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Retire CHOOSING MAINE AS YOUR RETIREMENT DESTINATION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION OF THE BANGOR DAILY NEWS яБо 2017


Retire Publisher RICHARD J. WARREN Senior Editor, Special Sections MATT CHABE Print Sales Manager TODD McLEOD

CONTENTS 02

08 Art Director AMY ALLEN Creative Services Manager MICHELE DWYER Creative Services MARCIE COOMBS, CORALIE CROSS, BEN CYR, CALLIE PICARD, CAROLINA RAVE Cover Image JACOB AMMENTORP LUND/ THINKSTOCK

RETIRING IN MAINE For retirees, Maine offers sense of home and fun.

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MAKING NEW FRIENDS Tips for meeting new people after a move or life event.

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RETIREMENT SAVING Ways to save for late bloomers.

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CREATE A MAINE BUCKET LIST Ideas for a quintessential Maine bucket list.

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MAINE STUFF A guide for those “from away.”

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MAINE ART DESTINATIONS Explore these 3 destinations for true Maine art flavor.

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TAKING TIME TO TRAVEL Make vacations and travel a key part of retirement.

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ROAD TRIP 5 great New England day trips (with Maine as home base).

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GET MOVING Fun and simple ways to get outdoors and exercise.

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VOLUNTEERING Check out these Maine volunteering opportunities.

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SAMPLING MAINE Beer, wine, and foodie tours to keep you busy this season.

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TRY THESE MAINE DISHES Hot dogs and apple pie recipes to try.

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FUN & GAMES What’s a 7-letter word for Maine’s favorite crustacean?


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RETIRING IN MAINE

RETIRING IN MAINE For retirees, Maine offers sense of home and sense of fun.

WE’VE ALL HEARD the saying, “You can’t get there from here.” But the reality is, you can get there from here in Maine, making many communities a great retirement destination. “I was just in Boston recently,” said Bangor retiree Carol Kitchenka recently. Her husband, Frank, chimed in: “Boston was not too friendly, yet Bangor is totally friendly!” For people like the Kitchenkas, there are many ways for retirees to travel and explore with Maine as a home base. Maine has two international airports and the Downeaster passenger train link to Boston. In addition, sojourning to Canada via land or sea is yet another opportunity to “get there from here.” While this couple misses lakeside living in Naples, Maine, where they met as children “from away” summering here, they’ve since discovered “there is lots to Maine,” said Carol. “We never visited the coast, and now we’re out exploring [with Bangor as a hub].” From majestic mountains to Maine’s breathtaking coastline, multiple communities have been acknowledged as retirementfriendly including Bangor, Portland, Bethel, Farmington, Waterville, Camden, Rock-

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land, Boothbay Harbor, Kennebunkport and Bar Harbor. “Many have been vacationing in Bar Harbor since childhood,” said Gail Caruso of the Swan Agency Sotheby’s International Realty. Certainly the coastal landscape and abundant outdoor activities reign in future retirees. A bonus, of course, is that the Pine Tree State offers residents aged 65 and older free entrance to Maine state parks, promoting healthy living. Added to the shopping list in finding the right community are safety, access to healthcare and certainly the cost of living. AARP has ranked Portland as one of the top ten affordable retirement cities in the nation, citing its well-preserved working waterfront, nationally-recognized dining scene, and moderate housing prices. Bangor followed suit in 2016 when AARP claimed the Queen City was the best place to retire in Maine on $30,000 a year. Tanya Emery, Bangor’s director of community and economic development, said making this list is an “endorsement of the quality of life here in Bangor.” In addition, Forbes and Money Magazine have noted Bangor as a well-suited retirement spot. “People from all across the country

PHOTOS: (KAYAKING PHOTOS) JACOBLUND/THINKSTOCK

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RETIRING IN MAINE

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are seeing Bangor as a destination for arts and culture, entertainment and more,” said Emery. This, of course, has been solidified with the American Folk Festival and waterfront concerts which bring notable, international performers to Bangor. Ten years ago, Ted Brush and his wife moved from Virginia to Bangor. “It was too rural there,” he said. “We were looking for a small city, and here we have everything from the airport, hospitals, colleges, arts, shopping, restaurants. It’s a variety and all appealing.” Brush warns to plan out your finances. “It was very expensive to move, so it’s something you really should only do once,” he said. But for Brush, the move’s difficulty was compounded: “It’s emotionally expensive leaving friends behind.” The Brushes had a prior Maine connection. Ted visited the Downeast coast as a child and has cousins and family property in that area. Now, instead of the couple sailing from Virginia to Maine, they appreciate a shorter, more enjoyable sailing journey. Bangor is known as the gateway to the coast and to the Maine highlands region due to its close proximity to Acadia National Park and Baxter State Park. Secured in Maine’s highlands region is Mary Alice Mowry, who moved from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Maine. “I did not really select Millinocket. I feel like it selected me,” she said. Moving was not as much of a financial burden for Mowry as it was a burden to downsize: “There were so many highs and lows of divesting my belongings.” The once vibrant mill town is now Mowry’s home thanks to a former colleague who grew up in the area and extended the invitation. Millinocket doesn’t often make it on “places to retire” lists, but for Mowry, this community’s economic decline was a real advantage for her. “I am just at the beginning of my retirement,” she said. “I don’t know where this will all lead, but I am loving my new-found home. I have experienced that one can find a sense of place and belonging no matter how old or young you are.” Moving in the other direction were Gloria and John Nelson. They lived in Aroostook County running a buffalo farm and guide/lodging business. “As soon as the young ones were old enough to make it clear that they were not interested in carrying on the business, we knew we would have to sell out sooner or later,” they said. That choice became a necessity after John suffered an injury. bangordailynews.com

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The Nelson’s moving and retirement plans took into consideration the need for a hospital and familiarity. “I was born and raised on the Megunticook River in Camden and most of my family is right around there,” said Gloria. “We looked between Bangor for the hospital and Camden for family and ended up in ‘out back’ Winterport.” Gloria, like many retirees in Maine, either grew up in Maine, moved away and returned, or summered in Maine as a child. Summer childhood memories from the mountains of western Maine, like Bethel and Farmington, center on taking in the crisp air at the Sunday River ski area. If not snow skiing, water skiing offers a great

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childhood memory of being in Maine as the state is riddled with ponds and lakes, offering endless adventures. Robin Zinchuk, the executive director of the Bethel-Area Chamber of Commerce, a New Jersey transplant herself, suggested that people move to Bethel to avoid the “hectic” lifestyle, yet still lead active lives. In central Maine, retirees are being drawn to Waterville which is making its trademark in the arts and connections with local colleges while offering a small-town feel with bigger city assets. No matter the draw, Maine’s quality of life has proven to be very satisfying for retirees. It allows the ability to walk

downtown areas and travel state- and region-wide with ease. Ted Brush contends Bangor offers a sense a safety and security and “it’s easy to navigate.” “Maine is a beautiful state,” said Mowry. “Each month I plan at least one overnight in a place that I haven’t been before. Home is where your heart is, and also where possibility begins.” No matter where you choose to live in Maine—coastal, inland, mountains, or otherwise—activities of all types are never more than a couple of hours away. In Maine, you can enjoy retirement any way you see fit. You truly can “get there from here.”


