Page 1

dollars sense

the

PTrimeTMime e n i z a ag

ary 201 a0nd

rhode island

Second Han Around th d Shopping e State • stretc hin

ywo l l o h

d f o l h e at r e o c ag i c t o r s • t m e th o v i e s • a

g Yr oue re fasf hion

• eating healthy

$

e e n m i i z e Maga

on a B u We’ll sh d g et ow you how! • a Crus hing Wa The Best ve of ta Years Ho w RI sen xes ior s are aff ected

ife r L

mus

PrimeT

fr ee

Prime e e Tim iagm PTrMime azine z aga ine You r Life The Bes t Yea rs of

endless

iY d travel Home

T h e B es t Ye ar s of Yo u r L if e

M

secr ets

marriage

PossibilitiesThere’s No Place • enjoy the Great outdoors • tips for travelers

ar d ll abo ollectibles

sC • afor ChristmaYour

Bringing it Back!

side Home Modificaintion th is issu e! Habitat for Humanity Shui Going Feng

euroPean f GetawaY o ft

2 co nt es 2 chan ts! to wi nces !

e... iss u

ign w h r i ng! d d c la a

i • thieviGnG baCk G

meTi m Magaze ine

& happy

Like Home

vacations close to home

de is lan d

to a long

Sexy

Improvement

s i d ea

ary 20 09

r h o d e is lan d

free rh od e islan d

rhode island

• take a hike in ri • Gettin g in the G Back arden

ic

febru

march 2009

june 2009

• Ghiors e in retir factors ement

od

of Yourm Life

The Best Years of Your Life

s

ars

free

Foreca

in s

id e

th is

lor rain e

a

! 0 1

Adler’s

Be e etty fr Tools for Success

fr e e

seym oU r ia

n

PlU s...

dati ng advi ce

– lib rary

love rs’ mo nt

h

e l l ri

e G e m n l 0 i i z a a T 2 g t e i a m p i M o r a P t e C PrimeT

of Y our Life

n ov

emb

er

200

9

d r ho

The

ti ps for b ette r a you • easy

exe for every rcises one • food fo r though t • Going f or the Go ld

w

d n i

B

nd

la e is

rs Ye a est

e Ch

m ay 2 0 0 9

s h t r e at our of Y

Life

4 e r t tofathse r fo n e o s a n e i ns into • Bite nksgiving a h s t wiche sand mily or fa • sav ories Mem fill your k • Get iving Bac of G

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

n C es 5 Cha in to w 0

0 0 0 1 City ar de n

$

G

Ce ntesr pree!

shoppin

g

sst


Greenville Inn The

Italian/American Cuisine A family-owned restaurant known for personal attention & service where “everyone knows your name.�

Famous For Prime rib GiFt certiFicates Private Function rooms Your Hosts: The Belknap Family

36 Smith Avenue, Greenville

949-4020

hours: Mon-Sat 4-10pm, Sun 12-10pm

www.GreenvilleInnRI.com

Have a healthy, happy holiday, from the people who have a lot of experience with the healthy part. At The Westerly Hospital, we wish you the best, and that includes making sure you feel your best. So from all of us who care 24/7/365, remember that our expert teams of physicians, nurses and clinical staff are here to do everything possible to give you the gift of good health. 401-596-6000 800-933-5960 | westerlyhospital.org


I

n January of last year, my sentiments to you focused on New Years resolutions - what to accomplish, how to keep them and how we’d all benefit from them. I’m proud to say that I actually stuck to my resolutions last year, but as 2010 kicks off, I find myself less concerned with making rules and more interested in breaking them. It’s been a tough year all around. The nationwide unemployment rate is about 10 percent, people are fed up with politics and most of us have had to cut back on the little extras to stick to a barebones budget. So consider this a special dispensation from your “to do” lists for the New Year. When there’s so much anxiety going around, I for one think it’s time to celebrate the things we should be grateful for. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that last year, close to 62 million people volunteered their time to help people and causes that are worse off. Charitable giving is down, but the National Philanthropic Trust says 89 percent of households give in whatever way, however little, they can. In a lot of ways, this recession is reminding us what’s important. This year, get back to basics. Raise your glasses to the things that matter most and give a toast to 2010. That’s what we did in this month’s PrimeTime. We put our cares aside and celebrated. After all, that’s what New Years is all about. Nothing makes a party like top-notch entertainment, and we’ve got a few characters in this issue. Meet Astrid Drew, who celebrates her heritage through January 2010 song, or Ginny Loring Cook, who has been 1944 Warwick Ave. an entertainer since the age of 4. For theaterWarwick, RI 02889 goers, Don Fowler has a great wrap-up of 401-732-3100 FAX 401-732-3110 what the upcoming season has to offer. Distribution Special Delivery For some feel good news, read about St. Elizabeth Community changing the way PUBLISHERS elder care is done and piloting a vacation Barry W. Fain, Richard G. Fleischer, program that they’re now advocating for at John Howell the state level. Lorette Dussault broke some rules of her own, and decided in her late forEDITOR Meg Fraser ties that it was the best possible time for her megf@rhodybeat.com to start a family. Then there’s Roberta Humble, who is promoting her home state while MARKETING DIRECTOR giving families an affordable way to spend Donna Zarrella quality time together. donnaz@rhodybeat.com And in true New Years fashion, we pulled Creative Director up a stool and picked the brains of two barLinda Nadeau tenders who have been serving up celebralindan@rhodybeat.com tions for a combined 40 years. They’ve heard a lot of stories and seen a few crazy things photo editor behind the bar - and they wouldn’t throw in Darcie DiSaia the towel for anything. darcied@rhodybeat.com Front to back, this issue is a feel-good WRITERS look at Rhode Islanders who are looking on Susan Contreras, Don Fowler, Don D’Amato, the bright side. Let them serve as an examHerb Weiss, Joan Retsinas, Kevin Worthley, ple of what positive thinking can bring. Take F. Steele Blackall III, Mike Fink, Meg Chevalier, a cue from them and kick off your shoes. It’s Heather Fraser, Moira Richardson, Joe Kernan time to celebrate 2010.

PrimeTime agazine M

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Donna Zarrella – donnaz@rhodybeat.com

Carolann Soder, Lisa Mardenli, Janice Torilli, Suzanne Wendoloski, Gina Fugere Classified ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Egan – nicolee@rhodybeat.com Sue Howarth – sueh@rhodybeat.com PRODUCTION STAFF Matt Bower, Joseph Daniels, Brian Geary, Lisa Yuettner A Joint Publication of East Side Monthly and Beacon Communications. PrimeTime Magazine is published monthly and is available at over 400 locations throughout Rhode Island. Letters to the editor are welcome. We will not print unsigned letters unless exceptional circumstances can be shown.

Happy New Year!

TOAST

TO

A

NEW YEAR

IN THIS ISSUE Sounds of the old country................................... 4 Astrid Drew celebrates her heritage through song An unlikely family................................................... 5 Lorette Dussault celebrates building a family Behind the bar........................................................ 6 Two Rhode Islanders serve up and celebrate 2010 Star for the seniors..............................................10 Ginny Loring celebrates a lifetime of performing The good ol’ days.................................................11 Retirees celebrate easy friendships born of hard work Take a ‘Rhode’ trip...............................................20 Creative businesswoman celebrates the Ocean State Fifty years out.......................................................24 Don Fowler celebrates love longlasting

PLUS PROFESSIONAL PERSPECTIVE Your taxes................................................................................................................................. 12 Senior Issues.......................................................................................................................... 16 Savvy Senior............................................................................................................................ 17 FOOD & DRINK Smart choices for the new year.............................................................................. 13 LIFESTYLES That’s Entertainment........................................................................................................ 18 A vacation from the usual............................................................................................ 19 What do you Fink?............................................................................................................. 21 PEOPLE AND PLACES Glimpse of RI’s past......................................................................................................... 22

Meg Fraser editor

February will be a cold one, but things are still burning up with our issue on the trends and to-dos that are hot this year.


DOER’S PROFILE

p

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

by J OAN R ETS I NAS

Astrid Drew

Sounds of the old country Most days Astrid Drew tends to patients on the cardiac unit at Memorial Hospital in Rhode Island. She has been a nurse for 30 years. On Tuesday nights, though, she sings. She joins with 11 other women to sing the songs that some remember from their childhoods. Since 1984, the Scandinavian Women’s Chorus of Rhode Island has been keeping alive Scandinavian folk songs, traditional and modern, while at the same time incorporating American music into their repertoire. Led by music director Stephen Moye, the women’s chorus practices on Tuesday nights at the Scandinavian Home in Cranston. (Their male counterpart – the Verdandi Male Chorus - has the same mission; they practice at the Scandinavian Home on the same Tuesday evenings.) Four to five times a year, the Women’s Chorus gives concerts, often in conjunction with festivals, like the Christmas festival at Bethany Lutheran Church, also in Cranston. The Scandinavian Women’s Chorus joins with the Verdandi Chorus several times a year as well. “This is not a singalong,” Drew said. A committee selects the year’s music beforehand, choosing pieces to accommodate a range of voices from soprano to alto. They aim for half the songs to be in Swedish, though Astrid explains that if a member who knew any of the other Scandinavian languages were to join the chorus, the group would add Icelandic, Norwegian, Finnish, or Danish songs to their repertoire. The chorus includes a few songs from the modern Swedish group ABBA, and audiences recognize the songs from Mamma Mia without necessarily linking them to the group or Sweden. The chorus also includes American songs, folk and modern, with a piano accompaniment. The chorus members range from early 20s to age 70. Astrid is one of two

