meringue swell and round itself mushroom, into a shell as thin as and finger macaroons of the the meringues paper n ne COB fee ionaries. There are measures and rules

rial,

that

like the top of a

when one

1 pound of granulated sugar. 8 whites of eggs.

Flavoring extract. 3 drops of acetic acid, or a pinch of tartaric. or a

lemon juice. Put half the whites in a bowl without beating, and all the sugar with them and beat together with a wooden spoon or paddle. It may save half the These are trifles of course not to be compared with labor and insures success to have all the utensils and the importance of making good bread and puddings,

and knows how.

for these,

the finest are easy enough

at ail they should yet if one makes such "pretties" have found be in the highest degree excellent. oral instructions always useless to the many who have

We

little

It quickens ingredients quite cold to begin with. the process if the beating can be done with two paddles, using both hands as regular workmen do. The

should be a deep one holding two quarts. make fine meringues. The cook-books give bowl The sugar and egg at first are as stiff as dough. hit or miss it as to leave and formula a dry may you Beat rapidly and constantly for about 15 minutes, to explain happen. Therefore we shall be particular when it should be white and rather firm cake icing. that at about is there all the trick them, belie-ving Now add the remaining 4 whites of egg, one at a any rate printed words may be quite as good as time, and beat a few minutes between each one, but refer who can actual examples for intelligent readers, before the last one is added put in the acid and if to them tried to

again

138.

necessary.

the flavoring.

The whole time of beating

Meringue Paste.

An

is

about 25 minutes.

essential point is to beat the icing after the addi-

tion of each white until

This in various forms has had to be mentioned

it

will again

draw up

in

peaks after the paddle is lifted from it, except the It is always white of egg often in these columns. last white which should not be beaten much as it and sugar, but is sometimes soft meringue as on forms the gloss and smoothness on the meringues lemon pies, and sometimes nearly all sugar as in when they are baked. cake icing and "kisses." Drop this meringue paste in egg shapes on baking pane instead of on paper as in the last receipt, and

139.

Meringues a la Creme.

these being

made with granulated sugar

powdered do not need any sugar

instead of

sifted over, they

These are made in two different ways, the first look better without. finest and smoothest glazed merBake in a very slow oven till pale straw color and ingue resembling frosted glass, but the paste must They slip from the pans easily when cold. be used immediately as it soon becomes too thin to dry. Cut out the thin bottom crusts with a penknife* keep shape. and fill the meringues with whipped cream sweet, 1 pound of powdered sugar. ened and flavored, or with wine jelly, and either 10 whites of egg*. the bottoms or join them place two together by 1 or 2 teaspoonftfs of flavoring extract. two together side by side with melted candy Have everything cold and dry to begin with. Whip or icing, like an open walnut shell, and pile wipped the white of eggs in a deep bowl with a whisk made cream or chopped jelly upon them. These mer-

makes perhaps the

bunch of wires, till it will not fall out when likewise look well singly as cups filled with turned upside down, add the sugar and flavoring all ingues of different colors and with ice creams. jellies bright at once and stir it in just enough to mix it well and no more. Have ready some strips of writing paper two inches wide and Instead of placing the meringue paste on the pans of boards to of a

pieces

bake

the

meringues

on.

(not pine)

Place

shaped on the strips of paper, not too them with a knife, sift powdered sugar shake

and

and knife it is much better to use the egg- with spoon smooth sack and tube, such as lady-fingers are made with a funnel shaped canvas bag with a tin tube in the over them,

spoonfuls close, all

the surplus, place the strips on the boards dry-bake them with the oven door partly open. off

They need

to

bake nearly or quite half an hour.

inch in diameter at pointed end, the tube about J the narrow end for these. Fill the sack with the in the size and shape desired. paste and press it out


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Rose Meringue

141.

favorites for

Puffs.

of

Hiving made the meringue paste according

to the

preceding directions, color it, or a part of it, of a delicate pink and flavor with rose extract. Drop

desiccated

the cake baskets.

cocoanut

Care should be taken to have the icing well made a d

firm before adding

it,

for

rightly baked.

Let the macaroons re.

145. Almond Rings and Fingers.

panful of any of these varieties put into the range will run together and melt and come out worthless, and the next come out

Sometimes the

no additions of flour or

starch will do any good if the icing is incMned to run in the first place. And too much care cannot

with the sack and tube pieces like large marbles on baking pans previously greased and then wiped dry, be taken with the baking. and bake slowly without color. These rise rounded main on the pans till cold. and nearly hollow and have a gauzy appearance

when

The sugared kind

the beet to use.

is

first

perfect meringues, or one side of a pan will be This shows that spoiled and the remainder good. the baking is the critical part of the making, and that is what we never can teach by word of mouth.

Make the same as the preceding with 8 ounces of blanched almonds minced very small. Put a smaller tube in the forcing sack, and form finger shapes and rings of the almond meringue paste on baking pans, and bake them in a very slack oven. These all bake light and nearly hollow and have a fine glazed surface.

At a certain gentle heat the egg in the meringues cooks and dries in shape, but at a higher degree the The foregoing varieties, which can all be made A.t an sugar melts and runs to candy in bubbles. out of one large bowl of meringue paste, form a handinsufficient degree of heat the meringue dries as it some assortment for the cake stands, to build pyrawould in the sun and does not swell and change its mids, to place around glass bowls of fruit, to decoappearance. In the brick oven after the bread has rate cakes and to fill icing or nougat baskets with. been withdrawn is the proper place to bake mer-

.

Chocolate Meringue Puffs.

12 ounces of almonds.

nothing of the kind choicer or more Only a slight change in the fragile than these.

There

is

ingredients from the foregoing varieties. 1 pound of granulated sugar. 6 whites of eggs. 3 ounces of grated

common

chocolate

a heaping

2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla extract. Beat up the icing as directed for meringue puffs, using 6 whites instead of 8, and when it is finished in the chocolate thoroughly.

tions with

bake

a very gentle heat

at

like a

the sack and tube on

mushroom, and nearly hollow.

They

slip

from the pans ea-ily when cold.

Puffs.

Take some of the white icing as made

for

mer-

ingue puffs, drop round portions like large marbles o-i baking pans and stick 5 or 6 halves of almonds (hat have been blanched and split, in each one, in circular order,

144. Make the

and bake

salt.

carefully.

Oocoanut Macaroons.

white iMng or meringue paste as directed for meringue puffs and add to it when finished 8

off the skins,

with a rolling-pin upon the table. Mix them and the sugar and flour together in a bowl. Drop the eggs in the middle and mix the whole into a rather soft dough. Place in lumps size of cherries on

baking pans very slightly greased. Bake in a slack oven light brown. A few bitter almonds or peach kernels mixed in improves them.

Drop round por- 147.

baking pans and These rise rounded

143. Almond Meringue

8 ounces of granulated sugar.

4 ounces of flour. 4 eggs. Pinch of

Crush the almonds without taking

cupful 3 drops of acetic acid.

mix

Common Macaroons.

14G.

ingues.

Meringue Cakes

in General.

Make white iciog or meringue paste according to directions in preceding articles and add two more whites to thin it Color some of it and leave some white. Spread it over sheets of any eort of cake, or on small cakes and bake in a very slack oven with something under the cakes to keep them from too much baking at bottom. Granulated sugar may be sifted over the top before baking, or colored sugar

sand on the white.

148. About Eggs and Egg Beating. One

of the very first cook-books I ever picked up the reader not to stop beating the eggs

cautioned

that were once commenced, because they would go ounces of desiccated cocoanut. Drop pieces size of down "and no human power can whip them up walnu s v.ith a spoon and knife point, on greased light again." The statement is altogether erroneous baking pans and bake in a very slack oven. These and a very mischievous one for the class of learners


THE AMERICAN PASTRY who it

are always seeking excuses for bad work.

went on

to say,

Ar.d

COOK.

almonds in the white macaroons may be doubled

;

"and sometimes they cannot be meringues baked on boards may be made extremely

In that case email, placed two together with a spot of apricot whipped to perfect lightne-s at all lam inclosed some may be dredged while still moist you should procure some fresher eggs," etc. Hotel work admi's of no apologies, and when the before baking with chopped pistachio nurs, etc., etc. steward and coolis plan the dinner thry cannot affoH These things are not needed by name to vary the hotel bill of fare as some other things that we have to rn.-t.Ve the appearance of a dish contingent upon the caprice of a dozen of eggs, whether they wiil o do with are, but are always bunched together as ;

to come up light or not. assorted cakes, email cakes or cakes and confection. The ease or difflcu'ty cf beating up eggs, mrringne, cries. The following summary will have meaning icing, pponge cake snd the rest depends upon the for those who may have essayed the making of degree of density or viscidity rf the pg^s rr the white meringues a la creme, or macaroons, and failed. 1 pound of sugar and 4 whites of eggs beaten of eggs, and that often depends upon the temperaabout an hour makes a ture; they are thicker when c Id, and when vrarm with a paddle till light the white of eggs sometimes becomes so thin as to stiff cake icing and bakes hard and solid in the shape have no more power t hold the air bubbles beaten it is dropped on the pan. 1 pound of sugar and 6 hites makes soft or finishing icing, and bakes in into it than so much water. me that are partly hollow but still dry and had worked with a man who winter last meringues Only was boarding at a small hotel and happened in the hard, rattling together like walnuts. 1 pound and bar room when some men who couldn't were try- 8 whites makes the thin and fragile meringue we ing to beat up the eggs for the ChrMrais egg nogg. have described and the finer qualities of macaroons, Tfapy had the eggs in a tin pail and eat by the stove and when the paste beats up easily, as is the case taking spells with each other and beating for all when the conditions are right, another white may be that was out, without the least sign of success. As added with advantage. For twelve whites to a pound whip the whites with soon as the man saw what was the matter he took the pail, went outside and set it on the snow, and a wire egg whisk at first. The acetic acid should be added to the icing only in ten minu<es h d succeeded in converting the eggs into a paiiful of foam, and the men who couldo't when it is nearly finished. Its effect in whitening and stiffening the icing will be seen at once. allowed that it was a little trick worth knowing. The common trouble in making icing or meringue Sometimes the eggs can be beaten up quite as easily when warm, but tint is when they have lost paste is its tendency to run out of shape and drip off

choose

>

part of the wa-er they contain by evaporation, as phell wiU do in dry weather, and thus become as thick as if made cold.

even epgs in the

149.

Dried Eggs.

the cakes covered with

it.

This cannot be remedied

by the addition of more sugar, which indeed Ofily increases the trouble, but must be prevented by care in the beginning, by having the ingredients cold and not damp and by using enough sugar to the eggs at

starting to make a stiff dough that can hardly be White of eggs poured thinly on platters soon stirred, but will get thinner as the sugar dissolves, evaporates and becomes a powder like pulverized and the beating done must be rapid beating, not This is easily soluble, even to the touch of a glass. Granulated sugar can be made into stirring around. moist finger, can be kept a long time dry and then meringues or icing with more ease and certainty If the dissolved in water and used as well as fresh. than powdered sugar. powder obtained from two cups of white of eggs be dissolved in only one cup of water it can be beaten The annexed are candies but match well the merto ftoth for icing, etc., in a minute or two whether ingues and macaroons, with the drawback, however, warm or cold. That is the result of condensation of being solid sugar and costlier, for their size than The yolks of eggs dried alone are not soluble bu t the articles of their list. These caramels sell well in the entire egg beaten together and dried slowly in the shops.

w*ter, and mors rapid iy if

mixed with sugar before

Ooooanut Caramels, White and Bed.

drying.

15O. The varieties of macaroons "kisses" and meringues that might be given would fill several columns, but there is no need Scores of things of this class with imposing names are but the variations played

upon the foundation of a few simple and well known combinations.

Any

one

who has made

few varieties we have described can

new changes

for himself.

perfectly the easily discover

1 pound of granulated sugar. 8 ounces of desiccated cocoanut.

A small half

cupful of water.

Coloring. Set the sugar

and water over the

fire

in a small

bright kettle and boil about 5 minu'es, or till the pyrup bubbles up thick and ropes from the spoon,

The proportion of minced and do not

stir

it.

Then put in the oocoanut,

stir to


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. mix, and begin at once and drop the candy by table spoonfuls on a buttered baking pan. Reserve a few

To form the lady.fingers put some of the batter having a tin tube in it from a spoonfuls, make it hot again and color with cochineal quarter to half an inch in diameter, and force it out and thin with a spoonful of water. Drop a spot of in finger lengths on sheets of blank paper, with an Should the inch of space between each one Sift powdered the red on each of the white caramels. candy become set in the kettle before all is used it sugar plentifully all over them. Take hold of two may be dissolved by adding a spoonful of water and corners of the sheet of paper (which may be of half When fresh grated newspaper size) and shake off the surplus sugar on setting it on the range again. cocoanut ia used the sugar needs to be boiled to the to the table, and lay the sheet of cakes on a baking pan placed readyt Bake 8 or 10 minutes in a modcandy point, or 3 or 4 minutes longer. erate oven, allowing the cakes to become no more The yolk of an egg may be mixed with a portion of the candy instead

of red coloring as above to

into the forcing sack

than deep straw color.

To get the lady-fingers off the paper it is necessary cakes downwards, on a table and another variety. brush the paper over with water. The cakes will 153. We set out white cakes, fruit cakes, pound and then peel off. Place them two together. The moisture will cause them to adhere. yeast raised cakes, but if we may judge by the cri 154. terion of the quantity used where people have free Assorted Italian Cakes Six Ways. and the cake numerous varieties choice, sponge 1. Sponge drops: Proceed as for lady-fingers and from the same mixture, all made without butter, drop the batter on paper in round shape, large or

make a yellow

color,

and melted chocolate added

for

to lay the sheet,

--

hold the first place as favorites. Italian cakes general term for the class ; diet- bread cake fanciful

name

is

the

is

the

for sponge cake sometimes found in

small; according to fancy. 2.

Place

fiat

sponge drops by twos together with

lemon or orange paste. The loaf cakes of this sort' 3. Have ready a lot of sponge drops. Make two whether large or small, are not so good when stale, or more colors and flavors of boiled icing or glaze, and in some large confectionaries having reputations for making which have already been to keep up, it is made a rule never to sell any over (directions and dip the bottom of each cake, holding it given,) a day old over the counter, but such stock is disposed on a fork, then set the cakes on baking pans to dry. of at a reduced rate to small dealers. 4. Instead of dipping the bottoms let the tops of The good quality of all these varieties depends the sponge drops receive the icing, and when dry the same observed as in (he precautions being upon place them by twos together of different colors of case of meringues and macaroons, just fully ex. glaze with yellow orange paste or conserve between old-time cook* books.

plained in the preceding columns.

them.

153.

Lady Fingers or Naples Biscuits. 8 ounces of powdered sugar. Quarter cupful of water J gill. 9 eggs. 10 ounces of

5. Have some finely minced almonds, pistachios, hickory nuts, or desiccated cocoanut ready and mix with the batter after the manner of macaroons and

dredge granulated sugar over the cakes instead of

powdered before baking.

flour.

Separate the eggs, the whites from the yolks, and set the whites on ice in a large bowl. Have the flour also in a cold place.

Put the sugar and water in a deep bright saucepan fire, add the yolks of the eggs and beat with a wire egg whisk till the mixfure is warm but over the

not hot

jelly spread between, or

5 minutes.

Then

set the

6.

Instead of mixing the minced almonds in the

batter mingle powdered sugar with it and dredge over the moist tops of the cakes before baking.

it

Small Savoy Cakes or Savoy Biscuits. Make

the

same

lady-fingers and either in small paper

batter as for

flavor it with vanilla.

Bake

it

saucepan in a

cases made 01 writing paper, or in jem or patty pans pan of cold water, and continue beating 15 minutes fastened together by the dozen. Prepare the cases more till the mixture is become cold, thick and or pans by brushing them over with clear melted whitish and twice its original bulk. Whip the whites butter and shaking powdered sugar about in them to a firm froth that will not fall out of the bowl up- instead of flour as with other cake?, and sift powdside down, and mix them lightly with the other and ered sugar over the tops of the cakes before baking. then stir in the flour, also without beating, and only These cakes bake quickly and should be light colstirred with a spoon sufficiently to hide it from ored. tight.

156.

-

Savoy Cake, Large.

The same as the preceding, baked in a large or The above receipt is well worth learning as it is mold coated with powdered sugar; good for a great variety of Italian cakes and will fancy shaped not have to be repeated here, except as we shall powdered sugar also sifted on top of the cake formshow another way of doing the same thing. ing a glazed surface when baked.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

41

When we come

One day one of my boys showed me such an assortto examine thoroughly the most most noted and the costliest works ment as the above all made out of a kettle of sporge on cookery extant, and to sift their methods and cake batier 4 times the quan ity of the receipt, and directions in the full light of a lifetime's working when they hive been approved, with a sly look he " But I was late and only beat the eggs and experience in ord r to discover the simple princi- said: authoritative, the

must underlie every successful method a sugar 20 minutes." " Your revealed that looks like charlatanry and ingredients were in good condition and the owlish pretense. atmosphere is dry and cold. There are exceptions In this little matter of Italian cakes, to look at to every rule, but yor. must work by the rule and not ples tbat

good deal

is

the imposing lists of varieties, each with its name, own set of weights and proportions and mode of

its

proc:dure, one would think it would take about a century to learn them all, but when we know in advance that every one must rest upon the simple

sponge cake mixture however well disguised we are acquainted with the whole of them already. The standard sponge cake mixture, as it may fairly be called, is 1 pound of sugar, 12 eggs and 12 ou ces

The nature of the ingredients will not admit of a deviation of over an ounce or two. But

of flour.

writing a receipt we designate say three-fifths of Ihese proportions cf each article, and for the next variety two-fifths or two-thirds or one-half, the only if in

in result will be in the

difference

the

exception.

knowing how

158. 1

Besides

there

a

ia

good deal in

to beat effectively."

Butter Sponge Oake.

pound

cf granulated sugar.

10 eggs. 8 or 10 ounces of butter. 1 cupful of milk % pint. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 1 pounds of flour. Beat the eugir and eggs together a few minutes as if for pponge cake, melt the butter and beat add the milk, then the powder and then the and stir up well. Flavor if desired.

If I

had

to lose the

knowledge of

but one I should choose the above.

an entirely

tive'y cheap;

different composition.

The work that the head of either culinary department of a hotel can actually do with his own hands must be but a small portion of the whole, and however sHllful he may be he must be largely dependent

when

fresh

it is

kinds of cakes

all

It is

answers more purposes than any other mixture made. In the exigencies that often overtake us when the

hctel business is good, I have frequently

begun

when

the doors were just opened for dinner, and had large sheets of this light cake 1 or 2 inches

his assistants for the general excellence of his thick and nicely glazed with sugar department. But these assistants cannot know and ready to send in when the plates are not expected to leirn a different formula for either as pudding or cake about 25 r every different thing they are required to make. Th the time of beginning which could will get the

comparaand

as good as any,

upon

min

flour

number of cakes

produced, but the unfamiliar weights and numbers make it appear on the surface as if each variety had

head

it in,

baked on top were changed minutes from not be done

more help from those working with any richer mixture.

under him the more he can simplify the processes he gives them to carry out. The receipt already given under the head of Naples

159. White Butter Sponge Cake.

The same as the preceding made with the surplus good one, but it is only spo ge cake white of eggs often lefc over from salad making, etc. mixture at last, and there is a simpler way that may Use 1 pound of whites instead of the 10 eggs and be intrusted to the boys with perfect safety to make add an ounce more butter. all the varieties of Italian cakes that are at all neces It makes jelly cakes; may have raisins or currants sary or desirable, and that is only to make common mixed in, and if made cold enough to keep shape sponge cake batter in a plain and common way. m*kes very fair sponge drops or other small cakes. biscuits is a

.

It is the best also for the f-llowing.

Sponge Cake.

15T.

1OO.

Cream Cake

14 ounces of sugar. 12 eggs. 12 ounces of

or

"Washington Pie

Bake the butter sponge cake on

flour.

"

jelly cake pans,

Put the eggs and sugar together in a kettle, tin quite thin, and place two sheets toge;her with pastry cream thickly spread between. The pastry cream is pail, or deep pan, set in a vessel of ice water and used to fill cream purls, which see beat the mixture rapidly f -r half an hour by the the same that is clock

Then

lightly s'ir in the flour.

If the

beat-

ing be futhful y performed this sponge c-vke batter can be used to make lady-fingers, savoy cikes, plain

ung'azed f-po^ge cakes, jelly rolls and the ha-f dozen varieties of Italian small

ckes

already described.

or index.

161.

Corn Starch Blane Mange.

2 quarts of milk and a cupful mere. 12 ounces of sugar.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 6 ounces of corn starch.

dissolved, but do not let

1 ounce of butter.

Strain

A pinch

of salt. Flavoring. Boil the milk with the eugr in

Mix

it.

the starch

with the extra cup cf milk, stir it in and let cook a few minuses. Take from (he fire, be t in the but ter to whiten

it,

flavor,

and put the

blai c

either wi'h a little uweeteced cream, or iruil, or fruit

cups it may be spread in bright square blocks and served with the

Infctead of

pans, cut ia

smooth bottom side up.

Corn Starch Jelly.

103.

This can be very nice when nicely made ; if not made sour and harsh wi>h too much lemon nor hard

and opaque with too much etarch. 1 quart of water and a half pint

off

thin

over.

Mix

pieces.

starch with the extra cup of water, gtir

it

the

into the

boiling eyrup and let boil slowly for about 10 minutes to loss its milky appearance and become almost Pour it iuto custard cups or any kind of clear.

molds.

Serve in saucers with a spoonful oi sweetto froth. This jelly looks bet,

ened cream whipped ter if

colored either with burnt sugar or like the

following kind.

1O3.

Tapioca

Jelly.

cupful of water.

12 ounces of sugar. 4 ounces of tapioca.

Boil the rest of the raspberry juice wi'h the sugar in i% add the steepetf ta^ioci and let

fruit juice.

simmer 15 minutes or more. Put it in cups or othef molds ard serve it cold with a spoonful of Tolls cfegg custard ia the s nicer, or with whipped cream. This can a'so be nnde with water and flavorings, as directed for corn starch jelly.

Gelatine Blanc Mange.

2 quarts of rich milk. 12 ounces of sugir.

and not repeated. useful rule to keep in mind is 1 ounces of gelatine to a quart of water for jeliy, etc., but 1 ounce only to a quart of milk.

ferred to

A

Cooper's sheet gelatine sells at about half the price of the imported kinds; it is tasteless and as good as any except that is liable to curdle the milk on actual

to dissolve.

105. Condensing Milk for Blanc-Mangers and Creams. Skimmed milk which hotels can be

is superabundant in many immensely improved for the pastry

cook's purposes by condensation. No process is required but to set 4 quarts cf milk on the range in a

shallow pan with the sugar in 2 quarts probably 12 ounces

it

that is required tir let the milk sim-

and

mer till reduced to 2 quirts. The cheesy coating that forms on boiling milk will not appear on that which has sugar in it.

Jaune Mange.

The blnc mange of the preceding receipt with 6 yolks of eggs b aten in after the gelatine is dissolved and just before taking from the fire. Divide the bbtno mange and color only half of U yolks, and thus have two colon cut in Rrnall blocks to serve in the same saucers.

Jaune

is

yellow, ss blanc

is

white.

1G7. Almond Cream Blanc Mange. 1

pouud of eweet almonds.

2 ounces of bitter almonds or peach kernels. 1

pound

of sugtr.

quart of cold water. 2 ( unces of gefatine. 1

I

small cupful of cream.

Boil the almonds 2 minutes, then take

off*

the skins

and pound them a few at a time in a mortar, adding a little Eugar and a spoonful of water occasionally. Put the a'mond paste in a bowl with the rest of the

2 ounces of gelatine. Flavorings. 1 small cupful of cream to whiten

Set the milk over the

is the basis of several kinds of ba described further on, and will be re-

yeUow with 3 or 4

Crush the tapioca, if the large kind, by rolling it, and steep it 2 hours in the water and some cf the

1G4.

to

16O.

1 quart of raspberry or other fruit juice strained. 1

The foregoing creams

and are troublesome

Sheapingtablespoonfuls.

and cut in small

mond, cinnamon or any other and the cup of cream. Pour it into mold? or custard cups, cr an icch deep

The transparent ge'atioes or isinglass, on the other hand, are as liable to burn on the bottom

Boil the water with the sugar in it ar,d add to it the juice of the lemon and about half the rind

shaved

milk curdle.

boiling.

12 ounces of sugar. 1 small lemon. 3 ounc-s of corn starch

boil lest the

in milk pans, to be cut when set, in squares or diamange monds and served with cream cr diluted fruit jelly.

immediately into custard cups previously wet with When cold take fttmt of the cups and serve water.

jelly.

it

into a pan and set away to cool. After it has cool. d tt r ia the flavoring- -lemon, vanilla, al. it

fire

it.

in a bright kettle with

the sugar and gela'ine in it, and etir them occasion* ally with a wire egg beater till the gelatine is all

sugar and water and let steep a while. the gelatine in a little warm water, add

Dissolve it

to the

milk-of-almondw, the cup of cream likevrisa and strain through a napkin with pressure. Set the blanc mange in molds on

ice.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY 168.

COOK.

mixed with the whites while beating

Floating- Islands.

to

make

choco-

late float. **

good general

bill

of fare

name

for a

number

of

useful trifles cold for dessert that are alike only in being something afloat in a sauce.

6. Make 2 quarts of boiled custard, set in the oven, after letting it cool a little, and drop meringue, the same that is spread over lemon piep, by spoonfuls all over the top. Let the merit gue bake with

dy 1. "Whipped Syllabub" or "Trifle:" An ornathe oven door open 6 or 8 minutes, then set the pan mental bowl of whipped cream flavored with wine, away to get cold before serving. Dish up custard with a cake in it. and a spoonful of the meringue in saucers. Care is 3 pinis of sweet cream. not to let the custard cook too much while required 8 ounces of sugar. the meringue is baking. The pan maybe set in 1 cupful of madeira or raisin wine another pan of water not boiling. 2 thin jelly cakes size of saucers. Put the jelly cakes in 2 glass bowls.

Whip

the

Snow

169,

Float.

sweetened and flavored cream with a whip churn Snow Pudding. Lemon Snow. Lemon Sponge. till half of it is froth. Pour the fluid portion into the bowls, pile the froth on top, and drop spots of Mont Blanc, etc , etc , or Russian Jelly. red jelly or of cream, colored before churning, all 2 quarts of water. over the surface "Missis Jane" will dip it out with 4 ounces scant of gelatine. a silver ladle, at the head of the table.

2 pounds of sugar.

cakes spread with jelly floating in wine custard, with whipped cream on top. 2 quarts of boiled custard flavored with a cupful

6 lemons

2.

Italian

of maraschino.

40 or 50 sponge drops spread with 1 cupful of thick

uppermost, in saucers nearly filled with* the maraschino custard. Whip the cream a little at a time as

wanted

for filling the orders

float

and beat the ontents

the kettle over the fire jelly.

cream.

Make the sponge drops as directed for lady-fingers, with a crisp srgar coating on top. Spread jelly on the bottoms and drop them, with the jelly side

each

juice of all, rinds of 2 or 3. 8 whites of eggs. Grate the lemon rinds and squeeze the juice into the sugar in a kettle, add the water and gelatine, set fre-

quently till the gelatine is all dissolved, which will be at about the boiling point. Strain it into an ice cream freezer or other vessel set in ice water, and

when

the jelly has become nearly cold beat it with a wire egg whisk till frothy a d almost whi e. Then whip the whites of eggs firm, stir them in and beat

and place a spoonful on the whole again

till it

is

set,

when

it

will be like

snow.

as they are sent in.

Make a yellow custard with n quart of milk, 8 The preceding kind can be made cheaper with and 4 ounces of sugar, and flavor, and serve yolks plain boiled custard and thin sheets of cake cut in it in the saucers with a spoonful of the float, ice small squares. All the varieties must be very cold 3.

be good. Place 4 or more lady-fingers, made small for the purpose and not doubled two together, ends

cold.

to

4.

downwards

in jel'y glasses,

and

pile

Wine flavored whipped cream. 6. Snow Eggs. Eggs a la Neige. 12 whites of eggs. 1 or 2

Articles like

the foregoing

come

in serviceably

when, as so often happens there is no milk to be had, upon them some for even the custards to go with them can be made with water.

Snow

Balls:

For a yellow variety

when

of the

Russian jelly or gela-

just at the boiling point stir in the yolks of 8 or 10 eggs quickly and take the jelly from the fire immediately before (hey become cooked. tine float,

ounces of granulated sugar.

Flavoring.

it is

1 quart of rich yolk-of-egg custard cold. Have a Flavor with lemon extract if necessary and beat pan of boiling milk and water ready in the oven. up without the addition of white of eggp.

Let the whites of eggs be cold to begin with. Whip them firm, add the sugar, then drop egg shaped por-

Race ginger boiled in the kind.

It

tions with a wet spoon into the boiling milk

water, and let

and beaten up them cook a few minutes with the Lemon

oven door open. They may either be turned over with a skimmer when half done or allowed to acquire

some color on top

like other meringues.

If cooked

too long these will shrink to almost nothing. much sugar likewise will spoil them. Sfrve

cold in a saucer of custird.

common

makes another

should be colored with burnt sugar and like the

snow

float.

juice more or less is essential in them to correct the taste of gelatine.

A

all

spoonful of whipped cream can be served with

the floats instead of custard.

Too

Snow

them

float that is left

over

is all

These egg floats are and run through the jelly bag be variously flavored, the clearest for the next day

very old favorites. They may and may have an ounce of melted

jelly

it

chocolate

it

clarifies

it

and then

its

to

ready to be boiled

make wine

jelly of

The white of egg in

strained out.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

44 do

Why souls,

have

172.

numbering seventy-five

fifteen

families,

fifteen

very poor cooks preparing

Baked Ooooanut Custard-

fifteen

very poor dinners over fifteen different fires when, a they were all together, two skillful cooks with mid helper and a man in the yard and two fires c

2 quarts of milk.

if

8 ounces of sugar. 6 ounces of corn sfarch.

prepare a most excellent dinner at less cost for them

Butter size of a guinea eggI oz, 8 eggs. 8 ounces of desiccated cocoanut.

all?

Fruit Jelly Floats.

17O.

milk with the sugar in

Boil the

starch in a bowl with a

Good firm

can be beaten partially

jellies of fruits

the

light after

of the gelatine kinds prewhites of eggs c*n be beaten in

manner

ceding, and whipped as a finish. Take quince, peich, currant, or other a knife and jelly that is hard enough to cut with

warm ing

it

and

it

to

sugar. oggs.

Set the bowl contain-

sufficiently to beit.

in a

pan of

ice

water

to cool it

while beating,

pound of powdered pint of jelly allow light add the whipped whites of 6 Beat 5 minutes more. Keep cold. Serve in

When

milk on the

fire

little

and take

Mix

it.

cold milk, add

off*

it

the

to the

immediately without

Beat in the butter, waiting for it to boil again. then the eggs, about half the cocoanuf, and pour the custard into two buttered pans where it will be only an inch de?p. Sprinkle the rest of the cocoanut

over the tops, and a little sugar over that and bake 10 or 15 minutes till set and of a yellow color on top.

Must be

cold to serve.

May

have a spoonful

of sweetened cream in the saucers.

saucers of cream.

And when do

fifteen families require as

the ice supply

delicious ice creams

aid water

is

exhausted and the

ices

persons Why to do the marketing for them, trusting to the butchers and bakers and others for the weights

contrivances for dessert suddenly

and measures, and trusting

why must

many

to luck for the quality of things bought because the qualities are too small to be worth a person's attention, when, if all were

families

have learned

which the

prize above all

to

fifteen

the other

fail to appear, persons at least worry over the situation and spend the days in unquietness conjuring up cold dishes that shall almost fill the ices'

fifteen

when one person making a trade of such buyer could buy better for them all at place, could satisfy them all without effort? knowledge of once, aided by acquired judgment and knowledge and measures and and scales, weights, goods prices, together, one

books?

173. 171.

Peaches and Cream.

Apple Float.

The harder kinds of peaches should be chopped and mixed with sugar 2 mealy cooking apples pared and or 3 hours before the meal. Allow about 4 ounces to the size of strawberries

1

pound of

fine,

Soft peaches, after peeling, of sugar to a quart. are best only quartered or sliced. If admissible serve them ia large glass bowls ornamented wih quarters of red or yellow peaches placed in order

quartered.

Half cup of water. 1 lemon. 8 ounces of sugar. 1 ounce of butter.

and a pitcher of cream with each bowl separately. in saucers pour the cream

2 whole eggs and 6 whites. Glove or cinnamon extract.

If served individually

over only as they are dished up.

Stew the apples with the water sugar, lemon juice and shaved or grated rind and the butter, in a }

saucepan with a lid, till they are tender. Rub the pulp through a seive. Add the 2 eggs and cook the

mixture 5 or 10 minutes

till

thick.

Then

Serve in saucers of custard.

And why do

going

operative housekeeping

under which

the

fifteen

household martyrs, one for each of the said fifteen families, instead of all suffering at once sh uld take turn and turn about doing the work of each department for the entire co-operating community, It is

fifteen families living separately

portions

asked with the intent of advising a system of co-

cool,

flavor, beat light and add the 6 whites of eggs whip, ped firm and beat 5 minutes more. Keep cold.

fifteen small

Once we read in the AtlanticMonthly a series of arwhich all such questions as the preceding were

ticles in

to

waste when,

have if all

a good many years ago, but we remember thinking then that the only practicable form of co-operative

Were together, the small portions in the hands of a housekeeping is the American hotel system, modiskillful cook would make a dish of which nearly all fied perhaps in the matters of wider separation of would partake and save a large item in the marke'- rooms and of individual freedom.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 174.

Strawberries and Cream.

It generally mellows and improves the fruit to let remain covered with eugar in a old place a short time before serving. Serve same as peaches and

it

cream.

short cake of biscuit dough should be buttered before being berried, ar d whether the berries may have cr am mixed with them or whether c earn is to be servtd with the shortcke. lu short, to quote the

words of the song,

<:

IIow do you like your shortcake

done?"

Strawberries, raspberries and peaches in sugar served in saucers of ice cream must be mentioned the great public festival delicacies of the For ice creams, either pure cream, season of fruits. also as

ordinary, or corn starch creams see index.

The best kind of flaky light dough will be in the receipt for roly-poly puddings. It is baking powder, rolled

177.

pints of milk. pints of thick cream. 12 ounces of sugar.

efforts and accomplish almost impossi partly because of the pecuniary value of their positions but more on account cf the reputation

imde

or marred.

But no

did not care

much

for the office

2 ounces of gelatine full weight. 1 cupful or less cf maraschino. Set the milk ovor (he fire with the sugar and gel-

co.

anyway

There are

a thousand rocks on which such a community would split up, like the following.

175.

Strawberry Shortcake.

Scarcely two families or two persons make this alike or believe any other person's way h the best.

atine ia

cooked we expect to ask them how they have their strawberry shortcake made.

The bakers and confectioners, who often

sell large

quantities generally mike layers of sweet cake such as the butter sponge cake, and place 3 of the sheets

it a'

d

siir till the gelatine is all

Then

nearly at the boiling point. ice

c-eim freezer

in ice water

se f

.

dissolved

strain

and

it

into an

let

it

get

Whip the cream to froth. Beat the nearly cold. milk in tie frrez-r likewise and then mix the two and continue beating ti'l the Bivarian is a delicate white sponge, and mix ia the maraschino while beating.

178. These creams

We

are not going to lay down any rule, but as long as people are asked which part of a turkey they they prefer, or how they will have their beefsteak

Bavarian Cream.

1

bilities,

operative could be a good cook, for example, who should be in office only one week and out four, and

in.

1

make almost

superhuman

for efficiency to be

made

with half the pie-pa^te quantity of butter and half

For the co-operative housekeeping idea has the defect of leaving out the power of discharging incompetents. Under the hotel system whea dfflculties arise the heads of departments will

f9und

are the most acceptable of all and have the advantage

the substitutes for ice ere m,

foat they can be s t in molds, and different sorts placed on a set table at tie same time, or a mold For hotel tervice it entire serv.d at a family tab'e

generally best to serve them out of the freezer in saucers with whipped cream or fruit. They then is

appear on the

bill of fare as

:

Mara chino Bavarian Cream.

with sweetened strawberries between.

Bavarian Oeam wi h Compote of Pears, or with But plenty of people say that is not right, but grapes, wbite cherries, or with strawberries not what can you expect the bakers lo know about home cooked; the compotes of course to be ice cold, a doings, and they make a rich flaky sort of biscuit spoonful served like a sauce with the white cream. dough with a good deal of shortening in and bake a large round cake big as a dinner plate, split it open and place a plenty of strawberries between the two

179.

Bavarian Cream Cheapo

halves.

And

there are others, whose tastes have become

enjoyment of the best hotel pies, who say the foregoing kind of short ca'<e is too poor and they want their short cake to be short, vitiated through the

and dry puff pastp, or the trimmings of it wh ch have been rolled more, rolled out thin on jelly cake pans, nicely baked, so they have the best light

rather dry and crispy, and strawberries with their

3 pints of rich milk. 1 cupful of cream.

12 ounces of sugar. 2 ounces of gelatine. 6 whites of eggs. Flavoring. Set the milk over the atine in

it

and

fi-e

stir till the

with the sugar and gel-

gelatine is alt dissolved. into a freezer placed in

Strain sugary syrup spread plentifully between two, and Do not let it boil ice water and when nearly cold enough to set add powdered sugar on lop. But even after these ways have been tried there the cup of cream, beat 10 minutes, whip the 6 remain the weighty que tions of whether after straw- whites firm, stir that in and beat the cream 5 minberries have been spread between there shou'd also be more strawberries on the top, and whether the

utes more. Flavor while beating with lemon, vanilla, almond, or other extract, instead of maraschino.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

46

King Louis did not keep hia huge establishments thing and are not really good when made firm and and made his Bavarian about like this tough with it. The object of the gelatine is to give 1 quart cf double err am, 2J ounces of consistency enough to the milk to allow it to become quite costly 1 cup of milk, spongy when b aten like whippe I cream. This also gelatine, 6 ounces of powdered sugar, for profit

:

cup of noyan or other liqueur. tine in the milk in a

the cream, whip

it

warm

place.

Dissolve the gelaPut the sugir in

to froth, drain the froth arid

necessitates the creams

whip

again what drip * through. Put back in the pan pour the dissolved gelatine to the whipped crspm a

184

1

a time, add the flavor and put the cream in molds slightly oiled with sweet oil and set oa ice. little at

This,

it

may be

observed,

the iced froths notised

is

barely one remove from

pmong

th

j

The

ice?.

b^ing served very cold, a

point on which their excellence a'so greatly depe ids

froth is

Italian

Cream.

Oaly another name for R man cream. The lowing i-i the form with pure cream which,

fol if it

were the only way would genera 'y prec'ude its The Italians themselves appearance at hote tables 1

1

HKC to flavor it strongly wi'h rum and add ground congealed by means of geUtine very cold instead cf cinnamon till it looks brown. frost, and might be in glasses as well. 1 quart of cream to boil, 1 pint of d uble c earn to ISO. Strawberry Bavarian Cream whip cold. 1

pound of sugir. 16 yolks of eggs.

1

BAVABVOISE AUX FRAISES.

2 ounces of gelatine.

double cream.

1 quart of

Stick of cinnamon

12 ounces of sugar. quart of strawberries. 2 ounces cf gelatine. 1

Dissolve the gelatine in a little much milk, added to thin it.

with as

of

the cream

Rub

the straw-

and piece of orange peel. Curacao or sherry or Madeira to flavor. Put the gelitiue in a cup cf milk in a warm place to dissolve som^ time bef .re wanted. Boil the quart of ere !m with the sugar, cinnamon and orange peel

in it. Beat, the yolks and pour them to the boiling through a seive, and add half the sugar to cream and immediately take off and etraia into a them. Whip the cream with the rest of the sugir freezer surrounded with ice water. When nearly in it to froth, mix in the dissolved gelatine, then the cold pour in the dissolved gelatine aud beat up and set ia molds. strawberry syrup light, then whip the pint of double cream to froth

berried

and

ANOTHER WAY.

181

Line j^lly molds with strawberries dipped in melted jel'y to make them stick, and the molds eet

When

in ice water.

set firm

fill

the lined molds

with either of the foregoing Bavarian creams.

We

dispense

which

Roman Cream.

on the if

quart of milk. 10 ounces cf sugar. I

lastly the liqueur.

will point ou* here that all of our

which we

little

182

and

stir it in

call

wLh

ways, being sh

hotel

>rt

own ways,

and

direct,

the separate dissolving of the gelatine,

is really a troublesome and time consuming v e dissolve it ia the milk or cream matter. fire,

without evei a previous steeping. Still to drop into the work-rcorrs of some

we hpp?n

restaurant Francaise

we

shall find

them proceeding

manner, and such reoeipts as the show what that manner is.

in a different

ounces of gelatine good weight. Piece of st ck cinnamon. 1 J

serve to

:

last

1 cupful of thick cream. 185. Italian with Compote of 12 yolks of eggs. Figs 1 cupful of curacao, or Madeira wine. Set the milk over the fire and put in a piece of Cut a pound of figs into small pieces ani one or thick cinnamon, the sugar and gelatine and stir till two lemons likewise and stevr them ti gether with

Cream

the gelatine

is

dissolved Bent the yolks light just about at the boiling point to the fire again for a minute but do not all

and pour the milk them.

Set on

Strain into a freezer set

in ice water.

let it

boil.

When

nearly cold enonjrh to pet whip the cupful of it in and *dd the curacao. Tnis is a

sugar and water. Make the compote ice cold and serve it a spoonful in each saucer with the Roman or Italian cream.

cream and beat fine

dusky yellow cre*m

apart in the saucers of

light

its

and spongy, that

own

186.

is

fruit is fruit stewec'

Rocky Mountain Cream.

Make Bavarian cream, about

weight.

The particular touch about all of these the gettiug along with the smallest possible quantity of gelatine. They are quite another

183.

compote of

falls

the

creams

A

in a thick rich pyrup.

of

half the quantity of Bavarian receipt, also prepare ab ut a pint sweet green muscatel grapes, and enough of

first

bright clear jellies cut in dice to make another pint. When the cream is finished beating and about to set


THE AMERICAN PASTRY mix in the grapes and jellies lightly without breaking them, and pour into a bright milk pan where it will be about 1 inches deep. Sha! e and Whoa to be served smooth it down and set on ice firm

cut acr SB in strips 2 inches wide. Cut these again Place the piece in (he eaucer in triangle shapes.

with the point upwards, pyramid form, and a spoonful of whipped cream around.

There should be 3 colors of

jelly,

clear

lemon,

If poured in too thin the

it

begins

to aet,

fill

up

cream runs and covers

should be fluid enough to settle to the shape and bind them all together. Set the charlotte in the refrigerator to become firm

up the

cakes, yet

it

cold.

Bavarian cream

191.

is

designated as being the

empl >ved, but there is no rule in the matter ami any other of the creams can be used as

8 ounces of sugar. 1 ounce of gelatine

well. filled

2 ounces of grated common chocolate. whites. 8 yolks of eggs and

a la

Charlotte

Chantilly

charlotte-ruse

is

with the thickest of thick cream sweetened and

and whipped to froth and made firm enough Charsimply by being rnide very cold. lotte russe au marasguin is the charlotte filled with mara-cli'no Bavarian cream very highly flavored with the liqueur and with correspondingly Icsa Charlotte russe aux fraises id the charlotte sugar.

flavored

to turn out

cup of cream.

Vanilla extract. Set the milk over the

fire

with the sugar chocolate

and gelatine in it. Beat as it heats with the wire whisk till all is dissolved. Beat the yolks in a bowl and at the first sign of boiling add them to the milk remain about a minute then strain

fire, let

fidshe<l beating, just as the molds with it.

filling oftenest

1 quart of milk.

on the

when

Chocolate Cream.

187.

1

done by dipping the edges of the cakes in white of eggs and p'acing them ude by side overlapping each Then make Bavarian cream sufficient, and o:her.

and

amber and red wine.

COOK.

filled

wiih strawberry Bavarian cream, or with whole mode chau-

strawberries iu whipped cream like the tilly.

into a freezer set in ice water.

Rinse out the thick chocolate custard that adheres

192

with the cup of cre^m and add that to the Flavor with vanilla, beat up other in the freezer. to the kettle

Individual Charlottes

It is easily prac icable to make them in custard add the 3 whites whipped firm with 3 fhia lady fingers trimmed a little to cups and beat up 5 minutes more. Put tho cre^m in oiled and Lot overlapped. Fill with any of Ihe shape molds or serve it by spoonfuls out of the freezer with creams and place th< m in the refrigera or to se> solid. a spoonful of sweetened cream whipped to froth as When served have ready eome thick whipped cream, a sauce turn out the charlottes on ice cream plates and top

as

it

cools

and

at lait

188.

them with a spoonful of the

Pistachio Cream.

half the quanity of the Bavarian receipt. Throw a pound of pistachio kernels in a vessel of boiling water and in two minutes take them out, peel, and pound them a few at

Make Bavarian cream

193.

froth.

Serving Large Charlottes

first

a time in a mortar with a spoonful of witer. B-ub the pas'e through a seive, mix it with the Bavarian while beating and color with spinach green the mixed with pressed out juice of spinach leaves

color as

this

cream

when

it is

desired only for its green to fill a mold in imitation of a is

bunch of asparagus with green tops, almonds can be they are very much cheaper; and spinach juice coloring used the same.

used inste id of pistachios

189 Make ani

color

'

Fielding:

Many

exquisite

vulgar, that something was to be found in * * the most paltry a'leys under the same name. Where then lies the difference be ween the food of

mon aad

the nobleman and the porter, if bo'h are at dinner

sugir.

Where

Says an old author

viands m'ght be rejected by the epicure if it was a sufficient cause for his contemning of them as com

;

but in the seasoning, the dress

and

the setting forth?" one of the few royal dishes th%t have become universally known by name. But as ' common'y met with it is a fine thing ruu to seed;"

Charlotte-russe

is

;

a very distant relation

of the original. Ti.e first departure usea a pponge cake with the inside all cut out and the c-ust filled

up with a cream or blaac-mange not

light piuk.

19O

calf,

ing, the garnishing,

one of the shabby genteel

Rose Cream.

Bavarian, flavor elightly with rose extract it

on the same ox or

falls

Charlotte Russe.

from that

s>

to a lining of slices of

bad; but

any

it

sort of

and trimmed cate, huska and scraps, filled with something sour and nasty. The individual ssyle of service makes the long and or a long and narrow mold made for the purpose arrow sha?.e of mold desirable for slices to be cut with either lady fingers or large pponge d'ops. This is Line a plain oaks mold, or a small round

stale cake, of burnt, scraped

tin pan,

-


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

48

always be of lady

lining should

across, but the

and glazed sugar surface fingers, their thinness king them the most suitable.

COOK.

Charlotte for a Small Party.

197.

ma-

And now for the conven ence of those wishing one charlotte rus-e and not enough for a hotel just be sliced as well But a large round charlotte may dinner we append a first-class working receipt that like a cake or cheese and the good workman will will suit. like to show in such broad slices the sponge-like 2 pints of thin cream. texture of the cream filling. A spoonful of thick 1 teacupful of maraschino. the in be sweetened cream ice cold should placed 7 ounces of sugar. or first. saucer plate 1 package of Cox's gelatine 1 J ounces. ;

be ornamented with small piping patterns of cake icing on the sides and a coat of thin icing on top

Put the extra half p i n t O f cream in a small saucepan and the gelatine and sugar with it, set over the fire and beat with the wire egg whisk till the gela-

colored very light brown with a red hot salamander held over it. A chantilly charlotte should have no

the maraschino into the cold cream, then strain in

194.

A

charlotte set on the tab'e whole should

cake lining on the bottom of the moldj and when turned out should have whipped cream piled high ontcpand spotted wi-h red or wi'h pieces of colored

Pour

the quicker the better.

tine is all dissolved

the contents of the saucepan, set the whole in a pan of ice water with salt in it and whip the cream mixture

till it

begits to

set,

when pour

into the pre-

it

manner should pared mold. The mold should be made ready beforehand. A 2 have strawberries and whipped cream heaped upon it. A border of whipped cream placed around the quart jelly mold wi 1 d^, or a cake mold. Line it

jelly.

A strawberry chirlo* le in

like

base, or meringues inverted like cups filled with

and

berries or grapes

set

around are other suitable

and proper ornaments, and

so are the shapes of gel-

with lady-fingers placed edge to edge, the edges wetted with white cf egg. Ornament the top on

turning out with whipped cream or meringue.

atine paste colored green with spinach juice as recommended for molds of ice cream.

Parisian Charlotte.

195.

Receipts and directions for making different colors of g^aza or boiled icing were given in connection with white cakes near the beginning of this book.

198

Table

There are jellies made with pure fruit juice fil tered through paper and set with gelatine French extras- -we may touch upon them further on. These considered are the everyday, off" hand sort found on hotels tables and in the windows of the confec-

first

tioners

who

sell

them by the mold or

Cut some thin sponge drops or sheets of sponge cake furnish paity suppers. in squares and dip one side of them by means of a fork in the g^aze and let them dry and harden. Have several colors.

these colored

Line plain drum shaped molds with squares checker-board fashion, dip-

ping the edges in melted g'aze or candy to make them stick. Then fill up the molds with any of the creams. tab'e

When

cold and set turn out and set on the

whole as direcied for charlotte-russe.

Jellies.

199.

Stock

glassful, or

Jelly.

Once making of stock jelly serves

2 or 3 meals.

for

For 6 quarts lake;

6J quarts of water. 3 pounds of sugar. 8 ounces of gelatine.

10 lemons

196 this

Wanted

A Name.

Is everything

and aU

country really running to pie? A Chic go lady wishing to do the writer a service de.

tourist kindly

him her way of making a "Charlotterusse" that is highly esteemed among her circle cf friends. It accordingly here appears in place. Bake 2 thin shee's of spongecake on jelly cake pans and while they ftre ftill warm p'ace them on soup plates and press them lightly to the shape. Fill one with

scribed for

1

juice of all, thin shaved rinds of 5. or 2 ounces of whole spices cloves, mace,

cinnamon. 10 whites of eggs. in a bright brass kettle, add all the ingredients the lemon juice squeezed in without the seeds, the yellow rind pared very thin,

Put the water

other

and the white of mixed in first.

egga' beaten a little with

The clean egg

shells

Use the sheet

in also to assist in the clarification.

whipped cream with gelatine in it (Bava-ian cream in effect) and place the other sheet of cake over it

gelatine that floats, f >r preference. kettle on the side of the range and let

a lid. This is convenient to cut. It can be covered with powdered sugar or with icing. It is good, excellent, but through some miserable prejudice or other we don't like to call it charlotte-russe.

to a boil

like

It is

too

much

like pie.

Let

it

some water

may be put

Then it

set

the

slowly come

with occasional stirring. boil about half an hour and above

all,

to

avoid the trouble and waste of having to boil it again, be sure that the white foam of egg on top

becomes thoroughly cooked so that

it

will

go down


THE AMEBICAN PASTKY COOK. and mix with the jelly again like so much meal. Sometimes to accomplish this it is necessary to set the kettle (in the oven a few minutes to get heat enough on the top. Then run it through the flannel jelly bag BUSpended from a hook. The boiling having been prop erly attended to there should be not the slighest difficulty in getting it to run through not only clear but bright and tranpparent as glass. The first pour-

ing coats the inside of the filtering bag \vith the congealed white of egg and every succeeding running

through brightens the

The above makes

jelly.

j

One Quart of

2O2. The rule

is,

49

for

good quality

Jelly.

:

1 quart of water. 1

ounces of gelatine.

8 ounces of sugar1 or 2 lemons 1 teaspoonful of whole mixed spices. 2 whites of eggs and the clean shells. But a cupful of water more must be added to

allow for evaporation and loss unless it is intended to add J pint of wine to the stock jelly produced.

For jellies

dinner pour them an inch or more in depth and when set cut out little diamond shaped blocks and serve way without more or less lemon juiee or some acid two such pieces of different color in the same saucer. equivalent it will not run through a filtering bag 203. Champagne Jelly. without. jelly of

good quality.

It

can be

made cheaper with less sugar and lemons. It may be set down as a rule that jelly cannot be made this

200.

to serve ordinarily at

in bright pans,

Dissolve one package of Cox's or other fine shred pint of hot water with 6 ounces of

Jellies in Variety.

gelatine in sugar in it.

The stock having been made it can now be divided into as many kinds as may be desired, thanks to quickly. the flavoring extract makers. But the stock jelly is already good and mildly flavored and care should be taken not to over season it,

or injure Jelly

is

its

bright appearance.

quite as

can easily be made for its

Lemon

its

for

ornament as use.

It

to attract notice at the finest table

and rich

lustre

therefore

much

appearance

colors even if never tasted, is

Beat about over the

Then

dissolve

it

quart of champagne when it is about to set take out half a cupful and beat it with a wire egg whisk 1 minute. Return the frothed jelly to the bowl, stir round once and let it remain on ice to solidify, either in Hie bowl to be cut out in blocks, or in glasses. There will be bub. bles all through the jelly and a thin froth on top.

the main consideration.

extract cannot be put in jelly because

2O4.

it

makes a milky appearance and dims its brilliancy. Orange extract the same Most of the other extracts can be used to flavor. Use wine in small proportion to mix with some of the stock and color deep red, but run through the jelly bag again while it is yet warm. Flavor some with vanilla and color it either amber or brown with burnt sugar, and run it through the jelly bag again. Flavor some with strawberry and color it pink, and leave some plain, pale

Sparkling

ring the froth in with only one turn not beating, which would destroy its clearness whipped jelly

can be congealed in the bottom of a mold first, nearly cold jelly poured in and the whole turned out at last with the froth on top.

Punch

2O5.

Soda Water

Jellies.

Wine Jelly.

Take the brightest wine jelly, deep red, as made by the stock jelly method, ana froth a little of it and manage as directed for champagne jelly, stir-

yellow.

2O1.

fire to

the dissolved gelatine into a in a large bowl. Set on ice and

strain

Jelly.

Make

a quart of stock jelly by the 1 quart reand when finished add to it a small cup of Having a number of diflerent colors and flavors strong tea and a small cup of mixed wine and prepared as above, fill a sufficient number of tall brandy. Cut a lemon in small thin slices and let thin stem glasses with them, but not quite to the them float in it. Dish up with pieces of lemon in Make each top, and set them in a cold place to harden. portion. the foam for the tops by beating a pint of jelly with a wire egg whisk in a pan set in ice water and when ceipt,

2O6.

Pure Fruit Juice

Jellies.

partly frothed

whip up the whites of 3 eggs, add them to the jelly and continue beating them For orange jelly Put the thin shaved rind of 2 together a minute or two. Then pile the white froth oranges in a bowl, squeeze in the juice of 4. Boil thus made on top of the glasses. Keep them in a a quart of water with a pound of sugar and pour cold place to solidify, and serve them very cold. the hot syrup to the orange peel and juice. Dissolve it is

:

These make a

a

set table.

fine

appearance in pyramidal form on

2 ounces of gelatine in a cup of hot water separately. When the syrup has stood long enough to draw the


THE A.MERICAN PASTRY COOK.

50

it instead of using white of eggs to clarify through a flannel bag lined with a sheet of blotting paper. Afterwards mix in

the dissolved gelatine.

All sorts of fresh fruit juices can be jellified in For a guide to the proportions

of fruit and sugar required in so much wafer see the receipts for fruit ices- The rule for gelatine is

ounces to a quart of water or juice.

1

207. Calves' feet

Device for showing

make good

work

rounded by a wall

Spread the inside wi'h some kind of jam to hide the cake and then fill them to the brim with the clearest jelly, amber color for one light red for

the other.

Ice over the top sur-

rounding rim of cake. The jelly when poured in must be just

jelly as does gelatine,

it

on

that is lost

stands will hold, and cut out the inside of all but the bottom layer of the cakes, making a basin sur-

and

Calf's Foot Jelly.

fine icing

Make

2 jelly cakes of 3 or 4 layers eich and of diameter as broad as the largest cake large pieces

the above manner.

Geneva Lake Cakes.

209.

flavor of the orange peel filiter

point of beginning to set.

If too firm

its

at

the

transpar-

only more brittle and liable to

fall apart of its ency will be destroyed, and if too thin it may soak weight. 4 feet will produce about a gallon of into the cakes. Set them on to bcil in 3 gallons of water and jelly. On the glassy surface of these lakes may be placed keep them simmering at the back of the range till white swans of the finest water is

own

lilies,

icing,

they are dissolved and the liquor is reduced to less than half, which may be in 8 or 10 hours. For further directions see the

Book of

When

Salads.

the calf 's foot jelly has been divested of grease it is the same thing as gelatine and water and is ready to

have sugar and other ingredients added stock jelly in the usual way.

208. Ornamental 1.

to

boats,

gondolas, arbors set on islands, trees, temples, fountains, all of the smallest practicable size. Every

thread of the finest icing shows plainly on the surface of these jelly charlottes, and besides they are

very good

to eat.

make

Jellies.

Fruits in jelly: With the very clearest and brightcan be carried out.

est jelly various pretty devices

Place a fine bunch of grapes in a mold and

21O.

Make

thin

White Mountain Gems. sponge drops about the

size of the

top of a teacup and place spots of meringue paste or icing all around their edge to form a rim or border.

The spots should be the

size of small cranberries

and

a high point should be drawn up as the tube leaves them. Bake a few minutes with the oven door

fill up with Or partially line a mold with fruits dipped in open to dry the icing straw color. Fill the centers jelly and let them get cold in place before filling up with a spoonful of wine or lemon jelly so nearly with jelly. Orange and lemon slices float, but they cold as not to run much. can be dipped in warm jelly and pushed down to line molds of jelly that is nearly set. Peach and 211. Spring Lake Gems. apricot quarters may be done the same way.

jelly.

Fish and other illusions in jelly

Many jelly Make macaroon paste by the receipt for common ware have fishes and macaroons, drop portions on baking pans and flatPour a teaspoonful ten them somewhat fruits stamped in for ornament. by means of two spoong. Bake of blanc-mange or jaune mange into the pattern, set the macaroons, and when slacked baked put them 2.

molds and

it

:

articles of crockery

in ice water, turning

it

about so as to thinly coat

into patty

pans or gem pans of corresponding

size

up the hollow with jelly and let it all and press them into the shape to form a sort of little set firm. Line a large jelly mold with a coating of baskets when cold. Ornament the edges of these clear jelly turned about in it in a pan of ice water. with small spots icing as in the preceding article, Place your little white or yellow fishes on the lining bake a minute or two, and when cold fill the gems and when they have become solidly set fill up the with minced wine jelly of different colers mixed. mold with clear jelly nearly cold. The fishes appear it,

then

fill

solid enough from the outside but when cut all that can be found of them is a small mark no thicker than a knife blade.

212.

Icing

and Ornamenting Cakes.

As these matters have been mentioned incidentally Macedoine jelly Cut different colored jellies in other parts of the book we will recapitulate by in small dice and mix them together. Moisten with that there are three well-known ways of a little clear jell- melted but nearly cold and fill observing ornamenting cakes; first, by patterns in piping of molds with it. white icing on the cake itself not iced, as on the 4. Fill molds with 3 colors by letting one larger fine yellow, glazed surface of a savoy cake, or a set solid and then pouring another kind upon it. or a charlotte-russe dark chocolate 3.

:

cake,

;

second,


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. by covering tbe cakes with

different colored glaze or boiled icing as described in connection with white

cakes, and, third,

made

for

by

frosting with the

raw

icing as

meringue puff? and "kisses," and orna-

menting with the same.

The

first

requisite is to

make

the cake itself

sym

metrical and level by trimming. The cakes of a cake maker will rise in baking all round alike so that only a mere shaving will have to be skillful

taken

off,

but whether

little

or

much must be

cut

214.

cakes that are to be handsomely ornamented should have the same double covering.

all

Make

the icing as directed under the head of

is

done

icing or meringue paste out of the cut point of a paper cornet. Roll up half a sheet of stiff

note paper into funnel shape and pin it, nearly fill with the icing, and double over the paper so as to

shut it in. If you cut off the point of the cornet straight the piping pressed out will be a plain round cord. If a slanting side snip is taking off the icing

comes out like narrow tape. Cut the poiit of the paper like saw teeth and a three or four .sided cord is

is

covering its deformity with a coat of icing. Fruit cakes always require two coa s of icing, and

The ornamental piping on cakes

by pressing

it

obvi msly useless to try to make an object that is not "square with the world" look well by merely

51

formed, and there are

many variations. We name

the paper cornet for example,but for constant use there are made tubes or points of the thinnest brass plate filed into the required shapes at the points, and

these are dropped into paper cornets made large enough to receive them. The biass point that is filed into three saw teeth will form a border of leaves around a cake. The

and macaroons, with a pound of tooth that is uppermost is caused by a motion of the to 6 whites of eggs. Spread it all hand to make the indentation marks as the icing over the cakej with a palette knife, smooth over passes under 'and out, and a sudden breaking off rough places, fill up hollows, cover the hole left by draws out the leaf to a point. This will probably the cake mold in the center with a patch of writing sufficiently explain the matter of cake ornamentapaper aid ice over that, and leave the cakes an tion for those who have never seen it done, the rest hour or two to dry. must come through actual practice and example, For the pecoud coat use powdered sugar sifted

mencgue

puffs

powdered sugar

beat up a through a fine seive or Swiss muslin 215. pound with 4 whites and then add 4 more whites one ;

at a time, beating aftejr each addition

the icing firm again, except the last white which makes the glossy surface on the cake and should only be beaten

To Make Flowers

for

Cake Orna-

ments.

till

is

in a

Flower making of icing and gum paste is a trade and it is generally cheaper to buy than to make them. But it often happens that the ready made article is not obtainable and we must do the of itself

little. Drop in the few drops of acetic acid sometime near the end of the beating and carefully add a drop or two of liquid bluing or dissolved best we can. indigo, to whiten the icing, and some flavoring Dip three or four sheets of writing paper in some extract. wax melted on a plate and form the flowers with the 213. To get a fine surface on the cakes as smooth cornets or brass tubes on the waxed paper. The and free from marks as fine card board the icing cornet that has the point cut off slantwise when must ba first as firm by beating as it can be nude pressed will discharge the icing in a narrow ribbon

and thinned with the

and another form and it is not difficult with that to form five rounded leaves, the points all meeting in the center and making a pansy, or a number of narrower petals around a centre like a dahlia. To make the conterously drawing over them the edge of a band of ventional red and white roses a core, or little paper. pyramid an inch high has first to be made and Cut a sheet of foolscap into ribbons 2 inches wide. let dry to form them on. These coves are of Spread the prepared icing thickly on the the top of stiff icing forced out of a cornet and drawn up the cake, take the paper strio by the two ends and They should stand on small pieces of waxed high. V\ hen scrape ff the surplus icing with the paper edge at paper. dry and hard wrap a morsel of last \vhite of egg,

if

necessity till it will settle slowly to smoothness on the cakes, but will not actually drip off. Besides that the cakes must be made smoother by dex-

(

one evea stroke, drawing towards you. Persons in practice can so well manage a ribbon of paper held stretched between the fingers and thumbs of both hands that way that they can smooth over a cushion

the

any concave or convex shape covered with icing without leaving the mark of either beginning or ending. When the sides of the cakes have likewise been covered and smoothed set the cakes in a drying

another, covering the point of the core on the other Let the next leaf lean outwards a little and side.

or

place.

ribbon icing pressed out cf the cornet the point of the core, like the inside leaf of a bud. After suddenly breaking off the ribbon mence again at the back of the first leaf and

over rose-

comform

still more, making them all adhere to the by one edge of the ribbon and making the rose leaves larger and larger till the core is covered and there is room for no more. The flat four and five

the next

core


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

ftft

leaved flowers, such as resemble apple Uossims and form panels, windows, and the like, of clear candy, S ightly oil the slab. Take a cornet filed with pansies, should be painted with a few fine lines of on.

The roses are made red by coloring the

color.

icing

m

de of. they are After learning to use the cornets in making borders on cakes and making flowers, to mane

work, such

ornamental

raised

fence*, sides of temples, etc

,

to

as lattice work, be raised up and

joined together on the cakes, or baskets and other objects it is only necessary to know that all such

icing

and form the outline frame of a church window,

example, and into the rim so made pour clear colored candy. S x or eight keystone shaped panels made the same way may be set up and joined together for

;

by the edges be

filled

The rim

of dough oiled over, or of putty when large sheets of candy are needed to build up large

219. Most of the white

plaster-like

gum

paste, a

probably never

compound although

is,

that could be eaten but it is

pieces.

Plaster of Paris Molds.

ornaments for cakes

in the confectioners' windows, such as birds, baskets, lace leaves, vases and twelfth-cake figures are made

of

held the candy in shape on the slab

to

may be made

be made on paper coated with white w ix, and when the object is dry and hard the paper can be ornamental warmed and it will slip off.

may

form a basket, which in turn may

to

with macaroons.

one-half sugar.

Are made by mixing to the thinness

dentist's plaster with water

almost of cream, pouring

utes the plaster hardens

216. 1 ounce, or a little

Gum Paste. more of gum tragacanth (gum

dragon). 8 ounces of finest powdered sugar. 8 ounces of corn starch.

it

into a

shallow box and pressing the object of which an impression is desired down into it. In a few min-

and presently the

fruit, or

stamped or carved object can be withdrawn. Articles so used should be oiled before immersing. The molds should be baked at a gentle heat afterwards. A whole tomato or apple meld may he made by entirely covering the fruit in the liquid plaster

wben

it

and

has hardened sawing in two and removing

The gum must be soaked 12 hours or more before A hole is cut into which the candy may the fruit. Put it in a cup with half a cup of water, used. be poured when the two halves are tied together. cover to keep out dust and set it on a warm shelf it is

Gum

When

dissolved squeeze it through a clean towel by twisting with considerable force. Scrape up the gum, place it on a dish, add the sugar a little at a

and work them together with a paddle or wooden spoon. Add a drop of liquid blue to whiten time

figures,

the sugar is all in begin adding the starch the same way. Pull out the paste as it becomes stiff, and double and pull again, and when all the starch

has been worked in the paste is ready for use. It may be pressed into shallow molds of fancy figures

made

in plaster of paris, or in carved boards and

left in

them

till

left

to

dry and are afterwards

2 2O. To

Gum Arabic Icing.

give to c-.ke

icing the

tenacity that allows

and loop work to be made on cakes, with strings of fine piping hanging between points several inches apart without breaking, mix with every pound of fine powdered sugar from 1 to 2 ounces of gum arabic. Powder the gum and dis-

borders of

fringe

solve it first in a spoonful of hot water in a cpp set ou the side of the range, and add a little at a time

Almond Gum Paste.

217-

An

dry and hard.

which are

painted or ornamented with icing.

When

it.

is pressed either with rolling-pin or pesshallow molds of shells, leaves and doll

paste

tle into

and semi-transparent: 1 ounce of gum tragacanth allow more for waste. 1 pouni of fine powdered sugar. 4 ounces of the paste of pounded almonds. eatable sort,

to the icing

while beating

it

up.

The paste of gum

tragacanth (gum dragon) as prepared for making gum paste can also be used in the same manner.

The ordinary methods and means employed for cake and center piece ornamention having now been Blanch the almonds, pound them to a fine paste the writer will here state that he has a and pass it through a strive. Make the gum paste explained different method of his own, which produces ornaas directed in the preceding article and add the mental effects incomparably superior to the common almond paste to it after the sugar and before the clumsy pyramid of cakes or the unmeaning and 8 ounces of corn starch.

starch.

This

is suitable to

make small cornucopia

or horns of plenty, and other objects to be ornamented with fine icing for a finish.

218.

A

is

temple of

gum

paste,

and which have gained

the admiration of some of the people whose approbation in such matters decides the question of merit.

The new method may be

Candy Ornaments.

marble slab or marble top table

futile

fully explained with the

aid of illustrations, in a few additional pages at

needed

to

future time.

some


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COCK.

A Few

*2t.

Candies for Amateur Candy

cream candy, but flavor it with vanilla if at Pour it hot int-> plaster of parh molds if you

for ro?e all.

Pullers.

63

have them, making hazelnut sizes of drops. If no confectioners recognize as many molds form the candy when nearly cold with the as twelve stages or degrees in boiling sugar, fingers, then taking them on a fork dip each piece in " " to the " caramel a bowl of chocolate, either common or sweet vanilla, ranging from the petit lisse noir " from simple syrup to burnt sugar caramel. melted by being set on the side of the range, and set

The French

However, we have not time to learn the degrees the drops on buttered pans to cool and dry. Other only just a little time to make some candy. shapes besides drops can of course be made in the same manner. The boiled icings or glaze elsewhere 222. Candy for Christmas Toys, Etc. described when left over from icing cakes can also be formed into cream drops and coated by dipping in melted chocolate, and so likewise can be used the 2 pounds of granulated sugar. common cake icing and macaroon mixtures'that may 1 pint, or rather less, of water. 1 large

be

teaspoonful of powdered gum arabic. cream of tartar.

left

over from their

first

purpose.

1 level teaspoonful of

Cocoanut Candy.

226.

Flavoring. Dissolve the

powdered gum in the water made warm for the purpose. Then add to the gum-water Turn to receipt number 222, take the same ingrethe sugar and cream of tartar and set on to boil. Do dients and boil the candy to a degree a little nearer It the brittle stage not stir the syiup after it is once well mixed. take it from the fire and put in 1 should boil about 15 minutes. Then try it by drop- pound of fresh grated cocoanut. Stir rapidly to ;

When the lump retains thoroughly mix, then pour the candy thinly in a little in cold water. When using desiccated cocoanut shape pretty well and can be worked between the buttered dish. Pour it into the which has no moisture to reduce the candy to thinfingers like gum paste it is ready. shallow plaster of paris molds, either oiled or wetted ness boil the candy only to the point named in the

ping a its

to

make

doll figures, or figures of animals, fishes,

first

receipt

and the same

as for

cream candies.

etc., etc.

This, if cast without being stirred,

candy, but to have

it

makes

white and opaque

clear

stir

candy in the kettle giving it only from 10 to 20 turns with a spoon, before pouring it out. The flavoring oil may be added while stirring. Should the candy

set in the kettle

add water and make

it

hot

again, with care that the candy does not immediately begin to burn to caramel.

Rose Cream Candy.

223.

227.

the 1

pound or a

Almond Candy. less of

little

almonds blanched and

split.

2 pounds of granulated. sugar. 1 pint scant of water.

1 large teaspoonful of

powdered gum

arabic.

teaspoonful of cream of tartar. Rose extract to slightly flavor. 1 level

Dissolve the gum in the water made warm, add The same ingredients and proportions as the pre- the sugar and cream tartar and boil without stirring 15 or 20 minutes. When a drop in cold water sets ceding receipt. Boil to the same degree. Then take

the kettle from the

fire, let it

stand 5 minutes to

nearly hard so that

it

can only just be pressed

flat

and red coloring enough to between the finger and thumb take the kettle off the and a it make pink, few drops of rose extract. Have fire. Drop the flavoring by spots over the surface, to a buttered dish ready, stir the candy rapidly with a give the candy only one or two turns with a spoon it in, then pour it into slightly buttered pans, in mix it to begins change its bright appearance spoon till Push the split almonds into the warm thin sheets. that is a of then it to a dull

lose

some of

its

color,

heat,

sign

setting,

pour

immediately into the dish. 224.

of

Lemon Cream Candy.

candy with the fingers. Mark it before it gets cold for breaking by rolling over it the edge of a thin dinner plate. of almonds.

The same as rose cream candy. Flavor with oil lemon and use no coloring. This is as white as

Sliced oocoanut can be used instead

Stick Candy.

228.

cake icing. 225.

Chocolate Cream Drops.

Make and

same as in the preceding rePour the candy, or a without stirring on to a marble slab. boil the

ceipt without the almonds.

These are lumps of cream candy coated by being portion of it, in melted chocolate. Drop flavoring over

dipped

Make

white cream candy by the method described

strips

and

roll into

it

when

round

partly cooled, cut in

sticks.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. White Sugar Candy to Pull.

229.

When

stir.

L

pound of white sugar.

A A

small half pint of water. half teaspoonful of cream tartar.

it

ounce of butter

1

peppermint or lemon or other flavoring. together, except the flavoring, about 15

Oil of

Boil

evenly

enough

a drop of the candy sets quite hard nd it from the fire and pour

cold water take

brittle in

to

over the

all

cover them.

almonds, only just deep This kind cannot be stirred

nor pulled, as the butter separates from the sugir which then turns grainy.

Caramels, Plain or Maple.

234.

all

Try by dropping a little in cold water. It Make the candy of the preceding receipt, omitting must set hard to be done. Do not stir it at all, but V- hen it has cooled on the dishes the almonds. a dish and flavor on buttered when cool enough pour of a dinner with the mark it in minutes.

to handle.

Pull

it till it is

230.

rolled

over

if,

through, making little square blocks. For maple caramels use maple sugar in the same

Peanut Candy.

pound of sugar.

1

edge plate and when cold cut the markings

squares

quite white.

way.

8 ounces of peanuts.

Make

the peanuts hot in the oven. Set the sugar fire in a kettle to melt without any water.

over the Stir

it

a

little.

When

it is

all

melted and of the

color of golden syrup or light molasses mix iq the peanuts, pour the candy into a buttered shallow pan

and when nearly cold cut 231.

it

into strips

and blocks.

Hickory nut and almond candy

is

m^de

in

the above manner, and will be better with a pound In the same of the nuts instead of half a pound.

manner with a pound of grated cocoanut a brown variety may be made to match the white and red cocoanut caramels (called also cocoanut cakes and cocoanut gems) described at number 151. Nougat the French name of nut candies made by melting the sugar without water as in the foregoing receipts.

Chocolate Caramels.

235. 1

pound of sugar

brown

either

or white will do

ounce of butter. Half cup of milk.

1

2 ounces of grated chocolate. Vanilla flavoring. Set the milk, butter and sugar on to

boil,

and

stir

grated chocolate and flavoring. After that do not stir the mixture, again or it will go to sugar Boil about 10 minutes. When a drop in the dish.

in the

in cold water

the

f-ets

rather hard but not brittle pour

candy into a dish well buttered.

Mark

in

little

Warm the dish or tin tray square blocks when set. a little if the candy sticks.

is

232.

Nougat Baskets Corbeilles de

236.

Molasses Candy to

1 large coffee

Pull.

cupful of molasses.

12 ounces of sugar, either brown or white. One-third of a cupful of vinegar.

Noix. The hickory nut, almond, pecan, or cocoanut made as directed for peanut candy may be

candies

Half cupful of water. 1 ounce of butter.

pressed while cooling into basket shapes of tin or crockery ware, and sticks and twists of the eame

in cold water.

placed for handles and borders. Very small baskets formed in fancy gem pans are used to fill with straw-

and fairly snap between the it on buttered plates. Pul'.

Put

all in

a kettle and boil It

must

boil

l-> ti.l

or 20 minutes.

Try

the drops set brittle fingers.

Then pour

berries or other articles for ornamental purposes on set

supper

of nuts 1

pound

tables.

may bs

For

this

purpose the proportion or even 2 pounds to

increased to 1

of sugar.

233.

Almond Taffy.

Called in England Everton

taffy, after

a town of

name.

that.

pounds of brown sugar.

1

8 ounces of best fresh butter. 1

teacupful of vinegar and water

half.

8 to 12 ounces of almonds.

about half and

237.

Molasses candy

allowed to set on dishes

if

not pulled but merely

is

improved by having about a half teasponful of soda stirred in after it has been taken from the fire and before it is poured out. Flavorings may be added at the same time. 238.

Chocolate Candy to

Pull.

8 ounces of sugar. 8 ounces of light colored molasses or syrup. Half cupful of cream. 1 ounce of grated chocolate. Vanilla to flavor.

Scald and peel the almonds, split them and spread Boil the cream, molasses and sugar together about them evenly on two large dishes slightly buttered. 15 minutes, then throw in the chocolate and boil till Boil the other ingredients together about 15 or 20 the candy sets brittle in cold water. Pour on dishes, minutes. Shake them together at first but do not flavor when cold enough to handle, and pull.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 238 a.

pound

Chocolate Cream Drops.

238 e.

The same as the preceding, but make them pink with a few drops of cochineal or vegetable red coloring and use wintergreen extract for flavoring.

tine icing sugar.

