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Bear 40 YEARS!

August 2019 • Tucson Edition • www.bearessentialnews.com

essential news

®

Betty

De la

Osa

Field Trips and Family Destinations Guide! See pages 19 thru 26

In This Picture: Find a smile emoji, a pencil, a combination lock, a school lunch bag, a pair of scissors, a bottle of glue, an A+, an eraser, a pushpin and a kindness heart.

FAMILIES

FEATURE

NEWS

Be Kind at S chool

Meatless Burger Wars Firefighters at Work Fun for Fall!

The importance of kindness! pages 14 & 15

Spotlight on Going Old School News Highlights page 5

NEWS & more news kids can use Scoops pages 7, 8, 12, 16 & 18

Tucson Parks & Rec! Page 28

FIELD TRIP

A dventures Guide! & Teachers Resources Pages 19 thru 26


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BEAR 40 YEARS •

www.bearessentialnews.com

August 2019

Have a Great Year!

Welcome Back!

Start the Year Off Right with Bear Essential

Every month, Bear Essential News delivers fun, relevant, thought-provoking news and features for your students. Sign up for the accompanying free classroom work sheets, designed by grade levels and aligned with AZCCRS at BearEssentialNews.com . Students in grades 3 through 8 can become Young Reporters for this award-winning newspaper, too! Bear Essential is a free, fun and trusted news source delivered directly to your school each month, providing quality informational text that’s great for classroom reading, writing and discussion. Much of Bear’s current content is aligned with Arizona College & Career Ready Standards, and students contribute news stories for this literacy award-winning publication.

dule a Visit!

Sche

Become a Young Reporter!

Kids all over Arizona write for Bear Essential News, and you can, too! The Young Reporters Program is FREE and teaches you the basics of journalism, sharpens your writing and gives you real-world experience. Your stories could appear in Bear Essential News, Arizona’s leading newspaper for young people and their families, and are permanently posted on Bear’s fab website. Sign up for the FREE Young Reporters Program (for kids grades 3–8). Print out the YR sign-up form at BearEssentialNews.com (under the Young Reporters tab). Fill it out, have a parent sign the bottom, and mail it in. Bear will send you an awesome Young Reporters Kit!

Bear Essential News offers five fun and informative classroom presentations for Tucson and Phoenix-area schools and youth groups for grades 2 through 8. These FREE presentations promote strong, standards-based writing, interviewing skills and teach the fundamentals of journalism. Students also are encouraged to sign up as Young Reporters. Younger students: How Bear is made or intro to journalism. Grades 3–8: Writing tips, interviewing skills or journalism as a career. Presentations run approximately 50 minutes. Three-classroom minimum per visit. Call toll free 1-866-NEWSKID.

Teacher Work Sheets Each Month! Each month Bear creates work sheets to be used in the classroom with the current issue. These work sheets can be printed from our website or emailed to you directly. Teachers can sign up for our Newsletter for Bear’s free AZCCRS-based Work Sheets for grades K–2, 3–4, 5–6 and 7–8. These monthly Work Sheets augment the current issue of Bear Essential News, which is a trusted source for a wide range of informational text. Work sheets can also be printed from our web site at bearessentialnews.com under the “Teacher” tab. Under this tab you can find information on becoming an advisor and signing up Young Reporters. There is also a great field trip and grant funding resource guide to help plan and fund your class field trips. To sign up for our newsletter and teacher work sheets, visit BearEssentialNews.com and click on the envelope icon at the top of the page on the right.

Free Young Reporter Workshops Each school year Bear Essential News offers a free Young Reporter Workshop. These workshops help students learn the basic skills they need to become Young Reporters and have their stories published in Bear. Students will meet with professional journalists and receive their Young Reporter Notepad, Bear Stylebook and Press Pass. Workshop announcements are printed in the Bear Newsletter and in issues of Bear Essential News a couple of months prior to the workshops.

See you at the workshop!

Bear Essential’s Standards-based FREE CLASSROOM PRESENTATIONS!

Are you signed up for the Bear Essential Newsletter? What you get when you subscribe:

• Alerts about new contests & cool prizes. • Information on free and fun family events. • Links to our Birthday Guide, Summer Camps & Field Trip Guides when they are published.

• Special offers, coupons and promo codes for exciting family events.

• Read monthly features, Young Reporter stories and highlighted events.

Subscribing is easy!

Visit BearEssentialNews.com and click on the envelope in the top right corner.

***Bear Essential News does not share or sell your email or information with other organizations or mailing lists***


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

B Letters to Boomer

BEAR 40 YEARS

Sponsored by

Write to Boomer Bear at

Bear Essential News • 2525 E. Broadway Blvd., #102 • Tucson, AZ 85716 or e-mail your letters to boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Dear Boomer, My favorite book series is Dork Diaries, and Rachel Renée Russell is my favorite author! Yours truly, S.S. Dear Boomer, Dork Diaries are my favorite books.

Dear Boomer, I think it’s important to be kind and respect others because we are all equal and deserve to be treated with love. Your friend, A.L.

Your friend, D.K. Hi Boomer, My favorite book is “Gamer Army,” and my favorite author is Lincoln Pierce. — L.B.

Dear S.S., D.K. & L.B., You’ve got great taste in books and authors! Both the Dork Diaries by Russell and the Big Nate series by Lincoln Pierce are way too funny. With school getting going, please ask your teacher to enroll in this year’s Book It! reading program. It’s Pizza Hut’s free, rewards-based literacy program, which runs from Oct. 1 through March 31. This issue shines a light on being kind, and Book It! has four book recommendations about kindness and free activities to go along with them: “Have You Filled a Bucket Today?,”“Judy Moody & the Bucket List,” “Lend a Hand—Poems About Giving” and “Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed.” Go to www.bookitprogram.com/articles/ read-do/kindness for the activities. Readers are Winners, Boomer

Dear Boomer, It’s important to respect others because everyone is the same, and it’s nice to be kind.

Yours truly, A.C.

Boomer Bear, For a field trip, I would like to go to some sort of concert. Sincerely, T.L.

Since 1984

Dear Boomer, I want to visit a farm for a field trip because not only do you get to spend time with animals, but it gets you used to the heat! Yours truly, E.A. Terrific ideas, T.L. & E.A.! I really enjoy concerts—they make me want to dance! I like everything from hip-hop to classical music. One of my favorite field trips was to a dairy farm. Loved seeing all their black-and-white cows. Check out my 2019–2020 Field Trips, Family Destinations and Teachers Resource Guide in this issue! You’ll get some fabulous field trip ideas for unforgettable fun.

Enjoy, Boomer Bear

Dear A.L. & A.C., Kindness can make a HUGE difference—especially at school. Having empathy for other students and trying to better understand kids (including those who may be bullies or giving you grief) will help you grow, too! Check out my main feature on kindness. Learn about the Kind Campus program of Ben’s Bells and check out “25 Ways to Be Kind!”

Dear Boomer, This school year, I would like to get straight A’s and start a shool newspaper. Your Young Reporter, A.H.

Peace, Boomer Bear

Your buddy, Boomer

Sounds like a plan, A.H., I’m sure you’ll figure out how to pull great grades this year. If you need help starting a school newspaper, I’m your bear!

g n i l l Ca l Al ! s r e h c a e T Our 2019–20 Program Partner

Origami Yoda Series By Tom Angleberger

The BOOK IT! Program is dedicated to encouraging reading in schools nationwide. It’s simple, fun and free to use in your classroom!

Enroll at: bookitprogram.com or call 1-800-426-6548

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August 2019

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August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

B

News Highlights

It’s Burger Wars — Without the Meat! Wait, what?! That’s right, meatless burgers are becoming more common and Burger King is the latest chain to hop on the bandwagon. Burger King is selling the plant-based Impossible Whopper at its more than 7,000 locations across the United States for the next month. It is testing the potential demand for the meatless patty after a trial run in the St. Louis area proved successful earlier this year. As awareness increases about the health and environmental benefits of decreasing meat intake, some people are looking for tasty ALTERNATIVES to beef. However, Burger King is not the first chain to see the potential for attracting new customers and those looking to try something different. White Castle has been offering the Impossible Slider since 2018. Carl’s Jr. teamed up with Beyond Meat at the start of 2019 to begin offering the Beyond Famous Star, a plant-based version of the restaurant’s iconic burger. Tim Hortons and Dunkin’ have both teamed up with Beyond Meat as well to offer meatfree options on their menu. It’s not just restaurants—grocery store chains, including Kroger (Fry’s) and Safeway, have started carrying the Beyond Burger. Kroger also carries the Beyond Sausage, a plant-based option for brat lovers. Impossible Burgers will likely be hitting grocery store shelves soon as a key ingredient in the patties was

approved by the Food and Drug Administration at the end of last month. Both of the plantbased food providers are relatively new on the scene but have been making a big splash since arriving. Beyond Meat started in 2009, while Impossible Foods opened in 2011. They have been so popular the companies have at times struggled to meet the increasing demands. One thing that nutritionists want to make clear to people is that just because the meat-free options are plant-based does not mean they should be seen as healthy. While the meat-free alternatives contain no cholesterol, they are comparable to beef burgers in saturated fat and are higher in sodium. What does all of this mean for consumers? Plant-based burgers should be treated like beef burgers—as an occasional tasty treat. Are you interested in trying one?

Imagine standing on top of a steep rock wall, overlooking a massive glacier—a place that is home to mountain goats with seabirds flying overhead and whales swimming in the water below. For a handful of students from Petersburg High School in Alaska, they don’t have to imagine. They’ve been making annual treks to the LeConte Glacier to collect data about the glacier’s position since 1983. The students’ notes about the glacier’s retreat several years ago was one of the things that caught the attention of scientists who wanted to better understand the melting of the glacier. In a new study published in July in Science, oceanographers and glaciologists revealed their findings using new technology to study the tidewater glacier, the name referring to glaciers that end in the ocean The research revealed that the glacier is melting far faster than previous theories had suggested. The melt rates were measured to be about 10 to 100 times

larger than what theory predicted, according to lead study author David A. Sutherland, an oceanographer at the University of Oregon. Glaciers can extend hundreds of feet below the surface of the water. Higher submarine melting rates indicate to scientists that glaciers are even more sensitive to ocean change than previously SUSPECTED. Getting accurate measurements is important in aiding scientists with predicting future sea-level rise. However, scientists have previously struggled to locate exactly where at the glacier’s terminus, or end, the most intense melting occurs and how quickly it happens. The reason for this is that glaciers may look majestic and unintimidating from afar, but there is real danger in getting close enough to the frozen masses to measure them. “We are just super jazzed that we can even do this,” Sutherland was reported saying in National Geographic. “We weren’t 100 percent sure it was going to work.” Sutherland jokingly added that it was “pretty simple in my head, and sounded good on paper.”

