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MONDAY EDITION An edition of the

WEEKLY

& Arcadia WEEKLY WWW.TEMPLECITYTRIBUNE.COM

MONDAY, JUNE 8 - JUNE 14, 2009 VOLUME 2, NO. 23

$0.00

New Fitness Equipment for Live Oak Park

Photo by Terry Miller

Capra Resigns, Strikes Plea Bargain to Avoid Further Charges Misdemeanor Offense Addresses Unreported Campaign Contributions

Temple City residents have a new place to get fit and stay in shape following the addition of new outdoor fitness equipment to Live Oak Park. The new equipment was funded through the Los Angeles County Regional Park and Open Space District Supervisorial District’s excess grant funds. The adult designed equipment includes Upper Body Warm-Up, Standing Push-Up, Forearms Roll, Leg Lift, Body Curl, Triple Beam Jump, Sit-Up, ChinUP and Achilles Stretch and Squat stations. The fitness equipment includes full signage for proper use and is ADA accessible. The new equipment will aid in the ongoing efforts of a program launched in March 2007 by the Temple City Parks and Recreation Department called “Shape Up TC.” “Shape Up TC” a ims to prov ide hea lt hrelated information on nutrition & physical activity; implement activities to educate our communit y on nutrition & physical fitness and to provide support and encouragement for posi-

tive lifestyle changes. The program started by hosting an information table at our summer concert series and special events. Workout demonstrations and food samples were also provided. The program specialists also hold workout sessions and teach the youth exercise related games at the City’s after school programs. The program’s mission statement says “Shape Up TC is a community health promotion program funded by the Parks & Recreation Department of Temple City. The main goal of Shape Up TC is to bring about awareness to the importance of healthy eating and daily physical activity. Members of the community, young and old alike can participate in the ever-expanding list of activities sponsored by Shape Up TC. Shape Up TC also embraces the distribution of health-related information to the community so that residents can take the initiative to make changes towards a healthier lifestyle. The need to implement a community health promo-

Live Oak on 3

BY JOHN STEPHENS After a six years serving on the City Council of Temple City, David Capra resigned from the office on Tuesday June 2. In an email to City Clerk Mary Flandrick, Capra cited his ongoing health problems as the reason for his resignation. “My health has deteriorated since my recent stroke,” said Capra in the letter, “and my decision to resign is in large

part due to my current health concerns.” Capra suffered a stroke one year ago last June. Around the same time, it became known that he, as well as former Mayor Cathé Wilson and current Mayor Judy Wong were part of an investigation into alleged solicitation of bribes related to Randy Wang's Piazza mall development. In February of this year,

an armed investigation unit from the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office performed unannounced searches of City Hall, the three council member's homes, as well as that of Scott Carwile, a former city council candidate. As yet, no official charges have been brought against any of the current or former council members, though the city is still involved in a suit and sub-

sequent counter-suit between the city and the developer regarding the troubled wouldbe development planned for the empty lot on the northeast corner of Rosemead and Las Tunas Blvd. According to Flandrick, the city has obtained legal counsel in response to the counter-suit, but that counsel will not extend to the indi-

Capra on 4

TCUSD CELEBRATES STUDENT ARTISTS

Artist on 7

City Bans Smoking in Public Parks Barrage of Anti-Smoking Activists Persuade Unanimous Vote

Superintendent Chelsea Kang-Smithand Board President Bob Ridley present Carolina Li with certificate of recognition.

Following an anti-smoking ordinance campaign that started in Pasadena and made its way recently

through Sierra Madre's City Council, the Temple City council voted unanimously

Smoking on 2

Monica Huyhn, coordinator for Shape Up TC, demonstrated how to use the equipment for the public. -Photo By Terry Miller


CITY NEWS

2 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

The Doozies TEMPLE CITY SPOTLIGHT Temple City Government Serving the Community!

By Tom Gammill

Tribune TEMPLE CITY

June 8, 2009

Community development department: T he next meet i ng Pla nning Commission will be held on June 9, 2009, at 7:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers at the Civic Center, 5938 Kauffman Ave.

Parks & recreation department: New Fitness Equipment for Live Oak Park – Check out the new fitness equipment at Live Oak Park! The new equipment is designed for adults and includes equipment for upper body and lower body workouts. The equipment is located at the northeast corner of the playground. Oak Avenue Concert – students from Oak Avenue Intermediate School’s band and orchestra will be performing in Temple City Park on Saturday, June 13th at 4 p.m. The community is invited to attend this pre-summer concert featuring the outstanding student musicians from Oak Avenue. Summer Recreation Programs – registration is currently being accepted at Live Oak Park for the Summer Basketball program, Summer STARS Adventures, and Teen Zone. These summer programs begin the week of June 22nd. Additional information is available at Live Oak Park or by calling (626) 285-2171 ext. 2327.

Public services department: Public Safety Volunteer – The City of Temple City is looking for people interested in becoming a Public Safety Volunteer. Two programs are available in the Public Safety Volunteer program. They are the Resident Safety Volunteer Patrol (RSVP) and the Temple City Emergency Radio Team (TCERT). Applications and additional information for the RSVP or TCERT programs may be obtained from the Public Services Department at the Civic Center, 5938 Kauffman Avenue, by calling (626) 285-2171 or by e-mailing Public Safety Officer Bryan Ariizumi at bariizumi@templecity.us.

Water conservation tip:

To save water, try watering your lawn and flower beds one day less per week or for half the time you spend watering currently.

Management services department: J O B AVA I L A BL E: T he C it y of Temple City is currently recruiting for the City Manager position. Anyone interested in applying for this position may obtain a job flyer and application from the Personnel office at City Hall (9701 Las Tunas Drive, Temple City, CA 91780), by calling (626) 285-2171, or by visiting the City’s web site at www.templecity.us. The deadline to apply for the City Manager position is Thursday, June 18, 2009, at 6:00 p.m.

BEACON MEDIA NEWS Publisher/Editor in Chief Von Raees EDITORIAL

editor@templecitytribune.com

EDITOR John Stephens

DeFlocked

By Jeff Corriveau

CONTRIBUTORS Nina Hauptman Jerry Jambazian Justin Rykowski Tom Gammill Deborah Anne Neely COLUMNISTS Dr. Jack Von Bulow Ruedel Franklin J. Dr. Kenneth Martin Wally hage EDITORIAL INTERNS Jacqueline Yue Nuria Mathog Sima Taslakian

Capitol South

By William Warren

Free Yard Sale Advertising: If you get your yard sale permit by Thursday noon (or earlier) the week prior to the sale (i.e. about nine days prior to your sale), you’ll get the sale listed in that week’s Temple City Tribune newspaper in the “Temple City Spotlight” section for free. The Temple City Tribune comes out every Monday, and is available at many popular locations throughout Temple City. If you have any questions, please call the reception desk at (626) 2852171.

Yard Sale Permits: The following is a list of Yard Sale Permits issued for the weekend of June 12-14, 2009. (Information is current as of 12:00 noon, Thursday, June 4, 2009. Yard sale permits issued after this time are not listed.)

PRODUCTION production@beaconmedianews.com GRAPHIC ARTIST Thom Gastelum ADVERTISING

Yard sales: Temple City residents wanting to conduct a yard sale MUST have a permit. They are available from the receptionist desk at City Hall, 9701 Las Tunas Drive, during normal business hours, which are Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. City Hall is closed on Fridays. The permits are FREE, and residents may only conduct one yard sale within a six-month period.

PHOTOGRAPHER Terry Miller

advertising@beaconmedianews.com

SALES MANAGER Andrea Olivas LEGAL ADVERTISING Annette Reyes BUSINESS CIRCULATION MANAGER Joseph Polk

Smoking from 1 last Tuesday to ban smoking in all the city's public parks. Local resident Roy Rosell was on hand to present his findings on the problem of not just the negative health effects of smoking and second-hand smoke, but of the growing problem of cigarette butt litter collecting in Temple City's public parks. Rosell has collected thousands of butts in two liter soda bottles for use as a visual aid showing how large the litter problem

Cover Story

has become. He and some concerned local children brought before the council these collected butts by the bagful, collected over one weekend in Temple City Park. Because of the overwhelming attendance of anti-smoking crusaders, from local teenagers to adults and the elderly, the council was forced to limit the amount of public comment time allowed for each commenter in order to have time to hear all of the arguments, most of which strongly favored the ban. Currently, the City of South Pasadena is considering a similar, though much

stricter ordinance in which apartment buildings would be required to be fully, or nearly smoke-free. Following a similar presentation from anti-smoking activists, the South Pasadena City Council decided to delay a vote on the measure until city staff could take the appropriate time to study the possible effects of such an ordinance. Some landlords have voiced concern that such a ban would put them in a difficult situation, forcing them to either diligently enforce the ordinance among their tenants, or facing penalties from the city of other tenants for their failure to do so.

UPCOMING YARD SALES: 5602 El Monte Ave

06/13,14

9015 Jaylee Drive

06/13

ACCOUNTING Vera Shamon This paper is published every Monday by Beacon Media, Inc.All contents herein are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in any manner, either in whole or in part, without the express written consent of the publisher. The Views and opinions expressed in this paper are not necessarily that of the management and staff at Beacon Media, Inc.The Arcadia Weeky has been adjudicated as a newspaper of general circulation in court case number GS 004759.