WELCOME TO THE

NEIGHBORHOOD Tips for getting acquainted with your surroundings after a move to a new area.

MOVING OFTEN makes sense in retirement. Many retirees find they don’t need as much space or don’t want the responsibility and maintenance costs of a larger home. Whether a move is across county lines or across the country, it can take some time to acclimate to a new neighborhood. These tips can help anyone get acquainted with their new surroundings and make friends in the process. 1. HOST A HOUSEWARMING PARTY. Get to know immediate neighbors by hosting a party. After some unpacking is done, host a simple gettogether for people who live nearby. Ask if neighbors can help out by bringing chairs. Offer light refreshments and some type of activities for children. The event doesn't have to be extensive, just long enough to engage in some conversation and introduce yourself. 2. WALK AND DRIVE AROUND. Scout out the area by driving around and making note of shopping centers, parks and places of interest. Schedule times when you will get out of the car and walk around on foot, which makes it easier to take everything in. Use a website like Walkscore.com to find places within walking distance of your new home. Bring the dog along. Dogs can be great ice breakers with new neighbors.

PHOTO: RAWPIXEL/THINKSTOCK

3. CHECK OUT COMMUNITY BLOTTERS. Community events may be posted in print and distributed through a local newspaper and also on municipal websites. Find out where the locals go on weekends or during the week. Communities may take pride in certain activities. It’s easier to get a feel for the neighborhood by spending time with the locals. 4. BECOME ACTIVE IN THE COMMUNITY. Find a volunteer organization or join a local house of worship. Check with the local chamber of commerce for ways to get involved or clubs to join. Like-minded people can make living in a new locale more enjoyable. 5. DINE OUT ONCE A WEEK. If budget allows, try a new neighborhood eating establishment each week to get a lay of the land. You’ll identify hot spots and hidden gems and will also be able to mingle with the community. bangordailynews.com

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MAKING NEW FRIENDS

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MAKING NEW

FRIENDS Tips for meeting new people after a move or life event.

PHOTOS: ©WAVEBREAKMEDIAMICRO, ©TYLER OLSON, ©AMRIPHOTO, ©HIGHWAYSTARZ / ADOBE STOCK

AFTER DOWNSIZING AND other life changes, retirees often find themselves leaving their comfort zones to move to new neighborhoods or regions of the country. It can be difficult to leave those comfort zones behind, especially when it means saying goodbye to close friends or family members. Establishing new social circles as a senior can be challenging. But with a little effort and the right attitude, retirees can meet new people and enjoy the excitement that comes with new friendships. • JOIN A CLUB. If you have a particular hobby or interest, rekindle it in your new location. Find a local gardening club, church-sponsored organization or fitness center where you can meet like-minded men and women. Ask the real estate agent who helped you relocate to make suggestions on where to find community information and read community notices in the local newspaper. • GET A DOG. Dogs make great companions inside of the house and also serve as an ice breaker when you are outdoors. Take plenty of walks and take advantage of opportunities for conversation when people come up to you to inquire about your dog. Explain your situation and you may make some new friends along the way. • VOLUNTEER YOUR TIME. Many people make new friends through volunteering. Volunteer and you’re likely to meet people who share the same interests as you. Sign up with a favorite charity or volunteer at nonprofit events and look for familiar faces. Start talking to those people you meet again and again. • PARTICIPATE IN CHURCH EVENTS. Places of religious worship are often cornerstones of a community, and they frequently host different events to get parishioners or members together. Read the bulletin and get involved in pot lucks, retreats, movie nights, and other church-sponsored events. bangordailynews.com

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RETIREMENT SAVING

RETIREMENT

S AV I N G (FOR LATE BLOOMERS)

TODAY’S YOUNG PROFESSIONALS hear about the importance of saving for retirement seemingly from the moment they are hired. Older workers may not have been so lucky, and many may find themselves trying

to play catch-up as retirement age draws closer. While it’s important to begin saving for retirement as early as possible, late bloomers whose retirement dates are nearing can still take steps to secure their financial futures.

PAY DOWN DEBTS. Eliminating debt is good for men and women of all ages, but especially so for those nearing retirement. Substantial debt may delay your retirement and can greatly reduce your quality of life during retirement. If you still have substantial debt, eliminate that debt before you start saving additional money for retirement. Once your debt slate has been wiped clean, you can then increase your retirement contributions.

ELIMINATE UNNECESSARY EXPENSES. If your retirement savings are low (many financial advisors now advise men and women that they will need at least 60 percent of their pre-retirement income each year they are retired), start cutting back on unnecessary expenses and reallocate that money toward retirement saving. Cutting out luxury items, such as vacations to exotic locales or country club memberships, is one way to save money. But don’t overlook the simpler ways to save, such as canceling your cable subscription or dining at home more often.

DOWNSIZE YOUR HOME. Many empty nesters downsize their homes as retirement nears, and doing so can help you save a substantial amount of money. If the kids no longer live at home or if you simply have more space than you will need after retirement, downsize to a smaller, less expensive home. Monitor the real estate market before you decide to downsize so you can be sure to get the best deal on your current home. Downsizing saves on monthly utility bills, property taxes and a host of additional expenses. Downsizing also means less maintenance, which gives you more time to pursue your hobbies upon retiring.

TAKE ON SOME ADDITIONAL WORK. While you may have long felt you would slowly wind down in the years immediately preceding retirement, taking on some additional work outside of your current job is a great way to save more for retirement and perhaps even lay the foundation for a post-retirement career. Workers over the age of 50 can be invaluable resources to startups or other businesses looking for executives who have “been there, done that.” Look for part-time jobs that seek such experience. Even if the initial jobs don’t bowl you over financially, part-time consultant work in retirement can make up for lost retirement savings and may even make your retirement years more fulfilling.

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GREAT PART-TIME

JOBS FOR RETIREES Fun and fulfilling ways to spend your free time and make a little extra money. UPON RETIRING, MANY newly-minted retirees find themselves looking for ways to fill their free time. Hobbies may not take up too much time, and travel can stretch retirees’ budgets. One way that retirees can make great use of their free time and make a little extra money is to find part-time employment. Part-time jobs can help retirees maintain their connections with their communities, whether it’s their professional community or the community in which they live, while also providing a sense of purpose. Retirees interested in finding part-time work may want to consider the following jobs. CONSULTING WORK: Many retirees have long resumes, and that experience is still valuable even after retirement. Consulting firms often hire experienced businesspeople on a project or contract basis, which can be great opportunities for retirees to fill their time and make sizable amounts of money without having to commit to long-term employment.