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Go Back to School in Arizona—to the 1880s Have you ever wished you could travel back in time? It is possible, and you don’t even need a time machine! Instead, you and your class can visit the Tubac Presidio State Historic Park and see what it was like to go to school in the 1880s. Third- through fifth-grade students and their teachers can experience a school day in the second oldest schoolhouse in Arizona. Teachers and students decide if they want to participate in a traditional day in the 1880s or just do some basic lessons in the schoolhouse, have a spelling bee and then take a tour of the museum. If they decide on a traditional 1880s school day, the teacher receives a curriculum, which includes copying lessons from school textbooks from the 1800s and follow-up guidelines.

photo courtesy of USGS

Glaciers Quickly Melting from Underneath

Teacher and students go in costume, wearing clothing of the time period, which means that girls wear long dresses or skirts with blouses, and boys wear jeans and a button-down shirt with suspenders. They will make individual slates to complete their schoolwork on, make their own lunch pail and fill it with food of the time period. Tortillas, fruit, beef jerky and vegetables were some of the common lunch items in the 1880s. The students have lunch and enjoy recess playing games from that period. Marbles, jump ropes and tops were popular at the time. Boys and girls cannot play together at recess. Reading and a spelling bee complete the day. The cost for the field trip is $2 per student and $5 per chaperone. The teacher is always free. Reservations can be made by calling (520) 398-2252 or your teacher can go to www.tubacpp.com/schools to read the program guide and for more information.


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August 2019

For grades 3 thru 8

Can Your Kids Swim?

Young Reporter Nigh t Is Every Third T hursday

Keep your kids safer, sign up today!

Join Us at

Formal swim lessons between ages 1 and 4 help reduce the risk of drowning by 88% it’s never too late to learn the lifelong skill of swimming, start today!

Bookmans–East 6230 E. Speedway

*source: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine 2009

Tucson’s Premier Indoor Swim School

520-877-SWIM (7946)

Thursday, August 15 • 4:30–6 pm

2850 W. Ina Rd. #130

4:30 p.m. Article Editing

www.demontswim.com

N.E. corner on Ina/Shannon

Voted “Best Tucson Country Charter School!”

Day School

Home of the Champions!

TCDS is also a FINALIST in this year’s

Readers’ Choice Awards! • K–8 and Private Preschool & Prekindergarten on a 10-acre campus • Outstanding, Caring, Dedicated Teachers • Small class sizes (1:24 K-5, 1:26 6-8) • Accelerated Classes • FREE Full-Day Kindergarten

Curriculum includes: Art, PE, Spanish, Sign Language, Multimedia/Tech, Band, Orchestra, Drama, General Music and Choir After-School Programs include: Sports, Drama Club, Lego Club, Dance, Jump Rope, Chess Club, STEM Club, Band Club, Math Club, KidzArt & More!

TCDS also voted WINNER of the Macaroni Kid East Tucson’s Gold Daisy Award for our Early Childhood Program!

Mention this ad when you come in for a tour and receive a free “I’m a Champion” T-shirt!

A Champion is:

Collaborative Honorable Academic Motivated Persistent Inquisitive Optimistic Nurturing

FREE K-8 Public Charter School TCDCharterSchool.com • 520-296-0883 9239 E. Wrightstown Road • Tucson, AZ 85715

Presentation: Getting the most from an interview! For more info please call 792-9930 Proudly Sponsored by:

• Free snack & drinks for reporters! • YR kits for new reporters • Bring in your story for editing & a chance to win a special prize!


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Get the Scoop!

First Responders Fight Floods & Fires by Reporter Lizzy Barrett, Old Vail Middle School

I interviewed three firefighters: Michelle Isely, Chief Allen Yalen and Captain Scott Laird. They work for the Rincon Valley Fire Department, formed in 1985. The firefighters and I talked about how they work to protect others and safety tips to avoid the dangers of monsoon season. Isely showed me the firetrucks and their features. Isely is the only female Rincon Valley Fire District firefighter. She was inspired by her dad who was a firefighter and her hero. He’s retired now, but teaches EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) courses. When she was in middle school, her dad would drive her in an

ambulance and drop her off at school. Although that embarrassed her, she was still determined to be a firefighter. According to Isely, “This is my passion, this is where I belong, this is what I love to do.” One of the ways firefighters help is by rescuing the victim when they are on a cliff. One morning, they were practicing on a cliff in Vail. They practiced by tying Chief Yalen on a safety rope and releasing him down into the cliff. Meanwhile, Isely and other firefighters control the rope that holds Yalen. In a real scenario involving a car, they would hook cables to a secure point and stabilize the car to safely get the victim out. According to Laird, sometimes the firefighter could also end up being the victim. People can avoid the dangers of monsoon season by staying away from floods. The National Weather Service started the campaign “Turn Around Don’t Drown” because flooding is one of the top weather killers in the U.S. Drivers can do this by turning around and finding an alternate route. Arizona has a “Stupid Motorist Law.” If you disobey this law, you will be fined for the cost of the rescue. Drivers should not go around the barricades into the dangerous flooded areas. MORE FIREFIGHTERS, page 8 ➧

School Makes Big Donation to Honor Flight by Reporter Natalie Luera Academy of Tucson Middle School     In May of 2019, I attended a family fun night at the Academy of Tucson Middle School. Tracy Shaw, the school’s office manager, and Susan Creenan, the principal, handed off a donation of $4,000 to Thom and Kathy Mansur on the behalf of the Honor Flight of Southern Arizona Organization. This non-profit organization thanks veterans for all their sacrifices by transporting our heroes to Washington, D.C., to visit and reflect upon the memorial of the war they fought in. Every $1000 that is raised is able to give one veteran an all-expense paid trip to D.C. For many veterans this is “the most important” trip of their lives. To be able to provide for that is truly an honor. The school has raised money, with a goal of sending two veterans per year through this organization, for the past five years. The annual fundraiser is kicked

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News Stories Written by Kids— for Kids Issue Heats Up, But What Does Global Warming Mean? by Reporter Diya Bhattacharya BASIS Oro Valley Currently we face issues about the Earth’s climate due to heat increasing over the years. This has arisen as one of the primary issues to many people, politicians, activists and civilians alike. In order to talk about global warming we must first delve into its true meaning. So what is global warming? Global warming is widely known as the warming of the Earth due to the constant harmful gases emitted by different industries, vehicular emissions, etc. Some of the more commonly known gases that causes global warming are water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons. These five gases are otherwise known as greenhouse gases. Natural greenhouse effect is important to maintain the earth’s temperature. But the problem arises when the concentration of these gases goes up. Carbon dioxide is expelled naturally when you breathe out, but since the industrial revolution, human activities have increased the amount of carbon dioxide. Methane is a gas that is expelled through natural, and human activities such as cultivating rice or caring for domestic livestock. Nitrous oxide is extremely powerful and expelled by soil cultivation process (fertilizers). Finally, the most unfamiliar MORE WARMING, page 12 ➧

Sign up to be a Reporter at

Young Reporter Night!

off by having Thom and Kathy Mansur present Honor Flight and their cause to the students. Then, the office holds a raffle for gift baskets created by students and donors from the community. This is followed by having volunteers spend Veterans Day working a bake sale held in front of the school for the public. During this time, they also accept monetary donations for the cause. That is how for the 5th annual fundraising event they were able to send four veterans to Washington, D.C, which is more than they have ever sent before and they strive to send even more in years to come.

Thursday, Aug. 15 at

Bookmans–East 6230 E. Speedway

5–6 p.m.

(Story editing at 4:30)

This month’s topic:

Getting the most from an interview! Call 792-9930 for more information.


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August 2019

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Get the Scoop!

Continued from page 7

More Firefighters Continued from page 7

Check Us Out Online at

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DAISY

Early Learning Preschool

15 Years of Great Beginnings, Bright Futures

Gear Up for

Kinder! Enrolling Ages 3+ • Using the CREATIVE CURRICULUM® for Preschool • Nurturing, family-focused preschool • Breakfast, lunch, and snack included • Safe, secure camps with monitored access • Exciting your child about science with STEMScopes

520-665-3450

delainfo@sonoranschools.org 2325 W. Sunset Road, (River & La Cholla) Tucson, 85741

Mon—Fri: 6:30 AM–6:30 PM Full and half-day schedules

According to Laird, “Six inches of moving water can wash your car away.” The most dangerous rescue firefighters have to do is swift water rescuing. Monsoon season can get really dangerous in the summertime, so we should avoid the storms. One of the tips is to stay away from anything electrical, like power lines. It can fall down, but it may not be dead. It can electrocute you and seriously injure you. I learned in science class that it is best to stay indoors, but if you are in the middle of a field, you should squat with heels touching each other and cover your eardrums. Thunder can actually destroy your eardrums. Another way firefighters can help is by getting animals out of backyards. It can be a snake or a raccoon. Firefighters carry a special box that secures the animal from getting out. They then take it far away from homes for the animal to have a safe life. They receive 2400–2500 emergency and nonemergency calls per year. Firefighters have to be in good physical shape in order to do all rescue missions. So, they have weight and exercise equipment to help them. Monsoon season can be pretty unpredictable and it can catch people off guard. It is best to stay indoors as the storm rolls in. Storms are really powerful. When monsoon season hits, the firefighters are our heroes in the dangerous storm.

