a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

ED24 MARCH 2020

CELEBRATING WOMEN’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE BUILDING DESIGN PROFESSION



1


Issue 24



2


Contents Why Intersect? 01. Project Matters

- Corner Store

- Civilex

4

02. Women in Leadership

13

03. Planning Matters

37

04. Industry Matters

43

Thank05. youJobtoMatters our sponsors

47

Intersect is taken from the word Intersection – a point at which two lines or surfaces meet, and represents: + The INTERSECT-ion of disciplines + The INTERSECT-ion of past, present and future + The INTERSECT-ion of form and function + The INTERSECT-ion where industries meet.

of Victoria appreciates the support and assistance of our sponsors.

Sponsors Matter Design Matters appreciates the support and assistance of our sponsors and partners.

FEATURE International Women’s Day, 8 March is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. In this edition of Intersect we honour the achievements of a number of women who have championed leadership in the buidling design and construction industry. DISCLAIMER Publication of an article or inclusion of an advertisement in this edition does not infer that Building Designers Association of Victoria Inc trading as Design Matters agrees with the views expressed, or message conveyed, nor does it imply endorsement of products. In addition, Design Matters does not accept responsibility for any errors or omissions. No content may be reproduced without the written permission of Design Matters. Requests should be lodged to The Editor, at info@designmatters.org.au. 

3


Issue 24

01. Project Matters: Corner Store



4


“Maison Co’s Corner Store shows what is possible through careful planning and considered design”

01. Project Matters: Corner Store

Winner Residential Design - Alterations & Additions $250K-$500K Construction Cost + Careful placement of louvre windows ensures excellent cross ventilation + Portal frames were used to create stability and lateral bracing + Fruit trees and herbs have thrived in the sheltered environment, creating a bountiful urban pantry The historical façade of an old corner store hides an exemplary, contemporary, adequately proportioned home for the current era. Maison Co and Amanda Lynn Interior Design retained the history and quirkiness of the Corner Store while introducing appropriate light and ventilation. This property sits on a corner at the end of a dog-leg street, creating something of a cul-de-sac. The street is a typical Brunswick mix of worker’s cottages and small factories and is bookended by a café on either side at the end of the road. Directly opposite is a 1950’s paint factory which has been converted into townhouses, saving the original brick and ground level and using lightweight black cladding for the first floor additions, a response mimicked by the owners. Many cottages have productive front vegetable gardens, a concept continued in this project, albeit in the internal courtyard. The site had its challenges. Construction on boundary, introducing natural light and ventilation into a building that only had two small sash windows to the street, overshadowing, access to boundary prevented due to heritage listed shed on neighbour’s fence line, overlooking of a neighbouring bedroom alongwith a shared laneway required for construction vehicles and material delivery. To overcome the site challenges, extensions to the original envelope at ground level were created just inside the original brick walls. Extensive traffic management programs were installed to allow access to the laneway adjacent to the property for some 19 cars whose garages were accessed from the laneway. While an ingenious cantilevered scaffolding system fixed to the first floor ensured tradesmen access and no damage to the neighbouring shed. The first-floor form, set back to the rear ensures the integrity of the front façade. Knocking out three storage rooms created a large living/kitchen area, and removing the roof of an internal storage room created a north facing courtyard and introduced 

5


Issue 24



6


01. Project Matters: Corner Store natural ventilation to the building. Encasing the new staircase in a light tower, with a large picture window at the landing facing west allowing natural light to flood the stairwell and create an extended vista of neighbouring gardens as one traverses the stairs. To ensure privacy at street level reeded glass was used in the lower living room windows. The centrally located courtyard, created by removing the roof of a previous storage space, introduces light and air into the core of the long, skinny building, allowing for new window penetrations into the adjoining two bedrooms. Stackable full height glass doors to the central passage create cross breezes to the living areas whilst flooding the central passage spine with daylight and passive heat retention. This space has become a sunny oasis for dining and reading, creating a second living area for the property. In addition fruit trees and herbs have thrived in the sheltered environment, creating a bountiful urban pantry. Existing brickwork was retained from the derelict garage and re-used to form the new garage. Careful placement of louvre windows ensures excellent cross ventilation with the need for airconditioning restricted to the top floor on very rare hot evenings. Northern sun introduced to the living area and studio which have slate floors warm the slab during the day thus avoiding the need for much heating.

The original crooked doorways made of weathered pine were retained down the spine of the building to honour the original builders. Removal of the original rotten wooden ceiling revealed the urgent need for lateral bracing and once the wall between the original shop and an adjoining storage room was removed the need for deeper footings became apparent. Stability was solved with portal frames. The property next door had a heritage listed shed right on the boundary so scaffolding erection for the purposes of building the first floor was frought. In addition there were overlooking issues to a bedroom directly across the eastern laneway and from the street into the proposed living area. Portal frames were used to create stability and lateral bracing. The existing living room floor was excavated and new footings were poured. Council maps of the sewer line were inaccurate so the new courtyard floor was excavated and a new sewerage line connected underneath the new paving. Intricate placement of brick shaped penetrations in the upstairs deck balustrading ensured no eyeline to the neighbour’s bedroom window. Corner Store’s history and original façade have been maintained and the themes and modest nature of the surrounding residential buildings have been picked up through reclaimed brick, black cladding and a vegetable garden in the internal courtyard. The design outcome sees the project restoring as opposed to demolishing key characteristics of the historical building. Corner Store also received a commendation for Residential Design - Best Small Lot at the 24th Annual Building Design Awards.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Designer:

Maison Co

maisonco.com.au Interior Designer: Amanda Lynn Interior Design Builder:

Unique Homes

Photographer:

Martina Gemmola

7


Issue 24

“This project is an exemplary case of a home with all necessary amenities within a modest footprint, using basic materials while creating richness through the layering of history, texture and space.” Maison Co Corner Store



8


01. Project Matters: Civilex 

9


Issue 24


“Through this clever design, Civilex employees’ experience at work has been enhanced making it a place they’d want to be in, a feat worthy of celebration.”

01. Project Matters: Civilex

Commendation Non-Residential Interior + Carefully crafted zones create areas which facilitate meetings, project collaboration as well as quiet work + At its core are values essential to good workplace environment: wellbeing, safety, culture, innovation, respect and relationships This project was a turning point for Civilex, a small engineering business that started with two founders and over the years grew into disjointed departments, teams and sub-companies. The design challenge was to bring together all members of the organisation into one shared space where all business processes were accommodated, building a unified cultural workplace. The building selected was an old warehouse in the inner west, filled with character of many past tennants. Beneath many layers of paint, was an exceptional industrial building with beautiful red-brick, high exposed ceilings and massive volume. All of these, coupled with great outdoor space, provided a perfect skeleton for an interior design project that resonates with the clients desired self-image. The conditions of the site were ghost-like. Dust filled the interior that was once used as a storage site for forgotten vintage cars. The previous life of the building became evident in the demolition process where varied wall finishes appeared as the empty shell was presented. The inspiration for the aesthetic of the project was driven by the company’s services being engineering, concreting and development. What was really important in the design brief was the functionality of the zones, i.e. the breakout area and fun area, introducing aspects of wellbeing through to the outdoor area, that would extend from the fitout, and natural greenery throughout. By understanding their corporate values and business workflows, STUDIOMINT created a central breakout hub where food is shared, informal meetings are held and organic interactions naturally occur. Carefully crafted zones were created which facilitate meetings, collaboration and projects as well as quiet work areas.

Floor to ceiling tilt doors in the open office area bring the feeling of inside/outside work environment. On sunny days the large doors open up completely allowing employees working at their desks to enjoy the feeling of being outside. Columns scattered at various points in the structure have been utilised as points for soft-wiring to connect to banks of workstations. The columns were painted black to integrate into the workstation system. The designed workplace uses locally sourced materials that complement the fitout, as this not only benefits local industry, but also reduces the carbon footprint of the goods being delivered to site. A sense of unified belonging is achieved through the people within the space designed. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Designer: STUDOMINT studiomint.com.au Interior Designers Harry Nguyen, Ling Gui, Alla DeLion Builder:

Albert Group

Photographer:

Peter Clarke Photography 11


Issue 24

“The client was responsive to embracing our design statements, such as the massive green wall at the entry, a fun and vibrant kitchen and outdoor area, as well a private professional business-lounge executive area. STUDIOMINT Civilex Engineering

ďťż

12


02. Women in Leadership



13


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Rebecca Casson Chief Executive Officer Master Builders Association of Victoria Rebecca Casson was appointed CEO of Master Builders Victoria in January 2019 and is the first female CEO in the organisation’s 145-year history. With a strong background in government, industry and the not-for-profit sector, Rebecca has had senior responsibilities in international engagement, government relations, major projects and policy. Rebecca emigrated from the UK to Australia with her husband and daughter in 2009 and has since become an Australian citizen. A highlight of Rebecca’s diverse career includes her role as Executive Director of the British Committee for Jamestown - an eminent group comprising representatives from the House of Lords, House of Commons and Buckingham Palace, together with business and academic leaders and media identities - on the occasion of Jamestown’s 400th anniversary. The group was formed to strengthen UK/USA relations and facilitate economic development through the commemoration of America’s anniversary every fifty years. Rebecca is also the author of a range of published work, including a book on paradiplomacy.

How would you describe your leadership style?

My professional experience has trained me to be both optimistic and opportunistic and I’ve learnt that what brings out the best in me as a leader is other people. Throughout my career I’ve been inspired by the talent, specialist knowledge and diversity of the people with whom I’ve worked. I’m very proud to represent Master Builders Victoria as CEO and since joining in January 2019, I’ve been actively seeking the views and opinions of our members who have a wealth of experience in building and construction. As a leader, I believe you can’t underestimate good listening skills, and equally important is being a proactive industry voice to advocate for our members with government, regulators, the community and media which, ultimately, helps to shape a healthy economic future for Victoria. Accountability, persistence and resilience form some of my key drivers, and for my dedicated team who serve our members, I lead by example. I value their input, aim to nurture their strengths and encourage collaboration in order to promote a membercentric approach. I also believe that sharing a sense of fun in the workplace is important, and I do have a very cheeky sense of humour! Some consider that laughter in a leader is a signal of openness and a willingness to show vulnerability – and I always aspire to do this.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

I have been very fortunate to work with some great mentors in my career – both female and male – who have helped me on my leadership journey. These mentors have very generously given me their time, support and assistance without judgement or the expectation of anything in return. I have also had the great fortune to work alongside some exceptional individuals who have inspired me, for example Viscount De L’Isle and Baron Bruce Lockhart of the Weald in the UK. Their outstanding sense of duty and resilience really motivated me to do better. More recently, I have been inspired by the work of Brené Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston who has spent two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame and empathy. Her research focuses on authentic leadership and whole-heartedness. My favourite work of Brené’s centres on ‘staying in the arena’, which relates to vulnerability and having the courage to show up and put yourself out there without knowing the outcome. In a recent presentation in Melbourne, Brené said: “vulnerability is about showing up and being seen. It’s tough to do that when we’re terrified about what people might see or think.”

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

While I was progressing my career, I underestimated myself as women tend to do, and I was a little hesitant to step up to bigger challenges. However, through experience, my confidence grew and I’ve been fortunate to work with people who believed in my abilities. My only regret is I wished that I had realised this earlier.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

As a leader, experiencing some form of resistance for a project or initiative is a natural part of working life because you are often dealing with diverse opinions and beliefs. I see it as an opportunity to, firstly, listen and learn so I can consider other points of view carefully to ensure the best outcome and, secondly, to discuss my thoughts in more detail. Frequently, the key to breaking down resistance is about taking the time to bring people on the journey of how you’ve arrived at your decision. However, in many of my leadership roles, I have also had to make some exceptionally difficult decisions and, in these circumstances, I always strive to choose courage over comfort.



