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Beddinghouse x Van Gogh Museum Ž Collection Bedding House is proud to be the official partner of the Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam. This unique collaboration between one of the most visited museums in the world, the Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam and Bedding House has resulted in a very special collection of bedroom textiles. This season our Bedding House design team created one new duvet cover and two new cushions to add to the successful Beddinghouse x Van Gogh Museum Collection. The new designs are, of course, based on Van Gogh’s famous paintings, each telling a story of dreams, passion and beauty. Naturally, the colour palette fits in perfectly with upcoming fashion and interior design trends.


"The painting comes to me as if in a dream" Vincent van Gogh to his brother Theo, Tuesday, 25 September 1888


Watch the movie The designs are based on Van Gogh’s

famous paintings, each telling a story of dreams, passion and beauty.


New Design Trees Green 100% cotton satin

Combined accessory: Wild Roses Green


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Trees and Undergrowth July 1887 Oil on canvas, 46.2 x 55.2 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Trees In Paris, Van Gogh experimented with the Pointillist stippling technique. This woodland scene is a good example. He covered the entire canvas with small dots of paint. The result is a play of light and shadow on the ground between the trees. The strip of yellow in the middle suggests the sunlight of a clearing in the distance. Along with the tree trunk on the right, it brings depth to the scene.


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Irises Saint-RĂŠmy-de-Provence, May 1890 Oil on canvas, 92.7 x 73.9 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Irises

Van Gogh painted this still life in the psychiatric hospital in Saint-RĂŠmy. For him, the painting was mainly a study in colour. He set out to

achieve a powerful colour contrast. By placing

the purple flowers against a yellow background, he made the decorative forms stand out even

more strongly. The Irises were originally purple. But as the red pigment has faded, they have

turned blue. Van Gogh made two paintings of this bouquet.


Irises Yellow 100% cotton satin

Combined accessory: Gladiolus Multi


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) The White Orchard Arles, April 1888 Oil on canvas, 60 x 81 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

The White Orchard

Soon after Van Gogh arrived in Arles, the spring

Orchard Natural 100% cotton satin

came. There were many fruit orchards around the city. He enthusiastically painted a large

series of studies of orchards in blossom. These

plum trees were poorly maintained, as their long branches show. Van Gogh was especially fond of timeworn trees like these.

Combined accessories: Self Portrait Natural & Create Soft Pink


Almond Blossom Blue 100% cotton satin

Combined accessory: Blossom Blue


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Almond Blossom, Saint-RĂŠmy-de-Provence, February 1890, Oil on canvas, 73.3 x 92.4 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Almond Blossom In January 1890 Theo wrote to Vincent that his wife Johanna had given birth to a son. The baby was to be named Vincent Willem, after his godfather. As a gift for the new arrival Vincent painted a picture of one of his favourite subjects, large branches of blossom against a blue sky. He thought that the work could be hung above the marital bed. Vincent chose the branches of the almond tree as a symbol of new life for the almond is one of the earliest trees to blossom, heralding spring in February. The artist drew his inspiration for the welldefined contouring and positioning of the tree in the picture plane from Japanese prints.


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Almond Blossom, Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, February 1890, Oil on canvas, 73.3 x 92.4 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Use this wallpaper in your styling: Wallpaper: BN International, Almond Blossom 200330

Blossom Grey Blossom Grey 100% cotton satin

The design for this duvet cover is based upon one of Van Gogh’s most famous works- Almond Blossom. The painting was a gift for his brother

Combined accessory:

marking the birth of his son and consequently,

Blossom Blue

Van Gogh’s godson. With a more neutral colour palette than the original painting this duvet cover features Almond Blossom branches against a light grey background.


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Wild Roses Saint-Remy-de-Provence, May-June 1889 Oil on canvas, 24.5 x 33.5 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Wild Roses

Towards the end of his stay in the psychiatric

facility in Saint-RĂŠmy-de-Provence, Van Gogh regains a serenity and joy of life that he had almost forgotten. This state of mind can be

seen in his work of this period, especially in

the sketches of flowers he created in the hospi-

tal garden. He writes to his mother and tells her that watching the budding flowers is good for his health.