1 teaspoonful

powdered gum

Wintergreen Drops.

arable,

2 tablespoons water.

These drops have a smooth surface but are slightly Clove drops, cinnamon drops,

1 teaspoonful extract vanilla.

granulated inside. pound common chocolate. Cut up the cake of chocolate into a tin cup and etc., same way. set in a shallow pan of hot water to melt by heat 238 f. alone without adding any water. Dissolve the gum arable in the two tablespoons A moist candy of boiling (rater in a small bowl, then stir in fine

make

to

powdered sugar enough

dough, adTurn it on the

it stiff

tis.,uc

1

Set on

be sliced, wrapped in

pound flour of sugar, or icing sugar. the honey hot without boiling, stir

Make

a pan or dish

wa>

in the

sugar a little at a time until it becomes too firm, then turn out on the table and knead in more sugar and

Chocolate Creams Best.

238 b.

to

paper.

4 tablespoonfuls strained honey. 2 ounced almonds, blanched.

ding the vanilla at the same time. a cord, cut off in balls size of hazel

table, roll into

nuts and dip these in the melted chocolate. to haiden. Makes 75 to 100.

Honey Nougat.

almonds, which must be dry. When the nougat is firm enough to keep its form in a square bar like a brick split lengthwise, sugar the outside,

also the

Make

ceding and Instead of

them 1

same as

the white inside the

make the common

balls

up in any

for the

preshape desired.

chocolate merely melted dip in this chocolate icing:

roll it in it

up

wax paper and keep it a day before Wrap the little outs likewise

for sale.

slicing

in

wax

paper.

cup sugar.

4 tablespoonfuls water. 3 ounces

common

238 g.

chocolate.

Grate the chocolate and set

it

Tutti-Frutti Candy.

on with the sugar

Take the preceding receipt and add to it a teaand water to melt gradually in a place not hot spoonful of vanilla, two figs cut small and an equal enough to burn it. When it has at length become amount of raisins seeded and cut; work up into a boiling hot beat it to thoroughly mix, and dip in the bar with all the fine, powdered sugar necessary to articles to

be glazed while

it is

make

hot.

it

firm, cut in slices

and wrap in wax

tissue

paper.

238 c.

Chocolate

Cream Dominoes.

238 h.

The white cream candy same as for chocolate drops. Roll it out thin and pour a layer of melted chocolate upon it. Cut when cold. 238 d.

1

pound

Walnut Creams.

fine icing sugar.

2 heaping teaspoonfuls powdered

gum arabio.

5 tablespoonfuls water. 3 dozen walnut kernels.

Mint Drops.

1 teaspoonful extract vanilla.

Put a

little

sugar in the water to make a syrup,

and the gum in it, stir over the fire until the gum is 1 dissolved. Take it off and work in the powdered arable. 5 tablespoonfuls water. sugar gradually with a wooden paddle. Add the 1 tablespoonful essence peppermint. The more it is stirred and beaten with the vanilla. Put the water on in a small saucepan or cup and paddle the whiter and finer the candy becomes. At the gum in it and let warm up. When the gum is last turn out the lump on to the table it is like dissolved put about a quarter of the sugar in, let soft white dough and roll it in one long roll, out boil up and then add half the sugar that remains off slices, stick a half of a walnut kernel in each 1

pound pulverized sugar. heaping teaspoonful powdered gum

putting

it

in gradually

boils again take

it

without stirring.

to the table

and

stir in the

When

it

remain-

piece and pinch the paste up to hold it, by shaping in the hollow of the left hand. Lay the finished

it

6 Drop por- creams on a tray [to dry. This makes about on sheets of paper. dozen. The sugar is not boiled, only the hot gnm They slip of the paper when cold. It may be nec- syrup is used. essary to add another tablespoonful or two of sugar 2381. Date Creams. to give the drops consistency enough not to run on the paper, yet it is better to be too thin than too The same as the preceding kind with dates cut in

ing sugar and after that the flavoring. tions the size of quarter dollars

much

the other way.

pieces to use instead of walnuts.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

56

Cut each for

fig

brown. A few bitter almonds or peach kernels mixed in improves them.

Pig Creams.

238 j.

COOK.

slack oven light

and proceed as

in six or eight pieces

walnut creams.

238k.

Angelica Creams.

3 pints of water. 1 pounds of sugar.

3 ounces of corn starch.

Flavor the cream candy with extract of straw-

Juice of half a lemon.

berry instead of vanilla. Cut green angelica or any other French candied fruit of a rich color and use

1

Coooanut Cream

1.

pound pulverized sugar. powdered gum

1 teaspoonful

sauce, then put in tne glucose and lemon juice and cook at the side of the range about 15 minutes.

Balls.

Dissolve the

it

238 p.

in the water hot

and

firm

is

make

be-

Cocoanut Cream Squares.

pound granulated sugar.

Set the sugar and water over the fire in a small and boil about 5 minutes, or until the

brighttkettle

syrup bubbles up thick and ropes from the spoon, and do not stir it. Then put in the cocoanut, stir to mix, and when it begins to look white pour it immediately into a shallow tin psn. oold.

As soon

as

ted,

and make

The same kind may be colored

Common Boxed

red,

it is

and

also

Macaroons.

Pinch of

known as fine granulaWhip some white of eggs

warm.

in a shallow bowl, dip the grapes in

the sugar and sieves to dry.

sift

it,

more sugar on top.

lay them on Lay them on

Grapes Glazed With Sugar.

Divide some bunches of grapes into small clusters. Put into a deep saucepan

pound

of sugar.

cup of water. teaspoonful cream tartar.

Stir to dissolve the sugar, then set it if for

1 teaapoonful ammonia. Crush the almonds without taking

When

the syrup has boiled iO minutes try a drop When it sets so that it is hard to

press between finger and are hard and brittle

on baking pans very slightly greased.

Bake

in a

the edges of

ready.

two of water added and be made hot again.

Make

with a rolling-pin upon the table. Mix them and the powder, sugar and flour together in a bowl. Drop the eggs in the middle and mix the whole into a rather soft dough. Place in lumps size of cherries

thumb and it is

Take it from the fire, dip the clusters of grapes in (without ever stirring the candy) "and lay them on dishes slightly greased to dry. Should the candy become set in the kettle it may have a spoonful or

r.

Frosted Oranges. and use it to dip orange has become too thick with

plain white icing

slices in just

off the skins,

to boil as

in cold waser.

238

salt.

on

candy.

12 ounces almonds.

8 ounces granulated sugar. 4 ounces flour.

4 eggs.

it

when drops

in little squares

be made with chocolate.

238 n.

Frosted Grapes.

1 large

1 small half cupful water.

and cut

of the

the sort of pulverized sugar

1

cated.

it off,

gum drop

of three or four grapes each. Prepare a platter with

238 q.

8 ounces cocoanut either fresh grated or desi.

mark

the cheap

Take grapes of twocolors,as red Tokays and white Work Muscadels, and pull the bunches apart into clusters

The same can be made with candy colored

set solid

is

nearly cold mould

powdered sugar.

the

stir in

pink. The foregoing kinds are all easy to cauee there is no boiling of sugar.

1

roll in

The above compound

enough, cut off pieces and roll into balls a little larger than cherries. Sugar well outside and let

238m.

any form and

street vendors.

sugar gradually, flavor, fruit and coccanut. the paste on the table with sugar until it

dry.

into

lemon extract.

gum

When

Color a portion of it pink. arable,

5 tablespoonfuls water. 2 tablespoonfuls cocoanut, minced. 2 tablespoonfuls currants, minced. 1 teaspoonful

6 ounce of glucose. Boil sugar and water together and thicken with the starch same as in making a thickened pudding

as directed for walnut creams.

238

Fig Paste.

238 o.

when

it

beating not to run off, and yet thin enough to settle Have a long splinter or skewer to smoothness. ready for each one. Stick the point of a skewer into the edge of the orange section, dip into the frosting,

bowl of

push the other end of the skewer into a aud let the pieces hang over the edge

salt,

of the bowl in a

warm

placo to dry.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 244.

Small Pastris

We

have now

to take

up and conclude the

list

of

small pastries that was dropped in order that the book of ices might appear in the summer season.

239. Shell Pies.orVol- au- vents of Fruit Crusts of pies that may be baked beforehand and with stewed fruit only as required.

filled

57

Saratoga Shortcake.

Drain the juice from canned strawberries into a quart measure. To a quart allow 12 ounces of sugar and set it at the back of the range to simmer down as thick as fruit jelly. Then put in the strawberries and cook a short time longer. Roll out two thin

sheets of ordinary flaky pie paste and bake them on two baking pans of the same size. When dore

Cover the pie pan with a thin rolled sheet of puff- spread the strawberry compote on one sheet, place the other sheet on top moving it by means of two paste, not made thinner in the middle as for other but left of even thickness and smooth. Cut a palette knives slipped under and over the top of

pies

mark

half way through the paste all round the rim of the plate, with the point of a knife and also score across the middle. When this crust has been baked

spread a coat of thin

that

the lid formed by the cutting can be lifted off in two halves and replaced when the pie is filled with fruit.

24O.

Sometimes served as a "sweet entree

parties,

and

for

sale

;

;"

more

suit-

best for luncheon, pic-nic a favorite form of pastry ;

Make

3 eggs, making a sort of paste. A little orange or zest may be added. Cover a baking pan with a thin sheet of pie paste, spread the almond paste

lemon

the flaky pie paste with about 12 ounces of batter to a pound of flour, roll it out to a thin sheet

pie paste.

and cut out

when

nearly as large as saucers, with the lid of a baking powder can or similar cutter. Place a good spoonful of dry stewed apple in the flats

middle of each piece of paste and double over in half-moon shape. Press the two edges together and

When

the

the baking pan is full of the turnovers brush them over with egg and water and dredge granulated

sugar on top.

Bake slowly

they are crisp, These glazed, and of a fine reddish brown color. They large sizes have generally to be cut in two. till

contain more fruit and are better eating than

made

Cannelons of

Fruit.

the piece of paste so to cover and inclose it. The word cannelon, like cane, signifies a tube with a pith it.

Egg

may

over, dredge with sugar

242. Mince

and bake.

Patties.

way instead of the minced With a coating of icing or glaze on top

be used in the same

almonds.

the articles of this class made of pastry are found to be very saleable at the bakers' shops.

246.

Florentines or Florentine Meringues.

Cover a baking pan with a sheet of pie paste Spread over the paste some green

rolled out thin.

goge jam, strawberry jam, or fruit jelly, and bake While it is baking whip up the it in a slow oven.

and when firm spread it top of the white of egg sift some granulated sugar and some desiccated cocoanut should bo strewn over that. Bake the cake about of from 6 to 12 eggs,

Put a spoonful of mincemeat, or lemon mincemeat, or mock mincemeat, on one of the fla's, lay another on top and pinch the edges together all round. Egg them over, dredge, sugar and bake.

cutter.

243.

Lemon Patties.

10 minutes more with the oven door open.

butter,

number

39, or

filled

lemon paste.

with the lemon

Cut in

247.

English Cheesecakes.

12 ounces of sweet rennet curd. 4 ounces of sugar. 3 ounces of butter. 4 yolks of eggs. salt.

a nutmeg grated.

Lemon

extract to flavor.

To prepare the curd sea number 303. Rub the curd as taken from the draining cloth through a Add the other inflour seive and mash it smooth. Line patty gredients and pound them all together. pans with tart paste and nearly fill them with the mixture.

be made as above and

On

squares when cold.

Pinch of Roll out a sheet of pie paste, or puff paste if preCut out flats with a large biscuit

ferred, very thin.

May

Cut in oblongs or squares Several of the nut creams and conserves

cold.

over the hot preserve.

Proceed as if for apple turnovers, but cut the sheet of paste into squares. Place a spoonful of any kind of firm fruit jelly lengthwise and roll up

in

it and cover with another thin sheet of Egg over the top, dredge sugar over and

bake in a slack oven.

when whites

small.

241.

the

Almond Shortcakes.

245.

evenly over

everywhere.

crimp them with the thumb and finger.

Dry

Chop 1 pound of blanched almonds quite fine and mix with them 12 ounces of sugar and the whites of

Apple Turnovers.

able to put in place of pie

cake icing.

icing in a slack oven and let it acquire a little pale color. Cut in squares or diamonds when cold.

Bake about 15 minutes.

The curd mix-

ture though seemingly too firm at first melisand puffs up in the oven. Powdered sugar over the tops.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY Puff Paste and Cheese, or quins.

248.

To be served with stewed

fruit.

Make

Bame

a

warm

COOK.

place a pinch of baking powder beaten in it.

improves

Common Frying Batter.

253.

puff paste,

using about 12 ounces of butter When it has been rolled and to a pound of flour. folded twice, the shortening being all in, roll it out

1 pint of milk. 3 or 4 eggs.

again and spread grated cheese all over it with the Fold and roll out and spread cheese palette knife.

1 large

but not the richest

on

it

again,

and then once more.

When

it

has been

it out thin, cut in squares inches wide, double these squares over something like split rolls, egg over and bake. A

Little salt.

spoonful of melted butter

folded 5 times in all roll

1 teaspoonful of

about 2

1

small piece cut from the pie paste

may be enough

to

answer

when making

this purpose.

for Breakfast.

Put (he

the fruit and cut

Lay these

strips in

in halves lengthwise close order in a baking pan,

strew sugar over and some bits of fresh butter and bake in a moderate oven about half an hour. The fruit

should be basted while baking with a f. w and should

spoonfuls of butter and sugar syrup come out glazed. Serve warm.

35O.

mix half the milk and the

other ingredients, except powder, together, and stir up the flour with them to smooth dough. Thin it

make common

254.

Beat in the powder just

mil-k.

Good

before using.

it

flour.

flour in a pin,

f r

egg plant in batter, as well

Spoonfuls of

as fruit fritters.

Peel

ounce.

baking powder.

pound or quart of

with the rest of the

Baked Bananas

249.

1

Half as much syrup.

it

fried in lard also

fritters.

a

Fritters

la

Creme Breakfast

Dish.

A sort

of sliced custard breaded and fried,

made

of

quart of milk. 6 ounces of sugar. 1

Crisped Bananas, Nerj Orleans Style.

6 ounces of mixed corn starch and flour. 7 yolks of egg".

2 ounces of butter.

Peel and cut the bananas in two across and steep the pieces in white sugar syrup flavored with cut up

Salt. Flavoring. Boil the milk with the butter and ealt in

it,

Kw

oranges and nutmeg. When they have steeped an hour or two roll each piece in dry flour, giving it a a good coating, and fry in olive oil or clarified fresh

the sugar in the starch and flour dry and dredge and beat them into the boiling milk. Let it cook slowly

Serve hot with the orange syrup they were

the yolks of eggs and take it off. Flavor with lemon, cinnamon, nutmeg or vanilla and let it get cold in a buttered pan. Roll the slices in egg, then in cracker

butter.

steeped in strained for sauce.

251.

Crisped Apples.

me-il,

Core some good apples such as easily cook soft, then pare them and if large out them in two. Steep them several hours in sugar-and-water syrup well flavored with lemon. Take the apples out, roll them over and over in flour aud fry them in hot lard. Serve with sauce.

Crisped pears can be done the same

at the side of the

way

if snft

fry in lard, serve

warm

with syrup.

Stir in

Any

good corn starch or farina pudding ei her baked or boiled when cold can be sliced and used in the same way.

255 A

Sponge

and spongy

soft

made with a

Fritters.

sort different

from the common

boiled paste.

of water.

1 pint

varieties of the fruit are used.

range about 10 minutes.

4 ounces of butter. 8 ounces of flour.

252. French Frying Batter.

1

Fine for pine apple and orange

fritters, scollops,

rut in the flour

oysters, frogs, etc.

12 ounce? of flour. 12 whites of eggs \ pint. 3 ounces of olive oil 6 large tablespoonfuls 3 ounces of white wine or sherry. orange or lemon zest if for fruit fritters. Whip the whites firm in a bowl, pour in the

fritters,

and wine, then add the

When

this

Stir

till

has lost

flour

by shaking

lightness

once, as if

making queen

flour.

Half cup of water. oil

in a little

by standing

all at

the paste cook about 5 minutes. from the fire and work in the following let

2 ounces of

well mixed, use immediately.

its first

and

Then take it and beat well:

Salt,

at a time.

ounce of sugar. the waier, sugar and butfer together, then

Boil

in

5 fggs

Flavoring of nutmeg or vanilla.

1 traspoonful of

baking powder.

Fry spoonfuls in a saucepan of hot lard with wiae or brandy sauce.

Serve


THE AMERICAN PASTBY Bread in Batter Smothered.

256.

Bread.

1 pint

ful of batter

69

and bake

it

brown on both

light

sides.

Serve with butter and syrup. These cakes are richer made with the yolks only than when the

PAIN PERDU. 12 ounces of

OOOK.

whole eggs are put

in.

flour.

259. French Pancakes -"Jenny Lind

of mila.

Pancakes

2 ounces of butter melted. 2 eggs,

1

tablespoonful of golden syrup. 25 slices of bread French rolls best. 1

Mix the flour and milk to make a thin batter and add the other ingredients. Let the bread slices steep a minute or two in it, then fry them in hot lard. They should be barely masked over with batnot thickly covered like fritters. May be sau* Serve with syrup, teed in frying pans as well. sauce, or jelly.

ter,

pound of

"

flour.

6 ounces of sugar. 14 eggs. pint of milk. I large spoonful of melted butter. 1

pint of cream to whip.

Half cup of brandy. Little salt.

Separate the eggs and mix the yolks with the milk, throw in the sugar, butter, brandy and salt, then all

and mix up smooth. Whip the cream and mix that with the batter, then whip the whites and Make them the stir in. Bake thin pancakes in omelet pans. Being Saleable in the baker's shops. same as directed for apple turnovers with dough not sweet they burn easily. When done on both Bides a spoonful of currant jelly on the pancake very rich. Use milk to mix up with and the dough spread Sift powdered sugar will have a better brown color than with water. and roll it up like an omelet. Wet the edges with egg and water to make them on top. Or, roll up plain and serve a little jelly in the flour

Fried Pies.

257.

t

stick

and keep out the grease. Drop the turnovers the dish pan of hot lard and fry them brown like

into a

faitters or

26O.

This

is

A

German Pancakes.

an anticle specially belonging of fare, for

to the restau-

its

;

deep; and such a cake almost constitutes a a meal by itself* They have usually to be mixed up

pan

is

The following is the quickest way: pint of milk to mix up with.

at short notice. 1

Small Patties.

10 yolks of eggs. 4 ounces of melted butter 2 ounces of syrup

1

delicate sort

of small patties have the crust

made by

only difference from common pancakes or good wheat flour batter cakes is in its being baked thick nearly as thick as the omelet bill

Petits Pates

doughnuts.

258.

rant

For cheaper kinds see wheat batter cakes.

frying the coating of batter that will adhere to a solid copper shape that is dipped into it, by im-

mersion in hot lard.

can be shaken

off

pancake batter or that made for waffles

will

answer;

minced meat.

will hardly be found ready Get a copper bolt made into the outward shape and size of a very small fluted tumbler, but in lerg(h fastened solid, and a handle a foot or two

The copper shape

made

basting spoonful,

Little salt.

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

pound or quart of flour. more mUk to thia it down. Put one pint of milk in a pan and

shell

the best for the purpose is the French frying batter made wi'h oil and wine. Fill the shells with chicken or partridge or other

3 basting spoonfulls.

The

the copper wiped and dipped in the batter ngain for another. The batler will not adhere The German if the copper shape is made too hot.

when done and

in the top to dip

1

it

by.

1 pict

things with

all

the other

Stir hard, rubbing the soft

dough smooth and free from lumps, and then add more milk gradually. Put a spoonful of hot lard in the COPPER HEAD PATTY FEIEB, FOR SMALL PATTIES A LA MO.NGLAS, ETC. small omelet frying pan, pour in about a coffee cupit.

THE WIRE EGG BEATER. ROCKY MOUNTAIN CREAM.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

60

Apple Creamcake.

261.

1

pound

of sugar.

8 ounces of butter.

For 4 or 6 cakes for a hotel supper take; 3 pounds of flour 12 cupfuls. 2 pounds of butter or lard 2 tenspoonfuls of salt. 1

6 eggs. 1 small cupful of milk. 1 teaspoonful of baking powder. Flour to roll out about 2 pounds.

4 cupfuls.

quart of ice water. flour to dust with.

More

Rub

between the

the butter info the flour dry

Use

hands.

shortening.

when

salt only

Make

lard

a hollow,

is

for

employed

pour in

the

water

Warm the butter and sugar and Btir them together to a cream, add the eggs two at a time, then the milk, then the powder and most of the Work the dough on the table by pressing out and folding it till it can be rolled out to a sheet. Roll it thin as if for cookies, cut to the size of your

flour.

mix up soft, and roll out on the table. It makes the cake flaky and part in layers to baking pans, roll up the piece of dough on the roll it and fold it a few times like pie paste. rolling-pin and unroll it on the pan, previously Roll out as thick as biscuit at last and bake on well greased. Bake very light colored and not jelly cake pans. Split them open, spread apple quite done, because it has to be cooked again. cream thickly between and powdered sugar on

top.

Macaroon Paste.

265. 262.

Apple Cream. 12 ounces of grated cocoanut. 8 ounces of powdered sugar. 2 whites of eggs.

4 cupfuls of grated apple. 2 cupfuls of sugar. Butter size of an egg.

lemon extract. above ingredients together in a bowl, the sugar and whites first and the cocoanut added. Little

2 tablespoonfuls of water,

Stir the

legg.

Place the paste, either with a teaspoon or with Flavoring of minced orange or lemon peel. Either grate apples on a tin grater or finely a tube and forcing-sack, in long cords across tha mince them; put the specified quantity into a sheets of cake, and then diagonally across to form saucepan with all the other ingredients and stir diamond-shaped hollows. The cord of macaroon

them over the

fire

Then bak paste need be no thicker than a pencil. in a slack oven with the door open till top is brown.

about ten minutes.

263. Covered Lemon Pie "Without Eggs. When

cold drop spots of clear fruit jelly in hollows between the ridges of macaroon paste.

8 ounces of sugar 3 ounces of flour 1

lemon

1

pint of water

the

1 large cupful. 1

small cupful.

266. Macaroon Tarts.

2 cupfuls.

Grate rind of the lemon into a small saucepan, using a tin grater and scraping off with a fork

Line small patty pans with sweet tart paste, fill with macaroon paste, made either with

half

grated cocoanut or minced almonds, and bake Squeeze in the juice, scrape out slowly in a very slack oven. The insides rise round* the pulp, chop it, put in the water and boil. Mix ed and partially hollow. tke sugar and flour together dry and and stir them into the boiling liquor. When half thickened take 267. Napoleon Cake.

what adheres.

and let finish in the pies. The above makes two large pies or three small

it off

Roll out two sheets of puff paste quite thin and be particular to get the right bake on baking sheets. amount of flour. The mixture is pale yellow from When done spread pastry cream (No. 285) upon the rind and sugar. one sheet, place the other on top of it, and finish For the crust rub half a pound of shortening the No. %. Cut in diawith the It is necessary to

top

into a

pound of

flour,

roll out three times.

mix with

cold

water

Put top as

well

as

crust on these pies.

264.

It is a sheet of

A

spec-

cake with macaroon paste baked For the cake take

fruit jelly in spots.

be

directed

at

268. Bismarcks.

ialty at

on top and

will

sort

found at No. 244.

Macaroon Cake.

Often incorrectly ca'led macaroni cake. some of the fine bakeries.

pearl glaae,

and monds or squares, bottom Another pastry cake of the same

Large doughnuts of the

plain sort

No. 561, with a teaspoonful of stewed fruit inside, cut out like thin biscuits, allowed to rise and then fried.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

A

Book of

Puffs,

Eclairs

and Cream

Fillings. Sooner

or later

it

was

these

morally certain

things would get into the papers the common darkness surrounding the subject and the many innocent deceptions practiced for that reason makes this ;

necessary.

For

may promise fairly enough, but not the least certainty that the promised

bills-of-fare

there

is

puff fritter will come to table puffy, and it is different with it than with almost anything else in this

world

;

we

are accustomed to speak of hollow frauds

and hollow mockeries, but a puff fritter is only a fraud when it is not hollow, and you can never properly call a puff fritter your "solid," unless it is a solid mockery of what it ought to be. There are at least a dozen cooks in Sleepy Hollow who can not make puff fritters hollow, and possibly the most of them do not even know what they are, and yet would resent any hint that they are not But they are not the only ones. first-class cooks.

COOK.

61

But there had to atmosphere of perpetual Spring. be some eating done even in Eden, and the Scylla Cottages were kept as an hotel by an estimable landShe prided herself upon her life-long experi-

lady.

ence in housekeeping.

Her regular patrons from the North, who arrived punctually each year just before New Year's, had discovered a spell to keep her in subjection. "What

Whom do you exsociety shall we have this year? pect?" and then "Have you found a cook yet who can make those delightful souffle fritters ? Oh, they make them

so elegantly at

Long Branch

!

And you

did not succeed with the receipt we sent you ? Dear me and we procured it from one of the most cele-

brated cooks, it must have been right. Why, they make them over there at the Charybdis Hotel, perhaps as elegantly as our cooks do at Long Branch,

and that but

is

quite a splendid

we seem

to

place,

the

have become attached

Charjbdis, to this spot.

0, if you only had a really good cook.!" Of course these intellectual people were not in

earnest nobody cares for a fritter, more or less, but There was a cook of considerable repute, who ran for they knew that in this way they could infuse gall several successive seasons on that splendid steamer, and bitterness into somebody's life, and when they the Aberbrothock, and he made it a point to have were good natured they played the subject for sport,

what he

called bell

fritters,

for one of his

;

"sweet and when they were really mean through eating too

entrees" always for the last dinner of the trip. He went through the motions of making puff

much green

turtfe, they rung the changes for pure would even go over for a day or two to They spite. ters, and he made a nice spongy sort of an article, the Charybdis Hotel, which is really a very fine but nobody could see why it was called bell fritter, place, with splendid shell roads and two-forty nags because it was not "hollow as a bell," and had not to drive on them magnificent rows of magnolias, even a space inside big enough to hang the smallest fig orchards and oranges; but, being a literary But one day, by some accident, and artist sort of crowd, they better liked the atkind of a clapper. frit-

;

he got the proportions just right, and, to his aston- mosphere of the Isle of Calms, for "the nightingales ishment, when he dropped the fritters into the hot sing round it all the day long," and the Southern The pieces of sunsets from that point are most gorgeous. lard, they presently began to swell. the paste he dropped in were as big as goose eggs at first, which was entirely too large in any case, but

he had not been used

As low,

to the it

is

Charybdis Hotel fritters, they were holbut they were little, old hardshell

true,

them increase much. things, and whenever they were served the guests and they swelled, and by had to be furnished with nut-crackers to break them the time they had attained to the size of canteloup with. And yet, that cook was so proud of them that melons, and the two at the bottom had hoisted all the he guarded the secret of making them from the But

to seeing

this time they swelled

and were about to pitch them over, the cook was thoroughly scared he thought Old Nick was inside them, and, hastily seizing the saucepan by the handle, he threw it and the whole caboodle out of the cook-house window. Puff fritters, or, rather, the want of them, was the

rest

;

boys as carefully as Aladdin's cave.

if

he had

discovered a

new

If there He needed not have been so careful. were any use of it, no doubt but as many as fifty vaThe key to rieties of hollow fritters could be made.

the whole matter

is this

:

2 TO.

you make a very stiff, smooth, cooked paste of about half its weight of Cottages, for several years. flour, then work in gradually There is not a more delightful winter resort than raw eggs you have a fritter paste that when dropped the Scylla Cottages, on the dreamy Southern coast. in hot lard will swell, and each piece become as hollow cause of a good deal of unhappiness at

It is

noted the world over for

its

location

the Scylla

upon the

very verge of Percival's beautiful coral grove, where the purple mullet and the gold-fish rove, and is only

If

as

an egg

shell.

Any

other substance, corn starch,

corn'meal, banana pulp, fruit pulp of any kind, cheese, almost anything smooth will act the same way, either

We shall have more to easy boat-row from the Isle of Calms, alone or mixed with flour. where the sea throws up some new and exquisite say about this when we come to souffle pudding But these simple foundations are not particularly tropical shells every day, and Morris's folks, in pensive thought, can wander on the sea-beat shore in an good eating, and have to be enriched. Their tendena two hours'


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. cy to puff up is already at the strongest, and whatever is added must be so balanced more eggs against

more butter and sugar

as not

to destroy

In

it.

pound of corn 1

to boil

away

after being measured.

The

made

receipt nexrfollowing gives the kind that by the Charybdis Hotel cook, and which he

so afraid lest

anyone should find

Little salt.

These are made same way as the "hardshells," except that the starch has to be mixed separately.

Boil half the milk with the butter and salt in it, and was mix the starch smooth with the other half; pour it was in the saucepan and stir over the fire till it becomes

They used

out.

starch.

ounce of butter.

8 eggs.

;

lowed

trust the pack-

ages for weight. 1 pint of milk.

things like these requiring exact proportions it may make a difference if the eggs used be unusually large or small. There is no magic in the number it is

weight you want. Ten eggs average a pound. And it may make a difference, too, if the water be al-

Weigh the starch; don't

through.

to

be called Baptist fritters, because they are never truly good until they have been immersed in syrup. In

a firm paste well cooked. Beat the eggs in one at a time.

Have

fresh sweet

lard moderately hot, and drop in pieces of the paste as large as guinea eggs, by pushing them off the

campmeeting countries where they are sold on the grounds by measure, the statute requires them to point of a spoon. They need considerable time to weigh four pounds to the bushel. They can be made fry. Serve with sauce transparent, wine, brandy, to weigh less if made larger. The number of eggs lemon or custard. Makes about twenty-five or ;

in the receipt is left optional. The Charybdis man only used four because they were dear, and he had

thirty.

CROUSTADES SOUFFLES.

to carefully round off the fritters as he dropped them, because while the rich kinds will smooth themselves

in the frying fat,

come out with

these only

all

the

373.

Fried Puff Borders.

You will like them with rough corners magnified. For individual entrees. Suitable to serve instead six eggs, and are not obliged to furnish nut -crackers, of Yorkshire pudding with any roasted or braised even with the other proportion. meat having a brown gravy.

Make

271.

Hardshell Fritters.

queen

either the corn

lady-finger sack 1 pint of water.

pound of 4, 5, or

a

flour.

little finger,

of small

6 eggs.

size.

on

starch fritter paste or the Put it in the

next following.

fritter paste

and press out to a

Form

in piping smaller than greased tin lid or a baking pan the piping into oval rings the

required for your individual dishes. frying fat is ready, turn the lid upside the rings on it and dip them in the fat. size

Slight seasoning of salt.

When

the

down with

Bring the water to a boil in a bowl-shaped sauceThey will drop in the flour all at once and immediately slip off and retain their shape while pan of good size Where many are stir to a firm, smooth paste, which will require about frying, but puff considerably. Then take it off and, wanted at once, a baking pan does best to fry in, a five minutes over the fire. after letting it stand a few minutes, work in the eggs smaller sized tin pan that will go down in it being ;

one at a time with a large spoon. Beat the paste up It does against the side for at least five minutes. no harm to let the paste stand an hour or two before

used

and

to

make the shapes

tube,

on.

a half sheet of

Instead of forcing sack paper, made into a

stiff

cornet, pinned, and the point cut off, will do. must not be allowed Serve hot, with the meat in the centre and gravy in ' to get cold before the eggs are beaten in. sh. Set on an the iron frying kettle half filled with clarified meat fat, The two following are the kinds that they made so and when that is hot drop in pieces of the frying, after

it

is

made, but

it

:

paste

about as large as guinea eggs. Only a few at a time. When done, take up with a skimmer drain on a

elegantly at

Long Branch.

;

colander or seive

;

serve with syrup.

Makes twen-

is

the French word for fritter.

CORN STARCH FRITTERS.

Souffle is

Sometimes Crisp and

fritters of the tribe.

fine.

No

limit to their swelling kettle. tle

When made

capacity but the size of the of the size of footballs the ket-

has to be set in the oven to

merely

float

on top of the

finish,

fat

puffed.

374. Queen Fritters.

Balloon Fritters. The boss

Souffle is

Perhaps puffed fritter would be better English than puff fritter, but common usage seems to sanction the latter.

ty-five.

373.

Beignet puff.

because they

and cannot cook

beignets

filled

with pastry-cream and called

au frangipane.

1 pint of water.

4 ounces of butter. 8 ounces of

10 egga.

flour.

Beignet Souffles.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

63

Boil the water and butter together in a bowl- cil, and half fill the sack with the paste. Squeeze shaped saucepan large enough to beat the mixture out piping and form rings of it the size of the top of in. Put in the flour all at once and stir over the a coffee cup, on tin lids previously greased over with fire till you have a firm, well-cooked paste. Take it lard. When the frying fat is hot, the lids in it

dip stand to lose a few degrees of upside down and the rings will slip off. Fry them drain on a colander; split them all heat, then work in the eggs one at a time with a light brown; spoon, and beat the paste well against the side of round with a sharp penknife spread jelly, or fruit the saucepan. Fry same as the other varieties. jam, or lemon butter between the halves place them They may be glazed by sifting powdered sugar on together again, dredge powdered sugar over and pile them and melting it by setting in the top of a hot on a stand covered with a napkin. oven, or else with a red hot salamander or shovel,

from the

let it

fire,

;

;

held over. egar,

May

be served also with raspberry vin-

Ring Puffs "With Peaches.

lemon juice and sugar, custard, or any pud-

Make the rings as'in the preceeding case. Instead The receipt makes forty to fifty. None of these fritters require any such thing as of splitting and spreading, place them in dishes or soda, or baking powder, or any substitute as is often saucers and half a peach on top of each, the syrup absurdly directed neither do the eggs require beat- to be poured under. The peach halves, if the entremet is to be served hot for dinner, should be baked ing, otherwise than in the paste, as described. ding sauce.

;

These remarks apply as well to eclairs, talmouses, etc.,

all

the baked puffs,

of similar character.

When any of them fail to puff up as expected, it usually requires another egg in the paste. There is a certain point of softness when the paste will al-

the purpose, with sugar and butter, or else stewed in syrup. If to be served cold, preserved or brandy peaches can be used. for

Bell Fritters.

most run out of a spoon, but not quite, that is the best for lightness, and is soon learned by'practice.*

T5. SPANISH

This

is

the

way they were made by

the cook of

when he made them right and threw them out of the cookhouse window in alarm because they swelled.

that splendid steamer,

PUFF FRITTERS.

Beignets Souffles, a la Vanille.

the Aberbrothock,

1 pint of water. 3 ounces of butter, or lard.

All the preceding kinds are unsweetened and cook light colored these contain sugar and require

8 ounces of flour.

;

5 eggs, or 6

care to prevent their becoming too dark in frying. 1 pint of water.

3 ounces of sugar.

6 eggs, or 7

if small.

it,

put

and make the

fritter paste same way as directed for the preceding kinds, adding the vanilla with the last eggs.

Fry in good lard slowly. They utes before they begin to expand. with a skimmer

;

orders of

fifty

may be

five

min-

Take them out

drain on a colander

dered sugar over and serve.

;

Enough

dredge powfor

average

persons.

Fritters glaces

au rkum, or otheiwise, are

powdered sugar melted on the

manner before

Good bread; not thorough, unshapely biscuits spoiled with inferior yellow baking bowder, top crust blistered and bottom crust soiled, so brittle and coarse that they crumble in the fingers, go down like sawdust and leave a taste of soda and salt butter in the

mouth, but nice

slices of

white bread, good

rolls,

flaky biscuits, fine grained muffins. There are about three-score-and-ten needs and uses for such as these in

good cooking.

In half of them nothing but bread bread makes a good substi-

will do, in the other half fritters

glazed, either with a thick sugar syrup flavored with rum (a rich pudding sauce) poured over them, or else

Good lard is

What do you do with the stale pieces of bread that are left over so abundantly, wherever there is an abundant table set and people pick and choose so ?

flour.

2 teaspoonfuls extract vanilla. Boil the water with the butter and sugar in in the flour

if small.

as directed for queen fritters.

preferable to bad butter.

7 ounces of butter.

10 ounces of

Make

fritters

in

tote for

something

2 TO.

else, as in this receipt.

Bread Puff

Fritters.

the 1 pint of

described.

water or milk,

pound of white bread crumbs.

27O.

Ring Puffs With

Jelly.

2 ounces of butter. 5 eggs.

For luncheon or supper.

Shave

Make

a puff fritter paste, the Spanish puff preferPut a tube in the able, but the others will answer. forcing sack not

much larger

at the point

than a pen-

all

crust off the bread

Boil the water, put the

and mash utes

and crumble

smooth paste over the then add the butter, and when to a

it fine.

bread crumbs in and fire it is

five

stir

min-

worked in


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

COOK.

take the paste from the fire and beat in the eggs one at a time as for other fritters.

voy, under different

bread.

Parmesan

names

and Parmesan (named

;

from Parma), though it is made in all the north of This makes a good fritter, but less certain to be Italy, and particularly in Lombardy. Gruyere hollow than others; depends on the fineness of the cheese is, however, most used throughout Europe; twice or thrice the price out of Italy.

is

In Italy, a plateful of grated cheese is mostly served The next, made by a different method, is one of with the soup, when each guest takes what he likes the most delicate preparations of the potato. But and mixes it on his own plate." It would be labor there are potatoes and potatoes. thrown away to use any but the best flavored and

mealiest for such a purpose.

380.

FRENCH POTATO FRITTERS.

Another writer says: "My friends had two surwhich I myself had not thought Parmesan served with the soupe, and a glass of dry madeira These were two novelties lately imported after. prises of

(into France)

diplomatists,

Beignets de

d'

de

witty sayings, etc." Every well regulated hotel storeroom of course has

terre.

Potato puree and eggs beaten light and fried. Hors auvre, (side dish) or vegetable garnish for en-

tress, or 1

Pomme

sweet entremet with brandy sauce.

pounds of pared 4 ounces of flour.

raw

potatoes.

warm, mix

him where found

"Among

in all the other

or more, like making sponge cake. When light stir in the flour. Fry small spoonfuls, egg-shaped, in

Drain on paper. Serve hot. Not hollow, but very light.

hot lard.

Makes about

will be gratfr

m

;

Gruyere cheese of Switzerland is also a well known It is made from new milk, and flavored cheese.

The Roquefort cheese is with a powdered herb. made of a mixture of sheep's and goat's milk. The Parmesan (an milk.

is made of skimmed and hard cheese, and is is six months old, and is

Italian cheese)

It is a high-flavored

not seat to market until

it

three or four years.

It is

extensively

used, grated, for cooking.

Transparent Fritters.

White. Good to use up whites of eggs out of muffins, custards, etc., wherein they do no Serve with red wine sauce, or lemon juice good. Crisp.

left

and sugar.

cheeses, since -ne

introduction of

the factory system, are exported in immense quantities to England, where they are much ought for, and

This is considered by epicures as great luxuries. at generally astonishing to Americans abroad, who, it only in rule to offer guests cheese of foreign manufacture.

home, often consider

pint of milk, or water. 3 ounces of butter, or lard.

pound of white of eggs

(9 whites).

is

as directed for other starch fritters. If the batter is beaten too

*

*

3 ounces of corn starch.

slowly.

it,

the best cheeses of England are the Stilof France, are those of Neufchatel

Our American

Make

But those who live where anything but American

The fromage de Roquejort is, Brie and Roquefort. The perhaps, one of the most popular of all cheeses.

often kept

381.

to choose.

difficult to obtain

ton and Cheshire

Then set the pan or ingredients except the flour. bowl in ice- water and beat the mixture 15 minutes

60.

fore it is

and interested in reading the following, "Practical Cooking and Dinner Giving."

Boil the potatoes well done in salted water, drain dry and mash them thoroughly better through a still

the different varieties of cheese on shelf, properly can have all the world be-

ified

6 whole eggs and 4 yolks. Juice of half a lemon. Nutmeg.

While

all

labeled, so that the cook

cheese, if they have not already read

4 tablespoonfuls of cream. Same of white wine or sherry.

colander.

by Prince Talleyrand, the first of our whom we owe so many wise and

to

much

after

*

*

*

*

Perhaps the cheapest of the foreign famous cheeses It comes in little rolls about an the Neufchatel.

is Fry inch thick and three inches long, enveloped the foil and costs about twenty cents a roll.

in tin-

The tariff may be saved by purchasing the Neufchatel the fritters are liable to explode and Westchester County, (They never explode on the table manufactured in New Jersey New York. As for that, the Stilton made in Cayuga no danger.) county can hardly be dected from the Leicestershire We now come to cheese puffs and creams. In the manufacture itself; and in fact, nearly all the famous so that great majority of instances when anything made cheeses a>-e very perfectly imitated in America, with cheese in a bill of fare, the kind named those who choose may indulge in foreign names and

whites are

when near

all in,

done.

appears Parmesan. Besides

time." this, the cook is directed to encourage home manufacture at the same use various other foreign cheeses, according to what The moral to be drawn from the preceding oxthe purpose may be. In Italian cookery, one writer tract is that for cooking purposes at least, American observes, "several varieties of cheese are much em- cheese will do very well, even for dishes au Parmtis

ployed

:

such as the cheese of Switzerland and Sa-

san, or

d.

la

Parmesane.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Parmesan 2S2.

with Apples.

Fritters

again, a few explanations here

When is

$ pint of water. 1 ounce of butter.

4 ounces of

come

in place.

possibly several inches deep off the top of the soup stock boiler and

the clear fat

skimmed

strained into a frying kettle, it looks clear enough and ready for frying. But in fact it contains a good

flour.

4 ounces of cheese.

deal of water

5 or 6 eggs.

rid

Grate the cheese,

65

if

dry enough, or

mince

else

it

extremely small.

and gelatinous matter that must be got

of.

When it is set on the range it soon boils rapidly, and inexperienced persons are apt to think that it is

then

to receive the

articles to

be

but

ready fried, by boiling the water if they are dropped in at that stage they only boil all and then stirring in the flour. When well cooked take the saucepan from the fire, away to a mush, and perhaps the grease foams over on to the range. If, however, the grease is allowed add the grated cheese an d beat it into the hot paste to continue boiling it may take an hour the water Then in at a the one a time work with pestle. eggs will all be expelled and the gelatinous matters, or and beat the mixture for several minutes. Fry gravy, will all be found coated over the bottom of small fritters. They swell very much and are not the kettle. The grease is then motionless and will good if dark colored. When done, drain them on soon begin to smoke it is hotter than boiling water. a a each one with of if twist necessary open paper If now poured off into a clean saucepan, it is clarifork, and put in a teaspoonful of dry-stewed apple When the cheese is of fied and ready for frying in, and may be set away to seasoned with fresh butter. cold and used whenever wanted without any a very dry sort, a little more butter is needed to get more preparation. make the

Make

the puff fritter paste

with the butter in

it

paste.

instead of pouring it into a clean saucepan, the be fried are put into the grease in the same

If,

articles to

The receipt preceding and the next to follow have been rehabilitated from some of those delightfully

was boiled down

in, they will dissolve more on the bottom, the grease vague instructions for making Italian or other dish- will become turgid and foam over and take fire, and es, which say, "take a glass of water and a handful instead of the articles browning they are apt to stick of cheese and a pounded anchovy, and some flour, on the bottom and the whole contents acquire a " and eggs enough to make a paste not too thin, etc burned and smoky taste. Hence the necessity of The anchovy is for flavor and can be added or not, clarifying all fat that is saved from the cooking of

at pleasure.

kettle

it

or less of the sediment

meats.

When

383.

Ramequin

fat that

Puffs.

in the

Make

the cheese fritter paste of the foregoing re"

ceipt.

,

Cut some manilla paper in broad ribbands, and brush them over with a little melted lard.

Form pressing

the paste in ring shapes on these papers, it out of a paper cornet, or a sack.

These are not slender rings, but more like cakes with a depression in the centre.

Draw

by

meats are baking in the oven, taken out as long as there

may be is

pan

in precisely the

all is

the

water

same condition as that

taken from the soup stock, and contains meat gravy. It is then what is called drippings.

But when the meat has become browned and the gravy in the pan dried and browned too, then all the fat that remains is clarified and will set like tallow it can be poured from the pan into when cold ;

flat

a saucepan direct,

and used

to fry

with immedi-

ately.

the bands of paper through the hot frying-

When kidney

fat,

or other fat pieces of meat are

rendered down in a meat pan, they should be treated They should be fried like the baked meats; cooked with a little water just of a light color. Drain, then split them as you in the pan at first, but allowed to dry out and let the would muffins, and spread between some creamed glaze be fixed to the bottom before the clear grease is cheese or fondue. Dredge a little gra ed cheese on

fat

and the

puffs will slip

off.

off. and set the pan containing them in the top of poured Articles properly made and properly fried and the oven for two minutes before serving. Care is redrained after frying have so little grease left about quired in forming the shapes not to have them too them that it is scarcely appreciated; but what they as large, they expand considerably. are liable to have about them are sickly flavors of the

top,

384. About Clarifying Frying

Fat.

nature of vegetable oils that the frying fat may have The bay leaf, onion, gathered from other vessels.

A number

described in

ever

the cloves, mace, lemon, or whatput in the soup are fine whilst they are living flavors, but their essential oils carried over in the fat to the frying saucepan are not so pleasant. Therefore the clear fat should be saved before any

celery this

of articles have

column that have

in hat

fat,

enough

to

now been

be fried by being immersed

at least to cover them.

be a long time before

thv will

As

it

may

have to be mentioned

is

and herbs;


THE AMERICAN PASTBY COOK.

66

of these seasonings are put in the stock pot. An or- ing the causes of obesity, finds his fat neighbors ange or pineapple fritter may have had the fruit showing a partiality for such things as tourte de soaked in good wine and the batter made of the frangipane, which in WorEnglish is cream pie.

lightest kind, but if fried in fat

from stuffed pork or cester ^finds that both these are one word, the wild fowl, the first thing the tongue will be conscious Italian being frangipanna, frangipane the French, of will be the ghosts of departed onions. The table but that it means two things a perfume of jasmine, may be furnished expensively, and the bill-of-fore be and milk boiled down thick and mixed with al-

French terms, yet

full of

little matters be monds. So, as Tommy Traddles would say, "There be an indescribable you are !" The people had a perfume which they something that will detract from the pleasure of eat- admired, but it would not satisfy hunger; they made If fat containing oil of onions an almond cream and ing at your table. thought it so good they named

must be used, keep fat is well

nigh

it

these

if

trivial there

thought too

will

frying onions

for

and

tasteless,

is

in.

Beef

good alone; see that

nothing goes into the rendering pan that will injure

it.

it

An

perfume.

obvious compromise between ethe-

And thus it is the longings and material needs. art of cookery meets every requirement, even of the delicate people who really eat nothing at rial

all.

Whatever it may have been, the frangipane of the present time is not made with condensed milk, and the nearest approach to the old definition is a receipt

Frangipanni-Frangipane.

A

strange trait

ways seems

it is,

but civilized humanity

be ashamed of

to

necessity of eating,

and

is

al-

subjection to the always ready either to its

that directs almond macaroons to be broken

The compounds carrying the name are with flour, and the flavors vary.

it.

bread and butter or laugh at it. this tendency, that only a very few au-

quarrel with

serious manner.

The nation that

is

PASTBY CHE AM OB CUSTARD.

necessity of eating, made the best of the difficulty, and elevated the entire matter to a point of respect, which the other peoples acknowledge whether

they understand or not. But, "Oh, if we could only live without eating!"

common have

tellers

Some

fanciful story aspiration imagined people living on air alone; still.

385.

FrangipaD

credited with

being the most highly civilized in Europe, finding that all its civtlization did not redeem it from the

the

up in made

its

So strong is thors of the utmost independence and decided power have cared to treat of matters of food and drink in a

is

all

The kind commonly used by bakers cream puffs, etc.

for filling

1 quart of milk. 8 ounces of white sugar. 4 ounces of flour.

5 eggs.

Pinch of

salt.

1

ounce of butter.

1

tablespoonful of extract of lemon.

Set the milk and butter on to boil. Mix the flour quaffing the rich south wind as real people quaff Others have come down a little lower, from and sugar together while dry, very thoroughly, then wine. airy nothings to trifles light as air. sprinkle them in the milk rapidly and keep beating "That suits me exactly," says one of Disraeli's till it is well up to the boiling point again. It is

"I

ladies, all

am

meals.

shall give

I

a great foe to dinners, and, indeed, to think when the good time comes we

up eating

in public, except, perhaps, fruit

on a green bank, with music." "It

is

a pity,

acters, "that

side of the range

and

stir in the five eggs,

it

to the

cover and

simmer slowly

for twenty minutes, or till well Flavor after cooling. EXTRA TOUCHES. Three ounces of fresh butter

let

cooked.

says one of Bulwer's charnot serve perfumes at dessert; it

my lord,"

we do

Move

worthless if in the least scorched.

lightly

browned

in a

frying pan

over the

fire

and

is their

then added to the pastry-cream, gives

rose and the jessamine; why not their odors, too?" "It is an exquisite idea of yours," said he, "and

Almond macaroons may be and flavor of nuts. broken into the milk when first put on to boil. Thick whipped cream can be lightly stirred into

appropriate place. In confectionery (delicate invention of the Sylphs,) we imitate the forms of the

the next time you dine

here

fumes." It

we

will

have per- the pastry-cream when the for immediate use.

seems likely enough that this very conceit grew

out of the name, frangipane, by which the cream or custard used for filling puffs is known to French

Thackeray, who names a cook Champignon, at the same time calls a milliner Mademoiselle cooks.

Frangipanni.

Frangipanni was as pears, as eau-de-cologne

common is

now.

a perfume,

it

ap-

Savarin, examin-

When

articles

to

it

be

richness,

filled

are

the pastry-cream is for cream pie, or tourte or for fauchonettes, which are small,

de frangipane;

tarts nearly filled with it and meringued on top like lemon pies; or for cream cake, the difference required is only to use 8 yolks instead of the 5

deep

whole eggs, and make the cream as usual. The juice The whites of of a lemon may be added for pies. the eggs

make

the meringue.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Chocolate Pastry Cream.

86.

Forfeuchonettes au choclat,

au chocolat,

Eclairs

etc.

Melt and stir the butter and sugar together in a sauce pan; add the eggs, beaten a little first, and stir the mixture over the fire till it is half-cooked, ropes from the spoon, and looks like soft butter. for puffs or tartlets it may be well cooked and

quart of milk. 8 ounces of sugar. 1

4 ounces of

67

If fla-

vored with orange or lemon. For pies, dredge a little powdered sugar over the top of the mixture

flour.

2 ounces of grated chocolate. 2 ounces of butter.

when

in the crusts

top.

Slow oven.

helps to prevent scorching on or 5 pies.

Makes 4

4 yolks of eggs.

The French name

1 tablespoonful of vanilla extract, Boil the milk, butter and grated

chocolate to

Mix sugar and flour dry and beat them into gether. Stir awhile to prevent burning, the boiling milk. then set the saucepan on the side of the range arid stir in the yolks, after beating them with a spoonful Let cook till well thickened. Flavor with of milk. the vanilla

when

38 T.

cold.

Cream

Coffee Pastry

1 pint of clear, ver 1 pint of

Use these instead of the quart of milk, and make

on

toast, cakes, filling

cream puffs. and one being

pies, etc., besides filling

In another point they are all alike, learned the rest become the easier for

have

be stirred over the

served with darioles in definition of dari-

But the nearest the English cooks could come to fitting it with a term was to call it a cheesecake. Neither term is appropriate. The ole is

a custard

tart.

Although

containing eggs, the keeping qualities of these prepa rations are such as to entitle them to be called con-

Lemon

They

it.

thickened

all

that

Conserve.

lemon custard, lemon For lemon honey, etc. tartlets, pies, and spreading on

Also called dariole

filling

The reader perceives that as cream fillings a variety of dissimilar compounds here come together. They are alike, however, in being each one adapted tarts, tartlets,

is

One English

the second course.

lemon

cheesecake,

then needed.

for several uses, for spreading

made

pastry-cream.

board ships and steamers where milk for cooking purposes can seldom be obtained, all the pastryAn creams are made nearly as good with water. is

and

feast of a choice order,

On

ounce of butter extra

little pies,

place "cheesecake to keep several years."

cream.

common

or

following, one of the danole fillings, is called in one

strong coffee.

according to directions for

for tarts

with the preceding mixture and several variations of it, is dariolts. Young Quentin Durward, of Scott's novel, on his first arrival in France, is set down to a

filling,

paste,

small puffs,

larger cakes. 1 pound of sugar. 5 or 6 lemons.

4 ounces of butter. 8 yolks and 1 whole egg. Put the butter and sugar in a bright saucepan, 1 grate the yellow rinds of the lemons into i with a

one touch of cookery makes the whole lot kin. Five different English cook books contain directions for

scraping off with a fork what adheres; sqeeze in the juice without the seeds, then stir over Beat the yolks and the fire till the mixture boils.

making the simple base of several conserves, to follow here presently, that is what is called there transparent pudding, and on this side is pretty well known

mix them in and stir about ten minutes more, or till cooked and thick like melted cheese. Lemons that are green, thick-skinned and acrid

as transparent pie. Only two of the five give the essential point of cooking the mixture over the fire

are not

to

before

the pies are

copies verbatim

filled

fire till

with

consequence

One says

the other says of it is that the

till

stir till like

like batter.

raw

88.

mixture put into the

will rise

Transparent Pie Mixture.

Used aiso

for puffs

and

tarts,

for this purpose.

variously flavored.

a rule useful if

to

ever scorch

time presses.

The

and look fine, but when done will go down and become like wax; whereas if previously cooked it remains light and delicious.

pies

fit

remember that these mixtures when they have butter in except the them; they may be left to simmer at the side when It is

and one of these seldom

from the older one,

change of a single word. buttered eggs,

it,

tin grater,

29O.

Conserve aux Amandes.

For small

puffs,

almond cream cake,

J pint of water.

8 ounces of sugar. 2 ounces of butter.

4 yolks of eggs. 6 bitter almonds and a

pound of sugar. pound of butter.

tartlets, etc.

8 ounces of almonds.

little

rose extract, if they

are convenient.

Scald the almonds and take off the skins, then

Nutmeg

or vanilla flavor

and brandy,

if desired.

chop them fine.


THE AMERICAN PASTBY COOK.

68

Boil the sugar and water to a thick syrup; n the minced almonds and the butter and boil

stir five

perpetual youth. thoughts of gold."

"I

minutes.

Then

ture off the fire

when

flavor

yolks of eggs and take the mixAdd the rose when they thicken.

stir in the

cold.

Cocoanut Conserve.

291.

I

Perish thy

find.

Don Leon!"

with thee in that search,

exclaimed Leonardo.

"Oh, would

again!" "Listen to the mocking-bird," Leon.

I

were a boy

said

Ponce de

"Aye," answered Leonardo, "and the woodpecker tapping the old hollow tree." "And the voice of the turtle is heard in the land,"

8 ounces of grated cocoanut. cupful of milk, or water.

8 ounces of sugar. 2 ounces of butter.

chimed in the

Whites of four eggs.

and beauty," exclaimed Leonardo. "Sebastiano, what ails thee," asked Gonzalez,

"Land

Thin pared yellow rind of an orange. Mince the orange peel and boil it with the sugar and milk. Stir in the cocoanut, the butter, and

Take the mixture

the beaten whites last. it

am

That will

off

when

thickens.

The two preceding kinds give a yellow and a white nut cream or conserve, very useful and ornamental for spreading between layers of snow cake. Pistachios

"why

blinkest thou

if too

is

'tis

when

believe in

I

seldom necessary to keep any such compounds

It is

as these in hotel

work

for

any length of

time.

The

quantities prescribed are for the usual daily requireIt should be remembered, ments of 50 persons.

however, that sunlight turns butter rancid, and anything containing it should be kept dark in covered jars.

I see it,

but in omens 1

had a dream the other night when every-

I

still

fig for

"

thy dreams."

"By our good tundo,

Saint Augustine," said Padre Ro"as thou saidst figs, we will have some figs.

Bring me the figs of Smyrna that remain in the boat, and we will plant the seeds. Haply in this genial land the fig will prosper, and many that come after us shall bless us. Yea, my son, there shall be in this land fountains and streams of perpetual

youth.

and

Florida Jam.

when

do not believe."

"A

cold.

at. the

nothing;

gold."

"Gold

"I do. and hickory nuts can be substituted for Can be thinned with thing was firm

Padre Rotundo.

sky?' but a jay bird sat majestic on yon hickory limb, and when he winked at me should I not wink at him ? Perhaps he knows where there

"Oh,

either of the other kinds.

milk

oily voice of

of love and sunny skies, bright with joy

They

shall flow

East, arid be of

many

from the North and West generations.

In magnolia

parks and orange groves and by the river "Florida shall be the cried Ponce de Leon,

name

of this

"for, in truth,

new

it is

land,"

a flowery

What sayest thou Padre Rotundo?" Florid is the red-bird "As thou sayest I say.

land.

flitting

through the green bushes;

florid the flamingo

St. John's, eyes shall look love to eyes that speak again; and there shall be many a sly flirtation by the light of the chandelier in the halls of And

there shall be gold, Sebastiano, but not for thee. The Gold and hotel-keepers of the future shall see it.

letters of credit from the frozen North. Golden orweeds were that floated that shall make this land a likeness wear too, anges, about our vessel as we passed yon enchanted islands to the gardens of thy native Seville." set in a luminous sea." "Beautiful isles of the sea," murmured Gonzalez. "Padre," said Ponce de Leon, drawing near and

in the

swamp;

florid the sea

sighed Leonardo. speaking in a low tone, "dost remember the convent "Surely," went on Ponce de Leon, "they are the garden near Seville, into which we stole, thou and I, veritable isles of the blessed that we thought were when we were small boys, to see thy sister once And dost remember the spicy breeze that but fables of the ancients, and this is the garden of more ? "Beautiful gems of the ocean,"

the Hesperides."

was wafted

to

us from the refectory, where the

sis-

"No gold, no gold," groaned Sebastiano, throwing ter s were preparing confections and conserves of ordown his prospecting pan and pick, "I have delved ange flowers? And dost remember how they caught among the sands of yonder shore and found naught. us and made us work till our arms did ache, at Padre Rotundo, thou sayest these shell mounds show pounding orange rinds in a mortar; whilst thou that

then,

this

land was once the ocean's bed, show us, lie the wrecks of ancient ships gold-

where

didst nearly roast at stirring orange

jam?"

"Tut, tut," returned the Padre, "I choose not to Yet if thou remember such undignified incidents.

Padre, show us the streams that flow down from El Dorado." wilt, thou mayst compare the delicate fancy of those "And if," said Ponce de Leon, pursuing his own good women for confections made of flowers, with train of thought, "this be the garden of the Hesperi- the cruel extravagance of the pagan Romans who des, somewhere in its glades exists the fountain of desolated the groves, and made costly dishts of the

laden; or,


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK, tongues of thousands of singing birds, and thou wilt concede the finer grace of the later day." But Ponce de Leon had not been listening. His thoughts were faraway, and he sighed, smile haunts me still.'

2. Florida For 1

a V orange,

pound

bright

eclairs

aux

For

confitures,

Little

puffs, canape's

betgnets

auparme-

aufromage,

etc.

salt.

becomes thick and just begins to boil; but must not quite boil, as that would spoil it.

fire till it

teaspoonful of extract of rose Put the sugar and butter in a bright saucepan; grate in the yellow rinds of the oranges and add an 1

ounce of candied orange flowers,

if

you have them.

Squeeze in the juice of the oranges and lemons without the seeds, and stir the syrup thus made over the Beat the eggs and yolks a little, add

fire till it boils.

the mixture becomes thick

Add

cayenne pepper and

Grate or mince the cheese very fine; put it and al the other ingredients in a saucepan and stir over the

6 yolks and 2 whole eggs.

till

cheese puff fritters

\ pint of milk.

juice only. 4 ounces of butter.

cook

filling

4 yolks of eggs.

4 large oranges.

let

Creamed Cheese.

8 ounces of cheese. 4 ounces of butter.

etc.

2 or 3 lemons

them and

fire,

to set in the pies in the oven.

SO4.

of sugar.

about ten minutes.

should be only half-cooked over the

and allowed

sanfor ramequin

Conserve of Oranges.

mountain cakes,

darioles,

tartelettcs

"Her

It

filling.

69

the rose extract after

it

As

the good quality of this preparation

is

depend-

upon its being made only just before it is to be served, and cheese grating is one of the tedious operations, it will be found, for hotel use, more expeditious to pound the cheese and butter together, slightly warmed, then pour in milk and yolks and stir till thickened. Can be used as a sauce with ent

Italian fritters,

made a

triflle

thinner.

205.

cooling.

Cheese Fondu, or Melted Cheese.

An

ancient, cheap, but laborious way of making a conserve of oranges or lemons, is to boil the rinds in

two or three waters for several hours, to extract the bitter taste and make them tender; then pound them a mortar and honey or syrup. to a paste in

boil the paste with either

A

large proportion of the area of the Bahama Islands is devoted to the cultivation of pineapples. The appearance of the broad expanse of young fruit with

of delicately-tinted, but sharp and serrated leaves, rising only a short distance from the its clusters

For Welch

rare-bits, canapes au fromage, etc. See preceding receipt for creamed cheese, and substitute ale for the milk. Either of the ways answers for all the purposes of the other.

For canapes, spread the mixture on toast, in the oven three minutes before serving.

and put

The preceding form of melted cheese is also one form of the fondue, which does not come under the It may be noted in passing, howpresent category. ever,

that the fondue of which Savarin thought so like a dish of scrambled eggs with

much, was more

He cheese, having no ale or other liquid added. ground and covering the undulating fields, produces says it is of Swiss origin, and that the cayenne is not a very remarkable effect. As many as 1,500,000 of to be forgotten, that being a characteristic of the the fruit have been collected from a single acre dish. He made his when a fondues,

293, Corn Starch Pastry Cream. 1

He says alentertaining five hundred people. low one egg for each guest, one-third as much cheese and half that of butter, etc. But it illustel

pint of water or milk.

6 ounces of white sugar. 2 ounces of corn starch.

rates the idea underlying small bills of fare, that every person will partake of the one dish, if that one dish be made of surpassing excellence.

2 ounces of butter. 5 yolks of eggs. Flavoring. Boil the water or milk with the sugar in the starch with a little water extra; pour

saucepan and

Flavor

when

it

in the

perhaps ten

minutes.

cool.

VARIATION.

A

the seeds thrown water,

Mix

up.

add the ture becomes quite thick

again,

it.

Then before it has boiled eggs and butter and stir till the mixstir

makes

01

lemon cut in shreds with the sugar and the preceding a lemon cream pie .small ripe

away

entertaining

few friends, in a chafing dish over a spirit lamp. His rule would be singularly inappropriate in an ho-

boiled

The reader perceives that as cream fillings a variety of dissimilar compounds here come together. They are alike, however, in being each one adapted 'or

several uses, for spreading on toast, cakes, filling pies, etc., besides filling cream puffs.

;arts, tartlets,

In another point they are all alike, and one being earned the rest become the easier for it. They all lave to be stirred over the fire

till

thickened

one touch of cookery makes the whole

lot kin.

that


THE AMEKICAN PASTBY COOK.

70

A BOOK OF PUFFS, ECLAIRS AND CREAM FILLINGSConcluded. If a list had to be made of the articles of pastry held highest in popular esteem, cream puffs would be found somewhere near the beginning. The popular name, Boston cream puffs, might lead to the

supposition that they are of American origin, but, far from it, there is so little in our trade that is new that I have a

private opinion that Pharaoh's baker,

eggs one at a time.

Drop small spoonfuls of the paste on baking sheets very slightly greased, allowing an inch or more of space between them, and bake in a

moderate oven about 20 minutes.

the side and

fill

Cut a

the puffs with pastry cre>>m.

slit

in

Makes

40 to

30?. To the best bakers who make them in large quantities daily, there is nothing easier than cream puffs, but

it is

not the less true that they are "mighty un-

made only occasionally and baked There are many finer in the uneven heat of a cooking range, instead of an that meet with less appre- oven.

who befriended them just as well as we the one

Joseph,

knew how

make

to

certain" where

do.

and more delicate articles ciation, and when we find a thing so prone to disappear, not only from the baker's windows, but from well-set supper, lunch and dinner tables, too, as cream puffs are, it is the part of good policy to see how we can make the best of them. There is more wit and humor in these puffs than in any thing else we make If it were not for this they would be in still Wit is defined as greater request than they are. something which startles by its unexpectedness. Wit

A

very ordinary workman,

1

once knew, traveled

as a first-class pastry cook from town to town on the strength of a knack he had of making these trifles in

greater perfection than one trick, but it stood

It was his anybody else. him in good stead for short

spells.

The more the paste is beaten up against the side pan as the eggs are added, and after, the more the puffs^will expand in baking. When they are perfect they are nearly smooth and often runs to practical jokes. When a person eating in haste, as the majority do, takes a bite of a puff look like small cauliflowers, whence, perhaps, comes that is filled with a cream insufficiently cooked and one of their French names. To make them so, the consequently in a fluid state, and the said cream is paste must be almost soft enough to run out of shape unexpectedly propelled this way and that way over on the pans; another egg may be required. of the

use a little less lard or butter and a more flour than the receipt, for a first trial. of wit should be discouraged, to which end the variThe puffs will not rise at all if the paste be alous cautions about the proper preparations of the lowed to become cold before the eggs are beaten inhis apparel, the wit of

is

it

sure not to be relished

may be

by the

apparent to all, but victim. This sort

Humor is pastry creams have already been given. not so objectionable, and when pure most people enIt is defined as a faculty of kindly pleasjoy it. The humor of cream

antry.

puffs is seldom un-

mixed. There

is humor, but not of a kindly sort, in giving a plate of empty puffs to a hungry beggar and watching the falling of his countenance when he

discovers their

emptiness; and there is humor in same before the hotel boarders

setting a plate of the

It is safer to

little

to

it.

The handsomest

puffs

are those baked done with-

out the ove" door ever being opened time.

in the

mean-

308. Corn Starch Cream Puffs. Finest. The name, eclair, is probably from the French word signifying a gap or clear place These Became Eclairs au chocolat, or au cafe, according to the cream used for filling. Pelits-ehaux a la comtesse

who habitually pick and peel the crust off everything are small puffs dipped in chocolate icing and the before them off the bread and rolls and corn bread coating dried on them before serving. the tops of the pies the brown outside front 11 1 pint of milk. the meats but this is humor of the kindly sort, as 6 ounces of butter. it makes such people happy to have something that 8 ounces of corn starch. they may peel, and be welcome, and leave no waste 10 eggs.

behind.

Boil half the milk with the butter in

Cream Puffs.

starch with the other half.

Eclairs

1 pint of water.

\

pound of lard or

butter.

\ pound of flour. 10 eggs. Little salt. Bring the water to a boil with the lard and in

it.

Put in the

ture over the

comes a

fire

flour all at once,

about

stiff paste.

five

and

minutes,

Then take

it off

stir the

or

the

to a

after

2OO.

Transparent

Puffs.

salt

mix-

till it

Mix

smooth paste. Add the eggs one at a time removing from the fire and allowing the paste and beat thoroughly. The to fall below boiling heat pieces of paste dropped on the baking pans should not be larger than guinea eggs. Makes 50. cook

Boston cream puffs of the baker's shops. a la crSme, Profitiolles, Petitsckouz, etc.

it.

Pour both together and

be-

and beat in the

These

rise

in shape like belk,

cups. 1 pint

of water.

or inverted tea-


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. witn 6 tablespoonfuls of essence of anchovies, botlx slightly warmed, and then made cold before using.

2 ounces of butter. 6 ounces of corn starch.

6 whole eggs and 4 whites.

300.

Cocoanut Puff

Eclairs au caramel. ball or concert suppers,

Balls.

The English ruralists are great at making cheesecakes in variety. kind of tart made of sweet milk or cream curd is the genuine sort, and holds about

A

]

Excellent for set tables, for

and not

too

common.

It is

the

same

relative

importance at the well-provided pumpkin pies do on

tables of the better class that

extremely wrong, however, to thus sugar-coat co-

this side. The scarcity of English culinary terms, dumpy, or burnt-up failures of puffs, and however, has made cheesecake a name expansive The try to pass them off as eclairs au caramel. enough to take in a number of French knick-knacks, French never do that way, (we hope.) such as the following, which only come in turn beMake the desired number of cream puffs of cause they are cream curd puffs. whichever mixture you have the best success with. 303. They They are not to be filled with anything. Nothing can be made of milk curd, successfully, should be small, light-baked, but dry, smooth and unless the curd be scalded to firmness so that it can hollow, and either round or egg-shaped. Roll them, be pressed dry; a point that our receipts, as we find after baking, first in thick sugar syrup and then in them, hardly ever mention. Curdle the milk or grated cocoanut mixed with granulated sugar on a cream with rennet as if for cheese; then set the pan on

lapsed,

Dry the puffs in a warm place, that they may plate. not be sticky when served. To make the syrup, pour half a cup of water on a pound of white sugar, and let it boil up without

the range and slowly come to the boiling point. Pour the whey and hang up the curd in a napkin to

off

That is what drip dry, and then slightly press it. meant by "well-prepared, firm curd," and a num.

is

Chopped almonds can be used as well as ber of good

stirring.

cocoanut.

time, can be

301. Eclairs aux Confitures. Sweet cream puffs variously shaped and filled with fruit jelly, conserve, or any kind of sweetmeat.

things,

made

of

be described at some other

to it

without fear of disappoint-

ment.

3O4.

Cheese Curd Puffs. Talmouses au Parmesan.

1 pint of water.

Cheesecakes.

7 ounces of butter.

6 ounces of cream or milk curd.

Petite

3 ounces of sugar.

pint of milk or water.

10 ounces of flour.

2 or 3 ounces of butter.

6 or 7 eggs.

4 ounces of

1 tablespoonful of vanilla extract.

4 ounces of grated cheese.

Boil the water with the sugar and butter in it, stir in the flour and make the paste as directed

then

for the preceding varieties.

flour.

Some pie paste for the bottoms. Of these ingredients make a paste the same

as for

Fancy shapes are made of this paste by using a cream puffs, the curd and grated cheese to be pounded Roll out pie paste, the thinner lady-finger sack and tubes, to form fingers, cres- into it while hot. cents, etc., and egging and sugaring them before bak- the better; cut out flats with a biscuit cutter; place a teaspoonful of the paste in the middle of each, wet ing.

CHEESE PUFFS WITH ANCHOVY BUTTER. 3O2. Ramequins a

1'

Italienne.

pint of milk or water.

4 ounces of flour. 4 ounces of cheese.

Make cream

Brush them over with egg and water and bake in a moderate oven about 15 minutes. They expand in baking and become hollow. May be filled with

3O5.

Cream Curd

Puffs.

Salt.

the paste of milk, butter and flour, as for and mix in the cheese previously

puffs,

grated or minced by pounding smooth while hot. Add the eggs one at a time. Place on the baking

pans in small oblong shapes, and bake carefully. They are not good if in the least dark colored. Makes about 30.

within.

creamed cheese.

2 ounces of butter.

6 eggs.

the edges and pinch them up in shape of a continental three-cornered hat, inclosing the curd paste

For

filling,

mix 4 ounces of fresh butter

Cheesecakes.

Talmouses a la creme.

The same in form as the

last,

but sweet.

Inclose

a spoonful of the curd paste in a pastry bottom; egg over and dredge with sugar. 6 ounces of cream curd. pint of milk. 1 ounce of sugar.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

78 2 ounces of butter,

they are

4 ounces of

The

flour.

better than dabs of sweetened grease.

them, but a

medium

5 eggs. Salt. 2 teaspoonfuls of flavoring extract. Pie paste for the bottoms.

Make a cooked

little

finest puff-paste is not suitable for

quality should be made. The edges will not rise on mince pies much in any case, and rich puff-

paste as for cream pufts

paste is lost upon them. They have the poorest apthe but- pearance of any pies if baked plain, but can be

and sugar boiled in the milk flour stirred in, made most inviting by being glazed, But don't paint them with yellow smears of eggthen the curd; the eggs beaten in one at a time, and Mix the yolk of an egg thoroughly with yolk. flavoring added last. twice as much water; brush the tops of the pies over of the These puffs can be partially filled with any with it before baking; sift a very thin coating of creams or conserves, for making which, the direcgranulated sugar all over, and then bake in a modtions have already been given. erate oven till the bottoms are baked dry and light brown, and the tops are covered with a crisp, glazed ter

Mince pies should have both bottom and top crusts rolled quite thin; otherwise the superfluous crust.

3OG.

pastry edges are invariably thrown away.

Pineapple Conserve.

3Of>. Mince-Meat a la Boyale. can of pineapple. 8 ounces of sugar. 1

Strictly first-class in all its appointments. 2 pounds of lean roast or boiled beef. 2 pounds of suet.

1 ounce of butter.

2 eggs.

Reduce the fruit to a pulp by mashing in a bright saucepan; add to it half the juice from the can and the sugar and butter. Boil; add the eggs, and stir over the

fire

a few minutes,

till

thick.

2 pounds of apples. 2 pounds of currants.

2 pounds of seedless raisins. 2 pounds of brown sugar

1 pound of candied citron, One pound of grated, fresh pineapple and a half 2 ounces of ground spices cup of water answers the same as the canned. Simmer with the sugar till cooked and transparent- mon and cloves.

ooking, then finish like the other.

1 or

mace, nutmeg, cinna-

2 cans of Bartlett pears, with the juice.

2 pounds of preserved ginger 12 oranges juice and grated rind. 6 lemons juice and grated rind. 1 pint of

rum.

pint of brandy. 1 quart of port wine.

1

30*.

Cuban Conserve.

Don't grind them Then mix everything together the dry articles first, and liquids poured over them. Put the mince-meat in jars, cover close, and let stand a week or two before using.

Chop

For Cuban cream cake,

gclairs

aux

confitures,

bouchees, etc. 1

pound of

sugar.

8 ounces of fresh, grated cocoanut. 4 or 5 oranges.

When Ibs.

Grate the yellow rinds of all the fruit and squeeze the juice into the sugar, carefully excluding the bitter seeds. Boil the syrup thus made; add the butter and cocoanut; boil again, then beat Cook five minutes more.

Desiccated cocoanut does as well; nilk enough to barely moisten it.

308. The Best Mince Pies make

made.

in the yolks.

steep

it first

in

is to

When

boiled

further extract the ginger flavor by pouring the This ginger port wine upon it and making warm. is not to be used in the mince-meat, only its extracted flavor.

When

the oranges furnished are ripe and thinit is better to chop half of them after

skinned

squeezing, and add them to the mince, instead of Grate the rest and use the juice of

in the "World.

make good mince-meat

make them

2 quarts of water.

one quart, put the syrup in the mince, and

to

only grating. all after

as

the pies healthful and enjoyable after it is Mince pies, too frequently, in hotels where

the desire

preserved ginger cannot be had, boil half a in syrup made with 2

of sugar in

down

8 yolks of eggs,

It is not so difficult to

ingredients small.

pound of common race ginger

2 lemons.^ 4 ounces of butter.

to

all the

in a machine.

rich, are

made

so that

excluding the seeds.

310.

Lemon Mince Meat Where brandy

is

"Without Meat.

disapproved

of,

use

double


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. quantity of strictly medicinal old port wine instead.

The

spirit evaporates in baking.

3 pounds of apples. 1 pound of raisins.

4 lemons.

1

2 pounds of white sugar. 2 pounds of currants.

1

1

pound of

1 pint

ounce of mixed ground spices. pint of brandy and port- wine mixed.

Use lemons that are ripe thin-skinned, not harsh Boil them in a quart of water till the wabitter. away.

Cut or chop the

mix

all

away

Then squeeze the juice into the seeds, and mince the

raisins,

mince the suet

the ingredients together.

Keep

fine

and

in a covered

jar.

The uater the lemons were boiled in should be This quantity makes about 20 added to the mince. pies,

according to

of

common brandy.

3 quarts of cider, or enough to

and

ter is half boiled

spices.

pound of candied citron, or the same of orange and lemon rinds boiled tender.

seedless raisins.

the sugar, throw lemon rinds small.

pound of brown sugar. ounce of mixed ground

1

2 pounds of suet, 1

V3

size.

311. English Standard Mince-Meat. 2 pounds of lean roast or boiled beef.

2 pounds of suet. 2 pounds of apples. 2 pounds of currants.