4 | PrimeTime

members born in Sweden. Born in Karlshamm, she earned a nursing degree in Sweden, then, at age 28, anxious to see a new country, she came to the United States, settling with relatives in Connecticut. She worked first as a nurse’s aide, then, when she got her American nursing credentials, worked in a hospital emergency department. In Norwalk, she met her future husband. In time they moved to Rhode Island, where she raised two sons and a daughter, with the latter also singing in the chorus. And, to the delight of audiences who hear the Scandinavian chorus, Astrid resumed singing the songs of her native country. In as polyglot a nation as the United States, ethnic music groups are common. Name an ethnicity – German, French, Italian, Armenian - and you will likely be able to find a group of singers. This chorus belongs to the American Union of Swedish Singers, an umbrella organization for 700 singers in 31 choruses. Whatever their origins, Americans can enjoy Scandinavian music. Indeed, a few of the chorus members have no familial ties to Scandinavia. They simply love the music. As for the language, lyrics are written phonetically, so everybody can learn. “Säg det med en sång,” becomes “Say it with a song.” Yet the ethnic ties represent only part of the lure. For Astrid, as for most singers, the lure is the joy of singing. “I just love singing. It’s good for your health,” Drew says. “It makes you happy.” Prospective members need not audition. The group welcomes newcomers. If you are interested in learning more about the Scandinavia women’s chorus, contact Astrid Drew by e-mail at astriddrew1@cox.net.? n

January 2010


p

by M EG FRASE R

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

An Unlikely Family Lorette Dussault and her daughter Jess aren’t your typical motherdaughter team. In fact, they didn’t meet until Jess was 12 years old. That was in 2001 when Lorette decided in her forties that she would adopt a teenager. “A while back I had let go of the concept of me having my own child,” Lorette said from her living room couch, an enlarged photo of her daughter commanding attention on the wall opposite her. “My intent was always that I was going to adopt an older youth. It seemed like a good match for me.” Lorette has always been somewhat of a free spirit with her love of travel and thirst for independence. When the time seemed right, she began looking into adoption, taking classes and sifting through piles of photographs of potential children. Overwhelmed by the process, she began a visiting resource instead, which is essentially an adult mentor to children in the foster care system. But when Lorette met Jess, it took less than six months for her to realize she wanted to make the relationship permanent. “She was very sweet, just very open and really curious. There were always a lot of questions,” she recalled of the younger version of her daughter, who is now 21. “At the time she was very excited. She was all for it.” With the support and assistance of Casey Family Services, she said the transition was an easy one. Jess was living in a group home at the time, so the possibility of being part of a family seemed too good to be true. “I think in all kids there’s this ideal of what life’s going to be and then there’s reality. Generally they’ve gone through so many different families there’s no reason for them to believe this is a commitment you’re making,” Lorette said.

January 2010

That became the first, and perhaps largest, challenge in her new role. “The challenge was in helping her understand I would stand by those words,” she said. In time, however, Jess came to realize that Lorette wasn’t going anywhere. She started to experience places and opportunities never before available. What’s more, with Lorette’s large family, Jess suddenly found herself with a vast support network. Although Lorette, who is now 54, recognizes her path to motherhood was uncommon, she said that network was equally important in her decisions and was never anything but supportive. “They were very open. I feel very fortunate in that way,” she said. For many years, she had been the “fun aunt” and when the time came for her to be the one setting limits, she says her family was thrilled at the role reversal. Setting those limits was something Lorette knew she would be confronted with. As a social service professional, she has experience with children and felt prepared to address the issues that come along with being a mom. What she wasn’t prepared for was the aching loss she would feel when her daughter left for college. “That point where they leave is so much sooner so I had a hard time letting her go,” she said, reflecting for a moment before she added with a laugh, “It was traumatic.” Jess is currently studying wildlife care at a small college in Maine. As her three cats wind their way around her legs, Lorette is not surprised that is the path her daughter chose. The two traveled to Africa last spring, where family – PAGE 24

PrimeTime | 5


by M EG FRASE R

A Toast to the New Year

I

t’s not New Years without a New Years toast, but what about the people pouring the drinks? They’re the ones working late on weekends and holidays, and the lone sober faces at last call. From a relative newcomer to a seasoned vet, read his and hers perspectives on life behind the bar.

Shauna Green Pouring a beer without looking, Shauna Green flashes a broad smile as college students and South County seniors pour into the Mews Tavern in Wakefield for a weekday happy hour. Sliding the drink onto the bar, the perfect sized head topping it off, her personality is engaging and interaction genuine. She’s only been behind the bar for five years, but it looks like she’s got the hang of it. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN A BARTENDER? Five years WHAT’S YOUR SPECIALTY? Chambord margaritas, martinis and Stoli cocktails WHAT’S IN YOUR GLASS ON A FRIDAY NIGHT? Leinenkugel WHAT BROUGHT YOU BEHIND THE BAR? I just started waiting tables and I just thought it’d be a better way to meet people, make money and have a good time. WHAT ARE THE PERKS OF THE JOB? Being able to meet new people and your time with your coworkers. It’s interesting; you get to learn a lot about people and life that way. It makes you look forward to work. WHAT’S THE MOST BIZARRE THING THAT’S HAPPENED TO YOU AT WORK? One time I had this older woman come in and she was just really eccentric. She had a huge bag of items and just proceeded to place them all on the bar. That was probably the weirdest experience I’ve ever had. IS THE PERCEPTION TRUE; DO BARTENDERS DOUBLE AS PSYCHIATRISTS? It’s more just listening. People want to know that you’re listening. If they know you’re listening and you care, it helps Photos by Darcie Di Saia

6 | PrimeTime

January 2010


p

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

behind the bar with RI’s best Paul Izzo A fixture at Providence’s Capital Grille for the past 14 years with a resume twice as long, Paul Izzo has seen it all. He’s slow to talk about himself, shifting the conversation back to the customer, and sure enough you’ll find yourself right at home before the first martini is drained. Park it on a stool in the dimly lit, posh bar long enough though, and you might get a glimpse of what makes Izzo a beloved member of the Grille’s service team. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN A BARTENDER? Thirty five years WHAT’S YOUR SPECIALTY? Stoli doli, and a lot of people like the way we make our espresso martinis WHAT’S IN YOUR GLASS ON A FRIDAY IGHT? Vodka on the rocks or tequila WHAT BROUGHT YOU BEHIND THE BAR? My friend owned a bar and I wasn’t happy where I was. I just got into and it went from there. WHAT ARE THE PERKS OF THE JOB? I think it’s just meeting a bunch of people from all different walks of life. You really learn that people you think are in high financial and powerful positions are the same as everyone else. If you anticipate their wants and their needs, they’re going to enjoy themselves and you will be rewarded WHAT’S THE MOST BIZARRE THING THAT’S HAPPENED TO YOU AT WORK? It was New Years Eve and I was working in a hotel bar at the time. This woman was frantic with hotel security that they couldn’t find her husband. She wanted them to start knocking on doors looking for him. The next day during the buffet, a hand came up from under the table and pulled a roll down. He got so drunk that he fell behind a partition and passed out. He must have been in trouble the next day. IS THE PERCEPTION TRUE; DO BARTENDERS DOUBLE AS PSYCHIATRISTS? There’s no question. People really do let their hair down. They don’t put their walls up with us. People will say something about their life to a bartender that they might not tell anyone else n

January 2010

PrimeTime | 7


Auxiliary puts volunteers on the water The Coast Guard was officially created in 1915 as an armed service, but it wasn’t until the summer of 1934 that a yachtsman named Malcolm Stuart Boylan planted a seed that grew into the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. By 1941, Congress passed the Auxiliary and Reserve Act to designate civilian volunteers as members of the Auxiliary. The Auxiliary has members in all 50 states and beyond, and is open to men and women. That force has played a major part in American history. When America entered World War II, 50,000 Auxiliary members joined the effort. Today, those members carry on the group’s cornerstone of member services, recreational boating safety, operations and marine safety and fellowship. The Auxiliary is divided into four organizational levels, one of which, the Flotilla, is crucial at the local level. Public education is especially important to the Flotilla. Here in Rhode Island, volunteers work through the North Star Flotilla. They offer short courses and workshops for children, basic seamanship, sail and advanced navigation courses. Safety days are held for the public, and the Flotilla is always looking for instructors in various areas of boating safety. After training, members can serve as crew or captain on weekend safety patrols in Narragansett Bay, or can assist at other events and locations. Vessel examination training is available, and a 16-week safe boating course will be held starting Monday, Feb. 1 at Toll Gate High School in Warwick. There are even opportunities to help out at different Coast Guard stations on the radio. For anyone interested in joining the local North Star Flotilla, visit www. NorthStarFlotilla.com, e-mail rbutziger@cox.net or captainderekrobert@verizon. net, or call Roz or Nick at 739-6028. n

8 | PrimeTime

January 2010


We’re looking for new members . . .

Korean War Veterans Korean Service Veterans Meetings held 2nd Wednesday of every Month Chepachet Senior Center Rte. 44 1210 Putnam Pike, Chepachet Call Frank 231-3736 or Gil 831-3301 For More Information KWVA – Chapter 3

January 2010

PrimeTime | 9


p

by DON FOWLE R

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

Star for the Seniors Seniors love entertainer Ginny Loring… and she loves performing for them. After all, she’s a senior too. “I took dancing lessons when I was four years old, growing up in the Boston area,” she said. “I did the local talent shows when I was 14. I looked a lot older. Back in those days there were lots of night clubs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. I used to open for a lot of acts. Yes, I was under the legal age.” Ginny remembers playing the El Morocco in Johnston.