ADDRESS:

125 E. Chestnut Dr., Monrovia, CA 91016

PHONE:

(626) 301-1010

FAX:

(626) 301-0445

Did Yo u K n o w? In keeping with our commitment to a greener planet, these papers have been printed on 100% Recycled paper for over 12 years.


CITY NEWS

3 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

beaconmedianews.com

Capra from 1

vidual council members if they are indicted on personal charges. But despite the content of his letter, health issues are apparently not the only reason Capra has resigned from the council. Last Tuesday, Capra appeared in the L.A. County Courthouse in Alhambra to plead guilty to one misdemeanor count of failing to report a campaign contribution of more than $1,000 during the 2007 campaign. The guilty plea in the misdemeanor offense matches well with allegations by developer Randy Wang that he gave $5,000 to Capra, as well

as $5,000 to Wong and $3,000 to Carwile during the 2007 campaign. In fact, the guilty plea to the lesser offense is part of a prearranged bargain between Capra and the District Attorney under which Capra is now guaranteed no additional charges will be brought against him in Wang's bribery solicitation allegations, according to David Demerjian of the District Attorney's Public Integrity Division. For the misdemeanor offense and as a part of the plea bargain, Capra was placed on probation for three years, forced to resign his office on the council and agree not to run for office again for the

next four years. Additionally, the court levied a $150 fine against Capra. As for the other council members and former candidates, neither Mayor Wong, former Mayor Wilson nor Scott Carwile have had charges brought against them. All three have repeatedly denied the allegations made by Wang and Mayor Wong continues to serve as the city's mayor. Of the four implicated in the allegations, Wong is the only to have secured her own independent counsel to help her respond to any possible forthcoming charges. In closing, Capra thanked the people of Temple City “for their support and the opportunity to have served the community.” Next up, the now four member council has decided to make an appointment to replace Capra. On Thursday, June 11 each councilmember will nominate up to two possible replacements who will all have an opportunity to present a case for their appointments as well as take questions from current council members. It is widely believed that most of the nominations will come from former council candidates or sitting city commissioners.

Live Oak from 1 tion program was becoming more evident as the rates of overweight, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes reached near, or at, epidemic levels n children and adults in all parts of the United States. We as a community can help to reverse the grim outlook on public health by

Cover Story

taking on an active role towards wellness.” The program’s first summer event will be the 5k Walking/ Jogging Club, to be held from June 9 to August 13 in Temple City Park on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. There is a $10 fee which includes a “Shape Up TC” t-shirt for first time members. -Photos by Terry Miller

BY DR. JACK VON BULOW

VISIBLY AWESOME Within my very first few months of treating patients with Invisalign, something happened that I’d never forget. I saw someone’s life change and I had a front row seat. I think of Diana every single time we begin Invisalign Care. And there are numerous reasons. Forget that I never really liked Orthodontics when I was a student and therefore never saw straightening teeth as part of my clinical future. But I’ll be the first guy to admit receiving orthodontic care changed my life. Back in The Day, I just didn’t see me on the giving side of the proposition. I actually used to cover my mouth with my hand when I was speaking. If early patients didn’t have canine-type reception, hearing Bolton was easier for them than understanding me. So I started my practice here in Temple City as the expressive dentist equivalent of a flabby personal trainer or a food critic who counted catsup as a vegetable. By the time Invisalign came along (Originally the work of two MBA candidates at Stanford) I was way more than seriously curious about all the new clinical advances in dentistry. The office was loaded with cam-

eras and computers and lasers…and I still felt a little threatened by the dental engineering also known as Orthodontics. Finally, I figured if two non-DDS types had dreamed up the system, there might actually be something to it. I gained certification as soon as GPs became eligible for training. I met Diana at a Pasadena Chamber breakfast. I love Chamber functions because the folks who attend are such dedicated networkers they don’t even run away screaming when you tell ‘em you’re a dentist. Diana won a free TCDC Zoom! Teeth Whitening in the raffle held at the end of every monthly breakfast. After a while, she made the drive down Baldwin and within an hour or so had a smile about 5 shades lighter. After folks visit us and walk away with whiter teeth I’m more likely emboldened to ask a few questions. One question is, “Do you have any other concerns about your smile?” This time the answer was, “I know darn well you’re looking at it.” Diana had had great whitening results and everything was looking good…with the exception of one badly discolored upper front tooth that was also sticking out at an angle

Molar’s on 4

Summer Internships • Graphic and Production Dept. • Photography email inquiries and portfolio to internships@beaconmedianews.com

BEADS

10% off all merchandise with coupon* *excludes all Swarovski merchandise (expires Feb. June 28, 30 2009)

•Direct distributors of SWAROVSKI CRYSTALS BEADS •HIGH QUALITY Swarovski Beads at low prices •REASONABLE PRICES for Gold-Filled, Sterling Silver, and base

metal findings •Stringing materials, tools, and accessories Jewelry Findings & Gifts 9459 Las Tunas Dr. for all your beading needs Temple City, CA, 91780 (626) 451-5849 •Affordable BEADING CLASSES for all levels Mon - Sat 12:00 PM - 7:00 PM www.jewelryfindingsngifts.com


CITY NEWS

4 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

The Weekly Crossword

Across

42. Tic ___ Dough 43. Misconception 45. Join a poker game 46. RR stop 47. Land in water 48. Relish 51. “____ loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah” 52. Early anesthetic 53. Capital of Madagascar 56. Editor’s mark 57. Cover 58. Ripe 62. Green land 63. Big galoot 64. Experts 65. E.mail command 66. Roulette bet 67. Untidy states

1. Irish tongue 7. Give ___ rest 10. Saturate 14. King of the Huns 15. ___ vivant 16. Commedia dell’___ 17. Here and there 18. Cornerstone abbr. 19. Incline 20. Pertaining to the eyebrow 23. Plant flower 26. Actress Peeples 27. Gandhi’s land 28. Wander 29. Ring org. 30. Compass dir. 31. Situated near the kidneys 33. Deserter 34. Half of D 37. “Fancy that!” 38. Barcelona bear 39. Broke bread 40. Handwoven Scandinavian rug 41. Besides

5. Hipbone 6. Group of tents 7. Spain and Portugal 8. Puccini heroine 9. Against 10. Salty 11. Mountain nymph 12. Pong maker 13. Nairobi’s nation 21. As a whole 22. Fillet 23. Actress Sonia 24. Water.repellent cloth 25. Paddled 29. Attended 30. Old Nick 32. Idea 33. Roof timber 34. Collide 35. Recurring series 36. Stratum 44. Understatement 45. Declared 46. Protected from the sun 48. Tenuous substances 49. Free laces, say 50. Severe 51. Long.billed sandpiper 52. Circumvent 54. Banned apple spray 55. Muslim elder and prayer. leader 59. FedEx rival 60. Hwy. 61. Pothook shape;

1. Breach 2. Loss leader? 3. Aliens, for short 4. Supple

Fill the 9x9 grid so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3x3 regions contain the digits from 1 to 9 only once.

3 9 5 1 2 8 6 4 7

1 6 2 4 9 7 5 8 3

8 7 4 3 5 6 9 1 2

6 4 8 2 7 5 1 3 9

9 2 1 8 3 4 7 5 6

On June 14, Americans will once again celebrate the adoption of this country’s first national flag. The most popular name of the flag is the “Stars and Stripes”. Over time it has also been referred to as “Old Glory”, “The Star-Spangled Banner” and the Grand Old Flag. The Continental Congress approved the first American flag on June 14, 1777 and it represented the thirteen original colonies. Between 1777 and 1960 there have been many changes and additions to our flag. For more than 200 years the American flag has been the symbol of our nation’s strength and unity. The flag stands for the land, the people, the government and the ideals of the United States. Today the flag consists of thirteen horizontal stripes, seven red alternating with 6 white. The stripes represent the original 13 colonies; the stars represent the 50 states of the Union. The colors of the flag are symbolic as well: Red symbolizes Hardiness and Valor, White symbolizes Purity and Innocence and Blue represents Vigilance, Perseverance and Justice.

The American flag flies on the moon, sits atop Mount Everest, was proudly displayed on the shores of Iwo Jima and is hurtling out into space. Today, when we view our Country’s flag, we think of liberty, freedom, pride, and

Molar’s from 3

3 9 8

8 5 7

7 5 3 9 6 1 4 2 8

1

2

Last Week’s Solution 2 3 6 5 1 9 8 7 4

Flag Day

Down

“The numbers must only occur once”

4 1 7 6 8 2 3 9 5

BY WALLY HAGE

Last Week’s Solution

Sudoku

5 8 9 7 4 3 2 6 1

FAMILYAFFAIR

2 3

5

3

and matched colors by placing a porcelain veneer without removing more than about 0.5 millimeters of enamel? Would you be interested?” “Can you do all the work here?” “Would you prefer that?” I still attend the monthly Pasadena Chamber breakfasts. The scrambled eggs continue to need some work; there are more chiropractors present than dentists in the state of Nebraska, and the guy who leads the meeting is an unapologetic bruin honk (poor devil.) And the whole experience is a total blast. Especially when Diana delivers her 20-second commercial with a big, beautiful freely expressed smile.

