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September 2012 vol 1 issue 7

Central Vancouver Island Edition

MAGAZINE

Mike Rebar: Rock Star • 28 New Generals Coach: Brent Demerais • 16


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5 EDITORIAL: A Personal Journey

A Holiday in Canada’s Hawaii

FEATURES 16 New Generals Coach Brent Demerais

Bringing a bit of ‘old school’ to Oceanside 28 Mike Rebar: Rock Star

TRAVEL & OUTDOORS

8 Travellin’ with Carolyn: A Holiday in Canada’s Hawaii 14 Thru the Seasons: Oh Rats! The Unloved Rodents 22 Tide Table

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

25 On the Rocks - a poem by Michael B. Poyntz 27 The Curtain’s About to Go Up: ECHO’s new season

FASHION & STYLE 18 Seasons: Fall fashion shopping in Qualicum Beach

17 Ready, Set, Jump Two local entrepreneurs take on a new business

COMMUNITY LIFE

13 Progress on Seniors Housing in Bowser 22 The Art of Conscious Living 32 Inspired by Community COMMUNITY PEOPLE 17 Images & Voices: Ready, Set, Jump

HEALTH & WELLNESS

9 Linda Watts: Plum Delicious 10 Companioning: Compassion for the Bereaved 24 Health & Wellness Matters: Shingles

THE REGULARS 33 34-35 36 3 7-38 39

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In the Stars: Georgia Nicols Horoscope Community Events Classifieds At Your Service - Local Services & Trades Subscribe to EyesOnBC Magazine

LOCALLY OWNED • COMMUNITY INSPIRED

Mike Rebar: Rock Star •

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MAGAZINE

September 2012

Linda Tenney Publisher tenney@eyesonbc.com

VOLUME 1 NO 7

EyesOnBC Magazine

Elizabeth Cudmore Customer Service & Social Media cudmore@eyesonbc.com

is published monthly

Main Email: info@eyesonbc.com Phone: 250-757-9914 Mailing Address EyesOnBC Magazine Box 182, Bowser, BC V0R 1G0 Hours: Mon - Thu 10-4

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Our Contributors this month: Lisa Verbicky, Nancy Whelan, Rita Levitz, Georgia Nicols, David Morrison, JoAnne Sales, Carolyn Walton, Linda Tenney, Linda Watts, Michael B. Poyntz, Dan LaRocque, Diane Hancox On the Internet www.eyesonbc.com & www.facebook.com/eyesonbc Subcriptions In Canada, from $35 CDN incl HST Inquire about foreign subscriptions Call 250-757-9914 to subscribe. VISA & MasterCard accepted or go online to www.eyesonbc.com to subscribe.

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Articles and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the writers and published for general information purposes only. Articles are not intended to provide specific advice the publisher will assume no liability.

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And on our website at www.eyesonbc.com

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A PERSONAL JOURNEY

The first few days were hell on earth, both physically and emotionally as I took my first walking tour of the hospital, and waiting for ‘news’ from the pathologist.

by Linda Tenney I was lucky! Very lucky!

I

n a mere half-hour, my perspective about continued good health and my own mortality changed dramatically in April when I found out, following a routine physical, that I might be carrying a lifethreatening disease. Although unconfirmed ... I was devastated to learn that I might have cancer. It was that one simple and very serendipitous visit to the doctor that started my four-month journey of discovery. A journey filled with trips to specialists in Comox, Port Alberni and Victoria – appointments for tests and procedures, and agonizing days of waiting for results. So many in our community have endured a similar situation; it’s no longer uncommon. Maybe it’s you or someone you know, but in some way, Cancer has probably touched your life. I offer my own story with the hope that it might inspire someone to take action for the sake of their own health. After weeks of ultrasounds, X-rays, CT scans and examinations, I still had no definitive answer. Did I or didn’t I? The results were inconclusive. The only thing I was quite sure about, was imminent surgery – planned for July. Great! I hadn’t been admitted to a hospital since I was a child. My world had become surreal. Some days up – some days down. I spent hours planning for two futures. One long ... one shorter. I had responsibilities – my husband in a care facility, the magazine, employees, my home, pets, extended family. Yikes! Yet, while my world seemed to be tumbling around me, it also presented some wonderful moments – like a deepening friendship with very special people in my life – Lorraine and Elizabeth helped me from start to finish, and I wouldn’t have been as strong without them.

Finally...the results were in. The bad news? Two types of malignant cancer was confirmed. I had uterine cancer ... more specifically Endometrial cancer and the rarer Fallopian Tube Carcinoma. The good news? Both cancers were in Stage 1 and contained. Neither had spread and were both fully removed by the surgery! I was ecstatic and very grateful. Everything was gone. No radiation treatments. No chemotherapy. Just regularly scheduled exams for the next few years - certainly a small price to pay for having been granted life.   It’s heart-breaking to know that some of the women I sat side-byside with in waiting rooms during my journey, might not be as lucky as me. In my case, early detection was key. I’ll be listening more closely to my body and intuition, and I hope you will too. If you think something might be wrong, schedule a routine check-up – it could be a matter of your life or death. I know that finding a doctor in our region is not easy. If you don’t already have a doctor, it might mean sitting on a waiting list, or finding an out-of-town doctor who can see you sooner – either way, I suggest you that you do it for the good of your health. September is Ovarian Cancer awareness month. If you feel so inclined, there’s an opportunity to show your support right here in Oceanside. Turn to our community events listing on page 34-35 to learn more about The Lunch – A fashionable afternoon by the sea. A fund-raiser with proceeds going to Ovarian Cancer Canada. ~

I wanted to run - somewhere far away! Somewhere this disease couldn’t find me. Somewhere my nagging fear didn’t exist. My Dad had just lost his own battle with cancer, and now I was facing the possibility of my own. My future was suddenly very uncertain. I had no choice but to be pragmatic about the situation; everything became very matter-of-fact. I let family and a few friends know what was going on. I created two very practical ‘what if’ lists, and prearranged the things I could for the best and worst of outcomes. I spent the rest of the time busy at work while I waited for my surgery date – thank heavens that magazine publishing is so absorbing! Knowing that there might be a long recovery period after surgery, I set about making frozen dinners, stocked up for easy to make meals, moved things I would need to higher shelves where I could easily reach them, arranged for house and pet sitting, put important ‘just in case’ letters in my safety deposit box, and created the ‘bones’ of the August edition. I was ready. Well ... sort of. Is anyone really ready to find out whether they have cancer or not? July 11. I was prepped and wheeled into the operating room. I was scared. Very scared. I felt vulnerable and wondered if I would even make it through surgery. And I wondered what they might find.

The Bare 'n Von Hair Duo bring an unforgettable evening of entertainment to the Lighthouse Community. After 20 years of playing together, Matt Day and Gord Graber merged their musical skills and their unique sense of humour to create a musical humour show complete with song parodies, videos, musical antics, audience participation, customized elements and more. Matt and Gord enjoy creating entertaining events suitable for all ages with a variety of elements sure to leave everyone with a taste of something wonderfully musical and delightfully humourous.

Sunday September 30, 2012 • 7pm Island Gospel Centre 90 McColl Road, Bowser

Hours later, I woke up in recovery. Surgery had been longer than expected and I received a substantial blood transfusion - but I was alive. Whew! So far so good! S E P T E M B E R

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FREEWILL OFFERING M A G A Z I N E

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REAL ESTATE - THE MARKET

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250-954-5561

Which Makes Buying Easier

 Pre-Sale Independent Building Inspection

LHesse@ReaListRealty.com

www.ReaListRealty.com Head Office: 427 G Fitzwilliam St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 3A9 MLS is a Trademark of CREA Discounts based on 7% of $100,000/3% of balance. Minimum listing fee of $2,950 + buyer’s agent fee. 6

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ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD’S INNER HEMINGWAY

(NC)—There’s more to just learning the ABCs in school. Children also have to be taught how to put letters together to form words and sentences that make sense and help communicate thoughts and ideas. Learning to write is an important skill to master and one that can be developed in children at an early age. Communication is important to our society and getting children used to writing will help them communicate well as they grow. Buy why is writing so important? It’s a skill required for both work and our personal life. From writing reports to penning a thoughtful letter, some form of writing is required almost every day. Writing helps people to express themselves and makes their thinking visible. For children it’s a good way to teach grammar, spelling and formation of logical thought. It helps with reading development as well. Writing can also solidify ideas and thoughts and help people to reflect on them once they see words on paper. Writing is also a good outlet for imagination, and children often have an abundance of that. To help develop your child’s writing skills, encourage them to write and make it rewarding. For example, you can post their work on a family website, or on the fridge,

or include their essay in a family holiday communication. Also, to encourage writing, be sure to include regular visits to the library, good writers are usually avid readers. There are many writing contests that you can encourage your children to participate in as well. One of the best is the Genworth Canada and Habitat for Humanity’s “Meaning of Home” contest which encourages children in grade 4,5 and 6 to write about what home means to them. This year’s contest runs from October 10th to November 9th. More information is available online at www.meaningofhome.ca.