Put the raisins in whole. soning the meat and suet a

make

Mince little

all

with

it

juicy.

the rest, seasalt

and pep-

Should be kept 3 or 4 weeks before using. Makes about 40 or 50 pies.

per.

Nothing is saved by buying trashy currants. They have to be well washed and picked over free from dirt there is the more will wash Some currants are like small raisins, nice and clean and large. There is no waste in them.

stones,

and the more

away.

To CLEAN CURRANTS.

Put them into a colander

with holes not too large; set that down in a pan half full of warm water and stir the currants about vigor-

The

ously.

dirt will go

through the holes.

Pour

This is the away two or three times. Spread the curquickest plan and most thorough. rants out in a baking pan; pick them over and let them dry for use. **14 To CLEAN RAISINS. When sultana seedless are the water

furnished, or even the larger kind of seedless raisins, put them in a colander with a handful of flour

2 pounds of seedless raisins. 2 pounds of brown sugar.

pound of candied citron. J pound of orange or lemon rinds, previously boiled 1

mixed

in,

and rub

off the fine stems,

which then by

When the through the holes. greater part have been so got rid of, the raisins must be picked over separately, especially to remove the mace, nutmeg, cloves them. gravel stones that may chance to be among

tender.

2 ounces of ground spices and cinnamon.

sifting

about will

fall

Layer raisins have

3 quarts of sweet cider. 1 quart of common brandy.

A

to

be seeded to be good in anyand requiring such

most tedious operation thing. help as can be had.

Chop the meat and suet fine, and season them Cut the citron in little salt and pepper. Some thirty years ago the English Vegetarians small bits, mince the lemon rinds, and chop or cut headMix all together and let stand two made a good deal of noise in the world. Their the raisins. their where in the Channel was Islands, quarters If too dry, wine, cider or weeks before using. It was called was published. paper representative the be added when or all should mixed, pies brandy, Healthian Journal. are filled. Candied orange or lemon peel, of course, the Vegetarian Banner and Manx the Proper can be used instead of the stewed peel, but costs Its motto was "Fruits and Farinacea, that abstiidea Its Man." of Food was, leading more and gives less flavor. This is enough for 50 or nence from meat diet would make the world better. 60 pies, according to size. to work earnWith a standard like the foregoing receipt to start Those who supported it set themselves to get up a new system of cookery wherein estly of mince the cost can from, anyone vary quality_and have no place, and a great many curiin excess meat should with a

meat, according to circumstances.

make

it

poor and insipid.

Apples

Raisins,

currants and

osities in the

way

of bills-of-fare of dinners without

meat were published in it in consequence. The anorange peel, and wine or sweet cider, make it rich. The cider excepted. nexed is one of their receipts. The meat is only a foundation. Cheap mince-meat is made by dosing with ground spices, and leaving PIE. out the more expensive materials.

VEGETARIAN MINCE

313. Good

Common Mince-Meat.

2 pounds of minced beef or tongue. 3 pounds of suet.

4 pouunds of currants.

315.

Jersey

Pie.

pound of currants. \ pound of seedless raisins. 1 pound of brown sugar and molasses mixed.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. A 1

little salt

Lay the mixture

and pepper.

cloves and alspice. pound of crushed crackers or dry bread crumbs.

pint of cold water. pint of vinegar or hard cider. 2 tablespoonfuls of lemon extract. 1

pound of

with

a

them plentifully, catch up two corners of the sheet and shake off the surplus. Lay the sheet on a baking pan. Bake about 6 minutes.

Take

off

by wetting the

paper under side and stick the cakes together while

butter, melted.

4 beaten eggs.

Mix

in email finger-lengths

cinnamon, mace, lady -finger tube and sack or a paper cornet, on a sheet of blank paper. Sift powdered sugar over

ounce of mixed ground spices

they are

the dry articles in a bowl, then add the fluids to the eggs, and pour over and mix in the

still

moist.

all

The proportion of melted butter by hard stirring. All molasses to sugar may be according to kind. syrup will do.

Make

like other

mince

318.

White

Jelly Drops.

The same mixture as number

Make drop

3.

A

cakes same as lady fingers, well glazed by letting resem- the siftings of powdered sugar lie upon them a few

pies.

half pint of brandy added makes the Makes about 10 pies, more or minutes before baking. blance very close. less,

according to

When done sandwich a slice of good wine jelly between two, and keep cold until time of serving.

size.

31O. Cheapest Good Mince Meat. Suitable for charitable institutions, easily distinguishable

from the

etc.,

Star Kisses.

1 pound of fine granulated sugar. 8 whites of eggs Flavoring extract. Whip the whites with a bunch of wire in a

will not intoxicate.

1J pounds of bread. 1 pound of boiled beef or ox heart. 2 pounds of brown sugar. 1 quart of good molasses.

pound of common dried apples. pounds of suet. 1 pound of raisins. 1 pound of currants. 4 ounces of ground cinnamon and other spices 1 1

mixed. 1

319.

and not

costlier mixtures. It

ounce of black pepper.

longer.

Put the meringue paste thus made into a

sack and star-pointed tube or else into a stiff paper cornet having the point cut like saw teeth and press out portions size of walnuts

on

greased and then wiped clean. slack oven about 10 minutes or a light fawn color and

pint of vinegar. Peel of 2 or 3 oranges. 1 tablespoonful of salt. 1

cold

place until they are firm enough to bear up an egg, add the sugar and flavor and beat a few seconds

They

slip off easily

to

till

swelled

when

pans

Bake

in

slightly

a

very

the kisses are of hollow.

partially

cold

32O. Frozen Fig Pudding Pour two quarts of cold water over the bread; and mash. Boil the steep apples in two quarts of water, then chop them and add the j uice to the rest Figs cut small and mixed in caramel ice cream of the ingredients, all minced and mixed as usual. and frozen in brick molds in a most excellent comThe orange peel should be boiled a little while and bination a modified tutti frutti. then minced fine. Any stewed fruit liquor or cider 1 quart of milk. can be added with advantage. Makes 2 gallons 8 yolks of eggs. 30 to 50 pies. 14 ounces of sugar. 317.

1 pound of figs. The caramel gives the

Finger Biscuits.

14 ounces of granulated sugar 8 eggs. 6 tablespoonfuls of water.

flavor,

but half a cupful of

curacoa improves it. Take four tablespoonfuls of the

2 cup*

caramel, put

it

sugar

to

make

into a saucepan or frying-pan over

the fire without any water, and let it melt and become a medium molasses color, not burnt, however, 2 heaping cups. then pour in half a cupful of water, and let boil into a sized the whites the good Separate eggs, bowl, the yolks into the mixing pan. Put the su and dissolve. Make rich boiled custard of the milk, sugar and to the yolks and stir up then add the water and

12 ounces of flour

gar

they can be beaten to a thick foam. It 10 minutes. Have the flour ready.

may Whip

take yolks, pour the caramel into it, strain into the the freezer, and freeze as usual. Cut the figs small as

whites with the wire egg-whisk till they are firm raisins and mix them in- Put the frozen Mix the flour in the into Neapolitan molds, and bed them in enough to bear up an egg

yolks and

stir in

the whipped

whites

last.

salt for

two hours.

pudding and

ice


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Water Sponge Cake

321.

14 ounces of granulated sugar 8 eggs. pint of water a large cup.

2 cups

together in a pan, and beat well; mix the soda in the flour, put that in and beat Dust the again. fruit with flou., stir in, bake in a mold or shallow

pan.

Another cake of the same sort can be made by

18 ounces flour

4 rounded cups. 1 heaping teaspoonful baHng powder. Separate the eggs, the whites into a good-sized bowl, the yolks into the mixing pan.

fruit in the

mixing

324. Make

Put the sugar and water with the yolks and beat No. 322. up until they are light and thick.

Mix

the

powder

in the flour.

the

220.

Blackberry Meringue. same as strawberry meringue

at

Peach Meringue.

325.

the whites to a very firm froth, and when they are ready stir the flour into the yolk mixture and mix in the whipped whites last. Bake either

Whip

sponge ginger-bread, No.

Pare ripe peaches (not cooked), and cut them to size of strawberries

and make the same as straw-

berry meringue at No. 322. sponge cake molds the little tin oblongshaped pans joined a dozen together or else 326. Peach Shortcake. spread in a large pan, and cut the cake in squares in small

when

it is

cold.

The same thing

322. Strawberry Meringue. This

is

sold extensively

at the fine bakeries un-

der the name, generally, of strawberry shortcake. For the cake take the butter sponge cake, or 8 ounces granulated sugar 5 eggs.

4 ounces butter, melted

cup of milk. 12 ounces of flour

1 cup.

cup.

and thick as a two after baking, peaches and sugar spread on the lower half, the other placed on top with the split side upward and more peaches paste, not sweet, as large as a plate

spread upon that.

3 cups.

The cake is liable to rise in the middle and must be spread on the pan accordingly. When done cover the top of the cake with raw itiawbcrries and spread a thick covering of mer ingue on top of them. Set the cake in the oven one minute to bake a very light color on top, but the meringue paste must not be cooked through. The meringue paste or frosting is made by beat, ing 5 whites of eggs to a firm froth and then mixing in 4 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar,

1

cup of ice water.

1

quart of cut peaches.

Pare the peaches, cut them small and shake up with the sugar before making the paste, and set them in a cool place. Bub the butter into the flour thor-

oughly with the hands. Salt is needed only where Make a hollow in the middle, pour in lard is used. the wa'er, mix up soft, roll out on the table in flour reserved for the purpose. It makes the cake flaky

and part

in layers to roll

1

fold

it

a few times

Then make it up round,let stand five minutes,roll out thick as biscuit and bake on a jelly-cake pan. Finish with fruit as above stated.

mixed with sugar and chopped and used immediately.

Peach Cobbler.

6 ounces.

A

peach pie made in a baking pan to be cut out n squares. Make common pie paste, roll out the off the arger half of it to a thin sheet and take up table by rolling it up on the rolling pin and so unroll

12 ounces sour milk.

teaspoonful of soda.

4 large cupfuls of flour

Apple Shortcake.

Use mellow apples of fine flavor and make the same as peach shortcake, the apples not to be cooked, bui

6 ounces.

2 eggs. 1 cupful of

and

to serve.

3 cupfuls of raisins 1 pound. 4 of currants 1 pound.

molasses

it

ike pie paste.

327.

1

8 ounces.

12 ounces.

1 cupful of sugar.

323. Family Fruit Cake

1 of sugar 1 of butter

The

J teaspoonful salt.

powder. Beat the sugar and eggs together a minute or two, add the melted butter, the milk, the powder and the

pan.

eaten with cream.

It is

ingredients required are: 1 cupful of lard or butter 3 cupfuls of flour

flour. Bake on jelly-cake pans as thin as it can be spread, or, if preferred, on a large shallow baking

strawberry shortcake, using It is a cake of short

biscuit, split in

1 teaspoonful of baking

Cut in oquares

as

chopped ripe peaches instead.

18 ounces.

Having prepared the fruit, make the butter soft mix it and the sugar, molasses, eggs and sour milk

Put in pared and cut peaches an t on the pan. nch deep, dredge a little sugar over them, cover ith the top crust and bake about half an hour.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

Border Moulds

For borders of jelly or blanc- mange, the with whipped cream or fruit compotes also for jce hi salads, shrimps aspic and other ornamental dishes.

center

filled

Raised Pie Mould.

Cream Mould.

Melon Mould. See No.

802.

See

No

75

For puddings,

salads, pressed meats, ices* etc.

See No.

127.

Neapolitan or Brick Mould. See No.

Boxes of Cutters.

Tall

meat, (tongue, chicken, for cakes and pastry.

Silver Plated Shells. loped oysters.

column box for cutting scollops of and vegetlbles-others

etc.,) truffles

For

cream and custards

the end

See No.

168.

escal-

cake in Shells.

-on,Whl P is perforated.

The Proper Sort Stamped Tin

125.

also,

and heavy

of

Pan

for beating eggs

Candy Kettle

tin, all sizes.

are

and making

made both

of copper


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

THE HOTEL BOOK OF PUDDING-S. Considering with what reluctance the public are said to read prefaces, it seems quite fortunate that puddings are such familiar things and there is nex

nothing to be said about them; and, besides, they constitute such a remarkably numerous family race

77

from shore when the vessel started and carefully Who could dare lay innovating kept for the day. hands upon the composition of that ancient pudding

?

Here

it is.

338.

English Boiled Plum Pudding.

to

Burns

that if only they all have to speak for themselves there will be quite a time. And that called

it

3 pounds of flour. 2 pounds of chopped suet.

2 pounds of seedless raisins. 1 pounds of currants. must give us pause, for among them 1 pound of citron. are some such hoary patriarchs, venerable relics of 2 ounces of mixed ground spices cinnamon, mace, antiquity, as would hardly brook any levity from us and cloves. the creatures of yesterday. Suppose one should say nutmeg Mix all the above dry articles together in a pan. to some of these old respectabilities, "You old relThen mix the following fluids ics, you are heavy, you are indigestible; you are a 1 pints of milk. black, unwholesome lump; you should be made over, $ cup of black molasses, large measure. shaken up, renovated like an old hotel; would they 8 eggs. not rise up and annihiliate us with, 1 pound of common yellow sugar. reflection alone

:

'Pass, little mortal, pass,

Thy days

are but as grass.'

1

Then

But we were since, perhaps before the flood, nurtured the stout dryads of the wood.' "

Every one must have observed how natural

stir

both mixtures together.

This should

be prepared over night, and next morning tied up in four or five pudding cloths and boiled without inter-

'Formed ages

We

pint of brandy. teaspoonful of salt.

mission six hours. it

artists to draw puddings with faces, especially Christmas plum puddings depend upon it, there is something in it. If it would be such a

seems for

heinous piece of presumption to attempt to change the nature of the old plum pudding, is it not almost as bad to change its form ? There is not much poe-

339 Some persons have hardly a speck of reverence and had as lief add something to the time-honored English plum pudding as not, if they

for the antique,

makes it lighter, more enjoyable and more Such people can add to the preceding receipts two pounds or less of fine white bread try about puddings,but what little mite there is belongs crumbs, and to the fluid part a half pint more milk. to the old time round pudding boiled in a bag. The That is all, but it makes a difference. tall fellow in fine fluted moulds is an upstart. A The quantity of pudding prescribed is enough for writer in the Bazar traced back the it

in

it

may be

plum pudding

three years since

to its infancy,

when

was only porridge a sort of porridge with plums but it grew out of that, and although occait;

sionally through the accident of coming untied in the kettle it relapses temporarily into its early state, it is

find

it

digestible.

100 to 150 persons

that

is to

say, of persons having

hotel dinners to eat besides.

33O. the preceding, and the purpose of giving color, but when refined

The addition of molasses other puddings to come, with the spices a dark

to

is for

respectable and to memory dear only as a pudding had burnt sugar must be added round and solid. In the sanctum where these lines are syrups only can be Not only cooks but many others likewritten one that is next neighbor to all out of for coloring. wise ought to feel grateful to Count Albufage Caradoors, looking off "where wilds immeasureably It is used of Nismes, who invented caramel. there is upon mel, spread seem lengthening as you go" a brown color to an immense number of the wall a picture from Harper's Weekly of a Christ- forgiving eatable and drinkable articles, and is not only harm-

mas at sea "the pride of the ship's cook." He is carrying the plum pudding himself to the captain's The pictcabin; none of the boys may touch that.

less,

but gives an agreeable flavor in some cases, as Put some sugar in a frying pan over the

in creams.

let it burn darker than browned coffee, then fill askew in order to straighten fire, the pan with water, boil and strain. up It makes but little difference which up the cook. way one hangs a picture of a vessel on a rolling sea, but the cook looks a little reeling, and that pudding But there is another plum pudding, called in Let no French bills-of fare ponding a V Allemande, which all must be kept right side up at all hazards.

ure

is

hung up a

little

one entertain the least question about that pudding, the traditional sort, dark and solid and round,

it is

and the holly harp-spiked,

sticking in the top; the glossy, red-berried English holly; brought

is

who

practice

it

will prefer to

make nine times

to the

preceding kind once. It contains no flour, and can be boiled in half the time of Christmas pudding.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

78

Plum Pudding.

Boiled

yet exist, "great chieftain of the pudding race," but in his makeup he will be found like a highland costume, not successfully transplantable.

GERMAN PLUM PUDDING.

331.

of white sugar. of chopped suet.

1

pound pound pound pound

1

pint of milk.

1

1

A

of currants.

meat.

A 1

teaspoonful of mixed ground spices

cinnamon,

1

1

Salt.

1

Mix

1

the dry articles together the bread crumbs being grated or chopped quite fine then wet with the milk, eggs and brandy, the salt and soda dissolved in them; tie

pudding cloths and

in four

boil four

hours.

Either of the in

plum puddings can be

fancy

to

moulds,

be sent

to

table

pounds.

pound of chopped apples, or raisins. pound of white meat of chicken.

6 eggs.

Salt to season.

home-made currant wine. mixed ground spices. Cook the heart and tongue half-done, then mince pint of

1 tablespoonful of

Mix

Cut the breast of chicken in thin

strips.

the ingredients well together, the dry artiTie up in two pudding cloths and boil 4 cles first. all

hours.

In deference to the temperance principles of some of their guests, the best hotels make it a rule to prepare two sauces for plum pudding, one being withspirit, fire

calf s heart and tongue 2 pound of chopped suet. pound of flour. pound of bread soaked in

quite fine.

boiled or

whole.

out

a large proportion of

1 pint of milk.

cup of brandy. Piuch of soda.

on

kind of mince pudding, of the boiled plum

pudding order, made with

nutmeg and mace.

steamed

Scotch Haggis.

of raisins.

7 eggs. 1

A

333.

2 pounds of white bread crumbs. 1

COOK.

the other the customary brandy sauce, set is sent in, or else the equally

just as the dish

approved sauce sabayon.

Another one of those revered patriarchs were almost sacrilege

to

touch

est sonsie face," the haggis.

however, there

it

333. Baked Bread Pudding.

unmistakable

2 pounds of white bread

slices.

identity that is very satisfying as compared with the shadowy indefiniteness of the Scottish chief. It is a

pity that one of the last

4 eggs.

minstrels, if only one of unchangeably in verse the component parts of the national haggis, as some one has done the "Eve's pudding," and Sydney Smith

humble rank, did not

made

The great majority of all the best puddings made are of bread, either wholly or in part. The next is a good every day sort.

2 quarts of milk, or milk and water. 4 ounces of butter. 4 ounces of white sugar.

pudding,

all

is

a grim,

is

whom

Burn's, with "honIn the English plum

Butter, sugar, and half cup of vinegar, hot and beaten together, for sauce.

fix

did for his salad, and another did for mulled wine.

We have

Nutmeg. The bread crust.

should be

quite free from

any dark and then cut Mix milk, sugar and eggs to-

Spread the butter on the

them in dice shapes.

slices

a compound called haggis, without the pregether and pour over the squares of bread in the ceding article, composed of meat, chopped ancho- baking pans. Bake till set in the middle. Any But vies, eggs, bread, sour wine, pepper and salt. pudding sace will suit. that does not seem to correspond with the remarks

of an editor of Burns, who says the haggis was to "Hotel puddings," said a gentleman of good Scotland what the plum pudding is to England, judgment and extensive experience of hotel and club and it was the pride of her people that all the in- life, for whom the writer was to prepare a litt'e gredients and even the bag native production. It

it

was boiled in were of complimentary dinner, "hotel puddings I never eat nor do I care to offer them to friends. They are al-

was either the Edinburgh Magazine or Cham- ways

ber's Miscellany that published the following receipt, used on anniversary occasions in the best Edinburgh hotels

and said

to

have been contributed by a Fife- not to see that they spoil their own work ? Now I had a woman cook in New York whose efforts in that

shire landlady, who observed, however, that the rich made the haggis as good as they liked but the poor

as good as they

too sweet nothing but sweet cloying too sweet and rich at first, then further spoiled by a How can hotel cooks be so dull as sauce all sugar.

had means.

We will not

sumptious, but call this a haggis.

line

were a perfect contrast

to

what

I

had found

you know of any pudding that The haggis may an hotel pudding, you may add it to the list." be too pre- hotel tables

If

is

at

not


THE AMEBIOAN PASTRY COOK.

79

There are no puddings that are not hotel pud- as cream pies and cheesecakes and lemon and pump, As in the case of English p'um puddings we kin and corn starch custards, can be changed into follow old patterns too much, and overleap the mark souffles by a very simple process which is the same with all kinds in the main, only slight differences trying to make the rich enough^richer.

dings.

334.

2 pressed

Baked Bread Custard.

having to be made according to the various mixtures used. Pudding souffles are of but little value for

MADEIRA WINE SAUCE.

ordinary hotel dinners which run on for hours, because they must be sent to table the minute they are

in quarts of white bread crumbs.

2 quarts of milk. 4 ounces of butter melted. 1

still

fallen,

dings.

in courses and for individual anywhere that there can be a set time for serving the pudding these light trifles are much esparties, for dinners

4 ounces of white sugar.

service

lemon.

8 yolks of eggs. Crumble the bread

puffed up, otherwise, when they they are not so good as common pudBut for dinners on the European plan, for

done, while

have

teemed.

by grating or chop What is required to be done is to take the mixGrate the rind of the lemon into it and ture ping. already prepared for a baked pudding or cream Beat the yolks of squeeze the juice into the sugar. pie and stir it over the fire till it assumes a pasty eggs and add them and the sugar to the milk, then consistency, then add to it some beaten yolks of the melted butter, and pour over the bread crumbs. eggs raw; after that the whites whipped firm and Stir up well, turn it into two buttered milk pans and a little Then bake the finished fine, either

brandy. perhaps Buttering the pans allows mixture either in large moulds or pudding shapes, of the brown outside being taken out clean instead of if for a party dining together, with a band of butIn this tered sticking to the pans and going to waste. paper pinned round to make the mould higher cheap, simple and excellent pudding, as in many to be removed before serving or, in small cups, others, the whites of the eggs would do no good; the silver scallops or shells, to be served in individual pudding is richer without them. They can be used style, or else in little- paper cases made for the purfor other purposes. pose. These little cases can be bought cheap, ready-

bake about half an hour.

335. The reader

made is

advised to note the preceding re-

ceipt for bread custard, as several acceptable varieties

made by

are

certain additions, as

BAKED CITRON PUDDING, CREAM SAUCE. RAISIN PUDDING, PT. WINE SAUlE. CURRANT PUDDING, LEMON SAUCE.

baked

in the cities.

They need

to be buttered

and

harden them. Cusin a pan of water while

slightly before using, to

tard cups so used can be set baking and need not be [made hot enough to spoil them; these little puddings bake in 15 or 20 minutes.

The mixtures

so treated puff

up

either hollow or

and must be carried to table in that Made by adding one pound of either of those or very spongy, Smooth mixtures like bread puddings condition. The fruit other suitable fruit to the preparation. and corn starch or rice flour compounds puff more must be strewn over the top after the puddings are than rough-grained sorts,|such as cocoanut creams or in. bottom if stirred to the in the pans; sink they The pastry creams used for filling rice pudding. Pass a spoon over to press the fruit slightly under, There is puffs, also lemon] honey, pine apple conserve and etherwise it comes out in black blisters. as

much

in careful baking as skillful making.

from 4

Another use of the same mixture

33O. Bread Pudding-

is

for

Souffle.

that are already cooked need only to have added and then the whipped

the like,

to 6 "yolks

whites to make the richest possible souffles. Flavorings and brandy or wine are to be added according to taste.

Or Bread

Soufle.

For this

make

the bread custard,

but instead of baking stir u the mixture in a saucepan over the fire till it thickens and becomes like

Take it off, and when cool enough not to Then beat all cook them add 6 or 8 beaten yolks. the whites that have been left over to stiff froth, and When this is Baked it stir them into the mixture.

With these general explanations covering the whole matter, only a few examples will be given here

and there as we go along.

paste.

rises

338.

Egg- Souffles.

INDIVIDUAL PUFF PUDDINGS.

high above the top of the pan or mould. 1 quart First make the frangipane pastry cream 2 ounces of butter; 4 ounces of flour; 8 of milk; ounces of sugarf 5 eggs. Mix sugar and flour dry; stir into the boiling milk; cook awhile, then add the :

337.

Puddings

Souffles.

It simplifies the making of puff puddings to remember that nearly all sorts of puddings that are made with eggs, and many of the pie mixtures, such

eggs,

and simmer 20 minutes.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

80

and on top. Beat and mix the eggs, sugar, milk and nutmeg together, pour over the bread, cover the Then whip the puddings with either buttered paper orbread crusts, extract. whites of 8 eggs quite firm and stir them in lightly. and bake about half an hour. To be good, this pudBake either in cups or paper cases, 10 to 15 min- ding must have plenty of custard in proportion to Sift on the top of each some the bread, and be baked late and served hot. utes, in a brisk oven. Lemon transparent sauce answers as well as flavored with vanilla powder or powdered sugar lemon zest. No sauce required. The chocolate pas- brandy.

When

this is partly cooled beat the yolks of 6 eggs

them in a little on, vanilla or cinnamon and

stir

try cream,

and others

at a time;

to

flavor with lem-

be found in "Cream

Fill-

"They say" that we in hotels run too much to baked puddings and not enough to boile&and steamed. It

ings" can be used in precisely the same way.

339.

so. They, the complainants, are probably English, Germans and Scotch, who all are accustomed to puddings boiled rather than baked.

need not be

Baked Brown Bread Puddinar. POUDING A LA GOTHA.

The

last boiled

full

Scottish.

Where

see a nice person

making

pudding we had was

else in old Scotland did

pressed quarts of graham bread crumbs. 2 quarts of water or milk (8 cups).

2

we

a boiled pudding, a favorite cosmopolitan sort not National in character ? Of course it was not Meg

4 ounces of molasses (2 cooking spoons). 4 ounces of butter.

witch-pot which so terrified Dominie Sampson, hun gry as he was; nor Flora Mac Ivor; nor Die Vernon; nor George Sands' s French imitation of her, yet it was some one with a family resemHave the bread finely crumbled; melt the butter blance to them, only there was the dash of sea waves and mix it with the milk, eggs and molasses; stir all somewhere about. Mirando keeping house for Prostogether and bake half an hour. in the island cavern in the Tempest ? No. Two The natural lightness of the bread counts for qual- pero in people cooking wild ducks on an island young it should not be deity in all these puddings, and Foul Play ? No; milder; further north, among stroyed by either scalding or heating. cliffs and wild fowl. Norna, of the Fitful Head ? Serve the preceding with honey and butter diIt was Madcap in waters. Scottish near but by No; luted and made hot, or else with any good pudding Violet on board a yacht making an apricot jam Merrilies stirring the

8 yolks of eggs. 1 teaspoonful of ground cinnamon.

sauce.

for the

captain, pudding, a real roly-poly pudding all hands if there were any besides and Apricot not are has been Souffle puddings, remarked, Green apple rolls are is real good. adapted for hotel dinners long drawn out, but they jam pudding rather more popular on this side. Does Mr. William are very handsomely replaced by meringues, which, wish it to be understood that over there but stay; the Boston publisher's pudding must Black really the wealthy railroad builders' daughters all know hotel Blessed is the whom be not guest forgotten. This one, it seems, made to make puddings ? the waiters delight to honor. The publisher was one how with a heart ache; a very poor of these sojourning in a beautiful winter city but her jam pudding too heavy; baking powder is incomparably whether it was a real Spartan like abstemiousness of mixture; it

habit or whether there could be nothing good outside of Boston, all their efforts

were thrown away

until

"Ha

!

now you

are bringing

me something

like."

34O.

I

better, as

you

shall see.

Boiled fruit rolls have the great recommendation of not requiring either milk or eggs in their compoNowhere are eggs so lavishly used as in our sition.

American hotel kitchens.

Boston Bread Pudding,

WITH BRANDY SAUCE.

knowledge of articles of a plainer sort. puddings and other plain combinations of flour and fruit are used everywhere in England.

cultivate a

These

2 pounds of bread in \ pound of butter 2 quarts of milk.

slices.

best fresh.

roll

The Frenchman serves them at the best tables as le ponding roule, or&spouding a I' Allemande, or, &

\ pound of sugar.

4 whole eggs and 4 yolks. 1

pound of clean picked currants.

They are usually cheap

enough, and if not it is best that articles requiring make them what they eggs should have enough to of scarcity, to ought to be, but the need is, for times

V Anglaise,

when made with preserves or jam. Not many can, and perhaps not many

try, to

make

good as it is capable of be said that none Have the slices free from dark crust. Spread being; but when good it can safely them with the butter and place in two layers in two of our richest puddings are more in request than a nutmeg, grated.

the paste for boiled rolls as

pudding pans, with the currants sprinkled between these following.


THE AMEBICAN PASTRY COOK. 341.

344.

Boiled Boll Paste. required to be as light and dry-looking when bread or biscuit, and to peel apart in

81

Boiled Cranberry Boll.

boiled, as

2 quarts of cranberries. 1 pound of white sugar.

It is made in the same general manner as flakes puff paste, but to secure the flakiness must be rolled

Wash and pick over

It is

only 4 times. No shortening nor powder to be rubbed The softer the in, but all to be rolled in layers. dough can be, to roll well, the better will be the flour.

water

full

measure.

teaspoonful of.salt. f pound of firm, cold, sweet lard. 4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

Butter can be used instead of lard, and the

salt

and mix carefully to have it smooth. Turn the dough on the floured table, work it very little, spread it out by rolling; drop the lard in lumps an flour

all over,

Roll

powder over count two.

biscuit

for about

fif-

The market varies a lit well as people in market. tie in its demands, but in a general way the rolypoly puddings finding the readiest sale are the two kinds proceeding; after them come

CURRANT JELLY ROLL. APRICOT JAM ROLL.

sprinkle the salt on that, sift a it in three, and count that one

PEACH ROLL. HUCKLEBERRY ROLL.

out again, spread two teaspoons of and then one made with molasses mixed with dry like so much flour, fold over and and vinegar. At the next rolling spread on the rest

it

flour

it

of the powder, and one more rolling and folding, making four times, finishes it. Common short paste

and

a colander and

Itought to be cold

ty people's orders. Hotel cooks dishing up dinner like to sell out their wares, whether fish, entrees, pastries or creams, as

flour over, fold

turn.

rolls.

All of these puddings are calculated

omitted. Lay aside a large handful of the flour to dust with. Pour the cold water in the middle of the rest of the

inch apart

Mash through

use the pulp for the boiled before being used.

1

little

the cranberries, place them in a bright kettle, strew the sugar over the top and pour the water over that. Put on a tight lid to keep in the steam, let them come to a boil slowly. Cook

about half an hour.

pudding. 2 pounds of 1 pint of

pint of water.

baking-powder to make the preceding arbut the less shortening. Light and whole-

It takes ticles,

dough can also be used for roll pud- some preparations are taking the places of the too But bakingdough improved by having short- solid puddings of a little while back. powder cannot be had everywhere, and the cook is

dings; also biscuit ening rolled in.

343. Pare

most independent of circumstances who is richest in resources. Other kinds of paste will do well, as

Boiled Green Apple Boll. and

slice

enough

At present we are in cooking apples to will be shown further on. Before a haste to some for Sundays. in them get up puddings Chop

good

make two quarts when minced. bowl and use without cooking,

to

spread over the

essary to

paste.

Cut the paste already made into 4 pieces,

roll

out

away from them, however, it is neeremark that none of the plum puddings

getting too far

intended for boiling

are

of

much account when

chopped apples evenly, roll up and baked, but the following, if carefully baked, will be tie in pudding cloths previously wetted and floured. found very satisfactory. Stick a pin in the middle to prevent swelling open; To crumble bread when it cannot be grated, first drop into plenty of boiling water and keep boiling without check from an hour to an hour and a half. slice it very thin, then cut in shreds and across in thin, spread the

Serve with butter and sugar hard sauce. The writer These rolls can be steamed as well. thinks they are better boiled.

ment

in cold water

when taking

of the cloth easier for

343.

Dip each one a moup, they come out

It is the only neat way. Puddings with white rough pieces of bread in the middle do not look well.

small squares.

346.

it.

Butter and Sugar Sauce.

HARD

SAUCE.

pound of powdered sugar. pound of best butter. Nutmeg. Warm the butter and sugar sufficiently to mix Beat them together till perfectly white. well. 1

Grate nutmeg over the smooth top. of sauce for any plain pudding.

A

favorite kind

1

Baked Fruit Pudding.

pound of bread crumbs. pound of chopped suet. pound of raisins. pound of currants. pound of sugar.

1 pint of milk or water. Salt. 3 eggs. 1 teaspoonful of mixed ground spices. 1 level teaspoonful of soda Crumble the bread small; mix all the dry articles


THE AMERICAN PASTRY with

it

except soda,

which

dissolve in

Beat the eggs in the milk and with it, add the brandy last.

Too much baking

scum.

is

generally the reason.

up the pudding Meringue needs only a very slight heat. Bake one hour in thing that spoils meringue is spreading

it

Another on cold

never cooks at bottom

but dis-

stir

Cover with paper

buttered pans.

from

the milk.

COOK.

to

keep the

fruit

jelly or fruit.

It

Have the puddingg or pies baking solves to syrup. hot when the meringue touches them and it will not

blistering.

What the following pudding has done that it should be called the "queen of puddings" no one knows, but that is one name it is known by on both sides of the Atlantic.

As to getting the whites to beat up disappoint you. light with ease and certainty that can be accomplished by having them cold to begin with, in a cold

Cooks demur at the appella- bowl and beaten

in a cool place.

Fifteen minutes of

always as good a pudding in hard work may be avoided by taking this precautheir lepository as ever was brought out, and each tion, and five minutes' beating will do as well. one is the queen for the day. However this is a The next is a fine pudding to make when you pretty pudding. have used the last pint of milk obtainable for ice tion,

because there

347.

is

cream; for this needs to

Nonpareil Pudding.

be

made with

water, to be

semi-transparent.

JELLY PUDDING, MERINGUE PUDDING, QUEEN Lemon Meringue Pudding, with Sweet OF PUDDINGS, ETC. Cream. 348. pressed quart of bread crumbs. quart of water. 6 ounces of finely chopped suet. 1 full

quart of white bread crumbs. quart of milk. pound of butter melted.

1 pressed in 1

1

8 ounces of sugar.

J pound of sugar. 1 lemon.

3 lemons

rinds of

all,

juice of 2.

8 yolks of eggs.

5 yolks of eggs. 1 cup of fruit jelly.

5 whites and 4 ounces of sugar for the merin

2 teaspoonful of soda. Grate the rinds of the lemons

into the

bread

crumbs using a tin grater and scraping the zest gue. The jelly is to spread on top after the pudding from that with a lump of sugar also mix in the suet. Squeeze the lemon juice into the water, pour are baked. Mix all the ingredients preceding it together cold it over the bread, add the sugar, eggs beaten, and Bake and finish in a little water. the lemon grated and squeezed. Bake till set in lastly the soda over the top made of the the middle. Take out and spread the jelly over the by spreading meringue over same as directed for nonpareil Beat the whites of eggs till they will not fall whites left top. No jelly needed. For an out of the bowl turned upside down; stir in the su- pudding preceding. acid pudding like this an extra sweetness and fine gar granulated is best and a few drops of flavorbe given by sifting granulated sugar Set the puddings back in the oven till the jelly appearance may ing. of the meringue at the moment before putting on top on top is at boiling he it, then spread the meringue The lemon makes a glazed crust. it in the oven over and let them stay with the oven doors wide left plain, without merincan be of course, pudding, open to dry-bake and acquire a slight color. Sweetened cream made hot, but not boiled, is gue. It seems impossible to get along very fast, for there has to be a little talk about meringues.

now Me-

ringue (marang) paste is the mixture of beaten white When we write lemon pie meof egg and sugar.

means that it is meringued. Meringues The icing and ornamenting on ake a wide scope.

ringut,

cakes

the best sauce.

Lemon Pudding

349.

Souffle.

INDIVIDUAL LEMON PUDDINGS.

it

is strictly

meringue paste.

Egg

kisses, as they

are called, are meringues. The differences are only in the proportion of sugar to eggs. Let us call this

Make

the

mixture for the lemon pudding of the

preceding receipt. Instead of baking stir it over the fire in a bright saucepan till it becomes thick and

Beat 4 or 6 more yolks quite light and stir pasty. on puddings and lemon pies soft meringue to distin- them in; then beat all the whites left over to a stiff A tray full cf saucers of froth and mix them in likewise. Bake in cups or guish it from frosting. If wished ;o ornament these small pudding of the preceding sort looks very attractive paper cases.

when

success has attended the making. The pudding should be shallow in the pan, and the meringue should be of about equal thickness; should be firm and cut square, only very often it does not do so,

but

falls after

baking

till it

is

puddings make some meringue and drop a tablespoonful on top while baking, when done fawn color drop some spots of bright red currant jelly on top of that. Send straight from the oven to the table,

nothing but a pitiful as they soon

fall.


THE AMERICAN PASTBY

COOK.

Already there are two or three ways indicated of and its cheapness, make "topping off" with meringue plain; with a crust- given to details. ing of sugar on top; and with spots of red jelly on the white;

ways

that are equally applicable to florand other dishes. The next

359.

it

worth the attention here

Apple Charlotte.

entines, fruit compotes

A LA PARISIENNE.

specimen gives another variation.

Compote of apples, or apples stewed dry and sweet, baked between two layers of buttered bread

350. Baked Cocoanut Pudding. WITH ORANGE SYRUP. 1

pound of cocoanut

(less

if

the

and glazed with egg and sugar. 40 small thin slices of French ro^s.

desiccated

is

2 pounds of pared and quartered apples 1

used).

pressed quart of bread crumbs. 1 quart of milk.

pound of sugar.

f pound of butter. 1 or 2 eggs for glaze.

1 full

2 ounces of butter.

or cinnamon. Stew the apples soft with three-fourths of the sugar and a pint of water and steam shut in; then mash with a spoon and grate nutmeg in.

Nutmeg

2 ounces of sugar. 1 lemon, or sour orange. 4 yolks of eggs.

Make up like preceding kinds; mix in half the Dip the slices of rolls as lightly as possible in the cocoanut and bake in two buttered pans. Beat up 6 butter melted in a deep pan dip both sides without whites of eggs, add to the firm froth 5 ounces of touchingthe salt dregs. Line two bright, threegranulated sugar and the remaining half pound of quart pans with them, bottom and sides, divide the Spread this cocoanut meringue over the apple in, placing it well around the sides; lay more puddings and bake again very slowly with the oven dipped slices all over the tops slightly pressed into doors open. Cut in squares or diamond shapes and the fruit, and bake the charlottes of a nice toast

cocoanut.

serve with orange syrup.

bottom crusts as well as top. Then with a brush wet them over with egg and water; dredge There are numbers of good nondescript articles the remaining sugar over and bake ten minutes more which we hardly know where to place on an Amerito glaze. can hotel bill-of fare. To be dished out of the pans; no sauce needed Their merit is proven by that best of tests, a conunless for pudding, when sweet cream is best. stant appreciative demand. A good dinner gets to For a charlotte to be served whole still greater care looking incomplete when occasionally they are left off. As these articles do not belong anywhere else is needed in baking. Take a deep mould, a six or color,

351.

they are by

common consent and usage called "sweet

which

entrees''

is

probably an Americanism

eight sided cake or

with the entrees they stand, usually bringing up the

pudding mould does.

Cut

slices

bottom, top and sides. Spread butter rather thickly on one side the slices, dip the

and of bread

to

fit

other side in beaten egg; place them with the butter As already hinted, these "sweet entrees" are al- next the tin, fill the inside with the apple compote; ways evidently welcome and undoubtedly make a place the cover of bread on top and bake in a moddifference in the amount of pastry required after- erate oven over half an hour. Turn it out carefully wards. But one of these is enough at a time. Bad on to the dish, glaze over with egg and sugar and taste, poor management and poverty of resource the red-hot salamander and pour round it either among meats and vegetables are apparent when a diluted red jelly or else whipped cream. rear.

with ten or twelve entrees shows half of be of a sweet or farinaceous character.

354. Buttered Apples on Toast.

Without the one each day a long line of favorites, such as fruit fritters, charlottes, rice cakes, sweet

AMERICAN APPLE CHARLOTTE.

bill-of-fare

them

to

croquettes, patties, turnovers, rice with apples, pancakes, etc., etc., cou'd never appear at all.

This can only be made "just right" when extra good, easy-baking apples are at hand, because the raw apples should be done by the time the bread

to hotels furnishing length bills-of-fare. There are greater numbers at bottom of houses, both public and private, where any one of

This, however, applies only

full

these sweet course,

and

entrees

might

suffice

this is particularly the

for the

pastry reason for here

describing the charlottes which are oftenest used as

fruit charlotte

and be good.

browned.

Pippins and bellflowers are

40 thin, square slices of bread. 2 pounds of pared apples. f pound of butter.

puddings A.

is

best.

cannot be

Its excellence,

"thrown together"

when

carefully made,

| pound of sugar. Cinnamon or nutmeg. The slices of bread should be

all

of one

size.

Dip


THE AMERICAN PASTEY COOK. one fide in melted butter and place them, buttered side down, in close order in a shallow baking-pan

pressed a blanket like coat of crumbs on to the thick buttered eides of the mould, filled that with the fol-

place half an apple or two quarters on each slice and

lowing mixture and baked it of a handsome reddish brown, why then you have a very fair conception of the way that many of our good but rough-arid ready

bake brown with repeated bastings with a syrup made cf the sugar, butter and cup of hot water and

The apples ought to shine transparently Dish up with an without black edges when done. cinnamon.

American dishes came .

egg-slice.

355.

Named, probably, after a French cathedral town; It is a charlotte of the most possib'y a monastery. elaborate degree, the bread cut in small fancy shapes and placed in patterns, or in fingers lapping edges, on the sides of a mould spread with butter. Apples and apricots, sugar and butter and fruit jelly all stewed down to a paste is used to fi 1. Baked, glazed, and wine sauce served with it.

The preceding

directions

and examples apply

to

be made.

English Sweet Apple Cake

FRIAR'S OMELET.

Charlotte a la Marialva.

to

GATEAU DE POM MES RENVERE.

A kind of tirabale of apple custard baked wiih a casing of bread crumbs. 1 quart of dry stewed apples, or baked apple pulp.

6 ounces of sugar.

4 ounces of butter. % cupful of cream. 6 eggs.

Nutmeg and cinnamon. Bread crumbs, about a quart. Custard for sauce.

PEACH CHARLOTTES. PEAR CHARLOTTES. CHARLOTTES OF MIXED FRUITS.

Mash

the drained

apples through

a colander,

add the butter to it while warm, then the sugar and Almost any kind can be used. The poorest that can flavor, and the eggs and creim beaten together. be used for such a purpose are the mulberries dyed Fpread some softened butter all over the inside of a with logwood, which are now being sold for canned mould or pudding pan and press on all the fine blackberries.

Mulberries with their

own

natural

bread crumbs that can be made to stick. Pour in the apple mixture; cover the top with enough. crumbs pressed in; moisten the top with melted butter and bake brown, and well set. Now here, in the next, is another knot to be unTurn the apple cake carefully upside down out of tied. Not that the charlotte itself is a knot, else it the mould and serve it either with whipped cream were better cut than picked apieces, but the name, flavored with wiue and sugar, (d la chantilly] or "friar's omelet," whence conies it ? The clue in this with diluted red fruit jelly (sauce auxfruita}. case is fainter than the almost invisible thread which led through the maze to Fair Rosamond's bower. color,

when mixed with sour

grated

apples, are good

should a charlotte, or rather, perhaps a mix. ture of apples be called an omelet, unless, because, it looked like omelet ? And suppose the preceding

Why

charlotte a la Marialva

came from a monastery and

the English cooks made an ap;le mixture as near like it as they could and called it friar's omelet.

And

suppose the French cooks adopted the English mixture because it was good and called it English

That is how it seems to have been. apple cake. used to be a saying about the longest way

There

round being the shortest way home, and another about going from home to learn the news. Some English names being placed backwards in French have come back to our language as new words, as canteen from tin can; so in French cook books we find that called English lish

apple cake, which in Eng-

on both siJes of the Atlantic

is

called friar's

357.

Individual Charlottes.

Are best and

easiest

made with

either the friar's

omelet mixture preceding, or the apple custard pudding following; use the deepest gem pans; if fluted or otherwise ornamented shapes, so

much

the better.

Brush them over with a brush dipped in soft butter, coat with bread crumbs, fill and bake like the large When done have somt sauce dorSe apple cake. mix into it a nearly equal amount of thick ready; cream whipped to froth, and pour this around the charlottes Another way is to place a spoonful of meringue on each one and set the charlottes back in he oven on a baking pan to color. Place two or ihree red raspberries on top of the meringue. sauce required.

358.

Apple Puddings

No

Souffles.

omelet.

Suppose once more that some person out of pa-

INDIVIDUAL.

tience with

trying to line his charlotte mould with bread patterns of leaves, flowers, crosses and hearts

Make

and diamonds,

e custard next following.

just crumble the

bread

fine

and

either the friar's omelet mixture or the ap-

Instead of baking, stir


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. the mixture over the fire

till it

becomes thick.

Take

pound of bread crumbs cut fine. pound of chopped suet. of seedless raisins, or currants. pound % f pound of chopped apples. a nutmeg grated. 1

and add 4 beaten yolks, cup of brandy, a of exteaspoonful of lemon extract and the same

it off

tract of cloves; then 6 whites of eggs beaten up firm. If the apple Bake in cups, shells or paper cases.

justard be used

it is

the richer of the two

of double quantity

observe

it is

ents

must be doubled accordingly.

:

Salt.

\ pound of sugar. 1

teaspoonful of lemon extract.

Stir all well together; tie the mixture in two cloths,

A L'AMERICAINE. 2 quarts of dry stewed apples

the above together dry; then beat together

9 eggs

Apple Custard Pudding.

35O.

or baked apple

pulp. 1

Mix

and the added ingredi-

that

85

pound of sugar.

leaving a little room to swell, and boil without stoppage 4 hours. When eggs are scarce 5 or 6 will do

Butter and sugar with half a cup of milk added. '-Adam won't sauce is suitable; though one says, like it without wine and sugar."

$ pound of butter.

20 yolks of eggs. "Such," says Bulwer, is the constant habit of Lemon, nutmeg, or cinnamon flavor. They think anything expensive is young people. Mash the drained apples through a strainer. Mix necessarily good." Bulwer was young himself at Bake in a bright pan pre- that time, and must have known how it was. If the in the other ingredients. Use as pudding with either obverse was as invariably the case we should expect viously buttered. '

;

sweetened cream or wine sauce.

to find but few admirers of the following,

Here we have reached a boundary line. One step more would be out of the domains of pudding and

the cheapest pudding made. Certainly it is not the case in this direction, for we find no difficulty in disposing of large quantities of this pudding of many

over the borders of pie, for the last apple custard with a little milk added makes nice apple cream pie.

"Well, thank'goodness, it was not a bread pudding, for we are so tired of bread puddings." We "When did we have any bread puddings ?

have had queen of puddings, plum puddings, baked pudding, lemon pudding, cocoanut pudding,

fruit

charlottes,

"They

souffles and meringues." have bread in them, more or

and

all

cept the boiled roll puddings, and they are

ex-

made

is

However, it must be properly baked, and be in a brick oven, otherwise it has no

names.

to

ought

The theory of rice pudding is goodness at all. by the way, perhaps you did not know there was a theory of rice pudding

?

Yes, indeed.

This

is

a

great day for theories, and there is a pudding theory as well as a nebular theory and an atomic theory and an evolution theory; and as there will be unlimited time to

less,

which

pudding

it

study the others after we are done with evident the pudding theory should

is

pudding theory teaches that derived from the evaporation and As one pint of rice will "But they all and many more were made with condensation of the milk. bread, more or less, before our time; and they are absorb three pints of milk and no more, the baking none of the rough, unsightly bread crust abom- has to be so protracted that the pudding is made to white contain the condensed richness of six pints of milk, inations, but delicate compounds of fine, crumbs." half of it, the watery part being dried out in the of stand

biscuit dough."

"There

is

all

first.

The

the richness

rice

is

no fault to be found with the puddings, oven. As a matter of course the richer the milk and see there's no more bread in the the more cream it contains the better it will be to

but don't you house ?"

start with.

"Oh, well there are many good substitutes when bread cannot be obtained, but you will manage to admit just one more that is made with bread, more or

Baked Bice and Milk Pudding. Asto? English Bice House Pudding.

less,

both because

it is

Pudding.

a boiled pudding for a change, called by name but never

appeared.

It is

Plain Bice Pud-

Poor Man's Pudding, Etc.

ding.

and has already once been

one of the best."

361.

36O.

Eve's Pudding.

1

pint of rice.

1 pint of

A light

variety of the plum pudding order, Also called ponding & la not too rich.

favorite

and

Francaise.

The pundit who put the

verse was not concerned hotete.

receipt

in

about the needs of large

white sugar.

6 pints of milk.

Ground cinnamon or nutmeg:. Very

little salt.

2 ounces of butter, optional. Wash the rice in three or four waters and divide


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. in two pudding pans. cinnamon equally with it

Add

cold.

the butter if

Mix

the sugar, salt and

then pour in the milk the milk is not rich. Bake it,

in a slow oven 3 or 4 hours.

It

may be

best to use

only 5 pints of milk at first, and add the other if time allows the puddings to boil down dry

the

some other kitchen. taurants.

They take partnerships in res They open ice cream saloons, bakeries,

railway eating houses, saloons, lunch stands; they go as stewards; and some are lost and never are found. So there is room for intelligent boys like Fhe keeps you clean you if you are intelligent.

Scorching on top may be prevented by Almost covering with paper previously greased. any pudding sauce is suitable, and so is pure cream,

and decent, doesn't she ? Can you read and write ? Have you worked in a kitchen before know Yes. a stock boiler from a chopping machine ? Yes, you but for preference, sauce dorfa or golden sauce may have worked about a kitchen a little. Good enough; You can't be taken; it gives the best appearance to so plain a now go and make me this rice pudding. enough.

make a

rice pudding ? Oh, yes you can; the finest pudding you ever saw; just as good as I can. People who are weary of the sameness of egg- Take this receipt; hang it on the nail before you; laden and butter-soaked hotel puddings, and who follow it out; you will come out right. But observe like simple flavors, will appreciate the foregoing there is not a word too much, and every word means plain rice pudding and the following wholesome When it says buttered pans it means something.

pudding.

rice

variations of the same.

you are

to butter the

pans before you pour the pud-

When it says well washed rice it means dings in. you are to sure enough wash the rice rub it clean in cold water, pick out the specks; pour water on

SOS. Bioe and Apple Pudding.

The plain rice pudding preceding, made with only and off it till there is no more It sign of meal in it 4 pints of milk and 1 pound of good cooking apples, is the meal or flour in rice that burns at the bottom pared, cored and quartered. When you have of the saucepan, not the rice alone. Drop the quartered apples in the puddings, bake made this successfully preserve the receipt. You 3 or 4 hours and keep covered with buttered paper will not be a cook or pastry cook because that one to prevent scorching, and black edges on the apples. thing is done perfectly; it will take you five years to An inch length of stick cinnamon to each pud- learn it a:l, and then there will be just as much more Cream and sugar, or else hard that ding improves. you will never learn. But if you do some new sauce. thing each day and hold on to the knowledge, and 303. observe all that is done around you you will have Baked Bice and Raisin Pudding. gained so much over and above your wages. Count the last with raisins instead of apples. of the foregoing rice puddings should ever be

it

in dollars if

i

None

stirred while baking.

whole when done.

you

like;

one dollar,

five dollars; ac-

cording to the desirableness of the article you have The rice grains shouM be learned to produce; according to the difficulty of making it which you will have overcome. So in a jear

or two you will have a trade better for you than if Now scoot. The next needs no help of sauce for its appear- your daddy had left you a fortune. It is as rich and delicate as a rice pudding Don't speak to me anymore till I speak to you. The ance. other boys will show you where to find the rice, pure and simple can be made. milk, sugar, butter, eggs.

You

will be slow at

first.

Old you say you have a mother to help, and We don't allow youngsters to do guess work. you have been trying everywhere and you can't get hands may guess, but even they can't always bit it, Afterwards you anything else whatever to do, therefore you want to and your ingredients cost money. Now, don't you see that must learn to work fast if you are going to be a hoget a jvb in the kitchen. is not at all complimentry to the kitchen ? Hotel tel cook. I shall know by to-night exactly what you "For man is man and master of his keepers have a hard enough time without having to are worth. So, sonny,

contend with the leavings and castaways of all other fate." Yet they always learn it occupations and employments.

want smart,

You

and

How if it

goes that song ? I will make that boy can ever be found again.

industrious boys. intelligent "Turn, Fortune, turn thy wheel and let it turn, have sense, perhaps you even have sense Thy wheel and thee we neitherfear nor hate. enough to become a good cook. And you might do Our lands are little but our hearts are great, worse. You will probably live to see the time when And man is man and master of his fate," a man of sense and sensibility will not be ashamed Or words to that effect. in the United States to say he is a hotel cook. And

appear

to

we

all want helpers of the right sort. Our good seconds, whose ways and dispositions we know, and who know ours, are continually drifting away from

us.

They are always wanted

to go to the

head of


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Bice Custard Pudding.

864.

87

a tendency to cause a watery separation of the eggs if cooked too Curacoa diluted a little and made hot is also long. in the midd'e, as the fruit has

VANILLA SAUCE.

a good sauce. quarts of well cooked dry ric. 6 ounces of butter.

2

full

For the same reason that apple charlottes were infollowing "sweet entrees'' are hero

cluded, the

8 ouuces of sugar. 8 yolks of eggs.

placed in succession; namely, because they are used as puddings

quart of milk. 1 tab'espoonful of lemon extract. 1

The

Rice Cake with Currant

be already cooked in water and Measure it and while still hot stir in the

:

rice should

milk.

on occasion.

36T. Jelly.

2 quarts of well cooked dry rice. 6 ounces of butter.

Beat the yolks with the milk and sugar. gradually added; stir well into the rice; flavor slightly; pour the pudding into two buttered pans and bake about half an hour. butter

6 ounces of sugar. 6 yolks of eggs.

\ pint of milk (or less, or none if the rice be not To prepare the rice from the first boil 1 pound of dry.) well- washed rice in 1 quart of water, add a pinch Flavor with nutmeg or vanilla. When half done add 1 pint of milk and let of salt. Mix all the ingredients together, mashing the rice simmer an hour with the steam shut in. Never stir with the Smooth it over, about an inch spoon. it and it will not be very apt to burn. in a buttered Bake in a hot oven to

Any

of these puddings left over can be used for

fritters.

deep, a quick

or

Full directions for

making a score or more of good

pudding sauces will be found all together, further For these richest rice compounds a clear on. transparent sauce flavored with vanilla, or else with red wine, will be found most suitable.

pan.

brown on

top.

other ceat shapes,

get

Cut out diamonds, squares, and serve with red currant

jelly placed tastefully on or about the rice cake.

Articles like the above ought always be

baked in

Iron meat pans, however clean, bright tin pans. generally stain the under side and make the cakes uneatable.

As with the bread custard and the plain reader rice

is

rice the

advised to note particularly the preceding not only to avoid repetition here,

368.

Bice Cake, with Fruits.

custard,

would be a small matter, but because the Prepare the rice cake of the foregoing receipt; alis all removed from the variations when so any kind of rich, thick, stewed down fruit, or the basis of all has once been made. compote of lemons or oranges. Spread the bottoms of two bright pudding pans Carolina Pudding-, with Transparent with butter and press on a coating of bread crumbs; which

mystery

Sauce.

365.

all that will stick.

Cover this with the rice cake

mixture by spoonfuls, not displacing the crumbs. Make the rice custard pudding preceding, and add Spread a thin layer of the compote over that, then to it one egg more, and pound each of seedless or rice cake, then compote again, and finish with rice Moisten and smooth over with a little seeded raisins, currants and candied orange peel. on top.

The fruit cream. Sift on a little fine bread crumbs from a Flavor with orange extract very lightly. The layers should Bake half an hour. must be strewn evenly over the top after the pud- colander. ding is in the baking pans, and slightly pressed in be no thicker than those of ordinary jelly cake. Serve neat squares Turn the cake out when done. with a spoon; else it may all sink to the bottom. or diamonds with the brown bottom side up and the

West

Indian Pudding, with G-uava

366.

compote syrup, or any sauce around.

Jelly.

We 'would the rice custard pudding, preceding, and add to it 1 whole egg and pound of grated fresh

Make

never trouble about timbales in a book

of puddings if the word was not a stumbling block There are timbales of rice and sweet in the way.

which in effect are ornaall, and when the pudding is in the timbales of macaroni, etc., in billspouni of pineapple in thin, small slices mental puddings. The word often appears of-fare when it means only rice cakes like the preand lay over the top, slightly pressing it in. Timbale means kettle drum, and is The pineapple, if fresh, should be stewed first in ceding kinds.

Mix

cocoanut.

pans take

a

little

1

sugar syrup; then use the syrup to dilute the

Bake

these puddings no longer than

a pudding in an ornaT Suppose you take some yel ow nouilles paste and by means of a mould form a shape in allusion to

the shape of

mental pastry case.

guava jelly for sauce. till

fairly set


THE AMERICAN PASTHY COOK.

83 like the castle in chess,

and bake

That

it.

is

and

fill

that with rice cake

the simplest form.

Petites Timbales de Biz.

Let there be no mystery about these. They are individual rice cakes, but they cannot be de-

little

scribed, only suggested, fjr they are but the cook's

and are more than

chameleon

Change shape as well as color. They are of no consequence

They are unlocked

cies.

they

like,

on'y passing fan-

for contingencies;

unex

pected circumstances; dernier resorts; put in to fill the bill, to decorate and set off the row of little

up

dinner dishes before the guest.

and there are stage scenes

laid

or twenty cents, or if there is Chinese help to be fed, a boiled rice pudding is not so bad Besides, we have Dr. Andrew Combe's "Physiology

of Digestion" to prove that it is the easiest of digep tion of all puddings, and therefore commended to

AUX FRUITS

notions,

or fifteen,

There are cameos on with a whitewash

dyspeptics. VVa^h a pint of rice; mix a handful or two of either raisins, currants or apples with it, tie up in a cloth with room enough to swell to three pints; put

on in cold water and

boil about

an hour.

Syrup or

molasses fur s uce. If the foregoing is a "poor man's pudding,'' the next must certainly be his rich relation's. It can be handsomely urned out of a handsome mould

and the rich custard poured round.

It will

good unless the tapl-ca be thorough^

s a'

rected,

and may take

pint

not be

el as di

more milk; the

re-

brush; both are'meritorous in their place. When the cook is tired of cuttKn.; out rice or farina or ta-

ceipt

squares, and dishing up cbar'ottes with a spoon, he takes some means of giving to ench person an uncut, untouched and more or less deco

Steamed Tapioca Pudding, with Custard

pioca cakes

trifle

on the safe side for turning out in good

shape.

in

The main com pound for these little rice sbapes is already found in the rice cake plain, preceding. A suggestion of va rated

is

in symmetrical

Sauce.

shape.

riation is found in the rice cake with fruits.

Sup. pose you take muffin rings, brush them inside with butter, coat them with fine grated bread crumbs, with rice cake, bake brown and serve a green gage plum stewed in bright syrup, or halt' an apri fill

red cherries with the thick juice on top. Or, instead of rings, take some handsome stamped

cot, or three

1 pound of tapioca 3 pints of milk. pound of sugar.

3 ounces of butter. 6 yolks of eggs. 3 whole e.igs. Salt. 1

lemon, juice aud grated rind. oak the tapioca in most of the milk in a

warm

Then boil theremainiug mi'k with and butter; turn iu the s aked tapigem pans, the deeper and more pyramidal the better, and on the buttered sides place some shapes cut oca, let simmer 15 mi; utes with the steam shut in; with your fancy vegetable cutters out of the greenest then be-it in the eggs and lemon. Butter two candied citron, or watermelon rind; or else, instead moulds, put in the mixture, arid steam one and oneof bread crumbs, use finely chopped yolks of eggs; of any of those, make some nouillcs

place 2 hours. the salt, sugar

half hours.

or, instead

paste

which

with a

is flour

litt'e salt

smoothness

and

moistened with yolk of egg,

and nothing

and worked to out of that Then

else,

cut.leaves, etc.,

STEAMED SAGO PUDDING. STEAMED GROUND RICE PUDDING. STEAMED FARINA PUDDING.

These can all be made by the foregoing receipt, place rice cake round, over the patterns a sort of wall or cising and inside fill with preserved fruit, but of farina use 2 ounces less, as it absorbs more

jam or conserve. out, glazed

After baking these may be turned with yolk of egg and milk or sugar, and

liquid than the other substances.

Sometimes lit le rice Enough has been said about rice cakes and timbaked in the tiniest gem bales to dismiss the subject, but here is the same pans holding scjrce a tablespoonfu!, and are served thing done in tapioca. as decorations of entrees, and with fish. 374. quickly browned again. cakes, not sweetened, are

Tapioca Cake, with Apple Sli.

The writer has not found

occasion to be

concerned about boiled puddings of

much

rice; hotel

peo

who

require anything so plain being amply satisfied with the rice prepared for a vegetable dish. pie

If,

is

Jelly.

Plain Boiled Rice Pudding.

however, the competition of the other restaurant give good meals for ten,

so severe that one must

f pound of tipioca. 3 pints of milk, or milk and water. 4 ounces ol sugar. 2 ounces of butter. 10 yolks, or else 3 whole eggs.

Orange flavoring. Salt. Soak the tapioca an hour or two in half the milk.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY Boil the rest of the milk with the sugar ?md salt in stir in the tapioca and let cook gently half an

COOK.

89

Sprinkle in the farina dry, beating all tlia with the large egg whip to avoid having Then beat in the butter, eggs and flavoring lumps in it, as if making mush. Let the farina cool; hour. and bake like rice cake, an inch deep. Farina kettles net slowly half an hour or more

it;

salt.

while

needed when there

375. Tapioca Custard Pudding.

and beaten eggs. 20 minutes.

f pound of tapioca. 3 pints of milk. 6 ounces of sugar. 3 ounces of butter.

wash

it,

sugar in the mixture, and set Then mix in the butter

Bake

in

two buttered pans about

3Y8. Farina Cake, with Quince

8 yolks and 2 whole eggs, Salt. Grated lemon rind or other Sift the dust from tapioca. ter to

is

back of the range.

at the

besides, like

Make same as tapioca cake; and no soaking needed.

Jelly.

an ounce

less farina

flavor.

Sometimes

Soak

rice.

it is it

bet-

Rum

Farina Cake, with Fruit,

Sauce.

in half

warm place. Boil the Raisins, currants and citron baked in the farina milk with the sugar in it the sugar pre- cake. Served with thick syrup containing rum. vents burning at bottom cook the soaked tapioca Small timbales on the same plan. Beat the eggs, mix all toin it about half an hour. the milk about two hours in a

rest of the

gether anl bake only till the puddings are just set in the middle, lest the custard in it curdle and separate instead of being creamy rich. Any hot, clear, transparent sauce or lemon syiup suits, also brandy and wine sauces. This pudding is often served coM

Also

with sweetened cream. shapes, egged, breaded,

and

may be

cut cold in

is

ceded

SAGO PUDDINGS. SAGO CAKES. Can be made by preceding receipt ter to write them out if to be used

required to be as good as the one that preand the whites of eggs left over are needed

it,

hundred ways. The whites do no more good in The yolks puddings than so much flour or starch. Probably at angive the richness and fine color. in a

day ?" "1 thought

eggs, white cocoanut

pies,

white whips and forgot.

3YO. Tapioca Custard Meringue.

floats,

JDci

I

bill

what pudding

of fare

would give you steamed p?und

if

to-

that

will suit."

"Will suit "Fail

first-rate if

you don't

there's no such

fail ?

?

fail

with

word aa

it."

fail 1"

*

*

*

""Well, Jerry, it is time to dish Look at them." are they ?

up the puddings.

How

"Failed

"Now, Jerry,

other time we shall have a talk about silver cakes, There snow cakes and a dozen others made with white of There

and the meringues must not be

for tapioca, for sago.

380, "Now, Jerry, the

fried as fritters.

Does it seem like extravagance to call for so many Is is not. What yolks of eggs for puddings ? might be so regarded in private house work is really the greatest economy in hotels where each fresh meal

3TO,

failed

this is too

by the holypoker

much

for

human

1"

nature.

no need to fail with steamed cake-puddings. a reason for everything, and pound pudding fails only because either there is too much sugar in the mixture or else because it does not get is

is

Now your mixture is all light but There is a white, not done. are your puddings was hottest, but light layer on top where the steam done enough.

When Make the tapioca pudding preceding. Steamed sponge baked spread over the top some lemon conserve or all the rest is gum and sugar. to cook; they take from an easiest the are puddings Beat whatever whites are left orange marmalade. to size. over to a froth; add sugar, about an ounce to each hour and a quarter upwards according but they must have near come Pound next, puddings Make white, lightly stirred in, and vanilla flavor. Steamed fruit pudunless very small. the top of the pudding baking-hot again, then spread two hours, If you go to a high point much take longer. dings on the meringue and dry-bate. in the mountains your puddings need to steam And remember the water below must longer still.

3TT.

Farina Custard Pudding.

2 quarts of milk. 7 ounces of farina.

Now who would

6 ounces of sugar. 4 ounces of butter.

8 yolks, or else 5 whole eggs. Boil the milk Tvith the sugar in

never stop boiling, and time counts nothing if you have no steam up."

pudding it

of bread,

have thought there was another less, lurking back here ?

more or

but this is a very good gorry they are so numerous, in demand. are steamed and one of a and pinch puddings


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

eo

Steamed Bread Pudding.

381.

after flour is all in

ture 1

To beat the mix makes the pudding fin

then the flour in small portions.

grained and whiter, but not so light.

pounds of white bread crumbs. | pound of sugar.

Don't beat

it

4 whole eggs and 8 yolks.

Steam in fancy tall moulds if to go to table whole; to be dished up in slices any sort of cake or jelly moulds suit. These puddings need to be put on in good tight steamers when the water is already boiling, anl be

1 teaspoonful of

kept steaming If hours, or longer.

pound of 1

much.

butter.

quart of milk.

baking powder.

Lemon rind or extract. Mix the bread crumbs and sugar the butter in

and

the milk

Put Pour the

together.

them.

boil

Pretty name, isn't it ? the next, sultana pudding. not going to be told here how it compares in goodness with the queen pudding which ve had It is

and butter over the bread and let stand because a comparison between a queen Beat the eggs and yolks together away back, and a sultana would be odious. However, this is a and mix them in; the flavoring, baking powder, then white rose. beat all together 2 or 3 minutes. Steam an hour or boiling milk

awhile to steep.

longer in two buttered mou'ds.

little

Serve with

384.

Sultana Pudding.

hard sauce, meringue sauce, butter sauce or maple Better write it a finer name on the bill-ofsyrup.

RED WINE SAUCE.

fare.

382.

pound of granulated sugar. pound of fresh butter. pound of white of eggs (9 whites).

Steamed Sponge Pudding. WINE OR BRANDY SAUCE.

cupful of milk. teaspoonful of baking powder. 1 pound of flour.

14 ounces of granulated sugar. 12 eggs. 14 ounces of

1

finest flour.

Vanilla flavor, about two teaspoonfuls. Beat the sugar and eggs together in a kettle half

\ cup of brandy. 1 pound of sultana raisins.

Cream the butter and sugar together as for pound by the arm cake. Add the whites same way not previously ache, as ten minutes seems half an hour that way. beaten. Then mix in the baking powder, after that Have the ingredients all cold and beat in a cool the flour, milk brandy, raisins. Steam in moulds an hour by the

clock.

You

can't time

it

,

When

place. full of

the time

The wine sauce served with up the kettle will be half from 1 to 2 hours. Then stir in the flour in this pudding should have a lemon cut up in it.

is

a foamy batter. Do not beat but

portions.

stir

round

till

the flour

Add the pretty well mingled and out of sight. To be perfect all sponge cake ar vanilla extiact. is

tides must be cooked as soon as

the batter

is fin-

Steam it in pudding moulds, jelly moulds, melon moulds or any kind you like no matter about lids about an hour and a half.

Raspberry vinegar is an excellent sauce for puddings of the above description.

385.

Steamed Coccanut Pudding.

ished.

WITH ORANGE JELLY.

The same mixture as the preceding with pound Whenever any of these cake mixture puddings of cocoanut and some lemon extract instead of raisseem to be heavy or sticky, provided the fault is not ins and brandy. Almonds, citron, cherries and in the steaming,

they

may be

corrected

next time

other fruits can be used in like manner.

At great aUitudes The same useful mixture also makes a good white the sugar has to be considerably less, and newly ar- cake, white raisin cake, etc. rived pastry cooks are often "thrown" through not by using a

.trifle

less sugar.

understanding or being willing to believe

383.

it.

Steamed Pound Pudding.

BRANDY, WINE OR CURACOA SAUCE. f pound of white sugar. | pound of fresh butter.

There is something almost apalling in the vaulting ambition ofthese cooks when they set themselves to

naming puddings.

blest,

then,

is

our

lot,

wise we, the reader and the scribe, should inevitably encounter and have to pay attentions t >, let us see

"Her Majesty's

10 eggs.

How

that for the purposes of this writing we are without the bounds of Great Britain and of Canada, other-

pudding,''

"Empress Josephine's "

pudding," "Queen Mab'g pudding pound This last is cosmopolitan, however, and is a nice Cream the butter and sugar together by warming and beating. Beat in the eggs, one or two at a time, enough little pudding, but too fairy like to be eaten 1

of flour.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. with a knife and believing that

it

There

fork.

good reason fo at all, but a

is

not a Spenserite

is

01

1 lemon, juice and grated rind. \ cup of brandy. 1 pound of raisins.

tawny Italian cream pretending to come accredited from 1 pound of currants. "The court of Mab and of the faery king." $ pounl of citron. Then there would be "Princess Louise's pudding," The first four articles are to be mixed first, as us"Beatrice pudding," and Marie Stuart's and Sir ual for cake, then the others added, not forgetting Watkins'. Besides, there would be shadows in the to dust the fruit well wi'h flour. distance of the illustrious Lord Dundreary's pudIt is one cf the most satisfactory puddings to make ding and the honorable Earl of Flaxton's. So every for hotel use; being reaUy a good plum pudding to cloud has its silver lining. We might be worse off. replace the boiled, which requires twice as much As it is, we already have the queen rose of the rose time, Steam these fully 3 hours; longer if in large bud gar I mean we already have the "queen of pud- moulds. dings" and the Sultana Scheherezade's fa v atleast, 388. that

is,

Individual Steamed Puddicgs.

we have a very white sultana raisin pudding

with carmine chee ored sauce;

that

we have

is to

say, with carmine col-

the king pudding that rules the

British roost, laurel crowned, with all his fierce snapdragon flames around him; the socialist Jack Cade of

Steam any of the foregoing

varieties,

and any oth-

made

of cake mixtures in eg? cups. They rise rounded on top and do not fall like so.ifHes.

er kinds

puddings is coming on his way, and how do we know From 30 minutes to one hour is required for steam, but that to meet and dispute with great Haggis, the ing, according to the iind, sponge puddings being In restaurants they are commonly highland chief, there will arise from our steaming soonest done. cauldron a stalwart Tuscarora chief,

in a yellow

won over his Minnehaha long ago, whatever her name may have been then. Meantime make way for the great; mantle, with

and

silk

he

tassel, just as

It is still a question here comes imperial pudding. whether this should be regarded as a 1' imperial or

a

1'

imperiale,

French probably this case the

but as pudding it is

and not to suit more remarkable. ror,

id

it

herself,

masculine in

No doubt but

imperial.

empress h

is

made

to suit the

which makes

in

empe-

it all

the

served in the cups with sauce in a little pitcher separate; but may be turned out and served in saucers as well.

389. Steamed Cabinet Pudding. 2 quarts of

4 ounces

slices of cake.

of butter.

\ pound of citron shred

fine.

3 pints of milk. 8 eggs. \ cupful of red currant jelly.

12 ounces of sugar.

Sponge cake is best. A 2 quart milk pan will measure the slices. Use shallow pudding moulds having lids. Stick the shreds of citron around the insides on a coating

11 eggs.

of butter.

386. Imperial Steamed Pudding. 14 ounces of butter.

pound of flour. Lemon and nutmeg

extracts.

raisits.

Mix

the former ingredients as if for pound cake. Sca'd, peel and chop the almonds, cut the citron in

shreds and take the seeds out of the raisins.

adding the fruit to with 2 ounces more

the

cake mixture dust

Before it

Steamed Fruit Pudding. 38T. Pudding.

and

Beat the

3O.

Individual Cabinet Puddings

Lena

Pound Fruit

The same ingredients and amounts as the preceding.

Cut the

slices of

cake with a small round, ocspread them with but-

tagonal or scalloped cutter, ter

and jelly and

pile

them

in

first is

over the steamer under the lid

12 ounces of sugar.

of water.

Fill

(o prevent diopping Place a spoonful of meringue on top of each one when they are turned out of the cups, and brown them slightly with a red hot salamander or

11 eggs. of flour.

mixed ground

custard cups.

eggs and milk and refill when the Steam half au hour with a clo h soaked in

with the mixed

14 ounces of butter.

pound

very

serve whether who^e or in slices with either meringue sauce or sauce er.umante poured over.

well

on, brandy, wine, meringue or sabayon sauce.

1 teaspoonful of

jelly,

flour.

Steam in ornamental moulds about 2 J hours

1

slices

milk and eg^s together no sugar needed pour over the cake; when absorbed fill up again. Tteam \\ hours. Turn the puddings out of the mouldsand

| pound of almonds. pound of citron.

pound of

Spread one side of the cake

thinly with butter, the other side with pile them in he mou'ds, not to fit tight.

1

spices.

shovel held over.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

92

Steamed Brandy Pudding.

391.

were written.

Pears, quinces, apples, bananas, per-

haps other dry fruits may be used as well as pineThe starch is to counteract the juiciness; apple.

2 quarts of slices of cake. pint of brandy.

with certain mealy kinds of apples it would not be needed. Bread or cracker crumbs have the same

pint of finely chopped, seedless raisins. 4 ounces of butter.

and 8 The whites must be beaten quite firm, and a wire whisk is the best to use for that purpose. The mixture when finished is as and blanched of almoads, split. pound Line the moulds with the split almonds stuck to a light and foamy as sponge cake batter. It rises arid thin coating of butter. Paper casts Spread the miuced raisins bakes cream color in the cups or cases upon the slices of cake; fill up the moulds, sprink- should be buttered icside and half baked before beand should be filled to the top to lovk ling in the brandy by spoonfuls, and the rest of the ing filled, 8 yolks are cooked

effect.

in the mix'ure

well beaten are added raw.

2J pints of milk. 8 eggs.

Then beat the eggs and milk together, well when done. Caiefully wipe the cut sides of These little fruit puff pudbefore baking. and hold the cake will moulds will cups pour Steam 1 hours. absorb. dings may be liked better with the addition of plain, Some people would add nutthick cream for sauce. Individual Macaroon Puddings. meg or cinnamon or braudy to the composition of butter in bits.

in all the

Have

or custard cups as there will probably be orders, about 40, and brush the insides with melted butter. PI ice in the bottom of each a small as

many egg

round sponge drop. Cover that with a thin layer of finely chopped raisins; ont hat place a maciroon and The caVes must be sp'it if in that way fill the cup.

Make a

not thin.

n a quart

to

fill

of these mixtures left over will do

Any

apple puffs.

tarts in patty pans.

other puddings.

of thin cream

cream, sweetened and flavored, piled on top.

good.

INDIVIDUAL. Make

the preceding pineapple souffle mixture in

respects as directed, and bake in deep tin gem pans or dariole moulds well buttered, Bake ten or all

fifteen

303.

!

Pineapple Sponge Puddings.

and 2 ounces of sugar.

with a spoon all the cakes will absorb. Steam Serve in the cups with whipped half an hour.

1

894.

rich cus'ard with 7 eggs beaten

Fill in

These are no better than

Ihey are a

minutes, keep hot, light and spongy as possiTake out wi h a small

ble without drying them.

Pineapple Puddings Souffles.

knife and dish up in saucers with cream sauce.

2 pounds of pineapple. 1

There need be nothing wasted.

pound of sugar. pint, scant, of the pineapple juice.