Please help to

9 3

6

9

5

8 1

7 4

4 2

3

not much unlike Sarah Brightman taking a curtain call in front of the rest of the lined-up cast of The Phantom. Diana helped head up a local non-profit, her children were all grown up, her family had always come first; you’ll never meet warmer person. On Zoom! Day, plus 10 minutes, Diana shared she’d hated that tooth for at least 40 years. She never smiled without posturing to hide the tooth, hated having her picture taken, and subconsciously screened her mouth from sight, using her hand as a prop. Hmmm, been there. Diana had heard all about Orthodontics but didn’t want braces. “What if we straightened that tooth without using braces

Betsy Ross. Did Betsy Ross sew the first stars and Stripes? An unbiased look at all historical sources -- written, oral, and pictorial -- lends unquestionable credence to the story. Most everyone over 40 remembers learning about Betsy Ross, credited with sewing the first stars-and-stripes flag for our young nation. However, history’s revisionists have tried to unravel the documentation of Betsy Ross’s historical accomplishment, much like, they have tampered with so many other historical facts of this great nation. I can remember so vividly as a young elementary school student being so proud to stand each morning before class as the teacher would lead us in the flag salute. It still is a very proud moment for me to recite Our Nation’s Pledge of Allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. Why not take a moment out of your busy schedule today and reflect upon those patriotic words of our American “Pledge of Allegiance”. I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, One Nation, Under God, Indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all. Our Nation’s Flag is truly a symbol of our Freedom, Our Liberty and our Pride to be Americans. Join me in display of our American Flag on June 14th so proudly … along with millions of other Americans. It is also a tribute to our Military Forces who are stationed here and throughout the world serving this wonderful nation proudly to keep it safe and free for all of us Americans.

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Conserve Water Thank you.


5

JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

 

BY DAWN RICKABAUGH

Seller Financing Helps Move Commercial Property



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Thursday, June 18th (6:00 pm)



Arcadia Masonic Temple



This is a follow up article to last week's where I introduced some basic concepts about seller financing. Buying my first commercial building from an owner offering terms several years ago made me an instant fan. I was reminded that the technique is still alive and well. Just a few months ago, 5828 Temple City Blvd. sold for near asking in less than 60 days. The listing description went something like this: “Commercial building for sale. Large lot with approx. 2500 sq. ft. building plus more parking. Currently chiropractic offices. Owner is retiring & will finance 1st trust deed with approved credit & terms.� So why does someone who is retiring think of doing this? Most likely his first objective was to defer capital gains and create a dependable monthly income. His money is probably growing somewhere between 6-8%, and is secured by a property he's very comfortable with. I'm thinking he's glad he hasn't been exposed to the stock market or to low- yielding CD's from banks who may, or may not, be in business next year. Secondarily, it probably helped him sell quickly for top dollar. When conventional financing isn't required, there are more potential buyers for a property. But that doesn't mean there isn't any underwriting involved. You notice that even though the seller was providing the financing, his ad said, “with approved credit and

terms.� He's still looking at the relative strength of the buyer . . . down payment, credit score, and probably financial statement. When a seller carries, it's important that the transaction be structured properly for maximum safety of the investment itself (the trust deed), as well as the marketability of the note if he ever needs to sell it for cash. The first items usually negotiated between the buyer and seller are: purchase price, down payment, interest rate, monthly payment, and term or due date (or balloon payment, if any). A seller should require no less than 10% of the purchase price as a down payment, with 20% being ideal (25%+ for commercial). There is no substitute for protective equity. The interest rate on a note, in most instances, should at least be the going rate in the market at the time. It can often be a point or two higher. Even with a higher interest rate, the buyer is saving cash at closing by not having to pay points or loan origination fees.

The sellers carrying back a note would want: 1) A due-on-sale provision. 2) A balloon payment due on the note 5-7 years from closing. 3) A late charge of 6% of the payment if it is not made within 10 days of its due date. 4) A prepayment penalty (if early pay-off would generate adverse tax consequences).

FORECLOSURE? SAVE YOUR HOME! CALL ATTORNEY

5) The buyer to pay all closing costs.



50 W. Duarte Rd.



A buyer would want: 1) No due-on-sale provision. 2) No balloon payment. Where will they get the money in 5 years? 3) No late charge. 4) No prepayment penalty. 5) The seller to pay all closing costs.



General Admission: $12.00



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For more information on Show of Support 

A compromise would look something like this: 1) A due-on-sale provision will give the sellers some control in the event the buyers sell. They will be able to approve the new buyer. 2) A balloon payment in 10 years, not 5. 3) A late charge of 6% of the payment if not paid within 15 days. 4) A prepayment penalty only if the buyers make additional payments that reduce the principal balance by more than 10% in any given year. 5) Buyers and sellers agree to share closing costs equally.

Arcadia, CA



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Dawn Rickabaugh is a broker with expertise in seller financing and real estate notes. 626.641.3931 www.NoteQueen.com. Always consult with your CPA, tax attorney and/or financial advisor before selling any real estate.

STEPHEN R. GOLDEN

Pasadena, California





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CITY NEWS

6 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

TEMPLE CITY CITY MANAGER’S WEEKLY REPORT For the Week Ending Noon on Thursday June 4, 2009 Cathy Burroughs, Interim City Manager

General council information 1. The Cit y Council has been inv ited to Temple Cit y High School’s Grad Nite prev iew on Fr iday, June 19t h from 8:30 – 9:30 p.m. 2. The Cit y Council has appointed A ndrea Olivas to t he Parks and Recreat ion Commission. A ndrea w ill be swor n in at t he June 16t h Council meet ing. A lso at t hat meet ing, t he Council will consider re-appoint ment of Planning and Pa rks a nd Recreat ion Commissioners whose terms end on June 30, 20 09. 3. The Cit y of Dua rte has submitted a protest to a proposed rate increase by Ca lifor nia-A mer ica n Water Compa ny (Ca l-A m). The Cit y’s pet it ion st ates t hat Ca l-A m’s proposed rate increase would result in unfa ir a nd unjust if ied increases cha rged to it s cit izens. 4. At t he Cit y Council’s budget study session last Wednesday, t he Council tent at ively approved rejoining t he Sa n Gabr iel Va lley Council of Gover nment s (SGVCOG). The Council directed staff to furt her research funding opt ions for t he membership dues. As t he Council is awa re, Bradbur y (t he only ot her cit y in t he Sa n Gabr iel Va lley t hat was not a member of t he SGVCOG) has recent ly rejoined t he SGVCOG. Bradbur y’s Cit y Ma nager informed me t hat t hey w ill be pay ing from bot h Prop C (same rest r ict ions as Prop A) a nd Genera l Fund. The major it y of t heirs is being pa id from t he Genera l Fund. She a lso ment ioned t hat some cit ies in t he past had pa id t he ent ire amount from Prop A /C, but M TA cha nged t he reg ulat ions a llow ing only t he port ion direct ly related to t ra nsport at ion project s to be elig ible. Ot her cit ies may st ill be pay ing t he ent ire amount from Prop A /C, or ot her funding sources, and will apparent ly do so unt il someone cha llenges t hem. St aff recommends submitt ing t he required For m A to M TA for approva l of 60% of t he dues to be pa id from Prop A. 5. The sidewa lks a long Las Tunas, bet ween Kauffma n a nd Loma, were clea ned t his week. The Cit y cont ract s w it h a vendor to come out a nd power wash t he sidewa lks. The Council had appropr iated funds for t he sidewa lks to be clea ned qua rterly, however in rev iew ing yea r end expenditures we discovered t hat no funds had been used t his yea r. We w ill t r y to get back to our rout ine clea nings. The sidewa lks look much better!

Administration 1. St aff has added wording relat ive to attor ney fees to our a nnua l ag reement s as requested by t he Cit y Council last Tuesday. The rev ised ag reement s w ill be presented to t he Council for approva l on June 16t h. 2 Last Wednesday t he Council gave tent at ive approva l to t he 20 09 -10 budget. T he public hea r ing a nd for ma l adopt ion of t he budget w ill t a ke place on June 16t h. The indicated w r iters have submitted t he follow ing items. A ll have been rev iewed a nd approved (but may have been edited) by t he Cit y Ma nager.

Department of the City Clerk (City Clerk Flandrick) 1. At t heir meet ing of June 2nd, t he Cit y Council considered t he process to f ill a seat on t he Council due to t he resig nat ion of Councilmember Dave Capra. Inter im Cit y Attor ney Er ic Va il adv ised Council of t he met hods of f illing t he vaca ncy eit her t hrough appoint ment or elect ion a nd t he t imelines involv ing each met hod. The Council chose to f ill t he vaca ncy t hrough ap point ment , w it h each Councilmember nominat ing t wo members of t he public who meet t he qua lif icat ions for elect ive off ice. Those nominees w ill submit mater ia ls (resume, letter of interest , qua lif icat ions, etc.) to t he Cit y Clerk for Council’s considerat ion. The Council scheduled a Specia l Meet ing on Thursday, June 11, 20 09, at 6:30 p.m., at which t ime t hey w ill conduct inter v iews of t he nominees a nd appoint a new member of t he Cit y Council. 2.Staff is in the process of purchasing a digital recorder for recording public meet ings a nd producing meet ing minutes. This is necessa r y because cassette t apes a re becoming increasingly more diff icult a nd expensive to buy.