Phone: 250-757-8944 Fax: 250-757-8654

Open daily 8am to 8pm

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RIGHT FROM YOUR LOCAL MARKET OR GARDEN TREE

PLUM DELICIOUS by Linda Watts, Registered Dietitian

B

ig, dark purple plums always remind me of September’s return to school days. My sensory association dates back to 1970 when I started elementary school. As a recess snack, my mother tucked plums into my school bag daily for the first week of grade one (there wasn’t kindergarten in Alberta). And during that time of tremendous change, the fruit was a consistent source of comfort for me, in a sweet-sour juicy way. Plums are a good source of potassium, vitamin A and the flavonoid, anthocyanidins, which may act as antioxidants. Anthocyanidins are also found in blueberries and other blackcoloured fruit, strawberries, rhubarb, red cabbage and red wine. 

Linda Watts photo

PLUM CRISP

Many of us are aware of how this fruit especially their dried form, prunes - help keep our bowels on track. According to the University of California, Berkeley, Wellness Letter, scientists believe their laxative effect is not so much related to plum’s dietary fiber content as it is their high quantity of sorbitol, and other substances that promote regularity.

Serves 6 What You Need: 1/2 cup rolled oats 1/2 cup light brown sugar 1/4 cup all-purpose flour, plus 2 tablespoons for plums 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup unsalted butter, chilled and cubed, plus extra for buttering dish 2 pounds large, black plums, pitted and cut into half-inch slices 1/4 cup granulated sugar zest of half a lemon

Last Labour Day weekend I brought a plum crisp to a crab cook-out on the beach. Fruit crisps are one of those desserts that provide bakers with satisfying results despite a modest effort.

What To Do:

This recipe doesn’t have a lot of sugar added to the plums. I like the contrast between the slightly tart fruit and the sweet oatmeal cookie-like topping. This dish is best served within two hours of baking, spooned over vanilla ice cream.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and make sure the rack is in the middle of oven. Lightly butter a 9 x 9 non-metal baking dish. In a medium bowl, combine rolled oats, brown sugar, 1/4 cup of flour and cinnamon. Incorporate butter into mixture using a pastry blender or clean hands. Once the mixture is a crumbly texture, set aside. This step can be done up to four days in advance; cover and refrigerate until needed. In a large bowl, combine sliced plums with 2 tablespoons of flour, sugar and lemon zest. Stir until plums are well coated. (This step can be prepared two hours ahead of time.) Transfer to baking dish and evenly scatter rolled oat mixture over plums. To prevent juices from overflowing onto oven floor while cooking, place dish on a baking sheet.

Linda Watts is a registered dietitian. Send questions to linda@foodtalkwatts.com

Bake for 40-50 minutes until juices are bubbling and fruit is tender when poked with a sharp knife. Topping should be golden brown. Loosely cover dish with aluminum foil if topping begins to burn during baking process. S E P T E M B E R

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British Car Specialist

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MG • Jaguar • Triumph Austin Healey • Land Rover Morris Mini • Bentley

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Visit our website to find archived editions of The Beacon Magazine and EyesOnBC Magazine

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Mon-Sat 9:30am-5pm Sunday 11am-4pm

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Tue-Sun 9:30-5pm Sat 10-4:30pm • Sun 10-4pm 7581 S. Island Hwy, Fanny Bay Tel&Fax 250-335-1475 www.fannybaytrading.com

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PASSWORDS AND SECURITY FOR MACS AND FOR MAIL

by Dan LaRocque, UpYourMedia Solutions

I

t’s a common perception that Macintosh computers are immune to viruses and malware, but technically, that’s not quite true. Despite Apple’s more secure UNIX based operating system, any computer is susceptible to attacks from unscrupulous programmers. However, in 20 years of using Macs online on a daily professional basis, I’ve yet to hear first hand of any successful, debilitating mass attack. To this day, the only reason I have an anti-virus software on my computer, is because I was asked by a client to test it. I check it every 2 weeks or so, with no reported attacks. Email is another issue that can be problematic from a security standpoint, particularly webmail services, such as Hotmail, Yahoo and Gmail. Hotmail is probably one of the most hacked email services out there, and you’ve probably gotten emails in the past year from ‘friends’ whose accounts have been compromised, and who have unwittingly spammed their entire contacts list. Your best defence against such potentially harmful hacking is to change your password to something more secure, and change it again every few months. When I say a more ‘secure’ password, that means that it should not be a common word, or string of numbers.  According to the New York Times, the most common passwords out there are ‘12345’, followed (logically) by ‘123456’, and then, if you can believe it, ‘password’. And if you’re one of the 70% of people I meet whose

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password is the name of their pet, or their children, don’t worry, there’s help for you. One trick I use when creating a new password is to substitute certain letters for numerals, ie., if the word contains an ‘O’, I’ll use zero. If it has an ‘E’, I’ll use the number three, and if there’s an ‘I’, I’ll substitute a one. Also, any letter in the word that falls on the top row of the qwerty keyboard, I will capitalize, thus making the password far harder to hack by any online robot. Visually it will look similar to the word I find easy to remember, but it’s far more secure against hackers. For instance, if one of my favourite authors is Farley Mowat, I might have a password that looks like faRl3Y. If my pet’s name is Luther, my password might look like lUTh3r. It might.  Passwords are probably the most problematic issue for casual users. If I had a nickel for every time I asked a client for their computer, email, Skype, Apple ID or wifi password, only to be greeted with a blank stare, I’d be a wealthy man. As discussed in the last installment, the Keychain access utility on your Mac will remember your lesser passwords for you, and allow you to retrieve them if need be, but you will need to know your computer user password to access them.  You can get away with not having your Apple computer’s password for a short period of time, but any software updates or installs will require that you remember it eventually. Luckily you can change

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the user password by booting from your system disk, included in the box at purchase time. To do so, insert the disk, click restart and hold down the ‘C’ key until you see the grey screen and spinning gear. Once it’s up and running, there will be a list of utilities in a drop-down box. Choose ‘reset password’ and input a password that you will remember, according to some of the previous hints. If you’re running Lion or Mountain Lion, hold the Option key on startup and choose the Recovery HD icon. That will bring up a similar set of options. When it comes to passwords, my suggestion is to use one or two straightforward passwords for inconsequential websites, like Facebook or Skype, and another one or two more secure passwords for more sensitive uses, such as email or online banking. And it wouldn’t kill you to write them down somewhere and store them somewhere not far away, because your main security threat is not the person who breaks into your home to steal your valuables, but some professional in an office in Russia, or his mom’s basement in Dakron, sniffing around for trouble. Protect yourself with strong passwords. Dan LaRocque is the owner and operator of Up Your Media, District 69’s only Apple Certified Computer Technician. He’ll be teaching an Introductory to Macintosh Computers at Vancouver Island University this fall, check the guide for details.

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Treatment

Do you have unwanted hair? Volunteers needed for electrolysis intern. Treatments will be done under the supervision of a certified electrologist. If interested, please call

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Our family has proudly served the Oceanside communities since 1998. We believe in providing the highest level of service in a professional and affordable manner, without compromising our commitment to reliable and respectful service to our families.

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NEW GENERALS COACH BRENT DEMERAIS BRINGING A BIT OF ‘OLD-SCHOOL’ TO OCEANSIDE

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Sylvain Giroux photo

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by Rita Levitz

T

he day was to begin simply enough —meet Arlene Veenhof at her home in Bowser to see what she laughingly called the Pacific Spirit Wear “sweatshop”; proceed with her to PineRidge Farm to interview her with Pacific Spirit Wear business partner Kris Masson; and along the way somehow solve the still outstanding problem of what to get two “very boy” grandchildren for their birthdays, the presents needing to be wrapped and ready as soon as I returned home from the interview. Another toy truck? Please, no…but weeks of thinking about it hadn’t helped. “We’re a full-service embroidery company capable of supplying any type of promotional, branding or logo work for a company, club, or team. We provide embroidery, silkscreening, digital fabric printing or heat transfers on hats, shirts, sportswear – really, any clothing item – and supply branded pens, notebooks, glassware…you name it,” explains Arlene. “When Kris and I bought the business eight months ago, my husband said, ‘Embroidery? Are you kidding?’ But a few days later he said, ‘I’ve been looking around, and logos are everywhere!’”

“Luckily, we both thrive on problem-solving and having our brains stretched. And yes, at least one of us is usually laughing, even if the other isn’t!” added Kris. They have embroidered uniforms for Hockey and Lacrosse teams, jackets for the Deep Bay Fire Department, shirts and vests for Qualicum Beach City Hall, horse blankets, chef jackets...and, before day’s end, two caps for me!

