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SaddleRidge Villas Residence #9

BEAVER CREEK яБо COLORADO


About the Property


About the Property Features Include:             

Ski Access on Beaver Creek Mountain Designer Decorated by Ralph Lauren and Naomi Leff 2 Bedroom Suites 2 Full Bathrooms 1 3/4 Bathroom Custom Designed River Rock Fireplace One Car Garage Front Desk Services and Concierge State-of-the-Art Fitness Center Indoor/Outdoor Heated Pool and Hot Tub 2,374+/- Square Feet Built in 1987 MLS: V322673

Beaver Creek Village

For Additional Information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.

Beaver Creek Nordic Center


I

magine the perfect year-round vacation home at one of the most private and exclusive ski resorts in North America, and you have SaddleRidge at Beaver Creek Resort. Recognized as one of the world’s most prestigious resort communities. SaddleRidge is unique in offering the exclusivity of private ownership with all the amenities and personal service of a luxury hotel. The result is a caliber of recreational living and worry-free ownership that simply cannot be found elsewhere. Carefully crafted and designed in an elegant Old Western style by Ralph Lauren and Naomi Leff using only the finest fixtures, finishes and custom furnishings, this exquisite 2-bedroom residence provides the ideal setting for warm family gatherings and wonderful vacation memories in Beaver Creek.

Perfectly located among stands of native trees, yet offering views of unspoiled meadows where elk and deer congregate, this home is only moments from the fine dining, shopping and other activities of Beaver Creek Village. Even closer are the slopes – you’ll ski back to your door at day’s end to enjoy warm, relaxing evenings with your family and friends. For those who wish to fully enjoy the fruits of their success and who share a common indulgence in superior service, we invite you to come celebrate vacation living at SaddleRidge in Beaver Creek, Colorado.

SaddleRidge Villas Residence 9


Living Room 

A very private setting on Beaver Creek Mountain

Dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows

River Rock fireplace with spacious stone hearth

Wide plank wood flooring

Spacious deck attached

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.


Living Room

SaddleRidge Villas Residence 9


Private Deck 

Spacious deck for entertaining and expansive views of Beaver Creek

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.


Views to Beaver Creek

SaddleRidge Villas Residence 9


Kitchen 

Custom slab and stone countertops

Raised breakfast bar

Stone flooring

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.


Dining Room

SaddleRidge Villas Residence 9

Formal dining room space

Attached deck with views to Beaver Creek Open Space.

Wide plank wood flooring


Master Bedroom 

Spacious Bedroom with attached closets and dramatic Master Bathroom

Window seat

Wide plank wood flooring

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.


Guest Bedroom Suite

SaddleRidge Villas Residence 9

Spacious Bedroom with attached closets and dramatic Master Bathroom

Window seat

Wide plank wood flooring


Amenities: 

         

Exceptional Ski Access with access for Village-toVillage skiing of Beaver Creek, Arrowhead and Bachelor Gulch Front Desk check-in and spacious Grand Lobby Indoor and Outdoor Heated Pool and Hot Tubs Spa and Massage Rooms State-of-the-Art Fitness Center Full Service Concierge Owner’s Lounge Owner’s Library Owner’s Meeting Room On-site Property Management Renowned SaddleRidge Restaurant

Private Outdoor Hot Tub

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.


SaddleRidge Restaurant


Centennial Library


“Boathouse” Indoor and Outdoor Heated Pool


Developer Floor Plan & Site Plan

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Real Estate Broker.