Department of Parks & Recreation (Dir. of Parks & Recreation Director Burroughs) 1. My thanks to Frances Manzo-Pimentel, Parks & Recreation Coordinator, a nd her st aff for t he count less hours t hey put in pla nning a nd orga nizing t he Cit y’s 1st Mult icultura l Day event. A lt hough attenda nce was light t hroughout t he day, t he event was well pla nned w it h g reat food a nd entert a inment. We have made severa l notes for next yea r’s event a nd expect Mult icultura l Day to

get bigger a nd better each yea r. 2. Temple Cit y volunteers sold root beer a nd cher r y coke f loat s dur ing Mult icultura l Day last Saturday. Selling over 70 f loat s, volunteers ra ised $157 to benef it t he Great A mer ica n Ba ke Sa le: No K id Hung r y prog ram. Proceeds ra ised t hrough t his prog ra m a re g ra nted to after- school a nd summer feeding prog rams across t he count r y prov iding k ids at r isk of hunger w it h mea ls when school is not in session. Great job Temple Cit y volunteers! 3. Oa k Avenue Intermediate School w ill be performing t heir a nnua l concert in Temple Cit y Pa rk on Saturday, June 13t h at 4 p.m. The Wednesday night summer concert s w ill beg in on June 24t h. 4. Over 150 children have sig ned up for t he summer basketba ll prog ram dur ing t he f irst t wo days of reg ist rat ion. We a re st ill hopeful t hat we w ill be able to offer a n indoor basketba ll prog ra m t his summer, but a re prepa red if t he prog ra m must be held outdoors at L ive Oa k Pa rk. 5. The f ields at L ive Oa k Pa rk w ill be sprayed on June 11t h a nd aga in on June 29t h. Sig ns w ill be posted not if y ing t he public. The f ields a re norma lly sprayed for weed abatement t his t ime each yea r.

Department of Community Development (Community Development Manager Lambert) Ea rlier t his week St aff issued building per mit s for a new commercia l building at 9955 Lower A zusa Road, just west of Ba ldw in Avenue. The t wo stor y off ice/medica l building w ill consist of four unit s, t wo of which w ill be on t he f irst f loor a nd t wo on t he second f loor, a nd w ill have a tot a l g ross f loor area of 6,060 square feet. This propert y was prev iously occupied by t he batt ing cage business t hat was est ablished in 1968. With the recent 10 -½ month extension of the moratorium prohibiting medical ma r ijua na dispensa r ies, St a f f w ill st a r t to work on a perma nent Ordina nce addressing medica l ma r ijua na dispensa r ies. There a re severa l ways to approach such a n Ordina nce, a nd St aff w ill present t hose opt ions to t he Council at future meet ings. We w ill be work ing closely w it h t he cont ract Cit y Attor neys on t his Ordina nce. At t he Pla nning Commission meet ing of June 9, 20 09, t he Pla nning Commission w ill hold t wo public hea r ings as follows: The Pla nning Commission w ill consider a cont inued request for a Condit iona l Use Permit to a llow t he inst a llat ion of a 40 -foot t a ll cellula r tower w it h t welve a ntennas at a church pa rk ing lot located at 6019 Ba ldw in Avenue. This item was cont inued at t he applica nt s’ request. A Tentat ive Parcel Map and Condit ional Use Permit to allow a lot split sub div ision, creat ing t wo lot s from one. The subject propert y is located at 10659 Da ines Dr ive (nort hwest cor ner of Da ines Dr ive a nd El Monte Avenue) in t he single family resident ia l ( R-1) zone. The subject site does not cur rent ly have a ny st r uctures, a s a ll of t he buildings were volunt a r ily demolished in Ma rch 20 0 8 after it was determined by t he Cit y t hat a ll t he st ructures were unsafe for liv ing pur poses.

Department of Public Services L A Count y Public Works has indicated t hat t hey have severa l slur r y sea l project s under way a nd t hat t hey a re underst affed at t his t ime. Wit h t his being sa id, t hey may not be able to address t he sink hole in t he 940 0 block of Lower A zusa for approximately 2 – 4 weeks. If work does not beg in on t he sinkhole next week, st aff w ill cont act pr ivate cont ractors to obt a in quotes to do t he work. Update: Wit h t he inclement weat her, L A Count y Public Works cannot complete t heir slur r y sea l project s a nd have assig ned st aff to complete t he repa ir of t he sink hole on Thursday.

Division of Public Safety (Public Safety Officer Ariizumi) The Sa n Gabr iel Va lley A nima l Joint Powers Aut hor it y Execut ive Boa rd is scheduled to meet t his week to discuss t he ag reement wit h t he Humane Societ y. The Huma ne Societ y proposed some last minute cha nges to t he ag reement a nd it is a nt icipated t hat t he approva l of t he ag reement w ill be t abled so t hat t he ag reement ca n be rev iewed by t he Administ rat ive Boa rd. A n update w ill be prov ided in next week’s ma nager’s report.

Office of the City Attorney (Eric S. Vail, Interim City Attorney) 1. Our f irst day as inter im Cit y Attor ney was June 1, 20 09, a nd I a nd my pa rt ners have been familia r izing ourselves w it h t he Cit y’s Cha rter, policies, a nd personnel. We assisted t he Pla nning depa rt ment w it h a rev iew of t he recent applicat ion to a mend t he Pia zza project a nd a rev iew of t he extension of t he Cit y’s medica l ma r ijua na dispensa r y morator ium. I attended t he June 2 Cit y Council meet ing a nd we a re work ing on items t hat a rose at t he meet ing. 2. On June 2 , Council Member Capra a nnounced his resig nat ion. Our off ice resea rched t he opt ions for t he Cit y Council to f ill t he vaca ncy a nd adv ised t he Council on t he procedures to implement t he va r ious opt ions.


CITY NEWS

7 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

beaconmedianews.com

The Tax-Man, He Cometh BY FRANKLIN J. RUEDEL

Seven Things to Know About the Taxpayer Advocate Service

TCUSD Celebrates Student Artists The TCUSD Boa rd of Educat ion recognized the accomplishments of two talented artists at their regular meeting on May 27, 2009. Demi In, a second grader at Emperor Elementary School was recognized for her artwork being selected as the second grade winner from over 450 entries in the Los Angeles County School Board’s Art Exhibition. Demi’s artwork will be permanently displayed at the Los Angeles County

Office of Education. Carolina Li, a fifth grade student at Cloverly Elementary School was recognized for receiving an Honorable Mention Award for her artwork entered in the United Nations Programme’s 18th Annual International Children’s Painting Competition. Both students are gifted artists who have a natural ability to express their ideas in an exceptionally creative way.

If you’re experiencing problems with the Internal Revenue Service, you may be able to get help from the Taxpayer Advocate Service. Here’s what every taxpayer should know about this independent organization within the IRS. The Taxpayer Advocate Service is your voice at the IRS. You may be eligible for TAS help if you’ve tried to resolve your tax problem through normal IRS channels and have gotten nowhere, or you think an IRS procedure just isn’t working as it should. TAS helps taxpayers whose problems are causing financial difficulty or significant cost, including the cost of professional representation. TAS employees know the IRS and how to navigate it. TAS will listen to your problem, help you understand what needs to be done to resolve it, and stay with you every step of the way until your problem is resolved. TAS has at least one local taxpayer advocate in each state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. To c o n t a c t TA S y o u c a n c a l l y o u r l o c a l a d v o c a t e , w h o s e n u m ber is in your phone book, or call the toll-free case intake line at 1-877-ASK-TAS1. Links: Taxpayer Advocate Service Publication 1546, Taxpayer Advocate Service - Your Voice at the IRS Taxpayer Advocate Service — Help for Problem Situations Form 911, Request for Taxpayer Advocate Service Assistance Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this article was not intended, or written to be used, and cannot be used by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions. Do keep in mind that these various suggestions are meant to be a broad base of advice and may not be proper for all taxpayers and should be reviewed with your EA or other tax professional prior to acceptance for your individual situation. You may contact Franklin J. Ruedel, EA at www.frankruedel.com taxprofrank@ charter.net, use this website for a reduced rate tax preparation http://www.1040. com/frankruedel/ or https://my.hdvest.com/franklinruedel 626-286-9662

Sen. Carol Liu’s Bills Pass State Senate Sen. Carol Liu announced that all of her bills pending on t he St at e S ena t e f loor passed before the legislative dead l i ne t o move bills out of the house of origin. “ We a r e moving these important bills forward,” said Liu. “Resolving the state’s fiscal crisis remains our top priority, but we can still work on legislation to improve transportation planning, clean up graffiti in our neighborhoods, and improve pedestrian safety around schools.” June 5 was the deadline to advance bills introduced in the Senate this year. Bills must pass through the legislative process by Sept. 11, 2009 and be signed by the Governor to become law. Among Liu’s bills that won approval in the Senate and passed to the Assembly are:

*SB 138 lets voters approve a tax on spray paint cans to fund local government graffiti prevention and removal programs. *SB 118 allows counties to assist families when parents are in prison or jail and help those parents reunite with their children when jail sentences are completed. *SB 391 makes sure that the California Department of Transportation takes into consideration the state’s greenhouse gas reduction targets, air pollution laws, and fuel efficiency and alternative transportation options when planning how to meet the state’s future transportation infrastructure and mobility needs. *SB 315 authorizes local school districts to establish a “Walking School Bus,” so parents can walk children in a safe and organized group to and from schools. For more information on legislation go to www.senate.ca.gov/Liu. Liu represents nearly 850,000 people in the 21st Senate District, which includes Burbank, Glendale, Pasadena, La Cañada Flintridge, San Gabriel, Temple City, and several City of Los Angeles communities.