Arlene Veenhof and Kris Masson • Rita Levitz photo

Although from seemingly diverse backgrounds and experiences, one can imagine the woven threads of their individual lives slowly pulling them closer together. Arlene and her six siblings grew up in Ocean Falls. “There were 10,000 people in town when we first moved there; by the time we left, there were only 2,000. I took my grade 12 in Victoria, and yes, I was just as out-spoken then as I am today. I joined everything…”

The germ of an idea was beginning to form. “Do you have children’s sizes in caps? Can you put names on them? Can you put excavators and front-end loaders on them? Can you do it this afternoon?”

“Sounds familiar,” interjects Kris.

Kris and Arlene had only known each other two months when they bought the business. “We’re both Type-A personalities—hardworkers, risk-takers; we both tend to jump into things,” says Kris.

Arlene joined the military right out of high school. “I thrive in situations where there are lots of demands on me.” She met her husband Bill in the military; they raised their three children amidst the opportunities and challenges that come with military life. “When you only live somewhere for three or four years and the yearly community turnover is 25%, you have to jump in and do things or you don’t have a community.”

It was full speed ahead, with intensity, enthusiasm and, perhaps the most crucial of ingredients, humour. “It’s been a steep learning curve. We’d thought that with my knowledge of threadwork, fabric and machine interplay, and Kris’ background in graphics that we’d know everything, but it turned out we knew absolutely nothing.”

Our community is reaping the benefits of that outlook. Aside from Pacific Spirit Wear and her Long-arm Quilting business, Arlene is a Deep Bay Improvement District Trustee, Chair of the Fire Services Committee, on the Oceanside Tourism Destination Brand Initiative Committee, Vice-chair of the Lighthouse Country Business Association

“Yes, yes and yes,” replied Arlene.

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and a coordinator of the Lighthouse Country Trade Show, to be held on April 28, 2013. “Our ‘toe in the water’ first attempt was an overwhelming success. This time we’re going to do a full-blown all-day event, using the entire Hall and the outside grounds too.” Kris was born in Winnipeg and spent her formative years in Duncan and Chemainus. “I apprenticed as a graphic artist with my dad at the Cowichan News Leader and then the Ladysmith Chronicle. I’ve been a graphic artist for over thirty-five years. I was the Graphic Arts Manager of the Nanaimo Daily News until six years ago, and now have my own business, Masson Graphic Designs. My husband Paul and I are also in our third season as PineRidge Farm.” The farm business has grown by leaps and bounds. Animal-loving Kris also boards dogs and has two donkeys. “The most challenging thing has probably been weaving this new business into our already busy lives,” says Arlene. “It’s all inter-connected, though. Our biggest source of referrals comes from our business, community and personal networking.” Hours later, Hayden and Ben, beneficiaries of this community networking, played together, proudly wearing their personalized hats, as the soft summer day faded into night. ~ E Y E S O N B C . C O M

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STYLE THE WAY YOU LIKE IT!

Seasons F

all is shaping up as a dazzler with plenty of head-turning trends, from versatile layered looks for day, to glittering gold metallics that light up the night. It’s going to be a good vintage, with this season’s rich, robust shades like merlot, burgundy and bordeaux, along with smouldering purples and plums. London 2012 made Olympian Blue a winner. Gray is the new black, in shades of gun-metal, slate and smoke. And there’s a frenetic splash of last season’s brights in accessory pieces to rev up all those neutral grays, browns and blacks.

Ladies · Mens · Petites All Summer stock on clearance

Ask how you can win a new Fall wardrobe

Fall’s silhouette suits every figure type, loose fitting and layered with lots of leggings. Cardigans are the new jacket

Village Clothing 120 West Second Avenue, Qualicum Beach

250-752-0436

WALKABOUT CLOTHING COMPANY is proud of

the famous national brands it carries. “They’re all well known for top quality”, says owner Penny Powers. She should know, since she’s been outfitting those leading an active lifestyle over the past 12 years. “We’re all about bringing you the best for your lifestyle, travel and comfort.” That includes the new line of durable luggage, fashion bags and accessories, with lifetime warranty from popular Eagle Creek. Now you can ‘walkabout in comfort - walkabout in style’.

LADIES APPAREL & ACCESSORIES

Stunning & Stylish We’re all about helping you look and feel great!

VILLAGE CLOTHING customers have a chance to win a

Fashion Wardrobe Makeover, valued at $500! Offer expires December 31, 2012. Winners will be announced on January 11, 2013. Ask Maureen and Ron for details while you’re browsing the Conrad C and Proportion Petite timeless fashion collection and their boundless selection of fashion for both ladies and men.

Two Great Locations! Qualicum Beach Mon-Sat 10-5pm • Sundays 12-4pm 210 W. Second Ave, Qualicum Beach (corner of Beach & Second Ave) 250-738-0638

SMITHFORD’S COASTAL STYLE is all about style with

a difference, classic chic with an edge, pure luxury knitwear, accessories for fun and flair and healthy shoes to take you anywhere. “We also feature North American and European designed clothing and accessories”. Owner Julia Mountain’s infectious enthusiasm for extraordinary fashion, designed with forgiving lines, will have you falling in love with fall.

Nanaimo Mon-Sat 10-5pm • Closed Sundays 2 Church Street, Nanaimo 250-591-3332 FOR WOMEN OF ALL SIZES AND SHAPES 1 8

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Petite

COASTAL STYLE

PIZZAZZ

FALL FASHION SHOPPING IN QUALICUM BEACH and coats are making a big comeback with volumes of sumptuous folds to wrap around you. Anything goes in accessories, from vintage to verve with loads of sparkle. Belts are still big. Heels are still high, yet slipper flats are it for evening.

Fashion with an Edge

Spirited! Fun-loving Fashion!

EXCITING ≈ DRAMATIC ≈ UNIQUE

NZ Eco-friendly Knitwear. The finest quality Merino Lambswool, Possum -fibre and Silk. Warm, lightweight, incredibly soft. “No Itch” sweaters, capes, cardigans, scarves, hats, socks, gloves, arm warmers. Great colours and styles for him and her.

Falling for fashion is easy at Oceanside’s outlet specializing in affordable quality, personal service and wide selection.

It’s clear that Fall 2012 is heralding its stylish return in the plethora of fashion stores around Qualicum Beach. From favoured classics to dramatic flair, from sport to hiking wear, loungewear to lingerie, petite to plus sizes and lots of accessories to accentuate every outfit, along with the kind of attentive service only specialty shops can provide.

Montreal’s EA designs are comfortable and stylish. Casual, sporty chic comfort and elegance, that is well-priced.

Styles and fits to flatter the “pleasantly petite” part of you!

We asked our advertisers for their interpretations of Fall 2012, and here’s what they had to say…

Sizes 4 to 18+

164 2nd Ave. W., Qualicum Beach

691-A Memorial Avenue Qualicum Beach

250-594-0040

250-752-3400

Discover Our New Fashion Section

PHARMASAVE QUALICUM BEACH has the hottest

new beauty trend to help your skin recover from the affects of seasonal change. BB multi-purpose creams soothe, protect, cover and brighten your skin, helping it look healthy and natural. Sometimes referred to as a blemish or beauty balm, they’re amazing on all skin types. Try one soon and see a visible difference.

BROWN-EYED SUSAN’S is adding bamboo tees and

Hot fashion apparel from Artizan Canadian innovative clothing that’s fashion-forward Versatile • Wearable • Affordable

leggings this Fall in response to customer requests. “Leggings will be fun and funky, with ribbing and textures, some even fleece-lined with added support to smooth us out and make us look great”, says store owner Brenda McConnell. “And we’re bringing in lots of tunics and tops, too”.

PETITE PIZZAZZ owner Dianne Martel is clearly excited about

Newest Trends & Tips

her huge selection of coats arriving soon. “Coats are big news for fall and winter, and we’re seeing the resurgence of the dress, with lots of feminine detail and retro style”. Dianne’s added news is the arrival in October of figure-flattering French Dressing jeans, exclusive to her store in this area. Petite Pizzazz is your Vancouver Island destination petite store.