2 ounces of corn starch. 16 eggs. Grate the pineapple

if fresh, if

canned mash

fine

sugar and butter in it over the fire. Mix the starch with the juice and add to the fruit, and let it thick-

305.

which add 8 yolks ot eggs, beat them in all cook 5 to 10 minutes longer, and then

Lemon Sponge Pudding

A SOUFFLE TO BE SERVED WHOLE. 2 pounds of grated ripe apples.

pound of sugar.

en, after

1

and

2 ounces of butter.

mixture away to cool. Then beat the remaining 8 yolks in a bowl with a Dover egg beater. Whip the 16 whites to a firm

set the

froth that will not

and

stir

in

fall

forego-

quart of milk and 2 eggs.

as possible adding the sugar at last to assist in reThen stir the pulp \*ith the ducing it to pulp.

let

The two

ing compositions and the one to follow all make nice cream pies if diluted with a pint of milk, or with a

2 ounces of best butter.

out of the bowl upside down,

the yolks and then the whites, without beating the mixture at all.

first

4 lemons, grated rind of all, juice of 2.

cup of milk. 2 ounces of corn starch or flour.

16 eggs.

Make according

to

directions for

the pineapp'o

mould that will Bake as soon as made in about 40 custard cups, hold 3 quarts Pin a band of buttered paper around Fill with the lemon buttered, or in silver scallops or shells, or else in the mould to make it higher. Ten minutes in a moderate oven is sponge nrxture and bake about half an hour. paper cases.

lightly

and

time required to bake. Dredge powdered sugar on top before removing quite from the oven.

the

The preceding receipt will answer as well for sev eral other varieties as if a column or two of repetitions

souffles.

Bake

in a silver dish or

Dredge vanilla flavored sugar on top in the oven. Take off the paper just before sending to the table. Sauce doree, or butter sauce with nutmeg or cream. It can of course be baked in individual style as well as the others.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. In old times, a very long while ago, there lived a race of hotel cooks who ran in such a very little

narrow

and had such very small resources in when they had made about three puddings they were at their wit's end, and

rut,

crowd of passengers aground on a steamboat up th* Arkansas, and they were g^ad I could.

397.

Baked

their trade that different

used

to

have

their heads against the wall to

to butt

Millet

Seed Pudding.

pounds of millet seed.

1\

shake up their memories, so they would know what Then they would recollect on earth to make next. something to make which required almonds, raisins

2 quarts of milk and water. 6 ounces of butter.

and citron; but when they ran to the hotel storeroom they found none of those articles in stock. Then they had to butt their heads against the wall

5 eggs.

again harder,

till

they could think of something

else,

and that would require apples. But the store room And then they had would be bare of apples also. to go and find a harder place in the wall and butt their heads against it harder and longer every time. What charity it would That was in the dark ages. have been, and what suffering it would have prevented if some person had stood up and told them

what they might do

How

in

the case of a short store-

room. they had no bread they could use cake; if they had no yolks of eggs they could make a pudding of the whites; if they had no eggs at all

8 ounces of sugar. 1

Little salt.

quart more milk to mix up,

Nutmeg flavor. Wash the millet seed and

let it

cook at the back

of the range about 3 hours, in the 2 quarts of milk and water; Then mash it a little and mix in the rest of the

Raisins,

ingredients.

currants, etc.,

The preceding is a trifle richer in Syrup for eggs than the steamboat pudding was.

may be

added.

sauce.

Yam

Baked

3O8.

Pudding.

if

Sweet potatoes in the

sandy

will do,

but the large yams grown

Louisiana and Texas are better

soils of

nor milk they could do just as well with a pudding for mealiness, and have less of the potato 1 that would be ruined if even milk or eggs came pounds of potato. near it; and if they had no pineapples they could do | pound of fresh butter. very well indeed with pumpkins.

Pumpkin pudding must be older than pumpkin is pumpkin pudding over pie, because pumpkin pie the water. The first appearance of pumpkin in his-

flavor.

pound of sugar. 12 eggs. pint of brandy. pint of sherry. 1 tablespoonful of vanilla extract.

young person named Gin Boil the yams or sweet potatoes after paring, in derella, who, finding her fine coach was changed salted water, and mash the required amount of dry again into nothing but a hateful pumpkin that came puree through a colander. Mix in the butter while rolling up to the door, felt vexed, and thought she still warm, then the sugar, liquorand vanilla. Sepwould make a pudding of it. into the mixture, and beat the arate the tory

is

in the story

of a

30G.

New

England Pumpkin Pudding.

3 pounds of dry stewed pumpkin. pound of sugar or maple syrup.

6 ounces of butter.

yolks eggs, Bake in the whites after whipping to a firm froth. buttered pans about half an hour. Lemon syrup or wine or brandy sauce.

Common

potatoes that are very good and mealy the preceding manner, with more

can be used in

1 pint of cream.

10 eggs. a nutmeg grated. teaspoonful of grated cinnamon. Steam the pumpkin and mash the required amount

sugar and less wine.

399.

Steamed

pound of pound of

through a colander, as dry as possible. It is generally well worth while to stew down the pumpkin

1

with the sugar and butter in which prevents burning till it has become thick and transparent. Then

2 ounces of flour.

add the cream and eggs well beaten together, and the Bake in two buttered pudding pans about spices. half an hour. Is best when just done, but good

8 yolks of eggs.

either hot or cold.

Brandy, rum or wine are some-

times mixed in; but not necessary.

Yam

Pudding.

potato,

butter.

3 ounces of sugar.

4 whites. \ cup of brandy. Vanilla flavoring.

Pare and water.

boil the

JViash

the

yam

or sweet potatoes in salted

required

amount through a

the whites, Squash pudding can be made by the foregoing re- strainer. Add all the ingredients except and stir in a froth to the whites beat a for and I made the well, Once whip ceipt. following again


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Steam in two small gently. lyrup sauce.

moulds

Lemon

1 hour.

the Greenwich pensioners and the Chelsea pensionWoolwich dock yard hands; the sailors on

ers; the

400. Baked Cracked "Wheat Pudding.

the high seas; the blue-coat children of charity marching down the streets and thoroughfares which

2 heaping quarts of cracked wheat, already well cooked and dry.

Dickens has made familiar,

have their duff days

all

currant duff, plain duff, plum duff Great days are the days marked by plum duff But they are not all. Thous nds of factory operatives, suet

duff,

!

6 ounces of butter.

pound of sugar. 3 pints of milk. 6 eggs (or 8 yolks).

thousands of railroad constructors of British, Cana and American railways all own a

dian, Australian

Now who will pre loving allegiance to King Duff Cinnamon extract or grated nutmeg. sume to laugh at Duff, with such a following, a new The cracked wheat must be dry, else use a pint Jack Cade though he may be? We shall do far betless milk. Thoroughly mix all, the butter first ter to discuss his merits, as the following pages are while the wheat is hot. Bake in two buttered pans not only Duff proper but his family and Vanilla transparent sauce or intended, about half an hour. But being but a new-comer, comparafollowers. almost any other kind. tively, taking the place of old pudding, whence 4O1. came the word. Did not some small wit, such as we !

Brown Cracked Wheat Pudding. "West Point Pudding. Graham Pudding. '2

And did not another smallwit more dough ? if e n o-u g-h spelt enuff, d-o-u-g-h spelt duff? and they had had enuff duff. But this would never have gone abroad if Dick SwiveUer had not been there. He was a little stage struck and very popuHe had taken the Mar. lar at his boarding house. chioness to the theatre the night before, and on that day they took a sumptuous dinner at a London cheap

say

pound of molasses (a small cup). 6 ounces of butter or chopped suet. 6 eggs. pints of milk.

ground cinnamon.

1 teaspoonful of

barrooms in the Newcomes, pre. was not cooked enough, call

tending the pudding for

heaping quarts of cracked wheat mush.

1

see in Thackeray's

pound of raisins. .Mix and beat all the ingredients together, except So when it came to calling for the house. Strew the boarding raisins, the beaten eggs to be added last he remembered the smallwits and shouted pudding on in raisins the pans; they sink if stirred in. top to the waiter Bake an hour. Maple syrup with butter for sauce. "Lay on, Mack Duff, and dumb be he that first cries, hold, enough !" One large pint of cracked wheat raw will mage Poor Dick he is gone now. But duff is all over the above amount. The mush is expected to be dry, In the copper mines of Lake Superior, the world. The pudding has else use less milk or more eggs. and in the carbonate mines of the Rocky Mountains, fluid when in the oven to be !

apparently quite but comes out firm enough.

put

When

either of the pre

ceding puddings are to be made, extra wheat should be put on for the breakfast mush, to secure the benefit of the three hours cooking.

When

the

mush

be cold, mash it with the milk made hot, Those are favorite pudso as to have no lumps.

happens

to

they

duff.

But

"Quantum suf

dings and worth attention.

Speaking of those the Marchioness. Swiveller.

personages brings to mind Dickens' Marchioness and Dick

have particular business with Dick he must have been the author and

originator of the word duff, as applied to pudding Else whence comes duff ? It is a word severely let alone by many people under the impression that it is slang;

it

permeates

all

athletic garb; not

now

in

fighting trim, but

mellow

with doing good; his countenance shining and his Is he rough and plain? sides shaking with fatness.

is

It

army and navy

as well as the U. S's. Midshipman Easy undoubtedly used the word duff for pudding, and the entire crew of H M. S. Pinafore follow the same practice. It is simply a cockneyism, and cockneyisms extend all over the world. So

able

He is Yet here he comes. Shake him heartily. no popinjay "perfumed like a milliner," with flumHe is an athlete in meries, frills and furbelows.

evanescent, this word is stable But think how he goes into the convalescent wards; cannot be even a vulgarism, for the workhouses; the almshouses, the veteran rethrough H. B. M's. most respect treats, the charity schools, the penitentiaries, the

but slang

and permanent.

Ficitof duff."

titled

We

Swiveller, for

as on board the Alaska

call for duff as glib'y

whalers; and in all those places all our fine pud dings would be called duff just the same Infantine pudd'n; feminine pudding; masculine

and they all smile to see him come. not happen in barracks army and navy training schools in camp and on the sea, were very hulks,

And what might

the regular weekly visits of this potentate arbitrarily forbidden ? Athlete, did we say ? Why, bless ue,


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

95

"things are not what they seem;" how do we know Jack Cade Duff's relatives moving in the highest sobut he is an Atlas, and on Lis shoulders he is bear ciety, and presently they will be found next of kin to old

?

ing up empires

you had

not been

treat

him

you might not have suspected that following is King Duff.

this

If

forewarned

to

knightly,

40G.

A

2 pounds of flour. 1 pound of suet. 1

1

about three hours.

The water

should be boiling when the pudding is put in and not allowed to stop. The suet makes the pudding

4O3.

Currant Suet

1$ pounds of 1

1

Eat with butter and syrup.

rich.

1 pint of milk.

2 eggs. the dry articles together first, then the Boil 4 hours poured in the middle, stir up. or longer. Transparent sauce with rum, brandy or

Mingle

fluids

wine.

Roll,

The next

flour.

Boiled

A

Salt.

1

softer

Make

the dough into two long c^ths and boil two hours. The the dough can be to be, handled at all, the altogether.

lighter the

404.

up

in

pudding

a flaxen blonde, that will dispute for

407.

1 pint of water.

Mix

is

supremacy with the highest.

pound of chopped suet. pound of currants or raisins.

rolls, solid, tie

spices.

1

the water. It makes a soft dough. Beat thoroughly with a spoon. Put it in a conical or fun. nel-shaped pudding bag, previously wetted and

and

and

flour.

teaspoonful of salt. ounce of mixed ground spices. 1 sma 1 ! teaspoonful of soda.

into the flour.

Mix with

quite light

suet pudding with molasses

1 it

it

boil

brown

pound of chopped suet. pound of molasses. pound of raisins.

1

A

and

Boiled Spice Pudding.

2 pounds of

pints of water. large teaspoonful of salt. Chop the suet, not too fine, and rub

himself.

WITH RUM SAUCE.

4OS. Plain Boiled Suet Pudding.

floured,

plum pudding

Lemon Pudding.

English.

lemon suet pudding, pale yellow, pound of flour.

rich.

pound of suet chopped fine. pound of white bread crumbs. ig pound of white sugar. 1

1

4 lemons.

will be.

4 eggs. 2 pints of milk.

English Suet Pudding.

1 teaspoonful of salt.

2 pounds of flour. pound of chopped suet. 1 pound of white sugar. 1 pound of either raisins or currants.

1 level teaspoonful of soda.

Make

the bread crumbs fine either

by grating or Mix together except sod i and saH,

jutting in thinnest slices

and squares

across.

Mix

the dry articles which dissolve inthemilk. Grate the lemon rindsin.

2 eggs. A small teaspoonful of soda.

Mix up with the milk and eggs. Squeeze in the Tie up in 2 pudding c'otbs, lemon juice at last. Hard sauce wetted and floured, and boil 3 hours.

all

1 teaspoonful of salt.

the above together dry, then add 1 pint of milk.

Stir all thoroughly together. bags 4 hours.

Boil in pudding

cream sauce, golden sauce or wine.

The missing link in this evolution of puddings More eggs in this pudding injures it. Can be made without any. Butter and sugar, cream sauce, from duff to English plum is Eve's pudding, which can be found easily some distance back, and thence or syrup, or kind of sauce suits. any

pudding

back

405. Boiled Cinnamon Pudding.

to the place

of

beginning at plum

pudding

corner.

A

considerable variation of the preceding pudding Now if it were right and proper or even allowable to it 1 heaping teaspoonful of to base an hypothesis upon pudding, we should say ground cinnamon makes it of a pinkish color. that the great mistake of Bulwer's life was in wishGround ginger may be used in the same Give ing that his countrymen were Frenchmen and in is

made by adding

way.

these puddings room to swell when tying the pudding bag.

all

and become

light

Not a half dozen degrees removed and we find

keeping them constantly remin led of his wish; and the great mistake of Dickens' life was in sneering at

Dickens was forAmericans for not being English given because of his world-wide Anglo-Saxonism;


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

96

COOK.

Bulwer retains his hold only by sheer strength; (those ubiqutous snap beans !) guephte-, (don't you through the polish and exact fit of his work, not wish you had some ?) gelee au marasquin; visnah; Dickens was English ekmek. That caps the climax! Though it is not all through love or indulgence even to the chops and tomato sauce of Pickwick and the bill-of fare, only about two thirds bread and cheese and kisses repasts of his However, we were trying to say that while we Bulwer sneered at the national Yorkshire know by the documents that Yorkshire pudding was pudding, and blackberry pudding, and boiled veal, served at the palace as stated, the other matter Hotel keepers are mindful which we know quite as well, yet cannot demonand he is not popular. When all nations and peo- strate, is that the cooks there separated the eggs and of the dread warning. ples shall have come to think alike and eat alike, made the pudding mag-dficent by beating the whises then the dreams of the universal peace society will to a firm froth and stirring them in immediately all

the

little

people.

be realized and there will be an universal language. In the meantime English inn keepers go on provid-

This is the way the line reads before baking. "Roast beef a 1'Anglaise York-Pudding .''

ing roast beef with Yorkshire pudding;

it is

pease pud-

:

And

preserved in the "cuisine classique."

ding; boiled apple dumplings and tea and toast; and hotel keepers doing business for profit

American

But it is not the Yorkshire pudding they long for keep up the supply of ham and eggs, oyster soup, so much. On these cruel cold days, when even the turkey with cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and All wild animals hedge up close to the cosy settlements mince pie, and coffee and Parker House rolls and the birds find wondrous attractions about the easy enough, and no need of stroking the fur the kitchen door steps, you may see poor, hungry chilwrong way. dren flattening their noses against cook shop and

4O8.

restaurant windows, gazing, when the inside steam upon the luscious puddings, and fain would

Yorkshire Pudding.

allows, fill

f pound of

flour.

3 pints of milk. 2 ounces of butter, melted. 6 eggs.

their toes

teaspoonful of baking powder.

butter, salt, powder,

the crusts

that

sticV

to the

and dragging on the ground, have a too close acquaintance with the

coats, twice too big,

Salt.

Have the milk not too cold, else it sets the butter. Mix the flour with it by degrees, free from lumps.

Add

their bellies with

sides of the pans and no man gives unto them. They are huddle 1 in remnants of old shawls and cast off

the eggs well beaten and

snow and mire, and

all

doors are shut.

the Yorkshire pudding that they swimming in rich gravy though

connected with the

It is

wish so much, it

not a' I

be, because that

of a

of

brown, thought piece Butter a baking pan and up all thoroughly. fat roast beef, and their thoughts dare notmou-t so Pour in the batter less make it warm in the oven. but the pudding beside it, the batter pudding than an inch in depth. Bake 15 minutes, or till high; with fat in the hollows and raisins snuggling close "When the pudding is made with lightly browned. together by twos and threes in the rich dimples. water instead of milk add a spoonful of golden syrup Just this square or that, and no man gives unto If made without the to cause it to brown quickly. them, butter it will puff up at the sides, but soon falls and is

beat

becomes tough.

On

4O3.

the twentieth

dred and

Peak gold excitement

the heighth of the Pike's in this country, Yorkshire

served for

dinner in the palace of

Prince Frederick William of Prussia.

It is best to

be chronologically particular in noting these histo rical events,

and

have the printed

WITH RAISINS.

day of August, eighteen hun-

fifty-nine, in

pudding was

Batter Pudding.

we know was a fact, for we menu with the royal crown and just as we have another, showing this

the date upon it, that on the 6th day of July, 1868, His serene Highness, the Sultan of Turkey, entertained Prince Je

1

pounds of

flour.

3 quarts of milk or water. 4 large basting-spoons of butter, melted.

2 large basting spoons of golden syrup. 12 eggs.

Salt.

teaspoonful of baking powder. 1 pound of seedless raisins. 1

Mix up

you would batter cakes, wetting the have no lumps; the milk tepid, rome Bonaparte, where was served the butter melted, the eggs well beaten and powder Pour into 2 buttered pans made Truffle omelet; poissons fnts\ (doesn't say what and syrup last. kind of fried fish, but doubtless from the Bosphorus.) warm an inch deep, and sprinkle the raisins all over Bake about 20 minutes, or till light brown. courgea farcies; (stuffed Jonah's gourds); beurek, (wasn't that nice?) biftecksaux pommes; (the potatoss Serve in squares with lemon syrup or any pudding :

were a

la*

parisienne, of course); haricots verts;

as

flour gradually to


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Baked Batter Pudding.

41O.

WITH APPLES.

like to stand the waiting of

The preceding, with 2 quarts of apples in quarinstead of raisins. The easiest cooking apples

ters,

baked in the pan with sugar and butter syrup first, and the batter poured over them and baked.

may be dropped

in raw, but others need to be

However good a plain pudding may look to hungry people, there are always others to exert them The credit of the origina selves to make a better. tion of the following is given to

As

derland.

measure

here changed from cup and spoon

3 pints of milk. pound of butter, melted. | pound of sugar. 6 eggs. Salt.

Apples enough for two three quart pudding pans. A little more sugar and butter to bake them with.

Cinnamon or nutmeg. Pare and core the apples, put them in the pans with sugar and butter;

pour over the coot ed apples; bake

well;

half an

hour.

J pound of seedless raisins.

pound of

Fill the core holes

whole.

Then mix basting with their syrup occasionally. the other ingredients to a smooth batter, beat it

BATTER PUDDING WITH RAISINS.

1

a long dinner.

flour.

grate nutmeg; allow water enough to wet the pans, then bake with a thick sheet of paper over till done,

Sunderland Pudding.

411.

10 ounces of

a duchess of Sun-

0. K.

it is

it is but an empty name, and this remakes the pudding sufficiently soft and custard

hotel service ceipt

First rate cooking apples small enough to be served entire with the batter round them are most

flour.

quart of milk. 8 eggs, or 10 yolks, and powder. 4 ounces of butter, melted. 1

wine or lemon

Poudmg a

413.

la St. Croix.

Baking powder optional.

INDIVIDUAL.

The pudding is made with the yolks of eggs. The whites are beaten to a firm froth and added last, or,

3 pounds of banana pulp. pound of sugar.

not so beaten, left out, and baking powder 1 teaspoonful used instead. Make like the puddings

if

preceding

6 ounces of butter.

it.

cream.

1 pint of

Birdsnest Pudding. For the inside take ten ounces of

12 eggs. first

building, before they become soiled. Three ounces of the purple gelatinous moss from Sumatra. Twelve eggs of the golden turtle of Sa

are finished

Two wine

marcand.

glasses of the

Tears of the widow of Malabar.

liqueur called For the outside or

casing cut thin shavings of the ripe fruit of the Malayan bread-fruit tree; soak them a few hours in the clarified

oil

of fat

What, don't want unblest"

why

not

puppy and

it ?

"Nay, then indeed

I

am

?

0, here is a regular Wilkie Collins of a plot. Some one has opened the book at the wrong page, and that it

Pinch of

salt.

pint of West India rum. teaspoonful of ground mace.

quality

white Chinese edible, glutinous birdsnests. They must be taken from the coast rocks on the day they

was not

sauce, or

sauce.

2 ounces of golden syrup. Salt.

Cream or cream

desirable.

2 pineapples. Peel the bananas

and mash them to a pulp; weigh; put into a saucepan with the sugar and butter and stir over the fire till at boiling heat. Take

it off,

add the cream and

flavorings, then the

a yolks of the eggs aad lastly the whites whipped to Bake in custard cups ^r tin gem pans firm froth.

handsome shape, and well buttered, about 10 or Slice the pineapp^s very thinly and Serve make .hot in a syrup of sugar and red wine. of

15 minutes.

puddings upside down on a slice or two of over. pineapple in a saucer and the syrup poured

the

little

Baked Plantain Pudding.

414.

at all.

WITH FRENCH CUSTARD SAUCE, Birdsnest Pudding. 3 pints or pounds of plantain pulp.

WITH CREAM. No doubt .derives its name from its appearance when baked in a small pudding dish and set on the round the edges and the apples might be supposed to resemble eggs. In table whole.

The batter

10 ounces of sugar. 6 ounces of butter. 1 pint of cream. 10 eggs. cupful of sherry.

rises

1

lemon, juice and grated rind.


THE AMERICAN PASTBY COOK.

93

are not good for this purpose unless fire with the

Plantains

Peel and mash; stir over the

ripe.

Butter two pudding pans.

Place in a layer of

Then sprinkle

slices of cake.

in

citron

and

bits of

Place another layer oa that with citron cooked semi-transparent; add butter. all the ingredients, the eggs beaten separately, or at and butter again and there should still bo thin Mix the Bake in a buttered pan about half slices enough left to cover the citrou with least very light. butter

and sugar

till

custard of eggs aud milk

an hour.

Cream Curd Pudding.

415.

no sugar needed add brandy and lemon juice and rind, pour over the cake in the pans and bake about 20 minuses. When

done meringue over in the way already detailed for pound of dry rennet curd (product of about 4 Wliei dry s'ices of cake are meringue puddings. of quarts milk). used the lemon juice is still more needed to freshen pound of butter. the flavor. The brandy may be omitted without pound of sugar. harm. 4 whole eggs. 1

1

6 yolks.

Salt.

A

pound of raisins and currants mixed. 1 pint of milk.

J pound of fine bread crumbs. Flavoring of lemon, nutmeg or almond. Rub the curd as taken from the cheese vat or draining cloth through a seive or strainer by means of a masher. Add the other ingredients, the solids

then the beaten eggs and cream, and flavorings. Bake in a buttered pudding pan about half an hour.

first,

Serve with custard or wine sauce.

410. 'See,

here

is

a whole eight-gallon can of milk gone

cabinet pudding to be served whole can have

the citron in patterns on moulds spread with butter. Wrap paper about the outsides to prevent too haid

Bake half an hour. Meringue and brown the top with a red hot

baking of the crust. after turning out

shovel.

such compensations as these. bread any more in cur puddings we must manage to get along with cake. But wait, before commencing on the laborious savo/ cake Life

is

Forbidden

of

full

to use

puddings there

is

something

else,

What a world of Aunt Betsey Trotwoods there Those milkmen seldom take pains to used to be eating arrowroot pudding f.-r the sake of thoroughly cool their milk before shutting it up in poor blacks that never existed, with a solicitude the cans." It is like hers for Copperfield's imaginary sister "Well, can you make any use of it ?" The argument plain it was an advertising scheme. "Yes, it will do very well for the preceding pud- was there are those poor blacls in the West Insour."

"Pity.

!

:

it

and

well as anything else in iis Let it get a little better curdled, then bring to about boiling heit; mind it don't burn at bot

ding, turn.

is

liked as

then strain through a large towel and hang the curd up in the towel to drip dry about 12 hours

torn;

dies;

you have caused them

to

be freed from bond-

they can do for a living but they cannot sell their arrowroot

age; there is nothing

make

arrowroot; if they will die, therefore, to save their lives, you must etit arrowroot pudding. Then arrowroot found

It will be a But take notice, this is not the best. a good maiket and the great majority of all the gold curd pudding lemon flavored, but the sweet cream spectacled people in the civilized world were eating or milk curd made with rennet will make a pudding The gold spectacle distinction has all they souM. to resemble almonds." to be made because people below that rank could

417.

Buy a dry

rennet of the butcher.

Place a piece

not very well afford

it

as the poor people

who made

and fill up with water. When it has arrowroot would have died if they had not sold it Eating arrowroot pud ling is not stood a few hours mix two or three spoonfuls of the at a high price. such a very unpleasant way of being benevolent, the three hours milk. In or in a of two liquor pan Then scald and draiu the but, bless their kind hearts, there came a time when milk will be curdled the go!d spectacles could not possibly eat any more, curd. Good for puddings, pies, cheesecakes, etc. and barrels of arrowroot lined with blue paper be418. Baked Cabinet Pudding. Meringue. came uncomfortably numerous in the merchants' Then they began mixing it with rice warehouses. Made with slices of cake and citron in small flour and starch and reducing the price, and there and baked. slips; custard poured over never being a very striking difference between starch of

it

in a bottle

2 quart panful of

slices of cake.

4 ounces of butter.

pound of

citron cut fine.

2 quarts of milk. lemon, juice and grated rind. cupful of brandy. Meringue for the top. 1

article has at last very arrowroot altogether, except from

and arrowroot the cheap nearly banished the drug stores. starch

puddings

All will

the

annexed

receipts

do equally well

for

for arrow-

any people solicitous for the welfare of arrowroot manufacturers still left in this root, in case there are

world


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Starch Pudding Corn match your one hot pudding with your cold cream? and custards and floats and the pastries, arri &> n.-3 Starch Minute Pudding. Hasty of these are rich enough to require the pudding to 41. Pudding.

Boiled Corn

1

.

be as simple pleased.

J pound of sugar. pound of corn starch, good weight. 2 ounces of butter.

milk

starch with a

little

be

2 quarts of milk, scant.

with the sugar in it. Mix the milk cold; thin it with some hot

pound, good weight, of corn starch. 4 ounces of sugar. 3 ounces of butter.

milk out of the

kettle; pour it quickly into the boiling milk and stir two minutes, or till it is well Have ready the two yolks beaten with thickened. a spoonful of milk, take off the kettle, beat the

6 yolks of eggs. \ teaspoouful of

salt.

tablespoonful of vanilla extract. Boil the milk with the sugar in it 1

yolks in, the heat of the starch will cook them, then the butter an i flavorings. Turn the pudding out of burning at bottom. the kettle it was made in to a bright pan buttered cold milk and then slightly,

to

Baked Corn Starch Pudding.

teaspoonful of salt. Vanilla or almond flavoring. the

if all are

421.

2 or 3 yolks of eggs.

Boil

as the corn starch,

And

don't have a brandy sauce pudding at the same time with a cold tipsy custard give the people who abhor liquor a chance."

2 quarts of milk.

and keep warm

till

wanted.

Serve with

lemon syrup sauce or with hot cream.

Mix up

which prevents the starch with a little

some hot, pour it quickly into the boiling milk in the kettle and a' most iinuiedi ately, or as soon as fair'y mixed take it off the fi e.

Beat in the butter immediately to cool it; then the There are not many puddings as cheap and simple yolks beaten up with a spoonful of milk; flavor and as that. Nothing else is so quick, and it is never bake about 20 minutes or till the eggs are fair y at table. "But why was it, the pudding so set 'ihe art to be learned in ail sorts of corn starch sighted nice and rich and firm when first made afterwards puddings is to cook the starch enough so that the turned to liquid in the pan and could not be dished

up

?"

It

rawness cann< it

was kept

too hot

and cooked

too

to

t

be tasted, yet not enough to cause Serve with Sultana sauce.

turn watery.

much.

New York PudOswego Pudding, Etc.

Corn Starch Meringue.

42O.

Boiled Farina Pudding.

ding.

2 quarts of milk.

pound of sugar. 7 ounces of farina. 4 ounces of butter

it

pudding of corn starch as in the foregoing receipt

3 yolks of eggs. Salt

and

Anyone who has made the nonpareil or queen will understand this in a moment whento^d is the same thing done in c~<m starch. Make the

pudding

When barely set in the middle spread over the top or drop portions with a spoon of p ach mtrmalade Make that hot on top and spread meor preserves. ringue of 8 whites whipped firm and 6 ounces of

flavoring.

Boil Nearly the same as corn starch pudding. and sugar and sprinkle in the farina dry, beating like making mush. Let cook slowly half an sugar over it. Bake again about 5 minutes with the hour with the lid on, at the back of the range. Then oven door open. Cream sauce. the milk

add eggs and butter. tard, or cream s^uce.

Lemon, wine,

vanilla,

cus-

The writer has seen more ably, with

and asks

others,

"Such puddings

as the two

last

come

in just

right for second puddings."

kind, such as your apple custards and fruit souffles and plain rice puddings to suit people of simpler tastes"

"Not now.

to

excellently

made.

must be made cooking hot before the meringue it if you would avoid having an undesirable albuminous syrup overflowing the pudding, and the touches

meringue must be only dry-baked.

There are people who

in all the

puddings,

best hotels.

one lich and

one plain, or one bakei and o e steamed, you

now

like chocolate in

three times a day, yet the liking

The fashion of having two hot pud- The following pudding

dings at once is abandoned Instead of matching your

They are excellent The marmalade on top

trifling details for that reason.

when

"What do you mean by second puddings ? they are just right for first." "But to offset the rich pudding, just as rich as it can be, the other has to be plain and of a lighter

partial failures, prob-

puddings than with any be excused fur dwelling upon

this class of

made of

its class.

along with some other ive.

any form

far from general. is probably as good as can be

It

is

should only be brought on

commoner

sort

for a:i


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

IOC

Corn Starch Chocolate Pudding. 423.

it had for a time an immense run of popularity far outside of the army, being sold in all the bakeries. The original was composed of hard-tack, bacon fat,

2 quarts of milk. 3 ounces of grated chocolate,

molasses and dried apples, with a tough flour crust, fat camps were occasionally en-

f pound of sugar. 6 ounces of corn starch. 1

but fat times and

6 or 7 eggs.

Pinch of

salt.

Boil the milk with both

Beat frequently

it.

solved.

Mix

495.

till

Lincoln Pie.

the sugar and chocolate the chocolate is all dis-

the starch as usual and stir

immediately remove from the

it

1

then

in,

1

Beat in the but

fire.

eggs and vanilla, and bake about 20 minutes, or Serve warm with but just set in the middle. ter sauce or golden sauce, or cold with sweetened ter, till

1

Little All-Bight.

of broken crackers or bread.

of

brown sugar

orjnolasses.

of currants. of raisins.

ounce of mixed ground

spices,

The foregoing makes a very

pint of cold water. pint of hard cider, or vinegar and water. 1 pound of suet chop ed fine, or lard.

fine

over like

appearing pud

the one proceed-

Some whisky and four

eggs,

if

it.

424.

Mix everything together. Cover the bottom of a baking pan with a very thin sheet of common short Pour in the mixture to be 1^ inches deep. paste.

barley.

2 quarts of water. 6 ounces of butter.

Cover with another very thin sheet of paste.

mix with. it

426.

from

Boil it in the 2 quarts of water at' the back of the range about 3 hours, with a tight lid on. Mix the other ingredients in and bake about half

the meal.

Currants and raisins can be added

Two

\ pound of good lard, butter, drippings,or grated

for inserting the proceeding

stt-ppi-g into

haste

A

and begin

to polish

of

up

off

to

a smooth paste, roll it out once like pie paste, over and it is ready for use.

it

The water should always be poured into a hollow when making any kind of paste, and us the flour drawn in rapidly but gradually while stir-

we touch carries

to roll out with.

the lard into the flour dry, till thoroughly mixed. Put in the salt and all the water, work it

fold

up whisks us up and

handful of flour more

Rub

corn starch immediately. Strange, but true, almost every pudding

salt.

1 pint of water.

good pud-

was the ever present fear an American pie if we did not shut

ding there in

teaspoonful of

1

full

The reas n

Plain Short Paste.

suet.

de-

if

to

2 pounds of flour.

quarts of barley ready cooked, if dry, answers the same. sired.

Brush

a light color in a slow oven about three quarters of an hour. Cut out squares either hot or cold.

a nutmeg grated. Wash the barley in several waters to free

au hour

Bake

over with milk.

8 ounces of sugar. 6 eggs. Salt. pints of milk to

you are rich

enough. Little salt. f oak the crackers or bread in the fluids awhile.

Scotch Barley Pudding.

pound of pearl or Scotch

1

chiefly cinna-

1

ding when meringued

1

pound pound pound pound

Camp

mon.

cream.

ing

to

this.

1 tab'espoonful of vanilla extract.

in

and then Lincoln pie blossomed out

countered

ounce of butter.

in the flour

over the water as quick as the genii did those who That puddings do not rubbed Aladdin's lamp.

ring with the

often belong litre is due to the fact that while Uncle Sam's children love not pudding less they love pie

mistake will

fingers,

otherwise the paste

rough and lumpy and much working

437.

more, and are very apt to call all things of native origination piethit would elsewhere be called pud-

make

it

may be

to correct the

hard.

Boiled Apple Dumplings.

Make the plain short paste preceding. Pare and core good cooking apples; cut them in halves. Roll the paste to a sheet a quarter of an inch thick, put of the apple under the edge, gather paste around and

ding. 1 his has been more than once before observed in these columns, and here is an example. There

I

were the soldiers "in the late great war, many them from homes of plenty and luxury, little relishthe anm.y commissariat, and them struck a culinary idea and

ing the rough fare of

some genius among invented "Lincoln pie."

Wherefore Pie?

It

was

pinch it off underneath, and so on, till all the sheet is used up. See that there are no holes or thin places to let in the water.

Drop the dumplings

into broad

saucepans of boiling water, shut down the lids; let a hard tack pudding in reality, but was made pie in them cook about half an hour, or till the apples obedience to a national instinct, and as Lincoln pie leave the fork when tried. Short paste cannot be


THE AMERICAN PASTRY made any

richer for these without breaking

in the

irter.

Dumplings Cooked

428.

in

serve while hot

the dumplings like the last variety, but use the roll-pudding paste made with baking-powder as directed in the early

part of this

own sauce

Then put

pound of sugar and \ of butter

in each pan, and strain the sauce thus made after the dumplings have been removed to another pan,

Peach

make the above

like apple roll.

43O

a.

Pine

Hominy Pudding.

filling

tered paper over the top to prevent browning, and baste occasionally with the liquor, which will glaze

them.

with sauce,

light,

All kinds of fruits can be used to

in the oven. This is effected

two bright and clean baking pans with milk and water. When boiling drop in the dumplings and cook about half an hour with but-

by half

and

kind of steamed pudding, which has no shortening, book, adding an but plenty of powder, and has the fruit in layers

mixing water for further precaution against breaking in boiling. Then boil the dumplings in their

other crust on.ttygn; th^ !the'. remainder- s>f the cherries and a third sheet' 6f dough 'on top/ Set in

a steamer and steam from 30 to 45 minutes and

Sauce

Make

egg to the

101

dumplings are

better this

way than any

other.

2 large cupfuls of cooked grits or

fine

hominy

hominy

samp.

Butter size of an egg 1 ounces. 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar 2 ounces. 2 yolks or 1 egg. small cupful of milk.

1

The hominy grits already cooked, should be dry and firm, otherwise use less milk or none. Mix all the ingredients together, the butter softened

429.

first,

Raspberry Pudding.

and bake in a buttered pudding pan about fifteen minutes. It takes a quart pan to bake it in. Use for this will answer The directions for making yolks of eggs if a rich pudding is wanted. Serve every kind of fruit that can be used for puddings. with a sauce. If no hominy ready put on a large as directed Make the plain short paste previously half cupful in full cup of water, and when it has if with suet it should be chopped with flour mixed boiled nearly dry add a small cup of milk and pinch in till it is as fine as powder. Line some deep earth-, of salt; never stir it, but let cook with a lid on one enware bowls of any size from a pint to two quarts half hour longer, at the back of the range. with the paste rolled out to a thin sheet. Then fill quite full berries.

and rounded up with Wet the edges of the

fresh-picked rasppaste;

roll

round sheet of paste and lay it on top; cut off the surplus by rolling the edge with the rolling-pin, thereby closing it at same time. Wet and flour a pudding cloth, lay the middle on top of the pudding, gather the corners around the bottom of the bowl

and

tie safely.

Drop the pudding upside

down

into

plenty of boiling water and keep boiling from one When to two hours, according to size and kind.

done dip the pudding a moment in cold water, take a>ound hole in the top, put in a sufficiency of sugar and serve in the bowl set on a off the cloth; cut

Several pleasant combinations of sweet and sour kinds of fruit can be

No

plate.

sauce needed.

made and used

in this

Boiled

out a

way; sometimes with a suit-

able sauce.

43O. Steamed Cherry Pudding.

1

pound of white corn meal (scant

quart).

quart milk. 4 ounces of sugar. 1

6 ounces of chopped suet.

A little salt. 3 eggs. 1 lemon, juice and grated rind. 2 teaspoonfuls of extract ginger. Boil the milk with the sugar in it

meal and

stir it

over the

fire five

; sprinkle intht minutes.

Then take it off, mix in the suet, salt, eggs beaten and ginger. Wet and flour a pudding bag place it tie loose enough in a bowl; pour in the pudding for it to swell to nearly double its bulk ; drop in plenty of boiling water and keep it boiling 5 hours. When to be taken up, dip it a moment in cold water ;

;

and 1

White Corn Meal Pudding.

it

will

come out of the

cloth smooth.

Serve with

butter and sugar hard sauce.

quart of pitted cherries.

8 heaping cups of flour. Heaspoonfuls of baking powder, 2 cupfuls of water.

43O c. Granula Pudding.

Granula is claimed to be a healthful dietetic of pour in the the same order as graham flour. It is apparently water and mix up as soft as it can be handled. parched wheat ground like corn meal, coarsely. It Work the dough on the table slightly by pressing it makes a pudding resembling Indian meal pudding. fiat with the hands and doubling over. Lay a bot- Make it precisely as directed for farina, either See Nos. 377 and 420. Use 4 torn crust of it in a tin pudding pan that holds 4 boiled or baked. to 1 cup of granula. or water of milk anon cups it, lay quarts; spread half the pitted cherries

Mix

the

powder

in the middle,

in the flour dry,

throw in a

little

make a hollow

salt,


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

102

B-3

0-S? 3 -

Had

it

jj f

*>' V f

* -

-

'

\

'

-

'

c

not seemed perfectly useless to ask so

simple a creature as that I should certainly have tried to learn some more rarious uses of the magnificent chestnuts

which

through the grand old of having her shortly

we picked up in passing manor grounds, but the fear answer, "Why roast them in

the bars and eat them/' deterred me.

pound of sugar.

\

O

If there were

8 yolks of eggs. 6 whites of eggs.

Pinch of

salt.

Vanilla or almond flavoring. Boil \\ pounds of chestnuts in

Mix

all

the

whites

the other ingredients with this puree except of eggs; the yolks having been well

no larger and better chestnuts than these sold so beaten before stirring plentifu'ly and cheaply on the streets there would not be

much inducement even

for the famous

men-

1

Is ey and catspaw business being fo lowed, of placing chestnuts between the bars of open fire places till

they burst and fly out, but the Spanish and British chestnuts are of a larger growth. Good old Horace Greeley, or at least the paper under his direction, at one time became very earnest in recommending (he extensive p'anting of chestnut trees in the west. It concerns us here only to hope that the result may be after a while plenty of chestnuts of the large variety,

wherewith

to

compound the European chestnut

water one hour.

Peel them, scrape offthe furry outside; and mash the kernels through a seive, moistening with hot cream.

Whip

in.

the whites firm,

and

lightly

mix them

in

without beating. Steam in buttered moulds about one hour. Serve as soon as done, with diluted fruit jelly

made hot

for

sauce,

or e'se with French

wine custard.

432. Chestnut Pudding Make

Souffle.

the preceding pudding with only six of the

Stir it over the fire till it yolk sand no whites. thickens. Take it off and add four raw yolks and when nearly cold all the whites beaten firm, and

\ pint of brandy. Bake in a two-quirt mould about half an hour. Dredge vanilla flavored sugar time to peel and over the top in the oven, and send it straight from scrape the small chestnuts in quantities, the followoven to table. Powdered vanilla bean will flavor two will be found ing pudding receipts probably

puddings.

For hotel cooks who have

sufficient,

dings

at least

among

There

is

till

little

we come

to frozen

pud-

little elf,

down

the ices.

Very often

a meal-co^red,

dumpy

chuckling audibly and saying there is a good deal more in dumplings than a little Short Paste stairs,

knows.

fhs language

the accent

is

the sugar.

is

that

either that of

of iVIarguerite, or Gretchen.

Hans

German German

elves are generally meal-colored.

rolic to

some tyrannical .baron

stories there are of

granaries

bills of

European plan

Cake."

in pudding's place 'Savarin Persons unaware of all our singu'ar wajs

would be apt to think there was no pudding. In but hotels where the cake is set on the tab'e in baskets Savarin cake as pudding is pretty sure to get ost in The

Queer old some of them going in a s

in the dinner

hotels there appears

in the

myterious small hours^of night, grinding a 1 the wheat in a few minutes in the baron s own mill and carrying the bags of meal with many a laugh to all the widows' and orphans' homes without so much as marking them G. D. The noisiest of those

In United

the confusion. ca'je is

States parlance Savariu

Savarin pudding as follows:

Savarin

pudding

is

a hot cake, yeast laised but

sponge cake, with a liquor poured into it, and may be served with sweetened cream. My meallike

colored elf

on the raising

downstairs, the muscular one

it,

says

it

who

sits

keep the dough from takes German bakers aiid cooks to

dough trough

lid

to

below is only "Davy Dompling, boiling in the pot," know how to make fine yeast-raised cakes, that but it appears from the ta k that dumpling is a American cooks and bakers are content to get along German word, and is not much different in Swedish, with pound and sponge cakes for every occasion. Norwegian and Danish. In a proposed book of breads yet to come we will There must be somethingin dumpling worth going have a course of yeast raised cakes beginning with to Rhineland to see about, but this chestnut pudthe simplest and including Savarin. However, the to be made and steamed and baked first ding has common and satisfactory way is to use a good hot The English and French receipts always prescribe sponge or savoy cake for this pudding. Here certain numbers of chestnuts, as two or three dozen. are both ways. }

It takes

from 150

to

200 of the plentiful American

433.

Savarin Cake.

chestnuts to weigh a pound, hence the uselessnes of

such receipts.

1

431. Steamed Chestnut Pudding.

1

1

pound of chestnut pulp.

J pint of cream. \ pound of fresh butter.

pound of good lively roll dough. pounds of freshest buWer. ounces of sugar.

14 eggs. 1

pound of

flour,

teacupful of brandy.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

COOK.

103

nips, etc., etc., so that special attentions and gradupound of almonds. ated fires are out of the question. With the utmost or nutmeg extract. This must be commenced five or six hours before respect for the fiftieth, the writer avows a greater the meal. Fora midday dinner, tike the roil dough, desire to be of service to the forty -nine, and for an (or dough bought of a baker), at seven in the morn- easier way recommends the annexed. ing, put it in a pan with the sugar and butter and

Lemon

(

set in a warm corner to get all warmed through. In half an hour, beat tbem together, then begin adding the eggs two at a time and the flour a handful at a

Beat

time

like

Beat

This is first cousin to the two preceding, and is popular, but is quite elastic in the way of details, that is it can be made and sauced in different ways,

It makes a soft batter some more against the not worth considering

blitzen.

pound cake.

like

435. Tipsy Pudding With Cream.

it

Make separate puddings. mixture preceding or else the for about two hours, when it quicker and easier butter sponge cake soon to folabout twice its original bulk, then beat again for low, and bake on jelly case pans which take scarce side of the pan.

Set

it

in a moderately

warm

place shou'd be risen to

the

sponge

cake

minutes; add the brandy and flavoring extract. !y five minutes B'anch and shred the almonds. Strew them evenly flat sheets five

over the insides of two buttered cake moulds; put in the batter with a spoon; set to rise in the moulds again about 1J hours, then bake in a slow oven

about

1

cakes.

Lay two

baking.

or three of these

piled up in a bright pan and pour over a hot sauce of either cream with sugar and wine, or else a custard

with maraschino or brandy

Or,

you

can partly saturate the sheets of cake, which should hour, or according to size and depth of be quite light colored, with spoonfuls of brandy and When nicely baked these cakes are of a rich have the cus ard plain.

orange color and quite spongy. Set them on the We have the next when we want to gild refined dish upside down; push a small funnel down in several places and by its means pour into the cake gold, for extra times, when all else seems stale, flat some hot orange syrup mixed with curacoa. Serv e and unprofitable.

warm.

-

434.

A

large

Savarin Pudding. bisquit de savoie partly saturated

with a is

tedious to

not

make and

very and served hot with cream. except in getting enough of one or over cake moulds two Prepare by brushing 43O.

there

is

no

fine liqueur

When cold part of melted butter. or nearly so, sift in some powdered sugar to coat the moulds, and turn out the surplus. Then

Baked Sponge

with the clear

and

difficulty

it.

Boll

With

Sauce,

set,

make

12 ounces of flour

less sugar than more. Too much sugar one frequent cause of poor sponge cake. Grease and flour some b king sheets or shallow roll pan . is

good weight.

Spread the batter over them as thin as can be, just Bake in a brisk oven about fiye

1 teaspoonful of vanilla extract.

pint of brandy. Have the ingredients in a

to cover the iron. all

round

quite

cold.

bottomed

Beat

kettle,

the

with a

arge wire egg-whisk, half an hour by the clock. in," or lightly stir in the flour with a

Then "cut

spoon, then the extract and brandy. When all the flour is out of sight stop stirring and bake the cakes as soon as you can. Sift granulated sugar on top before baking. Have a moderate oven and not the least

the sponge cake mixture according to the under the head of Savarin pudding.

Rather use

14 ounces of granulated sugar. 12 eggs.

sugar and eggs

Make

directions

the cake.

dark color about the cakes.

They bake

easily

in about half an hour.

When done pour

into

with a knife point

minutes, run a knife cake.

Turn

it

shake the cake

upside

down the down on

sides to loosen the

a clean table

and

loose.

Immediately ppread red current jelly thinly a 1 over and roll the cake up neatly. Serve warm, cut in suitable pieces, with a rich transparent siuce containing lemon juice and flavored poured over. It is too

much

trouble

and wastes time

to

bake

these sponge sheets on sheets of paper. Very little practice is needed to use the bare pan with greater

Sometimes it helps a bad bake to roll them through holes made advantage. up a britt'e sheet after the roll is made, in a sheet of

or funnel about a pint of nice lemon or orange syrup with half as much curacoa or maraschino mixed in. Serve with either hot

paper

to

improve

its

shape.

cream pweetened or a plain custard in the saucers.

In about

forty-nine

out

of every

fifty

places

where these puddings are made they have to be No one expected to find the above in a book of baked in ranges or stoves, and take their chance for puddings, but Ruskin says that cookery means th* their turn with meats, fishes, pies, potatoes, pars- knowledge of all fruits and herbs and balms and


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

104 and of and groves. epices,

We It

all

that

is

healing and sweet in

field

if

not something

like these next

described?

ought not to forget this white cocoanut souffle good to use up white of eggs, and good fo

is

end of dinner,

other purposes.

A peculiarity about the meringue puddings next following (or call them meringue cakes as Savarin did, if you like), is that it takes a good p stry cook make them successfully; but then they have the advantage of not being too common. They are not such as one would want to make every day; yet they are rich, elegant, ornamental and can be served to

43 T. Cocoanut Pudding

Souffle.

1 quart of milk. 6 ounces of sugar.

1

ual portions. They consist of three distinct p'trts; the cake bottom the cream layer in the middle and the ornamental meringue on top; yet the first speci-

ounce of butter.

pound of grated or desicated cocoanut. 12 whites of eggs, (10 or 12 ounces). Rose and lemon flavoring.

men being

Mix the starch and sugar together dry; drop them at once into the boiling milk; stir up rapidlj As soon as it becomes thick beat in the butter then the cocoanut, take it off the fire and let it cool, but not set firm. Then beat the whites to a firm froth Beat up the pudding mixture, stir in the whites add flavoring and bake about ten minutes in the usual

For the first part or bottom layer make this most useful cake mixture, called butter sponge cake. 1

honored by the

its

game

man.

Brillat-Savarin

may

be

\ pound of butter melted. \ pint of milk, slight y warmed, 1 pounds of flour.

j

2 teaspoonfuls of bak ing powder. Vanilla or lemon flavor.

dis-

being called his, as if it were all if he had been a tipsy

pound of granulated sugar.

10 eggs.

A 1'ttle way back tipsy pudding was placed close after Savarin pudding and called its first cousin, and now there is a old

the half dozen others, all dif-

Magnolia Meringue

a case of conscience.

fear that good

made

Lemon Cream Meringue.

438.

manner, either in cups, shells, cases or in one round mould. Powdered sugar on top. is

well

can be put through by the same methods, and the first trouble is not lost. ferent,

Set the milk on to boil.

This

or hot, whole on the table or in individ-

either cold

3 ounces of corn starch.

Beat the sugar and eggs together about five minAdd the melted butter, the milk, the extract

and as

utes.

Names are cheap; use some other. of vanilla, and beat all one minute more. Tben beat was well-disposed towards cooks, as in the baking powder, and into the light foamy batter was also Lever, the elder Dumas and Thsckeray, each thus made immediately stir the flour. after his own manner. You, reader, would make This can be used for jelly cakes, cream cakes, the tipsy pudding so excellently that the great adand many other purposes. vocate of gastronomy would but smile indulgently, Butter and flour the bottoms of two bright pudbut suppose that down there where bad hotels exist some poor fellow following your example of license ding-pans four quart milk pans are good and Don't.

Bri'lat Savarin

should

fond

make

of

it inferentially appear that Savarin was sheets of cake saturated with horrible

corn-juice whisky, and a turpentinish flavor of rancid lemon oil put up in a village drug store. Don't

spread the cake batter over thinly, like jelly cakes. Bake very light colored. Let the batter be well up to the

3 pints of water scant. f pound of sugar.

mix names; or if you must, take a slice of fine white bread and pour pure milk over it, and call that Sav arin pudding. He would agree with us; bread and milk pure and simple is glorious in comparison. :

4 lemons. 3 ounces of corn starch.

ounce of butter.

1

One

of Savarin's ideal d'nners, a Barmacide feast

which he spreads on paper, and which i* to "rive, " every guest's attention, at which "the faces of al'; one after another, are seen to beam with an

ecstasy

of enjoyment, the perfect repose of b'is?," finishes with a pyramid of vanilla and rose meringue cake

a

test

sometimes useless, unless in the case of

ladies,

abbes, etc."

What

then, amongst the various

article to

which

such a description might apply was this pyramid of vanilla

and rose meringue-cake appearing

at the

edges so as to have the sheets level, not bulged midd e. Then make the lemcn cream.

ip in the

10 yolks of eggs. Boil the water with the butter in starch, sugar

and grated lemon rinds

it.

Mix the

all

together rapid 'y into the boiling water. Take he mixture from the fire; add to it the juice of three

.try,

then

stir

the lemons, (if large),

>f

Pour

and then the beaten yolks.

mixture on top of the sheets of cake in without loosening them, and bake in a

this

he pans, 'ow oven about 15 minutes on theshe'f cf the oven, >r with a pan under to prevent the bottoms bak-

ng

too

much.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY The preceding is almost lemon pie mixture, but firm enough to cut square sided like cake. When the lemon cream is fairly set spread a thick layer of meringue on it while still hot and finish bak-

COOK.

105

441. Pineapple Cream Meringue.

is

Eclipse Meringue.

ing with the oven door open; time about ten minutes. Serve cut in tall but narrow diamonds or squares in

1 1

whipped cream around. Ten and about as many ounces of

plates or saucers with to fourteen whites

pound of sugar. 2 ounces of corn starch. 4 ounces of butter.

sugar are required for the meringue.

1

43O. Almond Cream Meringue.

make

Stew the minced pineapple and wine and half the till somewhat reduced and )ike fruit starch and the rest of the preceding, then butter. Mix the sugar together, stir them and the butter into the

the cake sheets in the pans, same

as for the lemon cream

meringue

the a'mond as follows:

3 pints of milk.

sugar together,

pineapple, add flavoring and yolks of egg*. cake. this cream on bottom sheets of white

4 ounces of sugar. 3 ounces of corn starch.

1

lemon rind grated.

8 yolks of eggs. pound of shred pistachio nuts.

Princess Meringue. Make and bake

quart of grated or minced pineapple, small cupful of port wine.

Bake Mer-

pound of almonds.

ingue over as usual Sift sugar on top before baking and strew over the shred pistachio nuts. Dry bake

ounce of butter.

to

a fawn color with the oven door open.

8 whites of eggs. Flavoring of rose.

Pinch of

When

salt.

these meringue

puddings are

to

be set on

the tab'e whole, to be eaten cold the method has to be varied a little, by baking on jelly-cake pans with

Scald the almonds, peel, mince and then pound them to a rough paste. Boil the milk, mix the starch a stout paper hoop pinned or pasted around. Butand sugar together dry, stir rap idly into the milk, ter the paper well, make the meringue in it instead take off, and add the other ingredients, the whites of in a pan, then remove it carefully when the menot beaten, except in the mixture, and the almonds

and rose extract last. Bake this white cream on the cakes

Make

the meringue a rose-pink

and

vanilla

rose,

before basing. sauce.

440.

ri^gue as before.

color, flavor

with

and sift granulated sugar on top Serve with a port wine and lemon

j

is

placed on

lly ca';e

fl .t

its

stand, being slipped from the In these palette knife.

by means of a

cases the meringue can be placed in pyramidal form through a large tube or cornet forming dome shapes

on top, etc

449.

,

etc

Here

is

one more for variety:

Orange Cream Meringue.

Chocolate Cream Meringue.

Natchez Meringue. Gipsy Meringue To ornament the top of this, cindied and sugared The same in the main as t^e wo preceding with a orange peel should be prepared, or green citron, or chocolate cream for the middle. preserved water melon rind. The orange peel first I

3 pints of milk.

cut into the smallest possible squares plenty of water to extract the bitter

4 ounces of sugar. 3 ounces of grated chocolate.

Make same way

this Little salt.

as

almond

cream, boiling the Make the meringue grated chocolate in the milk. white and very light baked; flavor it with almond

nd

sift

The

crimson sugar sand on top after baking.

then

3 oranges. 1

of sugar. pints of water (5 cups). 3 ounces of corn starch.

adhere to the bottom

1

prevent their mixture when

lemon.

pound

2

sufliciently to

candied peel over the top of meringue after it it from the oven.

has become firm without removing The orange cream.

of baking the sheets of cake in the pans in which the meringue is made is to have them object

and

stewed in

taste,

stewed in white syrup, then partly dried and rolled StrtW in granulated sugar to separate the pieces.

3 ounces of corn starch.

8 yolks of eggs. Vanilla flavoring.

is

ounce of butter.

10 yolks of eggs Grate the rinds and squeeze the juice of oranges poured in as otherwise they will do. Jelly cake sheets used this way have to be held to the bottom and lemon into the water, then bring it to a boil, rising

floating

in

the cream

by means of a little beaten egg, baked by passing add the starch and sugar and the pan a moment over the fire \ other kinds.

finish as directed foi


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

106

My

meal-colored

elf,

who

still

is sitting

on the in the flour

dough-trough as before, and converses so well, in a rich Hartz Mountain dialect, would be a delightful companion to wile away a witching midnight hour

away

to

it a stiff dough, again and set it At 11 o'clock work the dough by

make

to rise.

foMing and pressing out with the knuckles roll it out to a sheet, brush over s'ightly with lard or butor two if he were not such an idol breaker. Native of ter, cut out like biscuits, let rise about half an hour Smta Glaus land as he is it wouM be glorious to sit on greased pans, drop into boiling water and cook

when stars are in the quiet skies about 15 minutes Butter and si gar or any kind and the cricket chirrups on the hearth, and hear of pudding sauce, or tttewed fruit. him tell the weird wild stories of the Black Forest, The plain dough, or that of French roUs is often or the strange but mellowed legends, half told half cooked as dumplings to be ea*en with meat. The hinted in the Pilgrims of the Rhine. But his realism receipt preceding may be made ri?her by adding is chilling in the extreme and he has no fee ing of more sugir) yolks'of eggs and more butter (but no in the stilly night,

1

compunction:

to

"Mephistopheles?" 4 'No, not numerous.

Never but one man really saw Mephistopheles, that was Gurthe." Then I suppose Gurthe is Goethe, and wonder where Sir Walter Scott found the name Gurth for his Saxon swineherd. But, says he, there was no Gurth, no Wamba,no Ivanhoe, and Friar Tucx never had a venison pasty! "But the Hartz Mountains are they not full of the supernatural ?" "Nein. They are full of charcoal-burners, glass-

miners, and people

blowers,

who make

childrens'

Not as a matter of opinion as to what might or ught to be the case but as a matter of fact it has to be observed cgain that the plain dumplings yeast-

headless horesmen

who

ride

made

in ordinary hotels, the required and the ear y In ten minutes a them

raited are but Eeldom v.wo or three

manipulations

planning being against similar article can be made with soda

milk or acid, or with every purpose.

It is

and butterbaking powder, that answers something of an art to make

these so that they will remain light when done, yet it is a very simple one, the essential being only to

have the dough very

toys."

'No

any desired degree.

444.

soft,

made and dropped with a

you at spoon like fritters. No white lady of the what's its name mounnight! Egg, or Drop Dumplings. tain pass? No demons that come and tempt wood- 445. choppers to do something? No haunted hotels in 1 pound or quart of flour. the Black Forest? No safes, no annunciators, no 2 teaspoonfuls cf baking powdsr. past

elevators?"

3 yolks of eggs. thirds pint of water (largest coffee cup.)

"Nein."

Two

"No phantom herds

of deer that vanish into the

Little salt.

Mix fljur and powder together dry; drop the ground just aa the guests on a hunt are about to come up with them? No Metheglin? No were- yolks in the middle, pour the water to them and Have ready a beat up the batter with a spoon. wolves, no vampires, no dampfnudeln?" occasion the of water "0, yes, there are German dumplings." spoon boiling; dip saucepan "Real and sure?" with ally in melted fat; form egg-shaped dumplings "0, Yes; they are real enough."

it

"'Tis well for the hungry boy who shouts with his and at play; well for the sailor lad sister sings in his boat on the bay; that this much is " solid in Fatherland, and cannot be reasoned away

who

443. German Puff Dumplings. Very usually

fine,

cheap and wholesome.

boiled but can be raised

and

steamers, previously brushed over with

They are cooked

in

butter

as

well.

2 pounds of good light bread dough. 4 ounces of sugar. 1 egg and 2 yolks, or 2 eggs. 2 ounces of butter.

pound of flour. midday dinner take the dough at seven in the morning, mix the sugar butter and eggs with it as well as can be, then set the pan in a warm place ft while, after which it can be beaten smooth. Work 1

If for

and drop them

minutes. selves

Coek with the lid on about ten room theyl will turn themCan also bo steamed as fritters.

in.

If there

over like

is

well.

446. Egg Dumplings with

Fruit.

The yellow dumplings of the foregoing receipt, drained on a skimmer, rn"y be EerveJ in a saucer with fruit and hot cream and sugar.

44T. Blackberry Drop Dumplings. Flour the hands, take and shape spoonfuls of the

made soft-dough either of the egg dumplings or with one whole egg, or none into biscuit shapes; put a spoonful of ripe berries in the middle, close up and drop the dumpUngs into a pan of boiling and water and cook inside the oven about twenty minutes. Baste with the milk and water milk

twice to glaze. Serve with sauce. Halves of peaches in, the same way.

can be used


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. A

little

dexterity,

ling the soft dough snow flake affairs

is

acquired by practice in hand usually rewarded with light

do

that

not

turn heavy with

waiting.

448.

Pilling for

Sweet Timbale.

Baked Sponge Pudding.

451. This

107

is

simply hot cake with sauce, and

may be

th*

regular sponge cake mixture, but the following easier, cheaper, and answers equally as well.

is

pound of sugar.

1

10 eggs.

Baked Macaroni Pudding.

pound of butter me' ted $ pint of tepid milk. 1 pounds of flour.

f pound of macaroni. 3 pints of milk to stew

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Beat the sugar and eggs in a kettle as if making sponge cake, but t wo or three minutes will do. Then

in.

pound of sugar. pound of butter. pint of cream to mix up with

add the other ingredients, the powder just before the flour; beat up well, bake in shallow balurg pans Salt; vanilla. greased and floured, with granulated sugar sifted Boil the milk with the sugar and butter in it over the top before putting in the oven. The cake and a pinch of salt. Put in the macaroni broken rises considerably and should be only half an inch in inch lengths. Simmer with the lid on about half deep when put in the pans. It should be baked of an hour. Beat the yolks and cream together, add a very light color, and have a handsome g.azed apCut out in squares. Pienty of sauce ia flavoring, mix with the macaroni by shaking, with- pearance. out a spoon. Bake in a buttered pan about half required. A suitable article to make on short an hour, or till set. Stew raisins in wine sau e notice, and may be varied by having raisks, etc., 1

10 yolks, or 5 whole eggs.

to serve

with

mixed

it.

449. Macaroni Cake with Fruit

in.

The next

Jelly.

is

cottage pudding. It is supposed that it was called Jove-in a-cottage pud-

in pastoral days

pound of macaroni.

ding, because a very fashionable belle said she saw a love of a pudding in the cottage where she stayed But as love in a cottage till the shower was over.

quart of milk. 3 ounces of sugar. 1

2 ounces of butter. 3 eggs. Salt, vanilla or nutmeg. Keep out a cup of milk to beat

Mate same

went out of fashion, and it came to be love in a grand rooms and all the modern conveniences the poor pudding lost half its title and hotel with a suite of

up with

the eggs.

pudding preceding. Bake in a pan, to be about an inch deep when done. Cut in strips, squares, or diamonds and serve with red as macaroni

remains as follows:

45. Cottage Pudding with Basberry Vinegar.

fruit jelly.

A

45O. Baked Vermicelli Pudding.

ter

flour

compound midway between cake and bat-

pudding.

pound of sugar. quality of vermicelli varies so much that no Vermicelli ought to rule will serve tor all the sorts.

J pound of butter. 6 eggs.

be parboiled and drained before being used far this Some, however, will dissolve to a paste as purpose

1 pint of milk.

soon as hot water touches

3 teaspoonfrfs of baking-powder. Level teaspoonful of sa't.

The

it.

The same ingredients and proportions named

or

Impounds of

flour.

macaroni pudding serve for vermicelli. Make up like pound cake, Boil a small piece of stick cinnamon in the milk ii and butter together, adding lieu of other flavoring. Break the vermicelli rather the milk and then the flour email before cooking. Do not etir it except by shak- Bake either in cake moulds ing up with a furk.

and macaroni

Always drop both vermic:!

i

into milk or water that is boiling

with powder and

and sice

like

salt.

pound

pudding, or else in a baking pan, shallow, to be cut Takes from twenty to forty minutes. in squares.

Lemon syrup sauce is a good

a'r.ady.

by creaming the sugar the eggs two at a time,

substitute for raaberry

vinegar. Italian paste puddings, like everything else may have their day, but other pieces can be put upon the boards which will have a much more extensive run,

especia'ly

when presented

in

a

spirite

1

manner,

the following with brandy or wine sauce.

like

Rasberry vinegar English for

pancakes.

all

is

a favorite

Directions for

the end of this book.

sauce

with

the

and egg puddings and making it will b found at

sorts of flour


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

108

From this time forth stern duty requires us to stay cans by their ready appreciation of a good thing home and deal only in American productions. In when they had it. They had not been long in this this little private exposition as many foreign coun country before they found out that American Indian at

tries have been represented as small expositions The space allott d Grea generally can boast of. Britain was necessarily the Jargest, but France was

not far behind, albeit very few French flags were set to mark the nation* ity of the goods. One country is entire'y unrepresented, that is Central Africa

corn was far better than East Indian sago, and so p eased were they with the discove-y that as is 1

proven by Catlin's magnificent work on the North

American Indians, and by the writi.-gs of all the and novelists from Longfellow down who have drawn their particulars from that eource they poets

instituted a green corn dance to take place yearly yet it is not the f ult of the culinary commissioners but of the country itself. A careful examination of upon the first appearance of the succu'ent roastingthe books of Stanley's explorations ends fruitlessly. ears of which the following pudding is made:

appears p'ainly that the interior of Africa, or the African's interior and if there is any difference in It

the terms whichever

is

right wi

1

do

is

altogether

454. American Green Corn Pudding.

unacquainted with pudding. There is one nice pudding material which might, perhaps have been placed in the rice department of

453

the

Tuscarora Pudding.

Lower Nile but has been excluded through a

prejudice against the label on the packages, which s a picture of "natives manufacturing manioca," and

much

looks too leaves

for

like "natives gathering

chow chow chow

Helmbold's extract of

Doctor

Manioca makes pudding quite equal to Pound some rice in a mortar, sift out the

chow." rice.

coarse, sift out the flour, use the middle, sago-like grains and you will not know it from manioca. The farina or rice pudding receipts will do for it.

A 3

"vegetable entree" orentremet. of green corn.

pounds

6 ounces of fresh butter.

rounded teaspoonful of salt. teaspoonful of white pepper. 2 eggs and 8 yolks, (or 6 eggs.) 1

1

quart of milk.

Use tender roasting-ears. Free them carefully from silk. Shave the corn from the cob with a sharp China makes a fair showing if rice, yams, and knife till you have the required amount nearly two birdsnesbbe credited to her. The East Indies quarts. Melt the butter and stir it in, and the has only one article, sago pudding, but that is quite seasonings. Beat the eggs and milk together; mix all; bake in a four quart milk pan about half an impor ant in its relation to this country. Every reader who will recall to mind the first hour or till just set in the middle. American Indian romance he ever read will recol ,

how they always used

to greet each other with "Sago, sago, great chief!" Sago is the pith of a tree; and that is why the Indians got such a reputation for short and pithy sentences. But there is

lect

more

in

from?"

it

"Where did the Indians come

than thac.

a question never yet satisfactorily ans wered, notwithstanding the attempts to prove them the lost ten tribes, and floaters across Behring's is

Straits.

eous use

The word

sago,

among them.

it is

seen, is

in spontan-

455. Individual Green Corn Pudding. Make tulip-shaped cups of the lower part of the green corn husks, the stem being cut off c'ose and the top edges cut rounded with a pair of shears. Dip the cups in

hot, clear butter.

Place them in

with the cirn pudding preceding atd bake in a slow oven from 10 to 15 minutes without burning the husks out of color.

gem pans

of suitable size,

fill

sachem, saguache, When set life the puddings out of the gem or mufsaguiam etsego, (which the English used to proin the husVs hot. nounce hot-sago) and other words, all meaning fin-pans and serve places where they have something to eat are but As the green corn season is short, canned corn has corruptions or deviations from the same root. Sago is Asiatic. The sago tree which yields the ed'ble to do duty for it most of the year. Two cans of the so called two-pound size will Our pith is native in the East Indian islands. Saco,

Indians must have brought sago with them from that country.

Now

if

other suUab'e society

the anthropological or some would follow up this matter,

make the preceding amount

That

canned corn be used, which

is solid

dug out with a spoon.

is if

the honest

and has

When your house

to

be

"gets

perhaps tbey would be able to prove that our Indians came from the land of sago in the East

stuck," on the fraudulent corn and-water put up by he firm that dyes mulberries with logwood, for

much mooted

>lackberrie3, and cans the logwood chips too, then use four cans instead of two; drain it as dry as possible and mash iUo a partial paste, to imitate th

Indian Arcinoelago, and thus

settle

a

question.

Our Indians have never been accused of stupidity, but have often shown themselves to be true Ameri

shaved green corn.


THE AMEKICAN PASTRY COOK. 45O.

Baked Indian

Richest.

same time, Scribner's publishes

Also, at the

years.

2 quarts milk and 12 ounces corn meal. 10 ounces of butter.

109

an article presaging to hotel people the calamity of an avalanche of dried peaches. Now, what have we done ? It may be all very true ab^ut the Delaware " the plains being peach garden of the continent, where the peach trees stand in rows a mi'e long,

1 large coffee cupful of molasses. 1 large lemon, juice and grated rind. 12 eggs well beaten. Butter the bottom of a kettle and make

mush luxuriating in a warm and mellow soil and a genial simmer with c'imate, and every farm counts its hundreds or Then mix in the the steam shut in an hour or two. thousands. There are forests of twenty thousand other ingredients and bake about half an hour. peach-trees standing in prim and stately lines.

it

of the milk and corn meal and let

in

it

Some

45 T.

Indian Fruit Pudding.

crop

A

;

"when, in April days, the blossoms of these million tree 4 foretoken an abundant crop, the good news is

ground ginger.

6 eggs.

telegraphed over the country." Yes,

everybody glories in millions It is

is

Bake

ingredients.

in

a

how

the conclusion that

;

we

it is

all

good news;

love plenty.

makes us unhappy. There up. They have learned

new industry springing

dry millions of baskets as peaches as easy as

to

was not too many dried The dried peach is a g od thing

rolling off a log, as if there

peaches already.

458.

fair

more peaches than the nation can eat while they are " That is so is this: in good condition p'easant

6 ounces of suet chopped fine. 6 ounces of molasses (small cupful.)

pound of raisins. pound of currants. Cinnamon. Sa't. Make mush, add the other a slow oven about an hour.

or twenty

fifteen,

With a

there will be five million baskets of peaches on these trees. good crop will yield six million baskets

3 pints of milk or water. 12 ounces of corn meal.

1 teaspoonful of

large estates count ten,

thousand trees in one block.

Baked Indian Pudding.

abstractly

considered,

yet,

when presented

in a

of it goes practical shape to the hotel guest, a little The taste for it has to be cultiquite a long way.

Cheap and Good.

vated,

2 quarts of milk.

and

it is

tedious

work

for the cools.

Dried

peaches keep well, but it does hotel people no particular good to keep them. They might pay the Indians their annuities, perhaps, in dried peaches,

f pound of corn meal. 2 ounces of butter or minced suet. 6 ounces of molasses.

Delaware surplus in that way. do any good towards checking the growing 5 eggs. Little salt. evil to show how to use up peaches, green or canned, Make the mush with 3 pints of the milk, add the here are a few ways to go on with, and some more about Bake rest cold, and the other ingredients. may be studied up after awhile. half an hour. Three heaping pints of corn meal 1 teaspoonful of

ground ginger.

mush ready made

will do as well.

and get If

pound

A pastry bottom, peach pudding ingue on top. 1 quart of ripe peach pulp.

of corn meal (nearly a quart.)

^ pound of sugar. 6 ounces of chopped suet. Little salt.

lemon

;

the meal and

stir it

over the

and mer-

pound of sugar.

A dozen

juice and grated rind. 1 teaspoonful of ginger, ground or extract. Boil the milk with the sugar in it sprint le in

1

filling,

4 ounces of butter. 2 ounces of corn starch.

1 quart of milk.

3 eggs.

rid of the

will

46O. Delaware Peach Pudding.

459. Boiled Corn Meal Pudding. 1

it

fire

5 minutes.

Add

peach kernels pounded small.

8 yolks of eggs. 1 small cup of cream,

$ cup of peach brandy (optional.) Take ripe peeled peaches and mash with the back

Tie up in a bag with room the other ingredients. enough to swell to nearly twice its bulk; boil 6

Set it of a spoon enough to make a heaping quart. to stew in a bright saucepan with the butter and

hours.

peach kernels in

Butter and sugar or hard sauce, meringue sauce, or golden sauce are most suitable for the three pud-

gether dry, stir

dings preceding.

A

book

is

advertised which foretells

all

the disas-

ters that will befall this poor earth in the next seven

minutes remove

it

;

mix the

starch and sugar to-

into the peach, and in about 2 Be t in the mixture from the fire.

them

and brandy. Line two shallow common with pie paste, pour in the pudmilk-pans ding to be about 1 inches deep. Bake 20 minutes Meringue over with the 8 whites beaten and 6 ouncei the yolks and cream


THE AMEBIOAN PASTBY

110 of sugar. their juice.

Canned peaches

When

will

do

if

drained from

stirred over the fire with butter

good peaches turn creamy yellow and remain

so.

sauce to go with the cobbler. rhubarb can be used this way.

be stewed being put

461. Delaware Peach Meringue.

463.

down iii'o

New

Line two suitable shallow pudding-pans with pie paste and fill in three inches deep with halves of ripe peeled peaches. Strew over

them about

COOK. All sorts of fruit and

Canned

fruit

should

the juice becomes thick before the paste lined pan. till

Orleans Banana Puddings.

Jamaica

Souffles.

pound

of white sugir to each pan (or half the weight of the pound of best butter. peaches in sugar) and Bake in a a little Grate nutmeg over.

Puff puddings baked in candied orange rinds. oranges are used for jelly, sherbets, etc

When

,

save the rinds to form the cups or cases for this purThey can be cut as melons are cut, to make pose.

hour, with paper over danger of blackening the fruit. There should ornamental edges, or else the entire peel removed by be a thick, rich syrup of the peach juice and sugar being slit part way down, can be turned back to in the pans and the fruit transparent. Spread mer- form shapes like tiger-lilies. Boil the rinds in sevingue over while still in the oven, and dry-bake that eral waters till tender, and the butter taste is all exServe either hot or cold to a light fawn color. tracted; then boil in thick sugar syrup; drain, roll in sugar and set them to dry in the shape required Not only in Delaware but in Maryland, Virginia, till wanted. Tennessee, and we know not how many peach 2 pounds of banana pulp. growing states beside, the kind of pie to be next % pound of best butter (or, olive oil with salt.)

slow oven about half an if in

is called peach cobbler. Perhaps it would be as good by some other name, but being such a good medium for disposing of too plentiful fruit its familiar name that it can be readily called by had best not be tampered with The French

described

pound of sugar. 16 eggs, less four whites

left out.

\ pint of brandy. teaspoonful of ground mace.

Place the two pounds of mashed banana in a D'Artois of peaches or cherries, bright saucepan with the butter, sugar, mace and Ihere is a province of etc , or D'Artois cake eight yolka of eggs, and stir them over the fire tiil Artois in France which possibly may be as great a cooked to a sort of a marmalade, cool it, add the But the proba other eight yolks raw, then the brandy and beat peach country as little De'aware. bility is that D'Artois of fruit gained its name from thoroughly; then mix in the twelve whites whipped

name

is

D'Artois

a Count D'Artois, who, they do say, was some akin The English would scorn to to Marie Antoinette.

to

a firm froth.

Bake in the orange cups on a but-

tered pan, in a slow oven about ten minutes. Powdered sugar flavored with vanilla on top. Serve as

but a peach pie, call a peach cobbler anything but as they cannot grow millions of baskets of soon as done The rinds if skillfully candied withpeaches only a few on a warm south wall they out being made hard are a pleasant confection. Like apple are not good authority on the subject.

and peach charlottes, cobblers are good place of pudding or as sweet entrees.

463. Peach Cobbler Southern

either in

Style.

make anything of almonds as ought to be without a marble mortar and pestle to pound them to a paste in. If your house does not own one, a porcelain difficult to

It is

good as

it

potato-masher and small deep kett'e

D'Artois de Peches.

may have to do

for a substitute.

A

large pie baked in a shallow baking pan, from inches in depth, with bottom and top crust, glazed and sugared on top and cut out in square or

464. California

1 to 2

Individual or Souffles.

triangular pieces.

Fine puff paste is too rich for this purpose. Ordinary flaky pie paste made with 10 or 12 ounces of butter to a

pound of

flour is best.