An Encounter with a Hedgehog by Reporter Sophia Bradley, Sonoran Science Academy East Did you ever visit Belarus on the other side of the world? Well, this summer at my grampa’s dacha (cottage) next to the Dniper River in Belarus, my family had an idea to catch a wild hedgehog, because next to my grampa’s house there were a lot of bushes and a lot of hedgehogs at night. My family was ready. We went outside, and I saw a moving thing in the dark in the bushes, so we went closer. We saw a hedgehog! It was a round, small tailed, spiky animal with a long nose. We picked it up and put it inside my dad’s hat, and brought it back to my grandpa’s dacha. We gave it milk and meat. The hedgehog only wanted to drink the milk, so we all sat with it and watched it drink. It wasn’t afraid of us! After the hedgehog was done drinking the milk, we needed to let the hedgehog go. I was sad, but I was happy that it went home. MORE SCOOPS, page 12 ➧


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

BEAR 40 YEARS

August Is Drowning Impact Awareness Month! Child drownings in Arizona are nearly twice the national average, and it’s 100% preventable.

SAFETY POOL RULES

Water is fun when you play safely. Find the seven differences between these two pictures. Then, read the important safety rules below.

of Water Safety Checklist Active Adult Supervision • Always watch children when they are in or near ANY body of water, without being distracted • Never leave children unattended • Keep young children within arm’s length of an adult • Designate an official Water Watcher - an adult tasked with supervising children in the water

Barriers • Pool fencing around pools and spas • Self-closing, selflatching gates • Teach children to never climb over the gate or fence • Install a door alarm from the house to the pool area • Keep pool and spa

covers in working order

Coast GuardApproved Life Vest & Classes • All inexperienced swimmers should wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life vest in or near all bodies of water. • Choose a life vest that is right for your child’s weight and water activity. • Arm floaties are toys. They are not a life-saving device and should never replace a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life vest. • Enroll children in swimming lessons • Take CPR classes just in case of an emergency

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August 2019

Paw Prints Answers Your Questions Homework For Your Pets Now that you’re back in school, your pets will miss having you around all week! They may not have as many opportunities to play or as many interesting things to do during the day. Some pets just might need to get used to spending more time alone. Unless you provide them with plenty to do, some pets may become destructive—chewing, scratching or digging where they shouldn’t or playing with things that definitely are not pet toys. Here are some ways you can help your pet adjust to your school-year schedule: • GIVE YOUR PET A “SAFE PLACE”: A pet who seems nervous about being left alone (or who can’t be trusted with access to the whole house) would like to have a safe place to be in while you’re away. Try isolating him in one room with toys, water and DIRTY LAUNDRY—something that smells like you, like a shirt or pillowcase—to remind him that you’ll be home soon. • GIVE YOUR PET THINGS TO DO: Be sure your pet has plenty of interesting toys. Dogs should have something to chew on, something that rolls and something that challenges their mind. Try filling a hollow toy (the kind made of very heavy rubber) with a mixture of peanut butter and broken pieces of dog treats! • DON’T TEMPT YOUR PET: Pick up your clothes, toys, books and anything breakable. Put them out of your pet’s reach. If something is left available, then it isn’t really your pet’s fault if he thinks it’s a toy! • USE YOUR TIME TOGETHER EFFECTIVELY: Work off your pet’s energy when you are home by running, walking or playing together. Pets need opportunities to “let off steam” just like you do!

Dear PawPrints, My dog chews on his tail. He has chewed all the hair off. Does he need to go to the doctor? Luis Dear Luis, There are many reasons that might make a dog chew on his body. Usually it starts with an itch and, since dogs don’t have fingers to scratch with, they use their teeth instead. Sometimes that itchy place can become so annoying that the dog digs too deeply and too often with his teeth. When that happens, he can chew off his hair and even make a raw wound on his skin. He does need to visit the veterinarian to find out why he’s so itchy and to help heal up the raw spot. Itching can be caused by dry skin, allergies to grass or food,

or by fleas. Sometimes, though, dogs can develop a habit of chewing on themselves when they’re nervous or anxious about something —kind of like a person biting his or her fingernails. The veterinarian can also help to find out why that’s happening and how to stop the bad habit. Then YOU can help by following the doctor’s instructions to make your dog feel better. Maricopa County Animal Care & Control


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Joining Cub Scouts Rocks! It’s Sign-Up Time

Boys and Girls ages 5 & up

Join Scouting by September 11 & Get a

Scout Night!

Free Ticket to Scout Night at the Races!

Scout Night at the Races at Tucson Speedway

Saturday, Sept. 14. Gates open at 5 p.m. with racing starting at 7 p.m.

Classroom Crossword

CHALLENGE!

Sharpen your pencil and dust off your brain with this Back-to-School word game. 2

1

C

3

R

4 5

A

S

S

6

7

E

8

R

10

9

P

C

11

G

13

D

14

S

M

16

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18

19

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ACROSS 3. You earn this at school 4. Creative projects 6. We tell these to one another 8. A short break from class 11. This subject really adds up 13. You speak these 15. A good time 17. You go to school to do this 18. This helps with math 19. You should get this after doing a good job

A

12

C

R

ANSWERS: Across—3. grade, 4. art, 6. stories, 8. recess, 11. math, 13. languages,15. fun, 17. learn, 18. calculator, 19. praise Down—1. class, 2. share, 5. friends, 7. communicate, 9. principal, 10. reading,12. teacher, 14. games, 16. dreams

What’s best about being a Cub Scout? Is it all the great things they get to do with other kids? Is it the family fun? The friends you make? Boys and girls from kindergarten through fifth grade can be Cub Scouts and find out for themselves! And those lucky enough to join before Sept. 11 will receive a free pass to Scout Night at the Races on Saturday, Sept. 14 at Tucson Speedway! We asked some Cub Scouts from Pack 747 what they like best. Eleanor Chandler, 6, will be moving up from Lion to Tiger in rank. “I started last year. My mom and my dad suggested it, and I was excited to start,” she says. For her, the best parts were earning a second-place trophy in the Pinewood Derby and making friends. and Parker Madsen, Eleanor n Eleanor is a Cub Scout in a girls den. dse Ma Harper Chandler, and Ben Cub Scout ranks go by grade level from kindergarten through fifth grade—Lion, Tiger, Wolf, Bear and then Webelos (fourth & fifth grades.) Twin brothers Parker and Ben Madsen, 10, are going into Webelos. “This is our fourth year in Cub Scouts,” Parker shares. The two joined because their older brother enjoyed it and their dad was a Cubmaster. While he likes doing the LEGO and Pinewood derbies, his favorite activity is bowling. “We went bowling recently, and I won—I got 90 points,” he says. His brother Ben won first place in the Pinewood Derby! Ben also enjoys camping with his boys den, rock climbing and learning to cook things like pizza. As Webelos, Ben and Parker will start working on the Arrow of Light, the highest badge you can earn in Cub Scouts. Eleanor’s older sister Harper Chandler, 8, also started last year and goes from Wolf to Bear. “I was excited because I had some friends in it,” she shares. She also likes camping. “I like the outdoors. It smells fresher out there and I like how colorful it is. I learned how to bandage someone if they got hurt, and I learned how to climb rocks. It’s fun!” To join, call the Catalina Council at 520-750-0385, and you can find a pack or den near you by visiting BeAScout.org. See you at the Scout Night at the Races!!!

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DOWN 1. Where you spend most of the day 2. To do together

5. You can make these at school 7. To get the message across 9. The head of a school

10. An important subject 12. Person usually at head of class 14. These have rules

16. Our fondest wishes

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Get the Scoop!

Continued from page 8

More Warming Continued from page 7 one of them all, chlorofluorocarbons. Released purely by industrial causes, these are destroying the ozone layer of the Earth. Thankfully, due to international intervention, chlorofluorocarbons have been largely regulated. A topic as large as this is obviously going to have controversy. One side believes that global warming and climate change exists, and the greenhouse effect (name used to describe the causes of greenhouse gases) is causing changes such as the polar ice caps melting, excessive heat waves, and steady rise of sea levels. On the other hand are people who believe that these effects are not a cause of global warming and climate change, but rather, the effect of the Earth simply evolving. The heat index has been rising constantly in many countries, and there have been prolonged summers. Temperatures have risen over the years, and it doesn’t seem to be changing for the better. Besides, it’s not only humans

that are suffering—animals in cold regions such as the Arctic are suffering as well. Polar ice caps are rapidly decreasing which is alarming for animals that need the cold environment to live in. Creatures such as the polar bear will starve if these ice caps melt because they rely on the seals for food. However, if the ice caps melt, the polar bears cannot sit anywhere, and wait for the hunt. They must swim or walk large distances to find food. This could lead to an increased risk of death. Due to rising sea levels we see horrible destruction of coastal lands and animals. Massive erosion is caused by the increase of water as well as flooding. Then we have the land being invaded by the salt which has caused a decreasing habitat for animals and plants alike. These are only a few of the issues of global warming. Others believe that global warming doesn’t exist, and that the Earth is simply going through another phase in life. Commonly used arguments are that “animals and plants can adapt” or “climate has changed before.” Despite these words, animals and plants cannot change at the rapid pace that is currently here. And climate will change due to the most dominant force which is currently humans. These are a few of the myths that some people are led to believe, but regardless science is always there to counteract it, leading the majority of people to believe that global warming is real.

How I Spent My Summer in Bewildering Belarus by Reporter Anastasia Bradley Sonoran Science Academy East My visit to Belarus was amazing! There are so many amazing things there that are not in the U.S. Everything is so weird but so cool at the same time. Specifically, I was in Gomel, a city in Belarus. Belarus is located in Europe, on the other side of the world. There are so many things to do there!  In the center of Gomel, there is a fountain. No, no, not the kind of fountain where you just sit and watch the view. No, I mean an actual fountain you can play in! The fountain has pipes that spill out water, and makes the water form into cool shapes and sizes!  Gomel also has a theme park. Most of the rides can be seen in the U.S., but some of those rides are really unique, with their own special twists!  Then there is the circus. The circus had many fun stunts, including white tiger taming, monkey acrobatics and kangaroo boxing. And they all had one thing in common: they were hilarious!  A few days before I had to leave, we went to where they were holding the European Games. It was a big deal, because it was the second European Games….. hosted in Minsk, the capital of Belarus!   If you go, it might be a little confusing and hard to understand the language and alphabet, and also to get used to the wild animals that are around. But don’t worry, the trip will be fun.  MORE SCOOPS, page 16 ➧


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

August 2019 •

BEAR 40 YEARS

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August 2019

Back to School

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be kind to your family—they’re affected, too! Gomez suggests, “A weekly act, whether it’s helping your teacher, volunteering somewhere, or at home, saying, ‘I’m going to feed the dog every day this week without mom telling me.’ ” For more Kind Campus info or to sign up, visit: https://bensbells.org/kindness-education/kind-schools

Always Be Kind to Yourself! Sometimes you can be your own worst critic. But if you’re down on yourself—maybe you didn’t make the team or don’t understand what’s being taught or feel you aren’t attractive enough—it can be really hard to be kind to others.