• Elizabeth Arden brow powder for full, natural brows. • Cat’s eyes with a natural upturn for an instant lift. • Revlon’s Just Bitten Kissable™ balm stain. Lasting colour! • Reds for nails, alternating with grey & taupe.

www.qualicumpharmasave.com S E P T E M B E R

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Wednesdays 5pm Build Your Own Pasta Dinner

choose chicken or seafood as your main ingredient, pick one of four tasty sauces, then complete your dish with three vegetable choices. All Pasta Dinners served with Garlic +TAX Foccacia Bread and Asiago Cheese

HEALTHY EATS MAKE LABOUR DAY CELEBRATIONS BETTER

Thursdays 5pm Panko Breaded Stuffed Chicken Breast

Swiss & Mushroom Chicken with Mushroom Sauce or Chicken with Cheddar & Broccoli and topped with a 3 Cheese Jalapeno Sauce or Chicken Cordon Bleu with a Garlic Cream Sauce. +TAX

Fridays & Saturdays 5pm We’ve added a second hot dish to our weekly buffets. Is it Meatballs with sweet tomato sauce, Tomato Rose sauce baked with cheese, Seafood Pasta, or BBQ pulled pork. +TAX

Sundays 5pm

(NC)—As summer comes to a close with the Labour Day weekend, families, neighbours and friends will be hosting a lot of get-togethers and feeding the masses. You’re bound to see the usual spread of hamburgers, chips and soda pop. However, if you would like to step it up a notch and mix in an original, healthy and tasty dish that offers your guests a megawatt dose of bio-available minerals, the Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA) has the recipe to do just that. You can find the ingredients at any natural health retailer or visit chfa.ca to find one in your community. Also consider preparing a little ingredients card too, letting your guests know that “healthy” can taste fabulous. Orange Infused Walnut Kale Salad Ingredients (Try to use organic ingredients): • 6-8 handfuls of kale (baby kale that is organic and pre-washed, if possible) • 3/4 cup walnuts • 2 small oranges sliced Dressing: • 1/3 cup sesame or extra-virgin olive oil • 1/2 cup rice vinegar • 4 tbsp orange (naturally) flavoured Omega 3 fish oil. (or hemp or flax oil) • 1/2 cup fresh mint • Fresh juice from 1 orange • 2 tbsp orange rind Method: Place all your dressing ingredients into a food processor and blend till the mint is completely chopped up, about 30 seconds. Place your leafy greens into a large bowl and toss with the dressing. Sprinkle with walnuts and orange slices. (Makes 4 generous servings.) More tasty recipes are available online at chfa.ca.

Music Jam • Three kinds of Pizza

SEPTEMBER

Incredible Seaf

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115 2nd Avenue, Qualicum Beach, BC GarysBistro@shaw.ca OPEN 8AM TO 9PM • 7 DAYS A WEEK

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ood Basket... $ 1695 Panko Breaded Local ‘Fanny Ba & Pan-fried y’ Oysters... $1495 Alaskan Sole st uffed with Shrim p... $1595 Pan-fried Halib ut... $1995

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OLIVES ADD A TASTY TOUCH TO THESE SCALLOP APPETIZERS

There’s a New Lounge in Town! 4-180 W. 2nd Avenue

(NC)—If you’re a seafood fan, try this recipe created by the International Olive Council: Scallop Appetizer Cups (15 appetizers) • 1/3 cup finely chopped pitted ripe olives, drained on paper towels • 3 tablespoons garlic and herbs spreadable cheese • 15 prebaked phyllo shells (1 9-ounce package) • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 clove garlic, slivered • 3 to 4 ounces local scallops, patted dry • 1/4 teaspoon dried tarragon leaves, optional

in the heart of Qualicum Beach

Dining Room

Lunch: 11:30am-2pm • Mon-Fri Dinner: 5pm-10pm • 7 nights per week

Lounge

11:30am-11pm • Mon-Fri 4pm-11pm • Sat & Sun www.giovannisqualicum.com

Come in and enjoy a relaxing drink!

Combine olives and spreadable cheese in small bowl; mix well. Spoon evenly into shells (filling 2/3 to 3/4 full); set aside. Heat olive oil in medium skillet over medium-high heat until very hot but not smoking. Add garlic slivers; cook and stir 10 to 15 seconds until fragrant. Remove and discard garlic. Reduce heat to medium; add scallops. Cook and stir 2 to 4 minutes or until scallops are thoroughly cooked. Remove scallops with slotted spoon. Place 2 to 3 scallops in each shell, pressing lightly. Serve immediately.

Breakfast Lunch & Dinner Fanny Bay Inn www.fannybayinn.com

EVERY SUNDAY! BREAKFAST BUFFET

Fish Tales www.fishtalescafe.com Lefty’s www.leftys.tv

includes coffeeorortea tea includes coffee

Giovanni’s Ristorante www.giovannisqualicum.com Deez Bar & Grill www.deezbarandgrill.com

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+ TAX

Family Restaurant • Children Welcome

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DINNER

Tues to Sun 4pm-9pm

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Add 1 hour to times shown during Pacific Daylight Time - March 11 to November 4

SEPTEMBER 2012

LABOUR DAY LONGINGS & THE JOY OF LEARNING By Joanne Sales

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Gandhi said, “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”

LOCAL TIDE

earning is a luxury. It is hard work when taken seriously, but even so, it is a luxury.

I remember returning part time to university after being home for a few years with two young children. I was in the library one afternoon, studying chemistry, when a woman came through to clean the floors.  It wasn’t my trash she was cleaning up, but still, I was the one she was cleaning up for.  I had to fight the impulse to jump up and say, “Oh don’t worry about that.  I’ll get to it sooner or later.”  Instead, I sat, pretending to study, and watched the woman work. I sincerely hope the cleaning woman gets the same opportunity I had.  Education works best when we take turns supporting each other’s endeavors.  Being allowed the freedom, time and resources to learn is indeed an honor.

Our tide table measurements are taken from the Hornby Island substation. For other tides, visit http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/english/Canada.shtml on the Internet. Printed courtesy Canadian Hydrographic Service. Add 1 hour to times shown during Pacific Daylight Time - March 11 to November 4, 2012.

The beginning of September is Labour Day weekend. A final fling, an honorary celebration to those who labor, and then it is time to return to whatever we have been vacationing from.  If summer is time out, autumn is time in. Our children are going back to school with new packs of paper and sharpened pencils.  If we are honest with ourselves, we’ll admit that a part of us wants to “go back”, too.  Not literally, but there is some kind of undefined longing.  I believe we are longing for clean, empty notebooks and the prospect of filling them with newness.  We too want to learn and change and grow.  We want to get on with our education. In the 60’s, young people dropped out of college like ripe choke cherries because, as we said, “School gets in the way of our education.”  Well, that isn’t always true, but I like the idea that we are continuing our education outside of school. A good teacher is priceless jewel, classes help us overcome inertia, and in school, we learn techniques that are transferable.  But we don’t have to hire a teacher in order to learn.  We are learners by nature. continued next page

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For all our lip service to our concern about children’s education, our society doesn’t encourage us to continue our education. Entertainment industries and the profiteers of materialism would prefer that we keep our eyes on the surface.  But entertainment is a poor substitute for the deeper joy of learning.

Join us for worship, prayer and fellowship with others from the community

During one of the more down periods of my life, I taught myself how to rewire the electricity in our old house. Late at night, instead of sulking, I read about electrical codes, and during the day I became familiar with things that at first struck fear into my heart: three-way switches, ground wires, and armored cable.  It was great therapy.  It gave me confidence to rewire the weak connections in my psyche.

Sunday Worship 10:00 am

When a dictator or tyrant wants to take over a country, the first thing they’ll do is get rid of the intellectuals and scientists. They know all too well that knowledge is power.  Internal knowledge is inner power. Democracy is dependent on an educated people.  Not just politically educated – but that too.  Not just intellectually educated – but that too.  We also need to know how to “feel” things (emotional intelligence), and we need to know how to “do” things. In the 1950s, Aunt Jimmy took the family car in for a repair and the mechanic said, “I can’t work on this car.  It has too many handmade parts!”  Handmade parts?  Apparently, Uncle Curtis had kept the car running in ingenious and creative ways.  Some of the parts are even made out of wood. I respect how such people continued their education in such practical ways.  They would probably say they were hobbies.  Fine. Then hobbies make us strong and smart.   Hobbies are what we do of our own free will, on our own time. Our infatuation with the “professionals” is both a benefit and a curse.  We put our health in the hands of doctors, the mechanic fixes our car, and we let Pillsbury bake our birthday cakes.  We should be keeping our hands in more of those mixing bowls. We’re never too old to learn.  This September, we too could open a new notebook! Learn a second language or computer program. Develop a new skill, from knitting to bike repair.  Learn to be a dowser or painter.  Meditate or write or make wine.  Study quantum physics or art history.  Join a tai chi class or volunteer.  On purpose. I love finding nuggets of wisdom in unexpected places.  In the movie, “The Natural,” the heroine explains that we have two lives: the life we learn with, and the life we live afterwards.  I like that.  It is a very forgiving way to live one’s life.  And it encourages us to keep growing, in spite of our blunders. My Uncle Otto took me to a Washington Senator’s baseball game many decades ago.  He was showing me how to keep score.  I must have offered some resistance because he said, “If you have a chance to learn something, go ahead and learn it.  Some day you may be glad.”  I couldn’t have been more than 10 years old at the time, but even in my memory, the bleachers and the sky lit up.  The universe seemed like an exciting place to be. It is.