Superintendent Chelsea Kang-Smith and Board President Bob Ridley recognizes Demi In for her award-winning artwork.


Readers’Choice

8 JUNEE 8 -JUNE NE N E1 14, 4 2 4, 2009 009 00

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NAME/CITY

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

American................................................. Armenian................................................. Bakery..................................................... Caribbean................................................ Chinese................................................... Coffee House.......................................... Diner........................................................ French..................................................... Greek....................................................... Indian....................................................... Italian....................................................... Japanese................................................. Juice Bar.................................................. Korean..................................................... Mediterranean.......................................... Mexican.................................................... Restaurant............................................... Spanish.................................................... Thai.......................................................... Vegetarian................................................ Other........................................................

WHAT’S COOKIN’?

NAME/CITY

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Appetizers................................................ Bagel........................................................ Beer......................................................... Breakfast.................................................. Buffalo Wings.......................................... Buffet........................................................ Burger...................................................... Burrito...................................................... Cake........................................................ Chicken.................................................... Chili.......................................................... Coffee....................................................... Cookies.................................................... Desserts................................................... Frozen Yogurt........................................... Ice Cream................................................ Martini...................................................... Margarita.................................................. Mojito....................................................... Pasta........................................................ Pizza........................................................ Ribs......................................................... Salad Bar................................................. Sandwich................................................. Seafood....................................................

26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32.

Senior Specials.................................................... Steak.................................................................... Sunday Brunch..................................................... Sushi..................................................................... Taco...................................................................... Wine..................................................................... Other.....................................................................

WHO TAKES CARE OF YOU?

NAME/CITY

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Acupuncture......................................................... Chiropractor.......................................................... Dentist.................................................................. Dermatologist........................................................ Doctor (General)................................................... Facial.................................................................... Fitness Center/Gym.............................................. Hair Salon............................................................. Massage............................................................... Martial Arts............................................................ Nail Salon (Manicure, Pedicure)........................... Opthamologist....................................................... Optometry.............................................................. Personal Trainer.................................................... Pilates Program.................................................... Plastic Surgeon.................................................... Spa....................................................................... Tanning Salon....................................................... Wellness Center.................................................... Yoga...................................................................... Other.....................................................................

SHOPPING ANYONE?

NAME/CITY

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Antique.................................................................. Art Gallery............................................................. Arts & Crafts......................................................... Auto Dealer........................................................... Bike/Skate Shop................................................... Book Store............................................................ Cellular Phone Store............................................. CD/Record Store.................................................. Clothing - Children’s.............................................. Clothing - Men’s.................................................... Clothing - Women’s............................................... Computer Store.................................................... Department Store................................................. Furniture Store...................................................... Gift Shop............................................................... Golf Shop..............................................................

17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

Hardware Store .................................................... Health Food Store................................................. Independent Market.............................................. Jewelry.................................................................. Music Instruments................................................. Office Supply Store............................................... Pet Store............................................................... Pool Supply Store................................................. Specialty Food Store............................................ Shoe Store............................................................ Sporting Goods Store........................................... Stationary Store.................................................... Thrift Store............................................................ Other.....................................................................

WHO DO YOU CALL?

NAME/CITY

1. 2. 3. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 21. 22. 23. 23. 24. 25.

Auto Mechanic...................................................... Bank..................................................................... Car Wash.............................................................. Carpet Cleaning.................................................... Caterer.................................................................. Computer Services................................................ Dry Cleaner........................................................... Electrician.............................................................. Financial Services................................................. Florist .................................................................. Framing Store....................................................... General Contractor................................................ Home/Office Cleaning........................................... Hospital................................................................. Interior Design....................................................... Newsstand............................................................ Oil & Lube............................................................. Painter................................................................... Pet Groomer.......................................................... Pet Sitter................................................................ Pharmacy.............................................................. Photo Lab............................................................. Photographer......................................................... Plumber................................................................. Printer.................................................................... Real Estate Agent................................................. Real Estate Office................................................. Senior Living.......................................................... Veterinarian........................................................... Other.....................................................................

WHERE DO YOU PLAY?

NAME/CITY

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

24-hr. Restaurant........................................ Bowling....................................................... Botanical Gardens...................................... British Pub.................................................. Golf Course................................................ Happy Hour................................................ Hiking Trail................................................. Hotel........................................................... Jazz Club................................................... Live Theatre................................................ Local Bar.................................................... Local Sports Team..................................... Movie Theatre............................................ Museum..................................................... Night Club.................................................. Outdoor Concerts....................................... Outdoor/Patio Dining.................................. Outdoor Recreation.................................... Pool Hall..................................................... Race Track................................................. Rock-n-Roll Club........................................ Romantic Dining.......................................... Sports Venue.............................................. Tattoo Parlor................................................ Wine Bar..................................................... Other...........................................................

OTHER CHOICES...?

NAME/CITY

1.Institute of Higher Learning............................ 2.Library............................................................. 3.Local Charity................................................... 4.Local Festival.................................................. 5.Place of Worship............................................. 6.Other...............................................................

WHO IMPROVES YOUR HOME?

NAME/CITY

1.Bed and Bath.................................................. 2.Blinds/Drapes................................................. 3.Cabinets.......................................................... 4.Carpet............................................................. 5.Home Decor.................................................... 6.Landscapes.................................................... 7.Masonry.......................................................... 8.Pool................................................................ 9.Roofer............................................................ 10.Tile................................................................ 11.Window Contractors...................................... 12.Other.............................................................

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CITY NEWS

9 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

beaconmedianews.com

Methodist Hospital Foundation and Club 300 Committee Hold Vintage Derby Races at the Track And Away they Go…”KENTUCKY DERBY” - CLUB 300 STYLE…..

HATS OFF TO DADS AND GRADS FAST-FIX

J E W E L RY A N D WATCH REPA I R

Ladies were asked to don fabulous hats Saturday. Hats as we all know, are without a doubt the staple of the outfit - generally widebrimmed, Southern Belle inspired and decorated with silk flowers, bows and ribbons! There was no shortage of these, each with its own individual story at the 300 club. -Photos by Terry Miller

As invited guests found their way down the famous steps of t he Cha ndelier Room at Santa Anita Saturday, a beautiful voice announced each guest as if they were at an event at Buckingham Palace. Guests then had a formal photo taken by none other than the mother of the Rose Queen. So in actuality, guests were meeting Royalty, the Queen Mum of Pasadena to be precise! Met hod i s t Ho s pit a l Foundation and the Club 300 Committee held its annual Kentucky Derby Saturday in which party goers had the opportunity to bet on some famous races of years gone by. Now we’re not pointing any fingers, but we believe we saw some people accessing the web via their Blackberry to confirm the winner just prior to placing their “bet”. It was all in good fun and no one minded, in fact someone even suggested “googling” the particular race. The popular “Parade of Hats” took center stage toward the end of the evening and other festive opportunities, prizes were also awarded. Derby Attire was not required but was encouraged; from the fantastic to the sublime, there were no rules or limits and the men decided to follow that to the tee. Some wore Top Hats,

some in safari attire and others in just plain caps. Ladies were asked to don fabulous hats which are the staple of the outfit - generally wide-brimmed, Sout her n Belle inspired decorated with silk flowers, bows and ribbons! There was no shortage of these, each with its own individual story. One of the more unique and rather large hats was

worn by Mary Hansen who seemed t o t hou roug h ly enjoy the parade of hats. Sandy Butler and Noemi R. Biely also wore spectacular hats and they also brought along their respective better halves. The Club 30 0 event held at t he Santa A nita Race Track was up there next to the Kentucky Derby and Royal Ascot when it comes to colorful and won-

derfully eccentric hats. The choice of best hat is an event exclusively linked with the race tracks throughout histor y, part icularly in t he UK - The best hat choice is actually a fashion event which differs from Ladies` Day, which was held at the Santa Anita Race Track. The difference is that the club does not choose the Lady of the Track, but the most attractive hat.

The Met hodist Hospital Foundation develops resources to support Methodist Hospital in providing high quality health care to the community. The resources that are developed toward caring for new life, education and suppor t i ng t he ca reg ivers, ensuring a healthier future t hrough wellness programs, nurturing and treating those who are ill,

and, with dignity, caring for those who are dying. The Foundat ion be lieves that through philanthropic support of Methodist Hospital, the quality of life for those the foundation serves, their families, and their loved ones will be enhanced. Club 300 is a program designed to engage younger community members, typically under the age of 55. This club is an annual giving group that supports the Emergency Department and is under Partners in Health at Methodist Hospital. Club 30 0 of fers a unique opportunity to make new friends and network with individuals who share a strong sense of community and philanthropic idea ls while ma k ing a difference to an important health resource - continued advanced care at Methodist Hospital. Club 300 programs and activities are designed to address the challenges that younger adults encounter, but membership is not exclusive to age. The event chairwoman - Robyn Tapert, along with Committee Members - Ashley Andrews, Carolyn Crowley, Evely n Great house, Adrienne Haines, Susie Lu, Greg Mallis, Sherri Wedeen, Mary Winners ensured that this year’s event was a rousing success.