14


How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

Every day in the building and construction industry is a learning curve as it is a complex and dynamic environment. However, I hone my skills as a CEO by building strategic relationships both within and outside our industry. Having a broad, trusted network and business perspective helps me to think creatively and identify opportunities for Master Builders Victoria.

of where to live in Victoria using Google Earth, and we moved with no jobs or home to come to. I worked hard at immersing myself in the Australian culture and business community, all whilst supporting our young daughter as she transitioned into a new school and way of life. I quickly realised that the skills I had developed living and working internationally were very relevant and in demand here, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the transition.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

Be authentic, foster your own leadership style and be brave enough to be different. Develop and embrace your own narrative; don’t discard your personal history. You will reap the benefits from tapping into your own natural talents rather than conforming to the expectations of others. Always choose a career that you enjoy and be open to unexpected opportunities.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? During each step of my professional career, I’ve taken on roles because I believed I could make a positive contribution with a firm focus on the task rather than the industry. I was very warmly welcomed as CEO of Master Builders Victoria by a wonderful team and a diverse range of members and I’ve been following in some impressive footsteps. For example, the current and first female CEO of Master Builders Australia [based in Canberra] is Denita Wawn; Master Builder Victoria’s immediate past President is Melanie Fasham who is Managing Director of Fasham Homes; and I truly value working alongside Viviana Hood, who was the first female senior executive of our state-based team and she is now our Chief Operating Officer. Many of my peers in related areas are also women, and there is a growing strong and talented contingent of female registered builders and tradespeople.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

I have had wonderful opportunities to work in many parts of the world and to test myself in ways that I could never have thought possible. However, emigrating to Australia with my family in 2009 was a huge challenge in my career journey, and it really put me out of my comfort zone. We had to make the decision

There is more support and opportunity for women today to aspire to leadership positions. However, if you are experiencing difficulties in gaining a promotion, ask your manager for feedback so you can address any barriers. Accessing a good mentor is another approach, however, you should always ask your mentor to sign up to a structured mentoring agreement that covers confidentiality, time commitment and agreed outcomes.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

I believe our work world should reflect the society in which we live with a broad spectrum of diversity. A cross-section of experience, perspectives, cultures, genders and opinions is good for business and it yields happier workplaces and more productive performance. This should be done by conscientious effort to provide growth, encouragement and opportunity, and it would provide a richer leadership experience for both men and women. A future world without the specific need for quotas would be ideal.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“To be a positive role model for my daughter and future generations of female leaders so they are actively encouraged to follow their career dreams and are judged on their abilities and achievements and not their gender.”

Upcoming CPD Event Monday 30 March 2020 | 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm AEDT

Revit Training Series Part 2 - Corporate Template - Webex Speaker/Trainer: Tomislav Golubovic Our Revit Training Series is designed to help Revit users get the most out of the software providing insights and tips to help participants design faster, smarter and better. This second in our 10 part series for Revit Training will focus on the Corporate Template. Learn how to create and maintain a corporate template for consistency through projects.

1 CPD point

This Revit Training will be delivered via Webex (webconferencing) Bookings close 17 March. For more information and to register visit www. news.bdav.org.au/cpd

LOCATION: Online Webinar 

15


Issue 24



16


02. Women in Leadership

Jane Clancy Senior Educator, Advanced Construction Technology Swinburne University of Technology What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

My role here at Swinburne is to keep the teachers happy who deliver the Advanced Diploma of Building Design (Architectural) and the Diploma and Certificate IV of Building. I figure if they are motivated and have all the resources they need to teach, it will reflect on the students we have in a positive way. Pay it forward…. I don’t consider myself ‘the boss’ rather I am the ‘organiser’ of our team. I really enjoy the personal interaction with our teachers and the students. They have different needs and being able to understand what will make their work/study enjoyable, in turn gives me great job satisfaction. I get called ‘the fixer’.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

I started in the construction industry 20 years ago (but who’s counting) by accident and at that time there were three women about who were in a similar role. I was inspired by their complete disregard of their gender and how they just did the job well. My inspiration has come from people in our industry who never cease to amaze me with their passion and ‘get the job done’ attitude. I often tell our students if you have a question, no matter how silly - but you are genuine and want to learn, someone will take the time to help. You just need to ask.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

The juggle! Children, work, household, social life and at least some thought into exercise. I think it took me some time, but I now have the balance just about right. The construction industry is simply not structured for people who are bringing up young children. There is minimal part time work opportunities and little kids are much more brutal than a site shed at lunch! I’ve been very lucky in that I’ve had a lot of support to raise my children whilst working but unfortunately some women won’t consider starting a career in our industry because of the juggle.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

You can’t possibly work in construction and not have to manage your way through some new challenge. Our regulations flux, and if you want to be successful – or just even keep your head above water – you need to innovate. Naturally we all resist change so it’s a matter of bringing the team along with you. If you know something is not going to be popular, being honest and talking through the plan as early as possible is key. Taking your teams feedback and implementing the change that will consider the impact on their working day makes a big difference and helps mitigate resistance.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession? By reading Design Matters rags

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Watch and learn from people who have done well. Ask questions. Listen. Reflect. Learn. Be a positive problem solver. There is nothing to stop you from getting the job you want. It just may take a little more time than you hoped. But most of all network. Go to industry events, volunteer, make as many friends as you can with people in the industry. 1 in 10 people in Victoria work in construction so you will find someone who will help, no doubt.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? I’m still surprised I’m here most days.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

Technology. Our industry has been punished through the media and played with by politicians in recent times and we are not looking good. I truly believe that we can create a better built environment by using the technology readily available to us. I’m a true BIM believer (Building Information Modelling) and will keep promoting that it can save us time, money and the environment if only we could implement more projects using this building lifecycle strategy. Contact me if you’re a fan as I have a plan….

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

The building industry offers many opportunities, but you must prove yourself. I see our students struggle to get a foot in the door because of the slim margins we run on, as taking on a graduate can seem risky. However, when you see a student get their first job and then surpass their employer’s expectations, the opportunity for promotion and the big bucks will come. Value people’s strengths and help them with their weaknesses. We all have them! Personal insight is a wonderful thing.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

I’m a Gen X-er lucky enough to have escaped my early years without a mobile phone. What I see young people doing to each other on social media terrifies me. Be kind.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“We spend a lot of our waking day at work  17 - might as well make it fun!”


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Dr Bronwyn Evans CEO Engineers Australia What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

I am the CEO of Engineers Australia, the peak professional body for engineers covering all disciplines and industry sectors in Australia. My leadership style has three elements: •

Clarity – about the responsibility we all have to deliver the mission and vision for the profession

Collaboration – that it is only by working as one team can we support each other to be great in our job and be the best organisation possible

Curiosity – always wanting to explore how to elevate my own and the organisation’s performance.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

There are so many people who I get my inspiration from. Professor Mary O’Kane, previously the NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer and now the Independent Chair of the NSW Planning Commission, A scientist and engineer who tackles challenging technical and community issues with intelligence and insight. Professor O’Kane is a wonderful communicator and motivator. I am inspired by her ability to continue to expand her technical and leadership impact for the benefit of the country.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

Doubting myself – thinking that I couldn’t meet 150% of the requirements for a role. But I now know that it is only by taking on roles where you absolutely do NOT have every possible characteristic in the ad that I will have the opportunity to grow and change and evolve.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it? I have experienced resistance as a leader and it has arisen when people feel like they are not being listened to, or don’t understand why we are going in some direction. The most important remedy I have found is to be open to criticism and allow the team to voice their disquiet. But equally I have found it is essential that I set the ground rules about what it means to “disagree well” – and that requires respect and patience on everyone’s behalf.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

By staying curious and then combining that with an action plan that includes: •

Formal learning/ micro-credentials in areas of interest from leadership to technology to communications

By joining trade missions and delegations investigating specific industry sectors

By presenting at conferences and events.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders? Be willing to take opportunities when they turn up. Find a community of like-minded leaders that you want to learn from and who you can also help on their leadership journey. Hone your presentation and communications skills – professional presence is an important asset.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession?

I have always worked in engineering where women make up less than 20% of the profession. So working in a male-dominated profession as a leader was not a surprise.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

The communications technology that makes it is possible to be connected all the time – giving both flexibility and obligations to work whenever and wherever.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them? No. Promotion is easy - to be successful I recommend finding mentors and cultivating champions.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders? In my ideal world, for women leaders in the future the only challenges to overcome is to develop the strong skills and experience and a strong network.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“That it is ok to be vulnerable and still be a strong leader.” 

18


02. Women in Leadership

Paula Hanley Principal Paula Hanley Building Designer What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

I am a sole practitioner so I’m possibly not the one to ask about leadership as I have worked on my own for many years. However, I approach working with other disciplines as a team effort to achieve optimal outcomes, so as the primary consultant I suppose I do quietly lead the team! As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why? Professionally, this would probably be my first employer in this field, who seemed to really believe in me from the start. He taught me to strive for perfection and not to panic at approaching deadlines (although I still do) and most importantly, to hold tenaciously to our architectural goals and not take no for an answer. He described tedious tasks as character-building and it was some years before I told him in a fit of pique that I considered my character sufficiently built!

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader? A natural dislike of being pushy or aggressive. Unfortunately it seems that sometimes the female player is overlooked because of the lack of a loud voice and an aversion to self aggrandizement.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

My approach is generally a quiet one, but I will persist until I achieve what I am after. I also value the input of other experts, so while I may give the consultant team its direction I certainly don’t discount their ideas. In fact I tell my clients that I like to work with builders rather than tell them how to do what they already know.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

More and more regulation! Some of it good, some of it bad. I think it makes it more difficult to run a micro business as so much time is spent on administration. However, the sort of regulation that is leading to improved design through energy efficiency and accessibility and the like is to be applauded.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

I hope they don’t. I didn’t, but I’m sure I didn’t put myself forward for promotion as often as some of my more aggressive male colleagues. I think women tend to entertain a lot more self doubt than men.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

I’d love to see a less aggressive workplace, where people really are valued for their talents. I’d like to see a world where women do not need to adopt a masculine approach in order to achieve, and where we didn’t have to waste so much time talking about gender politics because we would all be treating each other with due respect.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“Building design is a great profession - we really do get to change people’s lives for the better!”

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession? Design Matters of course! Invaluable!

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders? Just knuckle down and do it - you can and will achieve!

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? No, I had not imagined that this would be the case as my first career was in fashion design, and although the powerful people in that field in the 1980s were often men, the people I worked amongst were mainly women.



19


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Ingrid Hornung Building Designer / Vice President Design Matters Designs for You What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style? Like most people, I have many roles. My ‘working’ ones are: Owner of a business, responsible for two employees. Principal designer in my business, working with up to twenty clients at any one time. Partner in CHI Design Studio, a collaboration with two other building designers. Vice President and longstanding member of the Committee of Management at Design Matters.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why? Acts of integrity inspire me.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

Expectations and assumptions get in the way of most people, whatever role they play in the world; and I am no exception. These can be expectations or assumptions I hold, as well those others hold about me.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

If there are any issues to resolve, my approach would be to listen to each member of the team, and then relate their contribution back to the overall aim of the project.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be working in a male-dominated profession? It actually didn’t occur to me – perhaps because my earlier working life was spent in other male dominated professions. I was just completely excited to start in a profession that I loved.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey? Forming CHI Design Studio – sharing the ups and downs of my working life with two other building designers has made us all stronger.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them? Women in our profession, like the men, create their own businesses. I haven’t applied for a job since 1996, so I feel unqualified to provide any advice on the subject.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation?

Ideally, we would be focussing on what we are building together, rather than which gender we are.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“I hope my legacy will be that we are a step closer to my ideal world.”