Apart from his famous Irises (1889), he paints white roses. The subject, the technique, close-

up, black outlines, and lack of background refer

to the Japanese print art. A few years before, Van Gogh discovered several Japanese woodblock

printing artists in Paris, who practiced this re-

fined and elegant art. He is very impressed with their work and often uses their techniques.

Wild Roses Green 100% cotton satin

Combined accessory: Van Gogh Blue


Gladioli Red 100% cotton satin Combined accessory: Coquelicot Green


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Vase with Chinese Asters and Gladioli Paris, August-September 1886 Oil on canvas, 61.1 x 46.1 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Vase with Chinese Asters and Gladioli Van Gogh had always used generous amounts of paint. But after discovering the flower still lifes of Adolphe Monticelli (1824-1886) in June 1886, he went one step further. That French artist painted colourful bouquets with thick paint and emphatic brushstrokes. Van Gogh compared them to liquid clay. In still lifes such as “Vase with Chinese Asters and Gladioli�, you can see how thickly he began applying the paint to the canvas in his own flowers. The vase shown here has been preserved and is now in the Van Gogh Museum collection. It is smaller in reality than in the painting.


Tournesol Yellow 100% cotton satin

Combined accessory Sunflower Yellow


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Sunflowers Arles, January 1889 Oil on canvas, 95 x 73 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Sunflowers A symphony in blue and yellow was how Van Gogh thought the interior of the yellow house should appear when Gauguin arrived. He wanted to impress his friend with a series of decorative still lifes of sunflowers. These still lifes were to grace the walls of Gauguin’s bedroom and be framed with ‘thin slats of wood, painted in red lead’. Van Gogh started the series with great ardour. He had to work quickly as the flowers quickly wilted in a vase: ‘I am painting with the enthusiasm of a resident of Marseilles eating bouillabaisse [Provençal fish soup], which shall not surprise you, when it involves painting large sunflowers’. Gauguin considered the paintings highly successful and declared that sunflowers should be Van Gogh’s trademark. In 1889 Van Gogh tackled the motif once more, in this canvas now in the Van Gogh Museum.


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Boulevard de Clichy Paris, March-April 1887 Oil on canvas, 46 x 55.5 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Boulevard de Clichy Boulevard de Clichy is one of the major streets in the Paris district of Montmartre, where many artists lived. Van Gogh painted the junction that he often crossed. Rue Lepic, where he lived with his brother Theo, began on the right, just beyond the edge of the picture. In Paris, Van Gogh was exposed to the latest art movements

Boulevard Grey

of his day, Impressionism and Pointillism. This

100% cotton satin

gradually led him to use lighter colours. He also experimented with a variety of painting techniques. His style of brushwork, with many dashes of paint side by side, shows the influence of these art movements. In the same paintings, he also tried out diluted oil paint.

Combined accessory: Blossom Blue


Vincent van Gogh (1853 - 1890) Small Bottle with Peonies and Blue Delphiniums Paris, June-July 1886 oil on cardboard, 34.5 x 27.0 cm Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Small Bottle with Peonies and Blue Delphiniums

Van Gogh painted this flower still life on a simple piece of card, using rapid, loose brushstrokes. It is one of many studies in which he experimented with the effects of different

Peonies Green

colours on each other. His brother Theo wrote

100% cotton satin

to their mother: “He is mainly painting flowers, with the aim of making future pictures brighter

Combined accessory:

in colour�. Theo wrote that acquaintances were

Countryside Blue

giving Van Gogh a bunch of flowers every week. This was one of the first bunches he painted; many more were to follow.


Accessories collection overview

Van Gogh Blue Front: 45% cotton and 55% viscose velvet with digital print. Reverse: 45% cotton/55% viscose velvet in plain blue. Finished with cord piping. 45 x 45 cm

Garden Ochre Front: 100% cotton with digital print. Reverse: 100% cotton in plain ochre. Finished with fringed edges in the colour ochre. 30 x 90 cm

Wild Roses Green Front: 55% viscose and 45% cotton velvet with digital print . Reverse: 100% cotton velvet, plain green. Fringed edges on the left and right side. 30 x 50 cm


Self Portrait Natural Front: 100% cotton slub with digital print. Reverse: 100% cotton chambray, plain naturel. Finished with velvet cord piping.