1

quite th'n.

with ripe peeled peaches, strew over them half their weight of sugar and a very little nutmeg. Cover with another thin sheet of paste and bake

pound of sugar. pint of water, (a cupful.)

Cover the bottom

of the pan with a sheet of paste rolled Fill in

Almond Puddings.

4 ounces of butter. 1

pound of almonds.

12 eggs. 2 tablespooufuls of rose water.

A few bitter almonds, or peach kernels. When half done brush over the top about | hour. Pound the almonds after scalding and peeling with egg and water and strew granulated sugar When them in a mortar a few at a time till all are reover. Put back and bake it to a rich color. Moisten the fruit is too dry to make its own syrup make a duced to a paste at least as fine as farina.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK, as you proceed with the rose water to prevent Boil the sugar and water a few minutes to oiling.

Boil the sugar and

and

milk

beat

till

grafed chocolate in half the the chocolate is well dis-

form a strong syrup. Throw in the butter, then solved. Separate the eggs EO as to get ten or the almond paste, then six yolks of eggs and stir twelve whites for the meringue. Beat the rest of about five minutes. Take it off, the eggs and yolks into the remaining quart of co'd till it cooks thick

add the six remaining yolks raw and beat up well. milk, pour the chocolate milk into it; flavor, bake Then the twelve whites whipped firm. Bake in cups in a four quart milk-pan or dish about twenty minor cases. utes. Custards are curdled and made watery by too Two ounces of starch added to the syrup along long baking. As soon as fairly set in the middle puddings have the meringue made as directed in manj previous cases, ready to spread over the top while stilt hot and baking. Sift sugar over it and bake about Every one thus far has been a week-day pudding, ten minutes with the oven door open. To be eaten that is to say, a hot pudding. Now a few are cold. A very handsome and excellent dish when with the almond paste will when souffles are wanted.

needed of another

class.

quite well enough

known

make

It

taller

does not seem to be

be vulgar to eat hot pudding on Sunday, except at a railroad eating house, and it is vulgar even there when the pudding is very hot and there is only it to

ten minutes for dinner.

carefully baked.

that fashion has decreed

The railroad companies do

their part to guard the public

against getting into such a predicament by running few or no trains on Sundays. The various journals of civilization never

The above may be cooked and served in custard The annexed directions for this will

cups as well.

apply equally to several succeeding varieties.

460. Chocolate Custards Meringues. Individual.

mention this new decree of fashion in their articles Prepare the custard preceding with the best on tab'e manners for the obvious reason that French chocolate and useless vanilla extiact. Pour only to the intellectual wants of the custard in cups, p'ace them in a steamer and who are thor steam fifteen minutes, taking care they do not bepeople already It would informed. be very awkward come cooked enough to curdle. Pile the meringue

cater

they

first-class

oughly

for those journals to go about advising people not to

pudding on Sunday who never do. It may be a little absurd to mention such a thing, but the cooks, and particularly those employed in hotels, are quite glad that hot Sabbath pudding is no longer eat hot

on top while they are still hot, set the cups iu a baking pan and bake the tops very slightly. They may also be cooked by setting in a pan of water in the oven, but with more injury to the cups than by steaming

countenanced by the best people. The change lets them out a little, and the result has not been, as

In a guessing class when it comes to guessing in trying to guess what some imagined, an overcrowding of the churches; flavors, they always slip up caramel creams and custards such a pleasant gives many of those released professing to be well enough taste. pleased with Strauss and Chopin, Verdi and Beeth

oven in a so-called beer-garden

Some

talk about

and Bryant's idea of the woods being God' s first temples, and Byron's pleasure in the pathless woods and rapture on the lonely

4OT.

Whitfcier's bro ider faith

At any rate it is shore, or something of the sort. said they do better and more careful work and show

Caramel Custard Meringue.

2 quarts of milk, or part cream.

pound

of sugar.

2 teaspoonfuls of almond extract. Four ounces of the sugar is to make the caramel, tion after the rest afforded through the abolition of which must not be black like that used for coloring hot Sabbath pudding. What, then, shall there be Put the sugar in a little brass kettle and set it on no more pudding after church? Yes, certainly the fire without water. It will melt and turn brown. there shall be puddings plenty and of the most When it looks like golden syrup pour in a quart of delicate and delicious descriptions but they are not the milk and let boil till the caramel is dissolved. good unless quite cold. Separate enough of the egg3 to get out ten or Beat the others twelve whites for the meringue 405.

more natural energy and

less pernicious

stimula-

Chocolate Custard Meringue.

flavor,

2 quarts of rich milk, f pound of sugar. 3 ounces

common

chocolate grated.

16 eggs

2 tablespoonfuls of vanilla extract.

add tbe sugar and and bake till barely If not wanted meringued use

into the remaining quart of milk ,

mix

in the caramel milk

set in the middle.

fewer eggs. It is less neceseafj io meringue this than chocolate custard, which does not look well without.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

112

We have had charlottes and apple cakes hot and variously made; the next is of the sort of articles It is rich enough to that are better than they look.

Beat the sugar and eggs together; pour in the milk extract. Bake in a shallow pan about twenty

and

or thirty minutes.

be eaten cold.

468.

The preceding is everybody's acquaintance and pudding is excellent without sauce or any

Maryland Apple Cake.

for a cold

other addition.

2 heaping quarts of apples in quarters.

When

it

turns watery

it is

because

of too much baking. But when it is desired to add to pound of sugar more with soUr apples, it some of our abundant fruits, which would harbest fresh butter. of f pound monize with it so well, an unpleasant state of fluidity 2 teaspoonfuls of ground cinnamon. results in spite of careful baking. Then the cooks 2 pounds of sweet paste for the crust. For the last named article, home folks" use com- say it is the fault of water in the milk, and blame mon cookie dough, hotel cooks use sweet tart paste the cows for going and standing in the river, as they are known to do, soaking themselves through and because it is easier to bake without burning. Break the butter in bits in two frying-pans, set through for hours at a time. The difficulty can on the range, and when melted put in the app'es be overcome and a nice line of fruit custards made '

(pared and cored of course) and fry them slowly and carefully till done. Put in the sugar and ground cinnamon and cook a little longer. The apples are expected to look brown. Butter a baking-pan and line

it

with the sweet

paste rolled out thin; put in the apples and cover with a thin crust. Bake as long as you can without scorching about three-quarters of an hour.

Turn the cake of tin and cut

out, upside

in

it

Thick cream cold

is

down on a board

or sheet

blocks or squares to serve

the best sauce.

Common cookie dough

for the

preceding

is

made

with:

3 eggs.

1

Sweet paste

pound

baking powder.

of flour.

tart paste is

halfway between cake and pie-

and better than common paste

and many other articles, such baked the day before and filled with preserves.

1

1

quart of cream.

\ pound of sugar, 2 ounces of corn starch.

10 yolks of eggs. f pound of pineapple. A small cup of milk to mix the starch.

A pinch of salt. Cut the pineapple in small ripe and sweet stew

it

in

Sweet Tart Paste.

.

and

if

not quite

California Cherry Custard.

Make

a thick compote of white cherries by stewtwo pound of sugar and pitted, with quarts, ing half cup of water till the juice is reduced to thick Spread this in a thick layer over the botsyrup.

tom of a four-quart pan.

pound

dice,

some syrup formed by cov-

for

apple-cake as shell pies to be

469.

Ne'w Providence Pineapple Custard.

ing cream to that, causing it to thicken without being quite cooked; beat the yolks and stir in, and then the pineapple. Bake.

\ cupful of milk. 1 teaspoonful of

way.

ering it with white sugar. Boil the cream with the half pound of sugar in it. Mix the starch with the cup of mil'*; pour the boil-

pound of sugar. \ pound of butter. \

And

in the following

of flour.

Make

the custard accord-

pour it over the ch rries To dish up place a spoonful of

ing to the receipt preceding,

6 ounces of butter.

and bake as usual.

2 ounces of powdered sugar. 2 eggs.

cream in the ice-cream saucer and a neat spoonful of the cherry custard in that.

\ cupful of water, Rub the butter thoroughly into the

Allow a

little

if

salt

not enough

Break the eggs in the middle, add the mix up and knead smooth.

water,

41O.

Plain

flour dry.

in the

Baked Custard.

473.

Virginia Cherry Custard.

butter.

sugar

and

With red morello, or black cherries. Butter the bottom of a four- quart milk-pan, place in it two quarts of pitted cherries and their juice and one

pound of sugar and bake

in a slow oven

till

the

adhere to the pan and not mix with Make a plain egg custard of one the custard. of quart of milk and 12 yolks and four ounces

cherries will

2 quarts of milk or cream. \

pound of

sugar.

24 yolks of eggs, or 16 whole. 2 tablespoonfuls of vanilla or lemon.

pour on top of the Serve cold with cream.

sugar,

cherries

and bake.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Sonoma Grape Custard.

47-1.

F.avor with

lemon.

313 Strain.

nearly set that the cakes

Make

a corn starch custard as directed for bak-

ing with pineapples and when ready for the oven mix in a quart or more of white muscat grapes,

washed but not previously cooked

Bake

as usual.

When

cold

cannot rise and

and

so

float in it

this lemon cream into the lined cups, set on and turn them out when firm. May be ornamented on top with jelly and whipped cream around

pour

ice

in the saucers.

Serve cold.

Corrections. Bartlett pears quite ripe can be used in the same way as white grapes. Apples should be cooked a^

475.

Compiegne Pudding.

Savoy

receipt, and a few others like near the beginning of this book should have been written, two slightly pressed quarts of bread crumbs, instead of pressed in or full-pressed. While a loose quart of bread crumbs has scarcly

any weight

Gipsy Pudding.

Float.

The bread custard

it

directed for red cheriies.

it

is

found on the other hand that

pastry cooks coming down on it with a pressure of Make a jelly cake composed of two sheets of fifty pounds to the square inch make much more of a cake and much less of a custard than the writer sponge cake baked with granulated sugar on top to formed a glazed surface, and red currant jelly does of the same receipt. Also the few people who know how to cook rice spread between and when to be used set it floating in two quarts of ice-cold boiled custard flavored dry, as it ought to be, will probably find the rice

with vanilla. or

May

by spoonfuls

be served whole in a glass bowl with plenty of the cus-

in saucers

custard pudding requires in their hands about a pint more milk.

Use

tard for sauce.

ADDENDA. Queen Mab's pudding

for twice the quantity. See variations and adulterations of baking-powder in Book of Breads

may have

been the predecessor of well-known charlotte russe

The writer remembers little

cook-book by a

first

titled

baking-powder than is directed for CotThe amount there specified is

enough

not unlikely

it is

less

Pudding.

tage

seeing the lady, that

name

in a

must have

been published half a century ago. It has since reappeared in many places. Queen Mab's pud ding, ia a charlotte made by lining a mould with lady-fingers striped with red jelly, and filling with the gelatine cream that is variously called lemon cream, velvet cream, (creme veloute), jaune-mange,

and perhaps others names. It is not the purpose here to enter into the methods and merits of gela tine creams, and a short course will be taken with

There has been a painstaking effort throughout make each and every receipt so

this entire series to

any person might choose among them with a reasonable certainty of success as complete

reliable that

on the

477.

first trial

as at

any subsequent time.

"Home-Made" Pudding Sauce, or Sugar Dip.

1 cupful of

brown sugar.

1 cupful of hot water.

cupful of butter.

this:

1 tablespoonful of flour.

476.

Mix

Queen Mab's Pudding.

and sugar together dry, pour the water add the butter, and stir over the fire till it The sauce should be thick.

flour

to them, boils.

Individual Charlottes Spread some small lady-fingers thickly with firm red currant jelly and place by twos together, then cut them lengthwise into stripes and line custard

cups with these so^that there will be red and yellow They may be stripes all round for the outside kept in position by slightly wetting the edges of the cake in white of egg. It is well enough for precaution to wipe out the cups

first

with a touch cf

QUEEN MAB'S PUDDING.

olive oil.

For the

filling

make a

rich boiled custard.

To

each quart allow an ounce of gelatine, (it used to be isinglass), dissolved in water separate, or beaten in the milk while on the

fire,

which

is

the shorter way.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

114

Simple Syrup Pudding Sauce.

would drink nothing but sugar-andsod i-fbuntains and raspberry and pineapple syrups had never then been thought of else why such a homely fancy?

pound he

4TT.

water.

2 pounds of granulated sugar. 1 pint of water. Boil them together in a clean, bright kettle,

new

Skim and

tin pan.

The above

often used p'ain

is

and unflavored as

sauce for steamed pudding, pancakes, dings of green fruit, etc.

4T8. Wine Sauce

or

strain for use.

fritters,

or

Pineapple

Sauce

Raspberry

for

pud2 pounds of sugar. pint of pineapple juice or syrup made by steeping the slices, or of liquor from the cans.

for Puddings.

pound of pineapple in shreds pint of port or claret wine. Dissolve the sugar in the pineapple juice. Bring to a boil, strain, then add the wiae and pineapple,

1 teacupful of water, 1 pint of wine.

dozen whole cloves. a lemon. blade of mace.

1

470. Puddings.

2 pounds of granulated sugar.

1

Surely

Melt the sugar in the cup of water on the fire taking care it does not burn while dissolving. Throw in the spices and the lemon cut in bits the seeds

keep hot without boiling. Instead of the wine half a pint of water and a few drops of red coloring to m*ke the sauce pink

can be used.

only

simmer to draw the flavors. Red raspberries can be used in the place of pineand add the wine, then strain. apple with the difference that the berries should be It should not boil after the wine is added. dropped singly into the boiling syrup while it is still In this way they retain thick and never be stirred. their proper shape while coloring and flavoring the The foregoing is not quite a simple matter, or one syrup. No wine needed. for is desirable in excluded

and

Remove from

let

the

fire

set instructions.

most cases

Color

and the wine is not always sufficient. Then artificial means must be employed. The wines of California are, happily, coming into use cheap enough for such purposes as these, and with the probabilities

Very handsome sauces of other kinds of fruit are made in the way above indicated, by adding it to a stroug syrup made with ha'f fruit juice aud half

in favor of their purity. They are not always of desirable color. Burnt sugar caramel will make

may be used

your sauce sherry or madeira

wine sauce.

color.

Carmine, which

the coloring principal of cochineal, will make a handsome claret color, 'provided there be lemon

water.

White sweet grapes which furnish no syrup to advantage thrown whole into boiling

is

juice or

any acid

in the sauce, otherwise

make an unpleasant purple. mixed make port wine color

;

it is

Lemon Syrup

480.

Sauce.

apt to

Caramel and carmine but let the tints be

2

pounds of sugar.

3 lemons.

weak rather than be overdone.

1 pint of water.

Grate the rinds of the lemons on a tin grater and Pudding sauces could perhaps be classified in four scrape the zest with a fork into the sugar. Squeeze Add water, boil up divisions, but they ought not, because it may almost the juice in without the seeds

be said the more unmethodical our methods in this and pass through a fine strainer. One of the best line can be the better. Not of course, the methods sauces for pancakes and, if made a little less acid, of making sauces, but of their application. This for tapioca and all farinaceous and cake puddings. matter, almost inexplicable, it will be our task to talk at and around about in a succeeding column.

The sauces

at

present touched upon

it

481.

observed have had nothing in them to give body to their linked sweetness but pure sugar and for richness

2 pounds of sugar. 2 oranges. 1 lemon.

only wine. So when more wine is used or when fruit or fruit juice instead, more sugar has to be added for thickening for sweetened water or liquor is not desirable for anything but a French beverage

They

tell

of a notable

when declared when

lighted

Frenchman who was so dewas first made that he

loaf sugar

the price got

down

to

Orange Syrup Sauce.

will be

two francs per

1J cups of water.

Make same

as

lemon syrup.

Th sauce preceding mixed with one is

the

proper

sauce

for Savarin

third curacao

pudding, to be

poured into the pudding or cake hot.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 487.

Curacao Sauce.

483.

Sauce au Curacao.

lid

White Sauce. Sauce au Vin Blano.

Silver Sauce.

made by steeping orange peel 1 pound of powdered sugar. and then adding to the flavored spirit 8 ounces of butter, (large oup). much simp'e syrup. It is brandy cupful hot water. As a substitute make the clear syrup colored. cupful of brandy, or else nearly $ pint of wine sauce, the first of this series with a few cloves and and no water. some orange peel grated in it. Boil, strain and add Warm the butter slightly in a bright pan, put the half pint or less of good brandy. sugar with it and cream them by rubbing together as if for cake. Then set it on the range and while Maraschino Sauce. 483. beating with an egg-whisk in one hand pour in the brandy and water or wine with the other. When Sauce au Marasquin. hot enough to s"rve it is ready. It must not boil, as Maraschino is made by steeping black cherry that destroys its silvery whiteness and makes a gray seeds in proof spirit a long time, and adding to the syrup of it. Takes but a few minutes and should be flavored spirit three times as much simp'e syrup made last thing. Good for souffle puddings of fruit, It is c'earaod colorless fora substitute make the simdrop dumplings and boil.'d puddings. a ple syrup wi<h the juice of canned white cherries pint to two pounds. Strain, flavor slightly with peach 488. Maple Syrup Sauce. or almond extract, and add a quarter pint of gin. Ex Curaoao

a cordial

is

in proof spirit three times as

cellent for steamed puddings,

and

fried

cream

rice

and farina cakes

Map'e syrup made

hot, a little fresh butter stirred

fritters.

As long as butter and honey, silver drips and map'e syrup are applied in such lavish proportions

489.

Maple Sauce.

Imitation.

GoMen syrup made

hot, two ounces of butter to waffles, hot breads and cakes as is the each quart ani flavoring of vanilla and nutmeg present custom there will be no reason to make excuse for the excessive sweetness of these clear

to ho' el

syrup sauces. Rich as they are they can go a degree higher for such things as sponge puddings and boiled

484.

2 pounds of granulated sugrr, of water.

enough

4 ounces of fresh butter. a lemon. tablespoonful of whole spices consisting of blades of mace, cloves, stick cinnamon and alspice. Boil all together ten minutes the lemon cut in

then strain through a

j

uice of the

lemon

is essential to

fine

strainer.

brighten

Wine

sugar. 1

rich

still

further.

for Plum Pudding.

transparent

sauce

as above

and add to it after straining, pint of brandy and do not boil afterwards. If to be set on directed

when the pudding is sent in another ha'f pint of brandy is required. Make it hot and pour it on top of the other sauce without mixing, then set on fire with a pine splinter.

fire

pound of sugar.

2 ounces of corn starch.

1

quart of water lemon.

1

ounce of butter.

1

then the transparent sauce goes

the

Sauce.

flavored

For macaroni puddings and timbales make a sauce preceding and stew pound raisins in it. Use the raisins as a garnish with the sauce.

Making

to

all

Substitute for the clear syrup and many other Takes only half the amount of sauces.

Raisin Sauce.

480. Brandy Sauce

and barely run enough

With

49O. Corn Starch Syrup Sauce.

the color

like the

And

to coat the article

down smooth.

The

of the sauce.

485.

gloss; glact, iced,

sugar sauces like the list preceding it is hardly practicable they would be almost candy. The next sett are better for gloss.

sett e

1

pieces

g^aze,

glass,

That is all very slippery. When a bid-of-fare instead of saying a dish has a sauce describes it as the glossy sauce is required to be thick glac

Transparent Sauce.

1 pint

Glace, ice, glace, glazed, glossed over.

pudd ings of flour.

A b'ade

scant.

of mace and few cloves.

pint of wine. Boil the water with the lemon sliced email in

it

Mix the the seeds having been carefully excluded. then stir them quickly instarch in the sugar dry ;

lemon water and let boil 6 minutes. Then beat in the butter and add the win. Strain to the boiling

for use.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

lie

"Mio

COOK.

amico,

why do

you, residing in tho Boule-

vard des Itahens, Pays Culinaire, yet writing French, that sambaoine which the French ca 1 sabayon, even when writing Fiench?" "Only because the French themselves call the same thing by two different names. The sauce or hot spirituous beverage is of Italian origin and has come down ,

from the time when

Sauce

cookery was in the

is sambaojne, the being pronounced like i." Then I asked my meal-colored German elf what

ascendent, but the Italian spelling

Millefleurs.

j

1

Italian

pound of sugar.

country they know about sabayon. He answered "Why that is drdfutz\ only" he adds, "when made slightly different with wine it is

in his

2 ounces of corn starch.

:

1 pint of water. 1 pint of thick

sweet cream.

schatto."

cup of red fruit syrup. Various flavorings.

The making of

Then

this sauce will be best

understood

by the explanation that it is a pearly cream sauce with a mixture of several agreable flavors. It should

Of

be pearl pink.

lemon

zest,

and

when

old,

the spices, almonds,

flavors of nectarine

and peach h id

to

be prepared separately this sauce .became a serious affair. Now, by boiling cinnamon, c'oves and grated peel in the pint ut water, btirriog in the sugar and starch, then the cream, and judiciously

adding drops of various extracts the sauce can be It must as good as need be in a few minutes.

made

be strained, of course.

492. Raspberry Vinegar Sauoe.

I

asked the great Columbian oracie and he,

smilingly answered, why that is scarcely different from Thomas and Jeremiah, only we do not cook our tom-and-jerry quite so much as you cooks do." Then I went to an expert Englishman and asked tbat sauce you make '.'Say, Johnny! what is plum pudding when you don' t have the common brandy sauce?" "That," says he, "is German Custard Sauce," "What is its French rame?"

him for

"Sabayon."

They are distinctions without The confusion cornea from the

Eaough said. much difference.

same compound being mentioned in a Babel of many If an intelligent person but learn the tongues. base he can build up as many variations as he pi ease, himself.

Vinaigre Framboise. The various fruit vinegars used extensively for sauces and beverages in Europe are but little enquired for in the United States, but probably need only The native to be better known to be appreciated. wild raspberry of the Rocky Mountains, with its peculiar aromatic flavor and bright scarlet color and juice doubtless contains

and

confections,

ited extent

new

possibilities in relishes

and could be cultivated

among

its

native

barrens.

abort season in the towns about which

no rival among

fruits

it

to

hours.

Let

stand

Mash

the

;

beaten yolks to thicken it to a custard-like consistency about 10 yolks to a quart and taking off before is

it

Mulled wine, a hot beverage,

quite boils.

an elaboration of

this,

having the whites of the

eggs beaten to a froth and stirred into the nearly boiling mixture the minute before serving.

an unlim

Duiing is grows it has

403.

Sauce Sabayon.

and brings a higher price than

any other. To make raspberry vinegar, ha^ fill a stone jar with ripe raspberries of any kind, and pour in pure cider vinegar enough to a little more than cover them.

The base may be learned by boiling a quart of Rhine wine, throwing in gugar enough to pleasantly sweeten, and a little spice then stirring in enough

in a

warm

place twenty-four berries in the jar; strain and

For plum puddings, pound of sugar.

fritters, etc.

12 yolks of eggs. pint of sherry or other wine.

Beat the yolks and sugar together in a deep saucepan as if making egg-nogg. Set the saucepan on the stir in the wine a little at a time, and then range

and then run the liquor To each pint allow a with the egg- whisk whip the mixture to a froth till pound of sugar if for present use or two pounds if it has become hot and begins to thicken. It must to be bottled. Boil and skim and it is ready for use not quite boil, and ought to be made only just be-

press

through a cloth

;

through the flannel jelly bag.

when made

needed. Either powdered cinnamon, vanilla, Brandy or rum

It can be kept in preserving jars cold. or cans a long time, put up in the usual manner, or in stone jugs, sealed while hot and painted outside

fore

to exclude air

provement.

it is

or extracts can be added for flavor.

mixed with the wine

is

generally considered an im-


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Sauce Ecumante.

498.

Raspberry Butter Sauce.

494.

Only bright red juice should be used not purple The juice of red currants or light red cherries doe 4

Foaming Sauce, Sabayon.

instead of light raspberries. 1 pounds of powdered sugar.

French Custard Sauce.

f pound of fresh butter.

juice cold. Cream the butter

6 ounces of fresh butter.

Have

red.

the fruit

ice

till

pint of madeira or sherry.

wanted.

Sauoe Doree.

495.

Golden Sauce. 1

2 eggs.

and

sugar together, slightly warm and add the juice slowly while beating, like vinegar to a mayonaise, so as not to liquify it.

Keep on

pound of sugar.

1

pint of red fruit juice. This is a hard sauce colored

117

^ t -aspoonful of ground cinnamon. Proceed at first as if making cake, to

time

pound of sugar.

2 ounces of corn starch.

With an egg-whisk then beat up becomes quite frothy and begins to must not quite boil. Should be made

till it

thicken.

It

be used.

it is to

Custard Sauce Plain.

499.

4 ounces of best fresh butter.

the

till all is in.

the eauce

only just before

1 quart of water.

warm

and sugar, and cream them together with the cinnamon and the 2 eggs in a deep saucepan. Taen set the mixture over the fire and while stirring a it as it becomes warm pour in the wine a little at

butter

3 yolks of eggs. 1 nutmeg. Break the nutmeg in pieces and

pound of sugar.

quart

of water.

Mix

quart of rich milk.

1

boil it in the

8, 10,

starch

and sugar together dry and

stir

them

When cooked beat in the butter; beat the yolks with a spoonful of sauce and add them with rapid beating to the sauce, which should b? immediately

Boil the milk with the sugar in

in.

taken from the

fire

and not allowed to

boil the yolks.

Strain for use.

light with a little

Lemon

Butter Sauce.

float, fruit floats

in.

it.

Beat the yolks

Turn them quickly

and gipsy pudding.

Hot Cream Sauce.

5OO.

1 quart of water. 1 pound of sugar.

For drop dumplings, etc. 1 quart of thin cream.

2 ounces of corn starch. 2 ounces of butter.

f pound of sugar. 1 ounce of butter.

2 lemons.

1

6 yolks of eggs. Grate the rinds of both lemons into the water and

ounce of starch, (a heaping tab'espoonfull

for the golden

directed

)

Flavoring of broken nutmeg or stick cinnamon. Boil the milk with the piece of cinnamon and half

squeeze in the juice of only one, unless quite small. the sugar in That being the flavoring instead of nutmeg make the sauce in other respects as sauce preceding.

milk mixed

into the boiling milk and in about cne minute or just before it begins to boil take off and strain it. The best sauce when ice-cold for snow eggs, lemon

snow

49O.

or 12 yolks of eggs. suit, or wine.

Flavor to

it

the sugar

prevents burning

and

the rest of the sugar with the starch mixed in When cooked thick beat in the butter and dry.

stir in it

strain for use.

497.

5OI.

Meringue Sauce.

"Whipped Cream Sauce.

Creamed Butter Sauce. 1J

Sauce a

pounds of powdered sugar.

1

$ pound of butter, 8 whites of eggs.

la Chantilly.

quirt of thick sweet cream. 8 ounces of sugar.

4, 6, or

Calipint of sweet wine such as raisin, canarj, fornia angelic i, or Madeira. J cup of brandy. Make the hard sauce as directed in two preceding Vanilla, rose, almond or any othei flavor as may cases with only one pound of the sugar. Whip the be required. whites quite firm, lightly mix in the remaining Have the cream cold and whip to a partial froth

gugar, then stir both mixtures together

brandy.

Make

it

late

and keep on

ice

and add the as wanted, till

wanted.

in ice.

either in a

whip-churn or deep bowl

set


THE AMBBIOAN PASTRY COOK.

218

503.

Paper Cases

for Individual

book

Cover the fruit with the sugar in a bowl, mash together and rub through a seive. Dissolve the gelatine in a cup of milk extra, in a

like writing paper not ruled, and pattern for the paper cases by fitting a band

small vessel set in a place where it will warm graduWhen the gelatine is dissolved put the cream ally.

of paper to the outside of a very small tumbler, such as is used for Roman punch, or some similar

into a pail or pan, take the large wire egg whisk and whip it to a froth, pour in the gelatine, and continue

Charlottes. Jtrocurc half a dozen sheets of cap or fine

paper, which

make a

is

The band of paper, when cut to fit, whipping, with the pan set on ice; then add the form a curve. Cut as many such pieces as are strawberry pulp or syrup, and when it is firm needed from the sheets, and then, placing three or enough, and before it is quite set, fill the individual four together, cut both top and bottom edges into charlottes with it, well piled above the edge Cream without fruit, and only flavored with Make fringe a quarter of an inch or less in depth. some corn starch and the ends strawberry extract, does not need any gelatine. small shape.

will

paste very stiff, paste of the bands together, forming cup shapes, then cut around the edges, press the fringe bottom edges of the cups on to the paste, the fringe bent outward,

5O5.

and the shapes are made.

the size of strawberries and

503. Strawberry

Charlottes in Cases

ounces of sugar to a quart. cases of about

the

capacity of very small tumblers, according to the directions in the preceding article; next bake 6 sheets of cake of any kind that is suitable to roll up, or of the following, which is right in quantity for 50 small charlottes.

3

rounded cupfuls

of

granulated

sugar

1^

pounds.

flour

Soft peaches, after peelIf admissible,

serve them in large glass bowls ornamented with quarters of red or yellow peaches placed in order and a pitcher of cream with each bowl separately. If served individually in saucers,

pour the cream

over only as they are dished up.

5O6.

Compote of Apples. it

but another term for apples stewed in

A

4 rounded cupfuls of flour 18 ounces. Beat the yolks, sugar and Separate the eggs. water rapidly for ten minutes. the

to

ing, are best only quartered or sliced.

This

15 eggs. i cup of water.

Have

The harder kinds of peaches should be chopped

mixed with sugar two or three hours before the meal. Allow about four

'or Fifty.

Having prepared 50 paper

Peaches and Cream.

measured ready

weighed or

the whites perfectly firm. Stir the flour into the beaten yolks, and the whipped whites last.

Whip

Spread thinly on sheets of blank paper not greased, and bake in a quick oven about 6 minutes. Careful baking is required, because if dried or

compote of fruit is understood to be difsyrup. ferent from stewed fruit, in being richer with sugar and the fruit being either whole or in large pieces. Fine ripe apples of a kind that have proved to be good to cook make a delightful sweet dish for tea in this

way: 4 large apples. ] cupful of sugar. cupful of water. Piece of orange peel or lemon peel, or cloves, or

cinnamon for flavoring. Put the sugar, orange peel and water on to boil in Pare the apples, cut each one in a deep saucepan. Should any of the sheets three and cut out the cores. Drop three or four become too dry to roll or bend in spite of care in and let simpieces at a time into the boiling syrup, them on of each other after top baking, lay wetting mer about fifteen minutes, or until done and almost the paper, and let lie so half an hour. take them out with a fork, and cook Cut out the pieces of cake by the same paper pat- transparent ; more in the same syrup, and so on till all are some tern the shapes were cut by, but a trifle shorter, and The apples can be in dessert saucers. No done. Serve put the lining of cake in the paper cases. red fruit juice or currant bottom of cake is needed, but little square pieces colored pink by adding jelly to the syrup. can be pushed down inside if wished. burnt the cake will break.

Brush the paper, under can be pulled off the cake.

side,

with water, and

A

short time before serving fill the chariot tes with the cream intended for the purpose.

504. Strawberry Whipped Cream Fifty. 1

quart of red strawberries.

3 pints of thick sweet cream.

pound of sugar 2 cupfuls. 1J ounces of gelatine a package. 1

for

stick

it

5O7.

Pineapple Sweet Salad.

1 pineapple. 1

teacupful of powdered sugar

cup of maraschino. Peel a pineapple, cut it into uniform slices and cover them with the sugar in a glass dish. Let it remain to form a syrup, and when to be served add the maraschino.


THE

OF

BREADS AND C AK ES. FRENCH, VIENNA, PARKER HOUSE AND OTHER ROLLS, MUFFINS, WAFFLES, TEA CAKES; STOCK YEAST, AND FERMENT; YEAST-RAISED CAKES, ETC., ETC., AS

MADE

IN

THE BEST HOTELS

AND RESTAURANTS.

BEING A PART OF THE

"OVEN AND RANGE"

SERIES,

JESSUP WHITEHEAD.

JESSUP

CHICAGO: WHITEHEAD & CO., 1894.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

THE HOTEL BOOK OP BREADS.

123

It will then weather, activity, and need of using be ready for use, and should be kept cold.

All the Mystery that Pertains to Yeast

Not much in that; yet

it was once the subject of Somewhere between 1825 and 1835. And in the days of our daddies was kept a Who is your baker?" Bnllat-Savarin "Limet, in Rue de Richelieu profound secret and termed patent yeast, London He supplies the royal family; but I send there be- yeast, and patent London potato yeast, long after cause it is near, and continue doing so because I the patent had expired. Now it is used in almost have proclaimed him to be the first bread-maker in every household where bread is made. the world"

511.

Stout Party

:

"What

delicious bread

you have

an English patent.

:

"I must take a note of his address Stout Party a great eater of bread, and with such ro Is as those I could almost dispense with everything else." :

am

I

To avoid sourness in tial

son for It is

world,

one of the most natural occurences in the

when

traveling hotel patrons stop at a good if situated

no matter what the rate per day in the midst of the land of sweet butter hotel

on the

table hot rolls that are

soft,

and just splendid

;

so that

/icy think they "could almost dispense with everything else;" for them to ask somebody as a special favor to procure them the receipt to make them by.

But, more's the pity, they seldom derive any bsnefit from the reply; not only because the ingredients are

ferment

kettle the

it is

quite is the rea-

which

second time

pour over

have

to

along with

it

the potatoes.

find

white, sweet,

up the

filling

plenty of boiling water to

Ought not the potatoes be pared?

remarkably light, well-

baked, we'1-shaped, thin-crusted, fine-grained, delicious

and

this

that the flour be well scalded,

Yts, they ought to be. ladies they are pared

by

All the bakers

nium comes.

In nice

hotels kept

little

and the eyes scooped

out.

wi 1 do that way when the millenAt present the bakers have a sort of

make

superstition that the potato skins

the

yeast

sironger, and if it should fail to be good would b3 sure to lay the blame to the paring of the potatoes.

However, they are obliged to wash them very clean, but seldom weighed or measured, and the pastry and if they did not pour off the first water they are cook may be unable and unwilling to supply the boiled in, its blackness would injure their bread. information, but because in the nature of the case the receipt

is

but a small part of a little system of to be faithfully followed from

bread-making that has

small beginnings to great results, and bread are to be produced

rolls

if ;

There

uniformly fine

and that

little

is yet so large that it cannot be explained quite all in a minute. Happily however, bread-making

system

is

no

salt in the receipt.

Ought not

salt

be

added? It

need not be.

seems about

It

house authorities add tions all are against

all

the

priva'e

The baker's superstiMost bakers will not put

salt.

it.

not a very complicated affair compared with other branches of cookery where each new article may

Salt in yeast probably does no harm; it certainly does no good. This little book teaches to make bread with such ease, certain-

require a different method, but this once learned little more than a matter of routine. The

ty,

is

becomes first

step is

making the

Common

and

sponge.

indifference to trifles that

liberty to do either

you

will

way without impairing

be at

success.

yeast.

Yeast, or Baker's Ferment.

512. About 24

salt in their first

potatoes.

2 pounds of flour. 4 ounces of sugar.

Not so with sugar.

It

has a chemical

effect

that

very observable. People can go on for years making good bread without, but they never discover how quici and strong yeast can be until they try

is

the sugar experiment.

513.

But there is stock yeast mentioned. Where are we to get that? By all means make your own if you have to make When done pour off what remains of the dark water bread constantly and regularly, no matter in what and fill up again with fresh. When that boils turn quantity, for stock can be made either by the barrel out potatoes and boiling water on to the flour in a or bottleful, and needs be made only once a month, quart of stock yeast. Wash the potatoes thoroughly, using a brush for the purpose, and boil them in a kettle of water 1

large pan and mash all to a smooth paste. in the sugar. Thin down with ice water

Throw because stock is not put into bread direct, but only Hie used to make the common yeast or ferment.

till

Set the large colander over your 6gallon stone jar (just fresh scalded out) and strain the yeast into it. When it is no more than about

thick cream.

It costs

only the trouble of making, the materials

being almost too trifling in expense to count. Of course you c^n shuffle along without. Some hotel milk warm mix in the stock or other yeast to start pastry cooks do so all their lives, never knowing it. Let stand in a moderately warm place, undis how to make stock. But then they are always dethose who are unwilling to turbed, for from 12 to 24 hours according to pendent, begging from


THE AMERICAN PASTBY COOK.

124 give or sell

Or

it.

ferment to start

else t-hey use

with over and over again, and

it

carries the

of acetic fermentation, or seeds of sourness

all

the

weak and makes

rotten dough, while with every time, or at least alternately, it is the most difficult thing to make dough or bread become sour, even if you were to time;

it is

with stock used

try

Cut out in suitable cakes and dry them in a

ing.

possible, turning over freIf covered with meal and dried under a

germs cool place as quickly as

to start

quently.

slight pressure of

board and weight

Some who go on using the lifeless ferment made with ferment for years, blaming the flour and the luck, are astonished after all to find yeast

made with

of

way they will be found both for bread or yeast

Either

yeast of the stores.

making.

515.

A

brand of dry yeast with a German name that

is

packages, is made as above with The starch absorbs more moiststarch and flour.

perfect stock turning out rolls and loaves twice as large and twice as good as ever they had known

sold in tin-foil

them

ure

before.

much

is

very strong and ready

it.

so

till

expelled that they cannot ferment, these cakes will be as free from breakage as the dry the moisture

up more

takes

yeast.

There are then several kinds of yeast. Of comStock yeast is the foundation corner stone of a yeast, the all in all and first necessity with pressed trade. The receipt for making it is never published. this little book will not have much to It is too valuable to be spread broadcast in a news- many bakers, It is neither better nor worse than that we make say. paper, yet some way will be indicated at the end of ourselves Its one merit is that it saves the trouble this book by which those who really need it my obof making either stock or ferment. In the largest

tain the desired information.

which have bakeries attached it is used and, is as cheap as any. But it has to be purchased, and in the ordinary hote) and boarding house, after a month or two, the question invariably comes "Can't you make your own yeast? So and so does, and they have splendid bread." Then the cook or pastry makes his own, and rather liking the independence it gives him, and not caring to change methods every month, the prachotels

But

A

if

saving labor,

no stock yeast, what then?

quart or more of good ferment from the shop of

a good baker

is the best substitute. Next to that is dry hop yeast in cakes, (they are made from stock yeast) not good for making bread direct because of

their taste, perceptible to all persons

their bread, but good to

Use a

sugar.

liberal

start

amount

critical

Make a new

gallon of ferment made.

about

ferment along with about 6 cakes to each start that

way

:

tice of

about once a month and use ferment for starting at rule.

using home-made yeast becomes the hotel

other times.

There are no hops.

Don't you use hops in mak-

ing yeast?

All ignorant imaginings of luck,

chance, water-

witchery, mystery, hidden knowledge, moon's age and the like having to do with fermentation should,

Yes, in all cases where no stock can be had, tie up one would think, have been banished long before 4 ounces of hops in a piece of muslin, boil them but such is not the case, as we are often rethis with the potatoes in the second water, and press minded seeing how easily even some old hands will out the liquor through the colander when straining give up trying under the least stress of accident. the yeast Hops are not needed "with stock for ;

starting, as that is already bitter with them.

The baker or pastry cook who

Two men,

makes

perfect yeast is naturally reluctant to take chances on other

people's on

making a new commencement, and

own

prefer to take along his

and

reliable

in the

will

following easy

manner.

a few months since, started a "French

handsome new sign bad it in The capitalist, with five years savings of some plodding business; the other partner, a routine shop baker from an so their

Bakery"

the livest

new

city

on the continent.

size portable oven procured at large tent, all other fixtures suitable, high hopes of course, scores of such beginnings had become fine stores doing a rushing busi

eastern city.

Large

great expense, very

514.

Dry Hop Yeast.

1 pint of strong, thick, stock yeast. 1 pint of fresh ferment. 1 1

ness.

color

2 tablespoonfuls of sugar.

down

thick stock to the

point of using, for this purpose.

together to a

stiff

full of holes

rolls

bad gray run together

very all

called referees, proved best flour in the state.

meant some that

common

more consistence

Mix all

is

opening day bread

Blamed flour. Sent shapeless, worse than bread. for the merchant author of their ruin. Merchant

pound of corn meal. pound of flour.

By

First

like rye

is

not watered

but

left

with

day bread no water,

oven,

better, could not

salt.

Next blamed

dough trough, weather. Next day blamed the luck, moon, planet, Ran to place of one of referees where

bread no better

dough, without knead- climate,

be worse


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. glorious bread

was made and borrowed eome good be

too hot into

which the starting yeat

made

or whether the dough be

jeast.

Next day had good average baker's bread. But no mere customers. All parties demoralized. Baker on a stool smoking said it was no use, his trying in that town any more, because he had made his first

with yeast in

it

to rise.

Asa

too hot

is

poured,

when

the ground for months without growing ground be cold so will yeast remain without

a similar condition.

Aud

a plant

as

it ii set

root or seed will be in if life

the in

may be un-

wrong quarter of the moon!^ Sold out naturally forced <o a sickly rapidity of growth till it enough to go back home falls of its own weight so do yeast and dough act when they are hurried too much by being kept as baker lost.

yeast in the for a song

with

capitalist raised

hot as they can be without killing them.

The steward of a good hotel where The best bread and yeast are made by giving the finest bread was known to be made, was sought p^nty of time and gejitle temperature for all the by the owner of a bakery that had been running processes to be carried out in a natural manner. with good success for some time. "What brand of flour do you use? I must get some Accidental freezing solid does not kill yeast, nor I have no more good bread and seem to injure it. This refers only to common deor close my shop. my trade is leaving me." grees of coM, not extremes. Another

"We

case.

such a brand."

use the best

"Why,

I

have

that, but

they must have changed

quality on me." ''That does not seem possible, for you got the other half of the same car load as ours. Perhaps you will find the fault is with

warm

weather; " has run out Correct.

now

your baker.

He

did well in

the nights are cold.

His yeast

Some changes, and the business recover-

ed and has grown.

to

In one of those Florida hotels, years ago, they tried do without engaging a pastry cook for the season,

and might have got along very well had for the inscrutable

make it impossible for ordinary home fvlk to ever penetrate to the bottom of it. The company was coming but the yeast would not come nor the light The family carryall was sent

a baker, in haste.

He

fifty

miles for

came, he saw, he made some

Flour, Graham Bread, Bye-an'Injun and Boston Brown.

In fact, great emphasis has been laid upon the quality and manufacture of bread from early times, when the whitest and finest was called simnel cakes, and was concocted chiefly to please the palate of the rich and high-born, as well as the wastel bread, not quite so aristocratic; whi'e the tourle, or twisted loaf, and black bread made from the coarsest portion of the wheat, or from some inferior grain, fell to the share of the poor. Nowadays we have discovered that the coarse fare furnishes more nutriment, and the rich have adopt-

it not been ed mystery that so envelops yeast us

to

bread.

51G.

About

it

and made

it

popular

Harper's Bazar.

Every cure of corpulence mustbpgiu with these three

maxims

or absolute principles

:

discretion in eating,

moderation in sleep, exercise on foot or horseback. To abstain more or less rigorously from all that is

and starchy tends to lessen corpulence. You like bread; then eat brown or rye bread At breakfast, take brown bread as a matter

floury

it very warm into their cold and of and in an hour it was all life, overflow- course, and chocolate rather than coffee. Strong Eat coffee, however, with milk, may be conceded ing the top and filling another jar besides. Such as little of the crumb of bread as possible. Gastrono-

mash and poured inert yeast,

wonderful witchcraft as he understood they never could expect to learn, so he had to etay the season It was well for him that he understood through. yeast.

my

as a Fine Art.

Perfect yeast, quick tasteless that

and

strong,

no harm can result

and so sweet and from using it

plentifully is the first requirement for Scientists tell us that yeast is a plant, a festive soi t of microscopic fungus, or multitudinous mass

of exuberant growth under the usuual conditions favorable toplintlife. There is any desired of

it,

making perfect

bread and the quality of the flour is next to be tak^n

The flour is too generally made to A good bread the blame of poor bakings. with good yeast c n make better bread from

into account.

bear

all

maker amount of natural philosophy besides the above to second rate flour than a second rate workman genbe found in studying the singular ways of yeast, erally can from the finest. Yet in good hands the such as the different kind of fermentation and the finest flour will produce rolls and loaves half as changes produced in the flour, but the really practi- large again for their weight as those made of infecal thing for bread-makers' profit to remember is rior flour. Shop bakers who hnve to count their that, one point that yeast is a plant and to be cared profit by the number of loaves that a barrel of flour as such As plants grow fast under the influence of can be made to produce, know that several more warmth and moisture so does yeast. Hot water loaves of the same weight, and of larger size, can bt poured into a bed of plants will kill them and the made from fine flour than from coarse, showing that same excess of heat kills yeast, whether the ferment the best takes up most water, and from the bread-


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

126

maker's point of view may be as cheip as the flour which costs less money.

poor

of bran, defrauding the consumer of the finest porThe beat remedy is to

tion of the flour altogether.

buy such flour only of a reputable miller who makes do not gnerally amount it a special care to select good wheat generally The miller's brand white wheat for the purpose. Another remedy is to much in assisting the buyer, is his trade mark, and most of them try to keep up supplied by the proportions of the following receipts. the quality of their best at an even degree of excel-

The usual

tests for flour

The brand

lence.

is often

If two or three samples of flour are placed

hand

side

by

side,

and smoothed with a

A handful of flour pressed in the hand, if good, will retain its shape, while coarse flour falls apart like sand. Yet the best flour new-

standing article on the bill of fare of most hotel?. 2 pounds of graham flour, not sifted. 1 pound of white flour. 1 pints of warm water. \ pint of yeast. (1 cup). 1 teaspoon ful of salt.

Commence

in a general way.

answer

this test,

to

flour with age will.

may be

white,

but

will

not,

unless in exceptional cases, make rolls and loaves of as good shape as winter wheat flour, they having a tendency to run out of shape, the dough being soft

and

sticky.

tall

round handsome

It is

7 or 8

hours before time to bake.

Mix

and water together strain them into the graham. It makes a stiff batter. That is the sponge. and poor Let it stand in a moderately warm place about 4 hours. Then add the white flour, knead and pound the yeast

;

Very sligh^y grease the pan it was lump of dough in it, brush that

the dough.

Spring wheat flour

Bread.

A

in the

silver knife,

the finest may be known by its greater freedom from bran. Yet when one sample is from red wheat, another from white, the appearances maybe decep White wheat does not make the whitest bread, tive.

ly ground will not

Graham

517.

the best guide.

started in, place the

no matter how slightly

over

and

2

set to rise

loaves, rise

with the butter brush

Then make

hours more.

into

and bake.

winter wheat flour that makes the rolls

and

loaves.

Graham dough rises faster than white, and after made into loaves should not be a'lowed to rise

being

Good

flour is slow to go

through the seive, rolls or proof too much, lest it be too crumbly to slice Poor flour passes well. The bakers usually bake these ia round moulds.

and coats the sides. through like buckwheat or meal.

up

in balls

Flour improves with keeping, especially in whiteIt should have six months age before being used for fine rolls. Bakers sometime buy flour that ness.

has become caked in the barrels through long keepand mix portions of it with the newer flour to

ing,

impart whiteness and strength. It often improves the bread to mix two

Taking

fine

French

rolls for the

standard,

graham

enjoy a degree of popularity in hotel service averaging about three to five. They are more diffirolls

cult to roll is all

make

and a

or at least to bake

not to be met with

know how

to

everywhere.

fine

graham They dori t

make them

as nice as these.

Graham

Bolls,

or three

brands of flour together, particularly when one is older than the other. Spring wheat flour may be

worked off by having some old winter wheat flour to mix with it.

518.

best

But

this is all

good flour means

on the common assumption that fine, white flour, and the crowning

glory of bread-making is to have bread snowy- white and delicate in taste and texture. A very large

minority in our hotels, however, make known their preference for various kinds of bread of a coarser sort.

This

is for fifty rolls

piuts of warm water. pint of yeast. \ cup of reboiled molasses. 1 egg 2 whites are better. 1J

1 teaspoonful of salt. Set sponge with the

morning, for

Graham

flour should

be the unbolted

than bran and shorts, as if the thinnest wheat had been got rid of in that

seems

little else

In other samples the flour is made by taking econda flour and mixing in an indefinite amount

hape.

at 9 or

about

1

10 in the

add

all

the

of other ingredients and make it stiff dough. Let rise good till 4. Then work the dough bv spreading it out

wheat, but not only that, the wheat should be grain, such as would make fine flour. Very often the appearance and handling is such that flour

graham

rolls for supper; at

meal

plump

graham

of small size.

2 pounds of graham, not sifted. 1 pound of white flour.

on the table, with the knuckles, folding over and

Make iuto rolls in any pressing again repeatedly. of the ways to be hereinafter detailed for whi** rolls.

Grease slightly

between eacn one witn a

brush dipped in melted lard or butter. Brush over the tops with the same, and set the rolls to rut


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. about 45 minutes. Bake carefully about 15 minutes. Brush over with clear water on taking them from the oven.

There

ig

Keep hot without drying

out.

philosophy or something like

it

in that

the pores in the crust and retains the air of fermentation that otherwise would

one egg.

It closes

escape from the rough graham flour, and the result is increased lightness, softness, and better shape. No shortening should be allowed in the mixture.

2 whole eggs and 2 yolks. Take the dough that has been already prepared Warm it and the butter in a pan for making rolls. Put in the other ingredients and beat all together. Grease tin muffin rings together about 5 minutes. Half fill them. Rise half an hour. or gem pans.

Bake 10 minutes. Brush over with butter or hot water. But if you have no light dough made the muffins can be set from the beginning with 1

is

to

the force of habit or custom, one must not be accounted the best breadmaker in the

expect world if our graham and brown breads be not brown, and our gingerbread be not "old-fashioned," that is

dark colored.

Graham

rolls are

expected to be

pound white

pound graham;

milk; 1 cup yeast;

Such

127

pint molasses, eggs, butter, as in Mix and let rise 4 hours. Beat

salt,

foregoing receipt. 5 minutes, rise in rings

till

dght, then bake.

heaUh who frequent and pleasure places for recuperation are

the people in poor

Many of the springs

extremely

:

flour;

criiical in the

matter

of

such hygienic

They don't look; natural articles of diet as graham rolls and gems, and all otherwise; they are nicer so and not so likely to be the hints here given will be found useful in the entaken for second-rate French rolls. But now that deavor to meet their requirements. the march of civilization has taken away our oldfashioned black molasses and given us colorless light-brown

Illinois

in color.

sorghum syrup

instead,

it is

hard

to see

what

Made with Baking Powder. 1

1

The trifle of sweetening makes the crust thin and

called

rolls

for

in

graham

soft.

Graham Gems.

52O.

we can do but use

a spoonful of burnt sugar caramel for coloring, else our brown breads cannot possibly be brown. else

quart of unsifted graham. quart of white flour.

4 spoonfuls of baking powder. 3 large cups of milk. 1 egg.

Salt.

the sponge with the graham 2 ounces of lard melted. and soften the bran, instead of taking Have the milk tepid and mix the lard and egg in up white bread sponge and working stiff with grait; the powder and small teaspoon of salt to be mixBest breadas is "for short." oftenest done ham, ed in the flour. Stir all together and beat for 3 minmakers in the world use themselves to the right Have the iron gem pans hot; drop in round utes. from the first. ways spoonfuls of the fritter-like batter and bake ten It is far better to set

so as to soak

Pastrycooks do not and need not flour.

measure the

They measure the three-fourths water and yeast, and add all the flour needed to

one-fourth

make dough. A pound of flour.

cup, or half pint of fluid wets a

minutes.

As

it is

none of our business

to

decide which are

the very best gems, here is another receipt to be tried when the sameness of the foregoing has be-

come wearisome: immaterial whether the dough be made by setting sponge, or batter with yeast in it, as preIt is

viously directed, or all the ingredients put in a pan and mixed up at once. At night the latter way has to be adopted. The dough made by the receipt for

graham rolls over night can be used part for loaves and part for muffins by the following short and easy

all to

a

stiff batter.

Graham

Muffins.

Make

the

gem pans hot and Bake in slow

grease them. Drop in spoonfuls. oven 15 minutes.

531.

method.

519.

2 pounds of graham; 2 eggs; 4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 2 basting spoonfuls of syrup; small teaspoonful of salt; 1 pints of milk or water. Beat

Graham

Biscuit.

2 quarts unsifted graham. 1 quart flour.

Makes about

2 ounces lard.

thirty.

2 pounds of graham 2 ounces of butter.

roll

dough.

2 ounces (a bastingspoonful) of molasses.

& cupful of milk.

1'egg in the milk, (optional).

Salt.

4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Milk or water to make sofc dough.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. An hotel pastry cook and baker who had grown rolls at night, and should be baked two or three ashamed of himself, once told me that for years he hours at very moderate heat. Or, mixed at night went from one hotel to another, as pastry cooks do, and made into loaves very early the bread may be und always finding the people earnestly wished for baked in time for breakfast. But the best way is Boston Brown Bread, he as earnestly protested that could not be made unless there was a bric'i oven

it

fifty

Make up

the dough as directed, at 7 in the morn-

8 hour?, and as only about one ing. Work and make into loaves at 12 or 1. After of American hotels own a brick oven this rising one-half hour set the iron pails containing the

in which to bake in

this:

it

usually ended the argument. And yet here and there would be some

loaves in the steam-chest, or in a boiler with water, house and steam in this way till 5 30. Then bake one-hnlf hour and serve hot for supper, the remainder enjoying quite a reputation and a run of custom be cause of its much beloved Boston brown, or it might answering for cold bread to toast. little

be only rye-and-injun, hot for breakfast or supper, or for Sunday mornings especially. No matter how, but as he grew wiser and older this pastry cook found the brick oven was by no means an artic'e indispensable, and Boston brown that was a thous-

and times pronounced all that could be wished, he made by the following described methods.

When

these loaves become hollow in the top it is much rising or proof in the pails.

because of too

Steaming does not arrest fermentation quick enough and they get too light and fall.

The forogoing is one way that requires good The next is shorter still and takes baking powder instead. It is hard to say which is the You can be happy with either. better.

yeast.

Boston Brown Bread. Raised with Yeast.

523.

1 quart of corn meal. 1 quart of

Made with Baking Powder.

graham.

1 quart

rye flour. 1 quart white flour. 1

Steamed Brown Bread.

2 pounds of corn meal. 1 quart of boiling water.

quart of boiling water.

1 cupful of dark mola?ses.

1 pint of yeast.

1 pint of cold milk or water. 1 teaspoonful of salt.

1 small cup of molasses. 2 teaspoonfuls of salt. cup of burnt sugar coloring.

6 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

1 pound of graham. The method here recommended is materially 1 pound of white flour. different from the common troublesome process; Scald the meal with the boiling water. Add the first, because troublesome processes cannot and will molasses and then rest of the ingredients the powder not be carried out in hotels doing good business being mixed in the flour. Beat up thoroughly. It and secondly, because this way produces as good makes soft dough. Put it in 2 or 3 iron pails having results as if one sat up all night about it. lids and steam 5 hours or more, then bake about Scald the meal by itself first, by pouring the boil- 20 minutes. ing water on and stirring in a pan. Then add moIf still hot, let it stand awhile Hotel providers who would have brown bread by lasses, salt, caramel. before adding anything else. "When only ncilk these easy methods always, need to provide a set of warm strain in the yeast, then mix in the graham pails that will stand baking, having bales and lids. and rye and the white flour last. The dough will be They should last for years and require to be made of like graham dough and can be worked on the table. the best Russia iron, as these properly cared for, Part of the white flour should be left over to dust greased while hot and wiped out, never discolor the

with.

After a

little

kneading, slightly grease

the

bread.

5 inches across, 8 inches deep.

was mixed in, place the dough in it, cover with a cloth and let rise moderately warm about 6 524. Bye and Indian. hours. Turn on the table, knead a little, make into 4 or 6 loaves, place in round moulds or pails, let rise No different method is needed but to change the about half an hour or an hour if to be baked instead ingredients of Boston Brown so as to leave out the of steamed. graham and the flour and double the proportions By this method no sponge is set, but the dough is of meal and rye in their place. mixed up stiff at once care being taken not to let the yeast get ecalded in the hot meal greatly lessenBakers' rye loaves are made by the same method ing the trouble. If commenced in the middle of the as French loaves, and will be found in that connecpan

it

day the loaves

will be

ready for the oven after the

tion at a subsequent page.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

How

The Best White Bread and to

Make

common

bakers' bread

12S a new

revelation

of

how

sweei the taste of bread can be, and wonder whence It is not what the bakers springs the diflFerence.

it.

525.

put in the bread but the proper method of working.

Archestratus, a friend of one of Pericles' sons; * this great writer, during his travels, did not make inquiring into the manners of nations, since they always remain the &ame, but going into the laboratories where the delicacies of the table are prepared, he only held intercourse with those who could advance his pleasures. Philosophical History

bread making as a

of Cookery. The ardent dietetic morality which extolled the

may be found

*

bread that was coarsest, brownest, stalest and most truly home-made, and caused fine white and fresh bread

if it were a sin against nature, among the "Isms of forty years ago" in one of the January magazines. Dr. Syl-

to

be swallowed as

is

classed

Graham

started the reform, great lengths at first, has resulted, in the long run, in a happy mean, a modific :tion, a d greater variety in the popular bill of fare.

vester

of Connecticut,

which, running

to

The people in great numbers, who find the white rolls and bread irresistible may reap satisfaction from finding so eminent an authority as the author of "Gastronomy" in their favor. His prescription, the groundwork of his cure for thinness, for "a young sylph, or other airy creature, who wishes to assume a more material form" is "first of all, make it a general rule to eat nothing but

newly-baked bread,

es-

pec ally the crumb, and plenty of it." And he had studud such matters all his life. But as there are dinners and dinners,

marks

so

Cardinal Richelieu re-

Just the other day a magazinist spoke of good lost art. A figure of speech,

perhaps, or else the opinion of a lover of good bread whose experiences have been bad ; but if there be

any grounds for such an idea

to rest

on the cause

in the unwillingness of instructors in cookery to property dwell upon eo Eeemingly simple and self-evident a matter as the proper way 01

kneading dough. And very recently another intimated how many persons accustomed to " biscuit streaked with saleratus and heavy with lard, regard white and light as newly-fallen snow as Something belonging to the households of princes, to the Ring of France's Kitchen, but not to be freely eaten rolls

folks." Now it is cheaper to have good bread than bad, and the bare formula for making it

by common

being so little and the understanding how so much, we are going to do our best to endeavor to draw atten tion to

what the knack of making bread both good and yeast and flour being good to begin

fine consists in

with.

It took one, otherwise excellent, pastry cook ten years to discover this knack for himself, but he was all the while the worst mystified man imaginable, because he had, when a boy, made rolls that people

major domo, meaning that some are very would eat in preference to anything else, while now so it should be said about bread. The rolls every other kind of bre id was preferred to his handbad, of Limet, of Rue de Richelieu, could not hurt any- somest rolls The fault with them was the same as with to his

the lady's fine, brittle and tasteless bread already

body.

526.

spoken

of.

On

one occasion the writer was called upon as a This man had been shown how to work in a probably competent judge to pass opinion on the routine way in a large bakery without ever being work of one of the reputed very best bread makers. impressed with any idea of the particular way being There is a dubious kind of excellence in this line as essential to good quality, and when, afterwards, in stand

a French kitchen where ornamentation was run to

alone but always wants somebody to keep saying it excels. Such was the case here. The bread was

the extreme at the expense often of good flavor, he exercised his ingenuity till he could make rolls in

in everything else that does not feel able to

extremely not enjoy

fine, yet, I it

venture to say the people did

except to look

essential quality

at,

and

was lacking.

It

felt

forty different fancy shapes, he found, after

some were

that

was white

as

in little

demand.

of the dough in

making

He worked it

all

the

into curliques.

all,

life

they out

Then

in

chalk and a good deal like it ; fine-grained as delicate cab e, but had no toughness nor elasiicity and

a busy time a very common fellow came along and was set to make the ro Is. He was too common even

crumbled when broken, like meal.

have a name except a familiar Tom, Die'*, or Harry and was quite unconcious that the rolls he made were the fmtthat had ever been eaten with a real zest and favored with a constantly increasing demand in that house. But after that the fancy breads were neglected and there was less cry for Even the "help" excellent judges of what toast. would steal the is good, although. discretely silent

It

had a sweet-

ish insipidity of taste, instead of the hearty relish-

ing wheat flavor of good bread. an immense amount of kneading

It

the

was made wrong

so

by

-way.

These people did not invite instruction nor

criti-

cism, only praise. I said the bread was superlatively fine, and the lady was one of the best breadmakers in the world.

to

That the bread was not good was a We all frequently make bread new man' s

mental reservation.

rolls out of the corners

of the pans as

but not good, and they that have such they passed a thing never known to be done befor their regular diet sometimes find in a loaf of fore, as long as a biscuit could be had. that

is fine


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

130

And all

the difference was in two different

ways

air distributed in bubbles all

through

5ST. As a

Common Bread

Then

to

roll

making

it

into

plain rolls, cleft rolls, or loaves.

Dough.

rule use one-fourth yeast

Fold orer

it.

The superiority of and repeat this process several times of working the same materials the common fellow's rolls and bread was all owing up. It will be LIKE AN AIR CUSHION. to bis kneading the dough the right way. Let it stand a few minutes before

Making Dough at Night.

three-fourths

water.

would be a great hardship and in most cases the night dough by the it, the shop bakers do so, and make, does But work it in the middle of the night. Quite as good the weather is cold or time of mixing late. be made by mixing up into stiff dough at the whitest bread is made when the dough can have bread can It

The good potato yeast with no germs of sourness

we have already no harm in still larger

such as

in

long time to

rise,

how to impracticable to make method, although proportions whea sponge directed

first,

not hurried up.

1 pint of yeast.

3 pints of warm water.

heaping tablespoonful of salt. 8 pounds of flour. Makes 8 loaves of convenient size.

1

538.

in

be

observed.

In summer the dough may night keeps it back. be mixed up with ice water instead of warm, at any

Strain the yeast and water into a pan and mix Beat the batter thus made half the flour.

thoroughly. Scrape down the sides of the pan. Pour a spoonful of melted lard on top and spread This is to prevent it with the back of the fingers. a crust forming on top. Cover with a cloth and set

warm

precautions

checks fermentation, but when all the flour is wetted atocce, there is no check except the coolness of

Setting Sponge.

the sponge in a moderately 5 hours.

provided proper

The danger is of too much fermentation, the dough When being ready to bake hours before the time. a sponge is set the fresh flour added to it hours after

place to rise 4

or

time after supper and fermentation will not begin some time after, while the flour is becoming

for

whiter

all

the time for being so long in

the dough

state.

How Much Kneading. Small quantities of dough can be easily injured by too

much kneading. The true plan is

to

keep kneading

India rubber-like toughness causes it to begin Then stop and let to break instead of spread out. till its

53O. Making up the Dough.

it

lose

its

springiness beforekneading again.

The sponge having been set at 8 in the morning, beat it again about one, add the salt and make up Knead the stiff dough with the rest of the flour.

531. Premium Family Bread.

spoonful of lard melted in it will do for this brushing over and insures the truest saving and smooth-

532.

To have bread superlatively white and fine graindough on the table, alternately drawing it up in ed and good besides, put the dough through the round shape and pressing the pulled-over edges described kneading process three or four preceding into the middle and then pressing it out to a flat times half an hour apart. The dough made up stiff sheet, folding over and pressing out again. over night should be kneaded at 4 in the morning Brush the clean scraped pan over with the least and again an hour after, in order to make good rolls touch of melted lard or butter which prevents This helps to make up for the loss of for breakfast. in place the dough sticking and waste of dough the thorough heatings of the sponge when the sponge and brush that over, too. Where economy reigns method is practiced. the strictest a little warm water in a cup, and tea-

est bread.

Let the dough rise

till

4.

53O. The Important Ten Minutes Kneading

Cooks and Bakers.

"Why, good heavens what a

!

we have

lost

our way.

But

delightful smell there is here of hot bread,

Andree." "That is by no means surprising," replied the other, "for we are close to the door of a baker's

At about 4 o'clock spread the dough on the table shop." Dumas. we read in Roman antiquities the Anciently, by pressing out with the knuckles till it is a thin Double it over on itself and press cook and baker were one. In the hotel work of the uneven sheet This present the same rule holds. This little book recogthe two edges together all around first. imprisons air in the knuckle holes in large masses. nizes a distinction bet ween the hotel baker or pastryThen pound and press the dough with the fists till cook and the shop baker. The latter seldom does the inclosed well when he tries hotel work. The hotel pastryit has become a thin sheet again, with


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. cook going into a bakery generally makes the goods This richer than shop rules and profits will allow.

book applying

to hotel

methods.

have

to

w^ys pursues a new path and

Place each loaf with tbe smooth side

down

in

a flowered napkin or piece of c eaa fljur s ck and set them to rise an hour that way, ia a deep pan or

at variance with baker's box just touching. The oven being ready, turn the were a baker's routine we should leaf right side up on to the peel, cut it lengthwise describe three bucket sponges or ten bucket down nearly to the bottom, and slip it to its place

necessarily a

is

1.

131

If

sponges; and

little

it

when

the baker makes

dough on the oven bottom. much 2. The tbove plan not being conveoient to pracmore warm water. tice, make the leaves as befor j and place them right This plan of adding more liquid to the sponge is side up in the usual hotel bakiog pans, brush over commendable for checking too rapid fermentation with water, rise, cutas before, and bake ia the pans. best way when loaf bread only is to be made, but There should be plenty of room between. Brush The bakers' ways with water again when done. not for rolls or fancy breads. he adds

are

to his three

referred to for illustrations

chiefly.

The

his

up

bucket sponge about as

essential points in bread

for

comparison

The bakers pursue a method so laboiious in makmaking are the same ing their flaky, stringy French loaves as would for-

whether in shops, hotel kitchens, or private houses.

When

baker's proper ways of wor ing, we in hotels add the small amount of enriching ingredients which they do not need and cannot afford in to the

ever deter weakly people from trying,

if ii

were the

But in this c*se kuowiedge ii li,erally power The dougii carefully kneaded OQ the table in the way that has been directed reaches the same their larger operations, we produce the extra fine condition as if it had been worked in a trough with rolls a d extra bread, having which people think water with an immense expenditure of strength. they can almost dispense with everything

only way.

else.

535. The lump of dough already prepared, smooth and like an air cushion, lies in layers or flakes, and it another part of the art of good bread making not It might be to disturb them much in making up.

is

Hotel Loaves.

The crusty for the table,

cleft loaves

nor for

not being suitable to s'ice we make of the same

toast,

dough slightly worked, a better sort. Cut the dough in eight pieces and moutd them up round, but not enough to destroy the texture only from 6 in the loaves should make but it is plain it does, and in this lies the desirable- to 12 turns. Let stand on the table a few minutes. Press them out like dinner plates. Briogover two ness of what are known as French loaves. opposite edges and press them into the middle and hard

to explain

533.

why

this stringy texture

preserved a difference in the taste,

place the long loaves side

Baker's Cleft Bolls.

To Prevent

Petits Pains.

by

side in the pans.

Splitting at the Ends.

curious to obrerve that tie

of

simple way Take a portion of the dough flat as it lies and folding the loaf just described prevents splitting without working it at all, spread it with hands and at the ends in baking, while one more folding Cut open rolling-pinto a sheet less than an inch thick. in of the other two sides has oftea the opposite effect this into 2 inch squares. Take two opposite corand causes much waste of bread that cannot be ners and press them into the middle, making long It is

sliced.

them smooth side up on baking pans with plenty of room It makes a thin crust to bread and the loaves to betwsen. Brush over with water. Let rise nearly an hour. Just before putting in the oven cut them part clean and even if they are brushed over with a cushion

shapes with pointed

ends.

Place

lengthwise with a down stroke so as to nearly divide the two halves. Bake in a hot oven about ten

536.

minutes.

534. Baker's French Loaves. The same as the preceding, of larger size. Cut the entire piece of dough in about 10 pieces. Flatten out without kneading Bring two opposite corners together and press them into the middle and press the loaf sides together in long, pointed shape. there are two

touch of melted lard

ways of proceeding.

when placed

in the pans.

Plain Bolls.

Mould the dough into little round balls and place them ju-t touching in the pan?, slightly greased between. Rise an hour; bat e 20 minutes; brush over with water when done. Keep hot without drying out or sweating the bottom on the iron pan.

We shall further on.

come

to the

more

delicate sorts

of rolls


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

132

where

Baker's Milk Bread.

537.

all sorts

of sweet

cakes are eaten with

a

hearty relish.

We who have to serve such kinds side by side Make up the sponge and dough for this the same with hot French rolls need such assurances as the as for common bread, but use sweet milk instead of above seeing our sweet breads and cakes come Its merit is its whiteness,

water.

sweetness of taste like French

fine

rolls.

grain,

and

There are three

essential points to be observed. 1. Beat the sponge and dough extremely well, only adding the flour gradua'ly and beating it in.

possible to knead it well, too eoft to keep good shape as loaves apart, and bake the loaves in tin moulds. 2.

Have the dough

as soft as

richer sorts yet to come.

it is

540.

Put it in to bake after the rolls come out. As must be of light color outside and browns too easily it can only have a slack oven to bake in. 3.

German Baker's

light bread dough. 8 ounces of sugar. 8 ounces of butter or lard.

Brush over the loaves with milk when done.

1 egg.

(Not essential.)

Take the dough

Bye Bread.

Coffee Cake.

4 pounds of

it

538.

The simpler kinds of sweet-

back again neglected.

ened breads and good ginger bread seem to be mo r e acceptable in the ordinary hotel where the "balance of victuals" is always nicely adjusted, than the

ents

all slightly

at

noon and mix in the ingrediKnead it on the table with

warm

Set to rise until 4 o'clock.

flour sufficient.

Knead

The proper method with rye bread is the same as it again by spreading it out on the table with the with French loaves, that is, the dough is to be work- knuckles, folding over and repeating. Roll it out to ed in layers and nothing added but salt to the yeast sheets scarcely thicker than a pencil, place on bafc. and water the dough made up rather stiff to keep ing pans, brush over with either water or melted good shape, and when the loaves are put in the lard, or milk. Rise about an hour. Score the cakes oven, instead of a long downward cut merely score with a knife point as you put them in the oven to Bake about 15 minthe rye loaves across diagonally three or four times. prevent the crust puffing up. But for hotel use, where there is no brick oven, utes. it does as well or better to make long loaves in pans One of the attractions of this plain cake is the as already directed for ordinary hotel bread. powdered cinnamon and sugar sifted on top after baking, the cake being first brushed with sugar and ;

Some Cheap and Good

Varieties of

water.

Cut in squares and serve hot

Sweet Breads.

539.

The foregoing makes a sheet There is old Lindsay of Pitscottie ready at my elbow, with his Athole hunting, and his "lofted and joist ed palace of green timber; with all kind of drink to be bad in burg and land, as ale, beer, wine, mus-

and aquavitae;

with

ma'vaise, hippocras, wheat-bread, main-bread, ginge-bread, beef, mutton, veal, venison, goose, gnce, capon, coney, crane, swan, partridge, plover, duck, drake, brissel-cock, pawnies, black-cock, muir-fowl and caper-cailzies; not forgetting the excelling stewards, cunning baxters, excellent cooks, and pottingars, with confecOld author quoted by tions and drugs for desserts."

cadel,

Seott

Waverly.

to

of cake large

enough

cover a stove top.

Pic-Nic Bread.

541.

Another form of the coffee cake, cheap and good and the like, and for sale.

for school pic-nics

Mix a few

raisins or currants in the

German

coffee

Roll out pieces to the size of dessert a little plates and half inch thick, brush over with

cake dough.

melted lard, double them over like large split rolls. Rise and bake like bread, and brush over with a

We had dinner where by the way, and even at mixture of water, egg, and sugar. breakfast as well as supper at the public houses on the road, the front rank is composed of various Currant Buns Chelsea Buns. kinds of "sweet cakes," in a continuous line from one end of the table to the other. I think I may 542. Washington Buns. safely say that there was a row of ten or a dozen To account for which , platea set before us two here. Hot for supper. No eggs required. Favorite they s*y that when the lumberers come out of the This makes 45. sort and quickly made. woods, they have a crvving for cakes and pies and 4 pounds of light bread dough. such sweet things, which there are almost unknown. And these hungry men think a good deal of getting 8 ounces of currants. their money's worth. No doubt the balance of vic8 ounces of softened butter. tuals is restored by the time they reach Bangor 8 ounces of sugar. Mattawamkeag takes off the keen edge. Thoreau It is soon enough to begin these 2 hours before The Maine Woods. So it appears from these extracts "ginge-bread" supper. Take the dough from the rolls at say 4 has been thought worthy in the grandest kind of a

to

be mentioned in pla e

feast,

o'clock.

Spread

and there are places knead them

in

it

out, strew the currants over

and

Roll out the dough to \ inch sheet.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

133

2 pounds of flour. Spread the butter evenly over it and the sugar on Cut in bands about as wide as y -ur Mel! the butter in the milk ma^le warm, and pour top of that Roil them up like roly-poly puddings. them into the molasses and sugar, mix, add hand. eggs, Brush these long rolls all over slightly with a little well. powder, flour. Beat

up

ginger,

melted lard so that the buns will not stick together Then cut off in pieces about aa inch in the pans. thick.

not

Place

flit

crowded.

in a

Rise

545

buttered pan, touching but 15 nearly an hour. Bake

No

eggs needed. 1 cup butter 7 oz.

minutes. Brush over with sugar and water. Dredge

2 cups light brown sugar 1 cup milk | pint.

sugar and cinnamon over.

543.

Common

Fairy Gingerbread.

a.

Busk, or Buns without Eggs.

4 cups flour

1

13 oz.

pound.

1 tei^poonful

4 pounds of light bread dough. 6 ources of butter or lard,

Warm

ground ginger. the butter and sugar slightly and rub them

cream. Add the milk, ginger and It ma^es a paste like very thick cream. flour. cinnamon extract. Spread a thin coating of butter on the baking pans, Take the dough at about noon and work in the let it get quite cold and set, then spread the paste Let stand an hour, then knead other ingredients. on it no thicker than a visiting card, barely coverAt 4 o'clock knead again, mould int> thoroughly ing the pan fr m eight. Ba e in a slack oven, and round balls, grease between each oue as you place when done cut the sheets immediately into the them in the pans. Rise an hour, bake 20 minutes. and size of common cards. are the ordi- shape close in the together to a

8 ounces of sugar.

1 tablespoon ful of

1

Placed

pans they together nary sweet rusks. Set some distance apart they are round flat buus; maybe sugared on top aad have currants or carraway seeds mixed in the dough. The richer French varieties will be f.und further on.

54. "Old Fashioned" Gingerbread. 1J pounds of molasses. 8 ounces of butter or lard. 3 eggs.

544. Yeast-Raised Gingerbread.

1

ounce of ground ginger.

1

teaspoonful of soda, large.

4 pounds cf good light bread dough. 1 pounds of d irk molasses.

2 pounds of

12 ounces of butter or lard.

Salt

1 tablespoonful of

Melt the butter and

Little

ground ginger.

cinnamon, or other spice.

Flour to work up to soft dough. egg or two does not hurt it.

An

coffee cake

directions.

over the top when done.

when

lard

is

used. stir it into the

then the eggs, ginger and soda. The mixture begins to foam up.

Make up by

the

flour,

and

lastly

the hot water, a

molasses and

Then little

stir in

at a

the

time

Dredge granulated sugar Bake in a shallow pan.

Good

for supper, hot.

gingerbread, however, the although not made with bread dough, is the best sort Gingerbread is yet discovered for hotel suppers.

Speaking

flour.

1 pint of hot water.

of

The three

varieties

preceding do well as small

The next, cakea, baked in patty pans or gem pins. besides doing for sheet gingerbread, can a^o be

mads into the plainest ginger cookies. Need brushand uncertain, or more propering over with milk to look well. Sugar or comfita ly speaking, sticky and uneatable, if not made wi h be dredged on top. care. Too nmuh molasses or too much ssda or may inclined to be tricky

powder are usually the faults. This can be made with buttermilk and sodi if desired.

545.

Sponge Gingerbread.

Sometimes called black cake and spice cake. 1

pound of molasses.

6 ounces of sugar. 8 ounce i of butter, melted. 1 pint of milk.

6 eggs. 1

ounce of ginger.