PHOTOS: ©PIKSELSTOCK, ©IRIANA SHIYAN, ©LDPROD, ©BARANQ, ©LEV DOLGACHOV, ©PRESSMASTER, ©GOODLUZ/ADOBE STOCK

TEACHING: Retirees can also put their professional experience to work in the classroom. Inquire about teaching opportunities at a nearby university or even the local high school. Such opportunities may only be available on a volunteer basis, but some might pay part-time salaries or small stipends. Either way, many retirees find that working with young people helps them stay young, and passing on lessons learned to younger generations can provide a strong sense of purpose. SEASONAL WORK: Seasonal work is another great way for retirees to fill their time and make a little extra money along the way. Come the holiday season, retirees should have no trouble finding seasonal retail work at their local malls or shopping centers. In warmer months, retirees may find seasonal employment at area beaches, golf courses or parks. SPORTS TEAMS: Retirees who live in cities with professional sports teams may be able to find work with their favorite franchise. Professional sports franchises often rely on retirees to staff in-game positions like ushers and concessions employees, and some may even hire retirees to greet fans. While the pay might not be great, such positions are ideal for retirees who happen to be big sports fans. CRAFTS: Retirees with a love of crafting can turn their hobby into income. For example, Etsy.com makes it easy for creative entrepreneurs to post their creations and sell them to buyers all over the globe. Sellers often dictate how quickly they can make and ship products, so retirees need not feel worried about being rushed. bangordailynews.com

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MAINE BUCKET LIST

CREATE A MAINE

BUCKET LIST A quintessential Maine bucket list inspired by people and their stories. BY ROBIN CLIFFORD WOOD

Between 2010 and 2015 I wrote a column for the Bangor Daily News called “Conversations With Maine.” All over our home state, from potato country to the rocky coast, from western ski mountains to the easternmost tip of the United States, from the middle of nowhere to the heart of Maine’s cities, I found people with a passion for what they do. Their unique, insider views have inspired me to explore both the highlights and hidden corners of Maine, and to talk to people as I go.

MT. KATAHDIN. Climbing Mt. Katahdin may be considered a rite of passage, but there are other ways to bask in Katahdin’s glory. It was on an interview trip that I first discovered the scenic overlook at I-95’s mile marker 252. The view there of Mt. Katahdin is exquisite, and requires minimal physical exertion. For more great views of the mountain, drive route 11 south from Sherman towards Grindstone. If you want more than a car view, try a shorter hike in Baxter State Park (I love Basin Pond) or the Maine Woods and Waters region (high on my to-do list). There are many ways to enjoy Maine’s greatest mountain without the blisters. THE KENDUSKEAG STREAM CANOE RACE. Whether you’re into whitewater paddling or watching the action at Six-Mile Falls, find your way to take part in this annual event. One interesting insider view is to enjoy the pancake breakfast at Mystic Tie Grange Hall and watch paddlers prepare for the start of the race. You can also browse stunning photographs of the race online thanks to Mike Alden, who has spent years enjoying the event from behind the lens.

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Mt. Katahdin as seen from an outlook on the loop road in the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument.

PHOTOS: (LEFT) AISLINN SARNACKI; (BOATS) PAT WELLENBACH (AP)

BEING ON THE UPPER side of 50, I’ve done some revision on my own personal bucket list. Sadly, I’ll never meet Paul Newman face to face, and I’m no longer that keen on bungee jumping. Although I’m still interested in global travel, I’ve grown more intrigued by the idea of exploring close to home, right here in Maine. What an amazing wealth of discovery lies out there, just a few miles from home. I’m not referring only to sights and activities. My Maine bucket list grew out of Maine’s people and their stories.


MESS AROUND WITH BOATS. Seeing Maine from the water, whether you’re on the ocean, a river, or a winding stream, will provide you with perspectives impossible to access otherwise. Wherever your explorations take you, enjoy an hour or two seeing the world from a loon’s eye view. Three of my favorite spots are Donnell Pond, Lobster Lake, and the Western Way off Mt. Desert Island. Or, if you’d like to plunge more deeply into the world of boats, meet some of Maine’s many boat-builders and sign up for a class at the Wooden Boat School in Brooklin.

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MAINE BUCKET LIST

CHOOSE YOUR FESTIVAL. No matter your interests—food, film, beer, arts, agriculture—you can find a festival highlighting your heart’s desire. If you want to get a feel for potato country and Maine’s Swedish heritage, don’t miss New Sweden’s annual Midsommer Festival. I’ll never forget dancing in full Swedish garb with Ralph Ostlund, who shared his stories of growing up in northern Maine in the early 20th century. On my own to-do list is Maine’s Artisan Bread Fair in Skowhegan, which I learned about in two interviews with Mainers who had backyard bread ovens. The Maine Indian Holiday Market takes place in December at Collins Center for the Arts. It was there that I encountered Rolfe Richter, a wooden flute carver and musician, and Jennifer Sapiel Neptune, a skilled basketweaver, beadworker, and anthropologist who taught me about the rich heritage of Maine’s indigenous people. FOLLOW YOUR NOSE. Some of the best discoveries come from exploring without an agenda. On my travels around Maine, I stumbled upon memorable delicacies at Monica’s Chocolates in Lubec, Rockland’s quirky Home Kitchen Café, Slate’s Bakery in Hollowell, The River Café in Island Falls, and a now-closed bakery in Rangeley that sold fresh-baked scones I still dream about. Baker Nicole Lund now runs Rangeley’s Thai restaurant, The Blue Orchid, which I’ve added to my check-it-out list.

FIND YOUR INNER ARTIST. Local artwork abounds not only in galleries all over Maine, but on the walls of libraries, restaurants, cafes, and beer houses. There is something about Maine — is it the quiet, the unpretentious beauty, the crystalline air? Whatever it is, our state draws forth creativity. Be inspired by Maine’s artists, then open yourself to your own inspiration — needlework, poetry, woodwork, stone and moss, sea glass jewelry, or traditional studio arts. You can take a class through your local adult education program, or find a program at the wonderful Haystack Mountain School in Deer Isle.

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PHOTO: TROY R. BENNETT

THEME TOURING. Retired teachers John and Marisue Pickering published a small book, “Maine: Beyond the Usual.” The book—now out of print but still available on Amazon—highlights historic and cultural curiosities all around Maine, most within a day trip of Bangor. Marisue told me about a new University of Maine project offering themed walking tours around the UMO campus. Another cool way to frame your Maine explorations is by using the interactive Ice Age Trail map, created by Hal Bornes, a retired UMO geologist.


ISLANDS IN THE SEA. Maine poet Rachel Field wrote, “If once you have slept on an island, you’ll never be quite the same.” Maine has over four thousand islands, and each one has its own history, character, and distinct vista over the sea. A few Maine islands can be reached by car, and several by ferry, including a few with year-round communities. Spend a night or two on Peaks, Deer Isle, Monhegan, or one of the Cranberries. Chat with islanders and learn about the allure of their unique way of life.