August 2019

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Page 15

25 Ways to Be Kind!

B

en’s Bells believes everyone has the capacity to Be Kind and that we can help each other work toward this goal. Here are 25 ways you might practice kindness at your school. Share these ideas with others, and at the bottom, add some of your own ways to be kind as well:

1. Make your own “be kind” signs and hang them around your school as a powerful visual reminder to be kind.

2. Write or draw a note of appreciation for someone and give it to them as a reminder you’re thinking of them, especially someone who is having a hard time. 3. Create a gratitude jar for your classroom. Jot down what you’re grateful for and see if your class can fill it! 4. Be kind to yourself and eat a healthy snack. 5. Write a Thank You note to a staff member who helps keep your school clean and safe.

Image: shutterstock.com

6. Read a book together as a class and talk about moments of kindness between characters.

...with

KINDNESS!

As you’re setting your goals this school year, keep kindness in mind!

keep kindness in mind! “In some way, try to incorporate kindness,” encourages Helen Gomez, the new Executive Director of Ben’s Bells. This Arizona non-profit organization seeks to strengthen people and communities by teaching them about what intentional acts of kindness and trying to understand others can ACCOMPLISH.

Schools & Education a Key Part

Getting back into the swing of things doesn’t always go smoothly. School’s a challenge, whether it’s learning harder stuff, getting used to your new teacher(s), dealing with a rough school or the social side of things—there’s a lot of change for everyone! But there’s something you can do to make things better for you and your school, and that’s to learn to BE KIND! So as you’re setting your goals this school year,

You may have seen the flashy Be Kind mosaics around town or even on the wall of your school! Schools and kindness education are key COMPONENTS of Ben’s Bells. “There are a lot of little ways to show kindness— and if you can do that on a weekly basis, I think that would be a great goal for the school year!” Gomez says. She points out that there’s a difference between just being nice and actually making the effort to be kind. “Oftentimes people are nice, but they don’t actually take the time to do something that’s really meaningful and impactful— that’s going to help somebody else in some way,” she explains. “Around campus kindness could be doing something like having lunch with somebody who’s sitting by themselves, who maybe doesn’t have a friend,” Gomez suggests. “Something little like that can make a huge difference!”

Kind Campus

Kind Campus is a fun and upbeat program of Ben’s Bells that your teacher can sign up for and begin at any time. It’s designed for different age levels, but geared mostly for elementary school kids. Broken down by week, “It’s a whole year’s worth of free curriculum for teachers that they can INTEGRATE into their school day. Basically it covers various ways to intentionally practice kindness. It’s like a little hidden gem!” Gomez describes. Knowing how busy teachers are, the activities are straightforward and don’t take up too much time or require a lot of planning. It provides easy ways to talk about kindness, has students practice kindness and shows the great variety of ways to be kind (check out the list to the right!). “Kindness is a skill and you have to practice it,” encourages Gomez. She points out that the new school year is a time of a lot of new circumstances and new people, so be kind to those around you and remember to

7. Smile and say “hi” to 10 people when you walk by them. 8. Make a “What Is Kindness?” bulletin board or poster for your classroom. Brainstorm ideas together. 9. As a class, talk about why sleeping well and eating well are important for self-kindness. 10. As a class, talk about some great things about living in your community. 11. Welcome new students to your school by showing them around and introducing them to other students. “In terms of image, as a society, we’re very self-critical,” Gomez explains. Know that you’re an individual, beautiful person, and take time out to treat yourself well. Maybe it’s setting aside a half hour to take the dog for a walk or to watch something silly on TV. Maybe it’s reading a new book for an hour. “Then you recharge, and you’re able to better deal with difficult situations or difficult people,” she continues.

Understanding Others School can be far from easy. It might be a rough school, someone who bullies you, or maybe it’s socially a tough place. “I have a 9- and a 10-year-old, and so often (they share) ‘this person was mean to me’ or ‘they did this’ or ‘they did that.’ We really talk through it,” Gomez says. How might you handle it? “Think about it Kin from their point of Kid d view—there may be s! something going on. It could be something as simple as they’re hungry. Their parents might be going through a divorce. There could be a lot of things that could be happening behind the scenes,” Gomez explains. “The fact that somebody lashes out—they’re trying to get that emotion, that feeling out. So for most kids, I think the best way to practice kindness is to try to understand where the other person is coming from in trying to understand their actions.”

12. Write kind messages with sidewalk chalk in a common area at your school. 13. Share your snack with another student. 14. Write Kind Notes to several people in your school’s neighborhood and deliver them. 15. Learn as many people’s names as possible and practice using them. 16. Share your ideas with a younger student about ways to be kind and why it’s important for your school. 17. Practice ways to stay calm if you begin to feel angry or frustrated, like taking a short break by yourself or thinking about three things you are grateful for. 18. Compliment five people on a quality that helps them be kind. 19. Learn to say “thank you” and “hello” in a new language. 20. Hold the door open for students entering school in the morning. 21. Be sure to include new students when playing on the playground. 22. If you see someone sitting alone at lunch, invite them to sit with you or with you and your friends. 23. If you feel stressed or overwhelmed, take three deep breaths in order to build awareness of your body and your thoughts. 24. Find a bracelet or rubber band to wear on your wrist. Every time you feel grateful, move the bracelet to the other wrist. As you soak it in, become aware of your gratitude. 25. Get excited for opportunities in the new school year to learn new things and make new friends!

Think of and write down several more ways to show Kindness this Year!


Page 14

BEAR 40 YEARS •

August 2019

Back to School

www.bearessentialnews.com

be kind to your family—they’re affected, too! Gomez suggests, “A weekly act, whether it’s helping your teacher, volunteering somewhere, or at home, saying, ‘I’m going to feed the dog every day this week without mom telling me.’ ” For more Kind Campus info or to sign up, visit: https://bensbells.org/kindness-education/kind-schools

Always Be Kind to Yourself! Sometimes you can be your own worst critic. But if you’re down on yourself—maybe you didn’t make the team or don’t understand what’s being taught or feel you aren’t attractive enough—it can be really hard to be kind to others.

August 2019

BEAR 40 YEARS

Page 15

25 Ways to Be Kind!

B

en’s Bells believes everyone has the capacity to Be Kind and that we can help each other work toward this goal. Here are 25 ways you might practice kindness at your school. Share these ideas with others, and at the bottom, add some of your own ways to be kind as well:

1. Make your own “be kind” signs and hang them around your school as a powerful visual reminder to be kind.

2. Write or draw a note of appreciation for someone and give it to them as a reminder you’re thinking of them, especially someone who is having a hard time. 3. Create a gratitude jar for your classroom. Jot down what you’re grateful for and see if your class can fill it! 4. Be kind to yourself and eat a healthy snack. 5. Write a Thank You note to a staff member who helps keep your school clean and safe.

Image: shutterstock.com

6. Read a book together as a class and talk about moments of kindness between characters.

...with

KINDNESS!

As you’re setting your goals this school year, keep kindness in mind!

keep kindness in mind! “In some way, try to incorporate kindness,” encourages Helen Gomez, the new Executive Director of Ben’s Bells. This Arizona non-profit organization seeks to strengthen people and communities by teaching them about what intentional acts of kindness and trying to understand others can ACCOMPLISH.

Schools & Education a Key Part

Getting back into the swing of things doesn’t always go smoothly. School’s a challenge, whether it’s learning harder stuff, getting used to your new teacher(s), dealing with a rough school or the social side of things—there’s a lot of change for everyone! But there’s something you can do to make things better for you and your school, and that’s to learn to BE KIND! So as you’re setting your goals this school year,

You may have seen the flashy Be Kind mosaics around town or even on the wall of your school! Schools and kindness education are key COMPONENTS of Ben’s Bells. “There are a lot of little ways to show kindness— and if you can do that on a weekly basis, I think that would be a great goal for the school year!” Gomez says. She points out that there’s a difference between just being nice and actually making the effort to be kind. “Oftentimes people are nice, but they don’t actually take the time to do something that’s really meaningful and impactful— that’s going to help somebody else in some way,” she explains. “Around campus kindness could be doing something like having lunch with somebody who’s sitting by themselves, who maybe doesn’t have a friend,” Gomez suggests. “Something little like that can make a huge difference!”

Kind Campus

Kind Campus is a fun and upbeat program of Ben’s Bells that your teacher can sign up for and begin at any time. It’s designed for different age levels, but geared mostly for elementary school kids. Broken down by week, “It’s a whole year’s worth of free curriculum for teachers that they can INTEGRATE into their school day. Basically it covers various ways to intentionally practice kindness. It’s like a little hidden gem!” Gomez describes. Knowing how busy teachers are, the activities are straightforward and don’t take up too much time or require a lot of planning. It provides easy ways to talk about kindness, has students practice kindness and shows the great variety of ways to be kind (check out the list to the right!). “Kindness is a skill and you have to practice it,” encourages Gomez. She points out that the new school year is a time of a lot of new circumstances and new people, so be kind to those around you and remember to

7. Smile and say “hi” to 10 people when you walk by them. 8. Make a “What Is Kindness?” bulletin board or poster for your classroom. Brainstorm ideas together. 9. As a class, talk about why sleeping well and eating well are important for self-kindness. 10. As a class, talk about some great things about living in your community. 11. Welcome new students to your school by showing them around and introducing them to other students. “In terms of image, as a society, we’re very self-critical,” Gomez explains. Know that you’re an individual, beautiful person, and take time out to treat yourself well. Maybe it’s setting aside a half hour to take the dog for a walk or to watch something silly on TV. Maybe it’s reading a new book for an hour. “Then you recharge, and you’re able to better deal with difficult situations or difficult people,” she continues.