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And even grown-ups are entitled to clean notebooks in September. ~ Joanne Sales is a writer, organic blueberry farmer and EFT practitioner in Qualicum Beach. Contact her at joanne@glasswing. com. S E P T E M B E R

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SHINGLES prepared by Lucy Churchill, RN HAVE YOU HAD YOUR SHINGLES VACCINE YET? IF YOU HAVE HAD CHICKENPOX, YOU ARE AT RISK.

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pproximately 95% of Canadians have had Chickenpox and are at risk for Shingles. There is no way to predict who will get it or when it will occur. The risk of Shingles increases with age, as we get older, our body can’t defend itself against the shingles-causing virus (Varicella) as well as it could when it was younger.

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MEDICATION REVIEW A Medication Review is a service provided by our Pharmacists in a personalized appointment, which is available to enhance your health outcomes. Each of your medications is reviewed and optimal use is discussed. A plan is made to manage any issues uncovered and you will be provided with a comprehensive list of your medications.

In Canada it is estimated that nearly 1 out of 3 people will develop shingles in their lifetime. What is shingles? The same virus that causes chickenpox causes Shingles, also known as Herpes Zoster. Once a person has had Chickenpox, the Varicella Virus becomes dormant (meaning inactive) in certain nerve tissues. If it becomes active it can cause Shingles. Shingles is a painful, blistering rash that can last several weeks and cause skin infections and scarring. The nerve pain that comes from shingles can last for months or even years, after the rash heals. For some people the pain can be excruciating, interfering with normal everyday necessities including walking and sleeping. What to look for:

Our Pharmacists are dedicated to promoting safe and effective use of your medications.

The first symptoms of Shingles are often felt before they are seen and can include: Itching • Tingling • Burning • Pain A few days later, a rash with fluid filled blisters generally appears (typically on one side of the body or face). These blisters may take from two to four weeks to heal.

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The aftermath of shingles: For most people, the pain associated with the Shingles rash usually lessens as it heals. For some, Shingles can cause severe pain after the rash has healed which can last for months or even years. This long-term pain is called post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and occurs when the virus that causes Shingles damages certain nerves. The type of pain can vary and may be described as: Burning and throbbing • Stabbing and shooting • Constant and intermittent For many PHN sufferers, even the touch of soft clothing brushing against the skin can be excruciatingly painful. Other potentially serious complications from Shingles include skin infection, scarring and a decrease or loss of vision or hearing. Don’t wait. If you think you may have Shingles, talk to your doctor or healthcare professional immediately so that you can begin treatment, if needed, as soon as possible. Talk to your doctor today about getting the Shingles vaccine. 2 4

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s this month is the one year anniversary of my work appearing regularly in EyesOnBC Magazine, I thought it would be fun to present one of my more ‘heart in array’ kind of poems.

On the Rocks Scotch and love on the rocks both can be hard to swallow one can bring tears to the eyes the other tears from your heart.

‘On the Rocks’ is one of those poems that came out of nowhere in my celebral mass! It was written as you see it within ten minutes, including editing, from the first letter hitting the paper. I have been told that many writers’ best work is created in this manner...I’m not sure...I will let you be the judge. But it is, to me, a decent introspective poem and what would any poem be if didn’t make one look to the future from the past? I hope that you enjoy it. The words and thoughts are real to many of us who have reached for ice cubes and a glass at two in the morning.

One easy to walk away from the other impossible to outdistance one mellows with time the other always feels like just yesterday One takes you gently the other can take you to your knees one is forever easy to look forward to the other takes you completely by surprise. One allows you to toast your fortune the other to ponder a treasure lost one may take a day to get over the other you never truly get over...ever. One can be done alone the other takes just two one can be stirred the other shakes your very soul one is measured by age alone the other can happen regardless of age one is referred to with words of respect the other with words you wish had never been said. You get to choose the one from the other. Irish

Michael B. Poyntz, author of ‘Dusk to Dusk’ has over 150 poems published on www.poetrysoup.com/Irish. His ‘That Canadian Poet’ greeting cards are available at many gift shops, book stores, and other fine retail outlets on Vancouver Island, and can be also found at all BC Ferry on-board gift shops.

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THE CURTAIN IS ABOUT TO GO UP ON A NEW SEASON OF ECHO PLAYERS THEATRE

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s this is written, it’s early August, summer is in full glorious heat, ECHO Players still has their Village Theatre rented to Bard to Broadway for another two weeks, and ECHO members are well into preparations for their 2012/2013 season of plays.

ECHO rents a facility on Van Horne Road in Hilliers where the challenging ‘set’ for this production is currently under construction. There’s been some headscratching moments for the set designer and his team of volunteers who are building a rotating stage with a rostrum to safely hold six dining tables, several chairs, doors for entrances and exits, a large window seat with window overlooking an exterior view, and an elegant stained glass window on yet another wall.

First onto the ‘boards’ will be Terence Rattigan’s “Separate Tables”. Born 101 years ago, Terence Rattigan was considered one of the 20th century’s most popular and successful writers and his plays are considered perennial favourites. He specialized in stylish ‘well-made’ plays about the English middle-class and its deceptively genteel discontents. Drama critics state that now the ‘swinging 60’s’ have passed themselves into history, it’s possible once again for playgoers to unapologetically savour his sharp wit and elegant craftsmanship. “Separate Tables” is the collective name of two one-act plays both taking place in the Beauregard Private Hotel, an elderly and ornate facility used as both a permanent place of residency and a holiday home for those seeking the fresh air of Bournemouth, a seaside town on the south coast of England.

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All the cast has to do now is learn their lines so that Director Gerri Hemphill can whip their characters into shape! Come see how the whole show comes together. “Separate Tables” runs from October 11 – 28 at the Village Theatre Qualicum Beach. Tickets online at info@echoplayers.ca or by phone at 250-752-3522.

The ‘set dresser’ meanwhile is visualizing cable drums for the tables, draped with white floor length cloths accentuated by the soft light of table lamps - hopefully! Floor length drapes will be ‘run up’ to cover the windows, and with pictures, knick-knacks and flowers, a tasteful room should emerge.

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Submitted by: Aileen Fabris - 250-951-0324 aileenfabris@shaw.ca

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Homage to the birds: the unique design and creative inspiration of Parksville sculptor, Mike Rebar • David Morrison

Mike Rebar: Rock Star by David Morrison

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ne of the many simple chores I would cheerfully undertake to earn pocket money as a kid was the maintenance and replenishment of the bird bath in our yard. Moulded in concrete, mildly ornate, and of the universal ‘shallow bowl atop a plinth’ design, it was just your average, common-or-garden bird bath. In the gorgeously manicured front and back yards of our own (advertising sales guy) Frank Hladik and his wife Arlene’s Qualicum Beach home are two bird baths as far from average, or traditional, as can be imagined. Both were created as commissioned pieces by Parksville stone sculptor, Mike Rebar, the one gracing the front yard completed just a few weeks ago. This enhancement of Frank & Arlene’s home is crafted from a large boulder that was already in place. At around 10 feet wide and 6 feet tall, it weighs several tons, and was long viewed by Frank and Arlene as something that Rebar, whom they have known for a decade, could transform into something special. The end result emphatically supports their hunch! “Mike drilled a hole through the centre,” explains Frank, “to see if it could be done, because some rock is so hard you can’t do it. Then when he’d worked out the water flow he took his saw believe it or not, it is all sawn – and created this beautiful bird bath over just two weeks. We left the design to Mike, but Arlene said she wanted water coming out of the top, flowing down into a not necessarily big pond, but just enough so the birds would have a bath and drink on the rock. Well, they love doing it and we’ve been getting visits from chickadees, nuthatches, flickers, woodpeckers, pigeons, and even hummingbirds.” 2 8

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The quality of this creation is that, especially at distance, Rebar’s subtle, cascade waterfall design leaves the rock looking perfectly natural in accordance with its surroundings, yet at the same time, in closer proximity, it stands as a beautiful and inventive work of garden art. Sitting close to the bird bath to observe the avian visitors it is intended to serve is a joy indeed, so just as they have been with the smaller, though no less stunning Rebar marble bird bath in their back yard, Frank and Arlene are utterly delighted with their investment. To gaze upon Rebar’s gorgeous and unique work (at his studio and on his website: details below), it is mind-boggling to consider that he has only been working in stone, principally marble and granite, for just eleven years. Yet it is evident he possesses the innate ability and artistic faculty to take these challenging materials and shape them into something magical. And when admiring a Rebar piece, like one of his sexy marble wine racks, it is easy to forget or not even consider the sweat and labour that goes into its creation. As Rebar explains concerning the completion of the new bird bath, stone carving is certainly not work for cissies! “In total it took about seven working days, but the working day of a rock sculptor is usually between four and six hours, because of the sheer physical effort. In my shop I can move stone around to be positioned as I need it, but when you’re working outside on a rock like that, it is you that has to move, so physically this is tough to do. There are not that many stone carvers, because it takes a lot of time; it’s dirty, heavy, dusty, and you need a lot of patience. You

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Mike Rebar: Rock Star - continued can’t start a piece in the morning and have it done by the afternoon, so there’s no instant gratification.” As I am obviously no expert on his chosen discipline, Rebar’s working methods are best explained by quoting directly from the biography available at his studio and art shows: “Mike sees the integral form of each piece inside the stone then works with traditional hand tools, carbide chisels and diamond blades until his vision emerges. Fine details are achieved with hand files followed by wet and dry sanding to complete the process. He creates freeform and realistic designs that continue to evolve as the stone is worked.”