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powfor.

54T. Soft Gingerbread without Eggs. 1

pound of molasses.

6 ounces of sugar. 1 pint of milk.

8 ounces of butter. tablespoonful of ground ginger. 1 teaspoonful soda and same of baking powder. 4 pounds of flour. 1

Warm beat

the butter with the sugar and molasses and Mix in the soda and all

up about 5 minutes.

the rest of ingredients.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

134 It

makes dough that can be

rolled out

and baked

on pans.

where the aim and end of all endeavor is to pit and that they, at least, appear to t ; of American origin.

However, it is easy enough to make ginger cakes. But the baking of them "aye, there's the rub!" There are cooks who, while the range is hot, cooking supper, can bake gingerbread of a nice light color without burn, gall, or bitterness, but

English Tea Cakes.

548.

I

sud

"America

ed:

her

much once to an old and educated Italwho had been a great traveler, but he smilas

ian cook

own

is too

young

to

have any cookery of

find a foreign

you can

origin for every dish you have I remember seeing euch rolls as those on the tables at restaurants and caffa in Europe,

;

when a

boy, over

years

fifty

Yet at

ago"

was but a conjecture He could not be sure that what he saw were not the baker's c'eft rolls mentioned some pages back, and which have no last this

2 pounds of light bread dough. 12 ounces of sugar. 4 eggs.

great merit over ordinary baker's bread. One of the best Amer'can domestic c ok-books also men-

J pound of flour to work in. 5 pound of currants.

tables of the city

12 ounces of butter.

lions "theclefc rolls

Takes about 5 hours time. Mix all the ingredients Let rise with the dough in the middle of the day.

which we so often find on the

restaurants"

And we

re

still

main in ignorance, even if they prove the same, whether they may net have been presented by

dough well with a spoon it America to Europe at first. The name, French r 11, handle- and spread it thin on may be but an American application, as if it had buttered pie piates. Rise about an hour. Bake, been taken for granted that whatever is adtnirab e ia cookery must be French, It is the popular underand split open and butter them. till 4.

is

a

Then beat

little

the

too soft to

One teaspoonful

of carraway seeds will suit better than the currants in some countries. Where the

children have been raised on "Abernethy biscuits," to wit ; and know what carraway seeds are. In

hurts a hous?, and the cook's sensibilities to have people picking the seeds out,

contrary situations

thinking they are

549.

it

dirt.

Hotel "French

Bolls.'

standing of a split roll or pocket-book shape that can be pulled open hot, and admits a lump of butter within

book sand those domestic.

The earliest dated mention of French rolls I have met with in the merely cursory search which such a mijor matter justifies, is the following, recently rcpublished in the REPORTER from "Forney's Progress"

Inquiry into their Origin.

:

#

*

*

An

melting clasp, but never so far as I can been described in any but American

its

find out has

*

A

Garden.

The

siiuated

on the

tier

of

Ann

public resort known as Spring to the premises was

hotel attached

late site of the

street,

Museum, at In 1760 (New York)

advertisement of John Elkin, to the

public,

rolls,

mead and

the

its

proprietor, offering tea in the 'breakfast from 7 to 9 ;

afternoon from 3 to 6

French

the cor" 1 fiod

and

pies

cakes.'

;

the best of g-een tea tarts

drawn from

and hot 9

7 to

;

"

This shows that French rolls were "the thing" at a date even acterior to the culminating period of modern French cookery, before the revolution.

But the French

rolls of that

advertisement

;

of

the quotation from Savarin at the opening of this book, of the quotation from Bulwer at the head of

Dishes worthy of special attention had ttoir name and quality ceremoniously proclaimed. Philosophi- the next cal History of Cookery.

An uncommon dish was introduced to the sound of the flute, a>d the servants were crowned with In the time of supper the guests were enflowers. * * * tertained with mu-ic and dancing, but the more sober had only persons to read or re-

division

the

French

rolls of the trades-

people who buy them hot for breakfast of the bakers in all the European towns are only little round loaves

crowded into the pans

so that they rise to a

shape, and taken from the oven at intervals, kept smoking hot under green baize covers made tall

Roman Antiquities peat select passages from books The kinds of rolls shown in the cut, which are un-

a

derstood to be par excellence French

American improvement In "Quentin Durivard" (chap, iv) Sir Walter Scott gives the most expHcit information in this re-

Yrybody

rolls,

are of chief-

us in hotels, for the two reasons that likes them most potent consideration

est interest to

trifle

sp'it roll

richer than ordinary bakers' bread. The shown in the picture is in all likelihood an


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. At the breakfast

gard.

"There

wai a

delicate

ragout, with just i^i petit point de V ail which Gas cons love and Scottishmen do not hate. There w,)s

c'eft rolls

135

whose texture

in flakes

is

and

and

coils,

their merit being individual loaves.

It appears that the general hotel and traveler's the most exquisite white bread, made into little round loaves called boules, (whence the bakers took understanding of the term is by no means univertheir French name Boulangers) of which the crust sal. Let us n ake rolls French, accordiag to th? was so inviting that, even with water alone it would European unders'anding, and never so good, if they have been a delicacy. But the water was not be round, tall, oval, obljngor twisted, some person

alone

*'

will

send them back, and looking at the bill-of fare him some French rolls. And another

will say bring

The probability that split rolls are an American improvement is strengthened by the apparant absence of any mention of them in the best foreign cookbooks. Seeing how suitable the shape shown in the cut is for sandwiches one would have expected Jules Gouffe (about 1860) this circumstantial

direc;ion

to

adopt

for

it

instead of

"rolls with foie-

gras ;" he says, "laie 24 small French rolls of an oval shape, 2 inches by 1 %, rasp the rolls and s'it

them open lengthwise without separating them euThe Cuisine Classique directs much the tirely." same way, to cut off" the tops of roll and brioche, (sort of butter rolls) and remove the inside crumb, for sandwiches and timbales. So also the "Modern Cook," (1840) and, later, "Model Cookery," which only directs to make French rolls in long shapes placed side by side.

A

number

of leaser

works

either ignore French rolls a togethrr or treat the making up in round balls as a matter of course.

great lover of bread we!1,

will

say,

"these are

all

very

but you ought to see "

the French rolls they some other house. Nevertheless a letter

have at

from Russia published in the REPORTER two years ago remarked how much better the deHcate soft rolls there were "than the French, which are nearly crust.'

all

:

These Russian

"French."

rolls

were doubtless the same as our

Puzzled by

these

diverse

ideas

I

wrote to the Royal Baking Powder Co., who had exhibited the making of "Vienna Rolls" with powder at the Centennial, in Philadelphia,

and the pres

-

dent kindly answered with drawings showing for French rolls, the cleft crusty loaves of the bakers

making which bave already been givea and their Vienna rolls were in shape

directions for at length

our picture. There is a remark in one of the higher-class cook-books recently published, that hot breads for breakfast and suplike those, plain ones, in

the contrary, the writer of these lines worked with a man, A. Ne!s >n byname, making boih the

per are but little used except in the West. Accordingly our hotel French rolls are no:, described in it at all. And yet the Parker and Tremont Houses are

shapes shown, as far back a 1850, on one of the

in Ihe East,

On

<

Id

time, high-living floating palaces of New Orleans, and found them then as ever since the most popular

and Boston people every where are exhibheathen with pride. Are those

iting their rolls to the

Bos' on hotels to be regarded asderiving

much of their

The man's home was at Nashville, Tenn. fame from the introduction of this peculiar instituJudging from his age and experience aad his un- tioa where before it was unknown? As an example conciousness of there being any novelty in this sort of how a thing rray have various names in differLast year a Canadian hotel steward of rolls it seems fair to assume that he had been used ent localities to them for ten or fifteen years before. Some four who went West and conducted a first-class house, or five years after I saw the same in Cincinnati and well knew the merit and importance of fine rolls, of

all.

:

Evansvi

le,

under the name of Parker House

Tremont House

little acquainted with their rsual name that So he had them printed on his bill-of-fare "buns." without reaily appearing on the bill at all, the s lit

yet so

rolls

Since then in numerous American publications they may be found ca led by those and other names

ro Is experienced an increasing or four hundred to over eight

rolls for one.

demand from hundred

three

at a meal,

Mr. Charles Wood, for an ordinary lifetime baker and so it went till abo-it the time the third batch of Tremont House, Boston, drawn out in reply supper and break fast bills were to be printed, when the pastrycook ventured to intimate that "buns" to a newspaper paragraph crediting him with the mean, were very rarely called for, but the "no names'*-^ origination of French rolls in this country the French rolls which did not appear at all upon the ing the split rolls shown in the cut only dates back the making of his pattern about twenty-six years, bill were having a tremendous run all the same. Then and explains that Mr. Paran Stevens required Lim the name was printed right. It is not to be inferred that the hotel steward was ignorant, but only that to make rollslike some he had seen on a European tour in the section Mr. Wood does not ia his that the these rolls were not familiarly known let ter

at the

published

rolls

say

he produced were the s^me as the

European, but only that after several months trial he produce what satisfied Mr. I'aran Stevens who may still

whence he came.

1

have

had in mind the French

brioche, or

even the

Perhaps nine out of ten of the people outside the circulating intelligence of our hotels, if

a?kd

the


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

136

meaning of the term "pocket-book roll," would guess it to mean a roll of five and ten dollar bills sometimes called greenbacks, and sometimes Spinnerisms.

Jt is

no such thing, but a

It Those in our cut, the hotel French roll.

is

A

like

roll just

a local domestic

"And what

coach

is it?"

"It be the Swallow, sir." "0. very well. And now Mr. Brown, having swallowed in the roll, I will e'en roll in the Swallow

At any rate," thought Mr. Copperas Ha, ha, ha as he descended the stairs, "Aehas not heard that before." BulwerThe Disowned. 1

name

for

Western author, Miss Farit and the method

Perhaps we, behind the scenes in hotels, take of making, in the "Cooking Club of Tu-wh;t Hol- different views of what is important, from the malow," in the children's Wide Awake, and speaks as jority of people. With the matter in hand, fur instance. if the appellation were one well known and under Individuals, or a family, may never even

man, of Michigan,

so describes

although so strange to cur see a hot roll on their table, and ye never realize However, it must be owned, our how unfortunate they are. The "sour grapes'* phirolls are the more like a pocket-book, (with s.lk or losophy may help them, and they believe hot rolls It is really of no consatin covers) the better they are made; for there is more are not wholesome, anyway. But when a whole hotel sense in having a somewhat flat shape, not too thick sequence in isolated cases. stood

among home

folk,

hotel bill-of-fare.

for a bite, than the taller

nor

form that

is

slice

neither loaf full of people show a decided liking for rolls, so that they could not well enjoy a meat without, does not the increased size of the matter justify our

case?

and many other con- There are lean times, too, in hotels, when the meat Through siderations too tedious to mention, I have arrived is poor, game out of market and spring lamb not when poultry almost disappears and at the suppositions that French rolls, as understood come in by commercial travelers and other hotel frequenters, oysters are no more neither choice vegetables nor Then the regulars grow are of American origin; that they were evolved out new fruits have arrived. of the competition between Boston hotels that discontented and seek new pasture at the restauthey were first a specialty of the Parker House, rants where sliced baker's bread is set before them all the foregoing,

;

;

;

that thence they spread

rapidly to wherever there living, because the travelling people went bragging about them, and that they have found their way like pilgrims and strangers into the domestic

was good

world, contentedly taking any pet name that have been thrust upon them. All of which is

may re-

spectfully submitted.

at the opposition hotel

grimy

Then the regulars return homes like good boys, and say it cakes.

American

mean

a split

right to loom

French

551.

hotels, should roll

In such cases

else.

However that may prove to be, I would advise that cook claim a rolls of any other shape be denominated on the bill- trade? of fare simply hot rolls, and the term French roll, in

always be understood like these shown.

to is

their

pr per

very well

all

over there, but they doa't have good rolls and w th such rolls as these they can almost dispense with

everything

55O.

where, whatever else they

try to have, the rolls are unwholesome wads of dough, or dry and unpalateable biscuits and

may

may

up

tall

not the pastryand exalt his

Rolls.

to

For about 60

French

Rolls. Parker House, Tremont House, or Pocket-book Bolls.

split rolls.

3 large cups of wafer or milk. 1 large cup of yeast. 1 ounce of salt. (A heaping tablespoon.) 2 ounces of sugar. 2 ounces of lard or butter.

4 pounds of

fl

our

Set sponge at 8 in the morning with half the flour. At 12 or 1 add all the enriching ingredients and

work up

stiff.

All the detailed instructions for making the dough and kneading it the right way have been given

already under the head of common bread. After the 4 o'clock kneading proceed to

dough into

Persons in practice find

Sacred heaven

!

what masticators

!

what bread

!

Quentin Durward.

"Well," said Mr. Copperas who, occupied in finishing the buttered cake, had hitherto kept silence, "I must be off. Tom, I mean De Warens, have you stopt the coach?" "Yees, sir."

pieces of

make

the

rolls.

dough of right

it

size

quickest

to pull off

and mould them up

instantly. off strips of dough, roll them in and cut these up in roll sizes, 2. Mould them up round with no flour on the beard and only a dust on the hands, and place them 1.

Others cut

Lengths

.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY in regulf

rows on

the table

the

smoothest

side

COOK.

137

553. No-Name

down

3 cups of sweet milk.

the middle of each, as in the cut. 4. Brush these over with the least possible melted lard or butter, using a tin-bound varnish brush

6 ounces of butter, melted. 6 yolk s of eggs.

for the purpose. Double the rolls, the 5.

3 ounces of sugar. 1 ounce of salt.

will not touch

2.

Richest.

Take a little rolling pin it looks like a piece of new broom handle and roll a depression across 3.

two -buttered sides together as seen in the cut below, and place them in the pans diagonally, with plenty of room so they

No.

Rolls.

1

cup of yeast.

AH

A

the flour

it

will take

or about 5 pounds.

up

larger proportion of yeast may be used in winter

The dough ought not to want coaxing under a stove to rise. Our yeast made from good stock brings the dough

up

enough anywhere in a

fast

warm room, and bread

thus easily raised is alw ys Half yeast to half milk or the best and sweetest. 6. Brush over the tops of the rolls in the pans with the least possible melted lard again and set t'.-em less or more according to to rise about an hour

water

is

better thau too

little.

If these pocket-book shaped rolls are such general

why are they not universally adopted and Brush found everywhere? The directions a little way over with clear water when done. back numbered 1 to 7 explain the reason why. Keep baking at short intervals and keep hot withThese rolls are very tedious to make and take

temperature.

Bake

7.

favorites,

in a hot oven, about 10 minutes.

out drying out.

up one person's time from

all

other kinds of bread.

the pastrycook makes them in great perfection for the few people, but as s'oon as the house begins to fill up the work begins to

When business is dull

The particular feature

of these rolls,

it is

seen, is

the folded shape, allowing them to be opened when done, and this is the result of brushing over with butter.

Rolls placed close together in pans will part clean

and entirely separate wherever they have been greased between in the making.

so

The preceding receipt producing fine French rolls, good enough for anything, the next are no-names.

crowd and

the

tinued just

at

tedious

the

rolls

split

time

when they

are are

disconreally

The remedies are, to leave out the unimportant kinds and to give the time to these, and where it is impossible needed and would

do most

good.

rather than give these rolls the 5 or 6 handlings, abandon, cut them out instead. To do this, roll the

The addition of eggs and butter does not make a vast dough to a sheet as if for biscuit. Brush over wiih Cut out and double over. French difference, but still makes them creamy colored and melted lard. rolls

crisp.

And for

if a

body choose

some favorite

Possibly their vere,

to

name

either of the

Who

if

James o r decide or prove what

shall

553. No-Name

Rolls.

No.

554.

Butter Rolls.

St.

they are?

1.

Sometimes called tea cakes, and also Sally Lunn. 2 pounds of light bread dough. 1 ounce of sugar (a spoonful). 4 ounces of butter.

3 yolks of of eggs. 1 teacup of milk or cream.

3 large cups of milk. 1 large cup of yeast.

3 ounces of sugar. 3 yolks of eggs.

come out the made that way.

of egg will

need any other body kick?

hotel,

name may be Parker, Tremont, Re-

Brunswick, French, Clarendon,

\\indsorrolls.

made without yolk

two smoothest-looking when baked,

1 pound of flour to work in. Take the dough, already light, 4 hours before the 2 meal, and mix in all the ingredients. Let rise hours. Knead, then make the dough into round

,

4 ounces of butter, melted. 1 ounce of salt.

and roll them flat. Brush over with melted and place two of the flats together, one on the All the flour the fluids will take up, or 4J pounds Make up either sponge or stiff dough, as may be other. Press in the center. Rise an hour, and most convenient. The latter way is best at night. bake. When done, slip a thin shaving of fresh butAll the ingredients may be put in at once, but the ter inside each and brush the top over sl'ghtly, too. milk should not be made too warm in summer, when Should be made very small if to serve whole, or as balls

butter

the dough has to be

made 12 hours

before wanted.

large as saucers, to cut.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

133

Fancy Twist

555.

Bolls.

COOK.

doughnuts in the Congressional Record, that spoken by a Pacific coa

For variety's sake a fey simple shapes should be repeat here and it round and oblong kinds at that. But if we

practiced, besides the plain,

is

senator

was

too long to said all the senators laughed t

it is

place on the board doughnuts, perhaps the original kind

some royal wi h their

original German name krapfen krapfen with apricots or wifh cheese, or flavored with orange flower water, it looks as if it will be hard to find the fun that

dwells in native doughnuts, and, essentially, that is all these are, though they have appeared in regal bills-of-fare.

559. 1

TWIST ROLLS OR COFFEE CAKES.

Sandwich

55G.

2 pounds of French

roll

Bolls.

Fold over and

dough.

roll

out once

cutout and butter and fold over book

rolls,

same as

rolls.

miy be

spread and rolled into

same

to

1

more

;

flour.

These can only be made

then

make pocket-

pounds of

Little salt.

puff-balls they

the

soft,

ought to be, by a

light

strict

yellow

and thorough

method of working the ingredients together. Take the dough 6 hours before the meal and mix Set in a warm the dough with the in the butter, sugar, milk and salt.

or else in round biscuits.

When no

pound of light bread dough.

2 ounces of sugar. cup of milk. 10 yolks of eggs.

Roll out in thin sheets, separately, place one on the other, fold over in three, like pie paste, and roll

out thin.

Puffs.

6 ounces of butter.

pound of puff-paste.

1

German

Rise and bake

pie paste on hand,

butter

Add place awhile, then thoroughly beat together. at a time and flour by littles alternately,

effect.

two yolks

55T.

beating against the side of the pan. Then turn out the dough and knead it on the table. Set away to

Finest Hotel Bread.

about 3 hours

Knead the dough twice more, more thoroughly, till air Mould out edges when pinched

Sometimes called Vienna bread, and French bread.

rise

Make

as directed for rolls, but

the dough

and knead

by the

receipt for

French

split

several times according to the extended directions already given for common bread. rolls,

it

This makes bread so white and

fi<ie

that

it

vies

will

snap from the

in little balls. to

Brush these over with melted lard Rise half an hour

prevent hardening outside.

with the napkins on the best appointed tables, and or more on greased pans. Fry in sweet lard. May admiration from the most f istidious. It is a be sugared over or served with sauce, or as doughfeather in the hotel baker' s cap when very particu- nuts, cold. They soak grease if raised too much

elicits

and discriminating housekeepers outsend to beg a Joaf of this extra fine bread for their company days. That's the on y sort of pre-

lar, excellent

500. "Little Pittsburgh"

side,

miums

hotel fellows are ever allowed to

member,

this

win.

bread should be kneaded 3 or 4

Re-

differ-

ed

little

history attach,

4 pounds of light bread dough. 8 ounces of sugar and syrup mixed. 2 eggs.

ent times, at intervals apart.

558. Doughnuts

These are doughnuts with a but let us make them first.

Doughnuts.

for the Million.

2 or 3 ounces of lard, melted.

A

regular Cape Cod man with whom we par'eyed, * he looked as if he sometimes saw adoughtoo grave to r, but never descended to comfort laugh, too tough to cry, as indifferent as a clam. * * * He stood in front of us telling stories and * ejecting tobacco juice into the fire right and left. * * At breakfast we Lad eels, buttermilk ca.e, 1 ate cold bread, green beans, doughnuts and tea of the apple sauce and the doughnuts, which 1 thought had sustained the least detriment from the old man's shots. Thoreau Cape Cod.

* n

Powdered sugar to dredge over. Lard to fry. Take the dough from the breakfast

*

Why

does everybody laugh

are d ugh-

say at 9

fl

In

uur sufficient, and set to rise about 4 hours.

Then

knead, and roll it out to a sheet. Brush over the who'e sheet of dough with very little melted lard. Cutout with a two-pound tomato can, and cut out

Even Thoreau, who laughs but the middle of each with a little empty two ounce There is a pleasant little piece about ground cinnamon can. This makes ring?, which

nuts in the case? seldom.

when there

rolls,

Summer the dough worked up at mid-day will do. Mix in the ingreWork up stiff with dients, let stand half an hour.

in the morning, in Winter.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. must be set to rise on greased pans about ^ then dropped ia hot lard. Sift sugar over done. They cook in about 5 minutes.

hour,

stead of two-pound,

when Not

satisfied with

t

139 making them bat,

the eggs and half the tugar

There was no margin

When

Leadville

first

began

grinding in

other

crowds of

Little Pittsburgh

to

and sold

pay

doughnuts

much

so

competitors

larger.

left

a* five

out

cents.

fur advertising ia that.

weakened and c^me

men poor, and grinding them out rich, the down and the advertising c ased. None may know men as they went in were often hard put to it what subtle connection there may be in the cases, poor milting

and they never laughed at a but both the Leadville newspapers soon after died, it with respect. As saloons, and the Little Pittsburgh mine itself experienced a I think it would have paid boarding houses, clothing stores, stables, theatres, temporary collapse. and even saw-mills and wood hastened to c ill both the papers and the mining company to have

for something to eat,

doughnut, but treated

yards themselves the "Little Pittsburgh," for the very

fa- gone on advertising the doughnuts at bed-rock of the camp, priors, or even free, for when they left them out the bakers did likewise, and the makers of the pre- they left out the spice of the paper, and as the doughnuts had boosted Little Pittsburgh i' would only ceding excellent doughnr.ts finding them a sort of

mous mine which was

at

the

first

life

bonanza as yet undeveloped, hastened to call them have heen fair for Little Pittsburgh Purs 'ing this vein they is useless moralizing. Little Pittsburghs, too.

boost- but

to

it

The next are the cheap, light-colored and large went oa and advertised extensively. You could get a Little Pittsburgh doughnut for ten cen's at anj doughnuts that knocked the bottom out of the rich, hour of the day or night, and a glass of dried-apple brown Little Pittsburghs. cider for the same price but in a commutation ;

arrangement you could get a d ughnut and a glass So Little of the cider together for fifteen cents. Pittsburgh doughnuts became a part, and indeed, a

561.

They were in two-line leading feature of the camp. local notices scattered all through the papers, so that nobody could miss them. It seemed, in fact,

4 pounds of bread dough 6 or 8 ounces of sugar

as

if

alHhe news was gathered

"Two hundred and

fifty

thousand

Made without

4 ounces of butter or lard

dollars

pur

has

ed the dough very thoroughly do not let the doughnuts rise much, lest they eoak up grease.

been offered and refused for the Chrysolite mine." And as a sequel

"Our esteemed 600

Or, perhaps

fellow citizen

feet deep, last evening.

fell

He

Little

:

down a

Bread Doughnuts.

5G2.

:

"There's nothing in camp can equal those Pittsburgh doughnuts."

Eggs.

Make same way as the preceding. Take care to One day have the sugar all well dissolved, and having knead-

for the express

posf of drawing attention to doughnuts. it would be:

Cheapest Doughnuts.

Only plain dough, or French roll dough. Cut out re very and fry. These

biscuit shapes, let rise, shafi

struck on his head

and probably never knew what hurt him."

of; en found at railroad lunch stands ; nearly cheap as bread and butter, and very saleable.

as

'

Pittsburgh doughnuts are so very fine, if you try them once you'll buy them every time, at the Union Bakery."

a suspicion of tautology in h the direction sometimes given to fry in hot lard however, that is the shortest way of saying the lard should be already

So, although the doughnuts were always the same, there was always something fresh and pleasant to

hot.

"0

!

those

Little

Sometimes it would be only give them a new zest a hanging, or a midaight garroting, but the chorus of doughnuts kept right on at the end of every performance, great or small. As a cousequence these

doughnuts had a great run. It is hard to fathom motives. Perhaps some people ate them fur spi'e, trying to abolish them and their "damnable itera-

There

is

;

503.

Some

Krullers.

Goldsmith. at tea ate short and crisp. Old English, crull, curled; Cruller, Kruller. crule to curl. German, krulle, something curled. Webster. curled or crisped cake boiled in fat

The cakes

A

The bakers for doughnuts, but women should make the crullers every time. Too heavy a hand with the sugar and, worse

still,

with the baking

was useless, there were powder will make them a burning disgrace, a greasy plenty more where these came from. They were 8 ain upon hotel cookery. Besides, only women in a tentative on the best hotel tables, placed way know how or have patience to curl crisp crullers wad they took or at least the people took and parinto wonderful knots, twirls, twists and ringlets, took. Evidently thee Little Pittsburghs were pop ular with all. The primitive form of cruller ia plain beaten But the halcyon days of ten-cent doughnuts were biscuit dough, rolled extremely thin and cut into short and few, for soon competition cams and began ribbons, then fried. A handful of sugar added to cutting them out wi h three-pound tomato cans in- the dough makes a better kind, and many are ihf

tion," but of course that

:

:


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

140

who would

people in the domestic world

not give

exchange for any more cake-like varieties. For hotel supper tables, to change with dou^h-

them

in

nuts, the following are the best.

5O4.

edges and making them meet in the middle, and then bring over the other two edges likewise, making a square piece of folded dough. Roll this out a little flatter, brush over with 4.

melted butter or lard, and fold over like other

Beet and Quickest.

Crullers.

COOK.

2 pounds of flour. 3 or 4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

shapes.

Large half pint of milk. 4 ounces of butter.

but the

This

is

the slowest and most tedious of

rolls are

all

shapes,

almost as flaky as pie paste.

BRIOCHE AND RUSKS,

56T.

6 ounces of sugar. 4 eggs. Salt. Nutmeg flavor.

split

They are square ended instead of half moon

rolls.

For Breakfast, Lunch and Tea.

Mix

the powder in the flour. Dissolve the sugar in the milk, add the eggs, and the butter melted,

Perhaps you want to know what sort of a breakfast one get s at Young's. I wish this was an essay Pour this fluid mixture into the on housekeeping, so that every point could be enmiddle of the flour and mix up like biscuit. Cut out larged upon. But the same wonder comes up at and fry right away. A quick way to shape them every notable restaurant, why people can't hive just as good eating at home every day and why they is to cut in rings with a double cutter, having a small never by any possibility do so. Why the diningcutter in the middle, and another way is to cut the room cannot be as coo', as orderly and spotless, the thin rolled sheet in bands with a paste jagger, and melon as crisp, the saiai as fresh and piquant, the divide that into pieces like three fingers attached at cutlet as brown without, as melting and juicy withor the bread and butter as perfect as that at one end or like a fork head. Sugar over when in, Young's, will always be remarkable to any one condone. demned to domestic interiors. Boston Letter in N. salt

and

flavor.

These crullers take twice as

much

Y. World.

time to fry as

doughnuts.

Dust unto dust; what must be must. you can't get crumbs, you had best eat crust. Old Song.

If

565. Richest Crullers, or Pried Cakes.

She would talk of the last tragedy with the emby stage or express, phatic tone of aconnois eur, in the same b.-eath that or to pack up for a fishing party or a mountain she world ask, with Maria Antoinette, why the poor people were so clamorous for bread when they might Don't put any baking powder in them. climbing. Bulwerbuy such nice brioche for two-pence apiece 12 ounces of powdered sugar. Pelham,

Good

to keep, to

6 eggs.

send

to folks

Flavoring.

The above

Half cup of milk.

allusion to brioche appears in nearly

the same words also in one of Dumas'

6 ounces of butter.

"Louise de la Valliere''

2 pounds of flour.

I

prefaces think, but the solecism

circulates with the point upon other articles of diet by creaming the butter and as well; as in one place the surprise is that poor the milk then in and beating eggs sugar together, peasants should prefer potatoes to meat, and only and flour. Roll out, cut in shapes and fry. last month, in a magazine, it wa3 a "French prin" In addition to the foregoing, it may be useful to cess," and "chicken broth

Mix up

remember,

like cake,

all

and brioches can be to be more

the rusks, buns

dougnuts when there happens dough than is needed to bake. fried as

5GG. Albany

Bolls.

Vienna

Rolls.

Delavan and

well in layers as already directed for other

gence and a proper degree of pride in the resulting

Make good it

why people condemned to domestic interiors should have to suffer from the comparison with those in hotels and restaurants, for after the details of the simple art of making it, set forth in these columns, there is only needed dili

Rolls.

knead

So far as living on the best of bread goes, there need be no reason

roll

dough with the

finest flour

varieties.

product.

The milk bread dough

is

understood to be the

The English are corrupting our language dreadarticle, but the hotels where milk can be had bread-making must be very few, and no person fully. They call our crackers biscuits; our biscuits not otherwise informed can tell the difference be- they call Scotch scones; our muffins, if they have twixt that and our French roll dough. them, seem not to be called muffins, for tint name 1. Mould out little balls as for split rolls. is given to a poorer sort that is baked on a kind of

proper for

2.

Boll these out in shape of plates,

thin. 3.

Fold

these

and very

our rusk buns, griddle, and in like manner they call while fresh and hot, and only accept tl.em as msks

by bringing over two opposite when

sliced

and dried brown in the oven.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

COOK.

141

Brioches and French rusks, the half dozen varie- slices of brioche in orange syrup and fries them inhot breads which seem to be popularly associ- closed in batter as fritters; and at a costly and elea'ed with those names in the United Slates, ars un- gaut dinner given in New York, on last Christmas, surpas-ed for the afternoon teas which are becoming "brioche crusts, with fruit" appeared among the ties of

fashionable, fasts of

and

for lunch,

and

for

French break- pastries

But the following sweet varieties might be employed for that.

bread and coffee

We a-

so

find "brioche, with cheese,'' and with fruit, forming parts of a course in some "royal" din-

One

in bread

point

making

that,

like

hand,

moulding, can only be learned through practice is the right pitch of lightness to be allowed. Some

ner menus,

At the great meat, fowl, fish and potato suppers and breakfasts of American hotels, these kinds seem stress has been laid on the lightness, sponginess and to find no proper place. They are well worih prac- large size of rolls and lo wes, because of the averticing, however, for more domestic occasions, and sion we all have to heavy bread, which is ruinous h*ve always been considered the highest test of to health. The inexperiesc-d are cautioned against There is a point skill in bread-making. running to the other extreme when the rolls have reached a certain height they A 5O8. Brioche, or Butter Busks. begin to settle out of shape and to crack open. little 1

pound of good,

lively, roll

Little salt.

pounds of flour. They require 5 hours time

570. French Sweet Busks. Richest.

1

to

make, raise and

bake.

sugar and cream, with the dough, together in a pan, and then mix thoroughly. Beat in the yolks, two at a time, and most of the flour,

the time to bake.

are.

10 yolks of eggs.

the

is

Butter rusks of our pattern should open and curl backwards in baking, therefore should not be brushed over with butter when panned as rolls

6 ounces of butter.

2 ounces of sugar. Half cup of milk or cream.

Warm

before this

dough.

butter,

gradually bringing the mixture to a smooth,

The receipt for making these is inquired for at p'aces where they are made in perfection, perhaps oftener than any other. They are cakes rather very showy, and never fail to attract Fhculd only be attempted with the strong-

than bread notice.

;

yellow dough.

Then knead

est yeast or lightest

that set

to rise.

slow to

it

away

it thoroughly, and afier In about three hours knead

the dough the second time, and an hour after knead once more, then make out as direct ed for French

dough, as they are otherwise

The art to be acquired through pracmake them elastic and pleasant eating, not

rise.

tice is to

clammy like half-baked bread. make the 1 pound of light dough.

and notch the edges with a knife, to shape shown in the cut of rolls. They rise and bake in the same time as rolls

6 ounces of butter.

Brush over with butter when done.

4 ounces of sugar. 6 yolks and 1 whole egg. Ha'f cup of milk.

569. The Many Uses of Brioche.

Flavoring as indicated below.

being eminently French, and every French cook mining brioche by a different receipt usu-

If for afternoon tea,

breakfast rolls, and six hours before the rusks are

more butter than the foregoing as might be expected, this unsweetened kind of cake figures

cream.

One says it is a considerably in French cookery. Anspongy kind of cake resembling Bath buns. other says it should be rich, yellow and like a

Next add the softened, then mix them thoroughly. eg s and flour by littles, alternately, beating the mixture up against the side of the pan, to make it

rolls.

1

It

ally with

sponge, whence it tikes its name. sins, currants and shred citron in

and makes

One mixes it

rai-

for lu ch ai.d

pounds of flour.

wanted place Let

smooth and flour

on the

it

all

in a

get

take the

pan with the

dough from the bulter, sugar

warmed through and

and

the butter

Spread the last handful of knead the dough as for roils,

elastic.

table,

and pressing and spreading it out with the knuckles, Another bakes the and folding it over repeatedly. Set it in a warm Then knead it the secdough in fjrm of round rolls, cuts off the top, takes placefjr2or 3 hours. out the crumb and fiJa with chicken or other meat, ond time. Every time the dough is doubled on it-

tea bread,

twists, also

in large

it

in various fancy shapes

cakes.

bakes in little moulds like oval gem pans, re- self the two edges should be pressed together first. moves the inside and places in the shell or timbale When the dough of this and of the brioche receipt is thus made a cooked bird with its gravy and dishes a good and finished it looks silky, and air will snap After this MOStill another steeps from the edg^ when it is p'nched. pyramid of these on a napkin. or,


THE AMEBICAN PASTEY COOK.

142

ond kneading the dough should stand an hour am then be kneaded once more and made into shapes The smaller notched bhape in the engraving of roll

Do not brush over perhaps the best for these. the tops with butter lest they run out of shape. Fd-i

Brioche dough is used in the same manner as the above, and also with carraway seeds mixed in. A teaspoonful does.

is

in the pans

1

minutes

Brush over when done with sugar, egg mixed and flavor with vanilla, and

and

water,

Bake

hour?.

dredge granulated sugar over. A little flavoring may be added ia the dough either vanilla extract, vanilla and rose mixed, or ange or nutmeg but for a nice variation grate in the ;

rind of one or two lemons

574.

Marlborough Rusks.

in a slow oven fif ee:

and squeeze in some

o

Make the one pound common sponge mixture it has already been twice given in the book of pud. dings and add thereto one oui;ce of carraway seeds Rake

in long,

slice,

a d brown the slices in

When

narrow moulds.

the oven.

a day old These

crisped slices can be kept a long lime, and serve much the same purpose as sweet crackers.

thejuice.

575. If to be

made overnight without

light

dough

for

start, all the ingredients can be mixed at once bj taking a pint of yeast and half pint of milk or nearly aU yeast adding ail the other articles atd

flour to

make

5 71.

soft

Russian Wine Rusks.

i

dough.

French Sweet Husks.

This and the next succeeding kind want the same making that sponge cake d es. 3 hey belong

skill in

..

properly to the department of cakes, and may be used as such as well as in the form of dry rusks.

14 ounces of granulated sugar. 12 eggs. 8 ounces of almonds.

Best Every-day Sort. 2 pounds of light dough. 4 ounces of sugar.

1 teaspoonful of almond extract. Crush the almonds with the rolling-pin on the table without removing the s' ins, and then mix them

4 ounces of butter. 4 yolks of eggs.

have the coarsest bran

Large half cup of milk. Flour to make it soft dough.

Beat the sugar and eggs together in a cool p'ace about half an hour. When perfectly

with the half pound of graham flour

1 pint of "liquor"

being half yeast, half water or

mlk. 1 teasf oonful of salt.

or other extract.

Flour to

mate

soft

once.

it

before

light acd thick stir in the flavoring and the and almonds. Bake in long, carrow moulds. and brown the slices ia the oven.

576.

flour Slice,

Anisette Rusks.

10 eggs. 4 ounces of almonds. 6 ounces of flour.

A

dough.

Mix up everything at

which should

away from

8 ounces of granulated sugar.

4 ounces of sugar. 4 ounces of butter, melted. 2 eggs or 4 yolks, better.

Nutmeg

sifted

weighing.

English, or Hot Cross Buns.

to

8 ounc?s of unbolted flour.

Manage according

extended directions f r rusks.

quarter ounce of anise seed.

Mince the almonds as tineas possible, and without Mix them and the anise seed aHng off the skins.

Make into round with tho flour dry. Brush over with syrup when done. quite light, as for

balls flattened.

But then rusks

the flour, etc.

Then beat the sugar and eggs sponge cake, and lightly stir in Bake in long and narrow moulds,

be dry rusks or "tops and and when a day old slice, and brown the slices on bottoms," according to some understandings of the )oth sides in the oven. term, and hotel pastry cooks are often called on to

make them

will still

at pleasuring places,for

wine parties, and

for ou'-door occasions.

573.

Brussels Busks.

Take, for preference, the dough made by the recaipt for rusks designated as the best every day

Muffins,

Waffles, Gaufres, Flapjacks-

At last, to be sure, Mr. Warri^gton burst into a oud laugh. It was when the poor chaplain, after a sufficient discussion of muffins, eggs, tea, the news, he theatres, and s> forth, pulled out a schedule of lis debts Thackeray's Virginisaw.

There were piping hot wheaten cake? no Indian and when finished make it ii long loaves and read, for the upper part of Maine, it will be rein tin moulds of bric'i When a day shape. membered, is a wheat country him and eggs, and old slice these and brown the slices in the oven. had and salmon, tea sweetened with molasses, and ort,

bake


THE AME&ICAN PASTRY COOK. aweet cakes in contradistinction to the hot cikes not sweetened, the one -white, the other yellow, to wind Such we found was the prevailing fare, up w th, ordinary and extraordinar7, along this river. reau-The Maine Woods. Beautiful evening

We

all poets have Tad a love to feel the stillness,

* * two hours back, was clamor. We love to nil our thoughts with speculations on man eyen though the man be the muffin man. Bulwer-Paul Clifford.

where

all,

5TT.

English

Baked around

Common Muffins.

on a huge griddle and carried Simply a customers, from the Bhops. bread sponge of the cheapest, the muffins in rings

lo

common

being puled apart and toasted, almost invariably, before they are eaten.

2 pounds of flour. 1 quart of

mixed water and

union instead.

These Roberls', striking into a new

path right through the fences of old custom, were both young men. But of the hotels, the "Peacock"

was the one patronized by the American travellers. The "Red (Hawthorne's England and Italy.) Lion" was frequented, principally, by "Cripps, the Gamer," and the "White Hart" by the farmers, and the "White Horse" by market people. Boston steeple, that most remarkable landmark, towers, an nd architectural glory, into the woild of rooks It can crows, three hundred feet above these all. be seen thirty miles out at sea, and from Lincoln But of course Minster, thirty miles the other way. t

evtry Bostonian knows of the presence of this great tower, although he may never raise his eyes to look at it so commoD, nor care to remember old John Cot

yeast.

1 tablcspoonful of salt.

Mix

They used to issue a compendium with their almanac, and tried to p'eaae the Middlemarch people and "layover" John Noble, the other bo>k eller, by leiving out the horse-doctoring matter and s gns of Zodiac, and putting in fine pictures from the art ;

For thee

!

*

*

song

Tho

143

the above together carefully, to have no lumps The water should be warm and the

But the Boston muffin man wi'h py flits, not to be found ia the una At about 3 sponge set to rise in a warm place. bridged, was an object of more immediate interest. beat the sponge thoroughly, and the longer the bet- The people "off the Skelligs," and John Halifax, Beat ter, with spoon or paddle, and let rise again. but as for us we should know iu

it,

at noon.

ton, the preacher.

his mysterious

Geut,

whatpyfli'S are, mild guess that they must have crumpets under an ancient name.

using. Set tin ring-? the size of can only saucers on the griddle, half fill them wi h the batter, been

up again before

bake light b-own on the bottom, then turn them over and bake the other side. Tbe batter should be

let

thicker than

for

pancakes and thinner

than

jump

to the

5T8. Cheapest Yeast- Raised Batter Cakes

Without Eggs

frit-

ters.

English Crumpets. The preceding being the cheapest made for private parties

a

little

make

sale,

richer qualities with milk and

shortening.

pounds of flour. 1 quart of warm water. 1

1 cupful of yeast.

The Boston muffin man had a name for some kind of a hot breakfast and tea cake which the great word-catcher dictionaries have failed to rake in. The word was pyflit; his painted sign read "Muffins,

1 basting-spoonful of melted lard.

"

"

1

of syrup

small teaspoouful of salt Mix all the ingredients together like netting sponge for bread with very cold water if made over night 1

." Py flits, Oatcakes, Goffers, Made Here by His place was a red brick, private house on Li- for breakfast, or else 6 hours warm. Beat thoroughly both quorpond street of course everybody knows Li-

before the meal with at time of

mixing and

before baking. quorpond street, Boston it leads into High street just Such cakes as these, baked rather dry and not too on the north and the Witham river runs at the back thin, are made and sold in shops which have no of the old brick stores on the further side of that,

and the river

itself is as lively as

a street when the other business but these and muffins

its channel to the sea is only maintained by means of bundles of wicker stuff, The muffin man used like the Mississippi jetties.

tide is up, although

punctual to the moment, morning and and them evening, and cry "muffins and pyflits" only, so his literary customers must have known to start out

In that they had the advanIn saying literary custotage of these columns. mers we only give honor where honor ia due, for

what "pyflits" meant.

Boston has always been famous for literature and The Roberts Brothers were located in good hotels. " Narrow Bargate, opposite the "Red Lion Inn

in all the

cities.

The "crumpets" are commonly

toasted

in

their

native lands.

5 TO.

Wheat Batter Cakes.

!

'Flannel" Cakes.

2 pounds, or quarts, of flour. 2 quarts of warm water. 1

cup of jeast.

basting-spoonful of syrup. 4 ounces of melted lard. 1

4 eggs.

Mix

Salt.

the flour into

a sponge with the yeast and


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

144

water, either over night or 6 hours before supper. An hour before the'meal add the enriching ingredients and beat well,

580.

1

of bread crumbs.

pound

12 ounces of

Baking Powder Batter Cakes.

Mix

White Bread Cakes-

583.

up, just before the cakes are wanted as in the

Just b afore

preceding receipt, but without yeast.

flour.

3 pints of water or milk.

1

4 eggs. Salt. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Remove all the dark crust from the bread, and then soak it in a quart of the water severa hours,

bake add two or three large teaspoonfuls of baking powder, take the large wire egg a Mash smooth and whisk and beat the batter thoroughly a vast im- with plate to press it under. add the flour, the pint of milk or wa'er, eggs and

you begin

to

1

provement.

It

powder.

always improves batter cakes

Hotel cooks probably have different estimates of the eggs light, before mixing them in. the public likes and dislikes from other and domes ing nor pyrup needed for the above.

Their opportunities are different. The The restraints are redifferent.

tic peoples'.

conditions

are

moved from

No

10 beat

shorten-

Graham Bread Cakes.

584.

people who eat, and they indulge their tastes without the hindrances of economic the

Make like the preceding, with part graham flour, The cooks know no individuals, and the crumbs of graham bread but as the tide comes and goes they learn what the Corn cakes will be found, with other preparations tide of humanity likes to consume the most of For instance, one favorite article which is not found half of corn meal, near the end of this book. considerations.

often

1

graham cakes.

Graham

581. 1

is

enough

pound of graham flour, not pound of white flour.

1 quart of

warm

Speaking of the way the English mis-call things, is a very pretty London cook book maHng the remark that something in the batler cake line is there

Batter Cakes. sifted.

baked "on a

"girdle"

les" are in

common

in Scotland,

where

"gird-

but as

they are dttle known in England the cake must be baked on the The idea of calling a griddle a girdle 1 stove plate.

water.

1 cupful of yeast.

use,

common

New Jersey, but is And if no griddles in

2 eggs. Salt. '2 ounces of syrup.

The griddle

2 ounces of melted lard.

England what do they do for buckwheat cakes ? Dreadful supposition perhaps they have none Time for somebody to start American kitchens over

little

Set the batter as a sponge like other yeast-raised cakes, either over night or 6 hours before supper,

and add the enriching ingredients an hour before

known

is

ple take

streaks,

sometimes your peo-

and the prevailing fashion

is

So that

there.

is

the reason

why

Scotland

is

apos-

58S.

lowing quantity 1 quart of cooked

cup of raw

rice

makes the

is

home without a

"girdle ?"

Her

Buckwheat Cakes.

2 pounds of buckwheat flour. 2 quarts of water.

pints of m'lk.

1

pound, or quart, of

1

basting-spoonful of syrup.

flour.

1

cupful of yeast. teaspoonful of salt.

1 large

4 to 6 eggs.

1

"

What

',

585.

rice.

1

"

and John o'Groates,"

fol

:

teaspoonful of

!

people are emigrating.

Bice Batter Cakes. coffee

cakes

barley bannocks; and England is not honored how can she be, with no ''girdih any such title

les

One heaping

o'

And

fo

rice cakes.

1

use in

State.

!

"Land for a change,

And, anything

2

York

trophized as

baking.

1

in

in

"

basting-spoonful of syrup. " " of melted lard.

Make a sponge or warm water, yeast and

salt.

bat'er,

overnight, with the

In the morning add Mash the dry-cooked rice in a pan with a little of the enriching ingrtdiects, beat up well and bake the milk, which should be warm, till there are no thin cakes oa a griddle lumps left, then add flour and milk alternately peeping

it

baking powder.

firm enough to

work smooth.

Add

the other

flour.

The great m-gority of people prefer buckwheat cakes with about a fifth part corn meal mixed with

Buttermilk and soda ingredients and beat well. can be used if desired, instead of powder and sweet

the buckwheat.

milk.

above will please them

And

twice as better.

much shortening as No eggs need ever


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. be used with buckwheat.

adding the

145

rest of the articles,

and in an hour

it

will

be ready to bake. first mixing with yeast some of the batbe saved and used instead of yeast for seve-

After the ter

may

ral succeeding days.

A teaspoon ful

59O.

Waffles with Self-Raising Flour.

of carbonate of

Or with baking powder, or buttermilk and soda

may then be needed to bs mixed in the batter n the morning, but cakes made that way, for some reason, are more palatable than with sweet yeast soda

care being taken to proportion the soda to the degree of slight sourness.

586. The neatest way to grease the cake griddle a piece of

is

2 pounds of flour. 2 quarts of milk (nearly. ) 1

4 whole eggs. 12 yolks. 8 ounces of butter, melted. 1 basting-spoonful of syrup.

with

1

ham

rind cut off large for the purpose, and the batter should be poured from a pitcher, or a can

Mix up just

having a coffee pot spout.

Where the smoke and smell

is

an objection the

cakes can be baked just as well without grease, not only on soapstone griddles but on iron ones as well,

teaspoonful of

lowed.

hotel cooks are not expected to be reformers.

fle

Very

rich

and

This

receipt 1

gaufres are our waffles, but made so rich that they are used as a pastry dish for dinner with jellies and marmalades. They are also used in all their rich-

flour be used.

like battercakes

501. Flemish Waffles, or Gaufres.

tion of the cleaner plan, because cakes half fried are eaten with a better relish than the others and

and they are wafers, or thin cakes, whence waffles, which are, or used to be, cailed also soft wafers. But thin cakes were of more than one sort. Almond gaufres and some others are a kind of candy cakes, thin and Flemish crisp.

common

beaten.

they be rubbed with a cloth after every baking, to We do not insist on the adop keep them polished.

58*.

if

befire the meal,

gradually, with the milk in the middle of the flour to avoid lumps The eggs should be thoroughly

if

Goffers are gaufres,

ealt.

Powder, 2 teaspoonfuls

is

delicate

when

directions

are fol-

only half the quantity of hotel waf-

:

pound of

flour.

2 cups of milk. 1

1

cup of yeast. cup of thick cream.

8 ounces of butter, me' ted. 12 eggs. Salt. 1 ounce or spoonful of sugar. Set a sponge over night, or else 6 hours before the In the mornmeal, with the flour, milk and yeast.

where expense is no object, but ing separate (he egg j , beat the yolks light and add can hardly come under the head of breakfast bread to the sponge, together with the sugar, butter and Then whip in ordinary. The next receipt is the happy mean salt. Beat up well, let rise an hour. ness for breakfast,

which just

the cup of cream and stir in, and lastly the whites of eggs beaten to a froth.

suits.

588.

Hotel Waffles.

5O2. French Sweet Waffles, or Gaufres.

3 pounds of flour. 3 pints of milk or water.

Made without

1 pint of yeast.

1

6 ounces of sugar or syrup. 8 ounces of melted lard or butter.

6 ounces of sugar. 14 eggs. Salt.

1 tablespoonful of salt.

1

10 or 12 eggs.

1 pint of

make up a sponge water and yeast. At 4

If for supper

with

flour,

at

noon, plain,

o'clock

enriching ingredients, beat up well.and till 6, then bake in waffle irons.

add the

let rise

again

580. "Waffles for Early Breakfast.

1

yeast.

pound of flour.

pint of milk.

cream. ounce of butter, melted.

cup of brandy. Mix flour, sugar and salt dry, Separate the eggs. in a pan. Beat yolks and milk together, pour them in the middle and stir to a bat'er, smooth and without lumps.

Then add the brandy and melted but-

When

about to bake whip the pint of cream to The waffle batter of the foregoing can be set over a froth and mix it in, and then beat the whites up Bake soon, whi'e the mixnight with cold water, but it saves making a sepa- firm acd add likewise. ter.

morning

to take

When the baHer must ture is creamy and light. stand and wait during a long meal a little baking

warm.

Let stand a few minutes, then beat smooth,

powder should be beaten in after the lightness of This the cream and egg-whites has evapor ted.

rate sponge

when

there J9 roll dough ready in the 2 pounds of the dough and work in the butter melted and a little of the milk made


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

140 makes

fine

COOK.

And surely necessary to announce clam pancakes. they are a Yankee invention and of local fame only at that, for nowhere in print, not even on clam can-

pancakes as well.

593.

As a rule, for those who would excel, it is well to remember that white of eggs makes waffles and pan- labels can such a dish apparently be found. This cakes tough and leathery unless added in the form is the route by which clam pancakes have reached of froth, which cirriea fine air bubblas into the bat- these columns: A number of pleasure-seeking peoter. Whea not so beaten the cakes will be better ple occupying the broad piazza and the hundred ruswith the whites left out altogether and powder used tic chairs at a hotel in the shadow of Pikes Peak, instead, along with the yolks which alone give the between dancing and promenading and the pause in Just such fine distinctions as these well the music got to talking about the sea-side and per richness. observed make the difference betwixt fine cooks and consequence about clams. There was one among those who loaf, out of employment, on street cor- them who had travelled on the staff of the Grand ners. Duke Alexis, and speaking of various persons' likes and preferences it came at last to "0, clams plain are

594.

Baking Waffles.

very well, clam fritters, clam stew, clam patties, but leaving out chowder there is nothing made of clams equal to our Yankee clam pancakes". all

Waffles, it must be owned, are the terror of hotel cooks in ordinary positions, chiefly because people

will persist in taking waffles just before they

"Why cant we have them "Why of course we can."

begin

here?"

the me<d, waffles for the meal, and more waffles just It is true Pikes Peak is a long way from Glamdom The cook had to be after the meal, making nine hundred orders of but canned clams do very well.

hundred persons. But as waffles instructed, and after that still ventured to ask '-Butter and syrup, are a means of distanc- "What do you eat with them?*' ing competition hotel stewards and proprietors often just like any the other batter cakes," waffles for three

make a house popular and

it good policy to look upon waffles without prejudice, and provide for their extensive manufac ture by furnishing the proper waffle range, thus

find

saving a hand and no

end

of confusion,

2 cans of clams (2

waste,

1

smoke, inconvenience, profanity and disappointment. Of course this applies to large business. A stove

and the common

waffle irons

may do

pound of

Ib. size).

flour.

clam liquor Salt. pint of milk. 10 yolks of eggs. 1 pint of the

1

very well

the guage of these receipts.

for fifty persons

Clam Pancakes.

590.

4 ounces of butter, melted. A spoonful of syrup.

Sweet waffles burn so easily that they cannot be baked fast. When waffles do not brown fast enough add sugar or syrup. The only remedy for waffles sticking to the irons is to keep the irons in constant use with scraping and rubbing out with lard while

1 heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. Cut or chop the clams a little larger than beans.

Mix

the batter as for other batter

clams at

last,

and bake on a

cakes,

add the

griddle.

and avoid letting them burn with nothing in There is a biographical dictionary across the To bake waffles, pour in one side a spoonful street, but no use looking in that for Sally Lunn. of melted lard, shut up and turn over the iron two Who was she? A muffin peddler? Some common or three times and then place a spoonful of batter body, else she would not have been called Sally. in each compartment. Shut and turn over to the Perhaps a female "good fellow," who invitrd folks

hot,

them.

fire

frequently

till

595. 1

both sides are brown.

take a cup o' tea. Maybe a vi lage Hampden or a Howard, or a female Cromwell guiltless cf aoyto

Bice "Waffles.

body's blood, yet a great backbiter. But "no further seek her merits to disclose;" she might turn out to have been like a certain Aunt Melissy of

quart of dry cooked rice.

1 J pints of milk.

1

pound of

Pennsylvania, recently sketched in a magazine, whe kept boarders, was famous for her savory pot-pies and doughnuts, but who sold whiskey and swore

flour.

4 Of gs. Salt. 10 yolks.

terrifically.

1 basting-spoonful of butter. 1

"

"

597. Sally Lunn Tea Cakes.

of syrup.

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Mash the rice with the milk, mix

up

like

rice

is

only

batter cakes.

But

to divert

attention

from waffles

it

2 pounds of roll dough. 4 ounces of butter, melted. 3 ounces of sugar.

2 whole eggs and 2 ycilka


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. Half cupful of milk.

Take the dough from the breakfast bread

8 ounces of flour.

Take (he dough from the rolls at 2 o'clock, and work in the enriching ingredients the milk warm, and sugar and butter melted in it and eggs beaten then add the flour and beat thoroughly. light It makes dough too soft to handle, and like fritters.

Beatagain. Divide in four pie pans. Rise half an hour. Bake about 15 minutes. They brown Rise 3 hours.

very

not so good when allowed to become should be brushed over with good butter

easily; are

too light

;

a

warm

and pan

Then beat in the eggs and keep beating against the side of the the batter is very elastic and smooth. Rise

place a few minutes.

flour till

awhile.

The tin muffin rings should be two inches across and one inch deep. Set them on a buttered baking pan, half fill with the batter which should be thin enough to settle smooth, and thick enough not to run let rise half an hour, bake about ten minutes

but carefully,

in a hot oven.

the breakfast.

Cut in pieces like

pie,

Should be baked

at intervals as the

and not sweated

in the pans.

meal goes on,

as something of

last ia this division, are

a

specialty

presented in breakfast breads

Bake small

lots at intervals

during

599. Muffins from the Beginning. When no

The next, and

at 5 in

the morning If French roll dough no sugir need be added. Work the butter ar.d milk in, and set in

with up and down strokes of a sharp kni'e, as it spoils the cakes to crush them witu a heavy cut.

when done.

147

other kind

made and

is

there

is

no

dough ready. 1 pounds of flour.

1 pint of "liquor" milk and yeast mixed. They have been very frequently complimented, Make a soft dough of the above over night and (always remembering that nothing can quite supplant fine French split rolls) and once I heard thi-: add the ingredients of the preceding receipt except

"We have penetrated we can

discover what

behind the scenes

pan icular

trick

it

to is

see if

Beat up well in the morning.

the flour,

that

makes these muffins so delicate, so fine and elastic Sugar in small quantities makes bread crust and like a sponge. We have boarded in the G Too much makes bread paper-like, thin and soft. House at Louisville, the B House at Cincinnati, puddingy. Yolk of eggs counteracts sugar, and the B House at Indianapolis," (these remarks dries the bread out, also makes the crust crisp and were made several years ago) "but never met with brittle. White of egg makes thick, tough crust any to equal these." Shortenlike leather that has been wet and dried.

"We

use here the finest

flour,

perhaps that's the

reason."

"No,

it isn't.

So they do there, and have the best

ing makes little difference besides lessening the stringiness of well-made bread. Sweet rusks and cakes are slow to rise and slow to bake. Such bread

of pastrycooks, too."

as muffins

"Perhaps you come to breakfast here at season, able hours when the muffins are fresh baked and

too

hot." in the muffins themselves

and the way

"No, you make them." Perhaps they had been used to regard hotel muffins as dry, little, unpalateable things that would grease the fingers to touch. The receipt for the sort it is

and Sally Lunn usually

rises too fast

and

much.

6OO. About Baking Powder, and How Not to Use It. Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there more cakes and ale ? Twelfth Night.

shall be no

After all that has been shown of the manner of which they esteemed so much better is here given, making the best of bread without baking powder, it but that is not all As was remarked about milk bread, must be to avoid the injuplain to see that the way butter rusks, sweet rusVs and waffles the thorough ries arising from baking powder adulteration is to beating properly performed with a cutting-under use good yeast instead. The use of powder does not motion, so as to inclose air in the batter, sential to insure fine quality.

598.

Hotel

Wheat

Muffins.

2J pounds of light bread dough. 4 ounces of but'er, melted. cupful of milk or cream.

is

quite es-

need to be eccouraged,

like

it,

many

other non-es-

place, but it is the tends to inferiority in cooking;

sential articles, is

good in

lazy cook's resort;

it

its

causes an expenditure of money for that which is not nutriment but which at its ver7 best is but empty air and at its worst carries after the air a residue of it

poison.

degree.

And yet baking powder But

is

good

to a certain

how few can make baking powder

5 yolks and 1 whole egg. 2 teaspoonfuls of sugar.

bread anything but a sorry substitute for bread ? In the mining and lumbering regions and such haif-

4 ounces of

civilized places

Little salt.

flour.

mix up a

where men

sort of biscuit,

in haste

any way

and

carelessness

for the easiest, bak-


THE AMEBICAN PASTRY COOK.

148 ing powder

who

is

ble to

used in such vast quantities as people is done might find impossi

where cooking That believe.

live

ijery profitable is

shown

its

in

manufacture must

many ways; by

be

substitutes f r soda

employing cheap but injurious and acid, and here is a hint of

aaother kind of deterioration.

the im-

mense number of different brands, the number of new and expensive ways of putting it up in packages, and of employing agents, traveling equipment s and printing and advertising, equaling the sewicg machine business of patent times, or patent medicine business of all times, and this without any monopoly Besides the immense factories of the for any one. large cities most of the small cities and outfitting points of the west have firms engaged in the manuKansas City has one, Denver has two, and facture. of these one alone advertises that it ships from three to four tons of powder per month to the mountain At the same time car loads are arriving of towns. perhaps forty different brands from the

ers accuse others of

east.

A man came was

around a new western town offering

a receipt for making baking powder which effect a great saving to all consumers. The

to sell to

price asked for the precious bit of information

When my

one dollar. told

him

that

knowing

was

turn came to be canvassed of quite a

I

number

of baking cents worth

I had just fifty of curiostiy left to know what he had to impart. for that sum I obtained the following

powder mixtures already

So

:

EUREKA BAKING POWDEK. Bi-carbonate of soda, 16 ounces; tartaric acid, 12 cream of tartar, 2 ounces; fine flour 3

ounces;

pounds. There

is two pounds of real baking powder and enough added to make five pounds weight. 1845 to 1850. Flaming posters appeared in all the Starch has more the appearance of real baking towns calling it German yeast, or baking powder, powder than flour. Does not this go far to explain claiming that a yield of about twenty pounds more the variations in strength and the inducements to Cost price of bread from a barrel of flour could be had by its use push the sale of cheap powders? than by yeast raising, on the ground that ordinary flour, 4 cents; starch, 10 cents; selling price of pow-

Baking powder was first extensively advertised for sale and generally introduced about the years

flour

yeast changes a portion of the flour into air in fermentation, and claiming for powder the effect of

OO1.

eggs,

and another saving.

were appended

to

Chemists

say that the powder

certificates

der the difference.

It

being our sole business to teach how to make to inquire into the nature of the ob-

when evapo- good bread and

left only an extremely small remainder, and that was but chloride of sodium, or

throw

we have no remedies

rated in the bread

stacles that

common

against these adulterations other than the first mentioned, viz: to use little or none at all, and employ

salt,

and no disadvantage.

Supposing the last to be true, it is on the presumption that either cream of tartar or tortaric acid are used in making the powder, and that they are so perfectly proportioned as to exactly counteract each

us,

to offer

In the palmy days of French good yeast instead. cookery, when culinary excellence was carried, under the auspices of fashion, to an extreme never sur. passed since, baking powder was unknown, and the more objectionable carbonate of ammonia

bakers'

was unthought

The

other and banish each other in the form of air, frum the bread. Otherwise a residue of one or other

light either

must remain, and other acids and alkalis may be used having the same or stronger effects but leaving still more harmful remiinders. Both before and

cles of cold butter as in

of.

finest

cakes were

made

with brewer's yeast, like those at the end of this book; with air beaten in mechanically, like our

common sponge

cakes; or with the fine parti-

the same agent commercial baking powders that imparts such extreme lightness to puff-paste. But cream Waffles and pan cakes at the same time were made pastry cooks used to make their own. of tartar was found most unreliable because of lack of extreme delicacy by means of white of eggs whip-

pound cake

after the introduction of

of uniformity in its adulteration. Some samples ped to a froth, being really a mass of air bubbles, would contain so much starch or worse matters that fine as snow, incorporated in the mixture, there to four teaspoonfuls were required to counteract one expand in the heat of baking and raise the whole. teaspoonful of soda. With tartaric acid ready powdered the same difficulty was experienced. Tartaric Baking powder is the cook's labor-saving friend, acid in crystals, powdered in a mortar at home as but if the friend be treacherous ar.d unreliable shall wanted, was the only reliable recourse to avoid hav- we not accept his good offices with caution ? All we ing biscuit spoiled either one way or the other. The can gain from him is gas to expand into big holes in proportions are one teaspoonful of powdered tartaric the bread in the oven, and a teaspoonful of soda to acid to two of carbonate of soda the reverse of a pint of Eour buttermilk yields the same. In "old cream of tartar proportioned. The Scientific Ameri- fashioned" gingerbread a teaspoonful of soda added

can has published a number of different formulas fur

making baking powders.

Many

of the manufactur-

to the

raw molasses makes a gassy foam just the all the half dozen ways

same, and, independent of


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. already shown of introducing air for lightness into food compounds, there is the purely mechanical of atmospheric

utilization

air

of the

method.

induced even Johnson himself to extol the luxury of a Scotch breakfast above that of all other countries. A mess of oatmeal porridge, flanked by a silver jug, following which held an equal mixture of cream and buttermilk, was placed for the Baron's share of this re-

Waverly

past.

6O2,

Virginia Beaten Biscuit.

Chap. XII.

could write a better book of cookery than has ever yet been written it should be a book on pbilo. Dr. Johnson. sophical principles. 1

;

Old-Fashioned "Way. There has

to

be a maul, or Indian club over 2

The biscuit will not be right unless you have the maul made of hard maple, square-shaped at the heavy end, but waving, so as to make uneven hollows in the dough and a hole in the handle for a string to feet long,

and a stout

table,

6O3.

Baking Powder

Biscuit.

for the beating.

2 pounds or quarts of flour. 4 ounces of melted lard or butter.

4 teasroonfuls of powder.

"

1 1

hang it up by. 3 pounds of flour.

of

salt.

pints of tepid water or milk.

Mix

the

powder in the

flour dry. Place the melt-

ed lard in a hollow in the middle, the salt and water or milk with that, and stir around, drawing the flour

teaspoon ful of salt. 4 ounces of butter or lard. 1 large

8 cups of milk or water. Have the milk tepid, mix the melted butter

in gradually so as to

make a smoo'h,

and Turn out on the floured

soft

d -ugh.

Press the dough over again and ag in

table.

wiih it, and wet up the flour nearly all into out flat with the hands, fold it duugh. Knead it to smoothness on the table, and press out till it is compact, even, and smooth. and then beat it out to a sheet with the maul, fold Let stand 5 minutes. Roll out and cut into biscuits. gait

s, ft

it

over on itself and beat out again. There is no established limit to

dough may be beaten

out,

Bake immediately. the times

but after a few times

the it

This injures it, begins to breik instead of spread. and an interval should be allowed for the dough to lose its toughness.

into the

The

dough makes

it

air in the

very

light,

Of all the

atrocious frauds in the

way

of bread

perhaps the worst is the baking-powder biscuit of unskillful cooks, sometimes found iu boarding hous-

hollows beaten es and low-priced restaurants. The compulsory and white and spoiling of biscuit through, excessive economy of in-

flaky

gredients

may

be pardonable in the cooks, but the them with too much richness

atrocity of spoiling

Modern innovators on the preceding practice add and wrong way of working, never. Such biscuit a teaspoonful of soda sifted into the fl,;ur and mix are yellow, dirty on the bottom, greasy to the touch; up with buttermilk, beating besides in the regular they have rough sides, no edges, for they rise tall and narrowing towards the top they are wrinkled manner. ;

and freckled and ugly they will not part into while There are few things more generally ac.-eptable and eatable flakes or slices, but tumble in brittle in some localities than beaten biscuit rolled out very crumbs from the fingers, and eat like smoked sawthin and fried. dust. Strange, that the same materials should make things so different as these and good biscuit. ;

So that

if

baking powder were banished from the

culinary world for the sins of its makers there would still be cakes and ale as of old. If we may

Biscuit

dough should be made up

soft.

The

short-

ening should be melted and added to the fluid milkof warm, to insure thorough incorpora'ion.

one brand The private house way of kneading the dough up powder that is pure and honest, but is not that reducing our means of safety to a very slender plank? into dumpling shape, perpetually breaking the For if by any accident a little of some other powder too layers and making the partc-d edges take up should get mixed wi'h that one there would be a much flour, is the wrong way that ruins biscuit. believe the advertisements there is

terrible state of affairs!

Baking Powder Bread. He found her presiding over the tea and coffee, the table loaded with warm bread, both of flour, oatmeal, and barley-meal, in the shape of loaves, cakes, biscuits, and other varieties, together with eggs, reindeer ham, mutton and beef ditto, smoked salmon, marmalade, and all other delicacies which

The right way

is

given in the receipt.

Baking Powder Bread.

OO4.

Because we in hotels are accustomed to make is allowed it should not be

every article as rich as

by no means essential to and the preceding receipt frr is just right for loaves of baking powder

forgotten that shortening is

make good biscuit

biscuit,


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

160 bread

if

the shortening be left out.

Sift the

605.

cles

Imitation French Bolls, with Baking

soda in the

Vienna

rolls.

Powder.

"Vienna

Mix

flour.

all

Make up

with the buttermilk.

G'aze or sugar over

the other artilike biscuit or

when baked.

The yellow specks in the crust for which the soda blamed are oftener due to the particles of curd of sour milk, which brown quickly in the oven. If

Bolls."

is

2 pounds or quarts of flour. 4 heaping teaspooafula of powder. " 2 of sugar. " " of salt. 1

you use "clabber," pass

it

through a seive

first.

'

4 tablespoonfuls of butter or

Corn Bread, Corn Muffins, Batter Cakes, Etc., Eto.

lard, melted.

2 yolks of eggs. 1 large pint of milk.

See directions for biscuit and

8ame way.

After

it

make

this

dough

has stood a few minutes to lose

springiness make into split rolls. Cutting out is the qu'ckest, and best for baking powder dough. See directions for French rolls. Brush over with its

melted lard in the pans. rise, if

convenient.

Let stand 20 minutes to

Bake

as usual.

When a seidlitz, or any effervescent powder is dropped into a glass of water the gas produced rushes to the top and immediately escapes, but if a portion of a raw egg be mixed in the water first, or

The perfect receipts for all needful preparations of corn meal appeared in these columns some time ago, and can be found in their place among these "breads" by means of the index.

GO8. Some Yeast-Raised Cakes. There was a table covered with cakes made in a *

* * variety of emblematical shapes representations of crosses, fonts, books, and one huge cake in the centre in the form of a bishop's mitre. Dumas, Three pounds of sugar;

five pounds of rice; rice ? mine do with rice? But my arabic, father hath made her (he mistress of the feast and I must have saffron to color the gas on top in the form of froth, as in soda syrups. she lays it onl The same effect in some degree is observable when warden pies, (pear pies), mace, dates; nutmegs seva race or two of ginger, (but that I may beg); aa egg is mixed in baking-powder bread. A film is en, four pounds of prunes, and as many raisins of the formed that holds the air, the dough may be allow- sun. Shakspeare's Winter's Tale. ed a few minutes to become lighter, and the rolls * * In bluff Kicg Henry VHP s days the seasoning of dishes was strong and pungent; are more spongy than if made without.

some dissolved gum

it

What

will this sister of

catches and holds the

taffron being a predominating ingredient in them.

Repetition, if odious to the thorough reader, is unavoidable in a cook book, where people seeking

Mary Jewry.

but one article will overlook

and meat cooked

GOG. ow

all else.

it

into

the dough.

do

do

biscuit but only put in a Mix the rest with a

observe and respect the dis-

tinction between solid instruction

and mere opinion

tion of middling

fourth part be broken up by the introduction of some of the sorts handful of which great cooks of old used to set before the king.

and sprinkle

it over the dough every time that Knead long and well. pressed out to a sheet. Let stand awhile. Cut out thin. They rise.

flour

to

1879.

The dreary repeti. trycooks and bakers than it is. pound cake and poor sponge cake, with a sorry variation or two, might with advantage

of salt.

1 large pint of milk.

Mix up like

While endeavoring

Persian Garden Party,

that the practice of yeasUraised cakes ought to be far more general among American pas-

2 basting-spoonfuls of melted lard.

of the powder.

A

we must say

2 pounds or quarts of flour. 4 heaping teaspoon fuls of powder. 1

rice, boiled to perfection, fowls, in every manner possible, all dishes highly colored with saffron, and very much fla-

vored with mint-

Flake Bolls or Biscuit.

Another way of using powder by working Worth practicing. Very white.

Large dishes of

That was before cooks began

to

begrudge a

little

it is

work

GOT.

ford to be so extravagant as we are, when there is to be a festival, the first thing the managers do is,

Buttermilk Sweet Bolls.

Cheap and off-hand. and village inns. 2 pounds of flour.

Often

made

at stage stations

2 teaspoonfuls of carbonate of soda. 4 ounces of butter.

,

in behalf of excellence.

In the European countries where they cannot

af-

go to the baker, either buy enough light dough, and some nota^e housekeeper makes it into cheap but

good cake for the multitude, or else the baker himself gets the contract. In this way plum cake itself

4 ounces of sugar. Salt. 2 eggs and 2 yolks more.

becomes a cheap treat, while still richer and far more delicate varieties are made for the wealthy by the same general method with difference of de-

1 large pint of buttermilk.

gree.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. conceded that some practice is necessary to these cakes perfectly, for the exact time when they are ready for the oven can only be known by observation. But as far as can be, the directions here It is

make

following will be found effectual, and

make

the prac-

tice easy.

009.

Scotch Seed Cake.

6 ounces of sugar.

8 ounces of butter or poultry fat. 8 ounces of dried cherries, or raisins.

Half cup of strong saffron

hours time

five

to

make,

raise,

tea.

pound of flour. Mix up like Scotch seed cake, manage and bake same as bread. One or two eggs improves the cake. 1

Election Cake.

619. Takes

151

and bake,

Make

using dough to begin with, 2 pounds of light-bread dough.

the Scotch seed cake but with 1

pound of

seeded or seedless raisins and half cupful of brandy and flavorings, and omit the carraway seeds.

12 ounces of sugar. 12 ounces of butter.

Baba.

Polish Cake.

613.

4 eggs. 1 teaspoonful of

Requires 5 hours time

carraway seeds.

8 ounces of flour.

1

Weigh out the dough at 7 in the morning. Set it At with the butter and sugar in a warm place. about 9 work all together and beat in the eggs one Give it another at a time, and add the carraway.

1

pound of good, light pounds of butter.

1

pound of flour.

makes a

4 ounces of citron.

Put

it

an hour.

not dough. in two buttered cake moulds. It

should not be too

would bread, in a slack oven,

less

Rise about

bake as you than an hour.

light,

010. Cheapest Cake Without Eggs.

dough.

6 ounces of sugar.

8 ounces of raisins.

batter

make, raise and bake.

14 eggs.

half hour to stand and become smooth, then add the flour and give the whole ten minutes beating. It stiff*

to

roll

6 ounces of currants.

Half cup of brandy.

Lemon and nutmeg extracts. These cakes made with dough

are

all

started alike.

Warm

the dough, butter and sugar together, mix and then set away half an hour, when the ingredients can be mixed better; then beat iu the eggs two Beat and handfuls of flour alternately.

2 pounds of light-bread dough. 8 ounces of sugar.

at a time

8 ounces of butter.

well; rise 2 hours.

1 teaspoonful of

brandy and

carraway seeds.

fruit.

Beat again, add the flavorings, Line the cake moulds with but-

Let the batter rise in the moulds 1 pound of flour. tered paper. The difference between this and the preceding about 2 hours, then bake, about an hour. kind is that this makes a soft dough, to be handled Savarin Cake. 614. and kneaded like bread, then baked in moulds. Brush over with a little melted lard when setting to The preceding without the fruit. Used hot as a rise. cake pudding with liqueur sauce. With dough from These raised cakes are like fresh bread, cannot the breakfast rolls at 7 o'clock it can be made ready be sliced till a day or two old, without waste. for midday dinner,

Once upon a time, so they say, an economical man A French authority says Kauglauff or Kugeloff, is out his cow with a pair of green glass specta a general name in German for all cakes made with cles, and thus induced her to eat shavings, which Perhaps the common term "coffee cake" is yeast. fitted

looked like hay. but the attempt of English speaking tongues at In the warm, moist gardens of the south of EngThe cheapest and commonest coffee ''Kauglauff." land the camomile flowers make pretty borders, and cake has been described as a warm bread several An infusion of saffron saffron grows like a weed. We now give two varieties that are columns back. gives the color of eggs to cake, and the people who the same name. really rich cakes by are glad there to sell their new-laid eggs are very

615.

well content with the substitute.

Perhaps saffron also gives something of the of eggs. Italian vermicelli is colored with it.

611.

1 1

Cornish Saffron Cake.

The miner's dinner-pail cake in the region Lake Superior and the Rocky Mountains, as well Penzance and Lands End. 2 pounds of light dough.

German

Kauglauff.

taste

1

pound pound pound

of light dough. of flour. of butter.

01

6 ounces of sugar.

as

1

pound of currants.

8 whole eggs and 8 yolks. Half cup of milk or cream.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

152

Hotel pastry cooVs

Extract of lemon.

wko think

yeast-raisei elites

too teuious, should nevertheless remember that, in Ground cinnamon. Mix up like Polish cake, the cream and currants some p^ces no others are believed io, or a" lowed to be made, and these are simple enough after a few las', and rise in the moulds. When d >ne pass a brush dipped in sugar and milk trials to learn the routine. over the cakes and dredge them with the groutid To clean seedless raisins, rub the fine stems off cinnamon mixed with sugar. Use to slice cold. them with the hands and some flour mixed in, then

618. for

pound of almonds. Mix up and beat and raise according to preceding Blanch and split the almonds and mix directions. use the remainder to half of them in the cake; stick all over the moulds with butter before the 1

put

Yarmouth

late,

flour.

Half pint of cream. Half cup of brandy.

is

in.

These mixtures

all

the

siftings all go

Toast and Toasters.

Excuse me, Tom, but

8 ounces of sugar.

dough dough

till

through and leave the raisins clean.

1 pound of light dough. 22 ounces of butter.

15 eggs. 20 ounces of

around in a colander

stir

616. Vienna Cake or Kauglauff.

make

if

I

have a weakness

anchovy

bloaters,

it is

milk, choco-

toast,

marmalade, IK! rolls, and reindeer tongue * *.-- Lever s Tom Burke.

