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ArcadiaWEEKLY

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THURSDAY, MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009 VOLUME 14, NO.43

What About the Rest of Library Park?

The Rest on 14

News, Arts, Opinions and Community Events Since 1996

$0.00

Regional Task Force Nets 12 Felony Arrests in Local Valleys

BY SUSAN MOTANDER

When the ribbon was cut on May 16 to open the new library there were still a few things missing in the park. The most obvious indication was the fact that there were signs warning people to stay off the then almost non-existent grass. More subtle was the missing fountain which will eventually highlight the entrance to the library. And lastly, there’s no children’s play area as there used to be. The grass will grow in, albeit slowly and the play area is also coming. The fountain’s plumbing is complete and was done before the planting started, according to the City Engineer, Doug Benash. It should be installed and functional by the end of July or in early August. The playground was a bit more complex. There were not enough funds to build the play area and the library bond issue monies were not meant for such an endeavor. Supervisor Mike Antonovich came to the city’s rescue with a $350,000 grant to provide for the installation of a

THURSDAY EDITION

More Arrests Soon to Follow

Track President Talks Santa Anita Sale The recent bankruptcy filing of Magna Entertainment, the Canada based owner of Arcadia’s Santa Anita Racetrack has left many citizens in and around Arcadia wondering what will become of the 74 yearold landmark and sports entertainment institution. Situated on 300 acres of prime real estate, Santa Anita could prove more important than ever for Magna as they work through bankruptcy proceedings and seek to lower their outstanding debts through the sale of various assets including, quite possibly, the park. But what exactly will become of the park, its employees and the future of horse racing in Arcadia is weighing heavy on the minds of many who already

fear unwanted or unnecessary development to a piece of property that is no stranger to controversy. In this Web Exclusive, Editor John Stephens sits down with Ron Charles, President and CEO of Santa Anita to discuss the latest developments and attempt to demystify the uncertain future of this Southern California landmark.

Visit arcadiaweekly.com to view the full interview

Pasadena Police in conjunct ion w it h severa l ot her a rea agencies i nclud i ng Bu rba n k, Glendale, San Gabriel Police depa r t ment s a long w it h L os Angeles County Sheriff netted at least 12 arrests of known felons early Wednesday morning. “Operation Happy Valley” led officers from a multi-jurisdictional area to serve pre-dawn wa r ra nt s a nd apprehend t he known and wanted individuals. As of 11:35 Wednesday, at least 12 had been arrested and taken into custody. That number was expected to climb as the operation was still underway at the time of Wednesday’s press conference. The operation targeted 66 locations in 13 cities, primarily

Task Force on 3

Oh the Times, They are a Challengin’ Local Student Strums Guitar and Sing Songs for his Life and Daughter

We caught up with Jake Lenaburg while he was singing a few tunes for passing motorists at the Myrtle Avenue off ramp Wednesday afternoon. - Photo by Terry Miller

BY TERRY MILLER

Jake Lenaburg, a single dad, supports his 5-year old daughter Vivinity and goes to school full-time at night. On any given day Jake can be found strumming his guitar and singing for donations which he uses to pay his tuition. You won’t find him listed the Arts and Entertainment calendar yet, but you will be able to hear him and perhaps even help at either the Myrtle Avenue eastbound off-ramp or at the Mountain off-ramp. Jake caught our eye as one seldom sees signs like his. Hardly ever do you see a busker on the freeway off-ramp. Unfortunately, it’s usually a homeless veteran and the like who have no other choice but to hope for a friendly freeway cash handout. In this tough economy, Lenaburg said that once he graduates he’s hoping to do something with his education that will “really make a difference and help people.” The nursing student who hopes to finish his degree in about a year

Jake on 3

Hundreds Hit the Streets as Court Upholds Prop 8 In a 6 to 1 decision, the California Supreme Court upheld Proposition 8, the ballot measure that eliminated the right of same sex couples to marry. In the ruling authored by Chief Justice Ronald George, the Court stated “We emphasize only that among the various constitutional protections recognized in the Marriage Cases as available to same-sex couples, it is only the designation of marriage

— albeit significant — that has been removed by this initiative measure.” At the same time, the court unanimously ruled that the more than 18,000 marriages that took place between June 16 and November 4, 2008 continue to be fully valid and recognized by the state of California. The decision reaffirmed the Court’s prior holding that sexual

Protests on 3


Dorothy’s

Place By Dorothy Denne

I’m A Shopping Failure I wrote recently that I don’t do well anymore at buying shoes. They feel wonderful in the store, but after wearing them in the real world for about 20 minutes, I’m crippled. This brings up another point. I’m not very good at buying purses either. I know what I’m looking for when I go shopping. I like something light in weight with lots of compartments. I prefer black or a nice neutral color. I won’t buy leather. I don’t want some poor animal to lead a torturous life and die a needless death just so I can have a new shoulder bag. I like cheap, but I don’t like cheap-looking, so I go for good quality imitation or a nice fabric. Neither are too difficult to find. I like enough compartments to keep things well separated so I don’t have to dig around for keys, lipstick, comb, notepad, pen, business cards, checkbook, kleenex, wallet, nail clippers, sunglasses, emery board, aspirin, breath freshener, pocket calendar, cell phone or my Weight Watchers point-finder. It sometimes takes a while to find enough compartments, test all the zippers, velcro and magnetic fasteners. Eventually I find one where everything works so I shove all that paper stuffing back. (only because I don’t know where else to put it) I throw the thing over my shoulder a few times. Feels great. Strap seems the right length, stays put on my shoulder. I look in the mirror and the image looks pretty jazzy to me. The color will perfectly match just about everything I own. The price tag is reasonably moderate. I happily trounce off to the cashier. When I get home I can’t wait to make the switch-over. It takes a while, with a few mind changes, but I eventually get everything into just the right compartment. Only thing left over is a handful of toothpicks. I decide to toss a few and put the others in the lipstick case. Job well done. I hang my new purse on the closet door knob all ready for use. Time for my next venture into the outer world. I’m in a bit of a rush so I grab the purse, toss it over my shoulder and head out the door. I’m wearing a silk blouse instead of the gauze one I had on in the store. The purse immediately slips off my shoulder. I quickly raise my forearm to break the slide and nearly break my arm instead. I realize the purse weighs a ton, yet I remember it feeling so light in the store. As the day progresses, I become more than a bit frustrated when I can’t remember in which compartment I put what. I finally return home with a serious pain in my shoulder, a dull ache in my back and a bruised forearm. The purse obviously became defective the first time I carried it. I just may return it. I’ll have to do it tomorrow though. My shoes are killing me.

MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009 2

The Good Life By Wally Hage

The Great Tomatoes Race The Great Tomatoes Race … was just a matter of honor, pride and great achievement for me. I never intended for it to grow into a “dog eat dog” neighborhood competition! My neighborhood is surely a great cross section of Americana. We all have about the same value houses, cars, wives, etc. Neighborhood pride is a top priority for most of us, the worker bees, the tired and the retired. However, when it comes to pride in flowers, gardens and landscaping we begin to separate the Weekend Weeders from the full time horticulturists. I was identified, for a long time, as the prize Weekend Weeder on the block. I took a lot of heat for my tidy but bland yard, sickly flowers and overgrown shrubs and my no desire to do any gardening. You might say … I have happily been on the dole enjoying the neighbors exquisite flowers, gracious donations of fruits and vegetables for many years, always offering flimsy “excuses” and “maybe next year” promises. Well my best neighbor and soon to become my former over-the-fence friend Ed, decided to take up my threat of “This year I’m going to raise tomatoes plants.” Well Ed’s recognition of my astuteness for exaggeration decided to pin me to the dirt…right there in front of my other, Over-The-Fence neighbor. “When Wally” … questioned Ed. Those were

Race” was now to officially begin. Wow, how can planting ten pitiful looking tomatoes plants be so much work, so tiring and so expensive. Hiring a handyman to spade up the planting area, plant, fertilize and fence the growing area at a cost of $250. was not a bargain. My calculations indicated that it would take 50 pounds of tomatoes at $5 dollars per pound to hardly break even. To the best of my knowledge I was first to plant the dumb things. “Now Honey”, I said, “in 70 days we will harvest the winners.” “Oh, No”…Pat replied, “we must water them each evening and talk to them daily.” I told her then she better pray over those Beasts. Her cutesy remark, “they are not Beasts Honey, they are Beefs”. This also was a very irritating. As the race progressed my neighbor Ed’s “know everything about Growing and Planting quickly surfaced. His vines looked like Jack and the Beanstock plants compared to mine. But shortly thereafter, the little green balls appeared on my plants first and now my bragging was in full bloom. “Hey Ed”… “Where is your tomatoes? Your plants look like weed vines.” The hurtful remarks that I said to him quieted our friendship for weeks. Then one night I was awakened by my wife asking if I had left the yard lights on…I

EDITORIAL

editorial@ beaconmedianews.com

EDITOR John Stephens PHOTOGRAPHER Terry Miller CONTRIBUTORS Susan Motander Juanita Harris Sandy Gillis Tom Gammill Deborah Ann Neely Justin Rykowski Sue Behrens Candyce Columbus Meg Galli Greg Aragon Eric Maundry Emilo Santoyo Jeff Couriveau COLUMNISTS Dorothy Denne Floretta Lauber Lou Perlin Wally Hage PRODUCTION

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Director

Thom Gastelum PRODUCTION INTERN Courtney Blackburn

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two very demanding words requiring a gracious defense. My wife’s snicker encouraged Ed, to offer an even larger challenge. Well, Pat, are you going to spade up the back yard? Now that comment wasn’t necessary nor was it funny. Here I am a very busy businessman just trying to get along in the neighborhood and now I am challenged to dig a bigger hole for myself to get out of! The following irritated response suggested that I might be interested in a “tomatoes growing” competition. “Now let me tell you guys this”, I said, “my dad and I had the largest tomatoes in the entire neighborhood, when I was a kid.” Quickly pulling at my arm, Pat chortled, I hear the phone dear, and it’s probably for you. Ignoring this gracious face saving opportunity to get out of the contest, my last volley of words did it. “Well Ed, I guess the race is on”…confirmed that the great “Tomatoes

got up to see what was going on and I couldn’t believe what I saw. There was my so-called friend, cheating by holding a sunlamp on his tomatoes plants. My harvesting the winning tomatoes shortly thereafter had little meaning to me and my bragging rights were really dulled. That is until my neighbor came to the fence and exclaimed that I had been very quiet lately. That he was truly very happy that I won the Tomatoes Race challenge inspite of what he did. I looked at him angrily and waited for his confession. But when he broke the silence and melted my anger by explaining that he had used a Sun Lamp on his tomatoes plants to dry and retard their growth. He did this just because he wanted me to “Win the Race” as he is so fortunate to have such a nice neighbor, friend and good sport. Gulp!