Bird bath detail • David Morrison photo

Easier written, said and read than done, but from what he tells me this simplistic summation does seem to express Rebar’s creative process to a tee. The design evolution component is particularly interesting, however, because the nature of the materials with which Rebar works means his plans for a piece may not be able to remain…ahem…carved in stone. “Normally I plan my designs,” he says, “and with this one I had a plan too, but I didn’t present Frank and Arlene with my drawings because I know them well, and as she trusts me, Arlene had said I could do whatever I want. Sometimes you have an idea but the stone ‘argues’ with you, so you just adjust, and as you work mishaps can happen, but they present the opportunity for a different piece! Anyway, you just keep going and coming up with a different plan, but I always come up with a base plan, a secondary plan, and usually third and fourth plans!” Every kind of workable rock will present its unique challenges to a stone sculptor, and each artist will have their favourite to work with. Rebar favours marble: “I have fallen in love with that particular stone. There’s plenty of it here and there will be thousands of years from now, so I get caught up in its history, but I also like the colours and how smooth it is.” Yet having rightly earned a sterling reputation as a stone sculptor, Rebar is a man who both enjoys and is highly skilled at sculpting in considerably less compacted materials. To be precise, sand and ice! He competes each year in both the Quality

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Foods Canadian Open Sand Sculpting Competition & Exhibition in Parksville, and the Fire and Ice Street Festival in Qualicum Beach. Rebar has a lot of fun doing so, but as an independent artist naturally also views such events as valuable opportunities for exposure. “I once lived in Harrison Hot Springs and they used to have a sandcastle competition there,” he says. “I used to think it was silly, and for ‘kids’ – this was in the 90s - but I didn’t go and look and didn’t realize what was involved. Coming out here, where the sandcastle competition is a big deal, I think it just rubbed off and I got involved.”

But it is his commissions for wonderful garden sculptures, exquisite abstract carvings and practical work, like freeform stone bathroom vanities, that have made his name and help pay the bills. Yet this richly talented man is so self-effacing that he tells me, without cracking his face, “I don’t know much about stone!” Ha! I guess as ‘rock stars’ go, this one is just a normal, humble guy. ~ Mike Rebar’s studio and gallery is at 833 Breakwater Road, Parksville. Please call (250) 248-4676 and visit www.bigrockbc. com for further information.

Another string to Rebar’s bow is his standing as the current ‘artist of choice’ for the creation of annual awards for the Qualicum Beach Chamber of Commerce. Indeed, (as The Beacon) this magazine proudly received a Rebar-sculpted New Business of the Year award in 2005. Mike Rebar with one of his ‘sexy’ wine racks • David Morrison photo

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Bowser Georgia Park Store Liquor Store Agency Post Office Fishing Tackle Lottery Centre Groceries

250-757-8386 Fax 250-757-8386

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First Class Thursday September 6th, 2012

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• Your Neighbourhood Pet food Supper Store • Farm Feed • Garden Supplies • Rental Equipment

Gym memberships and punch passes are also available at the Powerhouse Fitness Club. Call for details 778-424-FITT or visit us online at www.powerhousefitnessclub.com

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CANADA: THE THIRD COUNTRY TO PUT ITS TECHNOLOGY INTO ORBIT (NC)—There are many satellites from more than 50 countries orbiting the Earth. But one stands out for its unique place in Canadian history. In the early 1960s, only two countries built satellites — the United States and the former Soviet Union, the two superpowers. This changed on September 29, 1962. The launch of Alouette 1 made Canada the third country with a homegrown satellite in space. Understanding the ionosphere In 1959, NASA invited countries to submit ideas for space experiments. Canada suggested studying the ionosphere. Back then, long-distance radio signals were bounced off the ionosphere. But the aurora borealis caused interference. So understanding the ionosphere was important to a vast, northern country needing reliable communications to unite its far flung people. However, the instruments needed were too big for existing satellites. So, Canada would have to build its own.

Getting a space program off the ground John H. Chapman, from London, Ontario, is the father of Canada’s space program. He assembled a team of scientists, engineers and other experts who could build a satellite capable of mapping the global structure of the ionosphere. They enlisted Canadian companies to help with design and manufacturing. Spar Aerospace, for example, made a “roll-up” antenna that was later used on many American satellites. The team produced two satellites, including a backup later launched as Alouette 2. This hard-won expertise led to more Canadian “firsts”. The first domestic communications satellite — Canada’s Anik A1 — helped television reach the North. Canadian RADARSAT satellites can see through clouds and are used for disaster relief and environmental protection. Eight Canadian astronauts have been to space. Canadarm, adorned with the Maple Leaf,

was essential to space shuttle missions and this robotics technology is still used on the International Space Station. Exploring new frontiers Canada’s reputation for excellence continues to open doors into the most high-profile missions — including the Mars Science Laboratory, which lands on the red planet on August 6, 2012. Also next year, Chris Hadfield will become the first Canadian to command the International Space Station. Alouette 1 exceeded all expectations and was shut down after ten years. But not only will it orbit for another 1,000 years, its legacy lives on, too. Today, the Canadian Space Agency is headquartered in the John H. Chapman building. From there, Canadians coordinate our country’s space program to expand knowledge of the universe, improve quality of life for Canadians and make life better for all of humanity.

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FINDING THE PERFECT USED CAR By Scott Neil (NC)—The new school year means new classes, new friends and, for many students, a new commute. Most students have to hit the road before they can hit the books, so finding a reliable car on a student budget is the semester’s first lesson. Whether you’re a student heading to your first new home-away-from-home, or looking for a cool but reliable way to get to class, there’s still time to find the perfect used vehicle. Here are some practical, simple tips to help you find the perfect car on a budget, as well as a list of the most reliable used cars under $10,000: • Always ask the seller for the Used Vehicle Information Package (UVIP) and request a copy of the vehicle’s CarProof Vehicle History Report. • Have a professional inspection done by a licensed technician. This can help avoid unanticipated problems and expenses later on. • Arrange the test drive when the engine is completely cold to get a better idea of how the car starts, regardless of how long it’s been parked.

• Count the miles and the time. Vehicles today are built to last longer than vehicles built decades ago. You may need to consider some maintenance when a vehicle has accumulated over 100,000 kilometres.

• 2004 Ford Mustang (V6): More attitude and character than most cars at this price point.

Kijiji Canada’s Top Five Back to School Cars for Under $10,000:

• 2007 or 2008 Pontiac Vibe: While GM retired the Pontiac brand, the Vibe is a still a versatile hatchback with lots of space.

• 2005 or 2006 Honda Civic: Sporty, fun, and reliable, this has been a top seller in Canada for over the past 10 years, so there are lots to choose from.

Scott Neil is the head of vertical business at Kijiji Canada. He is responsible for the strategy, operations and development of vertical businesses at the company, including Canada’s most visited car site, Kijiji Autos

• 2005 or 2006 Mazda3: A great alternative to the Civic, but a bit more stylish. • 2007 or 2008 Hyundai Elantra: A few years newer than most of the other models on the list, the Elantra is a reliable, comfortable, and predictable car.

Illusion Lake Sand & Gravel

FIND US ONLINE

Off Horne Lake Road

www.eyesonbc.com www.facebook.com/eyesonbc.com

• CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES • SAND & GRAVEL

VILLAGE GARAGE

For those larger projects… Call for delivery or to Arrange pick-up

(1990) Ltd.