*

I have remarked before that not one person in a thousand knows how to make good toast. The simplest dishes seem to be the ones oftenest spoiled. slice of bread is If, as is generally done, a thick hurriedly exposed to a hot fire, and the exterior of * * the bread is toasted nearly black, etc. Henderson.

the

There, you see, boys and girls, you had better make that toast right and not jam it down on the hot mond*, fruit, etc., not to sink. Not Skrei citron or candied orange peel, pistachio range top with gnashing of teeth so savagely. Sometimes one in a thousand of you but knows how to make nuts and the like are added at option. the cakes are served hot, separated into layers with toast beautifully,but you have an invincible aversion like fritter batter, just thick

enough

for al-

a sharp knife, and jelly spread between.

617.

Yeast-Raised Plum Cake.

The slowest in win'er

it

a person who will order toast a it; you think monster, that to be hated needs but to be seen; you want to know why such people can't eat all these to

nice hot breads and batter cakes, and you call Use the liveliest dough, and them pet names which it will never do to put in had better be saved overnight and print. to rise.

up with the main part of the ingredients; add the fruit next morning, and bake after din-

Of course you think

ni'xed

ner. "2

1 1

p mnds of light bread dough.

pound of black molasses and sugar, mixed. pound of butter.

1 1

1

flour.

ouuce of mixed ground spices.

pounds of seedless

pound

the cook's business to

make

and another

is

busy dishing up side dishes and

Baking cakes and

ing fresh potatoes.

waffles

fry-

and me-

dishing up breads keeps another agoing, eo s The vegetable body besides must make the toast.

6 eggs.

12 ounces of

it

but that depends on circumstances, for toast must be n;ade just as it is ordered, and one of the cooks is busy broiling beefsteak and him to order toast,

raisins.

of currants.

8 ounces of citron.

cook might be hired with the understanding that toast making was one of the duties to be performed,

and would do well

at supper, but the two

hours of breakfast

is

the vegetable

or three

cook's busiest

It would not be so hard to make good toast time. Brandy, and lemon extract. V- arm the dough and all the ingredients slightly. if there was a place provided for it when the hotel Beat the kitchen is furnished and fitted up, but whoever in Mix well, except the fruit and brandy. Put it upon the batter, and set to rise in the mixing pan about 3 such a case ever thinks of that ? Beat again and add the fruit, previously cook and he must almost perforce bake the toast by hours. Line the moulds ^ith buttered paper, panfuls in the oven, but no persons, if they can help floureJ. ha-f fill and set to rise again about 2 hours. Bake themselves, will eat that except as milk toast. The from one hour to two, according to size. Large broiler is full and has no room but for mea's There

cakes should have a coating of paper tied outside the moulds to protect the crust during the two

hours baking. These cakes

moulds

till

should

at least one

not be turned out of the

day

old.

only the range top left available and that must be kept so hot that there is little chance of being able to do good baking inside at the same time,

is


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

153

The beginner takes but won't roll, but in hand they dough placed You must brush such expenses are not so reluctantly incurred as af- skate all over the table instead. ter some time of scrambling along without. away tha flnur, have the table so that the rolls wiH In hotels where the tcast difficulty is well over- almost s iek to it, very slightly dust your hands come there is ei her an extra band from some other with flour, take two fresh, moist pieces and roll department appointed for the duty, and the t-.-ast them under the hands with a slight pressure. The range or broiler K) work on, or else, in smaller ball of the thumb draws the outside of the dough tohouses where the dining room work is not rushing, wards the palm and makes a smooth ball. Of course charcoal broiler aside from the meat work would be in

every hotel

kitchen at the

first,

when

Easier said than done.

b rill a .

the pieces of

you must mould two at once, using both hands, else Expert you will never get ready for breakfast. make it hands seldom stop to cut off the little pieces of The best way where there is no special broiler, is dough; they can grab the right sized pieces for rolls to provide half a dozen wire hinged oyster broilers from the lump with both hands, as quick as winkor toasters and lay them with the bread in them on ing. You injure the dough by much moulding. The quicker you can get a smooth outside the bettop of the hot range. preparing a little toast just doors are opened for a start, are able to as wanted, and to suit the special orders.

the waiters themselves,

before he

ter.

Concluding Hints. Whatsoever thy hand fi^deth Ancient Book.

to do,

do

it

with

all

Brush your hot loaves from the oven with water, are going to shrink as they cool, and if the crust will not give, the crumb will part inside and make broken slices.

They

thy might.

Things done by halves are never done right. Modern Paraphrase. Considering how extensive is the domain of hotel

The bakers have a saying that it don't matter how cookery there is no likelihood that we shall ever re- you mould up the loaves if you make the dough cur to the items of bread and rolls again, and a few good. But that is only a comparative way of speakomissions in the foregoing matters must be made ing, and they don't have to slice and toast their bread as we do, and see the rough ends and broken good here. slices

go to waste by the bushel.

If the reader will

mix ing bread turn back to our directions for moulding hotel loaves is to make the small quantity of dough soft enough he will find a way that makes loaves as smooth and in warm weather. Fortunately, with large masses the seamless as a watermelon, but it remains to say that labor with s iff dough is so severe that few people moulding the loaves round first is done in either of two err that way, but a li'tle in active summer weather ways. If you are in practice with rolls you can fomentation easily takes up too much flour and bemould small loaves with both hands, the same way. comes rough and rotten, and all the instructions in If not, do as the bakers do with "tin loaves" and the wor'd will not help the "pastry" who does not Vienna bread. The shop bakers like to make loaves know enough to temper the dough a? cording <o the in tia moulds because they use for that soft dough weather. In winter when all the materials and tools carrying much water, and gaining for them several are cold the stiffer the dough the better; in summer The bread so made is pounds in a barrel of flour. use les? yeast and mix soft. moist to cut and to keep and does not crumble. But as every loaf will expand in the oven and may open I have, before now, when at the ends like the So in mixing biscuit. gaping shell of a dead oyster, it training down the rawness of a lot of picked-up is the business of the moulder to form and fold the summer resort help, placed all the ingredients for loaf so that it shall open and rise just where he wills

The hardest thing

to teach the tyro in

biscuits for the early breakfast of a party of tremen-

it,

who

and nowhere else. To mould "tin loaves

:" Your dough being propwas a bread baker and nothing else has utterly erly kneaded in layers leave it lying in a rather sp.iled them in the mixing, making them harder thin sheet. Cut that into the right sized squares for than crackers and not half as good. Biscuit should loaves. The expert workman makes them a little Take one of the be mixed as soft as fritter batter, so that when the longer one way than the other.

dous tr^ut

fishers, in

a pan, and then a baker

scrapings of the'pan ia flour and scr ps of doajH are added k can etO be pressed out easily ivi;h the flat

hands

till

worked smooth.

Whenever your

biscuit

tough that the doubled fists must be used o press it out, conclude that you have made the common mistake, and have something yet to

dough

is

s")

:

learn

abom mixing

pi ces,

rolls in

little

out with

the knuckles,

double

it,

Catch the furthest corner with

cf

dough under the hands and reach another corner.

Six motions makes a round, smooth loaf with a mid-

Now for

it

the extended fingers atid pull it over, and under the Tura the piece wrists, which press it in the middle.

dle depre.sion

biscait.

Mould out your dough

press

making a square.

made by

the wrists.

extend this depression lengthwise, forming

round a trough shape by pounding and lengthening the


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

154

COOK.

middle with the wrists while pulling over the rounding side with the fingers. Finally roll over the thick unher side into the hollow middle, the other or

pinching up the two thick sides together, slightly lapping one upon the other, and without any touch if lard about them, he placed them in pans so that

near side forming the top lap to the rolled up loaf, it in the brick-shaped mould. Press it

when raised and baked they opened out cleft rolls of very fine appearance and of flaky texture.

and place

down

slightly in the

mould

This loaf will rise the

way

to

make square

corners.

parted on one side, where the seam was left, and ihowing the whiteness of the inside without a break in the bread.

Our

Practice

the bakers like to see

Makes

Perfect.

Pastry cooks and bakers wishing their French rolls to open up tall and lean backwards, only touch a streak of melted lard on one side of the depressed

near the beginning are called Stollen by the German bakers. This kind of sweetened bread is often made richer with addi pic-nic loaves described

piece of dough, just where the lips, doubled, meet, and none on the top.

when

the roll

is

This gives the roll a start to open without quite making a split roll of it. Different stewards and bosses having different

The bakers make up the loaves notions about how these things should be it is often difficult for a young man, however willing and capable, to get a foothold with them without the knowledge of just such variations of method as the

tions of citron, etc.

as just described, only doubling the two sides together instead of rolling, making a long split roll without any brushing with lard at all.

In addition

to the

to the

applied

which Stollen

names Kauglauff and Kugeloff above.

varieties of

yeast raised cakes, of

one,Urbain-Dubois spells it Congloff, making three authorized ways, all meaning the same as Polish Baba, which is a general term for is

Sorry there should be such a thing as a warmed over roll in the world, but there will always happen to be whole pins of the nicest rolls left over, and

somebody will always want breakfast at four in the and French Savarin which, according The very beet way morning and expect hot bread. to Dubois' menus serves to designate several varieties to warm over .rolls, so that none but the most critiof cakes. These things are mentioned as helping cal can tell them from fresh baked, is this Wet a to throw light on the mysteries of foreign menus, clean cloth in clean water half a flour sack, for which "our own correspondents" in Europe delight instance and Lay this over your wring it out. to humiliate their Western cousins with. In about five cold rolls and set them in the oven. raised cakes,

:

Now

about moulding French loaves.

We

have

been unwilling

minutes, or when the cloth is dry, the rolls warmed through and almost as good as new.

will

be

to poach in the exclusive shop bakNever, if it can be avoided, let the rolls stay in grounds further than the thoroughness and useTurn pans over night it soils the bottom crust. fulness aimed at in our book compelled, and will

er's

them out

only add

tbis:

If

you wi-h

to try a

more workman-

like w^iy than thit previously set forth,

commence

as for "tin loaves," with wrists and fingers making the piece of dough into a round ball slightly depressed. the table

to dry.

If your iron pails soil the crust of the

brown bread, with manilla

Push these aside on a well floured part of melted lard. are moulded.

steamed

can be prevented by lining them paper, lightly brushed over with it

The loaves come out looking

as nice as

Make

the trough-like cake. depression across these with a rolling pin instead of By the .way, we forgot to put the cross mark on the wrists, using plenty of flour, and depressing all It has no use, however, except As no lard is used and bakers the hot cross buns. before folding any. a year, on good Friday, to enable British chilonce do not cut the loaves, the flour and the incidental dren to make a few pennies by selling them, perpetj drying of the dough whi'e waiting, helps the desired some old custom, nobody seems to know for uating Having parting open of the seam when baking. a certainty what. the far can double loaves thus like you practised cross mark cut on the buns as they are placed split

till all

rollswithout any greasing

and experiment

A

pans will remain and show; but if you let the enough, then with a chopping knife cut down deep, and let the buns finish rising, the depression will remain and make the buns apin the

further at your pleasure.

buns In a large western city the writer

who

knew a baker

French loaves (petits-pains) in quantities that can best be described as cart loads, and he made them almost as just above described. Taksold

little

ing the four corners of the little flat pieces of dough, he pressei them with the points of the fingers into the middle, and with a blow of the edge of the open

hand made pression,

the roU ready for a

miking

it

little rolling pin devery long and narrow, then

rise half light

pear to be in four parts. a

Those bun-sellers make the "one a-penny-buns" little richer than the "two-a-penny-buns;" and

they have to be a

little larger, too,

or else

when

the

one-a-penny-two-a-penny-hot-cross buns are all in a basket together, they wouldn't know 'tother from which, you know.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

TWENTY WAYS OF COOKING CORN MEAL.

621.

The rich breads and puddings with which we shall lead corn meal into general favor, are not com-

first

mended on the "Corn

the most widely cultivated grain in the

is

155

world, with the exception of rice."

"As to nutritive matter, corn is only exceeded by wheat, and followed by rice among the leading articles of food. Calculated according to the physilogi-

places

score of cheapness, except in country

where eggs and butter have but

value; but that

little

market

a real liking for corn meal, pure and simple, and not for the condiments, which obtains among so large a proportion of the Southerners, it is

is seen from the fact that the prevailing dinner bread at the most expensively provided steamboat wants of the system, a week's diet for an adult and hotel tables was formerly, and would only cost about twenty cents, and, excepting probably is yet, the corn cake made of nothing whatever but meal split peas, there is nothing approaching corn for and water. economy." Why one section should prefer a corn diet more "Even in the United States, where thirty-seven than another when there is no consideration of econmillion acres are devoted to the culture of Indian

cal

corn, yielding a total product of thirteen hundred million bushels, while the wheat crop of the world

only seven hundred and sixty million bushels, we only understand the economic value of corn as cattle

is

involved at

omy for,

and

the result of tastes trained in early

domestic cooks good.

food."

all, I have never seen fully accounted venture the supposition that it shows

will

who knew how

to

life by a race of make corn bread

What has been done can be done

again.

It will not be expected that we professed cooks "In buying wheat flour, the same outlay would shall dabble either in political economy or social scipurchase double the amount of nutriment in Indian meal. The prejudice against the use of corn as an ence, but I, for one, cannot help thinking that a better knowledge of the ways to make corn meal a palarticle of human food is based on ignorance in many atable diet, diffused throughout the land, would re in others. Wheat is most cases, and on false

pride agreeable to the taste, and is preferred by a greater portion of the human family, or, at least, by those

who

are able to purchase it. While all the world is wheat as an article of food, not one-

familiar with

tenth of

its

suit in

the million.

In the culinary departments of the best American it is but reasonable to expect that the greatest

population ever heard of Indian corn ex-

cept as cattle food. its

withstanding

It is quite

remarkable that not-

acknowledged good

qualities

hotels,

in compounding American specialties will and its perfection have been attained. However there is only one not01

it is but little known to the people those portions of Europe to whom cheap food is an absolute necessity and even in times of famine it

economy, yet

bringing the fiifteen-cents-per-bushel corn of

Kansas and Nebraska into its proper use of furnishing cheap and wholesome food and luxuries for

;

has required judicious and persistent governmental efforts to induce famishing communities to use it."

able instance of a large hotel becoming celebrated for its corn bread, even that is nearly forgotten, now that there

is

no more

call for special

commissions

to

go and teach the art to Europe. I have seen "going the rounds,"

what purported be a receipt for St. Charles corn bread, which the Boston Cultivamentioned sugar as one of the ingredients, but cantor, suggest the conclusion that it would be a good not consider it genuine. Different cooks may have in a if all thing general way, people could be led to tiad different ways, but the following was the formlike corn better than wheat. It is our business to ula in use on the floating palaces of the same day, believe that such a consummation can be reached such steamboats as the Southern Belle and the Magsolely through the instrumentality of the cooks by

The preceding statements, taken here and there

from an able

to

statistical article in

;

of the "coast" trade, and the long-trip boats more general diffusion of knowledge of the best nolia, which made the excellence of this bread known on ways of using corn meal, and encouragement to put he upper rivers. We used to bake it in cake moulds, in those extra careful touches which are needed to make even the best receipts thoroughly successful. My ,nd sometimes serve it with sauce as corn pound own experience as a cook warrants the assertion that pudding; more in fun than from any necessities of he case. It can be sliced thin like cake, and used corn bread properly made and carefully baked, can n many ways be made popular almost anywhere. The small loaf that at first finds no takers is presently in demand, St. Charles Corn Bread. and then gives place to one of twice or thrice the

the

:

she, a proportionate amount of wheat bread being thereby displaced. That an entire community, state or nation may have a real preference for corn over wheat bread, is

shown by the States,

fact of the

where corn bread

is

at the b<?st furnished tables.

matter in the Southern

never out of place, even

1

pound of white corn meal

(not qufte a quart). (size of two eggs).

4 ounces of fresh butter, melted 1

pint of boiling water. of cold milk.

1 pint

4 eggs.

1 level teaspoonful salt. teaspoonful of wholesome, home-made baking >owder. 1


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

15*

Pour the boiling water into the meal, wetting and soon acquires a bitter, musty taste, which may have scalding it all. Then add the melted butter, salt and as much to do with the small liking there is for cora Put the baking pan in the meal preparations as any other reason. milk, and then the eggs. Add the powoven to get hot, without greasing it. beat up with the large wire eggder to the batter 624, Corn Gems. The batter is as whisk, then pour it into the pan. IF the pan is hissing hot Corn gems were instituted to meet the grave emerthin as for batter cakes. it never sticks, and there is no discoloration of burnt gency that arises when more than four persons in This bread should be about an inch and a one house want a corner piece of corn bread. Their grease. half deep in the pan, and bake half an hour or more. other use is for corn bread in individual style. There is no need of special receipts, as both of the The sooner the top crust is formed the better, after ;

that

corn bread mixtures already given are

needs to bake slowly.

it

first

rate_.

baked in gem pans. The richest, for individual The but it loaves, should be baked in deep round pans. But pastry cooks, generally, "hate to make people who call for corner pieces like the other, baked likes it. The gems should be For an- thin, to be nearly all crust. It is a little hard to bake just right. it." other sort, not too rich nor good for human nature's fresh baked, every half-hour, served hot and not

when

of course, only corn bread, has the peculiar characteristic, that everybody

This,

done,

is,

daily food, we have the regular stand-by the comhotel corn bread, which may be good or other-

sweated in the pans.

mon

wise, according to the skill of the maker.

Common Corn

623.

Corn Meal Muffins. The very best are made with yeast, but these are very good and can be made on shortest notice. "Whoe'er rejects them must be hard to please,

Bread.

pound of white corn meal.

1

3 ounces

of melted lard

(2 large

And

basting-spoon-

ripe for treasons, stratagems

and

spoils."

1 pint of boiling water.

pound of white cornmeal (not quite a quart). 4 ounces of fresh butter, lard, or both mixed.

f pint of cold water or milk.

1 pint of boiling water.

2 eggs. 1 teaspoonful of salt. 1 small teaspoonful of home-made baking powder.

Half pound of

1

fuls).

Scald about two-thirds of the meal with the boiling water, leaving the rest at the side of the pan to be

with the other ingredients.

stirred in

powder in

last,

and bake as directed

Beat the

for the

other

kind.

Now

if

no more for

corn meal was always alike there would be But here is where the genius be said.

1

pints of cold milk (3 cups). flour.

Salt.

Yolks, only, of 4 eggs. 2 small teaspoonfuls of baking powdej.

Put the shortening in a saucepan with the water, Add the salt, and scald the meal with them. then the milk and flour alternately, then the yolks,

boil,

and

lastly the

powder beaten

in well with the wire

to

making corn bread comes

in.

Both of these

sorts

should have a smooth crust rounded over like a good pound cake. The particular point is the scalding of

Bake

in greased muffin rings, 10 or 15 minutes, in

a hot oven.

Serve hot.

The batter must be thin to make good muffins. the meal, and that varies according as the meal Make the pan hot on which the rings arc placed, beotherwise use is fine or coarse ground. I have known some few fore filling, to prevent running under bottoms. with who saw the into of this rings neophytes deepest depths In daily practice we learn short ways to work, profound matter at the first glance, but others, seemwith fewest vessels. When the object is to thoroughly as would time a difingly intelligent, slip up every ferent grade of meal came in hand. Sometimes the scald the meal, it is not best to put the unmelted crust would rise and crack open forty ways, like a shortening with it first, but the way indicated above The milk is map of the Rocky Mountains, and the bread would is good for all kinds of corn breads. fall to pieces. That was because the meal was coarse necessary to give good color in baking. and not sufficiently scalded, or not mixed thin Sometimes the bread would rise at first, Tortillas. 626. enough but then cave in, all but the edges, like a pond gone That was because the meal Now that direct trade between Chicago and Old dry, and cut like mush. was fine ground, and would not bear scalding much. Mexico is about to be opened, it might be as well to White meal coarsely ground is the best. Some few pay a little attention to Mexican preferences, too How romantic are all the words that come straying peoplb think they like yellow meal, but as surely as ;

it is

put to the

for bread

tirely neglected

And how all cookery the demand both among us from that land of the sun and both are soon en- the Mexican story-writers, from Captain Mayne yellow meal, for some reason, Reid down, have revelled and gloried in the power

test in hotel

and mush

falls

And

off,

!


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

'And you have brown bread plenty on hand

these sonorous terms gave them over the imagination of their bewildered Northern readers Tarantula,

he time?"

arroya, caballero, ranchero, hacienda, cuisiniero, tor It was always the tortilla that crowned the tilla

lelicious."

!

'0,

!

The tempting tortilla closing day. delicious tortilla.

;

157

but this

is

not bakers' Boston brown

That was said before the Chicago

the sweet, the

rehensible hotel boarders

But the story-writer has yet to be born with selfdenial enough to drop his romance and tell his wondering readers what the tortilla is.

>f

the land and tire of

it

who

tUs

is

0, incom-

always on the fat But in a well-regulated

!

you can have anything.

lotel

fire.

;

all

live

This

is

one of the va

bread made principally of corn meal which he Boston writer before quoted, had in mind

rieties of

became acquainted with a Mexican youth, "On account of its lack of gluten, Indian meal is native of the ancient city of the MontezuIt was Man- not well adapted for making bread without a slight mas. There was poetry in his name. There was poetry in his face, for admixture of wheat or rye flour." uel de Carvalho. That is the eastern idea, not the southern or westhe had melancholy eyes and a sentimental mous-

Once

I

:

who was a

tache. His ancestors were Dons, but he, alas, was but valet to an English tourist. He had been through

n.

the gay capitals of the Old World, yet nothing had ever prevailed to chase the cynical expression from his lips, or withdraw his thoughts from the

It conis very no shortening, except what may be conveyed by rich buttermilk, when that can be had instead of jaking powder, and is probably very healthful eaten

home

cold.

all

of his early days.

And

then he came to a noted pleasure resort that was frequented by wealthy Southern people. And

on going into the bakery one day, he saw a griddle full of something that caused him to stop, openmouthed, with delighted surprise and as soon as he was sure he could believe his eyes he struck an atti;

hands and shouted in ecstacy So at last Manuel "Ha, ha! Tor theel as!" And this is how the tortillas were was happy. made:

tude, clasped his

This kind of bread

,ains

And

hot.

very few deaths occur.

still

G28. Steamed,

' '

or

Home-Made

' '

Brown

Bread.

:

Mexican

2 pounds of corn meal. 1 quart of boiling water.

Half pint of re-boiled, black molasses

Tortillas.

1

quart of white corn meal with boiling water

enough

to barely

wet

make

like thin

mush.

it,

(coffee

cup

full).

1

Mix a

Reckless inhabitants of the hotel world, genit right away quick while it is

erally prefer to eat

and cold water

after that to

pints of cold milk. teaspoonful of salt.

4 heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

pound of graham flour. pound of white flour. Pour the water boiling into the meal and stir; then mix in the molasses and the other ingredients in the "But," you say, "your toritllas are nothing but order as written the powder in the flour and stir the Southern hoe cakes." Yes, that's what they are. up thoroughly. It makes a stiff batter, too soft to be But many people like hoe cakes better if they are handled. Put it in two pails with tight-fitting lids shortened a little. and steam from 4 to 6 hours, then bake a short time The pails should be made for the to form a crust.

Add

a teaspoonful of salt Drop large spoonfuls on the hot griddle, and spread them out to form thin cakes. it

Hoe Cakes,

or Corn Bannocks.

1 1

at top purpose, of best stovepipe iron, a trifle wider than at bottom. Brush a little lard over the insides

2 pounds of white corn meal.

and then wipe it off thoroughly before putting in the dough, and there will be no stains on the crust when 1 teaspoonful of salt. done. Where there is a steam chest to the range, over Put the lard in the middle of the meal with the which vegetables are steamed, the pails can be set insalt, and pour in a little boiling water to melt it. side in the water, and then there is nothing in the Then add cold water or milk to make like thin mush Makes 8 bread line more easily made than this. Bake on a griddle or "hoe," placing the dough with slices. 4 dozen about into cuts of bread pounds a spoon and flattening out thin. Enough for the average orders of 75 people for one But if you meal, there being other kinds of bread. have had it talked about all through the house 40 "Why cannot we have this?" Such is "You can have it." people will get away with this much easily. Half pound of lard.

;

"What is it folded brown bread."

so nicely in a

lik\,

"It

is

brown bread."

napkin?

Looks the effect of advertising. use a

Our

Should the bread cut sticky,

liquid in mixing next time. "Twenty ways" will include four baked pud-

little less


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

158

dings of Indian meal, of different degrees, and this by good judges, be consid-

Chickasaw Pudding.

631.

following will, probably, ered the best.

"Tell that cook," said a heal thy St. Louis captain, his boat then laid up in the ice, "to make this once

more and

let

me know when, and

then he

may

go to

heaven."

Brown Indian

Souffle.

Perhaps not the connoisseur's pudding, but thought by many to have less style and more real comfort in it than any other. It is something of a

Most of us have heard something like that in a curiosity mood, but this was a jolly bon vivant, and

sarcastic

for its puffy lightness,

and should be served

whole in that condition as soon as done, or else dish was being helped the second time, so before "that it up, if you wish to secure for the bubble reputation, cook" started to heaven, I prevailed upon him to out of the oven's mouth. abstract and perfect out of the chaos of his guessYou will never know it at its best, unless you can

work the following

receipt.

Mohawk

629.

procure the old-fashioned, thick, black molasses. 3 pints of water.

Pudding.

12 ounces of corn meal.

2 quarts of milk.

1

10 ounces of corn meal.

pound of re-boiled black molasses.

8 ounces of butter.

4 ounces of fresh butter.

No

6 ounces of rebelled black molasses.

1 large

needed but what it

boiling water,

salt.

is

in the butter,

and take

has not too much.

Make mush by

lemon.

Pinch of

salt

care that

5 whole eggs. 6 yolks.

sprinkling the dry meal into the at the same time with the

and beating

When

egg whisk.

it

has boiled a minute or two put

stir together, put on the and push the saucepan to the back of the range It is not very apt to burn. Stir to simmer about an hour, same time with egg whisk to prevent lumps. over a fire a few minutes then put on a tight lid to Then turn the mixture into a pan, beat the 8 eggs a keep the steam in push the saucepan to the back of little and gradually stir them in. Makes Bake in a slow oven about 45 minutes. the range and let the mush remain at cooking heat

Make mush

in the usual

way by bringing

to a boil, sprinkling in the

the milk

meal and beating

at the

in the butter

and molasses,

lid

;

;

without burning, for two hours or more. Then turn out into a pan and mix in the other ingredients

about 2

the eggs beaten light the rind of the lemon grated Bake about half an and the juice squeezed in. hour, or till the egg in it is fairly set, and no longer.

sauce,

it

This makes about 3 quarts of pudding for the average orders of 50 persons.

;

mild, neutral sauce

is

best with this.

If hot

sweetened cream cannot be had try the following, which is as ornamental as useful.

.

Sauce. pound of white sugar.

1

pound

of sugar.

6 yolks of eggs.

Nutmeg Boil the

the sugar, grated rind and starch together dry; add the lemon juice into the boiling water

them

;

butter,

strain immediately.

2 or 3 yolks of eggs. extract to flavor.

633. Thanksgiving Pudding.

water in a bright saucepan.

Mix

the

dry, and rapidly stir them in. Pour a has boiled up, beat in the butter. sauce to the yolks in a cup beat, then mix all in the sugar

Indian Plum Pudding, Steamed.

it

;

begins to boil remove it from taking care the yolks do not curdle with too

together. Just before

the

Butter Sauce.

and when it boils again pour in the beaten yolks quickly and beat well. As soon as the eggs begin to thicken take the sauce from the fire and

1 quart of water.

fire,

much

this

1 quart of water. 2 ounces of fresh butter.

and

4 ounces of best fresh butter.

little

make

2 ounces of corn starch.

Mix

2 ounces of corn starch.

When

Lemon

failing that,

want of color.

Sauce Citronne.

stir

starch

or,

will relieve its

2 lemons' rind grated and juice of one.

63O.

Sauce Doree, G-olden Sauce, or Butter 1

which

enough It can be

baked in fluted pudding moulds, and turned out whole if handled carefully, where so required, or else in two small pans well buttered.

A

quarts.

Eat hot with cream,

cooking.

it

3 quarts of milk. 1J pounds of corn meal.

8 ounces of butter, or minced

suet.

12 ounces of re-boiled, black molasses.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

took the place of buttermilk, and it was not quite the But there was a Blackville near that same thing.

10 whole eggs. 10 yolks.

large hotel at White Sulphur Springs,

2 lemons.

ville

of seedless raisins.

1

pound

1

pound of good, clean currants.

Pinch of

;

with the meal and milk and

let it

cook

back of the range, with tight lid on, for 2 hours or Then add the other ingredients in order as

at

more.

grated and juice beaten light together.

the rinds of the lemons

written

squeezed

in,

and eggs

all

Steam in cup of flour. pudding moulds an hour and a half or longer, acDust the

fruit with a small

cording to size. This makes 4 quarts. Butter the moulds and shake flour inside before

pany was expected from the opposition village, whatever its name was, perhaps the young Blackvillans with their 'possum dogs would pass a whole night in the woods and fell any number of trees till they had Because you can't make fatty 'possums enough. bread without fat, and 'possum's fat does very well. Somebody has to churn in the morning and take the buttermilk

The

cool.

Serve with any sauce suitable for English

filling.

and Black-

near Brownsville, on Blackwater river, at the

Sweet Springs in Missouri. It was only in the flush times of hog killing that Blackville could indulge in this luxury but if com-

salt.

Make mush

159

1

plum pudding.

down

house to become

to the spring

rest of it is very simple

:

pound of corn meal.

pound

of lard or 'possum fat.

Salt.

O35. Thanksgiving Pudding.

Pour the lard, melted, into the meal, and stir in enough cold water to make it like thin mush. Spread in thin cakes on the hot stove lid, and If you when fried on one side turn them over.

Indian Plum Pudding Baked.

have no stove, but only a fireplace that takes in half The same as the preceding, except that chopped a hickory tree trunk at a time, rake out some coals and bake the cakes in a spider. apples can be used instead of currants, or in addiTo be eaten hot, with cold buttermilk. tion to them, which would make the steamed pud-

Spices can be added at option. ding too soft. May be baked in deep ornamental moulds, well buttered and dusted with flour, and served with burning

brandy sauce.

In extreme contrast to the foregoing of breai.

is

the White-

ville variety

Will bake in half the time required

for steaming.

636.

Corn Dodgers.

634.

Fatty Bread and Buttermilk.

This entree never appeared on any bill-of-fare. is

hoped

that

nobody

will

make

it,

it

It

might be

The ordinary dinner bread of the South. Take the required quantity of corn meal, say a quart, and stir it up with cold water enough to make it

like thick

so that

mush, just

it

can be shaped.

put in here Make it with hand or spoon, in shapes like goose in a baking merely in an historical sort of way, because it is eggs, and place them almost touching the while they of on that is hot and not American is on record in the of range top kept pan strictly any Bake in a hot oven. French books. To be still more precise, it is an in- are being placed. It is usually insisted upon that no salt shall be put stitution of Blackville, and the people who believed

thought too rich for good health.

It is

it had broad shiny faces and did not know a thing about dyspepsia. Although again it is hoped nobody will ever make anything so greasy anymore,

in

it

has to be recorded that the boys

who

did not be-

long in Blackville had a wonderful knack of coming home from squirrel shooting at sundown, just at the

Serve hot.

into this kind.

Simple as this

is,

some persons can make

it

twice

One requirement is to make as palatable as others. the meal take up all the water it will carry without losing shape. oven, so that

it

Another is to bake it in a very hot become brown without being too

will

most favorable time for snatching a portion of this dry and hard. While everybody will agree that there must be a peculiar feast, to which the Blackville people did not welcome them, and always declared it tasted better perfection point for every common article, beyond than butternuts. There are many Blackvilles in the which it cannot be improved, it is hardly likely United States, and the one where this dish came that anyone will take the trouble to scald the meal There is not time for all these nearest being named in French was on Bayou Black, for batter cakes. not very far from New Orleans, but you could not little things in hotel business, and yet it has to be translate the French spoken there, and, moreover, set down that therein lies the point that beats comalabashes full of

sugar cane juice from the mills

mon work

The following

will

do without

:


THE AMERICAN PASTRY

160

637.

Corn Batter Cakes.

front place. Down in that land of large estates and extensive operations, there used to be places where

pound of white corn meal.

1

to year's end the mush cauldron never stopped boiling, except as it was emptied and replenished once in every twenty-four hours, that

from year's end

J pound of flour. 3 ounces of melted lard (J cup). 2 eggs. A little salt.

being the time considered necessary for the meal to cook before it could become wholesome food for the

quart of milk or water.

1

COOK.

teaspoonful of baking powder. scores of laborers whose principal food it was. These to avoid having lumps in the batkettles, some with mush and some with hominy, If ter, add the lard, melted, and the powder last. hung in huge fireplaces, and were tended by old no milk, a spoonful of syrup is required to give colcrones, with stirring paddles like boat oars, day and 1

Mix gradually

But sometimes you have

or.

to

work

for thorough

night, like the witches in Macbeth with their "bubphilomaizians who love corn for itself alone and do fire burn and cauldron ble, bubble, toil and trouble not want any flour in theirs. In that case you must bubble.' How should we like to make mush for the pcald the meal. folks that way ? There are a good many degrees beG38. tween ten-minute mush and twenty-four hour mush, ;

'

Corn Batter Cakes Without Flour.

and as

to the stirring there are very few hotels where even ten minutes can be bestowed upon that part as a regular thing. Fortunately there is little need

pounds of corn meal.

1

1 quart of water or milk. 4 ounces of lard.

4 eggs.

of it. Heat and steam are restless enough to keep up a very fair bubble of themselves without much manual

Salt,

1 teaspoonful of baking powder. Scald the meal with half the water, and mix up the same as if for corn bread.

In der

the preceding receipts where baking powdirected to be used, it is to be understood that

all

is

buttermilk and soda will do as well, if the buttermilk be genuine, not watered, and sour enough to counteract a small teaspoonful of soda to the pint.

It

seems

will take

it

more. ter

and

up a

to

be with corn meal as with

certain

Ten ounces of rice all

rice,

amount of water and no

waadded beyond that only particles and make a blue

the water that

will absorb a quart of

is

tends to separate the Five ounces of corn meal will do the same as gruel.

the ten ounces of rice, absorb a quart of water and no more. With a much less proportion of water the

meal can never be well cooked, because the finer particles take up the water first and the course grains always must remain raw and hard, no matter

Theory and Practice.

G3O.

labor.

Since it has become the very general custom to eat how long on the one or other of the several varieties of mush as a first

fire.

Rice will cook well done in

of an hour; corn meal requires about course at breakfast and supper, the best methods of three-quarters three hours to reach the same point, although it may preparing the simple dish so as to have it in perfecbe passibly good after only one or two hours boiltion can no longer be considered a matter too trifling for

any

first-rate

cook's attention.

ever of consequence it

mush may

Besides, whatlack in the instance,

gains through diffusion, for thousands of cooks are

wanted

make good mush

to

quired to prepare costly

for every one that is re-

and ornamental dinners;

ing.

To reduce the time of cooking some people steep There is the meal in water several hours before. nothing to be said against this except that it is likelier be forgot or neglected than remembered and be-

to

so,

comes a cause of irregularity under the usual hotel from the utility point of view, well-cooked conditions. mush is a thousand times better than well cooked

you

see,

truffles.

And

if

that reads like a riddle

it

will

have

no room here to straighten it out. of corn meal is piled into a saucepan

to go, for there is

When

a

lot

of water, not half enough for so

much

meal, and im-

patiently stirred up and served ten minutes afterward, that is not mush. I don't know what it is. There is

no name for

64O.

Corn Meal Mush.

2 quarts of water. 10 ounces of white corn meal. 1

rounded tablespoonful of

salt.

Use a flat-bottomed, bright iron saucepan, with the idea that mush can never be cooked enough, the inside with the least possible amount of melted that they become crotchety, one might almost say lard. This reduces the tendency to burn and lesPut the salt in the water, boil, and sens the waste. fanatical, in pursuing the other extreme. it.

But yet there are people so possessed

As we may have to go to the Germans for instruc- sprinkle the dry meal in with one hand while you German dishes, to the French when the mat- beat with the large wire egg-whisk in the other, till Put on ter is French, and to the English when the excellence all is in and there are no lumps to be seen.

tion in

reputedly theirs, perhaps no excuse is needed for the lid, push the saucepan to the back of the range going often to the Southern States, even to plantation and let it simmer with the steam shut IB for three life for instances, whilst American corn meal has the hours. is


THE AMERICAN PASTRY Then turn in the

it

out and keep

it

hot in a bright sink

the

make

161

the fries dark colored.

Also, these*

cannot be had perfect unless cracker meal can be afforded to bread them with. Stale bread articles

steam chest.

Where

are apt to

COOK.

mush has

to

be made on a cook-stove,

a cast pot with feet, to raise the bottom an inch from the fire, is best.

dried and crushed and sifted

is

next best

;

corn

meal for breading is the worst of all. But powdered You will have the same measure of made mush as bread produces a reddish brown, and when dripping four quarts of water and for frying is used with it, the mush often looks more you had water at first ;

twenty ounces of meal producing one gallon. Double the quantity required for one meal should be made and half put away to become cold to fry. For this purpose very slightly grease a bright tin

like

smoked meat.

I

do not wish to be understood

All the cheap ways as advocating expensive ways. are to be given in these columns ways of cooking ;

without eggs, without cream, or milk, or butter, and it will not have to be without baking powder

pan, press the mush evenly into it, and slightly brush over with a brush dipped in melted lard again. said the articles so made are as good as the best, only but the opportunity is No matter how little the grease, it prevents the for- that they are good enough mation of a crust by drying on top. Warm the pan here improved of showing by one instance out of a few seconds and the mush, when cold, will turn hundreds, how some tables are and must be better than the rest, and why people cannot have four dollar out without trouble. ;

;

Each quart of cold mush will cut into about ten blocks or slices for frying.

fare for three dollars, nor three dollar fare for two.

When

breaded

articles like fried

mush

are

good with crushed bread crumbs and meat

made fat

so

from

the roasting pans that nobody observes any inferiority, the credit is wholly due to the skill and care-

641.

fulness of the cook. Corn meal for breading has such one of the things, as fried potatoes a bad appearance that it ought to be counted out. is another, that has a telling effect in giving the imPeople who like the taste of fried meal, and will have pression of excellence or otherwise of the hotel table. even oysters breaded with it, have to forego the That indefinite something so often mentioned, called neatness and color that the other methods give. excellence of cuisine, is made up of hundreds of such One of our French preceptors gives us a homily trifles as properly fried mush. on frying, put in the readable form of a Count So-

Fried

mush

is

Recently a correspondent of a leading New York and-so lecturing his cook, who, on the occasion of a newspaper, and whose letter in part was reprinted dinner to invited guests, had spoiled a choice fish in the REPORTER, had occasion to comment upon a through putting it into lard (or oil) not hot enough. The breakfast at one of the famous hotels of Boston, and gist of it is, that if you put the breaded article into went into well trained ecstacies over the simple per- lard not hot enough to immediately cook the outside, fection of it all. "0, the ineffable cuisine!" was the the breading washes off, the juices of the fish or meat exclamation, and of course it was a woman writing, and these cannot be browned at all without ooze out,

men

one never think of original expressions being entirely dried out. With an article so largely says "the cooking was tip top," and all the succeed- made up of water as mush, it is still more necessary ing thousands say the same words. Well, there was to have the outside coat of egg and crumbs instantly no mention of fried mush, but there was a hint of and be lost. set, otherwise it will merely melt away golden-hued cutlets breaded cutlets and the same 642. Fried Mush, Breaded. conditions and effects pertain to both articles. for

;

There was an intimation of crisp salad, and

deli-

cately browned rolls and perfect, fresh butter. When, in any case, you are curious to know "upon what

Take the pan of cold boiled mush, prepared as already described, and having slightly warmed the meat doth this our Caesar feed ?" you may be sure bottom, turn it upside down on a clean paste-board, that it is nothing more than you yourself can buy in kept for the purpose. Cut the mush into blocks, the market, and at the best of breakfasts the cups "filled with the nectar that are not so liable to be

square or diamond-shaped, or else into slices or fancy forms, according to the use intended. For every quart of mush one egg is required, to be Jupiter sips," as with good coffee and chocolate. The beaten up with an equal amount of water. guests prefer them. This tempting-looking fried mush and breaded Roll the pieces in this, and then in the meal made

cannot be had, as a rule to be depend- by pounding and sifting crackers. ed on, unless lard, good fresh lard, can be afforded Have a saucepan half full of lard made hot for the frying. One thing essential to the houses of enough to hiss loudly when a drop of water touches ineffable cuisine, is to be always excellent, and not it, but yet not smoking. Drop in the mush a few about fry them yellow-brown good for one observer and indifferent for the next. pieces at a time But cheap, home-saved material, if good sometimes, ten minutes then place them in a colander set always carries a proviso. Meat drippings and soup in a pan, and in a hot place, to drain and dry before cutlets, too

;

stock toppings ar^ wood in a comparative sense, but

serving.


162

THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. priety into

any

of tragic or heroic verse, but its own. Take this ex-

line

polenta can be, and can hold

Wonder by what mischance in the distribution of ample: it happened that we drew mush from Ger'0, Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?" man mus when the other corn-raising peoples nearly instead of a member of some other family and it names,

t

drew Latin polenta ? will be seen that without the least loss of dignity our For it is not to be supposed that we have the monop impassioned Juliet might shout "0 Polenta, Polenta! wherefore art thou Poolyof mush, excepting the poor word itself. That, ininstead of bread-crumbed trout. With due deed, does not seem to be known even to the English lenta ?' all

:

'

they take it care taken to give the true lisp to the "t" in polenta, as an experiment, they call maize porridge, our oat- as it would be heard in some old moss-grown inn in meal mush is the Scotch oatmeal porridge, our Granada, under the shadow of the Alhambra or any as a household word, for our mush,

cracked-wheat mush

mush they

if

the English frumenty, and

is

will not say at all.

France, which raises annually thirty million bushmakes mush and mush puddings, but

els of corn,

mush polenta. The term is specially applied

calls

to

we now

find a

Nesselrode pudding

;

fifteen million it is

pudding of chestnuts called

but the Italian polenta, a corn

bushels of corn, and makes corn food, not prosaic mush but musical polenta.

them all, raises forty-five million bushmakes mush, and calls it polenta. Also, Brillat-Sa-

Italy exceeds els,

varin, enumerating the various articles different countries to

by

:

No use ; even capitals do not help it will not ring in right at all, but you immediately think of Bottom, the weaver, and Starveling, his mate, and "0 Bottom, Bottom thou art translated !" This is an idle fancy, but it is serious, too, for we !

contributed

to

fare extant have, for a

Even our neighbor, Brazil, rateing and using large amounts of corn does not call mush our tasteless way, but speaking Portugese no doubt sups on mellifluous polenta.

does well enough for every day use,

for Sunday and company and mush, look at it any way you please, is positively too homely and humble to be elevated to any conspicuous position. The article mush is wanted it is to go to table with some very nice entrees pleasant to the sight and good for food, and can be cut handsomely and browned prettily and set up ornamentally, and is good for car apes and ./fowons, and croustades; but the word mush will never fit in gracefully where mush ought to be; it will not har-

we want something

;

monize with the grand surroundings of notable opening days and splendid banquets at gilt-edged hotels; it will hardly be admitted to the finest bills of fare, be printed in gold on satin, with borders of Japmocking-birds and garlands of roses from

anese

Bendemere's Stream, now will it? But you cannot say the same of polenta, the difference is immense. Polenta roses

and

is Italian,

all that.

and used

Mush

to mocking-birds

and

Cinderella, but polenta to the princess. If this differis

Cinderella changed is not already apparent, let us put it to the test. You cannot imagine mush being introduced with prois

ence

finest

dainty dish, "Marrow on well take the toast's place,

hard to say why, "Marrow on Mush" "Border of Mush, Filled" stylish.

seem so

with something, would not cut as grand a figure as "Bordeur de Polenta Oarniet"

among the entrees now would it?

Speaking of Juliet,

By

isn't it Juliet

who

says:

"That, which we call a rose, any other name would smell as sweet?" taken,

Literally

times,

to

Mush might

Toast." yet, it is

make a

better knowledge, the supposition is unavoidable that he meant Italian corn whisky or its compounds.

but

put mush, at least fried mush, on the

of fare that are gotten up bills for the Capulets and Montagus, stately as Romeo, dainty as JuSome of the finest bills of liet, if not so tragical. bills

perfect cuisine, says does not that Italy sends polenta ligueuers, and in the want of

Now mush

original at defiance.

And yet polenta is mush, but note the difference "0 Mush, Mush! wherefore art thou Mush?"

meal pudding, is also made in France, and polenta want for mush has a general application. Portugal raises

and there

murder the

heroics which do so

pudding made of instead of Polenta.

the meal of chestnuts, the same that, possibly, Count Nesselrode was fond of, for, improved to a superlative degree,

other Castle in Spain, the paraphrase possesses a depth of plaintive passion that would set the mock

but there

is

millions

have agreed

something behind the

literal

;

to

that,

words are

beguiling.

"Who

is't,"

quoth he, "that there reposes,

Upon yon bank

of

summer roses?"

Here the idea conveyed by reposes on roses is so pleasant that you forget about the probable thorns and go on reading to see what other pleasant things there are, and it is the same with eating as with Let a person spend a season at some dereposing. lightful winter resort and write home about the "exquisite mush," and all the people written to would But let it be the other case, and let surely laugh. the expression be "0, the divine polenta," and tliey would no more laugh than they would at the divine Piccolomini or the divine Celestina, but would go on reading to see what other good things you were having, and would forget about the probable cheapness of polenta, which would be the thorn in this case. Thus, it is seen, mush has a very bad case, and it is hard to see what is to be done about it. Perhaps somebody will help out this philological difficulty, and we will go right along with our receipts.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 643.

Polenta Frite.

mush can be used

163

heaping tablespoonfuls of flour makes it. Milk gives the better color. The frying grease has to be hotter

good ad vantage in many and fewer pieces must be put in at once to make thil It answers very way nearly as good as the other. potato garnishes, but in the guileless form of the com- well, also, to roll the mush in rich milk without mon breakfast fried mush, it is open to the same ob- flour. Fried

to

dishes that usually have toast, or fried bread or fried

that

jection

Brillat-Savarin brings against the po-

he says: "I never take any. I think nothing of the potato unless as a stop-gap in times of great It is, to my taste, most insipid." Therescarcity. should be had to the gastronome's expedient in many similar cases; slice the mush thin, cut the shapes small, and mix minced cheese with resort

fore

it with. The proportion about one cupful, finely minced, to three cupfuls of cracker meal, but it must depend upon the Needs extra care in frying, quality of the cheese.

the cracker meal to bread of cheese

as

is

soon acquires a deep color.

it

644, A

Polenta, a

1'

Italienne.

cake of buttered mush, with cheese baked on

frying-pan like

er frying requires a quantity of hot fat or oil, as indicated in the preceding directions for fried mush.

The word Sautes

is perpetually appearing in hotel the people to whom it conveys any It seems to be usually meaning are extremely few. guessed to mean sauce. As it is a technical term, a

bills

of fare, but

cient reason for its use, seeing that no other word expresses the same thing correctly. To saute mush, cut it in slices not over half an

the frying pan, and when hot put in two or three Brown it quickly, slices, not near enough to touch. and turn over with an egg slice. Is only good when

2 ounces of butter. 4 ounces of cheese, minced.

Level teaspoonful of salt and pepper mixed. Half cupful of cracker meal.

fried as

Brush the inside of a small saucepan slightly with melted butter, and make mush with the water and meal in the usual way, letting it cook with a lid on,

own

in meaning, according to Engand that means fried in a common fried eggs, etc. The French or prop-

is sauteed,

lish terminations,

inch thick, and flour them all over. Place a spoonful of lard, clarified butter or clarified meat fat, in

quart of water. 6 ounces of yellow corn meal. 1

its

Sautes

Sautes.

person might read French a long time without meetThere is suffiing with it elsewhere than at table.

the top.

in

Mush

646.

tato;

steam, on the furthest corner of the range, Then stir in half the butter and the

wanted and served immediately.

another variety of mush, and whethof the knowledge or not, the necessity of at least being posted on them all was well exemplified in the luck of a certain man from Boston.

There

er

is still

we make use

about 2 hours.

He came from one of the best hotels of that city, and It should be a stiff, well-cooked obtained a What he pepper and salt. good position in St. Louis. mush. Spread the other ounce of butter on the claimed to have been, or what he had been in the shallow famous Boston house, is neither here nor there, but baking pan bottom a 2 qt., bright, milk-pan is best sift half the cracker meal it was evident that his had been only one particular on that, then place the mush by spoonfuls so as to line of duty, for, unexcelled in some there things,

smooth crust.

cheese,

over at last without disturbing the under When leveled over, strew on the minced

it

sift rest

of cracker meal on top,

and bake

in

a brisk oven half an hour, or till nicely browned at top and bottom. This is a good dish for lunch. May

were other smaller matters that baffled his efforts, He knew of but and one of these was fried mush. one kind, and that was fried mush balls, which, you see,

was a great misfortune, considering that he was

head cook of a large hotel, having assistants who did be served like macaroni and cheese, or macaroni not think it best to do otherwise than as he directed. cake. Is best baked en caisse, that is, in little paper So mush balls they made and made them good, very likely, or else the demand was small and the style

When the cheese furnished is too dry to melt in the oven, moisten the top with the back of a spoon When too rich and meltdipped in melted butter. ing, use less,

and more cracker meal.

645. To Fry Mush Without Eggs. Mix

flour

and water together

to

unnoticed, for that

way

ing at the Hotel Terrible, up the avenue. They came in a huff, and soon began to looking about for

inferiorities,

mush balls. Then they make thickening them, condemned them.

of the consistency of cream, without lumps. Roll the pieces of mush in it instead of egg and water, then in cracker meal, or bread crumbs, and fry in fche usual way. A half cup of water or milk to two

lasted quite a while.

But

presently evil days came, and brought with them some people of grand import, who had been board-

sniff,

and

observed the fried

pulled them apart, analyzed If there was anything they

but these mush it was good fried mush were simply atrocious. They demanded what they were pleased to term the genuine article. But they might as well have called spirits from the vasty did love,

balls

;


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

164

deep, that would not come when they did call them, for neither they themselves nor anybody else could tell

what difference of process was required. So disgrew up on both sides. It took an earth-

satisfaction

quake

to

"roll"

the cooks out of their kitchens at

Pompeii, and required an eruption of Vesuvius to the bakers forget their bread in their ovens at

make

such in hotel work quire a small tion is valid

is

simply impossible,

it

would

re-

army of assistants. The common objec"0, we can't there isn't time." The

then, lies between making many cheap and good preparations in a half-way manner; giving them up entirely, or finding out the reason why of the long choice,

processes and getting at the same results

by shorter

Herculaneum, but that was in grander times than methods. There will be, it is hoped, many better ilthese, and it is not exceeding the truth to say that lustrations than this of corn meal puddings, yet this this sad fugitive from the modern Athens was im- will serve, and may the sooner establish an underhis connection through

pelled to sever

no greater standing of the motive of many directions that might It is commonly said that otherwise seem peculiar. corn meal puddings must bake three hours or longer,

reason than the vacuity of his perceptions of the inherent possibilities of fried mush. Perhaps you

think that after he was gone all was peace, and joy, and love, but it was not. His successor's mush was

but in a hotel doing a healthy business it is extremely inconvenient to keep one minor article, and one so

orthodox and irreproachable, but Well, there were some old habitues

liable to

who had

con-

ceived an affection for the other kind, they did not know what made the difference, but there was a in the other that the

solid sweetness

new kind

did

burn, in the oven for that length of time Fishes and meats have to go in and out, then vegeta-

bles

and pastry; three hours baking involves three

hours watching, and the strain upon memory lest it be There is no need of this. The only reaneglected.

son for long cooking is to cook the meal thoroughly, it he only knew one way so they split the and that is better done in a saucepan with a lid on in slices and double breaded them, and tried to make any out-of-the-way corner, or even in a sink in the To bake a pudding longer than till the believe, and worried along, and I think they are all steam chest.

The new cook did not understand

not possess.

either, for

;

dead by this time and out of their troubles, but if eggs are well set, is generally an injury. What is at ever you get into such a place after learning the fol- a certain point rich, smooth and custard-like, belowing receipt, you will know what they want, bet- comes, with longer baking, watery and inferior, ter than they know themselves. through the curdling of the eggs, just as is seen to happen when a custard is allowed to boil. Cook the

64T.

Pried

Mush

Balls, or Fried Pone.

materials as

put 1

pound

you please before the eggs are

as

little after.

described,

1 pint of boiling water.

of taste.

Scald the meal with the boiling water ; add the rest of the ingredients flour your hands make ;

balls,

much

but very

Several puddings of corn meal have already been the next is a plainer and cheaper sort. Not necessarily the worse for that it is mere matter

of corn meal.

4 tablespoonfuls of melted lard. 1 e Sg$ CU P cold water. Salt.

round

in,

64$, Plain

Baked Indian Pudding.

;

and fry in a saucepan of hot

lard.

They

2 quarts of water, or milk. 12 ounces of corn meal.

require long cooking.

No doubt

it

could be easily demonstrated that four

cooks in a hotel kitchen accomplish more in the culinary line than do forty domes ic cooks in twenty pri-

2 ounces of butter, or suet. 6 ounces of molasses (a tea cupful). 1

teaspoonful of ground ginger.

4 eggs.

Little salt.

Make mush

with the meal and water, and let it simmer about 2 hours. Then add the other ingredibut and system of their owing ents and bake in a buttered milk pan nearly an hour. work, the greater capacities of their ranges and utenMakes 2| quarts. the sils, labor-saving conveniences, water and drainBrown Bread, Yeast age arrangements, and the larger quantities handled. 649. vate houses.

No

particular credit to the hotel cooks,

to the larger scale

it is

Common

It takes

but

longer to cook five pounds than one, scarcely more trouble to make a gallon of soup for But the twenty persons than a quart for a family.

Raised.

little

emergencies are many, too. ping off and leaving out of

There has

many

to

be a drop?

1

long and tedious

which cannot be made in short time, most likely not to be made at all, or else attempted

pound

of corn meal

1 pint of boiling

water

about 3 cupfuls. 2 cupfuls.

cupful of black molasses. cupful of cold water.

processes. That

1

is

1 cupful of yeast, or a yeast cake in water.

and

spoiled.

There are printed directions for numerous articles apparently desirable, that must be constantly stirred or otherwise worked one or two hours. To follow

pound of either rye or graham flour. pound of white flour, a heaping pint. Salt.

Pour the boiling water over the corn meal in a


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. pan and mix, throw in a teaspoonful of salt, add the molasses and cold water, then the yeast and then the two kinds of flour. Line two sheet-iron brown bread pails with greased paper, put in the dough and let rise from one to two hours, then bake or steam for five hours. If steamed, bake the loaves afterward long e*nough to form a slight crust.

A

good sort of bread

is

m,ide

as above

with

a

a colander set in a saucepan. Press the frui through the colander into another vessel and mea. ?ure

Put as much sugar by measure into theap saucepan and boil them gently for

it.

ricot juice in the

half an hour, skimming once; then put mashed apiicot and simmer down thick.

652

through a common flour graham pound sieve to remove the coarse bran, and the white flour omitted; or with all rye flour and no graham or of

165

sifted

a.

Pumpkin Butter Pine

in

the

Quality.

2 pounds or pints of dry mashed pumpkin. 1 pound of sugar. 4 ounces of butter.

Flavoring either of shaved lemon rind, cloves^ Care should be taken not to scald the yeast nutmeg or race ginger. The pumpkin must be dry, either baked or steamby adding it to the hot meal before the cold water. When this kind of bread is sticky when sliced it ed. Mash it through a strainer, mix the sugar and shows it was made up too wet. When the loaves butter with it and the piece of ginger bruised, or come out hollow or caved in ii shows too much fer- thin shaved lemon rind; let simmer at the s?de or white.

mentation.

upon bricks on the stove for perhaps an hour. becomes thick and semi-transparent; can be kept in jars in a dark place. Good for the same uses as set It

65O, English

Home-Made Brown Bread.

fruit jellies

3 pounds of sifted graham flour. 1 quart of warm water.

652

ounce of compressed yeast 1 teaspoonful of salt.

By

sifted

bran taken

graham is meant flour with the coarsest Commence 7 or 8 hours before

out.

time to bake.

and marmalade.

Dissolve the yeast in the water and

6.

Peach Butter.

8 cupfuls of sliced peaches. 4 cupfuls of sugar. 2 cupful s of water.

The peaches need not be peeled, but should be rubbed

in a coarse towel before slicing. Put the water into a kettle or bright pan; then the sponge." Place the pan in a warm corner, to repeaches; shut in the steam and let cook at the back main 4 hours. Then throw in the salt, mix up to of the stove,or set on bricks, for an hour or longerstiff dough, scrape out the pan and knead smooth. Then add the sug >r, and do not leave it, as it burns Brush over the pan with the least possible amount a broad wooden of melted lard, or lard and hot water to prevent very easi'y, but keep stirring with paddle while it boils one-half hour more. Keep in sticking, put in the lump of dough and brush it in a cool place. over, and let rise 2 hours more. Then knead, make ajar

mix up

half the flour

into loaves, rise again

with

it,

that

is

"setting

and bake.

Where

potato yeast is used instead of compressed, take about one-fourth as much yeast as water. The foregoing is the kind of bread fashionably

served with stewed slices of

651.

fish.

Rhubard Marmalade

Rhubarb

for Tarts.

flavored with oranges and boiled

down

With sugar.

4 cupfuls of rhubarb cut very small. 2 cupfuls of sugar.

652 c.

Caterers'

Wedding Cake.

2 pounds of su^ar. 1J

pounds of butter.

12 eggs. 2 pounds of flour. 8 tablespoonfuls of wine. Same of brandy. 6 nutmegs gronnd or grated. 5 pounds of raisins. 4 pounds of currants.

2 pounds of citrons. Stone the cut the citron

raisin?,

wash and dry tke currants, mix all three together

email, then

3 oranges or orange peel only. and dust them with a cupful of flour. Grate the yellow rind of the oranges into the Mix the first four ingredients together the same saucepan and then cut up the insides, carefu'ly ex- as if for pound cake, add the liquors, nutmeg, and cluding the sreds and white pith. Put in a spoon- then the fruit. ful or two of water to wet the bottom, then the sugar Line the mold with buttered paper, and wrap and rhubirb, and simmer at the back of the range another paper around the outside and tie it with with the lid on for an hour. Keep in a jar. Use twine. Bake the cake about three hours. to fill tarts or spread between layers of cake.

652.

Marmalade of Canned Apricots.

2 cupfuls of sugar to 2 cupfuls of apricot pulp. Drain the fruit from the syrup by pouring all into

652

d.

Layer Fruit Cake.

Sheets of pound cake mixlure baked in jelly cake pans; minced raisins, citron, almonds and currants

mixed with icing and spread between.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

166

Pound Oake.

653.

Bake

14 or 15 ounces of sugar. 12 ounces of butter. 10 eggq.

pound of

1

flour.

the butter and sugar together slightly and them with a spoon till creamy and white. Add

the eggs 2 at a time, and then the flour in 3 or 4 portions. Beafing the batter after all the ingredi-

are in tends to make the cake Pound cake should not be flavored.

ents

Pound

cake, doubtless

is

fine grained.

so called, because

it

can

657.

too rich to be

does

sort of

plum cake.

A The

fruit first.

cinnamon,

1 small cupfrl of strong black coffee. 1 small cupful of reboiled molasses. 1 small cupful of brandy. I tablespoonful of extract of lemon.

figs

not sink to the

Black Cake*

pounds of seedless raisins. 2 pounds of clean dry currants. 1J pounds of citron, shred fine. 2 ounces of mixed ground spices cloves, nutmeg and mace.

Pound Fruit Oake.

The staple every day

Takes

2.}

good eating.

654.

Richest Fruit Oake

Prepare the

be rmde with a pound of each of the ingredients. The 10 eggs weigh a pound. But so much butter makes it

molds lined with buttered paper.

1 to

becomes moister and firm with a few days keeping.

Warm work

in

2 hours according to depth. This cake cannot be cut while fresh without crumbling, but

from

small addition of almonds, nuts, candy, or cut if wished.

can be made

Then mix the cake batter

:

fruit

14 ounces of sugar. 14 ounces of butter.

bottom in this mixture.

14 ounces of sugar.

II eggs.

14 ounces of butter.

18 ounces of

11 eggs. 18 ounces of flour.

flour.

Mix up same

as pound cake, after the flour is all add the 2 ounces of spice, then the coffee, molasMix the above the same as pound cake, then add ses, brandy and lemon extract. The batter will then to it: be quite thin. Dust the fruit well with flour and 2 teaspoonfuls of mixed ground spices, cinnamon, and mix it in. mace, and alspice. Line two cake molds with buttered paper and di1 lemon, grated rind, and juice. Set the molds in the vide the mixture into them. 1 pound of raisins. middle of a sheet or two of greased paper, gather it 1 pound of currants. up around them and tie with twine, thus wrapping 8 ounces of citron. the molds in paper to shield them from too much Half cupful of whisky (optional). heat and avoid burning the fruit. Bake from 2 to U~e seedless raisins. Nothing is good made full 2 hours in a slack oven. Mix the fruit together and dust it of raisin seeds. with flour before stirring it iuto the batter. The 658. The black cake above should be at least 2 hours* to bake. cakes require from 1 to The amount of cake or 3 days old before it is cut. in

H

655.

Either of the preceding pound cake mixtures with citron cut in shreds and added, and a

pound of little lemon 1

batter only serves to hold Uie fruit together, but,

Citron Oake.

656. 1 1

extract.

1

1 1

ingredients remain the

8 ounces of almonds, blanched. 1 tablespoooful

of mixed ground spices.

Half pint of brandy. 1 lemon, juice

and grated rind.

it

will still

be a

659.

;

Mountain Cakes.

Pound cake baked on jelly cake pans, 4 or 5 or more of the sheets piled on each other with cake icing spread between, and on the top. Decorate the top

pound of sugar. pounds of butter.

pounds of seedless raisins. pounds of currants. pound of citron.

same and

very rich black cake.

Wedding Oake Rich Fruit Oake.

1J pounds of flour. Mix the above like pound cake, then add

it

ought to be mentioned, the quantity of the pound cake mixture in it may be doubled and all the other

with the kernels of hickory nuts. :

66O.

Drop Oakes.

Pound eake mixture, or butter sponge cake mix* ture with a handful or two of flour added and a

little

baking powder placed by spoonfuls on greased baking pans make the cone shaped drop cakes of the shops.

A

strip of citron, a

few currants or granulated sugar

on top make the variations.


THE AMERICAN PASTRY 661.

White Coooanut Cookies and Small Cakes

667-

Lafayette Cake,

167

COOK.

Two sheets of pound cake baked in two shallow Make (he cake mixture number 15 an baking pans. Spread one with jelly, place the other on top and ice it over. Mark it in oblongs before or desiccated cocoanut to it. Roll out with a more flour and cut small cookies. Sugar over the the icing gets quite dry; The same may also be baked tops before baking in muffin rings in the icing.

662. Small Cream Cakes.

and

iced on top with cocoanut

mixed

Drop the butter sponge cake mixture on greased 668. German Cookies. baking pans. Let the cakes be about the size of thin. out silver dollars. run will Dredge They Make cookies of either of the mixtures and after Bake light. Spread placing in pans egg them over with a brush and sugar on top with a dredger pastry cream between two placed together. sprinkle on them chopped almonds mixed with

Sugar Oake Made Without Eggs-

663.

Bake light colored. Gravel sugar is gravel sugar. the small lumps from crushed sugar sifted through a colander.

8 ounces of sugar. 4 ounces of butter.

669.

Jumbles.

1 large coffee cupful of milk. to flavor, or

Nutmeg

Are cookies in ring shapes, of various degrees of richness of mixture. Commonly they are only cut in rings with a ring cutter; properly they should be

carraway seeds.

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 1

pounds of

Mix up

flour.

and added made with a sack and tube. Take a lady-finger tube and file the edge into saw and bake in a Brush over with milk before baking. teeth and press out the jumble dough in a ribbed cord, of which form rings on the baking pans. The

like biscuit, the butter melted

to the milk with the sugar,

shallow pan.

Roll out

cooky mixtures

664. Cookies, Sugar Cakes. Best.

1

1 1

pound of sugar. pound of butter.

12 ounces of butter.

3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Flour to make soft dough 3 pounds.

No powder.

sugar together the same as Beat the eggs and mix them in, then the powder, add some flavoring, then flour. Let the dough, after it has been worked smooth, stand a

Cream

few minutes before rolling

it

out.

Sift

sugar over

the sheet of dough before cutting out the cakes.

1

pound

Cookies,

Common.

8 ounces of white sugar. 3 eggs.

2 ounces of ground ginger. teaspoonful of baking powder. 1J pounds of flour. 1 to

671.

of milk.

4 teaeponfuls of baking powder. 2 pounds of flour.

Hard Cookies

or

To cut in fancy shapes.

They do not spread

Grantham Ginger Snaps,

English.

12 ounces of white sugar. 8 ounces of better.

Sweet Crackers. or

small. 1 teacupful of milk 2 ounces of ground ginger.

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

lose form.

12 ounce* of powdered sugar. 6 ounces of butter.

baking powder.

2 pounds of flour. Lemon or cinnamon

1

pounds of

Mix up

flour.

in the usual

way

for cookies.

Sift

sugar

over before cutting out the cakes.

6 eggs. Half cupful of milk. 1 teaspoonful of

8 ounces of butter.

Make same way as cookies. Sift granulated sugar over the sheet of dough and run the rolling pin over to make it adhere before cut! ing out the cakes.

of sugar.

6 eggs. 1 cupful

Ginger Snaps, Rich Kind.

1

8 ounces of butter.

666.

67O.

the butter and

pound cake.

665.

be used, or this:

8 eggs. Flavor of lemon or orange. 2 pounds or little less of flour.

12 eggs.

for

may

pound of sugai.

extract to flavor.

It is generally best to make the dough for all kinds of cookies and sugar cake as soft as it can possibly

be rolled out.

Different persons

make very

different


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

108

cakes of these sorts from the same receipts, and the

common

much

fault is too

The

flour in the dough.

baking powder too is responsible for some of the changes. With too much powder the cakes run into each other and lose the good round shape they to Lave.

ought

Brown Ginger Cookies, Good

672.

and add

it

tubular shape on a

Make

8 ounces of butter. it

and cut with a small

dough as

for

8 ounces more flour.

681.

cutter.

How

Ginger Nuts without Eggs.

8 ounces of butter.

8 ounces

it

to

out to a thick sheet

cutter.

Make Stock Yeast.

to

to

this process, requiring

about 5 days time before new ferment can be made from the new stock. But as stock will keep at least a month and much longer if bottled and kept in the ice-house, the trouble

673.

handle.

brandy snaps, and add

Roll

There are two parts

2 pounds of flour, or enough to make soft dough Mix the ingredients in the order they are printed Roll out

the

new broom

and cut out with a small

4 eggs. 2 ounces of ground ginger. Half cupful of milk or water. 4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

drawing

Soft Ginger Nuts.

676,

8 ounces of sugar. 8 ounces of black molasses.

Stir all together,

Drop this batter with a teaspoon on baking pans they need not be greased and bake in a slack oven. The snaps run out flat and thin. Take them off before they get cold and- bend them to round or

Common

in.

to the rest.

in the flour gradually while stirring.

often.

The

682.

Bottle Yeast.

first

part

of sugar.

does not recur very

is:

The Beginning of

Yeast.

8 ounces of molasses. 2 teaspoonfuls of ground ginger. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

Get a strong quart

Flour to make soft dough.

Warm

the butter, sugar and molasses together and well, when nearly cold again add the gin. Roll pieces of the dough in ger, powder and flour. long thin rolls and cut off in pieces large as cherries.

mix them

Place on buttered pans with plenty of room between.

Bake

light.

674.

Sugar Oakes without Eggs.

8 ounces of butter.

an ale or champagne

hops dry to get the full strength. The bottle must only be two thirds full. Then put into the bottle, besides, two handfuls of ground malt and one handful of sugar.

Shake up, cork, and

tie

the cork

down

with twine, like ginger-pop. Set the bottle on a warm shelf in a corner of the kitchen where it will not be disturbed and will not be in danger of getting Let it stand there too warm in the heat of the day.

from 44

8 ounces of sugar. 8 ounces of water a cupful. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder.

bottle,

Make some

strong hop tea by boiling a large handful of hops in a quart of water, cool it and strain it into the bottle, squeezing the

bottle will da.

to

on a small stock

1} pounds of flour to mix, and more to roll out. in the order they are printed. The softer the

ready

to start

it

will

be yeast

fermentation

in.

the

itself.

683.

Mix

48 hours, by which time scale,

Second Part.

Stock Yeast.

dough can be handled the better the cakes will be. Sift

The bottle having stood long enough or two days after corking it down make about 2 gallons of hop tea by putting a pail of water into a kettle

sugar over before cutting out.

675.

Brandy Snaps

with a 1

pound of

extract to flavor.

1 teaepoonful of 1 2

pounds of

Rub paste,

soda

of hops

;

rounded measure.

light molasses.

the butter into the flour as in

making

short

and add the ginger. Make a hole in the midand put in the sugar, molasses and

with a piece of ice. After that put in a quart of When coarse ground malt and J pound of supar. this mixture is no more than milk warm, take the

die of the flour

bottle yeasi, hold the

extract

draw the cork

;

nearly a pound and boiling lid on the kettle. Put 2

pounds of flour into a large jar, pan, or keg and strain some of the boiling hop water into it enough to wet and scald the flour thoroughly when stirred up when there are no more lumps in the flour strain in all the rest of the hop water and cool it

8 ounces of butter.

8 ounces of sugir. 2 ounces of ground ginger.

Lemon

lot

them about an hour with a

flour.

dissolve the soda in a spoonful of water

neck downwards and

which

will

come out

o*irefully

like the oork


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. from a bottle of champagne

and mix the two

Some time ago

169

the writer saw a Vienna Model

Set the jar or keg containing the Bakery so called begin and flourish awhile, and together. stock in a warm corner where it may fermen at last go into bankruptcy in an attempt to introduce undisturbed, and in a day and a half or two day afterwards the stock will be ready to star

ferment with, as has already been directed a

number

512.

and make the above described rolls popular in a that had but little appreciation of their excellence. For one thing it cost the firm $2.60 per week for compressed yeast alone, to arrive on certain days by express, when they might have made

community

not necessary to make the bottle yeas the common kind at a scarcely appreciable cost. every time that stock is made, for new stock may The lesson is: German bread for the Germans, be started with some of the old stock remaining but whenever the ferment seems weak and slow but Vienna rolls cannot be forced into the position and whenever the bread begins to turn sour be- of favoritism that is held by Parker House or Albany fore it is light, then new stock should be started rolls, or split rolls by any other name. Make the Vienna shape, however, out of French roll dough. from the very foundation, in the bottle. Brush over the sheet of dough with a little melted It may be observed that the above method butter, then roll up the rolls, and after baking they renders a person who can get the raw materials they can be unrolled, and the people who eat will quite independent of every other person's yeasl admire them. and of anj other kind of yeast to start with He It is

makes

his

own from

4 pounds of 1

1

first

germ.

Genuine Vienna

684. 1

the very

Bolls.

flour.

quart of milk. ounce of German compressed yeast.

ounce of

salt.

in

it.

the

the milk

Baker's Apple Cake.

A sheet of the coffee cake dough (No. 540) covered with apples in slices stuck in edgewise and, after a little time allowed for it to rise, baked in a slack oven.

Plain bread or roll dough is sometimes made purpose at the bakeries, and the apples

to serve the

are basted while baking with syrup and dredged

1 tablespoonful of sugar,

Make

685,

lukewarm and

with cinnamon. dissolve the yeast

A

Set sponge at 9 in the morning, at noon add and sugar and make up stiff dough. Let

Plea for the Pastry Cook.

salt

" In the time of Charles IX. of France, about 4. Then work the dough well on the pastry cooks made such advance that the products of their by pressing out and folding over. and Roll out the dough in one large sheet as thin as industry held an honorable place in every feast; for we find a considerable formed corporation, they you can, which will be about the thinness of a dinner plate edge then measuring with your hand cut that prince investing it with certain privileges.*' So and authority, and the dough into strips or bands as wide across as your says our most respected advocate continues: "It is easy to entertain a large number hand is Cut these rise

till

table

;

again into triangular pieces not equal sided but long and narrow triRoll these triangular pieces up, beginning

long.

for

rolls,

angles. at the broad bottom end, and the point will come up in the middle, and there will be a spiral mark around from end to end.

Give each roll a few turns under the hands to smooth it and place it on the baking pan in the form of a crescent -just the shape and size of the new moon. Brush over with water. Let rise in the

pans about half an hour and bake about ten minutes

of healthy appetites; with plenty of meat, venison, game, aod some large pieces of fish, a feast for sixty But to please mouths that only open is soon ready. in affectation, to

tempt women

fu)l of fancies, to

excite stomachs of papier mache, or rouse an appetite which is ever flickering in the socket, would

require more genius, insight, and labor than the resolution of one of the problems of the Geometry of the Infinite.'*

The pastry cook's occupation ought at least to rank equal to the meat cook's in the organization of the working force of a hotel. If it at present is held subordinate the reason may be found in the binding force of inherited customs; for the meat cook's office has existed ever since

men

first

began

animals and toast their flesh over the camp for food, while the pastry cook's is a later outof the highest civilization. But having the

to slay fire

growth more delicate and

mands GENUINE VIENNA ROLLS

alent.

difficult

for their perfect

tasks to perform

it

de-

execution a rarer kind of

Almost any person of ordinary shrewdne*


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK.

170

and apitude casually thrown for awhile amongst the bakeries in Chicago which are in reality large facto, cooks in a hotel may set up with a fair cbanco o: ries, as extensive as seme pork packing establishsucceeding as a meat cook himself in the vastly pre- ments, and these making specialties of pies, bread, ponderating number of places where cheapness has cakes, or crackers seem if we may be allowed to to be the first consideration, and from that may eas- make a rough guess to supply about one-fourth of but first-class the entire city. These large bakeries have shops for ily reach the more lucrative positions pastry-cooks, cannot be made in that way, for pas- retailing, large double stores in the heart of the city, try cooking, including bread making and baking, is converted into lunch houses with long counters and a more exact trade, a matter depending upon weights rows of stools, and waiters, clerks and cashiers, and measures and a particular manipulations, not to and they are crowded during about two hours be trusted to guess work without long previous of each meal time about six hours of the day, The products of the meat cook's labor are with men taking a meal of bread cakes, pies and cofpractice. ;

set before people

prepared for their enjoyment with

The cook, and the appetites sharpened by hunger. steward of practiced taste may discern in the soup a slight burnt or smoky or unpleasant flavor, yet the entire company will probably parlake of it with

fee, tea,

coffee rolls

or milk.

Nothing

made by steam

heat.

and round graham

cooked there except the

is

They serve French

rolls

split

with butter, three for

cents, in little baskets ; coffee-cakes made up in twists like one of our cuts, and brushed over with five

enjoyment without, perceiving anything amiss but syrup, two for five cents yellow rusks in long ghape after the keen appetites have been appeased let like rolls; Boston brown bread, very brown and something of the pastry cook's be sent to table burd- baked in pails, or deep molds same shape. Apple ;

;

ened with a similar inferiority and it will be imme- cake they have, and "stollen," and "Lincoln pie," and almost unanimously rejected. It used to here called "Washington pie;" small sponge cakes be the frequent remark of a very successful hotel- baked in pans the length of a finger, also ladykeeper, that "people take more notice of the pastry fingers, one cent apiece; milk bread baked in long diately

than of any other part of the dinner." The characmore apt to be judged by the

ter of the table is

quality of the products of the pastry cook's labor,

warm

breads, waffles, and cakes, than by anything else, and if the working man or woman of the culinary department is possessed of taste and

including the

tin

and

molds, plum cake, baked pies

;

home made

pies,

"apple dumplings," with pumpkin and

custard thick, even up to the brim, lemon pie with

meringue on

Our

top,

mince and apple.

interest in this matter is that of a theorist

Meat is the most liking to find his beliefs verified. perception in a superior degree their quality can no- expensive and wasteful article of hotel provision. where be so well displayed as in the last course of We have found in hotels that in proportion as the a dinner upon the dainty dishes that are set about to breads and other articles included under the head of beir comparsion and to hold their among the rich fruits and nuts, the

place if they may wines, the flowers

of the dessert.