“Would you believe it. It’s now a Senior Citizen Center,” she laughed. “And I was a regular at the 1025 Club. I got an agent and went on the road. One week here; one week there. I had to eat. But the night club acts were drying up, so I headed for Montreal, where the floor shows lasted a little longer.” She also performed for the military in New York and traveled everywhere from Alabama to Washington to perform. Loring teamed up with the Lordly and Dame Agency in Boston, where they booked her as the opening act for many performers on cruise ships. From there, she was a tour guide with Collette for a decade, worked for Paragon and served as a social director on motor coach tours all over the United States and Canada. The combination of tour escort, social hostess and director, and professional entertainer kept Loring busy for over 30 years. She settled in East Woonsocket over 20 years ago, and now does most of her entertaining for senior groups, organizations and conventions. “I love to perform for seniors,” she said. “I sing, dance, tell stories, and involve the audience in my act. I love to get them up dancing with me. I like to think that I am an inspiration to them.” Loring says that through it all, she’s collected some great stories. When she learned that famed jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie loved cornbread, she would bring it to him whenever he was playing. Comedian Charlie Callas was one of her favorites as well. Loring and Callas stopped at a diner outside of Framingham after his second performance once night. “Charlie would get up on the table and do his third performance for the late night diners. He was always on,” she said. “In the early nineties, I was performing in Atlantic City, when I got a call at 3:00 a.m. It was Charlie, wanting to meet me for coffee.” Most recently, Loring has performed at Senior Centers in Dedham, Mass. and Woonsocket, R.I. She has a 45-minute show, bringing her own music, sound system and microphone. “My fees are reasonable … and negotiable” she said. Ginny Loring enjoys East Woonsocket, but heads for Florida during part of the winter. When in Rhode Island, she is always looking for senior groups to perform for. Give her a call at 769-4418, or on her cell at 954-815-1240. You can also write to her at 1203 Brookhaven Lane, East Woonsocket, RI 02895. n

10 | PrimeTime

January 2010


by DON FOWLE R

p

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

The good ol’ days

Photo by Darcie Di Saia

Retirees reunite to remember years of hard work, easy friendships

If you are looking for Joe Valentim, there is one place you’re sure to find him - the Miss Cranston Diner on the first Saturday morning of every month. Joe and up to 15 of his fellow retirees have gathered at the Route 5 diner for breakfast and camaraderie for the past 20 years, remembering the years spent working at Sunbeam Bread and bringing their old pals up-todate on what is happening in their lives. They come from Warwick and Cranston, East Providence and Coventry, Narragansett, Connecticut and Massachusetts, and range in age from 54 to 85. The oldest of the group is Nate Lury of Warwick, the man who started it all. “We usually get a dozen or so each month,” he said. “I send out postcard reminders, and they show up.” Richard Oliver of Scituate has been retired for 25 years but still makes most of the informal gatherings. The men sit around a table in the diner’s back room, reminiscing about the old days when there were a number of different bread company trucks on the road. “Today, one company distributes all the bread,” Valentim said. “We all worked for My Bread Baking Company, which was a three generationowned business. The fourth sold out.” Valentim worked for Sunbeam for 32 years, and even still, has few complaints “Back in those days, people stayed in one place. The guys were all terrific. And they were dependable,” he said. “We delivered in all kinds of weather. It was a steady job. No layoffs.” Lury remembers getting up at 2:30 in the morning to go to work. The drivers hit the road at 4 a.m. and seldom got home before dark. “There were drivers, salesmen and garage men,” he said. “No women. Women didn’t work in those types of jobs 20 years ago.” Earl Medeiros travels from Glen, N.H. for his bacon, eggs and home

January 2010

fries with his former co-workers. When asked why make the journey, Medeiros shrugged it off - it’s just what he does. “Why not?” he replied. “I’m not doing anything, and I don’t mind the four-hour trip. And we all like to eat.” I sat back and listened to the half dozen conversations and it was obvious why these men keep showing up every month. They developed deep bonds and have fond memories of their jobs and the people they worked with. When I asked who had any funny stories, I heard a couple I couldn’t repeat. “Many of the old timers we buried had some good stories,” quipped Kevin Haley of East Freetown, Mass. They talked about everything from family and politics to sports and current events. They poked fun at each other, with one yelling out, “Who’s the sissy who ordered decaf?” Valentim squirmed in his seat, aware that everyone knew he was the culprit. The waitress cleared the tables and presented Lury with the bill, letting everyone know that they got a 10 percent discount. “That’s for being a senior citizen,” Nate said, as everyone threw in his contribution. “No separate checks here.” Three of the men brought their wives, but the women sat in a booth in another section of the diner. “We’ve heard all the stories,” one said. “We come along for the breakfast.” Besides, they have their own stories to tell. “My husband left home in the dark and came home in the dark. He expected his supper to be on the table when he got home, and his uniform to be washed and pressed for the next day,” another said, not wanting to give her name. The three women all laughed and used the same word when asked what it was like having them home all day now: terrible. n PrimeTime | 11


p

your taxes

r

o

f

e

ss

i

o

n

a

l

p e r s p e c t i v e

b y meg che v alier s e n i o r ta x c o n s u lta n t

internal revenue service

A break for the buyer A new law that went into effect Nov. 6 extends the first-time homebuyer credit five months and expands the eligibility requirements for purchasers. The Worker, Homeownership, and Business Assistance Act of 2009 extends the deadline for qualifying home purchases from Nov. 30, 2009, to April 30, 2010. Additionally, if a buyer enters into a binding contract by April 30, the buyer has until June 30, to settle on the purchase. The maximum credit amount remains at $8,000 for a first-time homebuyer – that is, a buyer who has not owned a primary residence during the three years up to the date of purchase. But the new law also provides a “long-time resident” credit of up to $6,500 to others who do not qualify as “first-time homebuyers.” To qualify this way, a buyer must have owned and used the same home as a principal or primary residence for at least five consecutive years of the eight-year period ending on the date of purchase of a new home as a primary residence. For all qualifying purchases in 2010, taxpayers have the option of claiming the credit on either their 2009 or 2010 tax returns. A new version of Form 5405, First-Time Homebuyer Credit, will be available in the next few weeks. A taxpayer who purchases a home after Nov. 6 must use this new version of the form to claim the credit. Likewise, taxpayers claiming the credit on their 2009 returns, no matter when the house was purchased, must also use the new version of Form 5405. Taxpayers who claim the credit on their 2009 tax return will •

Rhode Island in pictures The Newport Art Museum showcases “Focus on Four,” an exhibit that spans seven decades of photography. The show shines a light on the different approaches, intentions, techniques and levels of critical success these photographers achieved and draws our attention to links between past and present, and between society and art. It will be on display now through Feb. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the week and on Sunday from 12 to 4 p.m. For details, call 848-8200 or visit www.newportartmuseum.org.

12 | PrimeTime

In the time of Lincoln The Rhode Island Historical Society continues celebrating the bicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln’s birth with an exhibit that takes a look at life in Rhode Island during the 1860s. Housed at the Museum of Work & Culture in Woonsocket, the exhibit tells the stories of the people, places, and attitudes of the times. It is sponsored by the RI Foundation and the RI Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, and will be on display now through Feb. 14 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Call 769-9675 or go to www.rihs.org for more information.

not be able to file electronically but instead will need to file a paper return. The new law raises the income limits for people who purchase homes after Nov. 6. The full credit will be available to taxpayers with modified adjusted gross incomes (MAGI) up to $125,000, or $225,000 for joint filers. Those with MAGI between $125,000 and $145,000, or $225,000 and $245,000 for joint filers, are eligible for a reduced credit. For homes purchased prior to Nov. 7, existing MAGI limits remain in place. The full credit is available to taxpayers with MAGI up to $75,000, or $150,000 for joint filers. Those with MAGI between $75,000 and $95,000, or $150,000 and $170,000 for joint filers, are eligible for a reduced credit. There are also several new restrictions on purchases that occur after Nov. 6 that go into effect with the law. Dependents are not eligible to claim the credit. No credit is available if the purchase price of a home is more than $800,000. Members of the Armed Forces and certain federal employees serving outside the U.S. have an extra year to buy a principal residence in the U.S. and still qualify for the credit. An eligible taxpayer must buy or enter into a binding contract to buy a home by April 30, 2011, and settle on the purchase by June 30 of that year. For more details on the credit, visit IRS.gov. n

C A• L E• N D •A R • O F • E V •E N T• S Inexpensive art The Pawtucket Arts Collaborative (PAC) is pleased to announce that over 56 artists have committed to exhibit in the wildly popular 10”x10”x10” Exhibit, which closes on Jan. 9. Now in its third year, this annual exhibit has become a special show and possibly the best sale during the holiday season because every piece is for sale for only $150. Grab your inexpensive art at the PAC Gallery at 175 Main Street in Pawtucket. Details can be found at www.pawtucketartscollaborative.org or by calling 724-2200. Getting crafty Although it started in November, Rhody Craft 100 will be available until Jan. 30. Rhody Craft 100 presents a one of a kind shopping venture in a former mill with unique and original crafted wares from locally based artisans. To shop, go to the Hope Artiste Village in Pawtucket. For details, call 626-1833 or check out their blog at http://rhodycraft100.blogspot.com. On the waterfront The exciting, annual Providence Boat Show attracts over 20,000 visitors from throughout New England, looking to purchase everything from popular brand name powerboats and small

size sailboats to electronic navigational systems and fishing gear. The Annual Providence Boat Show is one of the finest boat shows to take place during the winter season, and will be at the Rhode Island Convention Center until Jan. 10. Cal 458-6000 or visit the Web site at http://www.providenceboatshow.com/pbsnew/index.php. Princess Katie & Racer Steve Pick up the grandkids and check out Providence Performing Arts Center’s Princess Katie and Racer Steve, which will launch their seriously rockin National Tour in Rhode Island. Tickets are $15 and are on sale now for the Jan. 17 show, which will take place at 2 p.m. For tickets, call 421-2997 or go to www.ppacri.org.