• Restringing • Eyeglass Repair • Bracelet Repair • Custom Engraving • Zippo Lighters

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Westfield Santa Anita • Near the Food Court 400 S. Baldwin Ave. #710L • Arcadia, CA 91007 • TEL: 626.446.1446

TEMPLE CITY TRIBUNE .COM Make Your Voice Heard.


POLICE BLOTTERS

For Temple City Police Blotters go to templecitytribune.com NOT AVAILABLE AT TIME OF PRINT

SIERRA MADRE

During the week of Sunday, May 17th, to Saturday May 23rd, the Sierra Madre Police Department responded to approximately 233 calls for service.

Monday, May 18th: 9:14 AM – Vandalism/Graffiti, Mount Wilson Trail Park. The public restroom was vandalized with various marking pens. Graffiti was found on the exterior of the restroom door and the interior of the restroom. No damage estimate was available.

Wednesday, May 20th: 12:45 PM – Vandalism, 500 block West Sierra Madre Blvd. A construction worker discovered and reported damages to a door of a home under construction. No loss value was given for the damages.

Friday, May 22nd: 11:42 AM – Arrest, Possession of a Controlled Substance, 100 block of West Sierra Madre Blvd. A motorist driving a pickup truck was stopped for a traffic violation. Further investigation revealed the driver had four truck tires and rims in the bed of the truck for which the driver was unable to provide proof of ownership. The officer believed the items to be stolen. During the investigation officers found Ecstasy and marijuana in the truck. The driver and one of his two passengers were arrested for possession of a controlled substance, and transported to Pasadena Police jail for booking. The second passenger was later released. The tires and wheels were confiscated pending a follow-up investigation. 8:57 PM – Arrest, Restraining Order Violation, 300 block Mariposa Ave. Officers responded to a call of a restraining order violation. The man fled the area prior to police arrival; however, he left behind personal property in the street as he fled. The man later returned in search of his personal property and officers found the man as he tried to leave a second time. The man was arrested for the restraining order violation and taken to the Pasadena police jail for remand. 10:23 PM – Arrest, Driving Under the Influence, 100 block North Baldwin Ave. Officer stopped an intoxicated motorist who improperly parked his truck in the roadway and was trying to drive away. The officer arrested the driver for driving under the influence of alcohol and took him to the Pasadena Police jail for remand.

Saturday, May 23rd: 10:12 PM – Arrest, Public Intoxication, 100 block West Sierra Madre Blvd. Officers stopped and detained a man who staggered across the street in the business district. The man was intoxicated and unable to care for himself. Officers arrested the man and took him to the Pasadena police jail for remand.

MONROVIA

During the last seven day period, the Police Department handled 553 service events, resulting in 117 investigations. Following are the last week’s highlighted issues and events:

member and is on probation for a gang enhancement from a prior crime.

Felony Vandalism /

On May 27 at approximately 6 p.m., a subject came into the police lobby to turn in what he believed to be a mortar round he found in his deceased grandfather’s WWII memorabilia. The Watch Commander and Sergeant immediately took the round out to the parking lot for initial examination, and then relocated it to a concrete sand bunker at the City Yard for safety. The Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department bomb technicians were called out and determined the object was actually an expended light anti-tank round. The item was taken by the Sheriff’s Department for disposal.

Suspects Arrested. On May 22 at 12:18 p.m., an officer responded to the high school, where school staff had two juveniles detained for vandalism. The juveniles had tagged several locations at the high school with gang graffiti. The amount of damage caused by one of the suspects resulted in felony vandalism charges, and the damage done by the second suspect resulted in a misdemeanor vandalism charge. The suspect for the felony was arrested, booked at the police station and released to a parent. The other suspect was cited and released to a parent at the school.

Missing Person Located. On May 24 at 2:29 p.m., officers responded to a missing person report at a camp in the 1100 Block of North Canyon. On May 23 at approximately 10 p.m., a male adult camper walked away from his camping group. The camper was in a tent with two friends when he stated he was upset about a breakup he had with his girlfriend five months prior. He then walked out of the tent, but did not take his backpack, water, cell phone, or any other personal items he had taken to the camp. On May 24, in the early morning hours, his friends realized the subject had not returned and they notified camp staff. After a search of the trails and the surrounding camp grounds, the Monrovia Police Department was called. Monrovia officers checked with the subject’s family and they advised they had not seen or heard from him. Sierra Madre Mountain Search and Rescue were called out along with the Foothill Air Support Team helicopter to search the mountains. The search lasted approximately 12 hours until the camper’s mother called the Monrovia Police Department and stated that her son had arrived at home, which was a long distance away from the camp. He had walked throughout the night and day and was tired, but he was okay.

Attempted Burglary / Suspect Arrested. On May 26 at 9:49 a.m., police responded to the report of an attempted burglary in the 900 block of West Walnut. The caller reported that a male subject tried to get into her residence. The suspect rang the doorbell three times and then went to the back of the house and tried to gain access through a sliding door and then a window. The victim saw the suspect trying to enter the house. The suspect found the door and window both locked and left the location as the victim was calling police. The victim provided police with a good description of the suspect and advised she last saw him walking towards Fifth Avenue. Officers arrived and located a male subject matching the suspect’s description. The subject was detained in the 900 block of West Olive. The victim positively identified the subject as being the suspect who tried to get into her residence. The suspect was arrested for attempted burglary. The suspect is a gang

Property for Destruction.

ARCADIA For the period of Sunday, May 17, through

Saturday, May 23, the Police Department responded to 1,007 calls for service of which 139 required formal investigations. The following is a summary report of the major incidents handled by the Department during this period.

Sunday, May 17 Units were dispatched to Huntington and Santa Clara in reference to a possible drunk driver doing “donuts” in the intersection. A 28-year-old male Hispanic driver was contacted and officers detected the odor of an alcoholic beverage on his breath. A field sobriety test was conducted and it was determined that he was operating the vehicle while intoxicated. The driver was arrested for DUI, unlicensed driver, driving with an open container of alcohol, and an outstanding misdemeanor warrant. Around 4:35 p.m., loss prevention personnel from Nordstrom advised that they had detained a woman for theft. The woman was seen taking a pair of earrings and three hair clips and concealing them in her handbag. A private person’s arrest was made, and the 63-year-old Hispanic was taken into custody for petty theft with prior conviction.

Units were called to Daniel’s Jewelers, located at Westfield Mall, around 12:46 p.m. in reference to a suspicious man causing a disturbance. A 26-year-old Hispanic was detained and officers found a 7” knife blade in his pants, and a record check revealed that he had 2 outstanding misdemeanor warrants totaling $100,000. The man was taken into custody at the scene without incident. At 4:00 p.m., an assault occurred in the 00 block of Bonita. The suspect was arguing with his wife when his father-in-law tried to intervene. This angered the suspect, and he went to the kitchen, grabbed a knife, and lunged at the father-in-law. Fearing for his safety, the father-in-law tried to grab the knife but he cut his finger instead. Upon seeing the injury, the suspect dropped the knife. A 45-year-old man was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon and exhibiting a deadly weapon.

Wednesday, May 20: A victim came to the station around 10:39 a.m. to file a fraud report. Unknown suspect(s) opened a credit card account with the victim’s personal information and made almost $2,718 in unauthorized charges. Units were dispatched to 171 East Live Oak around 8:50 p.m. in reference to a battery that just occurred. For no apparent reason, a male victim was struck several times in the face by a known acquaintance. The 19-year-old male Asian suspect fled in his vehicle after the attack.

Thursday, May 21: A 49-year-old male Caucasian suspect was detained by security guards at Pacific Clinics, 800 South Santa Anita, for a commercial burglary. Around 5:55 a.m., the suspect broke a lobby window by using his cane and entered the business building. He was subsequently arrested at the scene without incident. Between 6:00 p.m. on May 15 and 2:30 p.m. on May 21, a grand theft occurred in the 1100 block of East Camino Real. The victim’s coin collection, worth about $2,000, was stolen by a known acquaintance.

Monday, May 18

Friday, May 22:

Officers responded to the high school around 1:23 p.m. regarding an abuse report. A 14-year-old female juvenile reported that her mother uses heroin while taking care of 4 children. The mother was at the school and a consent search of her purse revealed a folding knife. A consent search of the house was also conducted, and officers found two bindles of heroin, glass pipe with burnt residue, and a foil pipe. The 38-yearold Hispanic was arrested for child cruelty, possession of a weapon in public school, possession of narcotics, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Shortly after 5:00 p.m., units were dispatched to the 2700 block of Caroline regarding a terrorist threat report. During an argument, the suspect told his wife that he will kill their children, burn down the house, and then kill himself so she will have nothing. A 44-year-old male Asian was arrested for making terrorist threats. An emergency protection order was obtained and a handgun was removed from the location for safekeeping.

Around 3:20 p.m., a victim came to the station to file a fraud report. Unknown suspect(s) made an automatic payment withdrawal from the victim’s bank account in the amount of $5,708 and then transferred the funds to another account. Loss prevention personnel from Sport Chalet advised that they had detained a male juvenile for theft around 8:42 p.m. A 16-year-old Asian was seen concealing merchandise in a backpack and left the store without making payment. A private person’s arrest was made, and the juvenile was taken into custody for petty theft.