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS IN THE TOWN LICENSED AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNICIAN FOR

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC VEHICLES

Trucks for Hire • Pick Up or Delivery

For smaller quantities… Call or stop by our Gravel Mart at 911 Church Rd., Parksville, BC

(250) 3 2

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248-3693

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OIL CHANGES • BRAKE SERVICE • TUNE UPS EXHAUST SYSTEMS • BATTERY • TIRE SALES Mon-Fri 7:30-6 Gas Only Sat 9-6 • Sun 10-5

(250) 752-9542

665 Memorial, Qualicum Beach •

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Aries (March 21-April 19) You’re thinking about how to get healthier. Naturally, we all feel an increased focus on dietary needs and eating habits in the month ahead because this Virgo Sun this month loves organizational systems. “I always keep my keys/ passport/Scotch tape/scissors/favourite lubricant/ (fill in the blank) in the same place.” Therefore, physical efficiency and health will be your focus plus you’ll refine your approach to work because you want results! Yesterday! (Typically Aries.) Taurus (April 20-May 20) Even though millions have partied their faces off in the past six weeks, you’re just gearing up for a month of pleasure, flirtation, parties, romance, vacations and fun with children and sports. The bottom line is you want to be free to do your own thing. Great! How timely, because the stars will now make you feel lighter, happier and more fun-loving. (Can you click your heels like Gene Kelly?) Actually, not only will you have more fun just being yourself, you’ll encounter opportunities to become more aware of who you really are.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) This month you’re focused on cash flow, earnings and figuring out where your money goes. Ka-ching! First you have to know just how much is coming in. (Information is power.) When you see clearly how much is coming in and where it’s going out, you’ll get a better picture of your situation. Although you can be a generous spendthrift, you can also save big amounts of money in a short time when you’re motivated to do so. Leos rock! Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The Sun is back in your sign boosting your energy plus attracting people and favourable situations to you. Since this only happens once a year, make the most of it. You’re a strong communicator now, which benefits those of you who sell, market, teach, write or promote anything for a living. It’s also a strong time for those of you who drive for a living. Meanwhile, fair Venus continues to attract creative, artistic people to you. Go do that voodoo that you do so well.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) This month the Sun is hiding in your chart, which means this is a good time Gemini (May 21-June 20) Family reunions, class for you to hide as well. And while you’re hiding or reunions and increased time spent with relatives working behind the scenes, it’s the perfect time to and family members is on the menu for Geminis plan what you want your new personal year (birthday this month. This is an excellent time for some selfto birthday) to be all about. If you’re specific about evaluation. Yes, we are a product of our backgrounds, your goals, including deadlines, the chances of but no, we don’t have to keep playing those tapes. achieving those goals are much higher than if you Too often as adults we keep responding to others like don’t make any goals and instead live willy-nilly with we did when we were kids. Naturally, some of these management-by-crisis. behaviour patterns are no longer appropriate. (Don’t Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your popularity is rising. take your soother to the office.) Groups, clubs and friendships make demands on Cancer (June 21-July 22) Not only will your your time. Fortunately, Mars in your sign boosts your schedule be busier this month, your mind will be energy and helps you keep up this mad social pace. racing as well. Many will read and study more than Travel for pleasure beckons and new, blossoming usual, plus take short trips, run errands and talk to romance with someone from a different culture is many people. It’s true we all have only 24 hours in possible. This is the perfect time to define your dreams each day. (In that respect, we’re all created equal, for the future. After all, the future is unchartered whether you’re a street person or Bill Gates.) But territory so you need a map to get where you want to trust me -- you will jam more activity into your 24 go. Right? hours than ever before. Travel for pleasure and enjoy your world!

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The Sun is now at top of your chart acting like a spotlight on you for the next six weeks. And hey, because this lighting is flattering, bosses notice you more and offers will come your way. Accept them because you’ll easily pull off whatever others expect from you. (Piece of cake!) Discussions with parents and bosses will be significant. Romance will be passionate and affectionate. In fact, gifts, goodies and favours from others will come your way, so keep your pockets open. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It’s time to get outta Dodge. You want to get away from it all. Travel somewhere or book a vacation for the future to feel happier and have something to look forward to. You’re eager to learn something new because you want more out of life. People from other cultures and different countries will intrigue you. Romantic relationships are warm; in addition to which, group activities are abundantly physical! Hmmm, looks like team sports and gym classes for many of you. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) This month you feel passionate! Intimacy will be hot. (You devil.) But your passion will also extend beyond the bedroom. You’ll feel passionate talking to everyone about anything! Mars is high in your chart now arousing your ambition and Mercury is opposite your sign encouraging intense conversations with others. You’ve got big plans and big ideas that you want to bounce off others to get their feedback. Where do you want to be in five years? Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) This month the Sun is opposite your sign, which is as far away from you as it gets all year. Because the Sun is your source of energy, this means you’ll need more sleep. This “opposite” Sun also focuses your mind on partnerships and close friendships, which is this is the perfect time to form working units with others. It’s also a good time to analyze your style in relationships. You have to be as good for your partner as he or she is for you and vice versa. ~

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Community Event Calendar September 2012

LIGHTHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE (LCC) Qualicum Bay - INFO: LOIS NELSON: 757-9938

CREDITMASTER MORTGAGE Renovate your kitchen...get a new car...buy a vacation home...go travelling...pay for your child’s tuition... consolidate your bill payments...invest!

Live your dream ...it’s possible! Ask any staff member at your local branch.

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BRIDGE at LCC Nordin Room – 1:00 – 4:00pm Friday afternoons. FMI Call: Sheila Steele 250757-8307.

LIGHTHOUSE COMMUNITY HALL PANCAKE BREAKFAST – Sunday, Sept. 9 - 8am to Noon, Pancake Breakfast, Poultry Swap, Flea Market, LIGHTHOUSE COUNTRY SCRAPBOOKERS – meet Live Music on the Hall Stage. The Hall Board 3rd Saturday monthly at the Lions Den, Qualicum will be cooking up breakfast this morning. Bay, 9:30am - 4:30pm, $10. Door prizes. FMI: Jorgie 250-757-8358 or Shirley 250-757-8384. LIGHTHOUSE SENIORS #152 – Next meeting, Monday, September 10th at the Lighthouse BOWSER LEGION – RCL BRANCH #211 LADIES Community Centre - hope to see everyone AUXILIARY – Meets at 2 p.m. the first Thursday back! FMI Call Shirley at 250-757-2384. of each month. We serve our Veterans, Branch and the greater community. FMI Contact Joyce BOWSER TENNIS CLUB - at the Legion Courts at joyce.bartram@shaw.ca or 250- 954-9787 or Novice Night - Mondays 6:30pm - coaching for Evelyn at wefoot@shaw.ca. beginners 16+yrs FREE Club Drop-in – Thurs 6:30pm, Sun 9-11am, Ladies Morning Drop-in TAOIST TAI CHI Classes at LCC and Fanny Bay OAP - Tues 9-11am. FMI Call 250-757-8307. Hall. New beginner classes start September. FMI Call: Susan 250-757-2097. LIGHTHOUSE COUNTRY FALL FAIR – Mark Sept 1, 2012 on your calendar for the 42nd LIGHTHOUSE TRAILS GROUP needs your help. Annual Lighthouse Country Fall Fair! This FMI Call: Val Weismiller: 250-757-9667. year is looking like another great year with great entertainment, a kid’s zone, petting LIGHTHOUSE RECREATION INFO PATTY: FMI zoo, games, exhibits, vendors, raffle and Call: 250-757-8366 or email shipshore@shaw.ca. silent auction, and much more. Volunteers are needed to make this one our best ever. RDN RECREATION PROGRAMS Call Sheena at 757-9991 to get involved! Our PRESCHOOL & CHILDREN exhibit guides have come out and can be Children’s Yoga 5-11yrs - Children can do picked up at local retailers or viewed online at yoga too! Join Shandora for this interactive www.communityclub.ca yoga class. Children will improve strength, balance, coordination and flexibility in a fun, LIGHTHOUSE FLOOR CURLERS – Mondays relaxed environment. Bowser Elementary School. only. Fall Curling commencing Sept 10 with a Tuesdays 3:00-4:00pm. Sept. 25 – Oct. 30. $35/6. Corn Roast for Club Members – this is a free day. Curling at 1:00 roast to follow. Lions Home Alone 9-12yrs - Be prepared! Learn to Rec. Hall, Qualicum Bay. Drop in $2. FMI Call: manage general safety, fire safety, emergency Dennis Leach 250-757-8218. phone calls, strangers and snack ideas for times when you are left alone at home for brief periods. LIGHTHOUSE SPINNERS – Tuesdays 10:30Bowser Elementary School. Sat., Nov. 17. 9:00am2:30pm in the Community Centre Board Room. 12:00pm. $26. New members welcome. FMI Jo 250-757-8402. YOUTH CARPET BOWLING at LCC: Closed for the Babysitter Certification - Learn valuable, Summer. Commencing again first Tuesday of practical information and become a certified October. FMI Call Layne 250-757-8217. babysitter. Be more confident and knowledgeable so you can go out and get your next job. AA LIGHTKEEPERS: Fridays at 8pm at the Price includes manual and certificate. Bowser Lighthouse Community Centre, 240 Lions Way, Elementary School. Sat., Nov. 3. 9:00am-4:00pm. Qualicum Bay. FMI Call: 250-757-8347. $43.25 2 0 1 2

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tone and define muscles while focusing on the whole body including the heart and lungs. Lighthouse Community Centre. Wed. 9:3010:30am Sep 26-Nov14. $65/8. COMMUNITY EVENTS September 4 - THE PARKSVILLE & DISTRICT CHOIR – Begins rehearsals for our December Concert: “Messiah Excerpts and Festive Christmas Music” Tues., Sept 4th 7 p.m. at Knox United Church Parksville, Annual Fee $90. All Oceanside area singers welcome FMI Call 250-752-8130.