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MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

CITY NEWS

beaconmedianews.com

Protests from 1

At least 300 people took to the streets Tuesday evening after hearing of the court’s decision including Steven Volpe, a Drama teacher from Arcadia High School - Photo by Terry Miller

orientation is subject to the highest level of protection under the California Constitution. Hundreds of Pasadena residents took to the streets Tuesday evening after a rally at Throop Church. The 300 plus strong contingent walked to Lake Avenue then to Colorado and marched onward chanting familiar civil rights demands. People, i nclud i ng a teacher from Arcadia High School and professionals from other areas of California joined in the march which culminated in a meeting back at the church where activists hope to get the decision retried. The ACLU has already attacked the court’s ruling on Tuesday and vows to fight until the court’s decision is overturned. Ramona Ripston, executive director of the ACLU of Sout her n Ca lifor nia , said, “Shame on California. Shame on California! We are deeply disappointed by the California Supreme Court’s cowardly decision today, which for the first time in our state’s history permits a majority of voters in a single election to strip a fundamental constitutional right from a minority group that has historically been discriminated against. It will take time, determination and a united effort to overturn Proposition 8, but we have all those things, and we will use them to full advantage.”

Jake from 1

Task Force from 1

Pasadena Chief Bernard Melekian announces the results of the early morning raids that targeted wanted felons. - Photo by Terry Miller

San Gabriel and San Fernando Valleys. “It is necessary for local agencies to collaborate in these efforts. With loomi ng budget cuts, we must share our resources to effect ively police our communities and maintain public safety,” Pasadena Pol ic e C h ie f Me le k i a n told a crowd of reporters at the Wednesday afternoon press conference in Pasadena. A nu mber of t ho se a r rest ed were pa rolees at large, many of whom have extensive criminal records, according to Melekian. With a projected 3555,000 prisoners projected for release in the coming year throughout Californ i a due t o t he bud g e t crunch, Melekian says now more than ever is when multi-agency cooperation, pla n n i ng a nd resou rce sharing must be used in order to keep the peace. He pointed out that Pasadena shares its helicopter resources with other cities such as Glendale and Burbank.

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whom choose to donate to his cause. “I need to make at least $150 a day,” says Lenaburg as he shows us the contributions thus far at 1 p.m. on a Wednesday. He pointed out that one woman gave him a twenty dollar bill and others give what they can, $5 or $1 bills usually. According to the busker, it all adds up, with the proceeds going first toward caring for Vivinity, and next to his college expenses. Lenaburg said hopes to repay the kindness of strangers once he’s completed school by helping put two more people through the education process. That’s Jake’s way of giving back to a world that is stopping, one car at a time, to lend him and his daughter a helping hand.

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has set his sights high. He’s hoping to be able to take on helicopter nursing (such as MediVac) and hopes that such an opportunity will be available once his schooling in Santa Ana is completed. But this isn’t all fun and games. Lenaburg said he always gets a bit hurt when some passers-by yell obscenities or make malicious remarks like “get a job, you bum” from the comfort of their Sport Utility. On the contrary, the nursing student says he’s anything but a ‘bum’, rather a clean cut, healthy student who simply needs to make money to pay for his education and keep his daughter clothed and fed. Overall, Lenaburg says the majority of people are kind and understanding, many of

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MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

Pulling Ahead of the Pack

Art of Living

ART OF LIVING

Track Star Catrina McAlister Says She Couldn’t Do It Alone BY EMILY LITVACK

Recently, Arcadia High School students have been abuzz with laudatory talk of this sophomore track and field athlete. And after only two years training in her sport, she has already run 1,600 meters in 4:54 minutes and 3,200 meters in 10:38, besting the school’s former records of 5:07 and 11:11, respectively. Indeed, she’s running her way into conversations all around campus. But just who is Catrina McAlister? Q. Tell me about your support system. You can’t be doing this all by yourself, can you? A. Having a lot of support is something that makes me want to keep working hard. My entire family, my parents, brother, sister and my grandparents are always there for me cheering me on. My friends inspire me and are also yelling my name at every race and even at practice. My support system is probably like no other because the people who are cheering for me aren’t just people that I know; they’re people that I love. When it gets difficult it is nice to know that there is always someone that will understand or will give me the courage to keep fighting and working hard. Q. I know a lot of work goes into your success on the track; I see you out there practicing with the team every day. Tell me, what’s practice like?

A. Practice is not easy. A lot of people think that since I’m fast I don’t have to work hard or try, but they are most definitely wrong. Running isn’t easy and practice is even harder because every [practice] counts. When I do repeats I try to work harder and push the pace in the middle ones, because the middle is the hardest part. The middle of the race is where the good runners and the elite runners separate. It’s not easy to try to run faster when you feel like you are going to die, but I push through the pain because I want it. You have to work really hard. A lot of people think that just because I like to run that it’s easy for me, but that’s not true. At every workout I have to run my fastest, work my hardest, and go my farthest, and if my legs aren’t shaking when I’m done, I always have to run some more. Everyone doesn’t always have their greatest workouts or best races, but I have learned not to dwell on the bad ones and go out and try harder the next day. Q. What about the future; do you plan to continue running competitively once you leave high school? A. Yes, I do plan on running beyond high school. I want to run in college and after that… Who knows? But ultimately it’s too early to think that far into the future; I’m only a sophomore! Q. There are a lot of extracurricular and sporting options for AHS students. What inspired you to get into this sport? A. My inspiration is my family as they are always there for me and they support me 100 percent of the way. My family, including my one year-old brother and sister, are at every race, in their schoolspirited outfits, to cheer me on. My grandparents even go to my races and support me. I can always count on them to be there for me. When I am running I can always hear my parents and grandparents cheering for me. My parents have inspired me to work really hard.


In Dr. Pezeshkian’s dental office, patients can rest assured knowing that they-and their teeth-are in good hands. Dr. Missagh Pezeshkian graduated in 1986 and started his general dentistry practice in Maryland within the same year. For over 20 years he has been practicing general dentistry and has spent the past 10 years working in the field of Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ) treatments. In fact, Dr. Pezeshkian received extensive training in TMJ at the Bay Area Center of Florida for Craniomandibular Disorders. He makes it a priority to expand his knowledge with continued research and the most advanced technology to be on the cutting edge of TMJ treatment. Dr. Pezeshkian has received much praise and acknowledgement for his work, and continues his TMJ education to bring patients closer to a pain-free life. Dr. Pezeshkian offices offer restorative work, dental implants, laser bleaching, and orthodontic services as well. He and his team of friendly, experienced dental assistants understand that every patient has different needs, and pride themselves on the world-class service they deliver to each patient who walks through their doors. When first-time patients come to his Arcadia or Glendale Advanced Dentistry office, they are not only greeted warmly, but with a detailed examination and necessary X-rays-just what the doctor ordered. If specific treatment is needed they will develop a written treatment plan and review it in detail, explaining findings and recommendations. For a beautiful smile to last a lifetime, Dr.Pezeshkian’s office is the place to go. Dr. Pezeshkian and staff are always welcoming new patients. If you are in the neighborhood stop by and meet the doctor and staff. They will be more than happy to answer any questions.

Locations Arcadia Office 150 N Santa Anita Avenue Suite 610 Arcadia, CA 91006 626.445.5840

$85

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Glendale Office 1016 E. Broadway Suite 104 Glendale, CA 91205 818.409.0999

Crossword T

H

E

W

E

E

K

1. Auditorium 5. Mindlessly stupid 10. Camp beds 14. Drug.yielding plant 15. Echolocation 16. Breezy 17. Metallica drummer Ulrich 18. Battery terminal 19. Consumer 20. Frolic 22. Bites gently 24. Belonging to us 27. Regretted

Expires July 31, 2009

L Y

Last Week’s Solution 54. Garment of ancient Rome 56. Casual assent 57. Depict in words 60. Thorny flowers 64. Do followers 65. Blow one’s top 68. Cheerio! 69. First son of Adam and Eve 70. Law of Moses 71. Cozy 72. Choir member 73. Long.billed sandpiper 74. Actress McClurg

Down

Across

For new patients only

28. City of northeast Scotland 32. Mother of Isaac 35. Fam. reunion attendee 36. Belief involving sorcery 38. Taboos 40. King of comedy 42. Hand woven wall hanging 44. Bites 45. Queues 47. Simmons rival 49. Bumped into 50. Draw out 52. Small telescope

1. One of two equal parts 2. Banned apple spray 3. Actress Petty 4. Landlord 5. This ___ stickup! 6. Prefix with profit or fiction 7. Bartlett’s abbr. 8. Lowest point 9. Volcano in Antarctica 10. Large kettle 11. Seine feeder 12. Very, in Versailles 13. Leb. neighbor 21. Acclaim 23. Frijole 25. First name in country 26. Prophets 28. Asian sea 29. Contradict 30. Gnu cousin 31. Nostrils

the world 55. Brother of Moses 57. Resound 58. Drop 59. Cosmonaut Gagarin 61. Quartz grains 62. Sewing case 63. Wise 64. Nipper’s co. 66. Soft food for infants 67. Common article;

33. Inner self (Jung) 34. Aspirations 37. Shrew 39. Grounded fleet 41. Elementary particle with no charge 43. Eye sore 46. Nae sayer? 48. Culture medium 51. Wading birds 53. Fourth highest peak in

Sudoku

Or, “the numbers must occur only once”

2 3

Last Week’s Solution

7 2

7 3 8

5 9

9 5 5 1

4

3 9 1 6

8

3 3

2 8 7

5 6

5 4

Fill the 9 X 9 grid so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3 X3 regions contain the digits from 1 to 9 only once each. Solutions run the following week.