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

From early on in my career as a building designer, I looked for opportunities to connect with my peers. It was even more critical when, like many members, I was a sole trader, working from home. CPD events provide a valuable way to keep up with the changes in the industry; but they are also an important way to connect and network with other members, who share the challenges we face, and understand them in a way that no-one else does.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

This advice is for any leader (male or female): look to your own strengths and what you have to contribute when deciding how to lead – don’t merely try to emulate someone else. And don’t make leading about you. This is the advice I try to follow!



20


02. Women in Leadership

Dominique Hunter Designer / President Design Matters Hunter and Richards What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

As a career Interior Designer with my own practice, I have led many projects over the years but this is the first leadership role within an association. I am a team player, don’t mind getting my hands dirty and am passionate about seeing the building design profession and all it’s aligned sectors prosper. As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why? I am inspired by many things. I don’t draw inspiration from any one person in particular. I draw inspiration from people I interact with everyday. It’s taken me a while to realise you can learn from good and bad experiences equally.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

As a designer, problem solving is at the core of my training, consequently I never consider any issue a barrier. If there has ever been a road block, I look for options and keep moving. There is always an alternative or solution. I don’t have time to stop or be flustered by other people.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

When I first started in commercial interiors I found when presenting concepts to boards, they seemed to have a pre-conceived perception of who I was and what I could bring to the table. Once they realised that I knew what I was talking about, their minds and postures seemed to change. I also find being very direct in my instructions and presentations assist when dealing with a male dominated board or workplace. Now I work mostly on residential interior projects, my presentation is more often to families. I find working and presenting to women for their homes can be more challenging than presenting to a commercially minded board.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

Over the years I have purchased thousands of magazines and books, but with the growth of a multitude social media platforms it’s not hard to be constantly inspired. Being a member of professional associations helps with keeping abreast of regulations and standards.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Be competent in your job, be fair and reasonable, speak your mind and you will go where ever you want to go.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? Having spent the last 25 years in the construction industry, the idea of counting or recognising the number of women around me was never an issue. I knew I would continue as I planned, regardless. I have never believed anyone owed me anything. To me, hard work and dedication pay off.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

Having raised two children while working actively in my own business, I have now reached a level of maturity that gives me the confidence to understand and focus on personal and work efficiencies which benefits my clients and the project outcome.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

We shouldn’t concentrate on the negative. Women, and men, need to do their best, work hard and concentrate on doing better everyday. Working in the construction industry means being a small part of a bigger picture. We should all be aware of this and work towards sustainable and efficient outcomes.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

The ideal world is one which rewards and encourages team players. Players who look towards creating better solutions and bringing out the best in their team members.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“I feel proud to be part of a line of leaders that has made tough decisions to bring about the changes necessary to make Design Matters the peak body for Building Design Professionals.”



21


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Narelle Lockwood Director / Building Designer Narelle Lockwood Design What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style? I am the company director of Narelle Lockwood Design and a registration assessor with the Victorian Building Authority.

In our office, we all love and are passionate about what we do, and our unique little office has its own style of being flexible and lifestyle friendly. Although my leadership style is probably best described as firm but fair.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

Along my journey, I have been fortunate to have always been surrounded by remarkable female leaders. When I first studied building design the head of the department was female, and during my time on the Building Practitioners Board the Chair was also female. There have been so many wonderful examples of female leadership in my life, and of course my Mum. I thank you all. Early in my career, one of my projects was the retail fit-out of The Body Shop stores throughout Australasia, Anita Roddick [the founder of The Body Shop] was quite an inspiration to me at that time, as a leader who successfully blended business and environment by doing it her way, along with all the female mangers at head office and their individual leading styles.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader? My lack of tolerance for incompetence!

While I don’t mind the challenge of a difficult project, I have no time for a difficult team environment. If I’m leading a team, everyone on the team needs to be a team player working together for the best outcome, or they’re omitted. I always surround myself with a great team.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

Through always continuing to learn, whether through further study, continual professional development, or just networking with like minded souls. I like to keep diversity in my learning including; student lecturing [also a good way to obtain the best staff], and registration assessor with VBA. Make time to have work lunches with industry colleagues [male & female], we are all time poor, but these lunches are generally always eventful, not to mention enjoyable. Thank you to all my morning tea & lunch buddies, I truly appreciate your time and enlightening discussions. We have regular CPD movie nights at my place, where a small group of local designers get together to watch the Design Matters CPD dvd’s, there is always discussion about what we are watching, but also about projects, issues or hurdles we are currently experiencing. When you put female company, laughter and food together, its always a good [mostly too late] night. Thank you, Gippsland ladies. Be generous, share your knowledge. Mentor others, give students or those new to the industry time. We all grow together.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Stay true to yourself. Surround yourself with a good networking group. Never stop learning, and always strive to be the best you can be. Follow your own path, don’t be too concerned about what others are doing around you. Make time to learn and treat others with respect. Learn from anyone you can; industry reps about their products, consultants and their disciplines, builders about buildability – visit the construction sites of your projects. Learn how you can improve what you do. Don’t compete with other strong females, work together to help lift as a whole. This is not always an individual pursuit.

Over time, most of the resistance I have ever experienced has come from within the workplace office, rarely have I experienced any resistance on a construction site.

Don’t be afraid to move on from a company that is not a good fit.

I have had my career threatened to be destroyed, and have been physically struck in the workplace. I tend to just sidestep around the obstacle [generally male, but not always] and continue forward on my own path. I do not spend time or energy continually banging up against an obstacle.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession?

I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve been told, ‘your bar is too high’ from those who are threatened. Never lower your bar for anyone.

Mostly, enjoy what you do.

Probably not, but maybe! But I always knew I would be the best I could be.

I have never thought of it as male dominated, I’ve always seen it as an even playing field. Although I do like to play with the boys. I have just never held the opposite sex up in that dominant position. What you don’t give, they can’t have. 

22


What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

My son, and the challenge of successfully balancing family and career. He has learnt from an early age how to hold the end of a measuring tape, is an astute defects inspector, a CPD movie night waiter & technology assistant, and now our official drone pilot. I on the other hand, take many more holidays now than I ever did, am available for school sports carnivals, assemblies or excursions, and after school activities when required. I’m not saying that I always get it right, but my time management skills have definitely been honed.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them? I have always considered the sexes as equal.

Stay true to yourself, be the best you can be. Widen your networking circle. The path forward will present itself. When required surround yourself in a protective bubble, which is flexible and strong, let in only the vibrations you wish to receive,

and radiate outwards only those you wish to give to others. [I think my inner yogi just snuck out for a bit]. In 2017 I was honoured with a Design Matters [BDAV] Fellow Membership, although I was a little taken back to find out I was the only female fellow member.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

Respect is earnt on merit. The sexes are considered equal by all. There are many more female fellow members of our association.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“Enjoy what you do. Be passionate about what you create and the environment we live in, and design and lead with respect to it.”

Studying Building Design or Interior design? A Design Matters Student Membership will help you get job ready !

Benefits for Students Members* include • FREE subscription to monthly Design Matters Intersect magazine and annual Awarded Magazine • Weekly electronic eNews • Ability to network with fellow students and future employers at Design Matters events • Free job listings • Accredited comprehensive CPD program including seminars, webinars, workshops, regional meetings as well as DVDs at discounted Member rates • Access to Design Matters Online Reference Library (limited) • Access to Design Matters Help Desk (limited capacity) • Ability to become a Student Ambassador at your campus. Send in your Expression of Interest to members@designmatters.org.au

Membership is FREE for students who join Design Matters, the peak industry body for building design professionals.

To join go to www.designmatters.org.au or call (03) 9416 0227 Design Matters is Social Follow, like or comment on Social Media 


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Susan Marriot Building Designer Quality Home Design & Developments Pty Ltd. What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

I am the Co-Director of Quality Home Design & Developments, a role I get to share with my daughter Alyson. I like to think of my leadership style as quite laid back, but still assertive. In our office, we like to have fun and we try to ensure that everyone enjoys coming to work – we believe that this is when you are the most productive and is when we get the most out of our staff – so being quite laid back allows this to run smoothly. We are quite a small company, so the need to be assertive doesn’t arise too often, however I know that when it does, people respect me and will listen to what I have to say and won’t challenge my authority. I like to think that I have the perfect balance and that this has aided my success over the years.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

for a reason. Clients come to me for a reason, and they trust my expertise, and I am not going to let a negative attitude and some resistance stand in the way of giving my clients the service that they deserve.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

It has not been without challenges that’s for sure. Ten years ago, I was still doing all of my drawings by hand! However, having my daughter come aboard the business, and eventually turning that business into a company, has allowed me to learn from her and in my opinion made me a much better designer, whilst also ensuring that we remain abreast and on top of all the new things that are constantly popping up. Teamwork is definitely the key here and I think that is why we work so well together and how we stay current, yet knowledgeable, in an everchanging profession.

I personally didn’t have a leader or someone that inspired me. I had a dream and I had a lot of support and encouragement from my family to follow that dream, and it has led me to where I am today. I wouldn’t have been able to do it without the support I received, which is why I also try to employ that same encouragement and support to those around me.

Having the support of Design Matters has been an invaluable source of information, giving us access to everything we need to stay up-to-date and current in the field. Their initiative of having the CPD points means that you have to attend seminars and you have to learn about the changes in the building industry, changes in regulations, and I think this is what has allowed us to do so well.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

When I was 35, roughly 10 years after opening up my building design business, I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). This is unfortunately a disease that is incurable, and something that is more likely to affect women as opposed to men. This has probably been one of the biggest barriers I have found in my career and in the running of my business, as sometimes flare ups would mean having to go to hospital which in turn meant having no one there to work as I was a sole proprietor for upwards of 20 years. Although I have referred to my MS here as a barrier, it has also made me extremely humble and proud of where I am and all that I have had to overcome to be where I am. It is still something that I am battling to this day, and at times it definitely does still affect my work, however this is just another thing that I have learnt how to manage and something that makes me proud to know I am still where I am even with this ‘barrier’ in the way.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

I think there is still a bit of resistance and at times a bit of condescendence from males (and sometimes other females) in the field – or in professions that we liaise with. But I know that I have got to where I am from hard work, dedication and a love for what I do, so when this happens I just keep my head high and remember that I am where I am, and I am successful at what I do

Having three daughters myself, I am very big on empowering women to go after what they want – regardless of gender. I have always told my daughters that I will be proud of them no matter what, as long as they are happy and are doing the very best that they can to achieve their goals. I think sometimes we put too much pressure on people to be successful and at times their happiness comes at the expense of this. So... my advice would be to go after what you want, be the best person you can be, but above all make sure you are happy no matter where you end up.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? Definitely not – it’s a bit crazy to me that I am even thought of as a leader haha! For me, I chose this profession because I was passionate about it. When I was thinking about my future, it was less about what job I should be doing as a female, or what female-dominated career should I go into, and more about what I felt like I could do for the rest of my life. I wanted a profession that I was actually interested in, and for me that was building design. I was drawn to it. Little did I know that I would be the first female member of what was then the BDAV, nor did I know I would be part of the first mother-daughter duo, but here I am, and I wouldn’t change it for anything. I still love it as much today, as I did when I started over 35 years ago. 