Understanding Others School can be far from easy. It might be a rough school, someone who bullies you, or maybe it’s socially a tough place. “I have a 9- and a 10-year-old, and so often (they share) ‘this person was mean to me’ or ‘they did this’ or ‘they did that.’ We really talk through it,” Gomez says. How might you handle it? “Think about it Kin from their point of Kid d view—there may be s! something going on. It could be something as simple as they’re hungry. Their parents might be going through a divorce. There could be a lot of things that could be happening behind the scenes,” Gomez explains. “The fact that somebody lashes out—they’re trying to get that emotion, that feeling out. So for most kids, I think the best way to practice kindness is to try to understand where the other person is coming from in trying to understand their actions.”

12. Write kind messages with sidewalk chalk in a common area at your school. 13. Share your snack with another student. 14. Write Kind Notes to several people in your school’s neighborhood and deliver them. 15. Learn as many people’s names as possible and practice using them. 16. Share your ideas with a younger student about ways to be kind and why it’s important for your school. 17. Practice ways to stay calm if you begin to feel angry or frustrated, like taking a short break by yourself or thinking about three things you are grateful for. 18. Compliment five people on a quality that helps them be kind. 19. Learn to say “thank you” and “hello” in a new language. 20. Hold the door open for students entering school in the morning. 21. Be sure to include new students when playing on the playground. 22. If you see someone sitting alone at lunch, invite them to sit with you or with you and your friends. 23. If you feel stressed or overwhelmed, take three deep breaths in order to build awareness of your body and your thoughts. 24. Find a bracelet or rubber band to wear on your wrist. Every time you feel grateful, move the bracelet to the other wrist. As you soak it in, become aware of your gratitude. 25. Get excited for opportunities in the new school year to learn new things and make new friends!

Think of and write down several more ways to show Kindness this Year!


16

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www.bearessentialnews.com

August 2019

B

Get the Scoop!

Continued from page 7

Tips for Reading Chapter Books by Reporter Aiden Molony, Homeschool This year in school, your teacher might ask you to read a chapter book. For second and third graders, you might feel a little scared or overwhelmed. The good news is that you don’t have to be. I’m going to share three important tips that will help calm some fears.

Worry #1: The words might be hard!!! Tip: That is a good point. The words get harder as you move up in grade level because you are becoming more skilled and are able to understand harder concepts. But, if you need help, you can always ask your parent for help looking up the definitions online or in a dictionary. 

Worry #2: It’s too many words! Tip: Chapter books do have a lot of words. This is necessary to build pictures in your mind. Don’t get stressed out over trying to read it all at once. They are designed to be read bit by bit over many days. Just start with one chapter.

Worry #3: This is going to take a long time to finish! Tip: This is true. One thing that can help you increase your reading speed is to listen to an audiobook or a parent read one page first so you know how to pronounce the words. Then, you try to copy what you hear using the words in the book.  Best of luck with your chapter books! MORE SCOOPS, page 18 ➧


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Teacher Month of the

Nominate Your Teacher!

James A. Weaver D.D.S., M.S. Laura Robinson-Rabe D.M.D., M.S. Kyle Rabe D.D.S., M.S.

Making teachers smile! Each month Dr. JAW Orthodontists honors our teachers for their commitment, hard work and dedication by sponsoring the Teacher of the Month column in Bear Essential News.

Recognize a Teacher & Tell Us Why They Are Great!

T

he friendly doctors and staff at Dr. JAW Orthodontists work hard to give kids happy, healthy smiles. Dr. JAW wants to give teachers in Southern Arizona something to smile about, too. That’s why each month it recognizes an outstanding teacher. Teachers in Southern Arizona can get their moment in the spotlight as Dr. JAW Orthodontists teams with Teacher honored Bear Essential News to honor great teachers and recognize their hard work and dedication. For the ninth year, Dr. JAW and Bear Essential News will choose a deserving local teacher to honor each month. Selected teachers are recognized in the pages of Bear Essential and online. If you know an educator who makes the grade, nominate that teacher today! To nominate a teacher, fill out the form on this page or write a short letter telling us why you think this teacher deserves to be named Teacher of the Month. Let your teacher know how much you appreciate them, and let others in the community know how

BEAR 40 YEARS

great your teacher is! Nominations can come from students, former students, parents and colleagues. So, what are you waiting for? Make a teacher smile! Nominate a deserving teacher today. Visit bearessentialnews.com and click the Teachers tab to find previous Teacher of the Month columns. You also can nominate a teacher online, or use the form to at school assembly. the right. Help us identify the top teachers in our community, and your favorite educator might be the next Teacher of the Month!

Dr. JAW Helps Students Brush Up on Oral Health Schedule a presentation for your classroom! Dr. JAW Orthodontists maintains a proud commitment to community outreach activities and educational programs. We are working with local schools to raise awareness of the importance of practicing proper dental health starting at an early age. Schedule a free on-site oral health educational presentation with a Dr. JAW representative to teach kids how to love their smiles by “brushing up” on good oral health habits. Students will enjoy hands-on demonstrations, interactive learning and our fun fact sheets. Plus kids love our JAWSOME toothbrushes and each participant will receive one. This program is available throughout the school year. To schedule an oral health presentation for your school, please email bejawsome@drjaw.net or call 520-747-JAWS.

Parents, faculty & students—let us know who you think should be in the spotlight! Teacher name: _______________________ School: _____________________________ Your name: __________________________ Grade: ______ Phone: _________________ email: ______________________________ Why is your teacher great? ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________

Send your nomination to Bear Essential/Teacher of the Month 2525 E. Broadway #102 • Tucson, AZ 85716 or submit by email to renee@bearessentialnews.com or at bearessentialnews.com under TEACHERS tab

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B

Get the Scoop!

Continued from page 16

Book Tells Why Movies Are Magic by Reporter Eleanor Wright Tucson Country Day School “Movies are Magic: A Kid’s History of the Moving Image From the Dawn of Time to About 1939” is a book that tells the history of movie making. Written by Jennifer Churchill and illustrated by Howell Edwards, the book features a young boy named Weston (he is Churchill’s son) and his dog Oscar. The two of them venture through the history of movies from silent films to talking motion pictures. The book is targeted for child readers, but adults will enjoy it, too. I suggest this book to anyone who has an interest in being a director. It provides a great amount of information about how movies are made and gives great examples of the history of films. It is a great book for good readers, although I do not recommend this book for brand new readers. My favorite part is the amazing illustrations. They are simple and detailed at the same time. I highly suggest this book to anyone who loves movies and wants to learn more of the history of film.

A Biosphere 2 History n 1991 a mysterious glass monolith appeared on the North side of the Catalina Mountains. It was called Biosphere 2 and the project’s early goals called for the design of an enclosed facility that could be occupied by humans to demonstrate their inter-connectedness with the planet. So, eight volunteers were locked inside for 2 years. They grew all of their food and recycled their air, water and wastes. The experiment was an outstanding engineering success, but they were not able to adequately balance their atmosphere. Oxygen (O2) plummeted from 21% to 14.2%. (The air you breathe every day is 20.95% oxygen). The main factor contributing to this decrease was the abundant microbes living in the extremely rich organic soil of the rainforest and farm areas. Soil microbes absorbed the oxygen and released huge amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) back to the dome, exceeding the ability of the plants to convert the carbon dioxide into oxygen. The outside supporting team pumped in oxygen for the safety of the crew inside—the system was no longer sealed! Perceived failure can be as significant in science as proven success. Today the work goes on. The University of Arizona now owns Biosphere 2, conducting experiments to help us in understanding our complex and ever-changing world, Biosphere 1. Bring your students to meet our scientists for an exciting and educational day under the glass dome.

Biosphere2.org/education/field-trip-planner Bio2-group@email.arizona.edu Congratulations to Bear Essential News— celebrating 40 years of publication!

Schedule a School Field Trip!

520-621-3960


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

&

August 2019 •

BEAR 40 YEARS

For unforgettable fun and learning, few things are as fabulous as a field trip! Here are Bear Essential’s 2019–20 Guides for Field Trips and Teachers Resources!

It can cement a concept, illuminate a lesson and inspire new ways of learning. It can engage and excite students and give them an experience and perspective that they might not otherwise get inside a classroom. It gives students ways to see, touch and participate in sensory-based learning that benefits many pupils and instigates a love of learning. What is it? It’s a field trip! A great field trip can benefit students in ways that extend beyond the classroom— and not just geographically speaking! It can expand students’ ways of thinking about a subject and open them to new knowledge and reflection. It can even spark interest in a field or a subject that did not previously attract the student, and may inspire goals for a future career that was not considered before the trip. “Field trips offer a unique opportunity for students to create connections, which will help them gain understanding and develop an enjoyment of learning,” write Marc Behrendt and Teresa Franklin in “A Review of Research on School Field Trips and their Value in Education.” They note that a well-planned field trip can impact students’ cognitive skills, knowledge and interests, and reinforce concepts learned in the classroom. More connections allow students faster and clearer ways to gain knowledge of a subject. This can increase enjoyment in learning, too.

Image: shutterstock.com

Field Trips Family Outings Science • History • Ecology • Farming

The range and variety of things that can be investigated through a field trip are limitless. Classrooms can explore topics related to energy, the environment and agriculture. Students can get hands-on with a variety of different science and STEM concepts, including plant sciences, chemistry, Earth sciences, physics, aerospace and more. Don’t forget biology and ecology—kids love to learn about local animals and habitats, marine life, insects and all manner of flora and fauna. Classes can study natural history, archaeology and the history of native peoples. They can learn what their home state was like hundreds of years ago, thousands of years and even millions of years ago! In more recent history, students can learn about the history of firefighting, vintage aircraft, mining, farming and transportation. Music • Theater • Transportation • Wildlife Arts and culture field trips expose students to music, theater and artworks that they might not have a chance to experience otherwise. These trips are not just entertaining and educational—an exposure to the arts can unlock a student’s potential creativity and can contribute to their mental and emotional health, too. A recreational trip can be good for students well being, too. It can build classroom comradery and trust, and it can be a great reward, too. So, what are you waiting for? Plan to take your class or homeschooler on a field trip (or two or three) this school year! Find lots of great field trip information in these pages and online. Get some great ideas to help you plan—just check out Boomer Bear’s 2019–20 Field Trips & Teachers Resource Guide on the pages that follow. The guide lists places that are fun, entertaining and educational for classrooms and the entire family. The guide is available online at bearessentialnews.com throughout the year!