SaddleRidge Villas #9

SaddleRidge Villas Residence 9


History of SaddleRidge


Library History SaddleRidge was built by the Shearson-Lehman Corporation as a private retreat for its clients and executives in 1987. The cost was $27 million with a total of 27 bedrooms. Architecture was done by Zehren and Associates of Avon, Colorado. Interior design, art and artifact collections were done by Naomi Leff and Associates of New York City. Naomi was selected because she had been the head designer on every award winning project credited to Ralph Lauren for 12 years. SaddleRidge was to be the first project she took on as part of her own design company. She was given three objectives: Create the largest living museum of Western artifacts outside of a museum. The facility should be conducive for the highest level executive. Spend as much money as you want. At no time was Naomi ever questioned on any purchase and on a number of occasions was encouraged to spend more. The results of Naomi’s expertise is that SaddleRidge is currently one of the largest, private collections of American Western artifacts and art in the United States outside of a museum. Some of the highlights of that collection are in the Centennial Library. Artifacts Most of the books on the bookshelf are either dated between 1850 and 1900, or are historical accounts and anecdotes about that time period. The oldest book in the collection is a French explorer’s diary of his travels across the American West. It is written in French and was published in 1797.

The large black and white portrait of horse and Indian was taken by Roland Reed and was well known during the turn of the century (1885-1915). Naomi was able to purchase four portfolios of Roland Reed’s original negatives and photo plates from the national archives and all of the Roland Reed prints at SaddleRidge are taken from the original artwork. The long, leather, fringed and beaded pouches hanging on the walls are Indian Pipe Bags. Native Americans would use these to carry their long stemmed pipes on the trail without breaking them. The three checks framed and mounted to the left of the armoire are unusual for several reasons. They were drawn on the Wells Fargo Bank and signed by Wells Fargo himself. The word “first” appears on the check blanks. During the 1800’s when checks or drafts were sent west of the Mississippi, three would be sent. One would be sent by Pony Express, one would be sent with a reputable wagoneer and another would be sent with the head of a survey crew for the telegraph or Railroad Company. Whichever draft was received first was cashed and word was sent back to the point of origin to cancel the other two. These measures were not only to insure delivery, but also was one of the first measures taken by US banks against check theft and fraud.


The blue hat and canteen were General Custer’s. They were his parade issued hat and canteen, obviously not his last hat, and were issued by the 7th Calvary. The badges in the display case are all authentic badges of Wells Fargo and sheriff’s from the period between 1850-1900. The gold tone portrait was done by Edward Curtis circa 1895. The unique characteristic of gold tones is that when viewed straight on they appear flat. At a 45 degree angle you experience a three dimensional effect in the Yucca and the position of the horses head. Later in his career, Curtis was commissioned by Teddy Roosevelt to capture the images of the American West and all of his works are considered national treasures. Curits was most famous for his Native American portraits. This is a particularly impressive fact considering Native Americans did not like to have their pictures taken believing it captured their spirit or soul. The ceremonial tomahawk and rattle were used by a Brahmin or Medicine man to ward off evil spirits. The beaded pouches are excellent examples of the detail and artistry achieved with the primitive tools of Native Americans. The black pot is a Marie and Julian original and was one of the last few made by these famous artisans. One of Naomi’s decorating techniques used with SaddleRidge was to mix up what she calls “cowboy grunge” with true Western artifacts. One example of this is the large Remington statue on the sideboard behind the couch, which is a replica, although the two in the bookcase are originals. The rugs on the floors are also imitations, but the rugs draped over the sofas are authentic Native American weavings and vary in age from 90 to 125 years. The long stem pipes on the sideboard are “every day” pipes. Peace pipes would have been beaded, feathered and tasseled. The Tiffany lamp is an original that was converted from gas to electric.

George Washington’s unfinished portrait was one of five proofs used in the selection process for the “athenaeum” portrait on the $1.00 bill. This portrait is a proof taken from a woodcutting and is a mirror image of what you will see on the $1.00 bill. This was not the portrait used on the dollar bill since he is missing the ruffled collar.