24


What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

I think the most significant change was the introduction of computer software and programs like REVIT and CAD, and learning how to adapt to the new programs and the changes. As mentioned previously, my MS also played a big role in this, as learning new software isn’t as easy for me due to the impact that MS has on the brain and my ability to retain and remember new information. The transition to REVIT took quite some time, and quite a few different courses, so that the information would sink in (I’m extremely grateful to Alyson who puts up with my constant questions) however, looking at how far I have come and looking at all the changes we constantly face and adapt to, it just makes me even more proud that I have succeeded in my journey.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

This personally isn’t something that I myself have experienced. Running my own business has allowed me the freedom that many women within the profession probably aren’t getting. I think that this is definitely still something that we see in the work force – especially in what is still considered quite a male-dominated field – and I know that at times it can be quite bleak, but I honestly do think (and hope) that there is a change coming and that hopefully soon women won’t have to face these inequalities within the workplace. My advice would be to hold out hope, work hard and stand up for what you believe in.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

I think female’s in business, and especially that of female leaders have come a long way since I was entering into the workforce, but that is not to say that there isn’t more that can be done. I would love to see a more equal workforce, one where women aren’t discriminated against, or not put up for promotions because they might need to take maternity leave, or have time off when their children are sick. One where women have the same leadership opportunities as men and one where maledominated fields are still open to women, and vice versa.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“If I could be known for anything, I would love for it to be that if you have a passion for something, work hard at following your dreams, you can achieve anything. There may be setbacks along the way, but as long as you love what you do, none of it will matter.”

Upcoming CPD Event Monday 16 March 2020 | 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm AEDT

Built to Perform: Zero Carbon Ready Join us as guest speaker Michael Li from ClimateWorks Australia presents key research findings for residential buildings from Built to Perform: An industry led pathway to a zero carbon ready building code. The report, published in July 2018, was a researchindustry collaboration jointly led by the Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council (ASBEC) and ClimateWorks Australia, that aimed to prepare new buildings for the net zero carbon environment. Since 2018, the Australian state and territory governments released their Trajectory for Low Energy Buildings, a national plan that sets a trajectory towards zero energy (and carbon) ready buildings for

1 NatHERS Technical CPD Points

Australia. This includes a commitment to investigate strengthened energy requirements for all new residential buildings from 2022 onwards. Michael will set out the journey that has been taken from Built to Perform through to strengthened energy standards and highlight research outcomes that may assist designers in preparing for this regulatory change. For more information visit www.news.bdav.org.au/cpd/

LOCATION: Online Webinar



25


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Susan Morris Manager for Building Design and Sustainability Box Hill Institute What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

I am a teacher and manager for Building Design and Sustainability programs at Box Hill Institute. I believe my leadership style is one of mentorship. In fact, four of the teachers I now coordinate are graduates of the Advanced Diploma of Building Design (Architecture) course and were previously my students. They are now working in industry as building designers and teaching our new students. Recruiting and mentoring experienced building designers to become accredited teachers means our teaching team is always enthusiastic, current and relevant.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

My first mentor was Brian Kidd, a passionate architect and expert in Universal Design and building design that enables barrier-free access and dignity for all people. I worked for several architectural offices after graduating and all the practice leaders encouraged me with professional development opportunities and a passion for equity, sustainability and design excellence. When I joined Box Hill Institute, I was sponsored to undertake extensive teacher training and online and blended learning teacher training. Ongoing professional development opportunities recommended and supported by my managers, have been numerous at Box Hill Institute. In 2011, I was encouraged to pursue my research in sustainability and was supported to travel overseas on an International Specialised Skills Fellowship. My research into Passivhaus (Passive House) evolved with the support of my manager, Tony Watson, and Box Hill Institute established the first opportunities for Australians to gain international Passive House certification in 2014. This program has been gaining momentum ever since and we now have trained hundreds of designers and skilled tradespeople to deliver high performance buildings at the leading edge of energy efficiency and thermal comfort.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

I have been fortunate to have worked alongside a series of inspirational building designers and architects throughout my career as a project architect. I felt fully supported by my peers, managers and clients but recall feeling uneasy as a very young woman on building sites until good working relationships between the builder and architect were established. Once I had children, the full-time, full-on nature of managing architectural projects did not enable a good work-life balance. It was at that time I made the decision to become a teacher and I loved it.

Therefore, I started a whole new career at Box Hill Institute. First as a teacher of building design and now as a teacher and manager of building design and sustainability courses.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it? This is not applicable as I am now working predominantly in education which is a more female-friendly sector.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

The most important aspect to teaching building design and sustainability is staying current and preparing the workforce for future change. Researching regulatory changes, innovative construction methods and understanding social and environmental sustainability developments are critical. Sustainable building design is paramount and ever evolving. The very best way to learn and stay current is the intense experience of research and preparation before teaching these subjects to others. I have been very excited to pursue learning in Passivhaus, Universal Design, thermal performance modelling, mid-rise mass timber construction and building design for climate change adaption.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

My advice would be the same for all leaders. It is important to mentor others to enable them to enjoy their work and feel passionately about quality of service and project outcomes. Sustainability comes in many shapes and creating a work-life balance for yourself and others is a priority.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? No.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

A series of professional development opportunities over the last ten years have influenced my career journey. Firstly, training to be a teacher. Then, being awarded an International Specialised Skills Institute Fellowship to research European sustainability regulations, thermal performance reform, Nearly Zero Energy Buildings and investigating successful collaborative learning opportunities for students in the building trades and professions.

ďťż

26


In 2016, I immersed myself in learning about cross-laminated timber (CLT) mid-rise buildings with a great deal of support from the team at WoodSolutions. The students of building design embraced their CLT project and had the benefit of many guest lecturers so really experienced collaborative learning with industry experts. At that time, CLT construction technology was new to Australia and this led to terrific employment opportunities for graduates. Now Box Hill Institute has been able to take this learning to a broader audience in the development and delivery of the Diploma of Project Management in Prefabricated Building Systems (Timber). I believe a significant change to the building industry will be increased demand for skills in Building Information Modelling (BIM). I am excited to be part of the team developing and delivering the Advanced Diploma of Building Information Modelling at Box Hill Institute.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

Apparently, men are much more likely than women to ask for a pay rise. Learn to negotiate for increased pay, more responsibility and bigger or more interesting projects. Be brave and do it.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders? An ideal world for female leaders is one where the workplace environment offers equal opportunity, free of bias allowing all people to be heard and lead if that is their ambition.

NCC Seminar Series Registrations are now open for ABCB 2020 NCC Seminars. The Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) will be delivering presentations in all capital cities during March and April 2020. The 2020 National Construction Code (NCC) Seminars will focus on answering common technical enquiries concerning the application of NCC Volumes One and Two, and information relating to the changes contained in NCC 2019 Amendment 1. These sessions traditionally sell out so we encourage you to register now. Seminar fees are $160 (inc. GST) per online registration (merchant fees may apply).

Register now at: www.ivvy.com.au/event/NCC2020/home.html For more information email: seminars@thisiscreative.com.au

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“As an educator, I have felt empowered by seeing building design students graduate with skills that will take them into the future with a passion for quality and sustainable outcomes. I hope they are inspired to seek out further learning opportunities so that they can design and construct a better built environment. With building design professionals, builders and tradespeople, I am always pleased to see their completed Passive House projects. Knowing that Australians now have access to world-best specialised training in high performance construction methodology is a legacy that will move us all towards a net zero carbon future.”

DATE/CITY

TIME/VENUE

12 March BRISBANE

13.30 - 16.30 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

13 March BRISBANE

9.30 - 12.30 Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

17 March MELBOURNE

9.30 - 12.30 Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

17 March MELBOURNE

13.30 - 16.30 Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

18 March MELBOURNE

9.30 - 12.30 Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

19 March HOBART

13.30 - 16.30 Hotel Grand Chancellor

24 March SYDNEY

9.30 - 12.30 Australian National Maritime Museum

24 March SYDNEY

13.30 - 16.30 Australian National Maritime Museum

25 March SYDNEY

9.30 - 12.30 Australian National Maritime Museum

31 March DARWIN

9.30 - 12.30 Darwin Convention Centre

1 April PERTH

13.30 - 16.30 Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre

2 April PERTH

9.30 - 12.30 Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre 

27


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Fiona Nield Executive Director - Victoria Housing Industry Association What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Over more than 15 years at HIA I’ve had a range of roles that have all involved regularly dealing with a wide range of stakeholders in urban planning, development, home building and government. We work to solve complex building and planning matters and improve the planning and building systems in Victoria and across the country.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession?

When it comes to being a leader, I truly believe it is important to lead with a style that’s true to yourself and who you are. For me it’s also about leading our industry with our members collective voice and representing our industry views strongly.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

I am HIA’s Executive Director in the Victoria region. I have worked in planning, building and housing policy roles for more than 25 years.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

There are so many people who have inspired me throughout my career. One thing HIA does phenomenally well is to provide great support to staff who want to progress their career through the organisation. It’s taken a lot of hard work, but my inspiration comes largely from our wonderful membership base and wanting the best services and outcomes for them.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

Whether you’re female or male, it’s a given that there will be barriers throughout your career but most importantly, having the ability to adapt, change (if necessary) and progress is essential.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

Understanding the true nature of resistance is key. This gives you the ability to make decisions quickly and map out a plan moving forward. Beyond that, having clear, concise and well thought through strategy helps to keep everyone on the same page.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

Great teamwork is fundamental for high performance in any business. It signifies that people are working towards shared purpose and common goals and in doing so, sharing their varied skills in complementary roles. There are so many sources of updates from government bulletins, subscriptions and from our members who are a wealth of knowledge. Networking with others in the industry also can help with staying on top of the latest trends.

Build! Build your knowledge, know where you want to be in 5 years and build on that every single day.

I’ve always believed that anything is possible! It’s about hard work and knowing your topics well and passionately believing in what you are doing.

Technology. People and businesses are communicating faster than ever so adapting to keep up with the pace has become essential and implementing new technologies in building as well.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

It’s no secret that the home building industry is male dominated, but at the same time, it also encompasses a wide variety of rewarding career paths that women can take; from being at the coal face of the building, to project managing, building surveying, site supervising, town planning, interior design, to a lawyer specialising in construction. HIA has recently launched its Building Women initiative with a goal to foster, support and celebrate women in residential building by creating opportunities to enter the industry and provide information support and advice for women already working in building.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders? I would like to see women feel empowered to take the steps in their own career to reach their career goals.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“Every day, our actions and choices are contributing to our legacy, however, it is not something we should chase in and of itself. Leaving an organisation in a stronger position and striving to influence the systems in which we operate to ensure better experiences for those who follow  28 after us is vital.”


29


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Ruth Nordstrom Studio Manager SUHO What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

I am the product champion for driving the design studio for SUHO as we transition the built environment towards a sustainable solution. I always seek collaboration and high levels of communication with my team. We work together across all projects and provide constructive feedback on design solutions to ensure that we are ticking as many of the ‘boxes’ for our clients. In terms of a ‘style’, I very much want to be viewed as a facilitator and my education training obviously helps with this! I want to see the very best in my team but also realise if someone isn’t performing that is also a reflection on myself, my methods of communication and therefore need to find an alternative mode of facilitation. Similarly, to our clients, people learn and function differently.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

Personally, would be my Mother who is super smart and juggled work/life well and nourished the minds of her children’s creativity. In literacy, I have always had an admiration for Anne Frank, though life was short. Her story impacted me and ensures I’m compassionately grounded in my approach to life. Professionally, I currently hold such admiration for so many people that the common link is their ability to bring out the voice of others. I believe we all have the ability to have a little Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandella, Eddie Mabo voice but need to find the best method to get it out there.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

‘Time’ and transparency I think is hard for women. Speaking from my own experiences, graduating from University and having to take longer to achieve the milestone of registration due to time off for having kids. I’m still working towards this and not afraid to say why. I’d never wish to change and would sacrifice everything for twice over, it is difficult when faced with a remark from employers that the norm is to ensure that you don’t have a family until after your registered. I believe in balance and to be transparent. Being in a science related discipline, I believe there are different time trajectories for women and therefore there should be no ‘norm’. I chose a different path and am still working my way towards my goals so I feel that I’m providing my children with a great example of hard work and dedication.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

I have been fortunate I think to not feel resistance myself. There are always challenges but I think that’s what makes life interesting. Trying to maneuver around these situations requires holding your tongue a little so that you can fully listen. Always be constructive in your response instead of focusing too far into the positive and negative. Being reflective is important for growth and learning.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

Lots of reading and asking questions, whether in a studio environment, going to events and asking people about their work or watching webinars. In the line of work my team does, being ahead of the standard expectations for performance on a building requires a lot of future thought. Writing articles and papers is something that I’m wanting to undertake more of in the future as I’ve found it ensures that your opinions not only have to be supported and critically grounded in research and evidence. Even for those not confident in writing, I do recommend it as designers with their sometimes overly muddled creative minds sometimes need more focus. This is a great way to do it. A lot of learning comes from analysing results in the modeling software before we even end up in Revit. Hubble software enables me to visually learn through probability and statistics which is great as a planning tool and because it is based on the math and physics behind Nathers/ASHRAE energy performance. I have also enjoyed the introduction to the CSIRO portal that demonstrates the average Nathers performance (stars) by location. If you analyse these figures, you can get a lot of history of what sort of housing affordability there is by demographic profile.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Be an equalist not a feminist. I feel the feministic nature in some campaigns is too strong. Designers are by job description required to facilitate and collaborate. Show your empathy as a value add and not a hinderance and working in teams can give you the opportunity to job share to increase your skills. Be confident in your biological tendency to understand gestures and emotions of people whilst not being afraid to ask your client, ‘how do you feel about this?’, ‘is this information overwhelming?’ rather than just where do you want your island bench. I would say about 80% of the clients I deal with say to me ‘I want a sustainable house but don’t know how to get there’. Offer to hand hold through the whole process including construction and don’t be afraid to collaborate with your builder onsite. 