January 2010


L

Family Features

eading a healthier lifestyle doesn’t have to mean making dramatic changes. It means making smarter choices. Looking and feeling better starts by making conscious choices every day that may be small, but will add up in the end. Here are some simple tips and recipes that will help you make smarter food choices so that you can truly live better. Add a Fruit or Vegetable to Every Meal. When you add a little bit here and there, before you know it you’ll be eating your five cups of fruits and veggies a day without even thinking about it. Here are some simple ways to increase your intake: n Lighten up your cheese omelet by adding fresh tomatoes, onions and avocado. n Fill your sandwich with crunchy veggies such as green peppers and cucumber slices and add a pickle on the side. n Keep mid-afternoon cravings at bay by stashing a bag of baby carrots or sugar snap peas in your office refrigerator for a healthy snack. n Satisfy your sweet tooth by tossing a handful of frozen berries on top of your frozen yogurt. Choose Smart Staples. Many families have a set of go-to ingredients they purchase on each trip to the grocery store. It only takes small adjustments to your current grocery list to achieve a better-for-you mix of foods and beverages. Try these easy tips: n Low fat or fat-free plain yogurt is an ideal choice because it’s often higher in calcium than other dairy products and is a good source of protein and potassium. n When buying deli sandwich meat, going all natural is a great way to cut down on additives and preservatives. For example, Hormel Natural Choice deli sandwich meats are free of preservatives and artificial colors and flavors so they taste the way meat is supposed to taste: fresh and full of flavor. n Instead of drinking sugary sodas and juices, quench your thirst with tea. Whether you drink it hot or cold, unsweetened tea is calorie-free and loaded with antioxidants. Lighten Up Lunch. Start a “Lunch Bunch” at work where members take turns bringing in a healthy lunch item for the group. Healthy lunch clubs are an excellent way to experience foods that are new and different and also good for you. Share recipes and make sure you know ahead of time about any food preferences or allergies that group members may have. For more tips and recipes visit http://www.hormelnatural.com.

Chicken Tacos

Serving Size: 2 2 spinach or whole wheat tortillas 1 package Hormel Natural Choice oven roasted carved chicken breast strips 1/2 cup whole kernel corn, cooked, drained 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1/4 cup shredded lettuce 2 tablespoons low-fat ranch salad dressing Layer each tortilla evenly with chicken, corn and cheese. Drizzle each with dressing; top with lettuce. For child-size portion, use 1/2 spinach or whole wheat tortilla, 1 ounce chicken (size of average adult ring and little fingers) and 1 tablespoon each corn, cheese, lettuce and dressing.

January 2010

Simple and delicious ways to enjoy healthier meals

Savory Smoked Turkey and Blue Cheese Salad

California Turkey Wraps

Serving Size: 4 4 9-inch burrito size flour tortillas 1/2 cup ranch dressing, divided 1 9-ounce package Hormel Natural Choice oven roasted deli turkey 1 tomato, thinly sliced 1 small cucumber, peeled, thinly sliced 1 avocado, peeled, sliced and drizzled with 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 cup alfalfa sprouts 1 cup baby spinach leaves or arugula Lay tortillas on clean surface; drizzle each with 1 tablespoon dressing. Layer each tortilla with equal amounts turkey, tomato, cucumber, avocado, sprouts and spinach. Drizzle with remaining dressing. Roll up tortillas tightly; cut in half diagonally. Secure each half with wooden pick.

Savory Smoked Turkey and Blue Cheese Salad

Panzanella Salad

Serving Size: 4 8 slices Italian or rustic bread, 4 to 5 days old, crusts removed 3 medium tomatoes, coarsely diced 12 Kalamata pitted olives, quartered 1 medium red onion, minced 1/3 cup vinaigrette 12 large fresh basil leaves, shredded 1 (8-ounce) package Hormel Natural Choice smoked deli ham, cut into strips Tear bread into pieces; soak in bowl of cold water 2 to 3 minutes. Drain; squeeze bread dry, removing all water. In large bowl, tear bread into smaller pieces with fork. In small bowl, combine tomatoes, olives, onion and vinaigrette; stir gently. Add vinaigrette mixture to bread pieces; mix well. And basil and ham; mix gently to combine.

California Turkey Wraps

Panzanella Salad

Serving Size: 2 1 8-ounce package Hormel Natural Choice smoked deli turkey, cut into strips 4 cups bite-size pieces red leaf lettuce 4 cups bite-size pieces romaine lettuce 6 ounces blue cheese, crumbled 1 tart, crisp apple, thinly sliced 1/2 cup candied pecans Prepared vinaigrette Freshly ground black pepper In large bowl, combine first 6 ingre­ dients. Add vinaigrette to taste. Season with pepper. Toss well.

Chicken Tacos

PrimeTime | 13


free

free

PrimeTMime PrimeTMime agazine agazine

jan uary 200 9

f e b r uary 200 9

rhode island

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

The Best Years of Your Life

secrets to a long

PrimeTMime agazine rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

diY

& happy

marriage

These Boots are Made for

Sexy

Dancin’!

free

march 2009

PrimeTMime agazine free

april 2009

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

in

iss

u e!

i nand w ner din how

sid

e th

is

Spring iS in the

as

Home

Improvement

Bringing it Back!

ForecaSt

There’s No Place Like Home

• Ghiorse factors in retirement

Home Modification Habitat for Humanity Going Feng Shui

(The Line Starts on Page 16)

in sid

a clad

!

Performing

ts to

at PPa c!

PlUs... –

iss Ue

a Pa ir of tic ke

lorraine seymoUrian

new year • new things • new you

e th is

• Getting Back in the Garden

...

iss ue

wdaighn ri ng!

in si

wi n divine

is de th

• take a hike in ri

arts

Betty Adler’s Tools for Success

dating advice

– library lovers’ month

January

February

PrimeTMime agazine free

m ay 2 0 0 9

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

March

PrimeTMime PrimeTMime agazine agazine

PrimeTMime agazine free

june 2009

rhode island

april free

j u ly 2 0 0 9

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

Faith and Family

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

The Best Years of Your Life

endless

survivors stories of Hope,

travel Possibilities

fit at any

vacations close to home

insi de

2 co nt es 2 chan ts! to winces !

• enjoy the Great outdoors • tips for travelers

Your euroPean GetawaY

th is

free

au g u st 200 9

tips for a better you

aGe

• easy exercises for everyone • food for thought • Going for the Gold

issue

!

the magic of old hollywood m ovi e s

actor s

th eatr e

music

art Therapy • Celebrating Motherhood • living to 100

May

June

July

august

PrimeTMime PrimeTMime PrimeTMime PrimeTMime agazine agazine agazine agazine free

o cto b e r 2 0 0 9

free

september 2009

rhode island

rhode island

The Best Years of Your Life

The Best Years of Your Life

heritage

The Best Years of Your Life

The Best Years of Your Life

5 ChanCes to win

10000 Garden

$

City Center

shopping spree!

• Bite into thanksgiving sandwiches

Second Hand Shopping Around the State • stretching Your fashion

rhode island

season

and

holiday

TradiTions Meet Professor Claus Problem Solved!

affordable Gift GivinG ideas

• savor family Memories

$

free

december 2009

rhode island

taste of the

dollars sense

exploring your

free

n ove m b e r 200 9

• Get your fill of Giving Back

• eating healthy on a Budget We’ll show you how!

• all aboard

• a Crushing Wave of taxes

for Christmas Collectibles

How RI seniors are affected

• the Gift of

GivinG baCk

septeMber

2009

OctOber

nOveMber

Vote for your favorite 2009 PrimeTime Cover to be entered in a drawing to win a

vote for your favorite cover!

customized 5-course dinner for 4 at the capital grille

Here’s how it works: Pick your favorite 2009 PrimeTime cover. If the cover you select wins the most votes, you will be entered into a random drawing to win a customed 5-course dinner for 4 at the Capital Grill! Email megf@rhodybeat.com with your favorite month, or send us this form. Entry Deadline: January 31, 2009. My Favorite Cover!

14 | PrimeTime

DeceMber

Month_______________________ _____

designed by their executive chef

the capital grille One Union Square, Providence th e c a p i t a l g r i l l e. co m Name_______________________________________________________________ Address_ ___________________________________________________________ Phone#_____________________________________________________________ e-mail_________________________________________________________________ January 2010


Don’t Let Winter Drafts Get You Down Are you shivering and bundling up inside your house? If your thermostat is set at the desired temperature, your furnace runs continuously, your utility bills are ridiculously high, but you are still cold, it is probably because energy is escaping your house. As it gets colder outside, here are some clues that will indicate if your home has air leaks: • You feel drafts or air moving even when all of your windows and doors are closed. • The floor directly in front of the sink feels colder than the rest of the floor. • There is a drastic temperature difference between levels in your house. • You find bugs in the same room over and over again. Outside air typically enters the home where building materials meet and where wires and pipes penetrate through the walls. The EPA estimates that homeowners can typically save up to 20 percent of heating and cooling costs by air sealing their homes and adding insulation in attics, floors over crawl spaces, and accessible basement rim joists. Sealing and insulating these areas add up to an average of $200 worth of savings a year on energy costs. There are several easy and cost-effective ways to eliminate drafts. • Replace weather-stripping around doors, including the garage door. • Add extra insulation in your attic. • Insulate perimeter walls in your basement. • Insure that the chimney flue is closed. Filling gaps and cracks with an insulating foam sealant is an easy, fast solution that anyone can undertake. Sealants such as Great Stuff form an airtight, water-resistant seal that cures rigid. The foam is sandable, paintable, and can be trimmed with a utility knife afterwards. Some common and effective places to seal include the holes where the HVAC ductwork enters the living space from the basement and attic, the attic hatch frame, plumbing stacks and shafts, and pipe, wire and conduit penetrations. For a full list of places to use foam sealant, visit http://greatstuff.dow.com/pdfs/checklist. pdf.