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN SEPTEMBER! www.rcl211.ca

September 9 - FALL CRAFT FAIR - Sunday, Sept. 9, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm at Union Bay Community Hall. Crafters on two floors and ‘Souper Lunch’. FMI call Dave at 250-335-2317.

Sept 6 • LA General Meeting Sept 25 • Branch 211 Executive Meeting Sept 27 • LA Executive Meeting Hall Rentals 250-757-9222 • Tue to Fri 9:00 am - 12 noon Sept 1 • LA Pie Sale & LCC Fall Fair Sept 1 • Giant Meat Draw (Prime Ribs) Sept 23 • Honours & Awards.......................................1:00 pm

September 11 - SPRING BULBS: THE FIREWORKS OF THE FLOWER WORLD - join Candice Coghill from Cultivate to learn ways to create impactful displays in containers and the landscape using spring bulbs. Candice will cover what’s new to Cultivate, gardening with deer, general planting and bulb care, and bulb combos for shade/ sun/alpine/wet/dry/etc.  Sept. 11, 7 pm at QB Civic Centre.  www. qualicumbeachgardenclub.com.

Mixed Pool Cribbage Texas Hold’em Mixed Darts Horseshoes

September 12 - CIRCLE EIGHT SQUARE DANCE CLUB - New dancer classes start on September 12th at the Nanoose Hall 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. “Friendship set to music” -- and great exercise too!  FMI Call Janet 250752-1542 or Tony 250-752-9152.

Tuesdays .............................................5:00 pm Wednesdays (Starts Sept 5) ...............7:00 pm Thursdays (Starts Sept 13) ..................7:00 pm Fridays ................................................7:00 pm Sundays ..............................................1:00 pm Open Sundays 1:00-4:00 pm

ADULT TAI CHI – WANG STYLE - Join Lawrie Milne for Tai Chi as taught by Master Henry Wang. Tai Chi is a soft martial art that integrates the mind and the body through a series of slow graceful movements. Students will practice the concepts of concentration, relaxation, centre, balance, circle, coordination and proportion. Wang Style Tai Chi uses an absolutely relaxed condition so that all the external movements are generated by internal movements of the core. Wednesdays Sept. 26 - Nov. 14 3:00-4:00pm or 7:00-8:00pm. $100/8. HATHA YOGA - Use principles of breath, alignment and space to balance softness and strength in this gently guided class. This program is suitable for beginners and beyond. Instructor: Brandy Kosiancic. Bowser Elementary School. Mondays Sept. 24-Nov. 26. Thursdays Sep 27-Nov 15. 6:00-7:30pm, $80/8. ZUMBA ® - A Latin-inspired, dance fitness class that combines dance movements to create a dynamic, exciting, fitness system. The class format combines fast and slow rhythms that tone and sculpt your body in a truly fun way! Come out and join the party! Lighthouse Community Centre Instructor: Jessica Whittman. Tuesdays 9:30-10:30am. Sept. 25-Nov. 13. $70/8.

September 13 - THE MID ISLAND FLORAL ART CLUB will meet on Thurs., Sept. 13 at 2:00pm at St. Stephens Church Hall, 150 Village Way, Qualicum Beach. Join us for an afternoon with Margaret Leeuw who will demonstrate some Thoroughly Modern Designs. It is time to look beyond the obvious in order to transform flowers and foliage into modern floral designs. All welcome. Guest fee $5.00. Call 250-7522179 or 250-248-3784 for more info. www.mifac.org September 19 - THE QUALICUM BEACH FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY – Will hold it’s monthly meeting at 7:00pm on Wed., Sept. 19 at the QB Legion. Guest Speaker, Oceanside Star reporter Brad Bird, the topic “My Dear Boy: A Family’s Wartime Letters and Memoirs from 1915 to the Kosovo Conflict”. All guests are welcome. September 22 - GIANT GARAGE AND BOOK SALE – Sat., Sept. 22. 9am - 2pm. At Union Bay Community Hall. Large selection of items. All proceeds to go to Tour-De-Rock. FMI Call Donna McKay At 250-335-2147 September 24 - THE LUNCH - A FASHIONABLE AFTERNOON BY THE SEA - 2nd Annual luncheon in support of Ovarian Cancer Canada at Tigh-Na-Mara Seaside Spa Resort. Guests Sheryl MacKay hosts and Dr. Sarah Finlayson, Gynecologic Oncologist, is keynote speaker. Live and silent auction of donated goods and services. Tickets $100. Donations welcome. FMI Call Sharon Wood 250-752-1946 or email sharon@ thelunch.ca.

September 29 - THE QUALICUM BEACH FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY INTRO TO CIRCUIT TRAINING - Join BCRPA Certified fitness leader, weight - Sept 29, 2012, 10 - 12pm, ‘Organizing Your Research’ presented by Sarah Hamster of the Victoria Genealogical Society, contact 250-954training leader, and group fitness leader, Susan Voerman to circuit train! 0758 or email kathy@flyingneedle.ca for more info or to register. This class will mix strength, cardiovascular and flexibility training and is geared to people who are new to fitness. Circuit training is a great way to S E P T E M B E R

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POTTERY CLASSES – Handbuilding and wheel work. To inquire about Fall Classes, please call Anne-Marie at 250-757-8041.

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Need an electrician? Give us a call.

Residential and commercial design, construction and service

250-618-3182

Accommodation

Call Carey in Bowser 250-757-2089 (H) 250-951-3641 (C)

Yoga

Small Truck Loads & Bobcat Service

Septic Installation

Gravel and Landscape Soils

Home Improvement

Electrician

Trucking / Bobcat

Underhill Trucking

Monthly Rentals Available September to April

New 6 Week Beginners Session

starts the week of September 17th. Sign up for one or two classes per week.

Teacher Training starts Sept 29

WWW.MOORESYSTEMS.CA

702 Memorial Ave, Unit 5 Qualicum Beach

DEJA~VU DECOR CUSTOM DECOR & WINDOW COVERINGS

Drywall

Window Coverings

Tea & Accessories

250-594-0108 www.oceansideyoga.com

Call

250-752-8772

Proudly serving District 69

Military Surplus

Excavating

Picture Framing

Convenient In Home Appointments

rcjex@shaw.ca

Canadian Army Thermal Tops & EACH Drawers $ 99

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NOMEX Pants & Jackets EACH

Lawn Services

Insurance

Electrical Services

SUMMER SERVICES

SAME DAY SERVICE, FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES • Lawn Maintenance • Fertilizing • Yard Clean-ups • Aeration • Pruning/Hedges • Power Raking • Rubbish Removal • Odd Jobs Yearly Maintenance Programs

CALL 310-JIMS (5467) www.jimsmowing.ca

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EVENINGS

surveyor-ark@uniserve.com

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL ALTERNATE ENERGY

T.J. Farrell

250 • 240 • 7778

Plumbing Sand - Gravel - Topsoil S E P T E M B E R

Registered Inspector, Treatment Plant Certified & Maintenance Provider

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Heating & Cooling

Foot Care House Painting

IRV MUELLER R.O.W.P.

tjfarrell@shaw.ca

Parts Store Open Mon to Fri 9-4

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Heating

Philip Brown

250-240-4902 • 250-757-8077

Water Systems

Land Surveying Electrician

INSTALLATION SERVICE & REPAIRS

Sani Services

Chimney Cleaning Appliance Repair

#7-1176 Franklin’s Gull Rd, Parksville, BC

PLUMBING • GAS • HEATING

105 Islewood Dr. Bowser, BC V0R 1G0

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Custom Renovations

Ph 250.248.5959 • Toll Free 1-888-842-5959 www.completewindows.ca

Plumbing Gas Heating

Windows & Doors

RENOVATIONS • WINDOWS DOORS • SUNROOMS

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Immature Eagle • Vancouver Island 2010 © Linda Tenney

September 2012 - EyesOnBC Magazine  

Community living in British Columbia - central Vancouver Island edition.