7 3 9 5 1 8 4 6 2

1 4 8 7 6 2 5 9 3

2 6 5 4 9 3 8 7 1

6 8 2 9 4 7 1 3 5

5 9 3 6 2 1 7 8 4

4 7 1 8 3 5 9 2 6

3 5 7 1 8 6 2 4 9

8 2 4 3 5 9 6 1 7

9 1 6 2 7 4 3 5 8


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MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009 6


MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009 7

ART OF LIVING

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MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

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(626) 568-9288

La Petite FranceFrance Café Café La Petite and Bakery and Bakery At La Petite France, we strive to bring you the best and freshest bread, croissants, sandwiches and more. For breakfast, stop-by for a cup of coffee, latte, cappuccino or espresso. Dip-in a pecan stick or biscotti. For lunch, try one of our sandwiches. Whatever the occasion may be, we also make cakes the way you want it. Call us for your special events and we will be more than happy to cater your party. Place your orders via phone: (626) 445-0392 fax: (626) 445-0235 email: info@pastrybakery.com Or, come visit us at: 411 E. Huntington Drive Suite 101-D, Arcadia, CA 91006

AtoZ Dinin g Dinin American Fare Cameron’s Seafood With porthole shaped mirrors and wall-mounted fish (sorry, no singing ones) giving this place the classic feel of a seaside fish camp, you’re sure to forget your an hour from the coast. Dine in or take home cuts from the seafood market. 1978 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 793-FISH Shrimp House Casual, comfortable, simple, and family operated for over 48 years. If you’re tired of the typical chain dining experience, give the little guy a try! Daily hand-breaded, huge Jumbo Shrimp, will haunt your taste buds for the rest of your days. Soon you will join generations of Shrimp House fanatics. It’s seafood you will crave. Shrimp, fish filets, steaks, chicken, salads, and food to go. 4488 E. Live Oak Ave, Arcadia (626) 445-6369, (626) 448-8742, www. originalshrimphouse.net

California Cuisine Picasso’s Café, Bakery & Catering Co. Try our upscale fast casual gourmet Restaurant and Bakery, conduct business in Picasso’s Private Dining Rooms, or explore other fresh food choices with our Corporate Catering division. Celebrating 20 Years of Business, and Awarded San Gabriel

Valley’s Small Business of the Year V 2 2008, we are focused on providing q quality food products and events, c consistent service, and competitive p prices. Experience our ever-growing selection of menus, services, presentation styles, and creativity; at Picasso’s, Great Food is a true “work of art!” Catering Available 24/7 at www.picassoscafe.com or (626) 969-6100. 6070 N. Irwindale Ave., Suite A-D Irwindale, CA

Coffee, Sweets & Such

La Petite France Bakery Not just cakes and desserts but a plethora of choices even not on the menu! Just ask for Chef Daniel and he will immediately come up with catering ideas from breakfast, lunch to a sumptuous cavalcade of homecooked Mediterranean cuisine. 411 E. Huntington Dr. Arcadia, (626) 445-0392. Patticakes: The dessert Company Located in Altadena and featuring such heavenly and huge dessert delights as: Truffle dark chocolate flourless cake with dark chocolate truffle cream. finished with chocolate curls. Or if that’s not quite your cup of tea, try their old fashion :four layers of Devil’s Food chocolate cake with a white chocolate mousse center. Glazed with dark chocolate ganache. 1900 North Allen, Altadena (626) 794-1128

Greek

Corfu Restaurant Family owned Greek and International homestyle cuisine set in a casually comfortable décor. Dishes range from waffles to rack of

lamb with everything prepared from scratch. 48 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre, (626) 355-5993

Italian

Restaurant Lozano A menu peppered with Italian and Mexican dishes like a crispy goat cheese quesadilla with baby spinach accentuate Lozano’s elegant creativity. 44 N. Baldwin Ave., Sierra Madre, (626) 355-5945

Thai

Pad Thai

You can’t go wrong with the namesake dish at this colorful place with pink booths, bright blue table cloths and red napkins. The garlic pepper mushroom entrée is a favorite among vegetarians. 3500 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 568-9288 President Thai Spacious, elegantly attired where hospitality reigns and classic cuisine rules. Wide range of selections from apps to entrees and unique specials. 498 S. Rosemead Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 578-9814

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10

MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

ART OF LIVING


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JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER SEASON! Whether you are a bride to be or just want to get into shape for summer, this class will help you reach your fitness goals. A semi-private personal training class to get ladies into either bride or bikini shape, or both! Class size is limited to maintain individual attention. The Class Concentrates on weight loss, toning, cardio conditioning and resistance training.

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Turning Your Best Investment into an Even Better One Sometimes Investors Feel Stuck BY DAWN RICKABAUGH

ake the older couple who has worked hard all of their lives, scrimping and saving and T investing in real estate. Perhaps they have a small portfolio of residential homes and duplexes that they manage themselves. And then something happens. Maybe an injury or illness makes it increasingly difficult to handle maintenance and repairs. Or perhaps quality of life becomes an issue. They’d actually like to travel and enjoy life more freely, but they don’t trust anyone else to manage their properties.

And they don’t want to sell for one, or several, of these reasons:

Sam in support of all the destitute investment bankers and fund managers in America. If we take care of the government, the government will take care of us, right? Right? But just in case you’re not so sure, why not use IRS guidelines to your advantage and create and protect your own future? Most people I know trust real estate more than Wall Street. A well-secured note and deed of trust can be a coveted investment.

Additionally, offering seller financing can help the seller:

1. The market is down and “it’s not a good time to sell” 2. They don’t want to pay all those capital gains, and they don’t want to exchange into an other management intensive investment 3. They need the monthly income for retirement 4. They want to leave their children a great inheritance 5. They can’t stand the thought of evicting their current tenants, even though they might be paying far below market rents Many people feel trapped and don’t realize that there may one of several options available to them that could deliver the desired benefits. Right off the bat I can think of three options that would work, depending the particular needs and risk tolerance of the seller: the installment sale, the deferred sales trust, and a real estate partnership through a title holding (land) trust. I’ll start with the first, and leave the other two for future comment. The installment sale (IRC 453) allows a seller to pay capital gains a little at a time, in installments, instead of all at once up front, if they ‘carry paper’ (a.k.a. ‘offer terms,’ ‘seller financing’). This wealth preservation strategy leaves most of the seller’s equity at work for them in the property (instead of in the hands of the IRS), and is secured by a property they know intimately. Then again, you might feel very patriotic and actually want to send a huge chunk to Uncle

1. Maximize price point - when you offer terms, you can support price 2. Sell and close quickly regardless of market conditions 3. Increase monthly income - note payments are usually much higher than rent payments 4. Grow their money at rates far greater than a bank CD can offer 5. Create relatively hassle-free monthly income 6. Leave a great inheritance - not all heirs want to manage property, but would appreciate a juicy monthly income 7. Retain a lot of flexibility - if there is ever a need for cash, a well-constructed note can be sold for minimum discount It’s not uncommon for real estate investors to convert their real assets to paper assets in the ‘afternoon’ of their lives; but it’s imperative to understand the principles of strong underwriting so you don’t end ‘being taken’ when you ‘take back paper.’ Of course, always consult with your CPA, tax attorney and/or financial advisor before selling any real estate.

Dawn Rickabaugh is a real estate broker specializing in seller financing and real estate notes. www. NoteQueen.com

OPEN HOUSE SUN 3-6 PM

The Gold Standard E US HO PM E N 4 S E 1 OP UN. OU S H PM

EN - 4 OP UN 1 S

This 3bdrm 2.5bth has high ceilings in living room, fireplace, split level family room, dining room and bonus room 2 car attached garage, low HOA, 1922sq ft, very convenient location, walking distance to supermarkets & restaurants, close to freeways and mall, with Baldwin Stocker elementary school. (C688)

A quiet cul-de-sac location with wonderful mountain views, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has a family room, master bedroom suite, formal and informal dining, CA/FA, hardwood floors, new laminate flooring in family room and kitchen, fireplace, covered patio, pool, large spa, grassy play area and 2 car detached garage. Great floor plan. (S460)

CENTURY 21 EARLL, LTD. (626) 301-1888

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INCOME PROPERTY

QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD

$589,000

This rare large lot in the Flintridge area, features great views of the valley and San Gabriel Mountains. Home plans included and approved by the city, all you have to do is build it. LaCanada School District! (DOM)

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REAL AVE $618,880

$729,000

688 W. ARCADIA

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME!

CAMINO

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LAND VALUE ONLY! $1,290,000 Fantastic Arcadia Lot! Large flat 19,000+ sq ft lot in one of the most desirable areas of Arcadia. Walking distance to Holly Elementary and Arcadia High School. Perfect location to build your dream home. (LER)

ABSOLUTELY MUST SELL NOW!

$579,000

$560,000

EL MONTE

$598,000

Absolutely gorgeous custom built in 2008 single story 3bdrm 3bth home, amazing architectural design, top quality, huge living room & dining room, top of the line kitchen w/ granite counter tops, & center island, granite floors, bedrooms have carpet (2) two Masters, and inside the garage laundry room. Lease at $2500/mo(C11449)

$448,000

2595 Rochelle, Monrovia. Hard to find newer PUD has 5 bedrooms, 3 baths with 1 bedroom located downstairs. Master has walk-in closet and spa tub. Built in 2004 with 2,588 sq. ft. of living space on 5,188 lot. (R2595)

4-Plex by golf course. Rental income $3,700 month. 4-Plex – 2 studios + 2 1 bedrooms. Each unit has garage. (B3212)

Beautiful north Altadena home featuring 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, gorgeous master bedroom with huge sunken tub,vaulted ceilings & sky lights. Large dining area, large kitchen with lots of cabinets & storage. (W303)

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14 MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

CITY NEWS

The Rest on 14

The Rest from 1 rubberized play surface, fencing, paving and new play equipment. The funds are coming from the county’s Wilderness and Recreation monies. The equipment, the major pieces of which are pictured here, will be installed in early summer. The whole area, with the exception of a small part of the younger children’s area will be covered in a safety conscious rubberized material. This material is made from recycled plastics and is designed to cut down on injuries to youngsters. All these final additions will be complete later in the summer. Look for another celebration at that time. In the meantime, the summer concert series will continue in Recreation Park for one last summer.