The atlas on the table was published in 1877, and represents the first official mapping of the “new” state of Colorado by the US Geological Survey. Ferdinand Hayden for which Hayden Peak and the tour of Hayden are named oversaw this survey. The most interesting map to look at is the drainage map. In its detail and accuracy, you can easily find Eagle River and Gore Creek. You can see old mining towns such as Breckenridge, Oro City and Molta (Leadville) as well as Silverton and Ouray. All of these towns were substantial “tent” cities comprised of 25,000 people or more during the silver and gold rush period in Colorado. You will notice a major river labeled the “Grand” river winding its way across the western slope of Colorado. This was the Native American name for this river and we know it today as the Colorado River. It begins in Grand Lake in Grand County, flows across the Grand Mesa through Grand Junction and the Grand Canyon. All of these major geographical points derived their names from the Grand River, which flowed through them. The bellows style camera is an American-made Kodak, circa 1900. This style of camera would have been typical of the camera used by Roland Reed or Edward Curtis. Photography with these cameras was a lengthy and deliberate process. Of the three Indians pictured in the black shadow box, the one in the middle is the infamous Geranamo.


The Wells Fargo style desk was the standard issue for all Wells Fargo offices in the 1800’s. This particular desk belonged to Buffalo Bill and it traveled

with him on his Wild West shows for almost twenty years. The Wild West show was widely thought of as the predecessor of the vaudeville circuit that later developed in the United States. This desk even traveled to England when Buffalo Bill performed for the Queen of England. It was also used for almost all of the correspondence between Buffalo Bill and Senators, Congressman, and the United States government. Another feature of the desk is the twelve compartments hidden by the front, top molding. Buffalo Bill’s sister, who was the bookkeeper for the Wild West show, used these; she would use one cubbyhole for each month. The two pictures to the left of the desk are of Captain A.Y. Alpee of C.D. Texas Rangers based in Carriggo Springs, Texas. He was responsible for the territory south and east of Laredo to the Mexican border from 1915-1940. He was highly respected particularly for his immigration control during the dust bowl days of the Great Depression. The top picture to the right of the desk is of Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir standing at the head of Yosemite Valley on the day it was inaugurated as the nation’s second national Park. John Muir was not only the father of our National Parks System; he was also the founder of the Sierra Club. Though these two gentlemen worked long and hard at developing and implementing a National Parks System, their disagreements on what should be included, access, administration and funding were legendary. If you look carefully at the body language and facial expressions of these two, it is evident that they both would have rather had this photo without the other present. Larkspur Room While walking to the Larkspur Room, between the set of double doors you see a portrait taken by Edward Curtis called Two Strike. Since Saddleridge was originally designed as a corporate retreat and conference center, the Larkspur room pulled double duty as a meeting room and exercise area. Highlights of this room include the championship rodeo cowboy belt buckles on the southeast wall and the posters on the northeast wall. The posters were originally called “one sheet” in the printing industry, a nickname that still applies to movie and theater posters. The one sheets at SaddleRidge are very good examples of early commercial art and printing. If you look closely at the Wild West poster with the red/orange background, you will see how creative these pieces of artwork can be. Swimming Pool & Boat House Naomi wanted to create the ambiance of an Adirondack boathouse with the pool area. The final touch she insisted on during the construction of the water circulation system was to have just enough air put into the water lines to make the sound of waves slapping against the side of the boat. Locker Rooms Highlighted here are the massage rooms and showerheads Elevator Here you will see more examples of one sheets mentioned earlier.