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MAINE BUCKET LIST

PURSUE PASSIONATE PEOPLE. Whether you live in the city or in unorganized territory, no doubt there are people around you with something unique to share. Take note of local happenings in schools, libraries, and grange halls. It could be a slide show, a travel talk, a demonstration, or a panel discussion, but get out there and take part. Maine attracts dreamers of all kinds. I’ve interviewed sea glass collectors who guard their secret beaches, a lover of lavender who started the Glendarragh farm in Appleton, a history buff who trekked into the lost town of Drew, Maine, and a family of fiddlers who hold an annual event in East Benton. All you have to do is strike up a conversation, and you might access some of the greatest riches Maine has to offer.

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PHOTO: TROY R. BENNETT

VISIT AN OLD-TIMER. Maine has the second highest population of residents over 65 in the country, and every one of them has a story to tell. Many of my most extraordinary conversations in Maine were with people over 80 or even 90. They revealed fascinating pockets of history, rugged independence, and wry humor, embodiments of the character of Maine. Whether you visit an aging neighbor or volunteer in a retirement community, you’re sure to come away uplifted.


MAINE STUFF A guide for those “from away.” BY BDN RETIRE

ONE THING’S FOR SURE, Maine’s got character. Perhaps no other region in the country can claim such a collection as the one that makes Maine “Maine.” If you’re new to the area, some of these things might seem downright weird. But love ‘em or hate ‘em, these quintessential Maine products are part of the state’s very fabric. MOXIE Ask ten different people whether they like Moxie, and you’ll get ten different answers. There’s perhaps no issue more divisive in Maine than this curious soft drink: some love it, some hate it, and some… just tolerate it. It was invented in the late 18th century as a “nerve food,” and the original “medicinal” ingredient, gentian root, still gives Moxie it’s bitter flavor to this day. It was Maine’s official soft drink until 2005. WHOOPIE PIES Mainers claim this treat consisting of two brownie cakes stuffed with filling was invented in Maine. While other New England states also lay claim to the fame, Maine has officially adopted the whoopie pie as its “State Treat” and hosts an annual whoopie pie festival in Portland. In community general stores across the state, the whoopie pie’s as ubiquitous as candy bars and cola.

PHOTOS: ©BILL/ADOBESTOCK; STEPHANIEFREY/THINKSTOCK

RED SNAPPERS Mainers know two types of hot dogs: the traditional kind with the brown casing, and “red snappers”—hot dogs with a thinner profile and a taut red casing (just food dye). It’s arguable if there’s a taste difference, but one thing’s for sure—you know you’re in Maine when you see these things appearing on the shelves. COFFEE BRANDY Sometimes called the “Champagne of Maine,” this coffee-flavored liqueur has been Maine’s best selling alcohol product for over 20 years. Consider this: in 2008, 1.1 million bottles of the stuff were sold. With a population of 1.3 million, that’s nearly one bottle for every man, woman, and child in the state. Note: can also be mixed with another Maine staple, Moxie, for a unique treat called “Burnt Trailer.” Don’t say we didn’t warn you. EARMUFFS Everyone knows about earmuffs, but did you know they were invented in Maine? Chester Greenwood invented them in Farmington, Maine, in 1873 at the age of 15. His first design was simply two tufts of fur with wire in between; in 1877, he was awarded patent #188,292 and went on to manufacture them for nearly 60 years. Today, Farmington celebrates “Chester Greenwood Day” each year with a variety of activities.

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The Tides Institute and Museum of Art in Eastport.

Crafts of all sorts line the walls of the Center for Maine Craft in West Gardiner.

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A Richard Nixon sculpture waves from the Langlais Sculpture Preserve.


MAINE ART

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GUIDE TO

MAINE ART

DESTINATIONS Explore these 3 destinations for true Maine art flavor. BY JASMINE J. HAINES

FANCY YOURSELF AN ART LOVER? Maine’s art scene is vibrant and booming, with something for everyone ranging from the traditional to modern. Make sure to include these three places on your list of must-sees Maine art destinations. THE CENTER FOR MAINE CRAFT (CMC): This exhibition gallery and retail store is located in West Gardiner. Here you will find Maine-made goods, paintings, music, film and much more. Over 300 local artists have their work on display or for sale. This fall, CMC will be showing “30 Days at Sea,” an exhibition of prints, books, and clay work by Maine’s own Tim Christensen. Christensen’s work recently has been featured in publications such as Downeast magazine and The New York Times. The exhibit will run from October 5 through November 19, 2017. They also feature cultural tourism information, like where to find craft artists’ studios, commercial galleries, and nonprofit arts organizations throughout the entire state. This is the perfect place to buy a gift for a loved one or discover a new local artist.

PHOTOS: (TIDES INSTITUTE) SHARON KILEY MACK; (NIXON) JASMINE HAINES; (VASES) KEVIN BENNETT

TIDES INSTITUTE & MUSEUM OF ART (TIMA): The TIMA campus is in the quaint coastal town of Eastport, located on the Canadian border. Its exhibits and programs focus on local art, architecture, and history that both celebrates and strengthens the international cultural bonds of Canada and the United States. TIMA’s facilities include six properties that offer art exhibits, concerts, artist in residency programs and an unusual New Year’s Eve celebration. Each year, a giant maple leaf is lowered to ring in the Canadian new year at midnight (11 p.m. ET), while everyone sings “O Canada.” Then, at midnight Eastern time, an 8-foot sardine is dropped while the crowd sings “Auld Lang Syne.” It is truly an international good time not to be missed. LANGLAIS SCULPTURE PRESERVE: This sculpture preserve in Cushing has got to be one of the most remarkable installations you will ever experience. It’s a mixture of a nature preserve and a larger-than-life outdoor art gallery. It’s replete with a 13-foot wooden horse, an uncanny Richard Nixon, and various other characters and creatures that blend into the charming and handicap accessible trails around the property. The artist behind the woodwork is Bernard Langlais (1921-1977), originally from Old Town, Maine. Langlais found success as a commercial artist in New York during the 1950s but always longed to return home. By the mid-1960s he decided to leave the pressures of big-city gallery culture, and he purchased a farmhouse in Cushing and began making some of the wooden sculptures that accentuate the landscape today. This fall, the farmhouse and the sculpture trails opened to the public to get up close and personal with the work of one of Maine’s great artists. Between the rocky coastlines and picturesque forests, it’s no wonder that Maine is home to a rich and vibrant arts community; beauty and inspiration can be found around every corner. The local art scene is growing here and leaving art lovers excited for what they will think of next. bangordailynews.com

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VACATION & TRAVEL

TAKING TIME TO

TRAVEL Make vacations and travel a key component of retirement.