In Memoriam

Sierra Madre Pioneer Cemetery hosted the VFW 3208 Annual Memorial Day Event on Monday. Hundreds of residents, mayors and former mayors attended the popular service which featured a traditional 21 gun salute as well as speeches by former military personnel.


Top 1% of Prudential Realtors Nationwide Reni Rose (626) 355-8400 110 Coburn, Sierra Madre Offered at $1,365,000.

A Perfect 10 -- Stunning is the only way to describe it - Built in 2004, this magnificent 3500+ sf home is one of a kind. There are 3 large master suites (one downstairs) including an impressive secluded master with sumptuous bath and tranquil view of the mountains/ valley, plus the Jack & Jill bedrooms and 5 baths. Other features include soaring ceilings, expansive windows, large family room, gourmet kitchen & breakfast area with window seating, wood flooring, plantation shutters & more. Call today for more details and for a private showing of the PERFECT 10!

Old Pasadena Restaurant Week Eat Great, Do Good June 1st - 8th

638 Manzanita Avenue, Sierra Madre Offered at $1,198,000.

SO

LD

A SC RC HO AD OL IA S

This decorator perfect home offers 2,792 s.f. with 3 bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms. The lot is 12,177 s.f. and has over 50 rose bushes as well as plum, orange, peach, and lemon trees. There is a formal living room with high ceilings, cherry wood flooring, family room, a Master Suite with a newly updated bathroom, a spiral staircase leading to a loft. There is a storage room with wall-to-wall cabinets. This contemporary style home is a delight!

2075 Santa Anita Avenue Offered at $1,195,000.

Special Financing creates an awesome opportunity to own this prestigious home in North Sierra Madre and an added bonus of ARCADIA SCHOOLS. Even Julia Childs would love the remodeled kitchen and new appliances. With over 3,000 sf of luxury on a 15,000 sf lot you can enjoy the sounds of the backyard waterfall or simply relax in the spa. Your family and guests will arrive on the circular driveway and enter to enjoy the many amenities including 2 family rooms, wood flooring, plus 5 spacious bedrooms and 3 updated baths. Call for details on the special financing being offered.

321 E. Grandview, Sierra Madre Offered at 1,075,000. Extraordinary in Detail – This house has a rich blend of history and craftsmanship. It was built in the 1890’s and its design reflects discriminating taste and art. The master suite is enhanced with a spectacular view from the balcony and steam sauna. You can entertain handsomely in the large country kitchen or around the saltwater pool and spa. Additional features include: family room, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2,621 sf home, 12,297 sf lot, tranquil mountain view and detached music room. If character, privacy and warmth are in your plans, this home is just right for you! Call to preview before it is too late.

Three gourmet courses, one great price. Starting at $15. 10% of event proceeds will be donated to Union Station Homeless Services, celebrating 35 years of feeding those in need.

ES I CR N OW

1946 Alta Oaks, Arcadia Offered at $1,050,000.

Offering Arcadia Schools, this home is located is the highly desirable “Highlands” community of North Arcadia. It has been lovingly maintained for the past 44 years and was updated in 1997. The rooms are spacious and light filled. The 12,781 sf lot offers a spacious back yard with sparkling pool, mountain view, lanai and patio. The home is 2,217 sf with a family room, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 fireplaces and CA & heat. This one won’t last!

Giving back never tasted so good. www.oldpasadena.org

ES

CR IN OW

2025 Carolwood, Arcadia, Ca Offered at $1,048,000. Situated in Highland Oaks with awarding winning Arcadia Schools, this home offers: : 2,985 sq.ft. (which includes the 664 sq.ft. of basement) with a 22,440 sf lot., 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, family room, 2 fireplaces, 2-car attached garage & a 664 sf finished basement currently being used as a media room and 5th bedroom. WEB

ES

CR IN OW

1745 La Cresta, Pasadena

LI NE ST W IN G OP SU EN N. HO 1- U 4P SE M

Offered at: $759,000

Located in north Sierra Madre, this home is located a short distance to the Mount Wilson hiking trail. This lovely home is located on a 10,670 sf lot and is 1,518 sf with 2 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. There is a guest quarters off the 2-car garage which has a deck and kitchenette. The home was built in 1950 and many new fabulous upgrades including new designer interior colors, dual paned windows, new roof, recessed lighting, central air & heat. It is wonderfully maintained. This one won’t stay on the market long.

285 Sturtevant Drive, Sierra Madre Offered at $699,500. Tucked away at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in Sierra Madre you’ll find a relaxing hide-away to come home to! The interior of this home has been freshly painted. The living room features a fireplace, is filled with natural light and is open to the kitchen.The floor plan offers 2 bedrooms and 1 ½ baths downstairs and situated upstairs is a grand master suite that features a mountain view, a fireplace, vaulted ceiling, spacious closet, and a large bath complete with soaking tub, separate shower and double sinks. The house is 2,038 s.f. and the lot is 7,029 s.f. Here is your opportunity to live in Sierra Madre!

180 Santa Anita Court, Sierra Madre CR IN OW

Magazine PASADENA FOOTHILLS REGION

Offered at $848,000. Owner remembers the architect as being a Frank Lloyd Wright understudy. This home offers wonderful tranquil views of the mountains and Brookside Golf course. For those who love to golf, this property is conveniently located just one mile from the Brookside Country Club. The floor plan is open and spacious and offers pleasant views from almost every room of the home. There are modern touches, walls of windows, new carpeting and new interior paint. 2,238 sq. ft. home. 3 beds, 2.5 baths, 22500 sq. ft. lot.

142 E. Mira Monte, Sierra Madre

ES

DESIGN MOTION DIRECT

Technology & The Human Element

New Price: $598,000

This cottage has loads of curb appeal and is located just a short walk to the quaint village of Sierra Madre & Sierra Vista Park. The inviting and open floor plan will inspire you to entertain or simply have a quiet evening at home. This 1165 sq. ft. home has 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. The lot is 6,318 sq. ft. There is a 400 sq.ft. attic which will be great for storage. The yard has been professionally landscaped and has auto sprinklers.

Email: Renirose@aol.com • Website: Renirose.com

PASADENA

Independent


16

HOME & GARDEN

MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

Bencosme Helps Plan National Real Estate Road to Recovery Andy Bencosme, President of the Arcadia Association of Realtors and Managing Broker of Century 21 Village Realty in Sierra Madre joined approximately 8,000 Realtors who gathered in Washington DC to inspire action on Capitol Hill that will help stabilize the real estate market and encourage economic recovery as part of the National Association of Realtors Midyear Legislative Meetings & Trade Expo. The meetings took place May 11-16. During the week, Bencosme participated in NAR’s “Real Estate Summit: Advancing the U.S. Economy,” an all-day program of sessions to address and meet head-on the challenges facing today’s residential and commercial real estate markets. Realtors were joined by a number of policy leaders and industry experts, including U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan; Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Director Shelia Bair; former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan; and former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich. “As the leading advocate of housing issues and homeownership, Realtors urge the federal government to make stabilizing the real estate market a priority,” Bencosme said. “We will continue to press the Obama

FORECLOSURE? SAVE YOUR HOME! CALL ATTORNEY STEPHEN R. GOLDEN (626) 584-7800

administration and Congress to keep taking meaningful action toward this goal.” Bencosme met with Congressman Adam Schiff and representatives from the office of Congressman David Dreier to reiterate the importance of this issue and discuss other subjects, as well, including protecting the mortgage interest deduction, facilitating short sales, easing limitations on mortgage availability and encouraging mortgage reform, ensuring affordable insurance through small business health care plans, and initiating effective energy efficiency legislation. “Moving the real estate market forward is imperative,” said Bencosme. “The goal of the year’s meetings is to develop a series of ‘next steps’ that will serve as a blueprint for comprehensive progress.” Becosme said Realtors believe a multifaceted approach to stabilization that includes making mortgages more affordable and available, reducing foreclosures and incentivizing home buyers. To this last point, he added that the $8,000 tax credit currently available to first-time buyers through November 30, 2009, will help thousands of consumers take advantage of opportunities in today’s housing market and realize the dream of homeownership.

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LEASE TO OWN RETAIL

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285 STURTEVANT DRIVE OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4PM

Stunning is the only way to describe it. This one of a kind home sitting on a 10,000 sq ft lot combines a rich blend of craftsmanship and detail. Along with 5 bedrooms and 5 baths a gourmet kitchen awaits. Its choice location puts you just steps from Sierra Vista Park. SIERRA MADRE $1,365,000 (COB)

Turn of the Century Charming Bungalow. Just a short stroll to downtown. Nicely updated 2bd, 1ba remodeled kitchen with custom cabinets, tiled counters, & floors, breakfast area & blt-in appliances. Light & airy w/formal dinning room, French doors & hardwood floors thru-out. Designer bath w/custom vanity, tiling, Jacuzzi tub & shower. Upgrades include newer copper plumbing, electrical, windows and central air. SIERRA MADRE $589,000 (LIM)

San Gabriel Retreat! You’ll find a relaxing hide-away to come home to! The floor plan offers 2 Bedrooms and 1 ½ baths downstairs and situated upstairs is a grand master suite. The house is 2,038 sq ft and the lot is7029 sq ft. Great Opportunity! SIERRA MADRE $699,500 (STU)

Craftsmanship abounds! This charming 3 br home is brimming with extras and was designed with attention to detail. Coved ceilings grace the living room and formal dining room. All of this is accented by the character of fireplaces in the family and living rooms. Price reduced to $699,000! If craftsmanship is important to you, call and see how you can enjoy the many features available in this home. MONROVIA (IVY)

Stunning Mediterranean Estate in the prestigious Linda Vista community. Superior architectural features, 4493 sq. ft. living space on over 12,000 sq. ft. lot. 4 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms and all the amenities one could imagine! PASADENA $1,988,000 (LIN)

Julia Childs would be jealous! The remodeled kitchen and new appliances found in this 3,000 sq ft are home full of luxury. A 15,000 sq ft lot allows you to enjoy the sounds of the backyard waterfall or simply relax in the spa. Your family and guest will arrive on the circular driveway and enter to enjoy the many amenities including 2 family rooms, wood flooring, plus 5 bedroom and 3 baths. Call for details on the special financing being offered. ARCADIA $1,195,000 (SAN)

Love the Lot. Fruit trees and oaks with a mountain view cover this 17,000 sq. ft. lot. Entertain from the privacy of the secluded deck and prepare your feast from a designer kitchen. Maple floors and plantation shutters adorn this traditional 3bd, 1.75ba home. Tired of hunting? Come and see this treasure. SIERRA MADRE $998,000 (MON265)

Whether you are looking for your first home or moving up from your current Home, it is now more affordable than ever. Mortgage rates hit a 52 year low, making now a great time to buy your dream home.