Tuesday, May 19:

Saturday, May 23: Officers responded to AMH around 1:27 a.m. in reference to a stabbing victim who was being treated in the ER. The man advised that during a physical altercation at Bar Twist, 48 East Huntington, he was stabbed in the lower back by an unknown suspect. Around 1:35 a.m., units were dispatched to Denny’s, 7 East Huntington, regarding a battery/robbery that just oc-


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING CALL C A L L ((626) 6 2 6 ) 3301-1010 0 1 -11 0 1 0 FFOR O R AADVERTISING D V E RTII S I N G PPLACEMENT L A C E M E N T IINFORMATION N F O R M AT I O N EMPLOYMENT Beacon Media, publisher of San Gabriel Valley’s fastest growing group of newspapers, currently has the following position available: Advertising Sales Rep. You must have excellent interpersonal communication skills, both written and verbal. You will work directly with clients to provide solutions for their advertising needs and to help design advertising campaigns that will best showcase the client’s products and services. Additionally, candidates should be: · Professional. · Ability to work effectively in a team environment. · Over 2 years prior sales experience · Computer-literate. · Reliable vehicle and a cell phone. This position is commission only. Send cover letter and resume to resume@ coremg.net or fax to 626-301-0445

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Incorporation, Contracts, Trade Secrets, Real Estate, and General Business Litigation.

Drum Kit w/ Cymbals 5 piece drum kit with 2 cymbals + hihat. Kit has everything you need and more: throne, drum and cymbal noisedampening pads, all cymbal stands and bass pedal. Everything works well. It’s an off-brand (Pulse Percussion), and could maybe use some heads, but all in all this is a very decent setup for the price. Call John at 626.789.6169. 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan Minivan. Auto, low mileage, front/rear/a/c, many extras. Great Soccer mom car. $9,000 obo. (626) 512-7050

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Blotters continued curred. Three male suspects, two Hispanic and one African-American, struck and kicked two male victims. When a female victim tried to take a picture of the suspects’ vehicle, a suspect pushed her to the ground, broke her camera, and took her cell phone.

Lobbying: It Takes a Buck to Make a Buck BY BILL PETERS Our cities find that in order to get back some of its citizen’s tax dollars, they have to spend money lobbying elected officials to see that projects get funded and all our local cities turn to professional lobby firms to help them. Just last Wednesday, Sierra Madre hosted a dedication ceremony of the Mira Monte Reservoir at Turtle Park to announce that their $8 million project, made possible largely through lobbying efforts in Washington, had come to fruition. The project consisted of several phases. The first phase was the removal and replacement of the existing steel reservoir which had been put into service in 1928. As this phase was completed, the City reports, “The second removal and replacement of the partially underground steel tank west of Mt. Wilson Trail Road was initiated. The final phase of the project consisted of the construction of a new pump house, exterior architectural work, landscaping of the park, and replacement of water system piping throughout the location.” Mira Monte Reservoir was installed in 1928 and has been in successful

WHAT A TREASURE: This spectacular 3BR 1.75 BA home has upgrades Galore including a designer kitchen with maple cabinets, plantation shutters, maple hardwood flooring inlaid with walnut & oak and upgraded baths, office or den and a full length trellised deck with spa and ambient lighting. You don’t need to follow a rainbow. Your Treasure is waiting here. Call now to claim this treasure for yourself. Sierra madre $998,000 (mon265)

FABULOUS VIEW HOME: Located in the “Beverly Hills” section of Monterey Park this charming home sits among million dollar estates and boasts views from downtown LA to Pacific Palisades and Long Beach. It has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, copper plumbing throughout and sits on a large flat lot. Needs a little painting to make it a dream home so get out your paintbrush and call us today and put this one in Escrow. Monterey park $768,000 (rid)

TAKE A HIKE! Step out your front door and escape to the mountains. This charming home is located near the Mt. Wilson Hiking Trails and features designer colors, a large yard, a large kitchen that is ideal for entertaining, picture windows and fireplace in living room, large yard, plus guest quarters for in-laws, visitors or rental income. Before you take your hike, pick up the phone and call to see this home for yourself. Sierra madre $759,000 (mir)

SAN GABRIEL MOUNTAIN VIEW: This unique 3 BR, 3 BA home is nestled at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains and offers separate master quarters upstairs plus 2 additional bedrooms on the lower level. The family room opens to a private back yard and oversized deck. It has a large driveway that can accommodate up to 4 cars plus a 2 car garage. Newly painted and ready for you. Call today for more exciting details. Sierra madre $699,500 (stu)

©2005, An independently owned and operated member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc. Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity.

service since. But in 1997, the Army Corps of Engineers Seismic Reliability study determined that the 81 year-old tank might be susceptible to failure during a major earthquake and called for replacement of the water tank. The Corps of Engineers study was based on calculations of not only earth movement but the impact of a generous slope, a condition which exists between Sierra Madre and Arcadia. The danger, and the additional water was seen as advantageous by both Sierra Madre and Arcadia. The two cities are now working together to lobby for the funding for this and a future, larger project. The two cities are now requesting $3.265 million from fiscal year 2010’s federal Energy and Water appropriations bill and the Army Corps of Engineers Construction General account which will allow the cities to continue mutually beneficial water system improvements. In a March, 2009 letter to Congressman David Dreier (R-San Dimas), then Arcadia

Lobbying on 13

Tell us what you think.

Send an e-mail to Editor@templecitytribune.com


CITY NEWS

12 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

The Gold Standard

SE OU M N H1-4 P E OP AT. S

AGENT OF THE WEEK Linda Jo Pyle

AGENT OF THE WEEK Rosemary Skillman

CENTURY 21 ADAMS & BARNES (626) 358-1858

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD. (626) 301-1888

AGENT OF THE WEEK

AGENT OF THE WEEK

John Vostenak

Julie Muttavangkul

CENTURY 21 LUDECKE INC. (626) 445-0128

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE, INC. (626) 355-1451

D CE U D RE

MURSOL CUSTOM BUILT HOME

$1,299,000

924 S. 6th Ave. Arcadia. This Beautiful 5bdrm 4bth home sits on 15,400 sqft with 4,000 sqft of living space, 2 master suites one upstairs one downstairs, separate grand entertaining family room with high beamed ceiling, FP and built in entertainment center, huge kitchen with oversized center island, fireplace in living room with bay window, gazebo in backyard with gated pool and 3 car attached garage. (S924)

$968,000

Beautiful 2 story home w/4bdrms 4bth + office, cathedral ceilings, formal dining room, family room w/FP, wood floors throughout, modern kitchen w/center isle/granite counter, breakfast nook, master bedroom w/scenic view, guest suite downstairs, upstairs office/library or 5th bdrm, rear yard q/ mountain & city views, 3 car attached garage. (R3146)

CENTURY 21 LUDECKE, INC. (626) 445-0123

CENTURY 21 LUDECKE INC (626) 445-0123

FABULOUS LOCATION

HISTORIC VICTORIAN

$729,000

A quiet cul-de-sac location with wonderful mountain views, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has a family room, master bedroom suite,formal and informal dining, CA/FA, hardwood floors, new laminate flooring in family room and kitchen, fireplace, covered patio, pool, large spa, grassy play area and 2 car detached garage. Great floor plan. (S460)

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE, INC. (626) 355-1451

$699,000

Located close to Old Town Monrovia this Historic two story 2426 sq.ft. character home features 4 bedrooms, dining room, family room, built-ins, central air & heat, 2 fireplaces and 2 baths. This is truly a “must see” home. (C626)

STUNNING MID CENTURY TRADITIONAL $858,000

CUSTOM BUILT

CENTURY21ADAMS&BARNES•(626)358-1858

CENTURY 21 LUDECKE, INC. (626) 445-0123

UNSURPASSED QUALITY

GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

748 Crescent Dr., Monrovia. Here’s the winning combination. Great family home and turn-key. 3BR, 3BA, 2900 sq. ft. on a 13,500 sq. ft. professionally landscaped lot. All the bells and whistles just bring your furniture. (C748)

$690,000

540 Trayer Ave. Beautiful 3bdrm 2bth home remodeled w/marble counters, dual sinks, ceramic floor, high quality appliances, solid maple cabinets, granite countertops, breakfast area, dining room w/ FP, living room w/double entry doors, separate laundry room, 3 car garage, Mountain Views, Turnkey home ready to move-in. (T540)

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE INC. (626) 355-1451 CENTURY 21 LUDECKE, INC. (626) 445-0123

$619,000

A wraparound yard and patio on two sides of this home provide privacy and lush landscaping to this unique townhome. A generous 1877 square feet with 3 bedrooms, 2 ½ baths, breakfast/den, formal dining area, separate laundry room, spacious living room with fireplace, ceramic tile floors, CA/FA, high ceilings, two sets of sliding doors, direct access two car garage. (E103)

TEMPLE CITY SCHOOLS!!