WHEN THE TIME comes to bid farewell to conference calls, meetings, and daily commutes, retirees have open schedules to fill with whichever activities they choose. Travel is one exciting way to pass the time. Even if you’re settled in Maine, traveling can be a rewarding prospect, particularly for those who successfully pre-planned for retirement and have the income to fund various excursions. Many retirees, both in the United States and Canada, find that travel tops their to-do lists once they retire. According to Senior Travel magazine, new travel options are emerging for newly minted retirees looking for something a little different from the status quo. The list of destinations retirees have at their disposal is limitless. The following ideas are some of the more popular ways retirees choose to travel. • ROAD TRIPS RULE. Taking to the highways and byways is an excellent way to see the country. Retirees can customize their routes depending on which places they want to visit. RV travel can be as comfortable or as rustic as travelers prefer. Many retirees spend months traveling in their campers, which offer many of the same amenities of home. Campsites and special RV hookup sites offer the other necessities of traveling the open road. • GENEALOGICAL TOURISM IS POPULAR. People hoping to trace their ancestry and visit their ancestral homelands are one of the fastest-growing travel segments. Visiting an old church in Europe where ancestors were married or buying food from a market in which a great aunt or uncle once worked leads retirees on many international adventures. Such trips provide travelers with a unique opportunity to understand their roots up close and personal while enjoying some international travel along the way. • EXOTIC TOURS CAN BE EXCITING DESTINATIONS. History buffs or adventure-seeking couples may be particularly attracted to exotic travel destinations that are slightly off of the beaten path. Travel tours may take vacationers to destinations such as excavation sites or backpacking through the rainforest. With passport in hand, retirees can go just about anywhere their desires take them. • ENJOY A RELAXING SEASIDE TRIP. A seaside vacation can be the perfect trip for retirees who want to put their feet up and sip some cocktails while watching the waves lap the shores. Many beach resorts offer all-inclusive packages for different age groups. Meals, excursions and hotel rooms can be bundled into one affordable, confusion-free price. • GO CRUISING. Speaking of all-inclusive vacationing, cruising seems tailor-made for those ages 50 and older because it offers the convenience of accommodations, food, entertainment, and transportation all in one. The various activities offered on the ship mean travelers can find ways to spend their time how they see fit. Cruising couples can opt to spend all of their time on the ship enjoying carefully prepared meals and entertainment or disembark and explore the various ports of call along the way.

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SAVING MONEY ON

TRAVEL EXPENSES 3 money-saving travel tips for retirees.

THOUGH A TRANSIENT LIFESTYLE is something few people aspire to during much of their lives, come retirement, the idea of staying in a place for only a short time has more appeal. Fortunately, you can make Maine your “home base” for all your adventure travel plans. According to a recent study from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, 36 percent of baby boomers want to spend their retirements traveling. Many are succeeding in doing just that, as a study from the luxury travel network Virtuoso found that today’s seniors spent an average of just over $11,000 per year on travel. That was more than any other generation, highlighting just how much older adults like to get out and explore the world. Retirees who fear they cannot afford to travel can explore the various ways to cut costs and still satisfy their wanderlust during retirement.

PHOTOS: ©AYGULCHIK99/ADOBE STOCK; ©BST2012/ADOBE STOCK; ©ANDY DEAN PHOTOGRAPHY/ ADOBE STOCK

1. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF AGE-RELATED DISCOUNTS. Some adults prefer to hide their ages, but when it comes time to travel during retirement, honesty is the best policy. Many businesses that cater to travelers offer discounts to seniors. Car rental agencies, hotels, travel agencies, and cruise lines may offer direct discounts to customers 65 and older, while membership in organizations such as AAA and AARP may make seniors eligible for additional discounts. Discounts on lodging and airfare might net the biggest savings, but even discounts on various smaller expenses can add up to big savings. 2. DON’T OVERLOOK TRAVEL AGENCIES. While many prospective travelers’ first instincts are to visit various travel websites in an effort to find the most affordable trips, it’s important that travelers not overlook travel agencies when planning trips. Travel websites, though a valuable resource, only list the hotels and airlines that agree to be included on their sites. While many participate, some do not, and those that do not may instead work independent of travel websites or partner with travel agencies. Travel agencies have access to the latest information, and many specialize in certain countries, knowing all the attractions visitors to their countries want to see. Travel agencies may offer packages that include admissions to popular attractions, which can be more affordable than planning a trip a la carte. 3. TRAVEL AS PART OF A GROUP. Group travel may not appeal to everyone, but it should appeal to older, budget-conscious travelers. Retirees who are uncomfortable driving at home will likely be even less comfortable driving in foreign countries where the rules of the road are not the same. Traveling in groups, whether it’s with a retirement community, religious organization or another program, can save travelers substantial amounts of money. Many hotels and tourist attractions offer steep discounts for group tours, which can even be arranged through travel agencies. A hidden benefit of signing up for a group tour is the chance to meet new people and develop new relationships with fellow globetrotters. bangordailynews.com

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ROAD TRIP 5 great New England day trips (with Maine as home base). BY BDN RETIRE

AS THE JEWEL topping New England, there are enough scenic lakes, mountains and drives in Maine to last anyone a lifetime. But the fact is, there’s no need to stop there. With a little planning (and a full tank of gas), you can take control of the open road and experience the best of New England in just a day or two. Here are five suggestions to help you do just that. U.S. HIGHWAY 1, MAINE U.S. Highway 1 winds its way along Maine’s scenic coast all the way to Canada, hitting must-see locations like Portland, Camden, Belfast, Ellsworth, and (with a short side trip) Bar Harbor along the way. The highway’s character really starts to shine past Ellsworth, though, as things become more rustic, undeveloped, and much less crowded. This is Lobster Country, and it’s a beautiful place to stop for a lobster roll on a summer’s day. WHITE MOUNTAINS NATIONAL FOREST, NEW HAMPSHIRE Just over Maine’s western border is this magnificent preserve. The White Mountains are the highest mountain range in the northeast, and they’re an outdoor-person’s dream. Even if you’re not looking forward to taking in the abundant camping, hiking, boating, and more, you can still enjoy the region. Take a drive up Mt. Washington, New England’s highest mountain, or take the cog railway up. Visit the Flume, a natural granite gorge. Marvel at the sights all around you. No matter how you choose to enjoy it, the White Mountains are a can’t-miss New England trip. MT. DESERT ISLAND, MAINE A lot of press is given to Acadia National Park’s loop road and Cadillac Mountain, and for good reason: they afford beautiful views from atop granite ledges and within deep forests alike. But don’t ignore Mt. Desert Island proper—to ignore the road looping around the island’s perimeter is to miss coastal living, incredible views, and the Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse.