Dining Room All of the wood in the ceiling and walks is butternut wood. It was brought in from Wisconsin and finished in an eighteen-step hand rubbed process to give it the warmth and depth of grain you see today. The architectural style is Post and Beam and was widely used in Puritan churches and Town Halls throughout England and New England. The main design feature of Post and Beam is that it gives a very high vaulted ceiling with minimal cross beams. It is the reverse mimic design frequently used in early trade ship hull design. Naomi designed all of the chandeliers, having them cast in Minturn, CO at a local ironworks. They weigh a little less than 1000 pounds each. The floors are random plank pine and were selected to give a worn look as well as the slap and feel of an old saloon floor. All of the chairs and tables in the dinning room are antiques and were individually selected to be part of this eclectic collection. The chieftain pictured above the fireplace is an Edward Curtis portrait of Chief Red Cloud, the successor to Sitting Bull. The back of the bar was found in a burnt down tavern in Ouray, CO, a large silver mining town in southwester Colorado. The front of the bar was built to match the back. Cabinetmakers used the two pictures of old bars to the left of the deer head as examples of the details and features that were characteristic of old mining town bars. The jukebox is a 1939 Wurlitzer. The box still works and uses the original 78-RPM mechanism. The slot machine is American made, circa 1865, and also still works, no quarters required. The Indian Princess to the right of the bar is a Roland Reed original. The coat rack has several old ranching items on it. The seal skin coat was treasured by any cowboy who could get his hands on one. Seal skin is more water proof and less bulky than buffalo or sheep skin and was much easier to work in on a horse. The lariat is made of braided leather and was commonly found on ranches until machines were developed that could provide tightly enough wound hemp or other rope fibers to hold a stiff loop for roping work. The Indian headdress, Naomi found on an Indian reservation. Since it is illegal to remove Eagle feathers from a reservation, Naomi removed them and left them on the reservation. She then replaced them with turkey feathers. The bear was the largest bear killed in Eagle County up until 1989.

Pool Table is a Boston of Briggs pool table and is made of one solid slate piece. Brunswick eventually bought out Boston of Briggs. Buffalo Bill had the saddle hanging on the railing above the bar made for dignitary’s children and his nieces and nephews. This one has ivory husk rings, a silver plaque with a picture of Buffalo Bill and is engraved “to my niece Lorna”.

For additional information please contact your local Beaver Creek Broker.


Beaver Creek Resort


Welcome to Beaver Creek Resort At the gate, you leave everyday life behind. That’s why people travel to Beaver Creek, Colorado from all over the world, and many make it a tradition. The drama of rock and sky, the sheer grandeur of this place, is one reason. That it is North America’s World Cup mountain is another. It is also a place of intimacy. A private resort hidden from view, with the power to bring people together. “The consummate kidfriendly resort.” that’s what SKI Magazine has called Beaver Creek, and strolling though the square you can see why. It is a modern, custom-designed resort with the cozy, unhurried feel of a European Alpine village. At this elevation the air is clear, and so are the taste buds. Here you’ll follow in the footsteps of gourmets and food critics. Here you can dine in a snow covered meadow, a pristine aspen glade, a private museum. Beaver Creek regularly wins awards and accolades for its food, wine, service, lodging, safety standards and environmental efforts. It’s a resort where the staff are trained to not just provide what guests want, but to anticipate it. Beaver creek sets the standard of service and has been awarded for the third consecutive year “Best Guest Service” by the National Ski Areas Association. There’s a commitment to service, from lodging quality to ski school and lift operations. Escalators, heated walkways and even warm chocolate chip cookies after a day on the ski slopes along with other amenities are designed to pamper Beaver Creek’s guests. Welcome to Beaver Creek, welcome to your Shangri-La.


The Mountain If World Cup racers refer to Beaver Creek as their favorite place to compete, maybe there is something you should know. Every year, athletes and spectators alike migrate to our mountain top resort for the Birds of Prey Men’s World Cup. But that is only a slice of what Beaver Creek has to offer. From the gentle, manicured slopes of Bachelor Gulch, to the open intermediate trails of Larkspur and Rose Bowl, to the steeps bumps of Grouse Mountain, skiers and riders of all abilities will feel at home on our mountain. At Beaver Creek grooming is our passion. We groom twenty hours a day, seven days a week. Fifty-two operators work ten hour shifts at 11,000 feet behind a turbo diesel engine. The result, 776 groomed acres a day or a total of 106,000 acres per season of pure corduroy for your skiing pleasure. After you enjoy the sweetest, softest terrain in North America, don’t forget about those groomers taking their 3 AM lunch break to get the mountain ready for tomorrow. Your mountain, is our backyard and experiencing nature is a privilege that we do our best to earn. Beaver Creek is 100% powered by wind, and recycles 1.4 million pounds of material every year. Even our trail maps are made with recycled paper. We hope you enjoy our mountain and look forward to making some turns with you.