January 2010

PrimeTime | 15


p

senior issues

r

o

f

e

ss

i

o

n

a

l

p e r s p e c t i v e

b y kerry park

Rhode Island nursing homes outperform nation Would you know where to turn if you needed to assess your options for skilled nursing care or rehabilitation following an accident or illness? Unfortunately, care decisions often need to be made under duress and with a sense of urgency. It’s hard for many consumers to know where to turn to find the information they need to make informed choices. There are many public reports on nursing home quality issued by state and federal agencies but as is often the case with government reports, they can be complicated and difficult to understand. There is, however, a “new” national benchmark that reports satisfaction levels straight from those who know the service

16 | PrimeTime

best: residents and their families. Who better to judge the quality of their experience and help guide others to the nursing facility right for them? In 2005, My Innerview, a national research company, issued the National Survey of Resident and Family Satisfaction in Nursing Facilities. The annual survey was the first of its kind to establish a national database to benchmark customer satisfaction, helping to provide valuable insight to consumers in need of skilled nursing or rehabilitation. The survey answers two substantive questions: How would you rate your nursing facility; and

would you recommend it to others? In addition to measuring overall satisfaction, the My InnerView survey measures three distinct areas: quality of life, which assesses such things as social relationships with staff and other residents, safety, meaningful activities and dining; quality of care, which measures the adequacy, competency and attitudes of the staff; and quality of service, which rates meals, laundry services, cleanliness and management responsiveness. Since its inception five years ago, Rhode Island has scored exceptionally well on the My InnerView satisfaction surveys. Last year, Rhode Island scored equal to or better than

the national average on all 24 assessment areas. In 2009, not only did Rhode Island’s facilities achieve the same feat, but also stayed the same or improved in every single category from the year before. The latest survey results show 92 percent of all Rhode Island nursing home residents and their families rated their nursing home excellent or good, compared to 86 percent nationally. The same numbers hold true for those who would recommend the facility to others. “The 2009 My InnerView results show the public what those of us in the profession have known all along,” said Virginia Burke, president and CEO of the Rhode Island Health Care Association, a non-profit trade association of skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities comprised of approximately 70 percent of Rhode Island’s nursing homes. “The caregivers in our long term care facilities are exceptional. Rhode Island’s nursing home community is viewed as one of the leaders across the country in term of proactive quality care.” Consumers can find satisfaction survey scores on the Rhode Department of Health’s Web site at www.health.ri.gov/chic/performance/nursinghome.php. The site also has several other clinical measures as well as a variety of information and resources to aid consumers in choosing a nursing home. n

January 2010


p

savvy senior

r

o

f

e

ss

i

o

n

a

l

p e r s p e c t i v e

by J I M M I LLE R

Diet Tips for a new year Dear Savvy Senior,

Are there certain kinds of foods a person can eat to help lower their cholesterol? -Cholesterol Concerned

Dear Concerned, What you eat can actually play a huge role in lowering your cholesterol, and for many, it may even eliminate the need for cholesterol-lowering medication.

Know Your Numbers As you may already know, your cholesterol level is the amount of fat in your blood. If it’s too high, you’re at a greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Ideally, you want your total cholesterol reading (that includes your LDL and HDL cholesterol) to be below 200, and your “bad” LDL cholesterol below 129 - less if you’re at risk for heart disease. If your total level hits between 200 and 239, or your LDL reaches 130 to 159 you’re considered borderline high. And if your total is above 240, or your LDL is over 160 you have high cholesterol. On the other hand, a higher number is better when it comes to the “good” HDL cholesterol. Most men range between 40 and 50 HDL, and women range between 50 and 60. Anything below 40 for men and 50 for women is too low, and anything above 50 for men and 60 for women is great, because it provides extra protection against heart disease. Cholesterol-Lowering Foods Lot’s of research over the past few years has shown that certain foods can help lower your LDL cholesterol and/or boost your HDL. Oatmeal and oat bran, for example, are loaded with soluble fiber. Oatmeal or oat bran is a great way to start the day and shave five percent off your LDL. Five to 10 grams per day are recommended. Other good sources for soluble fiber are apples, pears, prunes, citrus fruits, kidney and lima beans, barley, psyllium, carrots, broccoli and brussels sprouts. Studies have also shown that a daily dose of walnuts and almonds can lower your LDL by 10 percent, and raise your HDL by as much as 20 percent. Peanuts, hazelnuts, pecans, some pine nuts and pistachios have also been shown to lower cholesterol. But be careful because nuts are high in calories, so a handful (no more than two ounces) will do. The best way to add nuts to your diet is to substitute them with foods that are high in saturated fats like cheese and meat. That way you’re gaining the benefits of nuts without adding more calories. Sterols and stanols are substances found in plants that help prevent cholesterol from being absorbed into your bloodstream. A recommended dose of two grams per day SAVVY –PAGE 24

A Warm Home Awaits You This New Year! Enjoy “Family Traditions” in our country setting in the City. • Affordable • Three home-cooked meals daily • Housekeeping • Medication Management • Transportation • Activities • Utilities • Security & More

Visit us today at www.wyndemerewoods.com

1044 Mendon Road Woonsocket, RI 02895

(401) 762-4226

Wyndemere Woods Independent/Assisted Living

January 2010

Our Family Caring for Your Family Since 1973 PrimeTime | 17


that’s entertainment!

p

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

l i f e st y l e s

b y don fowler

Have a happy theatre New Year Chestnuts are roasting on open fires, and Tiny Tim is still blessing every one of us as we look forward to better times in 2010. The New Year shows great promise on theatre stages in Providence and nearby communities, with a number of plays never seen in Rhode Island, and a few of those old chestnuts returning. So make a New Year’s resolution to support the arts, and get out your 2010 calendar to fill it with theatre dates. TRINITY REPERTORY COMPANY Speaking of old chestnuts, Trinity kicks off the New Year with William Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” one of his funniest comedies. It is a classic tale of young love and mistaken identities and will be showing in the Chace Theatre from Jan. 29 to March 7. Remember Sarah Ruhl’s hilarious “The Clean House,” which played at Trinity a couple of years ago? The talented author is back with “Dead Man’s Phone.” It is a modern comedy about our grown-up toys (cell phones, iPods, GPS and PDA) with a twist involving secrets of the afterlife. Sounds like fun. Check it out in the downstairs Dowling Theatre from Feb. 19 to March 28. For tickets, call 351-4242. PROVIDENCE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Back by popular demand, and playing for nearly a month at PPAC is the smash Broadway musical, “Wicked.” It continues through Jan. 10, and tickets have been going fast, with many people planning to see it for the second time. The National Tour of “Beauty and the Beast” opens in Providence on Feb. 9 and will run for eight performances. We’ve seen the show twice, and loved it. Bring the grandkids. Remember the movie, “Xanadu?” It is now a lavish, campy Broadway hit, and it is coming to PPAC from Feb. 16 to 21. The romantic musical comedy has great songs, and a bit of roller disco thrown in. Lynn Singleton has certainly not forgotten the young folks in planning this season. “101 Dalmatians: The Musical” is a family show with some great messages. I’ve seen some clips on the show, and the dog actors should be up for some awards. 2ND STORY THEATRE Alan Ayckbourn’s “Comic Potential” received great reviews from New York critics, and you can see the satirical romantic comedy from Jan. 22 to Feb. 21 at the intimate theatre, which now has an elevator to take you upstairs. “Comic Potential” is followed by another new play to Rhode Island: Harley Granville-Barker’s Edwardian-era “The Voysey Inheritance,” which is as current as theatre can get. Even back then they were cheating people with Ponzi schemes. Artistic Director Ed Shea says it is part love story, part drawing room comedy, and part business-and-finance drama, involving a family in the midst of a moral dilemma. The dates are March 12 to April 11. For reservations, call 247-4200.