PHOTOS: DEBERARR, LITTLENY, SEANPAVONEPHOTO, PURESTOCK/THINKSTOCK

BURLINGTON, VERMONT Vermont’s largest city is situated on the shore of Lake Champlain, right in the shadows of the Green Mountains. The welcoming college town features the open air Church Street Marketplace and the headquarters of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and Magic Hat Brewing Co., both of which offer tours. Depending on your starting point, take the route through White Mountains National Forest for a real New England two-fer. RANGELEY LAKES SCENIC BYWAY This 35-and-some mile route in western Maine will have you travelling through mountains, forests, brisk mountain streams, farm fields, and a chain of lakes and ponds. The Height of Land lookout offers a beautiful panoramic view. For a taste of wild Maine not too far from the beaten path, try this route. Keep your eyes open for moose, bear, and other wildlife.

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EXERCISE OUTDOORS

GET MOVING Fun and simple ways for retirees to get outdoors and exercise.

TAKING YOUR WORKOUT OUTDOORS is a great way to enjoy pleasant weather and stay fit at the same time. In addition to exercise routines done at the gym, explore the following energizing outdoor activities to burn calories and soak up some sun at the same time. WALKING Maine offers an abundance of parks, preserves, and public spaces. Many feature walking trails, which are a good place to begin an outdoor workout. Some parks build exercise stations into their hiking paths, enabling visitors to vary their workouts along the way. Signs may also point out particular exercises that can be done during the hike, such as lunges or squats. HIKING Hiking is a good cardiovascular workout that is particularly beneficial when done on varied terrain. Mixing uphill and downhill portions of the trail with level ones will work the various muscles in the legs and also provide greater resistance to get the heart pumping. Maine offers wildly varied hiking opportunities, from the casual to the strenuous. “Hiking yoga” is a new fitness trend that melds the classic poses of yoga with the cardiovascular workout of hiking. Hikers can break up their workouts at various points by getting into yoga poses. By doing so, it’s possible to burn twice the amount of calories one would in a standard yoga session. There’s also the added benefit of being outdoors, which can boost your mood. OUTDOOR SPORTS Rev up the heart and cardiovascular system with sports you can play in the great outdoors. Eschew indoor racquetball for a game on an outdoor court. It’s easy to break a sweat and enjoy a good workout when a game of hoops is taken outdoors. Many parks include basketball courts where a few players can square off against one another. Pickup football or baseball is another way to enjoy physical activity outdoors, especially for those who may not be gym hounds. Both sports provide a cardiovascular workout while building muscle. When players are engrossed in the game, they may not realize they’re having fun and getting fit at the same time. CYCLING Calories burned while biking vary depending on the length and intensity of a ride, but cycling is often great exercise. It’s not only for city streets—explore the various “rails to trails” programs that crisscross the state. Defunct railway lines have been turned into walking and biking paths. Some hug coastal areas and feature impressive views. Especially adventurous riders can hop on a mountain bike and take to the hills. HORSEBACK RIDING Nature takes on an entirely different look when atop a horse. Horseback riding isn’t just for cowboys, and it can be a great workout as well as a recreational retreat. It takes balance, strong legs and quick reflexes to stay in a saddle. Those interested in horseback riding should visit a stable or riding academy nearby. You likely do not need to own a horse of your own, as riding schools and stables will have animals you can work with.

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PHOTOS: ©PERSHING, ©NADINE HAASE, ©WUTHRICH DIDIER, ©MICROMONKEY/ ADOBE STOCK


THE JOYS OF

VOLUNTEERING AFTER RETIREMENT Check out these Maine volunteering opportunities. BY SILAS WALSH AND LENARD KAYE/UMAINE CENTER ON AGING

THERE ARE FEW THINGS in life more rewarding than the heartfelt gratification that comes from helping others. While life in Maine offers wonderful opportunities for work, recreation and self-fulfillment, there is something so satisfying about making a positive contribution to the lives of the people within our communities. Volunteering offers a unique way to share a lifetime of experiences and knowledge with a person, or group of people, who may stand to benefit greatly from a small investment of your time. Fortunately, there are many great opportunities for volunteering within our community—all you need to do is chose the one that best suits your needs and talents. Here are just a few examples of programs offered by or affiliated with the University of Maine Center on Aging that are currently hard at work making positive changes in the lives of the people that they serve. THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM (RSVP), for people age 55 and older, provides volunteer services for children, older adults and veterans in Eastern Maine. RSVP staff work to connect volunteers with opportunities that best fit their lifestyle. Some examples include promoting reading with young children, helping children with math and science, supporting veteran’s services, and helping older adults stay active and healthy. GATEWAY SENIORS WITHOUT WALLS is an activity-based program that takes advantage of town spaces to offer many great opportunities free of charge. Their curriculum offers activities in self-expression, practical information, fitness/balance/strength, socializing, volunteering, and learning. Gateway Seniors serves Orono, Veazie and the surrounding towns. PENOBSCOT VALLEY SENIOR COLLEGE offers people 50 and older an exciting fall and spring catalogue of courses designed especially for them. Volunteers provide administrative support, serve on the board of directors, plan and present classes, and assist instructors. Classes are offered in six week sessions, twice per year and there are many opportunities for one-day events and field trips. THE SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM is a volunteer program for adults 55 and older who want to work with homebound or isolated individuals. These volunteers work with people to maximize, maintain, or regain their independence. Income-eligible volunteers may receive a tax-free hourly stipend, with mileage reimbursement. The Senior Companion Program has volunteer opportunities all over Maine, working with older adults who strongly value the assistance and companionship they receive. THE ENCORP LEADERSHIP CORPS (ENCORPS) is a collection of Mainers who are 50 and older who are active volunteers within their communities. ENCorps provides workshops and trainings to help supplement the skills of these volunteers while offering networking and the opportunity for each volunteer to spread the word about their work. The ENCrops program has members from Kittery to Caribou and everywhere in between. For more information about how to get connected with one or more of these terrific volunteer opportunities contact the University of Maine Center on Aging at 207-262-7919.

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VOLUNTEERING

VOLUNTEERING AS AN

OLDER ADULT How to find the right fit for you.

MANY PARENTS FEEL involving their children in volunteering at an early age can have a profound, long-lasting impact. But youngsters are not the only ones who can reap great rewards from volunteering, as studies show that men and women at, beyond, or approaching retirement age also benefit greatly from volunteer work. Research from the Corporation for National and Community Service found that more than 20 million older adults contributed in excess of three billion hours of community service time each year from 2011 to 2013. The reasons why older adults volunteer are varied, but in its 2014 survey the AARP’s Experience Corps found that 97 percent of its volunteers indicated that their volunteer work with the organization gave them a sense of purpose. The right fit can make all the difference for volunteers and the people they help, and the following tips might help older adults as they look for an opportunity that best utilizes their skills and experience.