Field Trips & Family Destinations 2019–2020

Fun Classroom and Family Outings Throughout Arizona —All Year Long! ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS BALLPARK TOURS

Chase Field 401 E. Jefferson St. • Phoenix 602-514-8400 Field Trips/Family DestinationsDbacks.com

The Arizona Diamondbacks are the Major League Baseball team in Arizona. Since its inception as an expansion franchise in 1998, the team has won a world championship (2001) and made six postseason appearances. The club has played in front of 32 million fans at Chase Field, which features a signature swimming pool, retractable roof and a kids play area called the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Sandlot. For more information about the D-backs, or to purchase game tickets, visit dbacks.com

ARIZONA EXPOSITION & STATE FAIR

1826 W. McDowell Rd. • Phoenix Field Trips • 602-252-6771 Dates: Oct 10–11; 17–18 & 25th schoolfieldtrips@azstatefair.com www.azstatefair.com/field-trips-2/ The Arizona State Fair provides unique opportunities for cross-curricular learning in Arizona’s MOST AWESOME classroom. Students and chaperones attend for FREE and registration is required. Field trip includes an ADE standards-based K-3 curriculum for Kerr’s Farm Tours. See and explore Animal Barns, Arts/STEM/4-H Entries, the Thunderbird Model Railroad and more. Public, private, charter, home schools and youth organizations should register today! Deadline is October 1st.

19

ASU EARTH & SPACE EXPLORATION DAY

781 E. Terrace Rd. • Tempe ASU Tempe Campus ISTB 4 Building Field Trips/Family Destinations Saturday, October 26, 2019 Cost: Free www.sese.asu.edu/public-engagement/events

Earth and Space Exploration day is a free annual fall event hosted by the School of Earth and Space Exploration on ASU’s Tempe campus inside/outside Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV. The SESE community presents special family friendly science-related activities from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be more than 40 exhibitors participating in this event. One of the biggest attractions in ISTB 4 is its Gallery

Teacher’s

Resource Guide Page 20

of Scientific Exploration that holds a variety of interactive exhibits and the Marston Exploration Theater, which will be running 3-D astronomy shows.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

2250 E. Broadway • Tucson 520-750-0385 Mon.–Fri. (Year-round) • 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Catalinacouncil.org The Boy Scouts of America Catalina Council serves over 7,000 scouts in Southern Arizona, from grades K-12 and youth from 5-20 years old. We have programs that also serve girls as well as boys. We strive to build good citizens and character in our youth.

MORE FIELD TRIPS, page 21 ➧


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August 2019

FREE Field Trip Transportation Available to Any School! The State of Arizona has given you an opportunity to decide exactly where your tax dollars will be spent. ARS §43-1089-01 allows taxpayers a tax credit if they contribute to extracurricular activities in public schools. Your class wants to go on a field trip but a bus is not in the budget? Parents and friends can donate the money and take exactly the amount of their donation off their state taxes.

• Up to $200 for an individual • Up to $400 for a married couple Contact your district Business Manager to make arrangements. Complete information can be found on the AZ Dept. of Revenue website.

https://azdor.gov/tax-credits/public-school-tax-credit

W

elcome back to a new and exciting school year! By now most teachers have planned their curriculum for at least the first grading period and some for the entire school year. There are many activities and field trips that educators would like to do with their classroom, but quite often, funding is an issue. To help teachers find resources for classroom expenses, Bear Essential News has researched 22 links to websites that offer grants and funding for field trips, classroom activities, and even transportation opportunities. Act One: Arts field trip funding for Phoenix and Tucson. https://act1az.org/field-trips/ Albertsons: Community funding. http://national.albertsonscompaniesfoundation.org/ get-funded/ American Honda Foundation: Educational grants with various deadlines. https://www.honda.com/community/applying-for-agrant Arizona Grant Watch: Grant links for teachers. Various programs and deadlines. https://arizona.grantwatch.com/cat/42/teachers-grants.html

Captain Planet Foundation: Grants to support ecoSOLUTION, ecoTECH and ecoSTEM Projects. Various deadlines. https://captainplanetfoundation.org/grants/ Clorox Company: Educational grants for literacy and STEM projects. https://www.thecloroxcompany.com/ corporate-responsibility/social-impact/foundation/apply-for-grant/ Teachers request items for their classroom. https://www.donorschoose.org/ teachers Educators of America: Classroom grants for Technology. https://educatorsusa. org/our-programs/micro-grants/ Home Depot: Funding for tools and supplies to help improve the community. https://corporate.homedepot. com/grants/community-impact-grants Kids in Need Foundation: Supplies for classrooms. https://www.kinf.org/programs/supplyboxes/ Lowe’s Toolbox for education: Funding for school/community improvements. https://toolboxforeducation.com/about.html Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation: Musical instruments for schools that qualify. https://www.mhopus.org/grant-guidelines/ National Park Foundation Ticket to Ride: Provides transportation to National Parks. https://www.nationalparks.org/grant-applications NEA Student Achievement Grants: Funding for special projects. https://www.neafoundation.org/for-educators/student-achievement-grants/

OneAZ Credit Union: Provides community impact grants. https://www.oneazcu.com/about/foundation/community-impact-grants/ Snapdragon Book Foundation: Provides books for schools. http://snapdragonbookfoundation.org/application/ SRP: Learning grants. https://www.srpnet.com/education/grants/default.aspx Target Field Trip Grants: Funding for field trips. https://corporate.target.com/ corporate-responsibility/community/philanthropy/field-tripgrants Toshiba America Foundation: Math and Science funding. http://www.toshiba.com/taf/ about.jsp USA Today Education: Free classroom lessons. http://www.usatodayeducate.com/ Voya Unsung Heroes: Educational funding for classrooms. https://corporate.voya.com/corporate-responsibility/community-investment/childrens-education/ voya-unsung-heroes Walmart Foundation: Educational grants. https://www.learninga-z.com/site/resources/videos/ walmart-grant

More field trips, more excitement, more learning!


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Boomer’s

Fabulously Fun Field Trips continued from page 19

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM TUCSON

200 S. 6th Ave. • Tucson 520-792-9985 press option 5 Field Trips/Family Destinations education@childrensmuseumtucson.org childrensmuseumtucson.org A visit to Children’s Museum Tucson inspires discovery, creativity and learning. Our Museum exhibits and programs are content rich, aligned with Arizona Academic Standards and ignite imagination and curiosity! And the best part – Adventure Learning Programs are simple to plan, economical and fun! $6 per child. Grades: K–5

CRAYOLA EXPERIENCE

3111 W. Chandler Blvd. • Chandler Field Trips/Family Destination 602-581-5370 chandlerexperience@crayolaexperience.com www.crayolaexperience.com

Discover the magic of color at Crayola Experience, Crayola’s premier, one-of-akind family attraction! Crayola Experience Chandler has 19 hands-on, creative activities for a full day of family fun. Field trips starting at $8.99 per person.Teachers can sign up for a free annual pass.

*CREATIVE JUICE

how best to experience them and what makes them tick. Next, the attendees pivot to “hands-on” mode, enjoying the wonders of the attractions for a fun filled hour surrounded by wall art featuring jumping cholla cacti. The JCE combines education and exhilaration for a memorable outing. (The tour has an optional preconfigured lunch/dinner for the attendees.)

6530 E. Tanque Verde #160 (La Plaza Shoppes) Fundraisers/Classes/Workshops 271-5023 • creativejuiceartbar.com Let your creative juice flow, as step-by-step, our instructor helps you create a painted masterpiece! Fundraising events cost $35 per person, with $10 donated back to the cause (20-person minimum). You choose the painting, or for $50, one can be specially designed. For students or families ready for a dose of art, take part in our Workshops for Kids or our Kids & Family Classes. Adult classes are offered, too!

DEFY TUCSON

4861 N. Stone Ave. • Tucson 485-3334 Open Year Round M–F Ages: 3 and up events@defytucson.com www.defy.com/tucson The Jumping Cholla Experience (JCE) is coming this Fall to Defy Tucson, the largest trampoline and air sports park in Pima County. Our park features numerous attractions for jumping, swinging, leaping, zipping and bouncing, including a 10 set Ninja Course. The program begins with a Park Ranger led tour where you learn how the different attractions are developed,

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to ignite your curiosity. Plus, you’ll have the option to see one of our amazing FullDome shows in the planetarium theater – you’ll feel like you’re flying through space as we launch from the earth and visit planets, moons, stars, and asteroids. Choose from one of our popular Discovery Programs to boost your classroom curriculum. Programs include: Chemistry, Marine, Physics, Insect, and Earth Science Discovery workshops. Our programs and exhibits connect with K-12 groups and are geared to Arizona State Science Standards. Visit our website for more information and to submit a field trip request form. Cost: $4-$10 child based on program Grades: PreK-12

GADSDEN PACIFIC DIVISION TOY TRAIN OPERATING MUSEUM

FLANDRAU SCIENCE CENTER AND PLANETARIUM 1601 E. University • Tucson Field Trips/Family Destinations 520-621-4516

Email: flandrau@email.arizona.edu

flandrau.org

Flandrau gives your class a chance to explore the marvels of our universe– from the depths of the ocean to the farthest reaches of space, and everything in between! Located on the mall of The University of Arizona campus, Flandrau offers hands-on exhibits

3975 Miller Ave. • Tucson 520-888-2222 gpdtrainshow@gmail.com www.gpdtrains.org

Educational and fun for all ages. Indoor and outdoor displays. Nine unique train layouts and educational exhibits include a caboose you can enter and explore. Operated by members of the GPD Museum. Gift/Hobby Shop with train themed merchandise, trains, accessories and supplies.The public is welcome to our open houses held on the 2nd and 4th Sunday’s of the month. September– May from 12:30–4:30 p.m. Admission is free. Donations accepted.Open the first four Sundays in December and the Polar Express Event is Saturday evening on December 7th.