18 | PrimeTime

SANDRA FEINSTEIN GAMM THEATRE “4:48 Psychosis” by British playwright Sarah Kane has penned “a harrowing journey into the depths of clinical depression,” according to Artistic Director Tony Estrella. The title comes from the time in the early morning when Kane regularly awoke to a brief period of clarity amid her despair. Estrella says that the play is “perhaps as intimate an exploration of mental illness as one can find.” This was Kane’s fifth and final play, and has “flashes of dark humor.” It will be at Gamm from Jan. 14 to Feb. 7. Tennessee Williams’ classic from 1945, “The Glass Menagerie” will be at Gamm for one month from March 4 to April 4. For reservations, call 723-4266. THE PLAYERS I have recently rediscovered The Players, America’s oldest little theatre, now celebrating their 101st season at the Barker Playhouse at 100 Benefit St. on the East Side. A Flex Membership in the Players gives you three plays for only $60, and a guest ticket is only $20. I saw a first-class production of “The Rabbit Hole” recently, and recommend the theatre to you. Arthur Miller’s classic American play, “All My Sons” will be produced Jan. 29, 30 and 31, and Feb. 5, 6 and 7. The hilarious “Tale of the Allergist’s Wife” will be presented March 19, 20, 21, 26, 27 and 28. For more information on the Players, call 273-0590. NEWPORT PLAYHOUSE AND CABARET RESTAURANT Newport Playhouse is famous for its bountiful buffet, cabaret, and light, fluffy plays. Avoid the tourists and visit them between Feb. 11 and March 29, when they present the comedy, “Wally’s Café,” about a couple who open a diner new Las Vegas. For reservations, call 848-PLAY. COLLEGE THEATRE: RIC, PC & BROWN Rhode Island College has an active and renowned arts and theatre program. Shakespeare’s contemporary, Christopher Marlowe wrote the moving “Edward II” at the end of his brief life, and it is considered a classic. RIC has the advantage of students of all ages in their productions, and some excellent direction. “Edward II” will be performed at their Mainstage Theatre from Feb. 17 to 21. Call 456-8144 for reservations. Providence College presents “The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man in the Moon Marigolds” (long title; great play) at the Blackfriars Theatre from Jan. 29 to 31 and Feb. 6 to 8, followed by Eric Bogisian’s “Talk Radio” at the Bowab Studio Theatre from Feb. 12 to 14. “Little Women,” adapted from the Louisa May Alcott novel, will be presented both from March 26 to 28 and April 9 to 11. Call 865-1000 for reservations. Brown University presents “lulu - a pandora’s box” by Frank Wedekind from March 4 to 7 and 11 to 14 at the Stuart Theatre on Waterman Street. Call 863-7529 for reservations. n

January 2010


p

by M EG FRASE R

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

l i f e st y l e s

A vacation from the usual It started with a casual conversation about vacations between St. Elizabeth Community CEO Steven Horowitz and Assistant Director Sarah Bowater. One month later, however, an out-of-the-box idea turned into a summer getaway for seniors who thought their traveling days were over. “It was like a dream. It was something you never expected to do anymore,” said Barbara DiMaio, a resident at St. Elizabeth Home in East Greenwich. DiMaio was one of six residents who traveled to Cape Cod at the end of September for a nursing home vacation, something that is unheard of in Rhode Island and required approval on both the state and federal level through the Rhode Island Department of Health and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Despite the paperwork and research required, nurse Janelle Hackett says the powers that be were supportive of the nursing home’s efforts. “They’ve been very helpful with us trying to do a culture change,” she said. “There was a plan for anything that could happen.” Hackett has worked at St. Elizabeth for 29 years, but said nursing home residents are often unfairly categorized as invalid. By planning a vacation for a group of seniors, she believes her company has started a shift in these beliefs. “It was a big learning experience for all of us. Most of the residents didn’t believe it was going to happen,” Hackett said. DiMaio was one of those skeptics. She said she was afraid of the idea at first because she too wasn’t sure she could handle the trip. With a little encouragement from the staff and her daughter, however, she was soon on board and ready with four suitcases for the four-day vacation. In the end, she was only allowed two. “I was the troublemaker,” said DiMaio, who also suggested the women on the trip take photos on the beach for a calendar. Although that idea was shot down, she said their time by the water was perfect. “I had the time of my life. I sat like a kid in the sand,” she said. DiMaio was handpicked for the vacation by St. Elizabeth staff who were cautious of what types of residents would be best for this inaugural venture. They matched each resident with a staff member and went over details of medications and emergency scenarios time and again before setting off. “Because it was the first trip we tried to get the appropriate people to come but I think what we found is that anyone could enjoy the trip,” Hackett said. In fact, after a day in their rented sevenbedroom Falmouth house, the nurse, who also January 2010

serves as the life enhancement coach at St. Elizabeth, said many of the participants had put their walkers aside and were moving around with more confidence than usual. In addition to excursions on the beach, they went for walks around their waterside neighborhood, went shopping, and had a day trip to Martha’s Vineyard, where they arrived by boat. “I never thought we could do it but we were able to do everything,” said Mafalda “Muffy” Jackvony. Jackvony, joking around with St. Elizabeth Administrator Matt Trimble, said if she found a better place to live in the Cape, she wouldn’t be returning to Rhode Island. Speaking from the armchair in

her East Greenwich room, she says she could live nowhere else. “St. Elizabeth is sort of a place where they try everything out first,” she said with a laugh. On the final night of the trip, Jackvony said Trimble ensured his esteem with the group, taking them out to an elegant dinner. “Matt said we could have anything we wanted. That was a highlight,” she quipped. Residents incurred no cost for the trip with the exception of shopping expenses. The staff estimates it cost approximately $4,500 between transportation, staffing and the house, all of which was covered through money raised at Rose Bids, the community’s annual fundraiser. Regardless of the details of the trip, Hackett said it sparked a change for staff and residents. “It wasn’t about the location, it wasn’t about the house, it was just about being a family,” she said. That’s exactly what the trip meant for Anton and Margaret Langhammer. Married for 62 years, Margaret became a resident in March while Anton still lives independently. The couple used to travel to the Cape for two weeks each summer, so the chance to be together was one they couldn’t miss. “This gave us a chance to revisit the scene of the crime so to speak,” Anton said as he visited his wife at the facility that has now become her home. “We couldn’t believe it. It didn’t take us long to say, ‘why not?’” When asked what the highlight of the trip was for Anton, the only non-resident senior to make the trek, he said, “Three or four solid days with my wife. Being with my wife, that meant a lot.” “They smiled the whole time,” Hackett said of the Langhammers. Residents also said that for the first time in a long time, they felt like regular people on a vacation, rather than patients who were under scrutiny of outsiders. That was an exciting feeling for several residents who have been in nursing home care for an extended period of time. For resident Rose Haid, the best part of the trip came with the relationships with other seniors, in particular one woman who stayed behind near the house while the others ventured to the Vineyard. “We got talking and we got close,” she said. That same woman that Haid became close with died two weeks after returning to Rhode Island. “It was almost like, what a gift, we were able to give her,” Hackett said. VACATION – PAGE 25

PrimeTime | 19


by JOE KERNAN

p

Take a

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

‘Rhode Trip’ right at home

With many people realizing that a group outing to the local cinema (with snacks and treats) can easily exceed $100, a $20 board game at the kitchen table seems a bargain. Because of that, board game sales have improved since 2008, and Roberta Humble is hoping to cash in on the trend. She is the creator of Rhode Test, a trivia game on all things Ocean State. “The game is always easier to play if you know the answers,” said Humble, “and some questions are harder. But they all relate to places in Rhode Island.” Humble started selling the game this fall and said it has been an almost instant bestseller in the area. “The game is now on sale in 15 Rhode Island cities and town but it has also sold to people out-of-state,” she said. “I got an order from Florida form a woman who got the game as a gift and she wanted three more to give to her friends.” “I assembled around 680 of the games and have already sold around 270,” Humble continued. “I even got a call from the Boarders bookstore to send them some more.”

There’s little chance of the Rhode Test becoming a national hit because of it’s inside jokes and questions. “I was called by the tourism people who said they wanted to use the game to promote tourism but I told them it would be of no interest to travelers coming to Rhode Island,” said Humble. Still, given the economy it provides residents in this state an affordable way to enjoy a Friday night. People of a certain age may remember that Monopoly, the most successful board game in America was patented in the middle of the Great Depression and, ironically, it allowed the hardpressed working family to amass imaginary fortunes. At its core, Rhode Test is an educational tool that makes the state’s history, geography and popular culture facts fun to learn. There are four clues on each card and Humble expects that even the sophisticated citizens of the state will guess the answers before they get to the last clue. For example: “A British schooner 4; Even before ‘the shot heard ‘round the world’ 3; Prior to the Boston Tea Party 2; ‘To express displeasure with the King of England 1.” If you didn’t figure out that the answer is the “burning of the Gaspee,” you should consider buying the game or Humble’s already published book, “Something to Crow About.” The book delineates all of the “firsts” and “only” in the state that goes way beyond Slater’s Mill. A portion of the money raise with the game will be forwarded to the Westerly Armory, of which Humble is a dedicated officer and booster. “We had 30,000 visitors this year, but we still need money to maintain the Westerly Armory and other armories around the state,” she said. Aside from preserving armories as artifacts, Humble sees the remaining armories as civic recourses, especially for the storing of state archives and historic objects. “We have already made the Westerly Armory a museum of sorts,” said Humble. Looking ahead to the future of her creation, Humble says she is confident Rhode Islanders will appreciate the game, which can be placed anywhere with any number of players. The box for the game is no bigger than a brown paper lunch bag. “It would be ideal for on long trips,” she said. “I will educate and entertain them.” To order Rhode Trip, go to www.westerlyarmory.com or e-mail Roberta Humble at tooRobert@aol.com. n