Community School•Religion•Community Activities•Social

Longtime Volunteer Reid Allen Receives Golden Star Award BY JENINE BAINES

Every winter, for nearly the past ten years, Pasadena resident Reid Allen has thrown a holiday party. But while the guest list changes yearly – Allen oversees plans for holiday celebrations at the Green House, one of 5 group homes for troubled teenage girls participating in Rosemary Children’s Services’ residential treatment program – those he drafts to help him trim the tree, wrap gifts, and serve refreshments invariably include Allen’s fellow members of the Kiwanis Club of Pasadena. “Reid has a servant’s heart,” says one of those Kiwanians – Karen Drew, a holiday party volunteer who, in 2007 and 2008, became President of the Board of Directors of Rosemary Children’s Services. However, this spring, the agency – which serves abused, abandoned and neglected children throughout Los Angeles county and portions of San Bernardino, Riverside and Orange counties – decided that it was time for Allen to receive a celebration and gift of his own. The longtime volunteer is this year’s recipient of RCS’s highest honor, the Golden

Greg Wessels, Executive Director of RCS presents the Golden Star Award to Reid Allen for his work as a community volunteer.

Citrus College Holding Summer Softball Camp for Local Youngsters BY SUSAN MOTANDER

Citrus College is holding a softball camp for young people ages 7 to 12. The camp will provide young players with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to reach their full potential in fast pitch softball. It will also assist the college in raising much needed funds for the sports program there. But the camp is not just about softball skills. “We take great pride in helping young players be successful both on and off the field,” said Citrus College Softball Coach Jackie Boxley. “Along with fundamental

skills, campers will also be taught about attitude, hard work ethic, good character, and the importance of education.” According to Boxley the program is using the brand new fields and training facility at the college. The camp will raise money for the programs which will use these facilities. In these tough economic times, money for programs such as softball is somewhat difficult to obtain. Boxley came up with the idea of using the facility to fund the activities for which it was built. This year the camp, designed for players age 7 to 12, will be offered in

two sessions. Session I will be held June 29 through July 3 and Session II will be held July 13 through July 17. They will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., with a late day option until 4 p.m. for an additional fee. The cost of each session is $150. Space is limited, so interested parties are encouraged to register as soon as possible. A $50 non-refundable deposit is required at time of registration, with the balance to be paid on the first day of camp. To sign up or receive additional information about the 2009 Citrus College Softball Camps, e-mail jboxley@citruscollege.edu.

Arcadia High Student Graces Cover of Sports Illustrated Kids

La Salle Graduates 181 Seniors at 50th Commencement La Salle High School graduated 181 seniors at its 50th annual Commencement on Friday evening, May 22. Commencement Exercises took place at the Church of the Nazarene, next-door to the School. Brian C. Conroy received the La Salle High School General Excellence Award, and will attend Harvey Mudd College as the recipient of the Harvey S. Mudd Merit Award. The General Merit Awards went to Florence F. Kerns, and Matthew K.Techy. Kerns, will leave for NYU to study Language Arts in the summer and Techy will attend Washington University in St. Louis as the Eliot Scholar.

Jordan J. Wingate received an appointment to the United States Naval Academy, Gabriella A. La Fontaine received the Archdiocese of Los Angeles Christian Service Award and the Pro Deo et Patria Award. Kaitlyn M. Tripoli and Darrell J. Triplett, Jr. received the Lancer All Around Athlete Award. Florence F. Kerns was chosen by the Faculty and the Senior Class for the honor of delivering the Commencement Address. 99% of La Salle’s graduating class will attend college next year, and 80% will matriculate at four-year institutions.

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kley, an eighteen-year year old h, gracfrom Newport Beach, es the cover in recognition gnition of his performancess as a football player at Mater Dei High School. In 2007, he became the he first junior to win the Gatorade Male High h School Athlete off the Year award. MEE Barkley will conT O F S TH E N U PE E X T tinue his football R ST G E N AR A E R A ca reer at t he TH L TI O ETE N Universit y of S Southern Califorœ mpete nia where he will compete œ œ as a freshman for the starting œ œ n. quarterback position. N

and grandpa to my two children.” “We’ve been fortunate to have many wonderful volunteers cross our path over the years,” adds Jennifer Radics, Director of Development. “Reid is one of the best of them. He remains involved with RCS not only to continue Kiwanis’ community outreach but because of his great interest in our cause and his belief in the work that we do.” “The name ‘Kiwanis’ was coined from an American Indian expression meaning ‘we trade’ or ‘we share our talents’,” explains Allen. “And we’ve chosen to devote the majority of our talent and energy to serving the children in our community. RCS shares Kiwanis’ commitment to providing a child with a chance to learn, experience, dream and succeed. I couldn’t ask for a better partner.” Tickets for “An Evening With Star Chefs” are currently available for $150/ person. For more information about Star Chefs or to arrange a tour of RCS’s campus in Pasadena, visit www.rosemarychildren. org or call 626.844.3033 ext. 211. Santa Anita Park is located at 285 W. Huntington Drive in Arcadia.

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wo local Los Angeles teens are on this month’s May issue of Sports Illustrated Kids. The issue introduces 20 superstar athletes under the age of 20 for 2009 as part of the magazine’s 20th birthday celebration. Arcadia native Mirai Nagasu appears on the SI Kids cover. The sixteen-year old won the 2008 national championships in figure skating and looks forward to competing in the 2010 Olympics. Says her coach Charlene Wong: “I think she’s more comfortable as a school girl who skates than as a skater who goes to school.” Along with Nagasu, Matt Bar-

Star Award. “Countless teenage girls have shared in the joy of the holiday season, thanks to Reid,” says Greg Wessels, Executive Director of Rosemary Children’s Service and a fellow member of the Kiwanis Club of Pasadena. “But Reid doesn’t stop giving just because the holiday season ends. He has also been a tireless volunteer for our annual benefit, An Evening with Star Chefs, which this year will take place on Saturday, June 27 at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia.” In addition to volunteering for RCS, Allen is a lifetime Director of the Tournament of Roses and the Past Governor of the Cal-Nev-HA (California, Hawaii and Nevada) District of Kiwanis International. “Reid has taken a special interest in many people during his years in the community service realm,” says Drew, First Vice President for Far East National Bank. “I am lucky to have been one of those people. Reid sponsored me into our Kiwanis Club and, under his tutelage, I became the first female president of our club. However, most importantly he has been my unofficial adopted father

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General Merit Award winner Florence Kerns will leave for NYU to study Language Arts in the summer.


18

The

COMMUNITY

MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

Social Whirl

Send your social and club news to “The Social Whirl,” c/o Beacon Media, 125 E. Chestnut Ave., Monrovia 91016. Or e-mail your photos and announcements to : socialwhirl@beaconmedianews.com

BY FLORETTA LAUBER

Mickey Ball Selected Senior Citizen of the Year at Rotary Salute to Seniors

Methodist Hospital Hosts ‘Celebration’ Brunch

Former mayor and part-time stand up comedian, George Fasching, was master of ceremonies and producer of the lunch, ceremony and entertainment event. Always a sellout audience, the event deserves a “10” for the Rotary Club and the Senior Services Department at the Community Center. Laughs started when Fasching, dressed as one of his car wash workers (overalls, orange wipe off cloth and cap), climbed on stage. From there, it was all uphill. Mickey Ball, the awardee, is a lady I have had the good fortune to work with over many years at the Woman’s Club of Arcadia, where she is concluding a three-year presidency; the Arcadia Historical Society, where she was also a president; Altrusa Club of Arcadia, where again she is a pat present. I know she has played a big part in the Retired teacher Organization, and four days a week, she does docent duty at the Historical Museum. This is just part of the story, because she has worked at every level in these organizations. Mickey’s service goes back to WWII, where she served as a WAVE. You can view her uniform and other memorabilia at the museum. Mayor John Wuo presented Mickey Ball with the city plaque honoring her as Arcadia’s Senior of the Year. The lunch-ceremony ended with the beautiful voice of Corine M. Delgado, who performs with the San Gabriel Music Theatre, and Jay Cohen, bugler at Santa Anita Race Track. Congratulations to the awardee and to all those behind the scene.

The Auxiliary of Methodist Hospital and the Alpha Auxiliary were saluted May 13th in the Sunset Room at the golf course by the hospital with a delicious brunch. Permanent plaques, which are placed in the hospital honoring the auxiliaries, were announced. Always a surprise, the Special Service Award was presented to two deserving women, Chris McClain and Janie Scott. Diane Bade, director of Volunteer Services, presented arm bouquets of roses to both. Hospital C.E.O., Dennis Lee, addressed the group, calling to attention the auxiliaries 55 years of service to the hospital, starting before it was built. On an emotional note, Foundation president, Sue Francis, spoke of her retirement July 31st. She will be missed and she leaves big shoes to fill.

Hailed as ‘One of the Best Parties’ in Los Angeles Stars of “Rotary Salute to Seniors,” George Fasching, the zany master of ceremonies, and Mary “Mickey” Ball, Senior Citizen of the Year.