PHOTOS: WAVEBREAKMEDIA/THINKSTOCK

KNOW YOUR SCHEDULE. Older adults who are still working but want to volunteer may have a firm grasp on their schedules, but even retirees should not overestimate how much time they have to volunteer. Before you begin to look for an opportunity, write down your commitments and daily schedule, using this list to determine how much free time you have to volunteer. DON’T DOWNPLAY THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CERTAIN OPPORTUNITIES. Volunteering opportunities come in many variations, and each is significant in its own right. Coaching a grandchild’s soccer team can have as significant an impact on the people you help as other volunteering opportunities. Volunteers offer their time because they have a passion to help others, and that help can be given in a myriad of ways. LEAVE TIME FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE. Volunteering is a selfless act, and volunteers are the backbone of many successful charitable organizations. But older men and women should leave time for the rest of their lives as well. Retirement should be fulfilling but also include time for recreation, so don’t downplay how important hobbies are to you in an attempt to find more time to volunteer. No retiree wants to grow resentful of his or her volunteer work because it leaves little time for other pursuits, so do your best to balance your charitable endeavors with the other things in life that matter to you. bangordailynews.com

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SAMPLING MAINE

SAMPLING

MAINE Beer, wine, and foodie tours to keep you busy this season. STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATE CONE

LET’S FACE IT: if “sitting is the new smoking,” as the headlines have been warning us, we need to get up, get out, and get some exercise. But it doesn’t all have to be at the gym or with your walking buddy. You can get plenty of extra steps in your day just by taking a tour. With over 90 craft breweries in Maine, a burgeoning wine and spirits scene, and stellar food that is drawing people from all over the country to our fair state, there is plenty of opportunity for sampling while walking, all in your own Vacationland. Maine Foodie Tours has been leading tours of local eateries for 10 years in Portland, Camden, Rockland, and Kennebunkport. One recent Old Port culinary tour started out with homemade lobster mac and cheese at Vervacious, a spice store with house-made blends of spices, herbs and their balsamic glazes. Paired with the pasta was a crisp, smooth Maine-made mead (a wine made with honey) provided by Old Port Wine Store, right next door. Further stops included Dean’s Sweets, the Portland Public Market for crepes, and, from Sticky Sweet, a tasty portion of sticky rice with a blueberry & coconut milk sauce. Then it was on to the Stonewall Kitchens store, where tiny, tender scones were on offer, and Gritty McDuff’s Brewpub, the first brewpub opened post-Prohibition east of the Mississippi River. Each person received samples of two different housemade beers and a special shepherd’s pie egg roll. The small portions added up to more than enough for lunch, yet with all that walking—uphill and down—consider it guilt-free sampling. 28

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Thirsty? The Maine Brew Bus and Maine Growler Bus have you covered. Gene Beck runs the latter, and folks gather at his pub, Nocturnem Draft Haus in Bangor, before they board the bus to sample all styles of beers made by knowledgeable brewers who love what they do. Gene is a long-time publican, and his tours include breweries in central Maine with a foray to the midcoast (Belfast) and Downeast to the Acadia breweries. The wood-fired pizza at Bigleow Brewing in Skowhegan and Jeff and Pam Powers’ pale ale is well worth the tour. Based in Portland, the Maine Brew Bus has shuttled beer lovers to breweries around southern Maine since 2012, giving over 15,000 people the Maine beer experience. Take your pick of over a dozen tours, which include a local snack or meal, trivia, behind-the-scenes experiences and, of course, beer. Some tours are structured around brand new breweries that haven’t yet poured beer to the public, affording tour-goers the honor of being the first to taste their beer. Ever had poutine? You could on any tour that includes Foulmouthed Brewing in South Portland, with a flight of their beers to wash it down. If wine is your thing, sign up for a Wine Wise experience. Created by sommelier Erica Archer, these tours will begin or enhance your knowledge of enology (the study of wines). Wine Wise leads you in discussions of terroir, wine types, and food pairings. Choose from land and sea packages, with walking and sailing tours in Portland, Kennebunkport, and Ogunquit. If you want to venture further, join up for a trip to Napa Valley in California, France, or Tuscany. Seasonal though they are, the following oyster tours are worth pursuing when you can. Both Nonesuch Oysters and Damariscotta River Tours will take you to the oysters, instead of the other way around. Nonesuch is a working oyster farm, so the tour is structured around getting you on the workboat, seeing where and how oysters are grown, then harvesting and shucking your own. A half-dozen bivalve beauties are yours for the price of the ticket, served with lemon and boat-made mignonette. Damariscotta River Tours is a tour boat, but has a tour that pairs oysters with craft beers, wine, sake, or Champagne along the Damariscotta River, where 80% of Maine’s oysters are grown. Check the companies’ websites and Facebook pages for changes or announcements, and to pick the tour that suits you. Staying fit isn’t as hard as it used to be.

MAINE GROWLER BUS Meets at Nocturnem Draft Haus 35 Broad Street Bangor, Maine 207-307-6666 thegrowlerbus.com THE MAINE BREW BUS 79 Commercial Street Portland, Maine 207-200-9111 themainebrewbus.com MAINE FOODIE TOURS 227 Commercial Street Portland, Maine 207-233-7485 mainefoodietours.com WINE WISE 207-619-4630 Email: winewise@winewiseevents.com winewiseevents.com NONESUCH OYSTER Scarborough, Maine nonesuchoysters.com DAMARISCOTTA RIVER CRUISES 47 Main Street Damariscotta, Maine 207-315-5544 damariscottarivercruises.com Email: info@damariscottarivercruises.com bangordailynews.com

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MAINE DISHES

TRY THESE QUINTESSENTIAL

MAINE DISHES “WHEN IN MAINE, eat as they (we) eat,” to co-opt a famous adage. Most everyone knows that Mainers have their own special cuisine. Sometimes Maine dishes derive from the abundance of foods we have on hand

(lobster dinner, anyone?) and sometimes it’s just downright inexplicable. No matter the reasons behind the dishes, check out these recipes for Maine dishes you’ve just got to try:

MAINE HOT DOGS WITH THE WORKS Backyard barbecues simply would not be the same without hot dogs. While many people may not eat hot dogs during much of the year, come summertime when the grills are fired up, hot dogs take center stage. Mainers have their own special variant: “red snappers,” or tight, compact hot dogs with a red casing. While many Mainers are happy eating them on a simple roll with condiments, those who really want their hot dogs to pack a flavorful punch can try the following recipe.