MORE FIELD TRIPS, page 25 ➧


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Boomer’s

Fabulously Fun Field Trips continued from page 21

GIRL SCOUTS OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA

4300 E. Broadway • Tucson 520-327-2288 customercare@girlscoutssoaz.org www.girlscoutsaz.org Out-of-the classroom activities are at the core of Girl Scouts! Girls get to lead their own adventures and team up with others in an all-girl environment to choose the exciting, hands-on activities that interest them most. The idea is to learn by doing, and at Girl Scouts, they’ll do lots of it. The main components of the Girl Scout program are STEM, outdoor activities, life skills, and entrepreneurship and while girls may be exposed to these subjects at school or in other youth programs, at Girl Scouts they experience them in a uniquely girl-led, collaborative way that puts them on a path to a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success.

GOLDFIELD GHOST TOWN/ SUPERSTITION SCENIC RAILROAD 4650 N. Mammoth Mine Rd. • Apache Junction Field Trip • 480-983-0333 Open daily • 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

www.goldfieldghosttown.com

Experience Arizona history! Spend a fun-filled day rich in history. Tour an underground mine, ride the train, view reptiles and insects of the Sonoran Desert, pan for real gold and check out the Mystery Shack attraction. Educational fun!

Year-round (Mon. - Fri.) • Cost: Free Grades: K-12 Marketing@HughesFCU.org HughesFCU.org Field trip to a local financial institution. Learn about savings and good money management. Free classroom presentations and curriculum on financial education for youth, parents and teachers. Hughes was named a top 10 finance resource for teens by BadCredit.org.

GOLF N’ STUFF

6503 E. Tanque Verde • Tucson Field Trip • 296-2366 x3 * Sarah Year-round ( Mon. - Fri) gnssales@gmail.com www.golfnstuff.com TUSD Curriculum approved. Have a great Field Trip! Enjoy 3 hours of UNLIMITED Miniature Golf & Laser Tag plus choose two ride tickets for: Bumper Boats or Go-Karts. $12.25 + tax per person. Plus, the largest arcade in Southern Arizona. Mon.-Fri., any 3 hour block of time before 5 p.m. 30 person minimum & reservations required.

HUGHES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

971 W. Wetmore Rd • Tucson Field Trip/Class Visit/Curriculum Available 205-5679 • Irlanda Cuevas

HUMANE SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA 635 West Roger Road. • Tucson Free Humane Education Classroom Visits (1-6 classroom visits) Inge Koopman-Leyva ikoopmanleyva@hssaz.org or 520-321-3704 x 142 or online application at www.hssaz.org Mon.-Fri. • 8 a.m.-3 p.m. The Humane Society of Southern Arizona teaches kindness, compassion and respect for people and animals through humane education. Our vision is to create

a community in which all pets are cared for and loved. Cost: FREE. Grades: K and up.

MINI TIME MACHINE MUSEUM OF MINIATURES

4455 E. Camp Lowell Dr. • Tucson 520-881-0606 ext. 114 Field Trips/Family Destinations School Tour Rate: $3/student with advanced booking. Grants available. www.theminitimemachine.org/school-tours michaelm@theminitimemachine.org A visit to The Mini Museum inspires a desire to explore mathematical concepts, leap into literature and art, investigate history and experience life in another time or culture. Tours and outreach presentations are developed to support objectives in the Arizona Common Core standards. Schools can request free classroom outreach presentations or apply for funding for field trip admission and transportation. Program details are on the website. Please Note: museum will be closed Aug. 17–31, 2019.

OLD TUCSON

201 Kinney Road • Tucson Field Trips • 520-883-0100 Grades: k–12 oldtucson.com Have you ever wanted to learn about the life of a cowboy, or explore the adventure of the Wild West? Old Tucson welcomes student groups of 20 or more to enjoy our living classroom experience on your next field trip! Old Tucson offers a full range of educational adventures to compliment your classroom social studies, history or theater curriculum.


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

OUT OF AFRICA WILDLIFE PARK

3505 W. SR-260 • Camp Verde 928-567-2842 Mon.–Fri.: 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Sat.–Sun.: 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. The admissions window closes at 4 p.m. We are closed on Thanksgiving & Christmas Day jambojava@aol.com www.outofafricapark.com Celebrating over 25 years in business, Out of Africa Wildlife Park strives to educate and entertain, to provide an exciting and engaging opportunity to love and respect creation and Creator. It is a place where family and friends gather to experience oneness with animals and each other during safaris, tours, walks, observations, and shows of wild-by-nature animals in their own, natural splendor. Cost: See website. Ages: All ages.

PIMA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY www.library.pima.gov

Need help with your homework? Get free Homework Help in person and online. Have a quest for a project or an assignment? Call 791-4010 or email us at askalibrarian@ pima.gov. Recommended books, online encyclopedias, learning puzzles and games, and more!

This year, include the Phoenix Zoo in your curriculum with inquiry-based educational programs that are hands-on and studentdriven, many with a focus on STEM practices. The Zoo is a unique destination to learn and interact with the natural world, offering a variety of topics that support classroom-based learning and are designed for multiple learning styles. Grades: Pre-K – College Monday – Sunday, year-round

PIMA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM 6000 E. Valencia Rd. • Tucson 520-574-0462 Field Trips/Family Destinations Daily throughout the year tours@pimaair.org www.pimaair.org

Explore one of the premier aviation museums in the world, the Pima Air & Space Museum! Self-guided exploration of our 3 aviation hangars is offered daily. Docent-led tours are offered Thursdays and Fridays at 10 a.m. and must be scheduled 30 days in advance.

Birthday Parties!

Starting at Only

POSTAL HISTORY FOUNDATION

920 N. First Ave. • Tucson Field Trips/Family Destinations 520-623-6652 x102 Mon.–Fri. (Year-round) education@phftucson.org postalhistoryfoundation.org

Join us for educational fun, connecting with stamps and the postal system through language arts, math, geography and art activities. Create and mail your own postcard in our post office, sort the mail, learn geography of Arizona, the United States and the world. Work on alphabet skills, listen to a story, practice counting money, make a bookmark, complete a scavenger hunt and tour our Old Naco Post Office. We have several activities available to meet your learning requirements and age of your students. Field trips are $2 per student. Teachers may also order lessons or schedule a classroom visit at no charge. Check out our website for lessons that are available for order.

Back to School with...

Bowling Field Trips!

$44.99* 2 Hours $4/per person plus tax per lane for kids and tweens

*$54.99 for parties booked after 6:00 p.m. A variety of add-ons available. Book online, or at the center.

Reid Park Zoo is pleased to provide Title I schools with either a free Zoo to You Outreach at your school or a Zoo Adventure Program at the Zoo through May 2020. A field trip to the Reid Park Zoo is just one of the fun ways to ignite your students’ interest in wildlife, conservation, and science! Teachers can reserve a Bio Bag filled with hands-on artifact activities and print Activity Packets.

40034 W. Clayton Rd. • Stanfield Field Trips • 602-477-2462 roxie_tour@shamrockfoods.com www.shamrockfarms.net

PHOENIX ZOO

*Group reservation required

Add Pizza and Soda:

Regular slice of cheese pizza & a drink $4 /per person, plus tax. Cactus Bowl 3665 S. 16th Ave. • 327-6561 Lucky Strike 4015 E. Speedway • 327-4926

vantagebowlingcenters.com Contact us: Info@VantageBowlingCenters.com

Fiesta Lanes 501 W. River Rd.•887-2695 Tucson Bowl 7020 E. 21st St. • 747-1363

23

www.skatecountry.com

REID PARK ZOO

3400 E. Zoo Court • Tucson Field Trips • Aug–May Mon–Fri. 520-791-3204 Education Department education@reidparkzoo.org reidparkzoo.org

SHAMROCK FARMS FARM TOUR

455 N. Galvin Pkwy. • Phoenix Field Trips/Family Destinations 602-286-3800 phoenixzoo.org

BEAR 40 YEARS

Shamrock Farms offers a fun and educational field trip through its working dairy farm that will show your students their pure, fresh farm-to-table story. View the cows being milked, let your students play on Roxie’s Outdoor Adventure and meet the newest members of our herd, the baby calves, on your hour-long guided tour. Reservations are required.

SKATE COUNTRY PRIVATE PARTY FIELD TRIPS 7980 E. 22nd St. • Tucson Field Trip • 298-4409 Program dates throughout school year askskatecountry@aol.com

Skate Country, the best skating facility in Arizona! Safe, affordable and fun, our field trips allow you to be in control of all music and programming. We tailor your party to fit your needs and your kids will love it! Call 520-294-4409 for reservations and more information.

School visits at the TUCSON GEM AND MINERAL SHOW® www.tgms.org Tucson Convention Center 260 S. Church Ave. • Tucson 520-322-5773

Friday, February 14, 2020 school classes are invited to attend the Tucson Gem and Mineral show®. Registration begins October 1, 20189 For more information visit www.tgms.org or call 520-322-5773.

TUCSON MUSEUM OF ART

140 N. Main Ave. • Tucson Field Trips • 520-624-2333 Tue.–Fri. • Dates throughout school year education@TucsonMuseumofArt.org www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org

The Museum offers a variety of programs for students to learn about art, history and culture. Whether it is a docent-led tour complete with hands-on art project or a self-guided tour of a special exhibition and a selection of the permanent collection, students will have the opportunity to explore one of Tucson’s treasures. Cost: $2–$6. Grades: K–12.

MORE FIELD TRIPS, page 24 ➧

Biosphere 1 Comes Alive

at Biosphere 2!

See our planet through the eyes of a scientist!

Experience a Field Trip: • Student-driven Scientific Inquiry • Hands-on, Minds-on Activities • Climate, Environment, Earth systems • Systems In Space • Marine Science & Sustainability • Behind-the-Scenes Access • Exciting Overnight Student Field Trip Programs Offered Year Round!

Biosphere2.org/education/field-trip-planner Bio2-group@email.arizona.edu

520-621-3960


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August 2019

Have a Super Recess

approved by TUSD

with a

FIELD TRIP!

Boomer’s

Fabulously Fun Field Trips continued from page 23

at

TUCSON REPTILE & AMPHIBIAN SHOW & SALE

the world’s largest living science center dedicated to exploring the environment and our planet’s future. Choose from many inquiry- and standards-based lessons for your science curriculum. Cost: $12+/student *seasonal (min 20) based on program.