Builders Guild Visits San Gabriel Valley Training Center and Residential Facility Builders Guild, a support group for San Gabriel Valley Training Center and Workshop for the Handicapped and the residential facility, enjoyed its annual May meeting with the board of directors and staff at the Center following a fabulous lunch. The Guild donated $16,000 this year, presented to Executive Director Randy Hyatt by Nancy Faulkner, Guild president. Founded in 1960 by members of the San Marion Women’s Club as a separate guild, Builders has been actively involved in support of the Training Center. The Training Center is located in La Puente and helps people with developmental disabilities find employment in the San Gabriel Valley. Vocation training is offered in a number of fiends, the most recent of which is computer technology. To learn more about Builders Guild or to become a member, contact Faulkner at (626) 918-6905.

Don’t Forget Big Band Show June 13th Mayor John Wuo presents a proclamation declaring Senior Citizen Day to Arcadia Rotary president, Bruce McCallum.

Mark your calendars for Saturday, June 13, 8 p.m. You don’t want to miss out on this fabulous night of big band music, singing and dancing, show stars Paul Boland and the Richard Allen Orchestra Support the San Gabriel Valley Music

Theatre in its quest to bring back musical productions. Call (626) 282-1440 for tickets. If you love the sound of big bands, join the rest of us. Enjoy the sound that will never end.

The Greater Los Angeles Zoo Association (GLAZA) presents the Beastly Ball, called “one of L.A.’s biggest and most popular fundraisers,” by FOX News, on Saturday, June 20, 6 p.m., under the stars at the zoo. The 39th annual event honors philanthropist and GLAZA trustee Laura Z. Wasserman for her commitment to animals and celebrates the theme “For the Love of Animals.” Chairing the ball are leading entertainment attorney Kenneth Ziffren and GLAZA trustees Nancy Dennis (a Los Angeles attorney), Kathy Nelson (president, Film Music, Universal Pictures), and Dana Walden (president, Twentieth Century FOX Television). KNBC TV’s Fritz Coleman serves a celebrity auctioneer. The fund-raiser marks more than 45 years of GLAZA’s success in supporting the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Garden’s work as an educational resource for the citizens of Los Angeles, and as an international center for the conservation of endangered wildlife. The Beastly Ball is a festive evening for guests, invited to dress in casual or safari attire, as they stroll through the grounds after hours to view zoo inhabitants. Bountiful delicious fare will be provided by some of the area’s most popular restaurants, all donating their services, and world music groups and dancing to a live band are all part of the fun. The Beastly Ball’s silent and live auctions include hundreds of remarkable items and one-of-a-kind opportunities. For tickets, at $1,000 per person, call (323) 644-4753.


19

MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

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(L-r) Barbara Lampman (2008 Holiday Homes chair), Diane Branson (Auxiliary treasurer), Grace Valentino (Ways & Means), with hospital C.E.O. Dennis Lee and Sue Francis, foundation president, at brunch honoring the auxiliaries. A check for $71,595 was presented to the hospital.

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COMMUNITY

MAY 28 - JUNE 3, 2009

More Social Whirl... Sadness? Fatigue? Isolation?

• Are You Often Sad Or Depressed? •Do You Feel Tired, Lack Energy And Motivation? • Is Depression Causing Relationships With Your Family And Friends To Suffer?

Pacific Clinical Research Medical Group is conducting a no-cost research study to evaluate the effectiveness of an investigational drug to treat depression. Participants must be between the ages of 18 to 64 and have felt depressed for at least the last 8 weeks. Call to see if you qualify to participate in this medical research study. For more information call:

(L-r) Elaine Allen, Executive Director Randy Hyatt accepting check from Nancy Faulkner, Guild president; Susan Harmon (in back), Residential administrator; Shirley Roland, founder and board Member; Alice Burns, Guild treasurer, and Mary Ryan Indenbaum, board president.

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The “Harmony 4” (l-r) Jim Potter, Barc Tucker, Phil Aydom and Phil Stray, barbershop quartet entertained the Woman’s Club of Arcadia May 6th.

Send your photos and community announcements to socialwhirl@beaconmedianews.com


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POLICE Monrovia

During the last seven day period, the Police Department handled 593 service events, resulting in 113 investigations. Following are the last week’s highlighted issues and events: Mental Evaluation. On May 14 at 2:59 p.m., officers stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation. As the officers contacted the driver, the subject stated he was having a nervous breakdown. Upon further inquiry, he claimed he wanted to kill himself. The motorist was detained and transported to a psychiatric facility for mental evaluation. Residential Burglary. On May 14 at 4:01 p.m., an officer responded to the 800 block of Monterey regarding a burglary. The victim reported a rear window of the residence was broken. No suspect was located in the residence. A watch and a television were taken. Investigation continuing.

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Child Abuse / Battery / Subjects Arrested. On May 14 at 8:49 p.m., officers responded to a mother and daughter fight in the 700 block of West Foothill. A mother struck her daughter several times in the head and the daughter threw a kitchen chair at her mother, striking her legs. The mother was arrested for willful harm to a child and the daughter was arrested for battery. They were fighting over a cell phone. Grand Theft Auto. On May 15 at 8:09 a.m., officers were dispatched to the 200 block of East Cypress on a report of a stolen vehicle. The victim told them he parked his vehicle in front of his residence at about midnight, and his sister saw the vehicle parked there at 2:00 a.m. When he returned to the vehicle in the morning, the vehicle was gone. There was no broken glass on the ground where it had been parked. Investigation continuing.

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Minor in Possession of Alcohol / Curfew Violation / Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor / Subjects Arrested. On May 16 at 1:35 a.m., officers responded to the 600 block of Shady Oaks on a complaint of juveniles in the street possibly drinking alcohol. Officers arrived and found eight juveniles and two adults hiding in the bushes. There was beer, whiskey, and drug paraphernalia on the sidewalk near the bushes. One female was found to be under the influence of Ecstasy and was takento a hospital for treatment. The two male adults were arrested for contributing to the delinquency of a minor and alcohol offenses. Seven of the juveniles were cited for curfew and alcohol offenses. Commercial Burglary / Subject Arrested. On May 16 at 11:50 a.m., loss prevention at a business in the 1600 block of South Mountain reported they had an adult male subject in custody for shoplifting. The property taken was worth over $2,000. Through investigation, the officer determined the subject had actually committed burglary. He was arrested and brought to the station for booking. Soliciting for Alcoholic Beverage / Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor / Subjects Arrested. On May 16 at 9:21 p.m., a witness observed a juvenile solicit two adult male subjects to buy beer for him at a business near Magnolia and Huntington. The witness called police. Officers arrived and observed the male adults walk away from the store and deliver a market bag containing

alcohol to a group of minors. All subjects were detained. The adults admitted to buying the beer for the minors. Two of the minors were found to be in possession of marijuana. All of the minors were cited and released on citation to their parents. The two adults were brought to the station and booked for the appropriate charges. ICE was contacted regarding both adult suspects and detainers were issued, as both were found to be illegal aliens. Suspicious Vehicle. On May 18 at 2:41 p.m., officers responded to a call of a suspicious vehicle driving by the high school. The vehicle was occupied by four male subjects who drove by displaying gang signs. Officers arrived and conducted an area search for the vehicle, but were not able to locate it. Extra patrol was provided as the students were let out at the end of the day. Investigation continuing. Shots Fired. On May 18 at 3:59 p.m., officers responded to the 500 to 600 blocks of Royal Oaks regarding the report of shots fired by a passing motorist. When officers arrived to investigate, they received conflicting reports from witnesses of this shooting. No one was hit by the gunfire. The investigation is continuing. Fighting in Public. On May 19 at 1:55 p.m., officers responded to the 600 block of Royal Oak on a report of approximately 10 male subjects fighting in the middle of the street. As officers were arriving, the reporting party provided descriptions of the vehicles leaving the scene. Officers were able to locate and stop the vehicles. The subjects were identified and allowed to leave. Bank Robbery / Suspect Arrested. On May 19 at 2:10 p.m., officers were dispatched to a bank in the 500 block of South Myrtle regarding a robbery alarm. As officers were arriving, dispatch relayed information that the bank had been robbed. The suspect had approached the counter and opened his suit jacket, exposing a firearm and requesting cash. The teller complied and the suspect left quickly, leaving his car keys behind on the counter. Officers conducted an area search and located the suspect’s vehicle. A DMV photo was obtained for the registered owner of the vehicle and officers were able to confirm the registered owner was the suspect in the robbery. A bloodhound was requested from the Sheriff’s Department. One responded and tracked the scent; however, it is suspected that the suspect got into another vehicle and fled the area. The firearm was also located and recovered. Later that night, the suspect called Los Angeles County Police to report his vehicle had been stolen. After confirming the registered owner was the suspect in Monrovia’s bank robbery, Los Angeles County police officers arranged to meet the suspect in Rosemead, where he was detained without incident. Monrovia officers responded and confirmed the man detained was the suspect who had been clearly identified on bank surveillance cameras. The suspect was charged with armed robbery, burglary, and excon with a firearm. The vehicle in his possession was also seized as evidence. The suspect is a 63-year-old career criminal with an extensive history dating back to the 1960s.

Arcadia For the period of Sunday, May 10, through Saturday, May 16, the Police Department responded to 1,082 calls for service of which 144 required formal


BLOTTERS investigations. The following is a summary report of the major incidents handled by the Department during this period. Sunday, May 10: Shortly before 2:00 a.m., units responded to the 00 block of Campus in reference to a verbal argument between a man and a woman. Investigation revealed that a 22-year-old male Caucasian suspect choked the victim, causing minor visible injuries to her neck. He was taken into custody for inflicting corporal injury to a former co-habitant.

Thursday, May 14: Shortly before 6:00 p.m., a victim came to the station to file an identity theft report. She was initially contacted on May 8 by a bank representative advising that an unknown suspect had forged a check in the amount of $1,980. She closed the account and opened another account; however, she was later contacted again when another fraudulent check in the amount of $2,200 was posted to her new account.

Officers were dispatched to the 400 block of Santa Cruz around 5:24 p.m. regarding the fraudulent use of an access card. Unknown suspect(s) used the victim’s access card information to make several fraudulent charges totaling $4,837.