30


When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? I don’t think I had ever imagined it as I didn’t feel I was ready. I also was very lucky to have guidance from Cary Duffield (Troppo) and the late Philip Nayda (Hodgkinson) straight out of University who both said to me don’t be afraid to take longer to achieve your goals, work hard learning about sustainable design and where you can source tools to support your work. So it wasn’t about acknowledging that I would be in a lower position for more years being a woman but observing the advantages that came with learning from others mistakes. Both were happy to support and promote women in the field. Circumstances changed after Uni, I have two kids and I found a great company that was ethically aligned which offered me a supportive environment for juggling work/life balance. Only then I felt ready to progress to the next level in managing a team as a facilitator.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey? Personally, having kids, but I wouldn’t change it. I love when we have kids (and dogs) in the office sometimes! It’s nice to be able to show a different side to your personality to your fellow workers and I’m proud of it.

I do feel that there is greater support now for women out there in the associations promoting women in this field. I think having these associations is the best way to flesh out ideas through participating in the chatter and sharing stories. A forum where you don’t feel judged is important to a lot of females I know.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

If you are in an environment where you feel like you are not valued or supported, don’t be afraid to create your own opportunities. Ask to be involved in business development also, it’s a great way for employers to see how you can engage with clients, attend meetings and even throw in a small comment here and there to support your lead. Creating trust is probably the best way to get further.

Also use the necessary support services that there are for your company or industry. Attend sessions with your female counterparts where you share stories. I think from my own experience, feeling like you don’t have anyone to chat to about how ‘normal’ your situation is, is probably the biggest barrier. I’ve had some shocking experiences, but I won’t let that define me as a designer. I want to focus on creating more positive experiences. It’s taken a while to learn this.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

Where the industry is less about the size of a firm or portfolio and more about how industry is working together to utilise skills for knowledge sharing. I do believe that this is how we will be able to facilitate change to a carbon neutral city. There are a number of young Adelaidean Architects and Designers (male and female) that are really at the forefront of disseminating information and providing gathering places to share knowledge. Education is so important and empowering to the home owner. I

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“If I had a magic wand, I would love to see high performance affordable housing no matter where you live. I am hoping I can provide education and a voice to those being affected by poor housing options and increase awareness of healthy homes being a fundamental human right. I think a lot of women are suited to this type of housing design also because we are not afraid to show empathy in our approach to life. I’m hoping one day, more empathy will be accepted within workplaces too.”

Collaboration on the worksite SUHO recently tested Adelaides first 10 Star Home, currently under construction, for air tightness. Read full article on page 42 of this edition of Intersect. Pictured here at the Ten Star Home First Fix Air-Infiltration test are Leon Morelli, Les Pearce, Mick Morelli from Woolcock Group and Geraldine Petit from SUHO. All of whom liaised with Jessica Allen before and during the testing process to identify potential areas of construction that could be improved. The results from the collaborative design process between the carpenters and SUHO meant that all the service channels were tested for any leaks. The advantage of undertaking air-filtration testing at the ‘first fix’ stage in construction is that there is a clear indication of where potential issues are, following the installation of some services, cladding, fixtures and fittings. These can all be listed for rectification before the home is completed. 

31


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Fleur Pitman Sustainable Building Consultant Eco Select What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style? I am a Sustainable Building Consultant working in my own business Eco Select.

Total Quality Management (TQM) with continuous improvement are the management principles I apply to my work and business. I have an egalitarian leadership style which fits into the TQM framework. The input from the team always produces a superior result, provides ownership of the project to all parties, and fosters mutual respect.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

Natasha Stott Despoja elected at the age of 26 as the Australian Democrats Senator for South Australia was my inspiration. She went on to be deputy leader of the Democrats only two years later. She showed Australia that young women could have a leading role in the governing of this country and at the same time have a family.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

I have not experienced barriers as a female leader. I have personally been encouraged by my lecturers and colleagues both male and female throughout my career. This includes my initial studies in Building Design, subsequent practice as a Building Designer, and to studying Building Project Management at Victoria University where I won several awards including Best Graduate in 1996. During my ten years in retail design and construction, I worked in a national role as Building Project Manager for Target Australia, working on greenfield and brownfield sites with developers and builders such as Westfield, Lend Lease, Multiplex and Civil and Civic. Eleven years ago, I had a change in career and started Eco Select, specialising in Sustainable Building. While working as a Building Designer, Building Project Manager, and Sustainable Building Consultant over the past thirty years, I have found that clients, colleagues, builders and developers alike respond well to the professional and knowledgeable manner with which I approach my work. The quality, accuracy, and timeliness of my project delivery have given me a good reputation in the Building Industry.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

I have worked extensively on construction sites during my career. As the Project Manager I led the Project Control Group (PCG) consisting of the architects, developer, builders, engineer and

other consultants. When I was younger, I would be asked about my qualifications by members of the PCG but I always took this in a positive manner as it was unusual to have a young woman managing large commercial projects in the 1990’s. At times I would be addressed as “love” on site and accepted this as a friendly greeting by the older men as they would usually call each other “mate” and didn’t know what to call me. Tone of voice and body language was my best guide as to whether “love” was meant as a positive or negative. On the rare occasions it was used in a derogatory manner, I would professionally and calmly remind them that it was inappropriate. I developed mutual respect between myself and the PCG and always strove to manage projects as a “win win” wherever possible, since an adversarial style is counterproductive to delivering the project. I instigated and established the first Construction OHS package for Target Australia. Initially there was considerable resistance from management, and I had to demonstrate the validity and legal framework of the OHS obligations on our construction sites from both a corporate and an individual risk management perspective since it was not seen as custom or practice at the time. My success in this project led to an invitation to join the team working on the WorkCover self-insurance package for Coles Myer.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

Over the past thirty years I have had three distinct changes of careers in the Building Industry, which have required additional studies and qualifications each time. In our changing workplaces, it is now expected that you will re-train several times in your career. All of the areas I have worked in, in the past, inform the work I do every day. The CPD program provided by Design Matters is invaluable in keeping abreast of regulatory changes and emerging trends. What advice would you give to the next generation of female

leaders?

Never feel afraid to ask a question if you don’t understand the issue under discussion. I have often asked a question at a PCG meeting to find that half the room (all men) also didn’t understand but were holding back from asking. Never feel under pressure to answer or commit to something you are unsure about. Take the question on notice and let them know when you will have the answer. You can’t know everything and it’s better to be honest than trying to wing it. Your reputation is important and you should build it by keeping to your word, actioning items in a timely manner, keeping abreast of the status of your project, and treating people in a fair and professional manner. 

32


When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession?

I went to a girls’ high school and we were educated with the expectation that we could become leaders in any profession we chose. My family were builders when I was growing up so I have never felt out of place on a construction site.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

I have had challenges with my health and have had to change my working environment to allow me to work on a part time basis. I currently consult on sustainable building and conducting energy ratings which has allowed me flexibility and cash flow while responding to an emerging need within the Building Industry.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

Women may feel that the quality of their work and their suitability for promotion speak for themselves. They don’t follow the lead of men and tell your superiors why you should be promoted and that you want to be promoted and are ready to take on new challenges. Provide your manager with a review of the industry to show your case for a promotion and pay raise. If you don’t ask you don’t get. Men ask.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

Structural changes in society such as those in Denmark would help encourage the next generation of female leaders and allow them to live an equitable and balanced life. The provision of extended parental leave, where men taking twelve months leave is a societal norm. Universal access to affordable quality day care with the flexibility for working mothers which afford them the balance in life and work. And in this way they can forge ahead with career goals without large breaks from the workforce.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“Working as a Building Project Manager as a young woman in the 1990’s leaves a legacy for the acceptance of women in these roles into the future. I was the first woman to be awarded Best Graduate in my Project Management studies at Victoria University. I participate in a range of community engagement areas as I feel it is important for women to be seen as a normal part of the Building Industry. I have done interviews for TV, radio, newspapers, and magazines when I jointly won the award for Best Sustainable Design presented by Kevin McCleod at the NABD awards in 2014.

Town Planning Consultants

I have participated in Sustainable House Day on four occasions showing best practice in Sustainable Design to the general public. I speak with school groups and Tafe students in Building, Surveying, and Building Design each year. Being visible within the Building Industry and wider community and portraying women in a professional role will only help to build the profile of women leading the way in Building Design and Construction.”

Where Your Vision is Our Purpose 435 Nepean Highway Frankston Victoria 3199 03 8765 2455 info@townplanningco.com.au townplanningco.com.au 

33


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Melinda Ryan Director and Town Planning Consultant Town Planning & Co. What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

As a planning consultant, we play various roles in a typical planning project including strategist, project manager, planner, advocate and negotiator. Consultative and collaborative in our approach internally and externally, I would describe my leadership style as ‘inclusive’.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

My mother who encouraged me to be my authentic self and to question everything.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

Stepping out of Local Government into the world of consultancy provided me with the opportunity to map out my pathway toward Leadership, with the support of my employer, mentor and coach. Progressing quickly into management roles, my career progression, to my knowledge, has not been stifled by gender stereotyping. Today, our small team consists of both male and female leaders.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

Acceptance of the fact that we cannot change things we do not control and working to develop my personal and professional self.

Fighting against the challenges of imposter syndrome.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

Based on my observations, no.

I have grown to understand that resistance in any project team is often a product of mindset. In my experience, taking the time to listen to those who you perceive to be the source of resistance, compounded with a small shift in language, can often resolve issues of this nature within the project team.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

As registered planner with the PIA, member of VPELA, member and Committee Member within HIA and member with Design Matters, I am frequently attending industry events and seek out networking opportunities. Planning Matters keeps me abreast with the ever-changing Planning Provisions across the State and highlights VCAT Red Dot decisions. What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders? Stay authentic. Be accountable. Put people first. Trust in a mentor.

promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

Should you find yourself in a position where you believe otherwise, I encourage you to connect with women in your industry who have succeeded and share your challenge. Ask them about the barriers they faced and how they overcame them. What advice or guidance can they offer you? How can you learn from their experience?

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders? I envisage a world where all individuals can be true to their authentic selves, without judgement or bias. Success and leadership does not discriminate.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“I strive to leave a positive impact on the people and environment that I encounter, as a leader, as a planner and as a human being.”