www.BeaverCreekMap.com

SaddleRidge Villas


History of Beaver Creek Beaver Creek is a feast for the eyes; a delight for the senses. The influence of renowned resorts such as Switzerland’s St. Moritz, Italy’s Cortina, and Spain’s Val d’Aran led to the creation of a unique mountain resort full of excitement and village luxury. Originally designed to accommodate skiers of all abilities, Beaver Creek Mountain continues to welcome and challenge those who visit her slopes. From the gentle groomed runs of Strawberry Park to the rugged glades and bump runs of Grouse Mountain, Beaver Creek is enjoyed by a variety of Nordic Sports enthusiasts. When George Townsend first settled in the valley in 1881, he knew he’d found something special- an exceptional mountain, lined with aspen groves and beautiful vistas that would become a world renowned destination. In 1972, Vail continued his vision by purchasing the land and began designing a resort that combined western hospitality and European charm. Obstacles delayed resort completion, but on December 15, 1980, Beaver Creek finally opened to the public. Major events have always found a home at Beaver Creek. The mountain was named as a potential site for the 1976 Winter Olympics. In 1989, the resort hosted the World Ski Championships. For the last several years Beaver Creek has hosted the Visa Birds of Prey ™ World Cup Downhill Ski race which brings together hundreds of athletes as they compete to be named World Champion. Beaver Creek is also popular as a summertime adventure destination hosting such events as the Ultra 100 mountain bike race and the Jeep King of the Mountain series. In December 2010, Beaver Creek celebrated 30 years of resort excellence, and continues to be a resort industry leader in guest service and terrain maintenance.


The Beaver Creek Club


About the Beaver Creek Club The Beaver Creek Club has been established exclusively for property owners of Beaver Creek, providing its members and their guests with unique opportunities and special privileges to more fully enjoy Beaver Creek Resort. Beaver Creek Club offers members, their family and guests an opportunity to relax, play, meet interesting and active new people, enjoy magnificent recreational facilities and participate in creative, entertaining and stimulating programs and activities. The Beaver Creek Club was founded on the principle that life is meant to be experienced best of all among friends, and within this family you will not want for things to do, places to go, or people to meet!

Amenities and Privileges:  

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Full access to the Beaver Creek Club, a year-round facility, located just west of the Centennial Chairlift; serving complimentary continental breakfast throughout the ski season. Exclusive winter use of Beano's Cabin and Allie's Cabin at lunch for members and accompanied guests, snowcat service to Beano's lunch for non-skiing members. Reciprocity to Game Creek Club and Bachelors Gulch/Zach's Cabin for lunch on a limited basis. Two unrestricted ski passes, renewable annually, to enjoy world-class skiing at Vail, Beaver Creek, Keystone and Breckenridge Mountains. Full membership to the Allegria Spa at the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek. Tennis at the Beaver Creek Tennis Center without court fees. The center includes two hard courts, five clay courts and a tennis pro shop. Exclusive rights to reserve member tee times and complimentary greens fees at the Beaver Creek Golf Course. Cart fees are not included. (Charter Membership) Exclusive summer access to the members' lounge and locker facilities, located on the third floor of the Beaver Creek Golf Club; serving complimentary continental breakfast throughout golf season. Access to the Ford Hall parking structure on a first-come, first-served basis. Invitations to special sporting/social events. Member ski school discounts on class lessons and workshops at Beaver Creek. Complimentary, short-term use of the Beaver Creek Club ski storage facility. Complimentary use of Beaver Creek Mountain pay-to-race course.


SaddleRidge Villas Residence #9

BEAVER CREEK яБо COLORADO

SaddleRidge Villas - Residence 9  

SaddleRidge in Beaver Creek - a part of american history in Beaver Creek

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