Loss prevention personnel from JC Penney advised that they had detained a male juvenile for theft around 7:30 p.m. He took two pairs of shoes into a fitting room, hid the shoes in a gym bag, and left the store without making payment. A private person’s arrest was made, and a 16-year-old African-American was taken into custody for petty theft. He was later cited and released to his uncle.

Monday, May 11:

Friday, May 15:

Around 5:32 a.m., officers were sent to the ER at Huntington Memorial Hospital regarding an assault that took place on May 9 at 9:30 p.m. The male victim claimed that while he was walking at Second and Huntington when several male Hispanic suspects approached, and one of them hit him in the face with a rock.

A victim came to the station around 8:37 a.m. to report an identity theft. A known male suspect retained the victim’s checks and made fraudulent checks using the bank information printed. The suspect forged the victim’s signature and cashed the fake checks for a loss of about $118,000.

An assault occurred at First Avenue Elementary School, 301 South First, around 8:55 p.m. The victim advised that he was playing basketball at the location when a male Asian player from the opposing team punched him in the face. Additional subjects joined in the attack and struck and kicked him; one suspect also sprayed him in the face with pepper spray. The suspects then walked to their vehicle, retrieved a long metal pipe, threatened him, and told him that he should run. Fearing for his safety, he fled the scene. Tuesday, May 12: Between 5:00 p.m. on May 11 and 4:00 a.m. on May 12, a grand theft occurred at Ralphs, 1101 West Huntington. During their daily inventory, it was discovered that 8 bottles of alcohol and 14 packages of razors were stolen. The total reported loss was around $706. About 4:51 p.m., units were dispatched to Active Statewide Funding, 150 North Santa Anita, regarding a 39-year-old female Asian who had made terrorist threats against an employee. Investigation revealed that during a meeting, the suspect grew agitated over suspicious loan requests that were not processed. She brandished a firearm and made criminal threats against an employee. Wednesday, May 13:

Around 4:24 p.m., units were sent to a dental office in the 00 block of West Las Tunas in reference to an embezzlement report. A 38-year-old female Asian was hired at the location as an office manager/bookkeeper, and she embezzled about $17,000 from the business and patients by collecting cash payments for free consultations and other services. During the investigation, it was discovered that the same suspect had also worked at an auto body shop where she had embezzled $60,000. Saturday, May 16: A traffic stop was initiated at Peck and Live Oak around 1:54 a.m. for a code violation. Officers detected the odor of an alcoholic beverage from the driver, and a field sobriety test revealed that the 39-year-old male Indian was operating the vehicle while intoxicated. The driver was arrested at the scene for DUI without incident. Shortly after 10:00 a.m., a victim arrived at the station to file an identity theft report. Unknown suspect(s) used the victim’s personal information to open a fraudulent savings account. The suspect(s) then transferred almost $10,000 from the victim’s checking account into the fraudulent account.

Sierra Madre

An auto burglary occurred between 3:00 p.m. on May 12 and 6:30 a.m. on May 13 in the 2200 block of South Fifth. Unknown suspect(s) broke a car window and took an air compressor and two demo kits for a total loss of $3,200.

During the week of Sunday, May 10th, to Saturday May 16th, the Sierra Madre Police Department responded to approximately 192 calls for service.

Officers responded to Longden and Holly around 7:53 a.m. in reference to an indecent exposure report. The female victim advised that she was walking near the location when a dark colored sedan pulled up next to her. The male Hispanic driver, 35-40 years of age, called to her. Thinking that he was going to ask for directions, she approached the vehicle and saw that he was naked below his waist and was exposing himself.

2:25 AM – Arrest, Residential Burglary, 600 block East Grandview Ave. An alert resident reported suspicious activity after hearing a car drive up the street and park. A short time later, the resident heard a loud bang and saw two people running to the car, which then drove away westbound on Grandview. Officers found the car and stopped it. The officers’ investigation led to the discovery of a smashed rear glass door of an unoccupied home under

Tuesday, May 12th:

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construction. Police searched the car and found burglary tools, drug paraphernalia, blank cashiers checks, checkbooks and identification in various people’s names. Officers arrested the four occupants, Monrovia and Duarte residents, for residential burglary. 4:53 PM – Identity Theft, 200 block E. Alegria Ave. A resident reported receiving a statement from DIRECTV for a deposit fee. The resident discovered that an unknown person used his personal information and attempted to open a new account with DIRECTV, without his permission. There was no financial loss at this time, since the new account required a deposit fee.

PET OF THE WEEK

Thursday, May 14th: 10:01 AM – Arrest, Assault with a Deadly Weapon, 200 block W. Sierra Madre Blvd. The victim, a day laborer, walked into the Sierra Madre Police Department and reported being beaten in front of Memorial Park. The victim sustained serious injuries to his left eye. He said that the suspect fled after the unprovoked attack. The victim described the suspect as a male Hispanic wearing a purple bandana over his head. Paramedics treated the victim and took him to a local hospital for treatment. Officers found the suspect nearby and arrested him for Assault With a Deadly Weapon and took him to the Pasadena Police Dept. jail for housing. On Monday morning the District Attorney filed misdemeanor Assault With a Deadly Weapon and Criminal Terrorists Threats against the defendant. Friday, May 15th: 3:53 PM – Mail Fraud, 300 block Sierra Woods Drive. The victim reported receiving a cashier check for $2,950.00 from a suspect who hired the victim as a driver. The victim received an e-mail from the suspect instructing the victim to deposit the check into the victim’s personal checking account. The check was supposedly over the agreed amount by $2,350.00. The suspect told the victim to return the overpayment. Officers conducted an investigation and discovered it was a scam, as the check was issued from a fraudulent out-of-state checking account.

Dante, a fun and lovable, year old Alaskan Malamute has lots of energy and loves to play! He gets along well with everyone he meets and enjoys being the center of attention. Dante knows the “sit” and “down” commands and would love to learn more. Come meet this fluffy sweetheart today! The regular dog adoption fee is $120, which includes medical care prior to adoption, spaying or neutering, vaccinations, and a follow-up visit with a participating vet. Please call 626-792-7151 and ask for A250540 or come to the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA, 361 S. Raymond Ave, Pasadena CA, 91105. Our adoption hours are 11-3 Sunday, 9-4 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, and 9-3 Saturday. Directions and photos of all pets updated hourly may be found at www.phsspca.org O’Malley from last week is still here. FYI: Our dog adoption fee has gone up to $120


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING CALL (626) 301-1010 FOR ADVERTISING PLACEMENT INFORMATION EMPLOYMENT Beacon Media, publisher of San Gabriel Valley’s fastest growing group of newspapers, currently has the following position available: Advertising Sales Rep. You must have excellent interpersonal communication skills, both written and verbal. You will work directly with clients to

provide solutions for their advertising needs and to help design advertising campaigns that will best showcase the client’s products and services. Additionally, candidates should be: · Professional. · Ability to work effectively in a team environment. · Over 2 years prior sales experience · Computer-literate. · Reliable vehicle and a

cell phone. This position is commission only. Send cover letter and resume to resume@coremg.net or fax to 626-301-0445

FOR RENT MONROVIA 748 1/2 Mountain View Ave. $1400 + Deposit, 2 bedroom quiet & secure cottage. Avail June 15. (626) 419 - 4033

LEGALS

CITY OF ARCADIA NOTICES REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Arcadia is accepting requests for proposals for legal advertising for the City of Arcadia as required by the City of Arcadia Charter Section 420. Proposals shall be submitted in an envelope marked “Proposal for Legal Advertising” and shall be sent to the City Clerk of the City of Arcadia, 240 W. Huntington Drive, P.O. Box 60021, Arcadia CA 91066-6021. Proposals shall be due no later than 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at which time they shall be publicly opened. Copies of the proposal may be obtained in the Purchasing Office, Administrative Services Department, 240 W. Huntington Drive, Arcadia, CA 91007. Said specifications, proposal forms and contract documents are hereby referred to and incorporated herein and made a part by reference and all quotations must strictly comply therewith. The City of Arcadia reserves the right to accept in whole or in part or reject any and all proposals and to waive any informalities in the bid process, and all bids are binding for a period of ninety (90) days after the proposal opening and may be retained by the City for examination and comparison, as specified in the contract documents. The award of contract shall be made by the Arcadia City Council. CITY OF ARCADIA PURCHASING OFFICE Dated: May 21, 2009 Publish: May 26 and 28, 2009 NOTICE THAT ALL BALLOTS FOR THE SPECIAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION TO BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2009, WILL BE COUNTED AT A CENTRAL COUNTING PLACE The Chief Deputy City Clerk of the City of Arcadia has authorized that the Council Chambers at Arcadia City Hall, 240 West Huntington Drive, Arcadia, CA 91007, is designated as the central place to count the ballots for the Special Municipal Election to be held on Tuesday, June 9, 2009. /s/ Lisa Mussenden Chief Deputy City Clerk Dated: May 4, 2009

OTHER PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Title Order No.: 4004646 Trustee Sale No.: 58912 Loan No.: H3990018486 APN: 8506-011-007 You are in Default under a Deed of Trust dated 12/13/2007. Unless you take action to protect your property, it may be sold at a public sale. If you need an explanation of the nature of the proceedings against you, you should contact a lawyer. On 06/04/2009 at 10:00AM, FCI Lender Services, Inc. as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 12/21/07 as Instrument #20072810091 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: Carlos Villanueva and Patricia Chavez, husband and wife as joint tenants, as Trustor. Casita Financial, a California Corporation CFL #603C587, as Beneficiary. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). At: The West side of the Los Angeles County Courthouse, Southeast District, 12720 Norwalk Blvd., Norwalk, CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: Lot 5 of Tract 7721, in the City of Monrovia, County of Los Angeles, State of California, as per map recorder in Book 89, Page 43 of maps in the office of the county recorder of said county. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 526 W. Colorado Blvd, Monrovia, CA 91016. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as

provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $75,539.61 (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Date: 5/8/09 FCI Lender Services, Inc., as Trustee 8180 East Kaiser Blvd., Anaheim Hills, CA 92808 Phone: 714-2822424 For Trustee Sale Information log on to: www.rsvpforeclosures. com or call: 925-603-7342. Vivian Prieto, Vice President, FCI Lender Services, Inc. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 153382) (05/14/09, 05/21/09, 05/28/09)