20 | PrimeTime

January 2010


p

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

l i f e st y l e s

what do you fink? b y mike fink

1

2

3

10

4 11

15

I call her “the mudlark.” I looked up the word in a dictionary I keep on a stand in the parlor by the fireplace. Sometimes it just means a meadowlark, because it nests in moist places. And the lady I am writing about has a name that sounds almost exactly like “mudlark.” She is a tiny soul, but she stands straight and tall, like a royal personage; like Helen Hayes playing a deposed queen or Helen Mirren, or even Judy Dench. But the grande dame I am thinking of lives just a short block away from my homestead on the East Side, in that village of numbered streets from first to twelfth. Mrs. M. came to us from Poland in the post-war period. She had lived in an open grave, a dugout of relative safety in the woods, in the land of the dead where one might perhaps find life. When she emerged from that muddy shelter, she thought maybe she was the very last person of her family, her people, her faith, upon the entire earth. I visited my mudlark years ago, for tea. Her kitchen is absolutely immaculate, scrubbed and polished, proud and pristine, and the china she used was of excellent quality. Yes, the cups with saucers and spoons, in the dining room. We were there, with a tape machine, to record the story of her life during the occupation and the deportations. She brought out some candid snapshots of her daughter who lives in Israel. Mrs. M. has been a widow for a long and lonely time, but she strolls Hope Street - aptly named - and strides with a certain European élan, a poised carriage, neat and indeed rather elegant. If I am driving by, I pull my little coupe over to the curb and turn the engine off. I make straight for my neighborhood friend, kiss her politely on both cheeks in the Parisian style I once knew, and greet her with a blessing. For me it is an honor to share this little world with a regal heroine of survival itself. I never forget to send her New Year’s greeting cards, and she answers them courteously in her own handwriting. I guess you could call me a sort of monarchist, an elitist, a classist. But not of birth or wealth. In Humphrey Bogart’s American usage of the word “class,” meaning dignity earned through cheer, style, and upright behavior toward others as well as toward oneself. Actually, the French occasionally borrow it and translate the word into “chic.” Not meaning dress or demeanor or jewelry, but kind. That’s class, doing for others, or knowing who you are inside, not outside. I have treasured the “survivors” I have known here in Rhode Island. I directed and produced a documentary movie about those like Mrs. M who made their way to our shores. I titled it “Here, We Live Again.” Mrs. “Mudlark” appears in it, briefly, but she doesn’t share her story with us. She has even lived beyond others who figured more fully in our movie. I sketch her, again, just a few jots of goodwill, because each time I glance at her on her errands, I feel a special happiness about being here in Rhode Island, in this 10-year-old century. I hope she stays safe and well in her nest ... forever and a day. n

January 2010

13

23 29

27

30 32

33

36

37

38

39

41

42

43

47

44 48

49

53

64

26

14

25

40

61

9

21

24

31 35

8

18

20

28

57

7

17

19

34

6

12 16

22

Call of the Mudlark

5

58

45

50 54

59

51 55

46 52

56

60

62

63 65

CLUES ACROSS 1. Father 4. Young women’s assoc. 7. Humbug 10. Breezed through 12. Not generally occurring 14. Baseball scoring term 15. Discharge from army (Br.) 17. Morally reprehensible 18. Leuciscus fish 19. Thin gruel or mush 20. Sulawesi 22. Take a seat 23. ___s - Nam’s neighbor 25. Popular cracker 28. _____ B. de Mille, filmmaker 30. Stories 31. Smaller quantity 33. A stone lined grave 34. Sales reciept 40. Popular BBQ meat 41. Rabbit 42. Days long past 44. Italian commune Lona-___ 47. Grooves on a column 50. Adjoined 51. Swiss river 53. Set free 55. Former $10 US gold coin 57. N. Central African country 59. Mountain range 60. Storage towers 61. Take in solid food 62. Large S. Am. burrowing rodent 63. Sandy piece of seashore (Br.) 64. A lyric poem 65. Owns 66. Very fast airplane

66 CLUES DOWN 1. Opposite of mamas 2. Vinegary 3. Assign to a lower position 4. El _____, painter 5. Rescue from harm 6. Plant parts 7. Capital of Brazil 8. Easy as 1 2 3 9. Go quickly 11. Pain unit 13. R____se - let go 16. Cognitive content held as true 18. In a way, separates 21. Bacon-lettuce-tomato sandwich 24. In addition 26. Crime fighter Eliot 27. This (Spanish) 29. A state of secrecy 32. Left heart there 34. College teacher 35. A small stream 36. Unrepentant 37. Expression of uncertainty 38. Abnormal breathing 39. Shipping containers 43. Goose egg 45. Am. birds of prey 46. Hairdressers shops 48. A less than average tide 49. Cockatoo 50. Plateaus 52. Readjust 54. Prevents harm to creatures 56.An assistant 57. Top business operator 58. Possessed PrimeTime | 21


PE O PLE A N D PL A CE S

a glimpse of rhode island’s past h i s t o r y w i t h don d ’ amato

Silas Talbot 1751-1813 The bitter and the sweet By the end of the Revolutionary War, Silas Talbot, at age 32, had already accomplished more than most people hoped to achieve in a long lifetime. He had proven his bravery by attaching his fireboat to a British vessel in New York Harbor as well as in a number of battles. He won high praise from General George Washington for his defense of Fort Mifflin, near Delaware, and from General Nathanael Greene for his significant role in the Battle of Rhode Island in 1778. General Sullivan, in charge of the state’s attempt to oust the British from Aquidnick Island, was grateful to Talbot for ferrying the American Army to the safety of Tiverton during that action. Against all odds, Talbot captured a British vessel on the Saconnet River that was much larger than his small craft. With a small sloop, Argo, he then proceeded to harass the British Navy along the American coast. This was accomplished despite relentless pursuit by larger British vessels. During much of his early life, Talbot suffered from numerous burns and wounds and a horrific term as a British prisoner of war. When hostilities ended, Talbot became a successful landowner and politician and retired to his several thousand acres of land in Kentucky. For nearly six years, he lived the life of a gentleman farmer. By 1792, however, he sold his land to return to a more active life that included politics and land speculation.

His tenure as a United States Representatives ended in 1794, and he once again assumed a military career. When relations with Algiers had deteriorated, President George Washington appointed Talbot as one of the six captains of the newly created United States Navy. On May 28, 1799, he was ordered to take command of the ship Constitution (later known as Old Ironsides). This large, 44-gun frigate’s successful early career began under the capable command of the Rhode Island hero. Talbot’s duties included protecting American commerce from French privateers. He was fortunate in capturing a number of French vessels and showing the might of the fledging American naval forces. When the hostilities with France ended, Talbot submitted his resignation to the Navy on Sept. 12, 1801 to pursue his interests in land speculation. His second wife, Rebecca Morris Talbot, died in 1803, leaving the semiretired captain a widower once again. In 1808, Talbot, now 57 years old, married Eliza Pintard, the divorcee daughter of U.S. Representative William Cooper, a well-known land speculator. Eliza was the sister of the famous James Fennimore Cooper. It is believed that Cooper’s writing on naval history was very much influenced by Talbot’s career. With his connections to the Brown family of Providence as well as the wealthy Morris and Cooper entrepreneurs, Talbot was successful in his business ventures. This was a time when land speculation made many Americans wealthy and many Revolutionary heroes found that this was a means of recouping the losses they encountered during the War for Independence. Many Rhode Island heroes, such as Nathanael Greene and General James Mitchell Varnum, found it necessary to leave Rhode Island for lands to the south and west to recoup their financial losses. Talbot and his sons were among those who did well in acquiring land in the Northwest Territory and in New York. Charges have been made that Talbot and his associates made huge profits by gaining inside information of where roads and canals were going to be built. This seems especially true in their accumulation of land in New York along what later became the Erie Canal. Unfortunately, the marriage to Eliza Cooper Pintard was a stormy one that ended in 1809. One of Talbot’s biographers commented that “If Talbot’s lengthy account of complaints against his third wife presents an accurate portrayal of their marriage, he is certainly to be pitied.” Silas Talbot, after escaping death on a number of occasions in his long and brilliant career, died at age 72 on D A D G S A B A H June 30, 1813. This A C E D R A R E R B I ends the story of Silas Talbot. n D E M O B E V I L D A C E A S

22 | PrimeTime

T

O

L

E

C

T

I

n

E

T

A

L

E

S

I

B

S

O

L

D

E

F

L

u

T

I

n

G

R

E

L

E

A

S

E

E

D

A

L

P

S

S

P

A

C

A

H

A

S

E

F

L

R

D

S

O

A

O

O

S

F

S

R

T

E

O

S

P

A

L

E

T

A

O

B

E

H

L

E

I

E

A

I

L

C

C

L C

E

P

C

I

S

T

u

R

C

H

A

S

E

H

A

R

E

L

A

S

E

S

E

T

A

A

R

G

L

E

n M

A I

L

O

S

D

E

n

E

S

S

T


ght business spotlion

Come see what sets us apart! • Assisted Living since 1992 • Spacious one bedroom apartments • Priority admission to Scandinavian Home

Spotlight your business

Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation

Scandinavian Assisted Living Retirement Center 50 Warwick Avenue Cranston, RI 02905

Call for details or arrange for a tour

401-461-1444

Email: TSodipo@ScandinavianHome.com A non-profit organization A CareLink Member

$150.00 a month*

Includes your Ad and 1 Story & Photograph! *5 month commitment

Call today to reserve your space

(401) 732-3100

Spotlight your business $150.00 a month*

Includes your Ad and 1 Story & Photograph! *5 month commitment

Call today to reserve your space

(401) 732-3100 January 2010

PrimeTime | 23


p

by DON FOWLE R

r

i

m

e

t

i

m

e

toast

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS TOGETHER

A Guide for Adult Children (and their parents . . . who expect them to plan a party) The invitation list is the most difficult task of all. Who do you invite? Do you assign tables and seats? We provided Robin with a list. She designed an attractive invitation on her computer, with responses sent to her. We ended exceeding our original number because only two couples couldn’t make it. We left the seating open, with tables of eight. We were also honored with the presence of our Best Man and Maid of Honor, both who came from out of town. Another important issue is dealing with gifts. What do you give a couple who have been married 50 years? Who needs a golden toothpick holder? But it is a golden opportunity to ask attendees to contribute to your favorite charity. We chose the Rhode Island Food Bank and the Food Pantry in our neighborhood, asking people to bring a couple of food items. Some even sent checks. The program, again, must be entrusted to whoever plans the party. The couple must leave the details to the planner and not interfere. We wanted an opportunity to acknowledge our guests, letting them know what an important

Fifty years of marriage is a rare achievement these days, and one that is deserving of a special celebration. Those of us who are surrounded by friends and family, and have grown children close by, are especially fortunate. Our forty-something daughter, Robin, wanted to throw us a “surprise party”, but let’s be honest - How do you surprise your parents when they are expecting some sort of celebration? There are a few prerequisites that have to be considered. When selecting the date, can the party fall on the actual date? Will the couple be available? Robin was concerned that we would be at the theatre or a hockey game on Nov. 20. When selecting a place, what is the couple’s favorite place? Is it affordable? Is it available? Is the private function room the right size and atmosphere for the number of guests? We anticipated about 50 people and wanted an informal, friendly, unpretentious restaurant with an affordable buffet. We chose our favorite, Lemongrass, in Warwick. •

C A •L E N• D A• R • O F• E V• E N• T S•

Rush Hour Series Have you always wanted to try out a classical concert, see what all the fuss was about - but never seemed to find the time? Join hundreds of other music lovers who enjoy short, classical, informal and informative concerts in the Rush Hour Series at 6:30 p.m. on Friday evenings throughout the season. Shows take place at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Providence. The Rhode Island Philharmonic also presents an unforgettable concert, “Back with a bang,” on Saturday, Jan. 23 at 8 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium. For details, go to www.vmari. com or call 421-2787.