But

the pastry cook's art

if

pastries rose

in

excellence the

demand upon the

meats was lessened, to the benefit, probably, of all concerned. The products of these large city baker-

es are good with the uniform excellence that might what be expected of factory work and because they are good he sales are immense. The lunch or meal of this has even greater Up and down the sind costs but from ten to thirty cents, yet its

may

claim considera.

tion because of its capacity for contributing to is

delicate, elegant,

and ornate,

it

claims on the score of usefulness.

crowded

streets of

one of the largest and busiest

cities

Caicagito-wit at frequent intervals may be found restaurants with all sorts of meats, fish and fowls displayed with their garnlshings in the most tempting manner possible ; and between them and twice as frequent are the beer halls with their lunch dis-

cheapness is not its only recommendation, for the crowds of customers are not of the tramping class ;

hey are the foremen and workmen of the huge warehouses near by, the compositors, machinists, clerks, salesmen, tradesmen and professional men who prac-

ice the dietetic moralities. Good bread, good butter, md good coffee has it not almost passed into a promeat, tripe, chopped cvbbage and rye bread, the indications verb that these are the first requisites to an excellent secerning to be that all the men are eaters only of :able? and taking the country over, away from the

played, more or less free, of boiled

meat and

its

"trimmings." But not so. men lunch and dine.

other places where

There are There are

ery large bakeries and the very best hotels are there articles seldomer to be found?

ny


THE AMERICAN PASTRY COOK. 685.

Fairy Butter.

171

Clear lemonade can be obtained by filtering it, blotting paper folded to fit in

when made, through

The 1

yolks of 4 hard boiled eggs. teacupful of the best butter.

a glass funnel.

O8O.

3 heaping tablespoonfuls powdered sugar. 1 teaspoonful orange flower water.

Either grate the yolks or pound and rub them smooth in a bowl, mix the softened butter with them

To

Catawaba Cup.

each bottle of dry catawba allow two bottles

of soda water and a quarter pint of curacoa, mix in a pitcher, and add ice abundantly. If not conveni-

and the sugar and flavoring. Set the mixture where ent to get bottled soda, use water and sugar or will get cold, and afterward rub it through a lemonade to mix with the wine and liqueur. It looks something like vermicelli. sieve. Pile the fairy butter lightly in the middle of a cake O9O. Tea for a Large Party. dish, cut the snow cake in slices and lay around. To make what tea-drinkers call a real good cup of They are to be eaten together likt bread and butter. it

080. On word

Apple

tea take nearly a teaspoonful of green tea for each cup, or 4 teaspoonfuls to 5 cups of water, the leaves absorbing 1 cup. But then there is a second draw-

Souffle.

account of the scarcity of culinary terms, the ing that brings this out. Four ounces of tea contain 28 teaspoonfuls or 2 has to stand for a great number of

soufflle

may have very little resemblance cupfuls, rounded np. Using mixed tea, and allowThis consists of a border of dry ing time to draw to draw 2 cupfuls of tea is sufficient

light articles that

to each other.

stewed apple raised in a large dish or an ice cream to put into 40 cups of water, or a quarter-pound of saucer, as the case may be, the hollow middle filled tea to 2 gallons of water, which it the same thing with boiled custard and whipped white of egg and in other words. The best way to make tea for a number is to have sugar, like the frosting on lemon pies, piled on top. It need not be baked, but the top may be browned the water boiling in an urn and put the tea in a box by holding a red hot shovel over it on the shelf in made of perforated tin and drop it into the water, the oven. which must then be stopped from boiling, Served cold.

O8T.

Egg Lemonade

OO1.

for Fifty.

2

a tin milk pail

Coffee.

made with

coffee that, instead of being browned, only baked to a slight yellow color and is not ground, or at most the berries are only bruised, and It is made with one-half milk and one-half water.

Is

8 quarts of water 3 pounds of sugar

White

full.

is

6 or Y cupfuls.

dozen lemons.

2 oranges. 8 or 10 whites of eggs. Shaved or broken ice.

requires twice as much coffee as the ordinary. For 8 cups t ke :

Grate the rinds of 8 or 10 of the lemons and the oranges into a large bowl, using a tin grater, and take less or more, according to the size and degree of ripeness or greenness of the fruit. Scrape off the grated rind that adheres. Put a little sugar in the bowl, and rub the zest and sugar together with the

2 cupfuls of light

baked

coffee berries.

4 cupfuls of boiling water. 5 cupfuls of boiling milk. The berries may have been parched before, but

when wanted heat them over again and throw them Close the lid and let hot into the boiling water. stand to draw for half an hour, then add the boiling

back of a spoon. Squeeze in the juice of all, add milk through a strainer. the sugar and some water and then the whites of When the milk is first eggs, and beat the mixture till the sugar is dissolved ;

J

put in water to strain the

make

the specified amount and

lemonade into another

vessel containing

ice.

When

to be served

vert another

shake up to

088.

fill

a glass three parts

on top, the rims

make

on to

boil,

put in a

and, if for a party, a spoonful of whipped cream in each cup.

full, in-

close together,

and

091a.

Chocolate.

the foam.

Plain Lemonade.

Three or four lemons, according to size, and a small cup of sugar to a quart of water. Slice th e lemons into the water beforehand, and let stand. Put shaved

set

tablespoonfal or two of sugar to prevent burning at the bottom. Serve sugar with the coffee as usual,

ice in the glasses before filling.

1 quart of milk and water. I ounce of chocolate. Boil the milk and water in a small, bright saucepan. Scrape down an ounce as marked on the half

pound cakes of common chocolate, throw

it

in

beat with a wire egg whisk about one minute, or the chocolate is all dissolved.

and till


THE AMERICAN

172

Silver Plated

Skewers or Atelets.

Sabatier Cooks' Knives.

COOK.

See No.

783.

All sizes.

A la Mode Larding Needle. Scollop Knife.

For potatoes and other Vegetables.

See No. 963.

See No.

Tin Parisienne and Nantaise Potato Spoons. For scooping balls, olives, See Nos. 953 and 730. berries, etc., out of potatoes and beets.

1234.

Vegetable

Cutters.- Many patterns and sizes,

also,

for

cutting custard shapes for galantine ornaments.

Hotel Saucepans

Both copper and tinned

iron.


THE

*HOTEL-BOOK> OF

SALADS AND

C

LD DISHES.

SALAD DRESSINGS, WITH AND WITHOUT OIL; SALADS OF ALL KINDS, HOW TO MAKE AND HOW TO SERVE THEM; BONED FOWLS, GALANTINES, ASPICS, ETC, ETC.

BEING A PART OF THE

"OVEN AND RANGE"

SERIES.

BY

JESSUP WHITEHEAD.

1884.


THE AMERICAN COOK. a

together

175 variety of materials for oar

sufficient

ea'ad-making,

let

us to work.

692. Mayonaise Salad Dressing. "Three times the spoon with

And

THE HOTEL BOOK OP SALADS.

oil

of Lucca crown,

once with vinegar procured from town.'*

raw yolks of

3 or 4

eggs.

1 teacupful of olive oil. '

And light

About half as much vinegar.

words spoken

Only for something to say." Whatever other matters may have been already

A teaspoonful

of salt.

Drop the yolks into a bowl, soup plate, or deep, written to death there is, it is plain to see, a great bright saucepan, add about as much oil and stir dearth of writers on the subject of salads, at least in them together with a wooden spoon or any other our own langu?sg o it seems as if this had been re- kind of a spoon for a minute or two, then comgarded as a foreign affair and not of home interest mence beating and add oil a tablespoonful at a time. at all. The things, consequently, that never have After five minutes stirring and beating, the oil being been written but ought to be would, if written, fill a more than half in, throw in the salt and begin ad;

very be,

much

and

may them

larger volume than this is intended to our title seem to promise too much it

lest

be proper

to

say

we

are not going to try to take

ding the vinigar also by spoonfuls. On the addition of the salt the mayonaise will be very likely to thicken

up

at once

and the vinegar

However, in the way of practical salad reduce it, as well as for flavor. making, we will try to crowd into small space The above is the way of making nearly everything that can be pressed into the hotel

is

required to

all in.

plain, straight-

and fruits that are taken like some forward mayonaise that is practiced by cooks and people's statements, cum grano sails, with many an- their assistants daily all over the country, and being other such a very simple operation there is no wonder if 'rich herbaceous treat do not see the reason for making so much ado " they Might tempt a dying anchorite to eat. service, the herbs

4

It takes ten or fifteen minutes to bring it and encugb if tbe ornamental for extra occasions. about it. The daily bill of fare writer, whatever other office to the proper consistence. There might be difficulty as a matter of habit the three or four if the ingredients were warm; may be his, who, tired of

repeating in a cold place. In hot stock salads, sits running his fingers through his cooks always keep the oil Mayonaise of hair and wondering what in the nation be shall weather set the bowl in ice water. write next, will very likely find in the following the required thickness cannot probably be made with a smaller proportion of oil, but the same yolks lists just the suggestion he wants, for the very good

reason that they have been prepared and adapted under extremely similar circumstances. We wish

will take

up much more

if need be.

A quicker way than the foregoing is : Place the yolks in a deep quart bowl set in ice water, if warm weather add a spoonful of oil and whip with h-ipa to hotel working boys and girls who have their a Dover egg beater. In half a minute add more oil, living to make, for common labor is plenty and then the salt, and the mixture will at once become abject enough; it is tkill that wins the good posiKeep thinning with oil and vinegar as tions and g ood pay, but skill that can adapt itself, like bu'ter. skill to do that which else in the house in the other case, three proportions of oil to one of to offer

a set of instructions valuable

mists, to those

may be

who

deficient in,

take

to hotel econo-

pride in their table, per

everyone even sometimes

to

make

brick

wiihout straw, to make salad sans oil, sans celery, sans chicken, sans everything that most people deem

vinegar.

694.

Uses of the Mayonaise.

essential.

The mayonaise when right is like softened butter, ealad-making of the only more tenacious too thick to run. It is to be veritable g'stronomer, the scientific epicure, the spread smoothly over the top of the pile or shape of avowed dinner giving and dinner taking bon vivant, salad material, over the fillet of fish or form of lobit is time f,r us hotel workers to lay down the pen ster or shrimp, or over the whole fish giving a end shut up the book. Not that we think the best glossy yellow surface to be ornamented as desired.

But when

(four

it

com^s

to the

trade sal ids inferior, but because he

that his ate

is

sure

It is to

and must be incomparably above them. would

be eaten with the salad material as butter Sometimes for ornamental purposes it is

be.

stirred into the too

loose material to

make

taller

shapes. It is to

be mixed with about an equal amount of


THE AMERICAN

176

to be just aspic jelly (the jelly being cold enough on the point of setting) to form coll tartar sauce

a yellow, flavored

696. Hollandaise Salad Cream.

Also mixed with

acid jelly.

p eparations it makes sauces or dressings and cardinal emerald green colors of other red. Besides! these employments it is used in the

pint of good white wine vinegar. pint scant of water. 8 ounces of butter.

different

12 yolks of eggs.

form of

695*

COOK.

1

A

SALAD CREAM, OB THIN MAYONAISE.

tablespoonful made mustard. pinch of cayenne. Salt.

Boil the vinegar, water, and salt and butter all Reduce the th'ck mayonaise to the consistency of Beat the yolks a together in a bright saucepan. cream by adding m re vinegar or vinegar and water little, add some of the boiling liquid and stir them and if you wish to in some cases milk or cream together, then mix all and let come to the boiling be particular use some clear strained chicken broth It is on the same principal as making cuspoint. (c -Id) or

unseasoned soup stock with the vinegar, For lobster and other shell fish,

instead of water.

however, its

all

vinegar sharpness. This

be used, as they take away salad cream used as a sauce

may

makes almost any kind of vegetable, meat and fish and relishing if served with it cold and

If allowed

tard.

and have

to

to thoroughly boil be thrown away; if taken

it

will curdle,

off too

soon

it

One minute of be rich and thick enough stirring after the yolks are added is usually enough. Strain and set on ice to be cold for use. will not

palatable crisp.

Palatable,

that

to those

is,

who do not

dislike

And some of your

people will make the Some will choose thin mayonaise for themselves. their dinner in courses even from an American form olive oil.

bill

of fare,

and

sa'ads

are as ''familiar in their

mouths as household words."

own

you have plain and wiih

Seeing

mayonaise they are apt to order the condiments and relishes before

it

The preceding will be found eminently satisfactory and can be used in almost every place that It can be made mayonaise would be employed. thicker or thinner as required, but

when thinned

must be rapidly beaten and the liquid water or broth and vinegar added by degrees, otherwise the dressing may separate and the butter come to the top.

This, however, seldom occurs.

them make their It is generally an object to have mayonaiae creamy own plates. white, for which purpose lemon juice is added to it, who almost invariably for his but the hollandaise dressing is golden yellow, antf

varia ions on their

My

Italian friend

own meals makes a to salad,

with

salad, or at least something akin the better for vegetable salads like the following, poured over, looks askance at the which have no good looks of their own. remarks "Along the shores of the

oil

: vinegar and diterranean the people, the wealthy people, the mercantile people, do not use vinegar more than to the amount of a squeeze of a lemon it is (he com

M

691.

green stuff and

may

serve to give

call

it

ealad

the right

V

A of

remark which that

Salad.

2 quarts of cooked lima or butter beans.

mon

people, the people of the interior, tl:e peasants (and he shrugs his shoulders contemptuouslj) only the peasants who pour vi ieg4r plentifully over their

Lima Beans

A small onion, A little chopped

parsley.

The hollandaise salad cream of the preceding

re-

ceipt.

hang Spanish Mince the onion small. Mix all (he ingredients ealad-making: "A spendthrift for together by pouring from one bowl to another, exoil, a niggud for vinegar, and a madman to mix the the parsley, which chop and sprinkle over the " cept For there are those who think the salad toge her proverb

about

one who p urs-in any oil at all is the madman, and any rate think it will be better to let the spend-

top.

at

donate the vinegtr instead of the oil. There are a so motives of ec nomy iu favor of the wrorg

And my

thrift

Italian friend looked

on dubiously when

saw me preparing to pour a mayonaise over lima beans, and afterwards over corn, and green reading; but we cooks are perfectly disinterested and had just as lief make our dressing without oil peas, and string beans, as if he thought in Italian, "To what, base uses may we come, Horatio!" as not. he

first

"But," I said, "you make the talade de legumet, which is excuse me something of a vegetable hash; The following, if a rather large quantity for fifty these are at least simple and from their looks inAnd you cut also beets in dice and mix in, persons for dinner, is not too much for a supper viting. salad on a hot summer evening, when the thought and they stain the cut potatoes, and the red juice alone of all other food is wearisome disgust. mingles with the pale yellow of the mayonaise and

makes an uneatable

color."

He

put on his study-


THE AMERICAN and presently adopted the butter beans as the others, but he did not give up as well salad, the cut beets in salad cream. Mere matters of fancy ing

cap

but jet we

perhaps

presently

discover

which

things are popular.

177

COOK.

For luncheon or a party dinner build up the caupyramidal form, or like half a melon, wish

liflower in

fork and knife, laying the pieces in order around the dish, the largest at the bottom, heads outward, and another tier on top of that, the salad cream to

be poured over

Lima beans,

so generally esteemed, in their green state have but a very short season. Contrary to the

general rule, the dried are better than the canned beans for winter use.

OO8. The

secret of cooking all dried beans soft is in the

following

:

pick them over carefully and put them

Wash and

on in plenty of cold water with a rounding teaspoonful of soda for every two pounds of beans. Boil about 2 or 3 hours till they begin to be sofr.

all,

and decorate according

to

your

taste.

TOO.

Sugar Corn Salad.

Like the Lima beans salad, and to be dished up wilh the salad cream as a sauce, in vegetable dishes. The grains of corn are required to be distinct and clean and free from mush, and should be

washed

in

a colander for the purpose.

Before going on to describe the other available

Then pour them suddenly *into a colander to drain, everyday salad dressings let us include one more turn them back in the boiler and put in enough variety best dressed with the bright hollandaise. fresh cold water to cover them.

hour more they The sudden adding of

in half an

Set them to boil again will be thoroughly cooked.

TO1. Vegetable Salad Plain

cold water to the hot beans causes the skin to crack,

Take equal parts of four, five or six kinds of no cooked vegetables green peas, string beans, cauliexcuse for the stupidity of the mule-driving cooks flowers, asparagus heads not too soft cooked, corn, told of in Scribner's Monthly (Rocky Mountain Lima beans and potatoes, and a smaller proportion Cookery,) who carry the beans partly cooked in of onions if small green ones so much the better their kettles and recook them for three successive and a few slices of beets for ornament. Cut the podays in the vain attempt to make them soft. Our tatoes in small dice, the string beans and onions to lima beans are comparatively easy, but the most match, an J pull the cauliflower apart in email ppngs refractory sample of navy beans can be reduced in Mix all with a little seasoning of pepper and salt five hours by the above method even at an elevation and shake them about in the salad cream in a bowl. after

which they

of 11, 000

finish

cooking easily.

There

is

feet.

699.

Dishupwith cut beets and chopped parsley sprinkeled over the lop. Cooks who care to follow the analogist will have is very like observed that hollandaise salad ores

Cauliflower Salad.

m

4 to 6 pounds of cauliflower. The hollandaise salad cream of the preceding

the hot hollandaise sauce used so re-

little oil

not only

for

a

in the high-

sauce but

fish

equally for asparagus, cauliflower, artichoke, potaThe difference is only in the proportions toes', etc.

ceipt.

A

est style cookery,

much

and vinegar.

Hollandaise or Dutch this being used cold. sauce by the English method is mi'der, the French This dressing anmore concentrated and pungent. swers the question of what we shall do when we

Cut the branches of the cauliflower in the right and in sized pieces for individual dishes while raw, trim the stems off evenly, let stand in a pan of cold

water an hour or two. water

to cover

else.

Cook

it,

till

Set

to boil,

it

on with plenty of cold salt, but nothing have no

and add

the thick stems will leave

the

fork

as in boiling potatoes an hour or less. Brain without bre iking the pieces and set away to get cold Mix a little oil and vinegar with the cauliflower as well as

may be by

careful pouiing from one bowl to

Over each piece placed on individual dishes pour a spoonful of the salad creiim, which should be thick enough to mask it and not run off in

another.

the dish. Cau'ifl iwer salad is worth decorating. A few capers, French green peas shaken about in vinegar,

some small patterns stamped out of beet sprig of parsley,

slices,

or a

oil,

and the people

I

have instruted

with

pencillings by the way, have generally taken more pleasure in making it than the other more trouble-

some

varieties.

when we have this and the genuine French mayonaise there remains a want of which we are reminded when people looking over a table unsatisStill

factorily furnished with lettuce without on top, and over a bill of fare equally

boiled eggs

incomplete send timidly asking the powers that be if they can't have a hard-boiled egg or two for their ealad. Such persons have been known to send written on a bill of fare the lines imputed to Sidney Smith

:

"True flavor needs it, and your poet begs " Tbe pounded yellow of two well- boiled eggs.


THE AMERICAN COOK.

178

Well,

we are coming to that kind of dressing, but mind the common aversion to and common

having in

pers. 1 quart of boiled potatoes, in dice.

ex-

1

periments of the critical in such matters a refine-

1

scarcity of huile

d' olives vierge,

will offer for the

ment upon the foregoing hollandaise.

quart of celery and lettuce. quart of lean boiled ham, minced.

1 tablespoonful

7O2. Salad Cream "Without

made mustard.

celery extract. hollandaise or any of the foregoing salad

The

Oil.

of

do

1

creams. 1

cupful of best butter. cupful of vinegar large.

Use the shank meat of boiled ham; chop it fine in Cut the vegetables neatly in dice

a wooden bowl.

6 raw yolks. 1 cupful of thin cream. 2

teaspoonful of

of uniform appearance.

Mix

well with the dress-

ing.

salt.

Now what can we careful managers of provisions Cayenne and white pepper, of each as much as best do with a whole panful of nice white celery (in would lie on a dime. Boit the vinrg^r and butter together ia a deep ice water) when all the heart pieces have already bowl-shaped saucepan. Beat the yolks light. Pour been picked out and eaten with salt only ? There the boiling vinegir and butter to them gradually are but two or three ways of cooking celery, and while still bea'ing, then place the mixtu-e on the very little suffices for that. It ia very liable to burn at the bottom fire again. aud must be beaten rapidly till it begins to thicken. Then commence and slowly pour in the cup of milk or cream and continue beating till the salad dressIt must ing looks like cream or boiled custard. not quite boil else it will curdle. Add the salt and pepper and beat

it

in a

pan of ice water

till

cold.

706.

"Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl, And scarce suspected animate the whole." 2 quarts of celery cut in small dice.

The cream salad dressing of the

An

A porcelain lined saucepan should be used for the If you cinnot stay with the salad cream till above. ii:,i

lied

and beat

Celery Salad.

last receipt.

onion grated or finely minced.

Little salt.

Mix well. Serve very cold with a little parsley saucepan in a pan of boiling water sprinkled over the top. Best for lunch when there up frequently as you pass. is cold chicken beside, or other cold meat.

set the it

703.

HARICOTS VEBTS EN MAYONAISE,

Oyster Salad.

1 quart of fresh oysters. 1 quart of chopped calery. Either the hollandaise or the salad cream of the

preceding receipt. Drsin the oysters from their liquor. Cut them in Mix with the chopped celery halves or quarters.

and pour the dressing

over.

In other words string beans salad, appears in a menu of a dinner of the royal family of Spain, one that has been preserved as a model, among many others.

Whenever canned vegetables have to be used and some of the best brands do very very well for salads drain the liquor from them and rinse them in fresh hot water before using.

Half lettuce and half celery will answer for the preceding, or tender white cabbage may be used. Oyster salad

is

in

demand.

"But where are those hard-boiled eggs?" "Coming up!" "In dressing salad, mind this law: With two hard yolks use one that's raw."

7O4. Canned Cove Oyster Salad. May be made like the foregoing, the liquor being excluded, ai.d also with boiled potatoes cut in dice in any other salad dressing. Clams

cm

be used as above in time of need.

some of the clam liquor

to thin the

U?Q

salad dressing

with, instead of water.

707. American Favorite Salad Dressing. 6 hard-boiled eggs (the yolks only needed). 2 or 3 raw yolks*

J cupful of olive oil. cupful of melted fresh butter. 1

705.

Ham

Salad.

salt.

tablespoonful of made mustard. Little black pepper and cayenne. 1

Excellent change from potato salad for hotel sup-

cupful of vinegar.

2 teaspoonfuls of

;


THE AMERICAN

COOK.

179

Pound the hard-boiled yolis quite smooth in a following being kept in mind is its wh'teness to bowl with the w,arm butter, add the silt, mustard contrast with the preceding kinds, which are all and pepper, and then beat in the oil gradually, and yellow. The bowl should be alternately with the vinegar. water in

set in ice

warm

weather.

This makes a

according to the requirement.

708.

cupful of best butter. 1 tablespoonful of flour.

cupful of olive oil. cupful of vinegar.

Best Potato Salad. 1

sm ill

cupful of strong chicken or veal broth. and white pepper.

Salt

Favorite hotel supper dish. 2 quarts of boiled potatoes. 1

Allemande Salad Dressing.

710.

buttery compound, that may be reduced either wi'h old chicken liquor, cream, or vinegar and wafer,

cream to thin and whiten the dressing. the butter and flour together in a saucepan over the fire as if making drawn butter, pour in the Little

Mix

onion.

2 tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley. The popular salad dressing of the preceding

re-

ceipt.

and then the broth gradually, stirring till it thickens, and then the vinegar, salt and pepper, and lastly the cream.

oil

break the potatoes, mince the onion exStrain and set on ice till wanted. mix, pour the dressing over and The broih should be strong enough to set in jelly combine thoroughly by turning the ealad from one bowl to another three or four time^. Throw the when cold, and should be strained through a napkin Slice or

tremely

fresh

small,

chopped parsley

into

it

just before serving.

The wbites of the eggs may be added, cut

before

711. The foregoing is the formula, the rut to run in, but how shall we infuse life into it or explain the particular knack which makes one person' B^ potato salad so utterly unlike and superior to another's ? Cold potatoes which have remained in the dinner steamers three hours, then are peeled and sliced, ma y do the dressing will carry the burden of their inferiority,

but they are not best.

new

Take

it is

used for the dressing.

in strips.

Potato Salad a r Allemande.

2 quarts of potatoes cut in dice. 3 or 4 green onions, with part of the tops. 8 or 4 radishes. 1

head of lettuce cut small.

The allemande dressing of the preceding receipt. Mix all the vegetables and pour the dressing over, or reserve the radishes to ornament the tops of the

potatoes if you can, if not, good dishes, or else use cress or parsley for that purpose. mealy old ones, pare and^ divide in large pieces. Throw them in cold ealted water and boil about half The same dressing will serve for various other an hour, or till j ust done. Drain the water from vegetable salads as well as the above, and for fish them and break the largest pieces apart with a and chicken when there is a mayonaise for border When nearly cold mix the dressing and this for twist of a fork. top-dressing. with the potatoes and set the bowl on ice till wanted*

V12 We

obtain

the best salads

with

the least fuss

when we can

get those trifling cooks, two or more of them, to run a rivalry with each other who can make the best. The last described dressing is a

'Rubbing the Dish with Garlic. There are yarns and yarns about great secrets in andj their J possessors, J like one in the

c )okery

KEPORTEB recently of a castaway Frenchman who compound of cooked made the fortune of a Russian innkeeper and of the and raw. The person dishing up vegetables during town by imparting the secret of French chicken the slow latter end of dinner generaUy can prepare fi icassee. What a curious scrap-book might be it between times to be ready for the next meal. made if some of the people who have time.to play would collect these wonderful gastronomical and All these salad dressings are susceptible of im- culinary anecdotes The really good cooks of the country practice provement by added flavorings, and the epicure little

tedioup, being a double

!

gets

in

his extra harmonies

confuse cur directions

we

in that

way.

Not

to

will treat of the flavoring

complications by themselves in a special chapter.

7O9. A scarcity dressing H

of eggs often

might term great

secrets,

the grand aggregate that hotel cuisine. Some of

and throw them

all into

styled excellence of the these fine touches lie in

is

makes us employ a salad flavoring salads, more particularly the salad dress dish with ings, and one of them is to rub the salad There was a head waiter in Boston once garlic.

can be made without any, for hotel mea's go on incessantly, but another reason for the at

thousands of the fine touches which the uninitiated


THE AMEBICAN

180

who nibbed

the dish "with garlic and his salads were

sist

COOK.

on his keeping

it.

in great repute, though none could (eli the secret of "He had given his address, and some time after, the subtle aroma they possessed. If any looked for he received a very civil note, requesting him to go It was and mix a salad in one of the finest houses in Grosvulgar garlic in the salad they found none.

only a case of the scent of the roses that huog round it still. Sort of hook baitirg trick, an illusion, as it were. Pos&ibly some castaway Frenchman had imparted this secret to this head waiter of the Boston hotel, but it was impossible for it to remain unshared, and so a waiter, after a while, discovered his superior rubbing the dish with garlic.

venor

D' Albignac

Square.

after furnishing himself with

ings and maturing his plans.

arrived

punctually,

some special season, He had the good luck

succeed again.

to

"The first party for whom he had manipulated had exaggerated the merits of his salad, and the Now two second company made so much more noise about it,

persons possessed the secret and of cor.r- e they could not both live in one house. There used to be

that d' Albignac' s reputation^was already made. He was known as the fashionable salad maker, and soon an awful story told about the great Captain Cook had a gig, in order to keep his appointments, with a and his too smart cabin boy who, when at the anti- servant to bring his mahogany case containing all podes, was asked by the gleeful captain if be knew the ingredients such as vinegars of different flawhere he was, and had the indiscretion to answer vors, oils with or without a fruity taste, soy, "under London bridge." But the captain would caviare, truffles, anchovies, ketchups, gravies, and not allow anyone to remain in the vessel who knew even hard-boiled eggs. as much as he did himself, and pitched the poor boy "Later he got cases made to order, furnished overboard, which was very shocking, and that is them completely and sold them by hundreds. In about what happened to this poorj waiter, so he went short he came to realize a fortune of more than

eighty thousand francs."

West.

13. jatelli instructing the English cooks in French In those countries where butter is held in little cookery could not quite abandon garlic, but found esteem and olive oil in a large degree takes its it necessary to warn them not to use a head of gar- place, it may naturally be surmised the fastidious lic, but only one clove, and took occasion to remark, people are as particular in the qualify of oil and its

combinations and critical of their flavors as Ameri"Over-seasoning is the bane of English cookery." A little touch of garlic is desirable, it is the petit cans and English of '-Cold Spring Creamery Gilt point

And

c? ail

in a ragout praised by Sir Walter Scott. one of many flavorings to be used

this is but

with discretion, for which no directions

Edged" and the famous "Suffolk Dairy Butter." The impossibility of improving the flavor of butter can be giv- by any addition does not exist in regard to oil, and

en. The foregoing will perhaps give point to the following excerpt from Brillat-Savarin, so far as to call attention to the flavorings named

it

seems quite possible for connoiseurs

the

of

palate

their

friends

to

surprise

by new admixtures,

In Russia, it is especially in mayonaise and salads. "I prefer] to tell the story of a Frenchman of said, the oil of sunflower seed is largely used for Limousin, who made his fortune in London by his salad making. The olive oil which now comes from skill in mixing a salad. Although his means were California has much the same nutty flavor, or pervery limited, Albignac (so he was The lied, if I re- haps more resembles the taste of beech nuts. :

V

member most

right)

famous

went one day taverns in

to

dine in one of the

London.

Whilst he was

finishing his succulent beefsteak, there six young dandies of good

were

five or

family regaling them-

selves at a neighboring table. him and sa'd very politely:

One

of

them came

to

best

we can ask for is to have oil as nearly tasteless we want to make salads more popular,

as possible if

and above because

it

all reject the oil which is sold cheap has become rancid, just as we reject strong

butter.

'Sir, it is said that

If

we cannot

afford to select our oils of various

your nation excels in the art of making salads; will brands "with or without a fruity taste" accordyou be so good as oblige us by mixing one?' ing to the use intended, we need not be so restrict"D' Albignac consenting, after a little hesitation, ed in the choice of vinegars of various flavors, to ordered

all that he thought necessary for the expected masterpiece, used his best endeavors, "and had the good luck to succeed.

give variety to the m-iyonaise. French cooks who disagree in most things are all agreed in using tarragon vinegar for salad dressings

"Whilst studying the ingredients, he answered all He said he questions about himself. was an emigrant and admitted, not without some

whenever

natural

course of his

frankly

from

shame,

he was receiving ass'stance a circumstance government

that

the

English which no doubt authorized one of the youog slip into the exile's

hand a five-pound

note,

men

to

and in-

can^be had and look with a withering on the American cook who has never had

it

sort of pity

even a pint of he to

is if

it

bought for his use in the whole

life.

They don't know how thankful

even the plain vinegar furnished proves not

be diluted sulphuric acid.

Tarragon and other flavored vinegars which con-


THE AMERICAN COOK. noiseurs regard as indispensible can be bought like any other good thing ready prepared, but where it

cannot be had for the asking it for the cook to make his own.

715.

may be worth

181

and sweet. 2 quarts of vinegar.

Mince the celery small.

while it

Boil the vinegar and pour Add a tablespoonful

to the celery in a stone jar.

of salt, stir up, let steep till next day then strain or stone jug and cork it tight. This may be used in almost all salads in place of part

into a demijohn

Tarragon Vinegar.

Green tarragon is a herb and can be bought of the of the plain vinegar. market gardeners in large cities. It is said to be best and strongest just as the plant is going into Eight ounces of celery seed scalded with a quart of boiling vinegar and let stand to steep makes the blossom. same kind of flavored vinegar as the foregoing. 1 pound of tarragon leaves. 4 quarts of white wine vinegar. Let steep in a stone jar two weeks.

But celery extract ready prepared through a flannel jelly bag, add to it and more convenient than either. a quarter ounce of isinglass (gelatine will do) dis-

Then

solved in it

and

is

cheap enough

filter it

warm

let it

cider or vinegar, to clarify

stand a mouth,

when

it is

bottle

it,

to be

718.

Garlic Vinegar.

decanted

into small bottles to keep.

4 heads of garlic, sliced. 1 ounce of red peppers, chopped.

But hotel cooks can never do all that, which is a method for phlegmatic people. Reader, did you ever go into the bar-room of a back country foreign

teacupful of walnut ketchup. 1 tablespoonful of salt.

2 quarts of vinegar.

Put all in a stone jar, cold, and keep covered though Peck's Sun says Iowa and see on the back shelf a series of home Used for Russian, Italian, Polish and Spanish made extracts, jars of whiskey with something in ii? salads. With the pulp of a few pounded anchovies

hotel

One

of these

flavor

Missouri

say in

the

is

green tansy leaves put in to

tansy

liquor.

That

is

An-

for tansy bitters.

other has peaches. That is for peach and sugar. Others have cherries, lemon peel, orange peel. They But tarragon can be are for we know not what.

steeped in cold vinegar like tansy in whisky, and half a pint of flavored vinegar thus be had at any Use it sparingly in piace of part of the plain time.

vinegar in any of the salad dressings, not flavoring strongly, however, as tarragon is a stranger to most of our people.

added, and a little red coloring the above sauce called carachi.

710. Turn a

the

Caper Vinegar. French capers and their vinegar wine vinegar in a jug. Strain This is best for the Allemande dress-

bottle of

into a quart of white

before using. ing.

ISO. Tarragon Vinegar.

is

Nasturtium Vinegar.

Vinegar flavored with pickled nasturtium seeds, The seeds are also very useful for as capers.

same 1

pound of green tarragon, partly dried before mixing

using. 6 small onions.

ounce of long pepper. 3 quarts of white wine or cider vinegar. Put the whole in a stone jug, cork and

in

and decorating

Beet Vinegar.

721,

1

let

steep several weeks. Strain through a napkin or silk seive

before using.

710.

Chili Vinegar.

Common pepper

Til.

is

Used occasionally for coloring, is the vinegar in which sliced beets have lain, boiled down to about one

half,

to

make

it

stronger and to

make

it

keep

without spoiling.

sauce.

quarts of vinegar for

spoonful

salads.

enough

to

Dilute a bottle with two

salad

mix

seasoning.

A

tablebottling.

in a salad.

The vinegar from walnut pickles, also vinegar made pungent with grated horseradish are also us-ed

Celery Vinegar.

2 pounds of the solid you cannot use on the

Strawberry, mulberry, raspberry and other vinegars of fruit not sweetened, are made by steeping the fruit in vinegar and boiling down, as above, then

celery roots and table

all

stalks that

white, however,

for salad seasoning, but not in ordinary life. are mentioned for information rather than use.


THE AMEKICAN COOK,

182

722*

Compound

1 pound of tarragon. 4 ounces of mustard

with carrots, pickles and capers, as well as beets, cut to correspond and mixed in only at the last minute, this salad will be fine, and need not be al-

Vinegar.

seeds.

With any one of the easy salad dressmade poured over and

alike.

ways

6 cloves of garlic. 6 small onions.

ings already directed to be shaken about in it the

4 ounces of elder blossoms.

attractive, enjoyable.

2 ounces of long pepper. ^ ounce of cloves.

chopped eggs

the

made kind,

salad

will

be stylish,

Or, without a dressing of with a little oil added and some

combination

this

ma'eria's

of

that

4 quarts of white wine vinegar. costs next to nothing will be equal to some of the Put all together to steep in a two-gallon jug cork- best salads of the best cooks, with high-sounding ed tight and let stand several weeks before using. names.

We

go on and instance various foreign mixsame class, first taking a lessen from

will

With such compounds as the above and others doubtless more fanciful than useful we may suppose d'Albignac of Limousin filled the vials which he sold by the case to the fashionable salad-crazed London-

not an exact receipt to be proven but rather a general lesson in salad making we copy the follow-

ers of sixty years since.

ing as

tures of the

one of the noted French cooks as

we

find

Perpetual Hotel Salad.

He

it.

and

says

:

MACEDOINE SALAD.

724. 723.

Jules Gouffe

it is

led me to prepare this Whilst staying at a friend's country house, the mistress of the house came [to me in great dis-

"The following incident first

salad:

Although some cf the things just examined into out of the regular routine, and occasion an

me

tress,

and confided

us not pass them without some consideration, or rather let us go to the extreme

failed,

she was quite at a loss

contrast of the perpetual salad that we sreused to. Perpetual ealad has no dressing and wants no flavor-

When

may be

impatient Bhrug,

let

nor aromatic

ing

vinegars

only vinegar, pepper

numerous

guests,

to

that her supplies having how to entertain her

and asked me

to

assist her.

I investigated the state of the larder, I

found

there nothing but cold meat and poultry, and cold game; all these I took, and, after carefully paring and cutting them up, I made them into a huge salad

and salt. And oh, yes, onions lots of onions we had nearly forgot. It is said Americans are which I mixed with an abundant and highly seascarcely more salad-loving than the English, and soned Mayonnaise sauce, adding lettuce, olive?, anand some some have never tasted salad, yet who does not chovies, hard boiled eggs, pickles, know this one the perpetual salad made by the chopped tarragon, chervil and shalots. This salad, It is always made after dinner. Into preceded by a good soup, and followed by sweets frugal cook ? in nice places it may be a bowl the boiled potatoes that have been left over, thea an onion sliced. Then there will be some

a deep tin pan goes

and

all

beets, beans, peas, butter beans,

perhaps corn, then

some onions, pepper, salt, vinegar, and it may be some fried bacon and the fat poured over, and this salad has been known to have diluted cooked tomatoes mixed in. Some frugal cooks will make disOne draws the line tinctions will have prejudices. at corn, and appeals to authority: "Who ever heard Another will set his of corn being put in salad ?" face against peas, and so on, but at any rate there will be potatoes and onions left, and beets, pepper, alt

and vinegar.

No

It

oil.

fun of this, but wherefore

?

and

fruit,

was highly appreciated by the hungry

guests."

With

all

the materials mentioned

it

cannot be said

the cupboard was very bare anyway, and the ealad was neither cheap nor simple, nor hard to imitate; but does not the proceeding show the difference in national customs?

An

American would never have

thought of making a salad, nor would the American hostess have felt comfortable seeing all the provisions going into that sort of compound. Some of us instead would likely have

made a

bill

120 dishes out of the material used

of fare of about

to

make

the din-

would be easy to make ner described.

It is all right, only too always for supper, and

A

macedoine salad, like a macedoine of vegetamacedoine jelly, is a mixture of to be made still better and more various. any number of different kinds and colors all cut to With the potatoes cut in dice all of a size, the one size. Gouffe says his abundant mayonaise was Elsewhere he eays mayonaise string beans cut in lengths diamond-shaped of size highly seasoned. crude, too perpetual. is

It is

at least better than none.

to match, the green peas

It is so

washed from

good

it

ought

their sauce in

warm

water, the corn likewise, the onions greatly reduced in quantity and also cut to match; wiih a little green stuff such as cress or parsley, or a very little

green onion tops, or celery, sprinkled

in,

and

bles, or of fruits, or

should be highly flavored.

Some

salads

contain

very high flavored ingredients and a small quantity suffices, as

pome

reject

them

altogether.

Mayonaise

a large amount of mustard, used in Salads may have the place of part of the raw eggs.

may

contain


THE AMERICAN COOK. and delicate seasoning of the sausages of Aries," praised by both Dumas and SaYarin pepper, salt and garlic with smoked beef. "piquant flavor

Hamburg

725.

red smoked tongue

all

we export large quantities every year. The roe weighs about one third as much as the fish. A fifty pound roe is considered a large roe. thirty pounds

As soon as the sturgeons reach being the average. shore they are opened and the roes taken out. Masses of roe are rubbed through wire selves. The

Salad.

2 large boiJed potatoes cut in dice. 1 cupful of celery, same way. cupful each of smoked halibut, dried beef and 1

183

eggs

then salted for a short time, after which

are

they are laid on hair selves to drain off. When thoroughly drained what was but a short time ago only halibut spawn, is now the toothsome caviare of which thousands of pounds are annually spread on bread and eaten with much relish."

cut small.

small onion.

2 cloves of garlic finely minced. 1 or 2 red peppers out of the pickle jar.

Caviare, like every other eatable thing, can now be bought in cans. It is black nearly as truffles. 6 hard-boiled eggs. The dried beef and tongue should be first cooked Softened with a little warm butter it can be used by boiling several hours. The celery is better if with good effect to ornament dishes of fish ealads in

blanched (parboiled.) Mix all, except the eggs, in and shake about with oil poured in till the

a bowl

mixture looks rich and glossy, then add a cupful of Ornament with the yolks of eggs chopped vinegar. fine

and the whites cut in

strips.

72G.

A German SaladHerring Salad.

piping and leaf patterns.

In the times when fash-

ionable ladies used to decorate their faces with huge patches of fancy patterns stamped out of court

and white and yellow dishes on the table had the same done for them with trrffle slices, it is very likely a similar service was required for fish

plaster,

en mayonaise, of the high-flavored caviare.

2 large smoked herrings. cupful of pickled red cabbage, chopped small. 1 cupful of slices of salsify or oyster plant cooked.

1 or

728

S

Salads and

Bills of Pare.

1

1 cupful of

chopped white cabbage.

Pepper, salt, oil, vinegar. Free the meat of the herrings from bones and skin

There will be a question, now that we are to demore formal dinner salads, as to their

scribe the

proper place ia the tremely convenient

bill

of fare,

and

if the bills in

it

would be ex-

use the world over

would kindly keep themselves according to a few and mince it as nearly in dice shape as may be, definite patterns as, say, French, Russian, English The salsify may be substituted with potatoes if and American. In fact, however, among fifty model Mix all menus of European court dinners there are scarcely necessary, cut in dice or lozenge shapes. wi h oil, vinegar, pepper and salt. two alike in their arrangement of dishes and headings, and the promiscuous bills of fare of American 727. While we are yet exploring for strong and pungent hotels do not vary more in their minor features than ingredients with which perhaps some knowing one those of the palsces of the European nations. The nvgbt "unwonted richness to the salad give," it slight differences betwixt salads and the cold 1

m<*y be noticed that the repertory of the salad-making D'Albignac of Limousin included both caviare

hors-d'oeuvre often make it appear as if salads appeared in two places on the same bill. The follow-

and truffles. People who enjoy anchovy toast; ing examples will, however, show the general usages which is toast spread with anchovy paste or anchovy in this respect. The first menu, chosen for its butfer, or canapes aux anchois; pieces of toast with brevity, contains the intermediate frozen punch filleted anchovies, will doubtless like canapes au which has come to be regarded the distinguishing These are

caviare.

all

good

Ealad accompaniments, in salads there

and as anchovies are commonly used

no good reason why caviare might not, but it is more likely it was used only in the way of decoration. As to what caviare is and it used to be termed Russian caviare as if it had been of Russian invention the Scientific American gives this inforis

fc

mation

the thorough French menu, although in us it appears so rarely as to seem more the exception than the rule.

feature

of

the collection before

FAMILLE ROYALE DE BAVIERE. Potage Tortue

Potage a

la

Reine

:

"Hyde

Park,

some eighty-three

Hudson River from New York,

is

cipal fishing stations for sturgeon,

properly

prepared,

is

known

miles

whose as

up

the

roe,

when

caviare, a food

preparation greatly enjoyed by our German and to forget the Russians, to whom

French crizens, not

Petits Croustades, a la Montglas.

one of the prinSeibling a la sauce hollandaise. Jambon a la Rothschild.

Bceuf braise a

la jardiniere.


THE AMERICAN COOK.

184 Cotelettes d'agneau

Dinde a

aux haricots

verts.

Celeri au jus

Tomates farcies

Petits poi9

la Toulouse.

Qrives a la Joinville.

SOBBET.

Pate foie gras a la gelee.

Imperiale.

PUNCH A LA KOMAINE.

Becasses en canapes

Faisans et ohapons rotis. Salade de Laitues.

Corbeille Florentine

Asperges sauce a

Coeur de

laitue

Blanc mange au marasquin Pouding Diplomatique aux marrons glaces et deguises Forme de fruits Napolitaine Petits fours

la creme.

DESSEBT ET FRUITS.

Beignets a la Francaise, Marasquin.

WINDSOR,

Gelee de paises au champagne.

Saratoga

August

^'prins's,

26, 1878.

Servi a la cour de Munich.

The general usage in a menu of the above descripThe tion is for the salads to appear with the game. next, the

mrnu

Another American example of a banquet for 250 persons.

of one of President Buchanan's din-

BANQUET

PRESIDENCE DES ETATS-UNIS D'AMERIQUE, WASHINGTON.

Hors d'oeuvre

Puree of Chicken, a

Beleves,

Langues de veau a la bechamel. Dinde sauvage a la Regence. Cotelettes de mouton a la Soubise. Boudins de pen] remix a la Richelieu Supreme de volaille aux truffles. Pain de gibiere a la belle-vue.

SORBETS A L'AMERICAINE.

Potatoes Hollandaieo

(Chablis)

REMOVES. Young Turkey, with

Entremets.

Celery, a la

(Pomery

Abricots a la conde.

In the following example sliced cucumbers accompany the fish and heart lettuces the game be^ow. This was for a dinner of 20 covers only.

Mumm's

Sec.

Ex. Dry.)

ENTREES. Sweetbreads en Chartreuse, a la Moderne Potted Quail, a la Royal Truffles au Champagne

VENETIAN SHBRBBT.

Petits pois et asperges.

Charlotte Russe Macedonia de fruits.

Creme

Tenderloin of Beef, Braized, a la Rothschild

Canvas-back ducks. Faisans bardes au jus

Rots.

Imperial Broth

la Princesse

(Cabinet Sherry) FISH. Boiled Turbot, a la Cardinal

de basse rayee au gratin.

Fillets

Entrees.

OYSTERS. (Haute Sauterne) SOUP.

Petits croustades a la Reine.

Poisson.

form of menu

COMPLIMENTARY TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT, By the Middlesex Club.

evidently a very proper one, does no', however, mention salad in the usual place.

ners and

Potage tortue vert.

this

for

GAME. Canvas-back Duck Woodcock English Pheasant Dressed Celery Lettuce Cressons (La Rose, 1868.)

VEGETABLES. French Peas

Tomatoes

Cauliflower

Flageolets

Epioards Veloutes

1

Champignon ?

DESSERTS.

Consomme de

volaille,

grille,

maitre

Malaga Grapes Savarin

Fancy Cake Oranges

Croquettes de pommes.

aux

Hamburg Grapes

Bananas Peans Salad concombres.

Petits Filets de boeuf, saute,

Napolitaine Ices

Confectionery

d' hotel

Selle d'agneau, Regence.

Eclaires au Chocolate

Charlotte Parisienne

aux quenelles,

Bouchees au Salpicon. Bass rayee,

Jelly au Macedoine

Meringues Chantilly Macaroons

MENU.

(Burgundy) Coffee.

truffles.

Ris de veau, en croustade. Poule', a la Dauphine.

*

THB

BBUNSWICK,

"

Oct. 13, 1880.

Boston,

Fruit Ices

Brandy Figs


THE AMERICAN COOK. Just one more

bill,

parted in the middle, from a

land of salads.

FAMILLE RO YALE D'lTALIE.

185

At that meeting of the emperors they ought to have had a diplomatic pudding and a crawfish sabd or two, by a1 ! means, for of course one party had to eat craw, if the other did endanger the piece of Europe.

Potage d'orge, al'Ecassaise Releveg

Turbot a la Bordelaise Noie de Veau a la Gastronome

Entrees

Poulardes aux points d'asperges Cailles a la Richelieu Aspic a la Dominicaine Artichautes a la Barigoule

Legumes

Jambon de York, a

Hors d'oeuvre

PNCH AIT

la Qelee

KlRICH

Faisans Peques

Rots

And we

find another salad

among

the entrees, aa

well as cress with the rots.

Venaison Salades Dessert, Etc.

Examining the following

footprints of the depart-

ed great we find a lobster salad among the entrees.

FAMILLE ROYAL DE PRUSSE. Diner de 24 converts a Potsdam, de Prusse a

S.

offert

M. PEmpereur de

par la cour

Russie. 1867.

FAMILLE IMPERIALS DE FRANCE. Potages

Consomme de

volaille a la Royal Potage tortue a la Francaise

Hors d'oeuvre Tartelettes de nouilles au foie gras Cannelons a la puree de gibier

Potages

Hors d'oeuvre Grosses Pieces

Poissons

Turbot garni, s*uce aux huitres Darne de Saumon, sauce crevettes

Releves

Boeuf fume de Hamburg, legumes va-

Entrees

ries

Langue de Veau de Pontoise Tomates et cepes Provencale Entrees

Cotelettes de

Rots

Dindonneaux piques Faisans de

Legumes

Entremets

Buheme

Fonds d'artichauts a

la moelle

Petits pois a la Francaiee

Pouding souffle a la vanille Croutes aux cerise?, a JaMontmorency Gelee muscovre garoie d'ananas Charlotte printamere aux fraises Glaces Compotes Dessert

Petits Pates

au natural

Saumon a la sauce Ger evoise Pieces de Bceuf a la Jardiniere Rossif garni de croquettes Tete de veau en tortue Petites timbales a la Lavalliere Grenadins a la chicoree Supreme de volaille aux points d'aa-

Chaupoix de foie gras filets de eoles, a la ravigotte

Filets

Cumberland

Pates d'ltalie

perges

daim aux champignons

de poulets aux points d'asperges, sauce supreme Homards a la gelee, sauce mayonnaise Galantines de cailles aux truffes, sauce

Pot-au-feu

Salade de

Rots

Faisans et chapons au cresson

Entremets

Artichautsfrits Choux-fleurs, sauce au beurre Haricots verts sautes Epinards au veloute Cbatlotte russe au chocolat

Timbale de poires a 1'Italienne Gelee m^cedoine de fruits Pains la Mecque Dessert.

Diner servi a la cour de France en 1860.


THE AMERICAN

186

COOK.

DINNER.

Salads appear but rarely in the English royal dinner menus. The annexed has one classed with as if in an

the entremets,

should plaoe lobster salad

American hotel

among

bill

LITTLE NECK CLAMS.

we

the vegetables.

SOUP. Printaniere

Terrapin

FISH. Boiled Kennebec Salmon, lobster sauce

FAMILLE ROYALE D'ANGLETERRE.

Potatoes Hollandaiae

ROAST.

BOILED. Puree de

Potages

|

volaille, a la Reine.

Consomme aux

Pates.

Leg of mutton, caper sauce Poissons

Turkey, stuffed Spring lamb, mint Sauce

Beans, with pork

Tranches de cabillaud

I

COLD MEATS.

Eperlaus pits

Boned turkey Releves

1

I

Cuissot de [chevreuil, sauce poivrade Poulardes et langues, aux chaux-

Troncons de anguilles, a la Perigord Rissolettes de volaille, a la Pompadour Saute de filets de Perdreaux Noix de veau, a la chicoree

Pate de foie gras

ENTREES. Fillet of beef, larded,

with mushrooms

Wild pigeon, en compote Spring lamb chops, with green peas Orange fritters, maraschino Flavor

fleurs

Entrees

Ribs of Beef

Turkey, parsley sauce Corned beef, with new cabbage

VEGETABLES.

New

Tomatoes

potatoes

Green peas

Cream spinach

Cauliflower

Asparagus

Macaroni, Napolitaine

Rots

MAYONNAISE.

Grouses aujus Poulardes, bread sauce

|

Lobster

Chicken Lettuce

Ileleves

Pudding de cabinet la Flamande

I

SWEETS AND DESSERT. Plum pudding, brandy sauce

Gaufres a

Entremets

Celeri a 1'Espagnole

Salade de homards Flan de Pommes Meringue

I

Biscuit glace

Fancy cakes,

etc.

Roman punch

Vanilla ice cream

Biscottes glacees

Side table

Peach pie

Rhubarb pie Catawba jelly

Strawberries, with cream Fruits, nuts, crackers and cheese

Roast beef Roast Mutton

Coffee

CONTINENTAL HOTEL, Philadelphia,

May 9,

1880.

Thirteen cooks of notebook part in the preparation of the above dinner; their names are all duly

appended, with the date 1858.

The next example of the American hotel bill of menus of a very elegant It would be a relief to anyone after scanning three New York City hotel. It shows whe-e the salads wore and ten such menus as the foregoing and findmay be found always, without necessitating search ing the salads wandering up and down in the bills through hors-d'oeuvres entrees and entremets. and going to and fro in the midst of them, to be able to give them a local habitation and a place all their DINNER. own, as happily we do in our American hotel bill of fare, the form that is unborrowed, that contains SOUP. aome features of all the preceding specimens, yet is Puree of chicken, a la Prmcesse different from all, and more suitable to the habits Consomme Desclignao and customs of the people. Some of the most re fare is patterned after the

nowned

hotels of the

United States use the exact

FISH. Boiled Turbot, a la C irdinal

form following, and a very large number beside only make the one or two changes of placing the list of boiled meats above instead of beside the

and

substituting the line "cold dishes

BOILED.

and salads"

for mayonaise, dispensing with the cold meats head.

ing altogether.

Potatoes Ilo'landaise.

roasts,

Turkey, oys*ereauce Tongue, caper siuce

Ham

ROAST. Ribs of beef au jus Lamb, Venetian sauce Wild duck, app'e sauce


THE AMERICAN COOK. ENTREES.

187

Poulets gras, a la gelee, sauce remoulade. Galantine de volaille, a la gelee.

Sweetbreads en Chartreuse Potted Quail, a la Royale

Macaroni and Cheese, Sicilienne

Salade de legumes garnie de saumon fume (with

COLD DISHES AND SALADS. Lobster in Shell

Chicken Salad

Sliced Tomatoes

Boned Turkey en Aspic

Smoked Tongue

smoked salmon.) Salade a la Russe.

German

salad.

Salsify en mayonaise.

VEGETABLES. Potatoes boiled, mashed, browned

Green Peas

Tomatoes

Corn

Italian salads in decorated aspic borders.

Salade de legumes, a Salade de laitues.

1'

Italienne.

Haricots verts en salade. Potato chips (once in salads place.)

SWEETS AND DESSERT. Lemon Meringue

Grape Pie

Pie

Choucroute aux huitres. Salade Italienne en belle-vue.

Cabinet Pudding

Salade de chicoree.

Blanc Mange au Maraequin Fruits Nuts

Neapolitan Ice Cream Assorted Cake3

The last named salad is found in the menu of a German duke's grand dinner. "In Holland and

COFFEE.

Salads and Cold Dishes from Foreign Menus.

Belgium, white chicory

is

sold at a cheap rate early

in the spring, and supplies a grateful salad long before lettuces are to be had." Endive and succory

are other

names

for chicory.

found suggestive not only of new or nearly forgotten dishes to make in this deThe definite object in view in bringing in the partment, but of different names or ways of writing foregoing perhaps somewhat formidable looking the same thing. mass of French is to discover what the best EuroBuisson de petits homards. pean bill of fare composers and cooks do when they

The following

will be

Mayonaise de homards. pic de langoustes.

do their highest endeavors for the greatest occasions that can arise in their particular world, and not at

Aspic de homards. Homards en coquilles.

all to

A

i

Homards en

lead any callow geese on this side to copy and use the imposing words they do not understand. We must have a standard to judge American hotel

belle vue.

Mayonaise de langoustes en bordure. Salade de homards en coquille. Lobster salad with plover's eggs. Lobster au gratin. (in one royal

work by, and as far as names and words can go to give an idea, these imperial menus and the salad dishes culled from many others mark the topmost

menu

stands in

Salade de ques d'ecrivisses (crayfish Salade d'ecrivisses, a la gelee.

tails.)

Crayfish, plain. Buisson d'ecrivisses

Groups of large

some American hotels, their and cooks, who would not consent to be ranked below the European in anyHowever, there can be no thing, even in salads. dispute, for after we have learned what they make

crayfish.

Aspic of plovers eggs and prawns. Buisson of prawns sur socle.

Aspic de crevettes (shrimp?.)

There

notch.

menu

the salad's place with the rots.)

there

remains

work,

skill,

and

are

writers, caterers

the greater question

readiness, dexterity,

of"

perfection of

and good

taste,

always remain open. Salads made look at are out of place in a hotel. Orna-

that

will

only to mentation that consumes hours of time

is

impracti-

new banquet comes on every day. Inone great dish of salad we have a hundred

cable where a

Silade de

filets

de

soles,

a la Parisienne.

Salade de saumon, a la Eusse.

Salade Russe au thon (tunny.) Fillets de saumon a la mayonaise.

Mayonaise de fillets de soles. Dame of salmon with Montpellier butter.

Salad of file's of fowls a la belle- vue.

Mayonaise of chicken.

stead of

two little dishes. Every person at table if he chooses has a complete dish to himself. Whatever it fixing up is to be done must be done quickly or or

will not be

done

at all.

A great check might be put upon the vulgar use of spurious French in bills of fare if guests and employers were to grow inquisitive and quizzical, de-

manding

to

Sliced galantine with jelly.

ever wrote

Salade de volaille.

time.

it.

know what each word means, of whoThere's a nice new game for winter


THE AMERICAN COOK,

188

about in

729. Dressed Crab.

draw Pick the meat from the shell and claws, cut the solid parts into small pieces, dry the soft part with the addition of a spoonful of fine bread crumbs, mix with a little oil, vinegar and mustard. Wash

all

and dry the shells and serve the meat in thrm placed on a bed uf something green lettuce, cress celery plants or parsley.

young

729 1 pint

a.

bowl of cooked and sliced potatoes.

all

fat.

together by pouring from one bowl to an-

other and shaking up.

Gastronomic heresy!

better than the potato.

I eat

diagonally across the top, as well, and some parsley added, giving the effect of a wreath of ber-

two

salade.) first

like to

class

send

cook of a to the

It is

worth while

to

know

that

when

the po-

mealy sort that break in the water they are better simmered till done ia fre&h butter, first melted and poured oflf the salt sediment, but not made frying hot. The potatoes are not to be

4.

hereby enter a protest for the preservation of my Savarin. rights." (Mem. To send them in also en

thorough

mask

Large dishes can be put up in the same genway, the beets may then be placed in a row or

in all the

ways, and should they appear in the second course, whether a la lyonaise or au souffle, I

A

2.

eral

There is nothing frying,

them done

different

would not

Pile 8 or 9 in each disb,

of nryonaise over so as to

allowed to become ia the least brown, nor even to have a hard skin fried on them; only gently etewed in butter. The butter can afterwards be used for

Hotel Dinner Salads. "Insipid?

them.

them, and finish by placing with two forks 3 or 4 of the beet balls around for ornament.

3.

Parsley, salt, pepper. tablespoonful of salad oil, or of fried bacon

Mix

to co<*t

spoonful

tatoes are of a

J cupful of vinegar. 1

it

Potato Salad Plain.

small onion, sliced or chopped.

1

a

hotel

first class

etc.

Instead of repeating, the next time use the if made with un-

allemande salad dressing, which, colored

is

butter,

pearl white,

and ornameiit with

and a few capers on top, or pickled nasturtium seeds or pods, or some pickled red cabbage chopped and drained from its vinegar, the beets in parsley,

this case being left out.

dinner table the in-

formal salads of the preceding part, which, however, do very well for ordinary supper and lunch, besides

7:51.

Beet and Potato Salad.

Cut some cooked blood beets with ycur sabaiier serving as examples for the employment of the half scollop knife into cubes or dice shapes with fluted dozen salad dressings already described. sides, and keep the cut shapes in vinegar.

73O.

Prepare some Parisienne potatoes there should be about a quart of each and the allemande salad Pile a few of the beet shapes in the middressing.

Parisian Potato Salad.

POMMES PABISIENNE EN MAYONAISE. Parisian potatoes are so called when scooped out of large potatoes with a scoop which forms them in balls of the size and appearance of white cherries, or

a

little

larger or smaller, for the scoops are sold of

place the potatoes around es a and with a tablespoon pour the sauce ever

dle of the dishes,

border,

the potatoes, leaving the beets of their natural color.

Ornament with a hasty sprig of parsley

to

each

dish.

different sizes.

Make

the mayonaise sauce in the quick way with bowl and egg-beater, directed in the beginning 1.

of this book,

and add a tablespoonful of made mus- does."

tard and a very little cayenne. Scoop out about two quarts of Parisienne potatoes, set them on to boil in cold mik and water with a little

ealt

in

it,

and take them

before they break out of shape.

and

set

away

"Characterless people

always just going

oflf

when just

who

are like sa'sify that is

to taste like

an oyster and never

Talmage.

("Was ofien thought but ne'er so well expressed." Mem. To give salsify a chance in allemande dress-

ing-)

done,

Drain in a colander

Salsify Salad.

to get cold.

Also scoop out about a cupful of cooked blood beet?, to match the potatoes, and cover the beet balls

with vinegar. Just before dinner set out from 15 to 25

sma

1

! flat

SALSIFIS EN MAYONAISE.

Wash the salsify roo's and shave oflf the outside, hrow them in cold water with salt in it and set hem on to boil. Try with a fork to kcow when

dishes (for the probable orders of 50 persons with a done. Salsify requires an hour or more to cook. varied bill to choose from). Place a spoonful of After draining from the hot water put it immedia emayonaise in a pan or bowl and shake the potatoes y in a pan of cold to keep it of good color.


THE ATflERICAN COOK. Cut (he Falsify across in round lozenge shapes

1.

as nearly rf one eize as possible. Put it in a bowl and pour over it the allemaudo salad dressing with

a

little

and in the hollow place a gooi spoonful of the shrimps and dressing. Dish up these ouly as needed, for the lettuce soon dries and loses its color.

Chid vinegar mixed in.

in the spring of the year, af;er it the winter frosts, and garden cress can then be had for garnish. Make a border of cress on the Salsiff is best

has ha

189

1

2. Make the thick mayonaiee, or else use that termed American ealad dressing, made of about the

same con sis ence.

dish or saucer and place a spoonful of the s ileify and its dressing in the middle.

Prepare the shrimps, put them in a bowl, pour in a basting-spoonful of vinegar, two of oil, a little white pepper, and shake about, making the shrimps

Cut the salsify i\ lengths of about 2 inches, 2. not using the largest roots for this purpose. Place 3 or 4 cf the pieces on each dish, diagonally across the dish, and pour over the pile a spoonful of thick

look moist

small

flat

mayonaise.

It is better if

the pieces of salsify can

and

shining.

Prepare small white hearts of lettuce, ore f r each individual dish, pull them apart and lay the leaves slantwise, wreath fashion, around the dish. Place a neat spoonful of the seasoned shrimps in the

moisten them,

center and over them pour or spread a spoonful of the mayonaise.

The cream hollandaise, or the other dressings, can of course be used instead of the two preceding, and salsify does well to mix in salads with other vegeta-

3. For a large dish like the preceding fill the shrimps, after seasoning with oil and vinegar, into a melon mould (a mould in shape of half a melon), and slighly press to give them the shape. Turn

steep in

oil

and vinegar, enough

to

awhile before dinner.

bles.

them out onto a The making of the allemande drcssin simple but that

may be

it

easily spoiled

not so

is

if

the

oil

leaves

of

flat

dish

heart lettuce.

the shrimps

already

and decorate with eggs,

and cream be added too hastily. Probably a half cut shapes of bee's, flowers, etc. cup more cf cream will be needed than the re4. ceipt calls for, and it should not be ice cold nor Having seasoned ths shrimps added

faster than a is

dressing

spoonful

at

a time.

This

valuable for needing no eggs and but is suitable for all sorts of vegetables.

and

prepared

with

Pour the mayonaise over olives, parsley,

shape them for

individual dishes by pressing a spoonful into a custard cup, or egg cup or similar mould.

Prepare about

a quart of celery by chopping it and seasoning in like manner as the shrimps, "We Florentines mostly use names as we do with oil, vinegar and white pepper, adding a little prawns, and strip them of all flourishes before we salt also. Romola. trust them to our throats." Turn the shrimps on to their dish and place The prawn is a larger kind of shrimp and for around a border of the celery with a teaspoon. the cook's purposes is the same thing. It has Finish with a spoonful of mayonaise on top of the little

oil,

fine

longer horns, feelers or flourishes than the shrimp, shrimps. Or the mayonaise may be dispensed with, which causes it to be preferred for a buisson; it is of or, leave the shrimps without a dressing, and pour when cooked, and in the markets the allemande dressing from a spoon over the celery lighter color border. usually sells for a lower price than the shrimp.

733.

Shrimp Salad.

MAYONAISE OF SHRIMPS OB PRAWNS, OR SHRIMPS (CREVETTES) EN MAYONAISE.

5. Place a neat spoonful of shrimps either seasoned or not, as the time may allow on the small flat dish, and over the top spread a spoonful of mayonaise. Throw 3 or 4 capers iu the center, place 2

Prepare about a quart of shrimps divested cf or 3 quarters of hard-boiled egg around, or 3 or 4 tails, heads and flourishes, and olives, like the beet balls on the potato salad, or lue place them in a bowl. both, and any other ornament such as cress or 1

their coat of maii,

Make

the thin mayonaise or salad cream and pour

over the shrimps. Take some heads of lettuce from the pan of icewater in which they have lain, shake them free

parsley that

may

be at hand.

it

from wafer and shred them as a sharp knife, on pose.

fine as possible

with

a clean board kept for the purto fill a 2 quart pan will do.

About enough

Place a

of the lettuce in the email, deep dish, ice cream saucer or deep glass plate; make a li:tle pile

hollow in the middle, forming a border of lettuce,

6.

when

Reverse the order of any of the foregoing,

of good shape, and handsomely coiled, by making a pile of shred lettuce or chopped celery in the middle and placing the

the ehrimps ere

shrimps around a'-d upon it. A very pretty mixture may be made of shrimps in cress, or water cress, without any other dressing.


THE AMERICAN COOK.

190

And now we aspic jelly,

cannot well go further without some

and

will

proceed

make

to

"What a perfect family!" exclaimed Hugo, as he extracted a couple of fat little birds from their bed of aspic jelly. "Everything they do in such perfect taste.

How ''

safe

you were here

to

their religion,

jt

suppose,'

eaid

Mrs. Transome, 'but thry are unhave about one's house " Felix '

to

Holt.

"Garnished with cut carrots, like a made dish in Pelham.

Bloomsbury Square."

"The dinner was a banquet a choice boquet beturtle and venison and piles of whitebait, and pineapples of prodigious size, and bunches of grapes that had gained prizes. The champagne seemed to flow in fountains, and was only interrupted that the guest might quaff Burgundy or taste Tokay. But what was more delightfr.l than all was the enjoyment of all present, and especially of their host. That is a rare sightfore every guest,

Banquets are not rare, nor choice guests, nor gracious hosts; but when do we ever see a person enjoy

'"The blonde misses of Albion see nothing in the brumous isle, which can compare with the ardor and vivacity of the children dull inhabitants of their

We bring our sunshine with us. My of the South. genius would use itself in the company of these the poesy of my art can not be understood rustics " Monsitur le chef by these carnivorous insularies.'

"Then Answered Dingdong: 'I bring these sheep out of a country where the very hog?, God be with " French us, live on nothing but myrobolaus.' Classic.

And

Endymion.

"Pantagruel did not like this pack of rascally scoundrels, with their manifold kitchen sacrifices,

Pendennis.

Mirobolant.

'

anything?'

would change

cooks

persecuted, and fly to England, as the old silkweavers did.' 'There are plenty of foreign cooks for those who are rich enough to pay for them, I

have ortolans for pleasant people

Lothair.

supper!

the finest thing in the world for this country if the

Southern

it.

so,

with a nod, he walked

off to

the cook's

shop at the corner of the Vicolo San Nicolo, and bought him half a loaf of black bread and a plate

of beans and oil, upon which frugal fare, washed and would have been gone had not Epistemon pre- down with another draught, from the green pitcher, made his solitary meal. His rage was vailed with him to stay and see the end of the farce. he presently He then asked the skipper what these gastrolatous over now." LordBrackenbury.

hobgoblins used to sacrifice to their god Gaster on interlarded fish days? 'For his first course/ said the skipper, 'they give him caviare, potages, then salads a hundred varieties, of cresses, sodden hop-

rampions, mushrooms, asparagus, woodbind, red herrings, pilchards, auchovies, fry of tunny, pickled eels, cauliflowers, beans, salt salmon, prawn?, cray-fisb, and a world tops, spinage, celery, sives,

Perhaps a little familiarizing talk about aspic jelly do more good than the bald receipt for making 1

will

alone. For, paradoxically enough, aspic jelly is the one unnecessary article that we cannot possibly do without in the kitchen, not in the kitchen of a

it

house that aims

to

be above the garnish of cut car-

Bloomsbury Square. Aspic jelly is one of the barriers, greater a good deal than mayonaise, of others.' "French Classic. which shut off the European style, or, more strictly had an speaking, French cookery from the popular appreand Everybody appetite for_dinner to-day, You have opened a hotel. the dinner was worthy of the appetites. Zenobia's ciation and adoption. husband declared to himself that he never dined so You are going to be first class. Oh, yes. You get a but instead of the decided improvewell, though he gave his chef 500 a year." Endy- foreign cook, ment in the get-up of common articles which you mion. looked for, unless he be a very reasonable man and " 'And now think of quick to perceive your wishes you will find him, here?' said you remaining most likely, engaged in the preparation of some unMr. Wilton. I lo^e intelligible nonsensicalit'es that were not included 'No,' said the lady, 'that I can fl ot do. at all. He thinks you must have your everything in this country except its climate, and, in your plans dishes garnished, ornamented, and he is not the perhaps, its hotels.'" Endymion.

"'The odd thing

said St. Aldegonde, 'you never can get anything to eat in these houses. Their is,'

infernal cooks spoil everything

'

"

Lothair.

rots style of

one to give you a garnish of cut carrots or turnips. He will place around your dishes "bold croutons of aspic jelly," as his celebrated get

this

he

calves' feet,

"

will bother

chickens,

masters direct.

To

you considerably, ordering pigs' feet,

gravy beef, veal

As Harold, 'the question is, whether the shanks, gelatine, lemons, eggs, flavorings etc. climate will agree with me. It's deuced you are not intending to have calves' feet, etc., on

'No,' said

English shifting

and damp; and as

for the food,

it

would be the

table,

perhaps you can't see the use of

all

these


THE AMERICAN and will forget them for a few days, to the And when they do come great distress of the cook. the zealous fellow who means to set your house on things

the very top pinnacle of first classness may be seen working at night after all others are in bed doing

seems foolishness

what

And

art.

but he

is

carrying on his

after that supply is exhausted

and a new

of materials called for you may Tyitk effort remember that there was on the tatale a dish of cold

lot

birds in a bed of jelly, whicrn one or two out of fifty

persons a Lothair, or some such stranger saw and admired. You will remember the shapes or the

border

oi

chopped jelly

sparkled with

it

as

turkey entirely

if

around the dishes that and a boned

set in jewelry,

ooated

with transparent j elly, of

COOK.

191

may be even more delicious and more sought by epicures than the meat itself. That is where The great skill and refinement in cookery come in. raised cold pork and venison pies or pastys, the brawn and the boars head on the oaken tables of Cedric and Athelstane, the Saxon carles of Ivanhoe, were filled and set and solid with aspic jelly in the rough. It was the gravy set with its own richness, but dark gray and looked as if it wanted straining But the earls were invited by the French Prince John and his nobles to a feast, and there was a fine bird pie, cold, of which the gravy had been clarified. The birds were so rare and costly as to be almost priceless, and betwixt them the aspic jelly had been poured and looked like amber. And even Athelstane game,

after

which somebody sitting near said, "How pretty," appreciated the merits of that pie filled with delicate and "Is it good to eat?" And then perhaps you aspic, for after he had gobbled the whole business have to think over the unsatisfactory condition of he wiped his mouth and asked what that thing was

and the mashed potatoes and conclude French cookery is one of the things that no fellow can understand, while the cook, discouraged, may be repeating some of the words of Monsieur

was

Now, we don't want

the roasts

that

that

aspic jelly, taking

Alcibiades Mirobolant above quoted. There is a want of mutual understanding in these matters. The foreign cook knowing that these extra accomplishments are what make him different from the home-bread article is apt to magnify their importance out of all reason, and not being used to count the cost of labor and material, is almost sure to take the longest way round about to reach the desired end. French cooks with Hotel-keepers want American ways, and American cooks with French knowledge. It is French to know how to make and

how

use aspic jelly. For that reason we cannot quite do without making it once a week, and this to

It regardless of whether people call for it or not. is well known that it is not necessary to existence.

Doctor Tanner quite recemtly lived forty days and forty nights without once tasting aspic jelly; but it is a matter of fashion. It has been seen that aspic

so good.

it

all

round,

to say that

is better

than rich

gravy, but It certainly is far more ornamental, and while you are making it to serve with fat little reed it is ornamental, take dosed with unsuitable herbs and

birds or rice birds because cat e it does not get

and burn on the bottom, The cook and confectioner can take the jelly from the pigs-feet keg and bring it back looking as clear as glass, and when broken it will shine "like dew on the gowan lying," but the demands of refined cookery will not vegetables,

and

taste

and then

stick

worse than scorched beans.

be satisfied unless

it

taste as

good as

it

looks.

734. Sometimes there is a remainder of a good looking amber clear soup left over that sets in jelly when cold, and you say involuntarily to yourself, "how rich that was, and what a pity to throw it away." Perhaps for

it

need not

something

be.

It will

make savory jelly

for pressed corned beef

and the

like.

But when there is a surplus of the broth that fowls and turkeys have been boiled in you have as good a is mentioned often in the loftiest Understanding menus, and the material for aspic as can be made. initiated are cognizant of aspic in many dishes be- this and a little rule or two, the terrors of jellysides where it is not mentioned by name. Because making and the dark mysteries of galantines and the leaders on the other side choose, followers on aspic salads will disappear. One and a half ounces of gelatine to a quart of this side must. The most delicate flattery of their table hotel-keepers ever receive,

most

highly parties look

appreciated,

is

will make jelly, or One ounce of gelatine to a quart of good broth, and

and generally the water

when

distinguished

on admiringly and say, "You employ less still, the stronger the broth may be. One calf's foot boiled in 3 quarts of water will French cooks, don't you?" though perhaps Pompey and Dina "done been done it all themselves." make a quart of jelly without any ge'atine. A pig's However, distinguished parties never say that when foot and shank does the same. Fowls either old or

French in

the

jelly in the

rough

is

native everywhere. jelly, aspic is the

is Choctaw. Meat young boiled tender in the liquor are necessary for no foreigner, however, but is good quality. Veal and veal shanks and coarse The English name is savory beef are also used, but will not do very well alone.

the bill of fare

same refined.

This

ought

to

be

better understood, that the first consideration should

be

make and keep

savory, so that the meat it goes with is improved by ir the jelly combining several fine flavors and the essence of choice to

the jelly

"Supper time approaching, Don Quixote retired apartment, and Sancho inquired of the host what they could have to eat. The landlord told

to his

him

his paiate should be suited

for

whatever tht


THE AMERICAN COOK,

192

earth and sea produced, of birds, beast or fish, 'There is was abundantly provided with.

air,

that inn

no need of all

that,'

'roast

quoth Sancho;

us but a

couple of chickens, and we shall be satisfied; for my master hath a delicate stomach, and I am no glutton.'

" 'As

for chickens,' said^the .innkeeper, 'truly

we

Put them on in a boiler having a false bottom to prevent burning, or, otherwise, put a pie plate in before the meat. Fill with cold water. Bring to a boil

and skim

off

what

rises to the top.

Then push

the boiler to the back part of the range, and let simmer gently about 12 hours. It should by that time be reduced to about a third of the quantity of water

have none, for the kites have devoured them.' first put in and will set in jelly when cold. But 'Then let a pullet be roasted/ said Sancho; 'only see during the time of cooking the vegetables and salt that it be tender.' 'A pullet? my father!' answered and pepper should have been added. White pepper the host; -faith and troth, I sent about fifty yester- is best, whole black pepper, broken a little, is next,

day to the city to be sold; but excepting pullets, ask and if you have not these ground black pepper will what you will.' 'Why, then,' quoth Sancho, do. Strain off your 4 quarts of jelly and fat, from the 'e'en give us a good joint of veal or kid, for they cannot be wanting.' 'Veal or kid?' replied the host, meat and bones, and set it away to get quite cold. 'ah, now I re