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? When I left my career in Real Estate to dabble in Town Planning, I had no idea how much I would enjoy the discipline and all the challenges that come with it. To date, fortunately, gender bias has not been one of those challenges.



34


02. Women in Leadership

Bronwyn Weir Director Weir Legal and Consulting Pty Ltd What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

I run my own business and whilst I do not have full time employees at present, I work on many projects with teams that require me to take on a leadership role. My style is to be firm but fair, effective and reliable.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

I am inspired by people whom I consider have integrity but who know when to hold their ground or hold their tongue. I have always believed that listening to older people was a way to learn the easy way. You can’t go past experience and wisdom. Most of my career mentors have been men who are very aware of gender equality and supportive of women but there have also been some wonderful women that have inspired me. In terms of famous people, some examples are, Elizabeth Broderick for finding such a brilliant way to allow men to be champions for gender equality. Rosie Batty for being able to be so articulate under adversity and speaking on behalf of those with no voice. Adam Goodes for remaining so clam and reasoned in the face of antagonism.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader? Unconscious bias.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

Defining the blocker or hurdle and leaning in to find a resolution to it. Talking straight and having an escalation strategy that you can implement to cut through, leaving as little damage as possible. On tricky issues and if there is time, asking someone I trust to second guess my strategy. Being firm but fair and treating people with respect.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? I didn’t think about it and I still don’t get ahead of myself. There is a lot of unconscious bias from men and women. Some people will tolerate women as leaders reluctantly. I never assume that everyone in the room sees me as an equal or a leader. If I am made to feel that I am a leader in a male-dominate context, I don’t take that for granted for one moment.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey?

Being co-appointed to write the Building Confidence Report with Professor Peter Shergold. What a privilege to work with someone with such an intellect and tenacity. I don’t think I could have asked for a better job. I still pinch myself about the opportunities it has given me and the momentum that the BCR has achieved.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

Women in the legal profession are promoted more readily than they were 20 years ago. However, the numbers don’t always reflect who is making the decisions and having influence. It can still be a struggle for women holding a senior position to have the same level of influence in decision making as a male holding the same position. My advice is that promotions are important but truly having influence is what you really need to work at.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders?

More equality outside the workplace. Men taking on more responsibility for ‘unpaid’ work and not being stigmatised for it. Men compromising their careers to allow their wives or partners to maintain theirs when children come along. I have been lucky enough to have this and more and more women are, but men that lean in this direction are subjected to bias.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

I do a lot of proactive reading about the issues emerging and try hard to keep on top of what’s going on. I also spend time talking to my networks which helps to stay current. I meet new people all the time and I can learn something from 99% of people that I meet in a professional context.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders?

Don’t be precious. You might be being asked to do something to bring a gender balance rather than on merit. Behave like you are there because you have merit. Women before us have worked very hard to cause the business community to be more aware of gender and look for ways to include women. Embrace that. Don’t be afraid of the term ‘feminist’.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“To be thought of first and foremost as an effective leader who had a positive influence and made a difference. If I also tick a box because I am a women then great. I hope in some small way what I achieve moves us towards a position where being female is not unusual.”  35


Issue 24

02. Women in Leadership

Sally Wills Director / Registered Builder Small Change Design and Construction Pty Ltd What is your role currently and how would you describe your leadership style?

Registered builder and sole director of Small Change Design and Construction Pty Ltd. Leadership style is collaborative.

As a female leader, WHO inspired you and why?

My sister who is founder of a successful vegan fashion accessories business. Her energy, courage and go-get-it attitude is inspiring.

What has been the most significant barrier in your career as a female leader?

The focus on me being female. Its boring, distracting and takes the attention away from discussing all things building and particularly small sustainable homes.

Do you experience resistance when you are leading a team or a project in the field and how have you manoeuvred your way through it?

Often, but I tend to ignore it and keep things moving towards the goal, whatever that might be.

How have you kept abreast or current in your profession?

I continue to study and take on new challenges. I’ve just started part time study (at night) with a few units of the building surveying course. I anticipate learning will be a forever process.

What advice would you give to the next generation of female leaders? Jump in, ignore the naysayers and most of all ignore the inner voice that tells you you cant do it. Sometimes we are our worst enemies.

When you began your career, did you ever imagine that you would be a leader in a male-dominated profession? I’ve always wanted to be in the building industry for as long as I can remember and I always understood it was male dominated. That is unlikely to continue forever though as more and more women catch on to the many benefits of this industry.

What has been the most significant change in the last 10 years that has impacted on your career journey? Achieving building design qualifications to complement my domestic builders registration.

Do you feel women in your profession have a hard time getting promoted and if they do what advice would you give them?

No, I see a lot of women getting very good opportunities. My advice is to say yes to things even if you are not 100% sure you are perfect for the job.

What would be an ideal world that you would like to see for the next generation of female leaders? No focus on the fact they are female, just focus on what they bring to the job.

What is the legacy you will leave as female leader?

“Hopefully changing attitudes and planning rules to promote small sustainable housing.”

Future Homes Competiton

PRIZE POOL OF

Victorian registered building designers are invited to enter The best building designers and architects across the industry will participate in a design competition to produce exemplar apartment designs that support better developments in Melbourne’s suburbs. In 2019, members of the Design Matters team campaigned tirelessly and successfully to ensure Building Design members had their work recognised in this esteemed event. As a Building Designer, and valued member of Design Matters, we encourage you to showcase your professional excellence by entering your designs in this year’s Future Homes Competition.

$500,000

Briefing Session Thursday 19 March 4:30pm – 5:30pm

Level 5 Theatrette, 121 Exhibition St, Melbourne Seating is limited so please RSVP via email to: FutureHomes@delwp.vic.gov.au by 4:30pm Tuesday 17 March

For more information visit: www.vic.gov.au/future-homes 

36


03. Planning Matters

ďťż

37


Issue 24

Little bits that can make a big difference to your town planning outcomes

03. Planning Matters

Planning Tid Bits Residential Solar Panel Confusion In late 2018, under Amendment VC149, the State Government changed Clauses 54 and 55 and included new Decision Guidelines requiring consideration of the impact of overshadowing from new development, on existing rooftop solar energy systems, on neighbouring lots in residential zones. At the same time Planning Practice Note 88, Planning considerations for existing residential rooftop solar energy facilities, was released providing guidance on the new provisions to applicants and decision makers. In a previous article we provided the following summary of VCAT decisions that have provided useful interpretations of the VC149 changes: Mellas v Hobsons Bay CC [2019] VCAT 400 involved the construction of three double storey dwellings in the General Residential Zone. A neighbour appealed Council’s decision, raising concerns about overshadowing to solar panels (among other matters).

Any other system features of the energy facility, such as micro inverters or bypass diodes, that assist operations of the facility in partial shading.

The maximum power generated from the energy facility and details of typical solar power generated during a 24-hour day – over a 12-month period.

The estimated loss of energy efficiency from the facility that may arise from overshadowing of the panels from the proposed development on the review site.

In this instance the neighbour’s solar system was an older ‘single string’ system. It was submitted that, in these systems, shading of any one of the panels would ‘significantly’ diminish energy output from the system. In its decision the Tribunal found that: •

the availability of an alternative location for the solar energy facility on the applicant’s property, including the age and use of single string panel technology, are all relevant considerations…

The Tribunal found that the extent of shadowing to neighbours’ solar panels was reasonable because:

and

A lower row of the neighbours’ panels on a single storey dwelling in an area where the Planning Scheme permits development up to 11 metres in height (General Residential Zone) was not ideally located to provide protection from shadow.

The complete avoidance of new shadow to the existing solar panels at the objector’s land would unreasonably constrain the development of the application site.

Hall v Moreland CC [2018] VCAT 2022 involved the construction of a dwelling in the Neighbourhood Residential Zone. The neighbour was concerned about the impact on his solar (single stream) system during the warm months of the year.

Cameron v Port Phillip CC [2019] VCAT 298 involved the construction of a dwelling in the General Residential Zone. The neighbour had an eight panel solar facility adjoining the subject site. The Tribunal made an interim order and required further information, including: •

When the energy facility was erected on the subject building.

The model and type of energy facility (including whether the facility is ‘multiple string’ or ‘single string’, or if the facility uses a ‘feed-in’ or ‘battery storage’ installation).

an alternative location exists on the applicant’s site … [to] ensure unfettered access to sunlight throughout the day.

The Tribunal considered that the facility was outdated and suggested the applicant relocate the solar facility or upgrade the system.

The Tribunal noted that the zone provided for a dwelling height up to 9 metres and two storeys and that the construction of a single stream solar system was unsatisfactory in those circumstances, and also that overshadowing of the system could occur from other circumstances such as vegetation growth or other structures not requiring a planning permit. It was indicated that while it may be unfeasible to modify the system, that issue needs to be balanced against whether it is unreasonable to constrain or compromise a modest redevelopment on an adjoining lot.



38


Beal v Yarra CC [2019] VCAT 411 involved the construction of a two storey extension to a dwelling in the Neighbourhood Residential Zone. The dwelling to the south of the proposal had a bank of 12 solar panels on the north facing roof plane.  In the appeal made by neighbours, the Tribunal was not able to properly assess the impacts on the appellant’s solar system as the appellant had not provided details of the age, quality and type of system, it’s maximum capacity and extent of loss of energy efficiency. The Tribunal found that the appellant’s panels had not been installed in an optimal location. Clause 1 Planning has also previously noted that we have been receiving requests for the following types of information, from Councils who are looking to assess the shadowing impacts on roof top solar systems: •

3D shadow or sectional shadow drawings to show the extent of shadow cast over the existing solar panels on the adjoining property. Shadow drawings must include the following times (daylight hours which provide function to solar panels): - winter solstice 22 June between 8am and 5pm - equinox 22 September between 7am and 5pm - summer solstice 22 December between 7am to 7pm

If solar panels are overshadowed, details (if possible) of the type of the existing rooftop solar energy facility e.g. single string or multiple string / or any other system features such as micro inverters or bypass diodes which can operate with partial shading. An outline of how overshadowing of any existing rooftop solar energy facility is proposed to be mitigated.

Although the VCAT interpretations and list of the types of information Council’s are likely to seek (above) are of some assistance to permit applicants, there remains a significant lack of clarity on exactly how the impact on roof top solar systems should be assessed. In a more recent VCAT decision, Ramjee v Manningham CC (Red Dot) [2020] VCAT 1 (5 February 2020),   the Tribunal has highlighted the inadequacy of the current situation and called for a more stringent state-wide assessment framework to assist permit applicants, affected parties and decision makers understand when overshadowing impacts are appropriate and when they are not. In Ramjee the Tribunal has noted: •

Where assessments are undertaken of overshadowing impacts as in this case and others, the Tribunal’s findings are frequently and superficially limited to the net change in shadow impacts rather than the actual effects on a system’s performance – that is, the net change to a system’s energy output. The introduction of a suitable methodology (such as the time of year and spread of hours) during which assessments are to be taken and clearer guidance on what constitutes an acceptable loss of a system’s overall performance at specified times would be of assistance to all stakeholders. The decision also notes that contextual considerations such as the strategic context of sites and the orientation of solar panels should preferably be incorporated into any newly developed methodology/provisions.

The absence of timely access to and ready availability of information about the type and operating characteristics of existing rooftop solar energy systems presents very real challenges for permit applicants formulating proposals and for decision makers tasked with assessing their effects. The introduction of a suitable framework facilitating access to such information and assessment guidance in circumstances where this information is absent may be beneficial.