$599,000

Beautiful remodeled 3bed/2 bath home features updated kitchen with granite counters, all new cabinets, fixtures and appliances. Freshly painted inside, new carpet and tile. Lots of storage, some hardwood floors and family room with fireplace. Located on a private street and has a large fenced backyard and so much more! (ACA)

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE INC. (626) 355-1451

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD. 626-301-1888

TWO STORY

TURNKEY! TURNKEY!

$349,900

Located in Castaic. Features vaulted ceilings, living room, formal dining area, kitchen opening to the family room with fireplace, guest bathroom & direct garage access. Upstairs two large bedrooms, spacious master bedroom two closets and private bathroom. Attached double garage. (G32014)

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE INC. (626) 355-1451

$349,000

GREAT PRICE

$589,000

$674,900

This lovely home is located on a quiet cul-de-sac and is about as peaceful as anything you will find. The family room has a great floor plan with access to the patio and the kitchen for maximum entertainment value! Views of the mountains add to this setting along with a lovely pool and entertainment area including a built in BBQ adjacent to the pool. (O341)

CENTURY 21 ADAMS & BARNES •(626) 358-1858 SE OU N H -4 PM E OP AT. 1 S

MORE HOME THAN TOWNHOME

$828,000

New Town Home w/Arcadia Schools, 3 bdrms 3.5 bth, FP, formal dining room, bonus room, loft upstairs, top quality workmanship, gourmet kitchen w/custom cabinets, granite countertops, laundry area, two car attached direct access garage, lots of storage, nice size front &side yard. (H1020)

ABSOLUTELY MUST SEL

RE DU CE D

$579,000

This 3bdrm 2bth features spacious floor plan with family room, big lot 13,003 sq ft, with swimming pool, 2car attached garage, boarding on Arcadia. (E849)

2595 ROCHELLE, MONROVIA. Back on the market and freshly painted. Hard to find newer PUD has 5 bedrooms, 3 baths with 1 bedroom located downstairs. Master has walk-in closet and spa tub. Built in 2004 with 2,588 sq. ft. of living space on 5,188 lot. (R2595)

CENTURY 21 LUDECKE, INC. (626) 445-0123

CENTURY 21 ADAMS & BARNES •(626) 358-1858

MOVE-IN CONDITION

$330,000

ATTENTION BUILDERS!!!

$188,888

This beautiful home features 2 bedrooms and 1 remodeled bath. Newly installed bamboo hardwood flooring throughout, new paint inside and out, newer roof, FA/ CA and much more! Close to City of Hope. (BRO)

Over 20,000 square feet residential, buildable lot surrounded by million dollar homes. Great Views!!! Property has water and electricity. (BLA)

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD. (626) 301-1888

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD. (626) 301-1888

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD. (626) 301-1888

QUIET STREET

BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED!!

This 3 bedroom home features a remodeled kitchen with Custom Oak Cabinets & granite counters. Oak molding throughout, hardwood flooring and newer paint inside and out. (SHE)

NK D BA NE OW

BANK OWNED CONDO

$187,800

$124,900

Why rent when you can own. This 1 bedroom, 1 bath condo has nice wood floors. There is an eating are off the kitchen. Please call for more information. (C225)

Located in Lancaster features spacious living room with fireplace and ceramic tile, dining area, open kitchen with granite countertops, 2 large bedroom, master bedroom with Jacuzzi tub & 2 full bathrooms. Covered patio, BBQ & RV parking. Double attachedgarage. (S43655)

CENTURY21ADAMS&BARNES•(626)358-1858

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE, INC. (626) 355-1451

CENTURY 21 Adams&Barnes

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD.

$84,000

This large manufactured home located in a very nice Senior Park (55+) and features a large living room & dining area with newer carpet, large master bedroom, new tile in kitchen and baths, large covered patio, 2 sheds & so much more! (JEF)

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD.

(818) 406-1908

CENTURY 21 LUDECKE, INC

PRIME NORTH MONROVIA RETAIL FOR LEASE $1.75 PSF M.G Don’t miss this rare opportunity to lease a turn-key hair salon w/ much of the furniture, fixtures & equipment. Located w/in a small shopping center on busy Foothill Blvd. Features 1,000 SF & ample parking in lot. (F443)

CENTURY21ADAMS&BARNES•(626)358-1858

CENTURY 21 VILLAGE, INC

(626) 358-1858

(626) 301-1888

(626) 445-0123

(626) 355-1451

433 WEST FOOTHILL BLVD., MONROVIA

320 E. FOOTHILL BLVD., ARCADIA

20 E. FOOTHILL BLVD. SUITE 105, ARCADIA

38 W. SIERRA MADRE BLVD., SIERRA MADRE

WWW.C21AB.COM

WWW.CENTURY21EARLL.COM

WWW.C21LUDECKE.COM

WWW.C21VILLAGE.COM


CITY NEWS

13 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

Lobbying from 11 Mayor Bob Harbicht said approval of the project would allow specific water system restoration programs “aimed at assuring supply reliability as well as protecting and enhancing water quality in each of the cities’ domestic water systems.” Age of various portions of the two city’s water systems are said to be at risk of deteriorating along with the lower levels of groundwater in the East Raymond Basin, the aquifer from which portions of Arcadia and Sierra Madre’s water comes. The request asks for $525,000 for improvements to the Santa Anita Debris Dam; $841,500 to divert Santa Anita Creek to Sierra Madre’s spreading grounds; $598,900 to rehabilitate the Santa Anita Spreading Grounds that are downstream of the debris dam; and $1.3 million to provide a back-up water supply at wells that could be used by both Arcadia and Sierra Madre. The cooperative arrangement between the cities is seen as additional protection for system reliability, improved water quality and fire protection in residential and commercial areas adjacent to the local mountains and supplemental emergency water supplies for Sierra Madre. Lobbying by both cities for this and other issues has not been cheap. It is easy to see that it takes a buck to make a buck. Arcadia has spent $220,000 since 1998 and Sierra Madre has spent $580,000 since 2002, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics, a non-partisan Washington research group. Both cities are represented by The Ferguson Group, a firm that proclaims its success in obtaining federal funding through Congress. The lobbying group represents many cities in California and elsewhere and numerous regional water districts throughout the nation. A project that wins federal support can normally count on as much as 75% federal

beaconmedianews.com

money, the balance coming from a variety of other sources, including ratepayers. The Sierra Madre Mira Monte Reservoir was financed largely with federal money, but also included existing water bond proceeds, a low-interest loan from San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District and an unspecified amount of local funding. The construction of the reservoir will be repaid through water rates in the city system, however it is not anticipated that rates will be increased to cover this project the Water Department said. This is the largest city project yet undertaken by the City of Sierra Madre. -Photos By Terry Miller

Safari Adventures S TAR ers Sentering ilable. m a Sum dren s av

e il o ch Two sit . red t Offe th grade 5 1st -

City of Temple City Parks and Recreation Department

Sum m

er T Offe r terin ed to pre EEN Z O g 6t h –9 -teens/te NE e th gr ade. ns en-

Join the parks and recreation staff as they go on a Safari adventure. All games, crafts, and activities will be done with a safari twist.

STARS Wildlife Safari — Cleminson School Grade: Entering 1st - 5th One Session: June 22-August 28 Days/Times: Mon. - Fri. 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. Fee: $300

Summer Excursions Offered to Summer STARS/TEEN ZONE participants only.

We provide: You provide:

he ES of t FE n each

W il

l

Reg istr atio n

beg **P requ roof of in o n att ired for endin June g Lon gde Longd 3rd n ST a e AR n summ t 8 a SS essio er sch .m. n I. ool i s

d o s. iste re l nd trip a s Fee ions a s ses

Withdrawals & Refunds v

v

v v

You may withdraw from your registered activities and receive 100% of paid fees through June 22. Summer Excursions require withdrawals two weeks prior to excursion for a refund. No refunds will be given if your withdrawal is requested in less then two weeks date of trip. Summer STARS— Refunds will be prorated after June 22. Summer Teen Zone– Refunds will be prorated after June 22.

You provide:

TEEN ZONE

Summer Excursions Summer excursions available to children in summer STARS and summer Teen Zone Date

TRIP

Session I : Days/Times: Fee: Session II : Days/Times: Fee: We provide:

Jungle Safari— Longden School Grade: Entering 1st - 5th June 22-July 17(attending Longden summer school only) Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. $100 July 20-August 28 Mon. - Fri. 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. $180

One Session: Days/Times: Fee: We provide:

Live Oak Park Grade: Entering 6th - 9th June 22-August 28 Mon. - Fri. 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. $200

You provide:

Cost

Wednesday, June 24

Corona Del Mar

$5

Wednesday, July 1

LA Zoo

$14

Wednesday, July 8

Knott's Berry Farm

$30

Wednesday, July 15

Wild Rivers

$25

Wednesday, July 22

Corona Del Mar

$5

Wednesday, July 29

Hurricane Harbor

$25

Wednesday, August 5

5th – 9th Grade Magic Mountain

$30

1st -4th grade Adventure City

$15

Wednesday, August 12

Corona Del Mar

$5

Wednesday, August 19

Disneyland

$60

Wednesday, August 26

Wild Animal Park

$30

Symbol Guide Lunch Snack

T-Shirt Water

For more information or questions please call (626) 285-2171 ext. 2327 or 2326.


CITY NEWS

14 JUNE 8 -JUNE 14, 2009

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READERS’ CHOICE 2009

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