40 cm

Fleurir Blue 100% polyester velvet, digitally printed. Finished with cord piping. 20 x 65 cm

Gladiolus Multi Front: 100% cotton viscose with digital print. Reverse: 100% cotton viscose in plain blue. Finished with fringed edges. 45 x 45 cm

Create Soft Pink 100% cotton velvet in the colour pink. With two digitally printed polyester buttons. 30 x 50 cm


‘‘The painting comes to me as if in a dream’’ Vincent van Gogh to his brother Theo, Tuesday, 25 September 1888

Blossom Blue Front: 100% polyester satin with digital print. Reverse: 100% polyester satin in plain pink. Finished with cord piping. 30 x 50 cm

Paintbrush Green 100% cotton canvas front and 100% cotton velvet backside with cord piping. 45 x 45 cm


Sunflower Yellow Front: 100% cotton canvas with digital print. Reverse: 100% cotton velvet in plain yellow. 45 x 45 cm

Countryside Blue Front: 100% polyester satin with digital print. Reverse: 100% polyester satin in plain dark blue. Finished with cord piping. 30 x 50 cm

Coquelicot Green Front: 100% cotton canvas with digital print. Reverse: 100% cotton velvet, plain green. Finished with cord piping. 45 x 45 cm

Bedroom Multi Front: 100% cotton canvas with digital print. Reverse: 100% cotton velvet, plain green. Finished with cord piping. 45 x 45 cm


Bedding collection overview

Almond Blossom Blue 100% cotton satin

Blossom Grey 100% cotton satin

Boulevard Grey 100% cotton satin

Gladioli Red 100% cotton satin

Irises Yellow 100% cotton satin

Orchard Natural 100% cotton satin


Peonies Green 100% cotton satin

Tournesol Yellow 100% cotton satin

New!

Trees Green 100% cotton satin

Wild Roses Green 100% cotton satin


Sustainable packaging Especially for the Beddinghouse x Van Gogh Museum Collection we developed a luxurious and sustainable packaging. Reuse the box for anything you want to store.

Certificate of Authenticity Thank you very much for your purchase of the Van Gogh Museum collection of Bedding House It’s a pleasure to make it possible for you to enjoy this bedding endowed with the same dynamism and passion as when the artist created it - in your own surroundings. The developing of this high-quality bedding has been handled with the utmost care and respect to the art of Vincent van Gogh. The Van Gogh Museum is grateful that you are directly contributing to the preservation of Van Gogh’s legacy and art collection so that it may continue to inspire and be shared with future generations. We hope you will enjoy this bedding collection for many years to come.

Adriaan Dönszelmann

Director Van Gogh Museum Enterprises BV


More to come about this collection Follow us and we’ll keep you updated on our latest collection news.

www.beddinghouse.com www.vangoghmuseum.com Bedding House B.V. Vennestraat 8, 2161 LE Lisse The Netherlands sales@beddinghouse.com T: +31 (0)252 433 080 F: +31 (0)252 412 846 Bedding House Germany Mühlwiesenstraße 14 D-34270 Schauenburg verkauf@beddinghouse.com T: +49 (0)5601 929 75 70 The Van Gogh Museum is grateful that you are directly contributing to the preservation of Van Gogh’s legacy and art collection so that it may continue to inspire and be shared with future generations.

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Beddinghouse x Van Gogh Museum - Bedding & accessories collection autumn/winter '20  

The unique collaboration between Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam and Beddinghouse has resulted in a special collection of bedroom textiles and ac...

Beddinghouse x Van Gogh Museum - Bedding & accessories collection autumn/winter '20  

The unique collaboration between Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam and Beddinghouse has resulted in a special collection of bedroom textiles and ac...

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