For now, permit applicants should continue to rely on the principles contained in the cases listed above (Mellas, Cameron, Hall and Beal) for guidance on the impacts of overshadowing on roof top solar systems – however, we expect more stringent and clearer guidelines might not be too far away. Single Dwelling Restrictive Covenant: Success (at last) Restrictive covenants have long been registered on land titles as a means of controlling land use and development. Some of the most common covenants, applicants seek to remove (or vary), are ‘single dwelling’ restrictions that prohibit development of land with more than one dwelling. Regular readers and practitioners will be aware that there are three primary means of removing or varying a restrictive covenant. The three methods are via; •

A planning permit application;

A Supreme Court application, or;

A planning scheme amendment.

Each of these three methods is subject to different assessment criteria and has its own pros and cons. The most appropriate method to use will only be known once a diligent preliminary assessment is undertaken to determine the facts of the matter. In reality, the planning scheme amendment method is rarely used and generally reserved for applications that enjoy strong Council support. As a general rule, the Supreme Court method has become the preferred method for seeking changes to restrictive covenants. However, many applicants consider Supreme Court applications cost-prohibitive. The planning permit application method, over recent years, had lost favour with applicants. This is primarily because of the arduous tests included within the Planning and Environment Act and how those tests have generally been applied by both Councils and VCAT. Sec 60(5) of the Planning and Environment Act requires (inter alia): (5)    The responsible authority must not grant a permit which allows the removal or variation of a restriction referred to in subsection (4) unless it is satisfied that— (a)    the owner of any land benefited by the restriction (other than an owner who, before or after the making of the application for the permit but not more than three months before its making, has consented in writing to the grant of the permit) will be unlikely to suffer any detriment of any kind (including any perceived detriment) as a consequence of the removal or variation of the restriction continued over page



39


Issue 24

The Sec 60(5)(a) test, above, is colloquially known as the ‘perceived detriment test’ and is applied to planning permit applications that seek to remove or vary a covenant that was created/registered prior to June 25th, 1991. The Tribunal has, on numerous occasions, highlighted how difficult it is for permit applicants to meet this test. In McFarlane v Greater Dandenong CC & Ors [2002] VCAT 696 (26 June 2002), the Tribunal noted: 21. The stringency of paragraph (a) is perhaps not universally appreciated. It sets the bar extraordinarily high. The existence of any detriment of any kind (including any perceived detriment) is sufficient to defeat an application to vary a covenant. In Dacre v Yarra Ranges SC [2015] VCAT 1453, Deputy President Dwyer summarised numerous previous cases and stated: 12a the Tribunal must be affirmatively satisfied that a covenant beneficiary will be unlikely to suffer any detriment of any kind if the variation or removal of the covenant is permitted. 12b it is not necessary for an affected person to assert or prove detriment because the Tribunal must be affirmatively satisfied of a negative, namely that it is unlikely that there will be detriment of any kind. In Castles v Bayside CC [2004] VCAT 864 (11 May 2004), the Tribunal noted: 41.  This is a severe test in that any detriment, even a minor one more than counter-balance by positive considerations, will be sufficient to bar the granting of a permit. In Giosis v Darebin CC (includes Summary)(Red Dot) [2013] VCAT 825 (16 May 2013), it was noted that: 8.    … the benefit of a restrictive covenant is a proprietary right that should not be lightly removed or interfered with.

In Ahiska, despite its complexities, the Tribunal agreed that the perceived detriment test had been overcome. In ordering that Council must issue a planning permit for the removal of the single dwelling restriction the Tribunal noted: 33. However, in this case, in light of my earlier comments as to detriment, I do not regard the absence of development plans as a fatal failure of this proposal. Whether there be two or more dwellings constructed, and irrespective of their configuration on the subject land, I am satisfied that the physical separation and lack of connectivity and visibility between the subject land and the benefitting land means that the owner of any benefitting land will be unlikely to suffer any detriment of any kind (including any perceived detriment) as a consequence of the variation of the restrictive covenant to remove the single dwelling restriction. 34.  Accordingly, I find that the Tribunal is not prohibited from granting the planning permit sought on the basis of the test contained in section 60(5) of the Act. It is important for readers to note that the Tribunal was at pains to emphasise that its decision in Ahiska was based on the facts of this case and turned on the specific facts associated with the site’s location, its surrounding environment, proximity to beneficiaries and other characteristics unique to this application. Although far from opening the floodgates, this decision does provide a little ray of hope for permit applicants (seeking to vary or remove covenants) who have legitimate cases, that warrant consideration via the planning permit application method. The bar associated with the ‘perceived detriment test’ remains very high – however, if the facts of your case stack up, the test can be met – even if you’re not Steve Hooker.  If readers required any further information relating to restrictive covenant removals, please do not hesitate to contact our office.

… 12. … In fact, the difference between the bars set by section 60(5) and the conventional planning test which requires a balancing of competing interests is akin to the difference between the high jump and the pole vault. It is the difficulty in overcoming the ‘perceived detriment test’ that ensures very few planning permit applications, that seek to vary or remove single dwelling restrictive covenants, are successful.

These tid bits are part of the regular contribution made by Clause 1 Planning to Intersect. For more information visit www.clause1.com.au

However, in a more recent VCAT decision, Ahiska v Hume CC [2020] VCAT 194 (19 February 2020), Clause 1 Planning was successful in arguing that this bar had been met. In that appeal we sought to review Council’s refusal to grant a permit for the rewording of a covenant that would effectively result in the removal of a single dwelling restriction, from land within the City of Hume.

Ph: 03 9370 9599 www.clause1.com.au 

40


Bupa offers the value you need Discover the benefits of being a Bupa member, which you get in addition to your corporate benefits, to help you take care of your health and wellbeing and live a healthier, happier life. Pay nothing for dental check-ups

Taking care of your mental health

Pay nothing for regular dental check-ups, mouth guards, bitewing X-rays, scale and cleans and fluoride treatments at Members First Platinum dentists when you have selected combined Hospital and Extras cover (up to yearly limits).2

To support our members, we pay towards the cost of both psychology and counselling, at recognised providers, under our mental health category on most Extras and packaged covers.

Age-based discount on all Domestic Hospital covers

Corporate cover with great benefits

If you’re aged 18-29, you could be entitled to receive an agebased discount on your Domestic Hospital cover in addition to your current corporate benefits. The discount is calculated at 2% for each year you’re aged under 30, when you first purchase Domestic Hospital cover. 3

Bupa have teamed up with your employer so you can access a range of health and wellness services as well as unique corporate benefits. Join your colleagues on your corporate health plan to take advantage of these benefits, including discounted health insurance premiums that may be available to you.

Switching is easy. Talk to us today.

1800 777 623 bupa.com.au/corporate-offer Visit your local Bupa centre

1

Only for new customers on selected combined corporate Hospital and Extras cover issued by Bupa HI Pty Ltd ABN 81 000 057 590 who join on direct debit or payroll deduction (if available) between 01/09/2019 and 31/10/2019 and who mention the phrase “Get Bupa corporate six weeks free” upon joining. Offer excludes Overseas Student Health Cover and Hospital products combined with Orange 50 or Orange 60 Extras products. Members must maintain a combined corporate Hospital and Extras cover for 30 consecutive days from the join date to be eligible to receive the six weeks free offer. 2 and 6 month waiting period waiver commences from the join d ate and only applies to selected Extras. Other waiting period s apply. Yearly limits, fund and policy rules apply. Not available with other offers. See the full terms and conditions here: https://www.bupa.com.au/ health-insurance/campaigns/6-weeks-free-terms 2Available to Bupa members who have selected combined Hospital and Extras cover that includes general dental. Excludes Your Choice Extras 60 when general dental is not selected and Orange 50 and Orange 60 prod ucts. Yearly limits, waiting period s, fund and policy rules apply. Full details at bupa.com.au/members-first-platinum. 3The age-based d iscount is calculated at 2% for  41 each year you are aged under 30, when you first purchase Domestic Hospital cover. The maximum discount is 10% for 18 to 25-year-olds. The discount applies based on how many adults are on the cover, and the size of their respective discounts, which are based on their age. Discounts will begin to phase out from 41 years of age. This is a voluntary Australian Government initiative that Bupa has chosen to adopt. Bupa HI Pty Ltd ABN 81 000 057 590. (BKQY-VQS6)


Issue 24

I n s u l a t io n

How will you deal with

thermal bridging after 1

st

May 2020?

National Construction Code (NCC) 2019 adoption is looming and from May 1st 2020, thermal bridging needs to be addressed and architects & designers could be forced to build thicker walls. Section J, thermal envelope calculations need to be considered from an early stage of building design. Thermal bridging is a big change in Section J & will result in significant implications to building design and thermal requirements. In many cases, it will affect the size of the windows and doors, forcing designers to reconsider thermal design and performance. Specify Kingspan Kooltherm® products, which easily address thermal bridging. Kingspan Kooltherm® is thermally efficient with a slim profile, helping you save real estate space while keeping the building thermally efficient. Call Kingspan Insulation for technical assistance at 1300 247 235.

Image Courtesy Australian Building Codes Board

Kingspan Insulation Pty Ltd Tel: 1300 247 235 Email: info@kingspaninsulation.com.au

www.kingspaninsulation.com.au Authorised Stockists: Eureka Sustainability Group Pty Ltd | Primo Building Services Pty Ltd | PlastaMasta Melbourne City | PlastaMasta South Side | Network Building supplies | Hume Building Products | Archiclad Building Products Pty Ltd | Archiclad Pty Ltd | Melbourne Building Supplies 

42


04. Industry Matters

ďťż

43


Issue 24

It is often difficult to convince anyone outside the industry that moisture management and air tightness is worth knowing about 04. Industry Matters

Design intersects with Building Science Jessica Allen, AIRAH Affiliate member, AIVAA Testing Member, SUHO AIR, Dip Building Design (Arch) Ruth Nordstrom, AIA Graduate Member, SUHO Studio Manager, B. Edu (secondary), M. Arch, B. Arch Studies Late last October, the AIRAH Building Physics Conference was held in Melbourne. Over the two days of meetings, seminars, and conferences, a group of professionals from different disciplines collectively talked about the steps that Australia needs to take in order to catch up to internationally recognised fundamentals of resilient building design. Wannabe building science nerds, Building Designers, Architects, Scientists, Chemists, Educators, Governing bodies, discussed the changes that are only now being integrated into the National Construction Code which addresses optional requirements for air-tightness condensation in buildings. Conversing with international experts and our own Australian counterparts, we shared anecdotal experiences which floored most of the gasping audience through the lack of indoor air quality (IAQ) consideration for the most vulnerable of dwellers. The discussion centered primarily around moisture control and how multifaceted the topic is. Talk across related topics such as dew points, relative humidity, hot humid climates, indoor air quality, the importance of sequencing in construction projects, building wraps, oversizing of HVAC systems, the changes to the NCC and fire safety. Grounding the discussions were reflections from international experts who have been there, done that a decade ago in their own countries. Australia has some catching up to do.

The typical detailing within high performance homes such as Adelaide’s 10 Star Home by SUHO, relies on a number of cavities which are typically sealed with vapour permeable but air-tight membranes, OSB3 Board, and taped air-tight around any join or penetration. The advantage of undertaking air-filtration testing at the ‘first fix’ stage in construction is that there is a clear indication of where potential issues are, following the installation of some services, cladding, fixtures and fittings. These can all be listed for rectification before the home is completed. This often happens before the plasterboard layers are installed. The air-infiltration testing can be performed without major interruption to construction works and coincidentally allows opportunities for the trades to be onsite learning about better building sealing methods.

An increasingly hot topic, air-tightness design and testing is making waves in Australian markets and in the minds of owners who see value added by reducing energy consumption. Air-tightness is generally described as Air Changes Per Hour (ACH) which is given a numerical value. This determines how ‘leaky’ a building is. The building is tested by qualified ATTMA Auditors such as Jessica Allen (SUHO) who recently tested Adelaide’s first ten star home, currently under construction. Jessica is amongst a number of people in her field that are consulting on projects in the beginning stages of design to ensure that not only the objectives for air-tightness, but also condensation and moisture management, are designed into the building envelope. In some instances, clients and designers are setting air tightness targets which are similar to the international and ‘best practice’ standard of 1.0ACH (Passivhaus standards are 0.6ACH and the highest level of performance). This outcome requires meticulous detailing of service channels within the envelope design.