Makes 6 servings

The Grill Gas: Direct heat, medium high (425 F to 450 F); Clean, oiled grate Charcoal: Direct heat, light ash; 12-by-12-inch charcoal bed (about 3 dozen coals); Clean, oiled grate on lowest setting Wood: Direct heat, light ash; 12-by-12-inch bed, 3 to 4 inches deep; Clean, oiled grate set 2 inches above the fire

PHOTO: WIKTORY/THINKSTOCK

2 teaspoons spicy brown mustard 2 tablespoons ketchup 1 cup refrigerated sauerkraut, drained, rinsed and coarsely chopped 4 hot dogs 1/2 ounce cheddar cheese, cut into 4 small sticks 4 slices bacon Oil for coating grill screen 4 long hot dog buns or small sub rolls, split

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1. Heat the grill as directed. 2. Mix the mustard, ketchup and sauerkraut in a small bowl. 3. Slit the hot dogs lengthwise, forming a deep pocket end to end in each one. Fill the pockets halfway with the sauerkraut mixture. Put a stick of cheese in the center of each and top with the remaining sauerkraut mixture. Wrap a bacon slice around each hot dog to hold it together, and secure the ends of each bacon strip with wooden toothpicks. 4. Put the grill screen on the grill and coat it with oil. Wait a minute or two, until the surface is hot. Grill the hot dogs until the bacon is cooked through and the hot dogs are browned on all sides, about 2 minutes per side. 5. To toast the buns, put them cut-sides down directly over the fire for the last minute of cooking. Serve the hot dogs on the buns.


DELICIOUS APPLE PIE Certain activities are unique to autumn, and apple-picking certainly falls into that category. Many families look forward to their annual trips to nearby apple orchards, where they can spend beautiful autumn afternoons picking fresh apples. While fresh apples are a delight on their own, few apple aficionados can resist the temptation to make apple pie. If homemade apple pie is on your agenda this year, consider the following recipe:

Makes one 9-inch pie 1 recipe Plain Pie Pastry (see below) Raisin Filling 2/3 cup raisins 6 tablespoons water 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice 1/4 cup light corn syrup 1 1/2 teaspoons all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar Pie 2 apples (preferably a tart variety) 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch

Spread the apple mixture in the crust in an even layer, then spread the raisin filling evenly over the apples. Brush the rim of the crust with water, cover with the second rolled-out crust, seal and flute or crimp the edges, and cut a steam vent in the center. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until golden brown. Cool on a wire rack for 1 to 2 hours, until completely cool. To make the icing, combine the sugar and water and mix well. Add the butter and mix until smooth. Brush over the top of the cooled pie before serving.

Plain Pie Pastry Makes two 9-inch pie crusts

Icing 1 cup confectioners’ sugar 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon butter, softened

2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup vegetable shortening 5 to 7 tablespoons cold milk

To make the raisin filling, combine the raisins, water and lemon juice in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally until the raisins are plump, about 15 minutes. Separately, combine the corn syrup, flour and sugar and mix well, then add to the raisins and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until thick and syrupy, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool until the mixture is just warm, about 10 to 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 F. Line a 9-inch pie plate with 1 rolled-out crust. Peel the apples, cut them into thin wedges, and put them in a large bowl. Separately, combine the sugars, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cornstarch, then add to the apples and gently stir until evenly mixed.

Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Cut in the shortening with a pastry blender until it is the size of small peas. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the milk over part of the flour mixture. Gently toss with a fork and push to the side of the bowl. Sprinkle another tablespoon of milk over another dry part, toss with a fork and push to the side of the bowl. Repeat with the remaining milk until all of the flour mixture is moistened. Press the dough together to form 2 equal balls, then flatten into disks. Roll out the crusts right away, or wrap the dough tightly, smoothing out any little wrinkles or air pockets and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. On a lightly floured surface, roll out each ball to a thickness of 1/8 inch. Use a light touch and handle the dough as little as possible.

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ACROSS 3 Famous Bean 5 Say It Ain’t ___ 7 Yarmouth ____ Festival 8 Woman’s Retreat 10 ___ the Way 12 Trap Marker 14 One Who Passes 17 Wedding Saying, Hopefully 18 _____ of Thrones 20 Opp. of Yes 22 Andre the Giant Sticker 25 If Not Now, _____ 26 Maine Area Code Added Together, +1 28 Spanish Yes 31 ___ Dodgers

33 String of Lobster Traps 34 MC _______ 36 Not You 37 Wise Bird 38 Reoccurance of Past Condition 40 Sport Utility Vehicle 41 The ____ Lodge 42 Chocolate Bite Sized Candy (French) 45 In the Distance 46 Smelly 47 Mainer’s Every Tool 48 Not as I Say, as I ___ 50 Not Your Friend 51 Add To 53 Wine and _____

55 27th President 57 This Crossword 59 Sail Supporter 61 How Much Do You Love Maine? 62 “Yes” in Maine 64 Ma and ___ 65 Not Tide In 66 Drive - ____ 68 Cheer Chant 69 Lobster Vessel 70 Maine’s Largest City 72 The Famous Mr. ____ 73 Lobster Bait 74 American Lobster 77 Smaller then Small 78 Best Part of the Lobster?

79 Legal Lobsters 80 Hippie Lobster 82 A Pair 83 5W30 84 Vanilla ____ 87 Not Feeling Well 88 One Clawed Lobsters 89 ___-For-A-Cure 91 Not Starboard 93 No Clawed Lobster 94 Opp. of 79 Across 98 ________ Is An Art 101 Smaller of the Two Claws 102 Female Lobster 103 Pen and ____

23 MDI Hot Spot 24 Showing Tiredness 27 Dr. _____ 29 Valentine Greeting 30 Maine Winter Tool 32 Michael ___ Jordan 35 Home of the Maine Lobster Festival 36 A Lobster That Shed 39 Second That _______ 43 ________ & Hobbes 44 Penobscot Bay Town 46 Apple ____ 47 Small Vegetable 49 Man ___________! 51 Long Hooked Pole

52 Stephan King Title 54 The Electric ___ 55 Swap 56 Afternoon 58 ___ Phone Home 60 ___ Law (Patriot) 61 I’ll be __ the Lobster Shack 63 Buddy 65 Lobster is Always On It 67 Not Down 69 Top Cop 71 Treat with Cruelty 73 Neck Sore 74 Short for Hello 75 In Addition

76 Street (Abbr.) 79 Boxing Acronym 81 Princess __ 85 Jail-house Rock Signer (Int.) 86 Foreign Currency 90 Fancy Hotels 92 What Investors Want 93 Opp. of Pull 95 Old Video Games were Played __ _____ 96 ______ Seeds 97 Standard Lobster Bait 99 ____ & Tonic 100 Emergency Room (Abbr.)

DOWN

PHOTO: OZGUR COSKUNTHINKSTOCK

1 Escargot 2 Maine State Motto 4 Sweetest LIAA Lobster 5 Smartest LIAA Lobster 6 Someone from Maine 7 7 Across, Plural 8 Young Lobsters 9 Coastal Maine Town 10 LIAA Lobster Made from Buoys 11 Go for the _____ 13 _____ Log 15 Online Auction 16 Route One Motel 19 ___ Tu, Brute? 21 Fossil Fuel

©2015 Lobstering is an Art

Find the solution to this puzzle, as well as more lobster games and unique lobster illustrations by native Maine artist Andrew M. Cook, at www.lobsteringisanart.com.

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WEEKLY iddlehead

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1 Merchants Plaza, Bangor, ME • 1-800-432-7964 • bangordailynews.com

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