What Would Jeff Do? Nationally known dog trainer Jeff Gellman of Solid K9 Training, New England’s own Dog Whisperer, is coming to Providence for another exciting seminar to demonstrate how audience members can live a happier life with their dogs. Gellman will present his four cornerstones of training and give tips to peacefully co-exist. After the seminar, enjoy a catered cocktail hour with the opportunity to meet Jeff and ask questions directly. The seminar takes place on Jan. 30 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Westin Providence Hotel. Visit Goldman’s Web site at www.solidK9training.com or call 527-6354 for details.

SAVVY – can help knock 10 percent off your bad cholesterol level. The best way to get these substances is to consume store-bought foods that are fortified with sterols or stanols, including certain orange juices, yogurts, breads, cereals, granola bars, cooking oils, salad dressings, margarine spreads and more. Check the labels to find products that contain sterols or stanols and watch out for high calories. Rich with omega-3 fatty acids, eating fatty fish (mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, salmon and albacore tuna) a few times a week can help boost your good HDL cholesterol by as much as 10 percent, not to mention lower your triglycerides and blood pressure, and reduce inflammation. If you don’t like fish, other food sources that provide omega-3s are walnuts, soybeans, flaxseed and canola oil, or take a fish oil supplement. Olive oil too contains a potent mix of antioxidants that can lower your LDL without affecting

your HDL. A good way to work olive oil into your diet is to substitute it with butter or other cooking oils, or mix it with vinegar as a salad dressing. About two tablespoons a day are recommended. Other Tips Additional lifestyle tips that can help lower LDL and raise HDL include reducing the saturated fats (fatty meats, butter and whole dairy products) and trans fats (found in store-bought cookies, cakes, crackers and many fried foods like french fries) you eat; lose excess weight (even five to 10 pounds can make a difference); exercise regularly (at least 30 minutes, five days per week); quit smoking; and monitor your alcohol consumption (no more than one drink per day for women and two for men). Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit www. savvysenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book. n

24 | PrimeTime

part of our lives they played. Robin did the rest, from balloons, flowers and a cake to setting up flat screen TV’s showing photos of us, our family and friends over the past 50 years. It provided many moments of nostalgia… and lots of laughs. Robin even recorded the Top 100 songs of 1959 and played them softly in the background, along with a collection of events and prices of the year. Robin asked everyone to write down on a special form where they first met us, words of advice and a funny story about us, all of which became a part of a bound memory book. Needless to say, it was a memorable evening, one that we will always remember. We didn’t want it to end. The joy of knowing about the party is being able to be there as everyone arrives and greet them. With most surprise parties, the guests arrive late to what they pretend to believe is an intimate dinner with their children, with everyone jumping up and yelling, “Surprise!” Being a small part of the planning, knowing who is coming, and being there through the entire evening, makes for a most enjoyable celebration. Now what do we do for our 51st? n

FAMILY –

Jess plans to return for an internship in May. That sense of adventure is just one of the commonalities she sees between the pair. “I think we both enjoy a sense of humor. We can be very silly together,” she said. More than that, though, Lorette has learned a lot from Jess. “She has the ‘don’t sweat the small stuff’ attitude so I’ve learned resiliency and letting things go,” she said. Looking back on her experiences, Lorette shrugs off the impact she has made on Jess’ life. From the beginning it just felt right. “There’s no part of me that ever thought, ‘why did I do this?’ It was just an amazing experience,” she said. Moreover, age has never been a factor. When asked if the experience is one she would recommend for adults nearing, or in, their retirement years, she did not hesitate to say yes. “I think if you’re at retirement age, then this is the perfect time to do it because you have the time to give to these kids. I think this is something to do at any age,” she said. While she says anyone interested in becoming a foster parent or adopting needs to be willing to “let things get messy,” Lorette believes the experience is life-changing. “What you get in return is family,” she said. n January 2010


We asked our readers, “What

EXTRAordinary results have you gotten from The Classifieds?”

They answered.

VACATION – As the fall faded, residents at St. Elizabeth are still buzzing with excitement about their vacation. DiMaio pulls her walker close, taking out a stack of photographs from the trip. Each resident was given a disposable camera, in addition to a photo album and bottle of sand and shells as mementos. “I don’t know where a nursing home would go this far to make patients so happy. I think I talked about it for weeks,” DiMaio said. The Cape group invited family members to see a slideshow and video of their experience, and often share memories as they pass one another in the hallway. Looking forward, Trimble says the trip showed him how crucial relationships and intimate settings can be in the long term care equation. He now plans to advocate for similar initiatives statewide. “I would say it’s worth the risk and it’s worth the anxiety,” he said. “Hopefully that’s the direction long term care is going in.” n

“I earned over $400 by selling old clothes and jewelry in PrimeTime Magazine.”

- Jan Staples

Don’t miss out. Advertise in PrimeTime Classifieds.

Call or email Nicole or Sue 732-3100

nicolee@rhodybeat.com

PrimeTime magazine

January 2010

CALE• N DAR OF •EVE NTS • • • •

Ranger Days Betty and Carlo Mencucci from the Burrillville Historical Society will present views of Spring Lake through the years. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Lake attracted thousands of visitors looking for recreation in the form of swimming, boating, clambakes and outings, providing rest from the workaday world of the mill workers. Their collection of photos and postcards at the Museum of Work & Culture will provide an educational and entertaining experience for all. Visit the museum on Jan. 31 at 42 South Main Street in Woonsocket. Call 769-9675 or visit www.rihs.org for more information.

PrimeTime | 25


Business Directory Asphalt Paving CESARIO PAVING CO.

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Auto Body

handyman

hardwood Floors

Ken Rocha

Triangle Handyman Services

Frankyal Wood Flooring

Auto Collision

ESTABLISHED 1950

• Cement Work • Landscape Construction • Excavating • Bluestone • loam & Fill • Back Hoe • Bobcat • Trucking Service

467-4800

Home Improvements

Free Estimates

Free Pick-Up & Delivery

DRIVEWAYS & ROADWAYS & PARKING AREAS

739-4372

Sanding starting @ $1.25 sq. ft. Installation starting @ $1.75 sq. ft. Installation • Sanding • Repairs • Staircases Refinish • Sales

Serving You For Over 32 Years

ASPHALT PAVING

Jim Cesario, Owner • Reg. #4541 91 deerfield dr. Free Estimates warwick, ri

Providence, RI (401) 785-2894 cell (401) 255-7541

Guaranteed Loaner Car

R.I. Lic. #865

Home Improvements

No Job Too Small...We Do ‘Em All!! Insured Free Estimates Lic#32146

Home Improvements Alexander & Sons Construction

K.F.G. Concrete

35 Years Experience

Free Estimates

Patios, Walkways, Stairs, Driveways, Floors

~ Decorative Stamp ~

Insured

Chimney Repairs ALL MASONRY REPAIRS No Job Too Small

(401) 269-1163

Kevin F. Gonsalves, Jr.

Reg. #25248

www.KFGconcrete.com

landscaping

YARD-SERVICE LANDSCAPE EXPERTS INC. Fall Cleanups • Free On-Site Consultations • Professional Lawn Cutting Services • Mulching • New Lawns Installed • Complete Landscape Service FREE ESTIMATES • Insured

Commercial & Residential Lic. #12161

828-1202

www.yardserviceexperts.com Bob@yardserviceexperts.com

26 | PrimeTime

RINLA Member 28 Years

Reg. #31422 PHONE:

Kitchens & Baths Replacement Windows & Doors

401-632-1815 Email: paulalexander63@yahoo.com

Paul Alexander

206-7297 or 632-3969 50 Years Experience

Insured

Reg. #15593

Home Improvements Put your business card into

PrimeTime Magazine

Only $30/mo. (3 month commitment) Call Sue or Nicole at

732-3100

roofing

roofing

scooters

Roofing Vinyl Siding

Put your business card into

Al’s Scooter & Wheelchair Repair

30% OFF 401-837-6730 KAC Construction Reg. #25211

PrimeTime Magazine

Only $30/mo.

Pride/ Silver Star Lifts

(3 month commitment) Call Sue or Nicole at

Servicing Pride & Mega Motion Products

732-3100

email: ReynoldsJoe17@verizon.net

401-732-5128

January 2010


advertise to

savvy seniors Looking to promote your products or services to a growing group of Baby Boomers and senior citizens? Look no further than PrimeTime Magazine, where you can advertise alongside informative features on topics that range from finance to health to retirement communities and beyond.

PrimeTime agazine M

To find out more about this valuable advertising opportunity, Call Donna

401-732-3100


January 2010 PrimeTime  

A toast to the New Year!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you