Jessica Allen reviews the thermography in real time on site which allows better communication between designers and trades. 44


There are a few reasons for higher requirement for mechanical heating/cooling:

Thermographical image of construction of a window (Above) which could show thermal bridging, air leaks, missing membranes and sill tapes etc.(Below) structural framing within the walls of a typical home showing thermal bridging (Allen, 2019 )

Lack of attention to passive design features of buildings from the beginning

Low levels of insulation

Thermal bridging

A building envelope with gaps and cracks that shouldn’t be there that allow expensive conditioned air to leak out too quickly.

Since energy efficiency requirements were introduced into the National Construction Code (back then known as the Building Code of Australia) in 2003, the requirements have incrementally changed. According to Paul Bannister of Energy Action, Section J has practically been re-written in the 2019 NCC draft. This is great news for our energy bills and, most importantly, for this beautiful planet we live on and want to see our great-grandchildren enjoy. The thing is, that buildings are complex. They operate as a whole system and you can’t change one part without affecting another. With authorities focusing further on fire safety and spread between compartments, the risk to lives and the containment of mechanical systems to provide autonomous occupant comfort levels, they also look to air-tight design, moisture and health of construction in order to maintain integrity. We’re seeing some movement on the front of regulatory changes that can encourage a better internal environment for building users, however progress is limited because industry is largely resistant to shifting away from a volume-value construction model during difficult economic times. As energy efficiency requirements tighten and the building envelope improves, a few things are likely to happen:

Doors and windows are sealed with one entrance being the main containment for the fan. The building is tested two ways, either pressurised or de-pressurised and then the air flow required to pressurise the building to 50Pa converts into a score based on the envelope area (m2). The auditor then ventures around the building to identify air leakage pathways using feel, smoke or thermal imaging. In addition to the fan test, the thermography testing allows the Auditor to see where there are issues within the walls such as squashed or missing insulation, thermal bridging etc. Regarding thermal comfort, Terry Brennan, US building physics expert, says people have been trying to solve envelope problems with mechanical systems for a long time. In terms of economic impact, additional air-tight detailing can assist South Australian’s energy cost-minded public become innovators in construction and empowered to ask for better housing. This subsequently means that the typical 0.41c per kW/h (Origin 2019) that is charged for providing mechanical heating and cooling can be reduced with an optimised envelope.

Increased airtightness will mean that there is less air infiltration, changing the drying speed of internal surfaces (and wall cavities) which means buildings will be less resilient to leaks from water pipes, rain etc.

The indoor relative humidity (created by breathing, cooking, drying of washing etc) will increase as it will not have an easy exit path increasing mould/condensation risk.

More insulation will change temperature profiles of wall and roof systems, meaning that the gap between the indoor conditions and outdoor conditions will get larger, increasing mould/ condensation risks.

As these things start to happen Australia will need to pay much closer attention to wall construction and effective ventilation in order to prevent “sick” buildings. The NCC 2019 has acknowledged this by also introducing a section on Condensation Management (Part F6). To put the fact that most of us don’t see building failure together with the fact that most of us aren’t sensitive to mould spores, and you have widespread lack of awareness or sense of urgency about the potential problems that improved energy efficiency and air tightness may start to uncover in upcoming code changes. The prevalence of respiratory illnesses are also possibly improved by adopting measures of the “build tight, ventilate right” model which reduces the risk of mould and bacterial microbes developing within living environments. Regardless of how sensitive you are to biotoxins (or mould), none of us are immune to the expense and inconvenience of mould rectification. It is important to get the right people on your project team from the beginning when planning a building project, large or small. There are a growing number of accredited professionals qualified and practising in accordance with the NCC and building physics principles. For more information visit www.airtightness.com.au or email air@suho.com.au 

45


Issue 24

YO U K N OW B U I L D I N G

WE K N OW INSUR ANC E Specialist Insurance Providers to the Building Industry

Sketch Building Design Pty Ltd Photographer: Dana Beligan

BUILDING DESIGNERS • CONSTRUCTION • ARCHITECTS • ENERGY RATERS • ENGINEERS

W E B B E R I N S U R A N C E . C O M . A U / D E S I G N M AT T E R S designmatters@webberinsurance.com.au

• 1300 668 553

WEBBER INSURANCE SERVICES PTY LTD | ABN 88 648 036 929 | CAR: 413233 As Authorised Representative of Webber Insurance Group | ABN: 70 612 339 894 | AFSL: 488465 

46


05. Job Matters



47


Issue 24

Bupa offers the value you need Discover the benefits of being a Bupa member, which you get in addition to your corporate benefits, to help you take care of your health and wellbeing and live a healthier, happier life. Pay nothing for dental check-ups

Taking care of your mental health

Pay nothing for regular dental check-ups, mouth guards, bitewing X-rays, scale and cleans and fluoride treatments at Members First Platinum dentists when you have selected combined Hospital and Extras cover (up to yearly limits).2

To support our members, we pay towards the cost of both psychology and counselling, at recognised providers, under our mental health category on most Extras and packaged covers.

Age-based discount on all Domestic Hospital covers

Corporate cover with great benefits

If you’re aged 18-29, you could be entitled to receive an agebased discount on your Domestic Hospital cover in addition to your current corporate benefits. The discount is calculated at 2% for each year you’re aged under 30, when you first purchase Domestic Hospital cover. 3

Bupa have teamed up with your employer so you can access a range of health and wellness services as well as unique corporate benefits. Join your colleagues on your corporate health plan to take advantage of these benefits, including discounted health insurance premiums that may be available to you.



48


05. Job Matters + Graduate Building Designer Seeks Entry-Level Draftsperson Position I graduated in November 2019 from Swinburne University of Technology with an Advanced Diploma in Building Design and an Award for Working Drawings. Whilst working part-time, I continued to average over 85% in all subjects across both years. As a mature student, navigating a career switch from IT into Building Design has been both challenging and rewarding. Now proficient in Revit and AutoCAD - and with an excellent grounding in Residential and Commercial design, construction and drafting - I am currently working on a part-time casual basis as a junior Draftsperson and I am seeking a full-time role. Contactl Elaine on 0417 943 174 or email elainesilver@optusnet.com.au

+ Student Seeking Casual/Contract Work as a Documenter Second year Building Design student at RMIT is looking for casual/contract work as a documenter. Proficient in AutoCAD and beginning to work in Revit. A dedicated worker, with a great understanding of construction and working drawings. Awarded the RMIT George Verdon Award in 2019. Contact Lily Molendijk on 0410 616 455 or email at lily.molendijk@gmail.com

+ Boutique Building Design Firm Seeks a Qualified or Recent Graduate Boutique Building Design Firm, located in the south-eastern suburbs seeks a qualified or recent graduate. Applicants must be proficient in Revit and have solid technical detailing and project documentation skills. The ideal candidate should in addition, possess a keen interest in emerging technology such as developing virtual reality environments and high-end 3d visualisation. Knowledge of 3ds Max and Vray is helpful but not essential. This is a great opportunity for a self-motivated and creative Building Designer wanting to work in a relaxed office environment within our growing team. Forward your CD to Crowhurst Building Design at admin@crowhurstbd.com.au

+ Graduate Seeking Employment I have completed my Advanced Diploma of Building Design (Architecture). As a recent graduate, I would appreciate the opportunity to work alongside experienced architects and designers, to grow and extend my knowledge to enhance future success. I would love to showcase my skills and abilities within the company. I have an eye for design and detail and love what I do. I believe I can offer a great new edge to your company as well as making a good contribution to your team. I am familiar with AutoCAD and Revit. I have completed Working Drawings, Town Planning and Sustainable Design throughout my course. I have volunteered and worked as a contractor throughout my time at University. I would appreciate the opportunity to demonstrate my skills, enthusiasm and willingness. I have produced a portfolio with all plans for you to overlook. Contact Justin Fotia On 0423 452 881 or email at justin.fotia96@outlook.com

+ Experience in Local Construction Regulations Required We are seeking an enthusiastic, mature minded, experienced person with a strong knowledge of the local construction regulations, with exposure to planning. The candidate should also possess strong creative design experience with the expectation of no limitations of design intent for a project. The candidate should be familiar and proficient with these two platforms, Revit and AutoCAD software. The position is a full-time contract position, however we would be open to part-time for the right person. You must have ethical values, able to liaise with third party consultants, have a respectful manner for all people in the industry and bring good energy to the studio. Submit your CV and folio of works to inquiries@sacbw.com

+ Well-Established Award Winning Design Firm Seeks Employee

Contact Yaser by phone on 0434 880 111 or email at samkepler27@gmail.com

Archsign is a well-established, award winning design firm in Collingwood. We are seeking a candidate who ideally has: Minimum 1 year local experience in building design or architecture; Tertiary qualifications in building design, architecture of equivalent; Sound technical knowledge and understanding of the Building Codes in Australia; Competence liaising with clients, consultants and councils; A strong work ethic and ability to work to tight deadlines; Exceptional organisational skills; and Excellent communication, interpersonal and problem solving skills. Salary of $55K to $65K per annum plus superannuation (depending on experience).

+ Seeking a Full Time Sustainability / ESD Consultant

If you think you have what it takes and want to join our friendly team, please submit your application to Ned by email at ned@archsign.com.au.

+ Graduate Seeks an Internship New graduate who recently completed the Advanced Diploma of Building Design at Melbourne Polytechnic seeks to find work experience in the form of an internship within a building design practice to gain an understanding of the role of building designers and draftspersons. Proficient in ArchiCAD and with a desire to learn Autocat and REVIT. 10 years’ of experience in the building industry as a qualified tradie with significant achievements and ready to embark on a career as a building designer.

We are a consulting firm located in the inner northern suburbs and we are looking for a full time Sustainability/ESD Consultant. The successful candidate will have an eagerness, experience and skills in producing one or more of the following sustainability reports - Section JV3 reports, BESS reports and Greenstar Assessments. A great opportunity to expand your skills and for job fullfillment! Forward your CV to Frater Consulting Services at admin@fraterconsultingservices.com.au ďťż

49


Issue 24

Members Matter Amplify your profession in the building industry with a membership of Design Matters: + Belong to a true Not-for-Profit Association that advocates for good building design for all Australians! + The peak national voice for the building design profession + Enthusiastic and proactive promotion of each profession in our membership + Network with peers and aligned professionals + Help Desk + Continuing Professional Development and Accreditation + Weekly industry update + Monthly magazine

JOIN NOW Call 03 9416 0227 Network

Education

1,872 BUILDING DESIGNERS

47%

EMERGING BUILDING DESIGNERS*

32%

SEMINARS

WEBINARS

REGIONAL MEETINGS

WORKSHOPS

SITE VISITS

STUDY TOUR

CORPORATE MEMBERS

21%

+ Practice and Advisory Notes + Primary Research - Fee Surveys + Free Business Advice - legal, planning, taxation etc + Member discounts on a range of business and lifestyle products and services + Tailor-made professional indemnity insurance + Annual Design Awards

Advocacy Building Design Specific Issues Energy Rater Specific Issues

Engagement

36

Good Design Matters

17

eNews 47 editions Intersect 11 editions

+ Website listing + Free job advertising

www.designmatters.org.au ďťż

50

Profile for Design Matters

Intersect, March 2020  

Intersect, March 2020 from Design Matters - enable, advocate and celebrate good building design. As part of International Women's Day celeb...

Intersect, March 2020  

Intersect, March 2020 from Design Matters - enable, advocate and celebrate good building design. As part of International Women's Day celeb...

Profile for bdav6