50,000 square feet of reptiles and amphibians from around the world. Petting zoo with tortoises, alligators, snakes and other lizards. Captive bred reptiles for sale. Cost: Adults: $10; Ages 6–12: $5 Ages 5 and under: Free.

VANTAGE BOWLING CENTERS FIELD TRIP

Tucson Expo Center • Tucson Field Trips • 520-405-7020 • Oct. 5–6, 2019 Sat. 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. & Sun 10 a.m.–4 p.m. serpensauria@comcast.net tucsonreptileshow.com

Enjoy 3 Hours of UNLIMITED

School, homeschool and daycare teachers love having their group outings with us! Enjoy music, light shows and a safe environment. We have lightweight bowling balls, small bowling shoes and lane bumpers. Cost 2 hours, $4/person (each plus tax). For $4/person add a slice of cheese pizza & a drink (plus tax). Ages: 12 and under.

Miniature Golf & Laser Tag Plus choose two ride tickets for:Bumper Boats or Go-Karts

12

WILDLIFE WORLD ZOO & AQUARIUM

Plus Tax per person*

*Available Monday thru Friday, any 3 hour block of time before 5 p.m.

3-1 6-4

10+5

4+1

30 person minimum & reservations required

3+3

COLOR by Numbers!

7+8

7+3

4+6 10+5

32540 S. Biosphere Rd. • Oracle 520-838-6192 • Grades: Pre-K–16+ Field Trips/Family Destination Year-round • Open Daily BIO2-GROUP@email.arizona.edu biosphere2.org/education/field-trip-planner Experiential, hands-on learning adventures under glass at the one-of-a-kind Biosphere 2! Learn about Earth systems, sustainability, biological diversity, and ecological complexity. Educational tours take students inside

(add and subtract to discover the right colors)

11+4

Yellow= 5 Orange= 10 Red= 2 Blue= 6

Come to the

Tucson Reptile & Amphibian Show and Sale

www.golfnstuff.com

Purchase reptiles, cages, supplies, art & jewelry— All at Great Prices!

6503 E. Tanque Verde Rd. • Tucson, AZ Call (520) 296-2366 ext. 3 for reservations!

6503 E. TANQUE VERDE RD. • 885-3569

October 5th & 6th, 2019 Sat.: 9:30 to 5:00 • Sun.: 10:00 to 4:00

Do NOT bring your ow n animals !

• Displays of exotic and native reptiles • Door prizes every 30 minutes

Expires 9/30/19

(with the purchase of another at the regular price) 36 Holes of the World’s Finest Miniature Golf • Arcade • Skee-ball Wet n’ Wild Bumper Boats • Cool Go Karts • Batting Cages • Laser Tag • Group Rates

Your field trip will complement any biology curriculum at any grade level. Students can feed Lory parrots, learn about animal ambassadors and see some display natural behaviors during a Wildlife Encounter Show. Meet baby animals in our children’s play area and petting zoo! Cost: $8/student, $15/ adult, one adult admission free with every 10 paid students (10 student min.). We accept cash, check or school purchase order. Rates subject to change.

50,000 Square Feet of Lizards, Snakes, Frogs, Tortoises, Alligators & So Much More!

Purple= 11 Green= 15 Brown= 12

FREE Golf Pass!!

16501 W. Northern Ave. • Litchfield Park Field Trips • 623-935-WILD (9453) Open 365 days a year Field trips Mon.–Fri. www.wildlifeworld.com

UA BIOSPHERE 2

* (Retail Value $40.50)

5+6

6+6

25

$

Kids! Color the Castle

Cactus Bowl • 3665 S. 16th Ave. • 327-6561 Fiesta Lanes • 501 W. River Rd. • 887-2695 Lucky Strike Bowl • 4015 E. Speedway • 327-4926 Tucson Bowl • 7020 E. 21st St. • 747-1363 Mon.–Fri. (Year-round) info@vantagebowling.com www.VantageBowlingCenters.com

• Meet breeders & reptile enthusiasts from around the world

Adults: $10.00 6–12: $5.00 5 & under: Free

Tucson Expo Center, 3750 E. Irvington (between Palo Verde & Alvernon) Map on Web site

For more information go to www.tucsonreptileshow.com E-mail: Serpensauria@comcast.net


August 2019 •

e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Teachers Resource Guide ARIZONA PROJECT WET (APW) arizonawet.arizona.edu

Arizona Project WET (APW) develops water stewardship and STEM literacy by providing teacher professional development focused on systems thinking , direct student outreach that delivers or extends classroom learning, and community engagement. We offer professional development that evolves teachers’ instructional practice and waterrelated content mastery through STEM integration, student- directed learning, real-world and relevant application, and collaborative work. Maricopa County • Pam Justice 602-827-8233 pjustice@cals.arizona.edu Pinal County • Chuck Dugan 520-836-5221 x210 cld1@email.arizona.edu Pima County • Betsy Wilkening 520-621-8673 ewilkening1@email.arizona.edu Arizona • Kerry Schwartz 520-621-1092 kschwart@cals.arizona.edu

2020 ARIZONA SCITECH FESTIVAL (602) 343-8324 info@scitechinstitute.org scitechinstitute.org

The Arizona SciTech Festival is a multiweek, colorful showcase of more than 1,000 science, engineering, technology (STEM) and innovation events in over 50 Arizona cities featuring exhibits, hands-on activities, colorful shows, tours and discussions. The 2020 festival takes place from February through March 2020.

ASU WALTON SUSTAINABILITY SOLUTIONS INITIATIVES Sustainability Solutions Family Day Feb. 1–22, 2020 http://sustainabilityfestival.asu.edu

Explore · Innovate · Celebrate The 2020 Sustainability Solutions Festival brings a diverse array of events for audiences of all ages to Explore · Innovate · Celebrate sustainability solutions. ASU’s rich sustainability expertise is shared with the public through hands-on activities featuring the latest in technology and research at SustainabilityFamily Weekend at Arizona Science Center and ASU Open Door events.

BEAR ESSENTIAL OFFERINGS

from Bear Essential Educational Services 520-792-9930 • 1-866-NEWS-KID (639-7543) www.bearessentialnews.com

AZCCRS (Common Core-based) Work Sheets: Fresh standards-based fun sheets for your classroom to use in conjunction with the current issue. Sign up for notifications of new Work Sheets online at BearEssentialNews. com. Free Young Reporters Program: Students in grades 3–8 learn to report and sharpen their writing skills by having their news stories published in Bear! Sign-up Forms and details online. Free Presentations: Five dynamic topics are available from a Bear editor. Three classrooms per visit minimum please (60–90 students). Bear Newsletter: Weekly updates sent to your email. Sign up online. Facebook: “Like” us at Facebook.com/ bearnews.

BOOK IT!

www.bookitprogram.com/ 800-426-6548 Pizza Hut established the BOOK IT! Reading Incentive Program to reward children for their reading accomplishments with recognition and pizza. Available to children 5–12 or grades K–6, including homeschoolers. Your students can earn a FREE one-topping Personal Pan Pizza and a sticker on their passport to reading when theymeet their individual reading goal each month! Simple for the teacher to use, free, flexible and fun. The BOOK IT! Digital Program offers simple and interactive tools to increase minutes read. Find your school now at bookitprogram.com. Homeschool enrollment for 2019–20 is also currently open.

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BOOKMANS ENTERTAINMENT EXCHANGE

East • 6230 E. Speedway • 748-9555 Northwest• 3733 W. Ina Rd. • 579-0303 Midtown• 3330 E. Speedway • 325-5767 & state-wide Open Mon.–Sun. • 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Sign up for our newsletter online bookmans.com/signup/ We honor the work of teachers through a variety of programs. Join Project: Educate to receive 20% off purchases. We encourage the love of reading in young customers through our Kids Club, 1317 and Read 10 programs. Project: Educate members receive details on our annual Reading Challenge, store tours for classes and Educator Appreciation Day.

CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT

Teacher Resource/Curriculum Available Classroom Speakers/Grant Program www.CentralArizonaProject.com 1-888-891-5795 or 623-869-2135 CAP offers an Arizona-specific water education program including downloadable lesson plans for K–3, 4–6, middle and high school students that are standards-based (Common Core correlations provided). Lesson plans supported by mixed media tools like videos, posters and activity books! Visit www.cap-az.com/education or call 623869-2135 for more information.


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August 2019

Climb Aboard Boomer’s Field Trip Activity Bus! Get set for some field trip fun—hopefully not frustration—with this crossword! Clues DOWN: 1) What paleontologists really dig! 2) Go in 3) Operate a bus 4) Home of art & artifacts 5) Feathered friend 7) The ‘S’ in STEM 11) Useful items 13) Fine ____ 15) Opposite of warm 17) Spanish for one 19) Plural pronoun 20) Not out

ACROSS: 1) Given 6) Parts of a school course 8) Given 9) Use your eyes 10) What __? 12) Ocean study: _____ biology 14) Place to learn 16) Not false 18) Coyote’s cry 20) What __ it? 21) Something learned 22) Seagoing vessel

Join Us for

Family Fun Classes Painting for the whole family! Saturdays •10:00 a.m. Ages 3 to 103 • $25/painter

our S ch e du le Y t y ar Bi rt h d ay P

NOW!

Plan Now for Fall Break Day Camps in October

271-5023 • CreativeJuiceArtBar.com 6530 E. Tanque Verde #160 in La Plaza Shoppes

SKATE

Country Field trips, fundraisers, birthday parties, and skating lessons.

Book Now!

5For $5

Bring in this coupon and get admission for up to 5 people. Mon–Thr 3–6pm, Fri 3–5pm Not valid for birthday parties or with other offers. Skate rental $4.00 extra if needed. Please limit coupon use to 1 per person per week, thanks. SKATE RENTAL EXTRA Valid now through Sep.15, 2019

www.skatecountry.com • 298-4409 • 7980 E. 22nd St.

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Profile for Bear Essential News

Bear Essential News August 2019, Tucson Edition  

Children's newspaper circulating in Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona.

Bear Essential News August 2019, Tucson Edition  

Children's newspaper circulating in Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona.

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