Sierra Madre - 2 bdrm apt. garden setting, spac and quiet, pool, a/c, ldry. $1300/ mo 355-5072

GARAGE FOR RENT $175 mo 24/7 Access Secore super clean storage or car. Temple City (626) 442-6650

Sierra Madre - Studio Apt. $750/mo, garden setting, all utilities paid, pool, a/c, ldry 355-5072

FOR SALE

FOR LEASE Sierra Madre 2Br, 1 Ba House, hardwood floors, huge yard, walk to town, A/C, w/d, fridge incl. $2600/Month (626) 3555556

Drum Kit w/ Cymbals 5 piece drum kit with 2 cymbals + hi-hat. Kit has everything you need and more: throne, drum and cymbal noise-dampening pads, all cymbal stands

and bass pedal. Everything works well. It’s an off-brand (Pulse Percussion), and could maybe use some heads, but all in all this is a very decent setup for the price. Call John at 626.789.6169. 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan Minivan. Auto, low mileage, front/rear/a/c, many extras. Great Soccer mom car. $9,000 obo. (626) 512-7050

Social Media Meets Politics Politicians Chasing Publicity Find Web Waters Welcoming BY JACKSON WEST

Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and other popular sites for publishing online have become ubiquitous in the news media, if not in everyone’s actual day to day lives. Recently, public officials have successfully made it onto the bandwagon by adopting these tools in their campaigns, fundraising, volunteer recruitment and, of course, garnering publicity. But are these tools truly being used to connect directly to voters and their concerns, or are they just another way to campaign? Barack Obama certainly made hay online, with plaudits, publicity and private contributions rolling in over the course of the campaign thanks to a popular Twitter stream, Facebook chatter, and a social network, MyBarackObama.com, powered by software from local company Six Apart. Yet once elected, the new media music died. His Twitter stream went silent for weeks, and only four updates have been made since election day. Local politicians who are “tweeting,” or regularly posting messages to Twitter, include State Attorney General Jerry Brown, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera, State Senator Leland Yee, State Assemblywoman Fiona Ma, and San Francisco Board of Supervisors Clerk Angela Calvillo, on the Board’s behalf. Befitting a brand new form of communication, they’re all using it differently. The one common thread is that they would presumably all be relatively easy to reach, especially by a constituent and member of the press. Adriel Hampton works as an investigator for the San Francisco City Attorney’s office and has kicked off a congressional campaign for California’s tenth district. An avid user of Twitter personally, he maintains a profile on Facebook, and is an active participant in a social network called GovLoop, where public employees are exploring ways to better connect public service with private taxpayers. It was at his urging that the City Attorney’s office created an account on Twitter. “We’re trying to be transparent and apolitical in a way that advances the public interest, the public’s right to know and builds public trust in the office,” Hampton said of the tone and impetus of discussion on the site. Certainly transparency and authenticity seem to be two benefits most often cited by proponents using these new communications tools in government.

Some of the decisions made San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom and his large communications staff and coterie of campaign aides seem to belie those types of good intentions. Newsom recently used Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to officially announce his entry into California’s 2010 gubernatorial election, garnering much media coverage and a few donations in the process. Newsom’s aides in City Hall and his campaign team have been using these and other online tools for some time, but his office is not known for embracing radical transparency. For instance, while Newsom’s account often features replies to other Twitter users, responding to questions from the press is another matter. Repeated emails to his press secretary Nathan Ballard went unanswered (as did an email to Newsom’s likely gubernatorial opponent Brown). Maybe the emails got lost in the shuffle. So why not play along and get in touch using Twitter? Because asking questions publicly using the service’s reply feature has gotten reporters in hot water. “We don’t ask the mayor questions on his Twitter feed,” said San Francisco Chronicle city desk editor Audrey Cooper. There’s no need, she argued. “A press office has a lot of different ways to communicate with the press.” And they probably won’t start any time soon, especially in the wake of San Francisco Bay Guardian reporter Steven T. Jones’ experience. This article is the first installment of a three part series funded by Spot.Us, written by Jackson West with editorial support from SFAppeal.com.


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MAY 28 - JUNE 3 , 2009 26 2

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $1.00 U.S. Gold ............................................. $90 to $2,500 $ $2.50 U.S. Gold ............................................. $80 to $5,000 $ $3.00 U.S. Gold ............................................. $350 to $3,500 $ $5.00 U.S. Gold ............................................. $125 to $5,000 $ $10 U.S. Gold ................................................ $325 to $4,200 $ $20 U.S. Gold ................................................ $650 to $5,000 $ $20 High Relief .............................................. Up to $50,000 $ $ WE BUY ALL SOLID GOLD ITEMS- NEW, USED OR BROKEN $ High School Rings ......................................... Up to $500 Wedding Bands .............................................. Up to $1500 $ Old Mountings ............................................... Up to $700 $ Bracelets......................................................... Up to $10,000 $ Necklaces ....................................................... Up to $15,000 $ Old Watch Cases ............................................ Up to $2,400 $ Charm............................................................. Up to $600 $ Dental Gold .................................................... Bring in for cash $ Broken Chains................................................ Bring in for cash $ PLATINUM - ALL PLATINUM JEWELRY - BRING IN FOR CASH $ Mountings ...................................................... Up to $2,500 $ Therm-Coupling Wire .................................... Bring in for testing $ Crucibles ........................................................ Bring in for testing $ Screen............................................................. Bring in for testing $ $ IF YOUR ITEMS AREN’T USED, BRING THEM IN FOR A $ FREE APPRAISAL AND CASH OFFER $ ½ Carat ........................................................... Up to $2,400 $ ¾ Carat ........................................................... Up to $3,000 1 Carat ............................................................ Up to $10,000 $ 2 Carat ............................................................ Up to $20,000 $ 3 Carat ............................................................ Up to $50,000 $ 4 Carat ............................................................ Bring in for a quote $ Large diamonds much, much more. We buy old mine cuts and Euro$ pean cut diamonds. We buy diamonds with or without GIA certificates $ $ ALSO WANTED: KEY DATES AND RARITIES, PCGS, $ NGC & ANACS GRADED COINS, COLLECTIONS, $ ESTATES, ACCUMULATIONS AND DEALER STOCKS, $ AMERICAN EAGLES GOLD, PLATINUM, SILVER, $ SAKR, CML, 40% & 90% SILVER COINS, SILVER $ BARS, SCRAP GOLD AND SILVER FLATWARE, CALL $ $ FOR QUOTES. $ WANTED: US AND FOREIGN CURRENCY, LARGE $ SIZE NOTES, SMALL SIZE 1976 AND BEFORE. $ $ WANTED: STAMPS, SINGLES, SHEETS, COLLEC$ TIONS, ESTATES AND DEALER STOCKS. NO COL$ LECTION TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE! $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Coin Connection: 39 Years of Experience

BUYING ½ Cent 1793 ................................................... $1,000 and up ½ Cent (other) ................................................ $5 and up Large Cent 1793 ............................................. 1,000 and up 2¢ Pieces ........................................................ $3 and up 3¢ Pieces ........................................................ $3 and up ½ Dimes 1794-1805 ....................................... $500 and up ½ Dimes 1829-1873 ....................................... $5 and up U.S. 5¢ 1866-1882 ........................................ $3 and up U.S. 5¢ 1883-1912 ........................................ 25¢ and up U.S. 5¢ Buff .................................................. 15¢ and up U.S. 10¢ Before 1808.................................... $100 and up U.S. 10¢ 1809-1837 ...................................... $8 and up U.S. 10¢ 1838-1891 ...................................... $5 and up U.S. 20¢ 1875-1878 ...................................... $25 and up U.S. 20¢ 1796 ............................................... $5,000 and up U.S. 25¢ 1804-1807 ...................................... $100 and up U.S. 25¢ 1815-1837 ...................................... $15 and up U.S. 25¢ 1838-1891 ...................................... $5 and up U.S. 50¢ 1796-1797 ...................................... $15,000 and up U.S. 50¢ 1794-1806 ...................................... $75 and up U.S. 50¢ 1807-1837 ...................................... $25 and up U.S. 50¢ 1838-1891 ...................................... $10 and up U.S. $1.00 1794 ............................................ $25,000 and up U.S. $1.00 1795-1805 ................................... $500 and up U.S. $1.00 1836-1839 ................................... $150 and up U.S. $1.00 1840-1877 ................................... $20 and up Trade Dollars.................................................. $50 and up 1906-S and 1931-S......................................... $20 and up 1909-S VBD................................................... $400 and up 1914-D ........................................................... $75 and up 1910-S, 1911-S, 1912-S, 1913-S, 1914-S, 1915-S, 1922-D, 1926-S and 1931-D............................. $5.00 1924-D ........................................................... $15 All other before 1934 2¢ each Foreign Coins (exc. Canada cents) ................ 3¢ each and up Proof Sets Confederate Currency (before 1928) U.S. Paper Currency (before 1928) AVERAGE PRICES - COMMON DATE - 1964 AND BEFORE Silver Dollars (before 1935) .. $9 to $25,000 Half Dollars.................................................... $4 to $5 Quarters .......................................................... $2 to $3 Dimes ............................................................. 80¢ to $1.50

•COINS•GOLD•SILVER

Coin Connection, the most diverse company in the rare coin and precious metals industry •Precious metals bullion trading current daily buy and sell prices •Rare coin, stamp, currency and estate liquidation 8 E. Holly St. •Authorized appraiser for estates, insurance companies and “Old Town” Pasadena probate •Authorized buyer since 1961 of coins, stamps, currency, Call Paul for an appointment at precious metals, scrap gold, flatware, antique and Rolex (626) 793-8686 watches, diamonds and estate jewelry $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $


27

Comics

MAY 28 - JUNE 3 , 2009

beaconmedianews.com

The Doozies

By Tom Gammill EmiliosPocket.com

DeFlocked

By Jeff Corriveau

Capitol South

By William Warren

By Emilio Santoyo



2009_05_28_Arcadia Weekly