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the building designer

building designers association of queensland inc.

building designers association of the northern territory

No. 168 February 2012


Honour State President 1990 - 1991 1991 - 1992 1992 - 1994 1994 - 1996 1996 - 1997 1997 - 1999 1999 - 2001 2001 - 2003 2003 - 2006 2006 - 2008 2008 -2011 2011 -

Board

building designers’ association of queensland inc.

Chris Raymond Jim O’Leary Adrian Pooley Keith Ratcliffe Russell Meikle Russell Brandon Phillip Buchanan Peter Nelson Jeff Osman Max Slade Greg Pershouse Arthur Martin

Life Member 1992 1992 1994 2000 2000 2008 2008 2009

Jim O’Leary John Hooker Adrian Pooley Jeff Osman Russell Brandon Glen Place Bert Priest Phillip Buchanan

Fellow 2009 2009

Stephen Kidd Chris Vandyke

Honorary Member 1999 1999 2003

Margaret Hooker Meryl Pooley Barb Priest


Editor Russell Brandon Advertising Enquiries Russell Brandon Phone: 07 3889 9119 Feature Writer Natalie van Egmond

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Spicers Balfour Hotel

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HOPGOODGANIM Reporting payments made to contractors

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DESIGN FEATURE Design challenge

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DESIGN FEATURE Borger residence

Art & Design Jon Walsh Publisher Building Designers’ Association of Queensland Inc. PO Box 651 STRATHPINE, QLD 4500 Phone: 07 3889 9119 Fax: 07 3205 1078 Email: admin@bdaq.com.au Web Site: www.bdaq.com.au

COVER STORY

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DESIGN FEATURE Ecovillage 256

BDAQ EXECUTIVE President Arthur Martin Phone: 07 4662 1403 Email: arthur@martindesign.com.au Vice President Greg Pershouse Phone: 07 4151 8350 Email: greg@designgp.com.au Secretary Colin Roe Phone: 07 3203 7045 Email: colinroe@tpg.com.au Treasurer Ian Darnell Phone: 07 4661 3714 Email: darnell@nspire.com.au

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Northern Vice President Rod Butland Phone: 07 4051 9722 Email: buck@buckdesign.com.au Central Vice President Steve Claridge Phone: 07 5641 1966 Email: steve@claridge.net.au Southern Vice President Peter Nelson Phone: 07 3808 8517 Email: nelsonpj42@optusnet.com.au Membership & Promotions Director Steve Gray Phone: 07 4124 0600 Email: hbdg@bigpond.net.au Technical, Legislation & Planning Director Joanne Galea Phone: 07 4942 1316 Email: genisis@activ8.net.au Training and Education Director Glen Place Phone: 07 4942 1316 Email: glen@placedesigns.com.au Executive Director Russell Brandon Phone: 07 3889 9119 Email: admin@bdaq.com.au

DESIGN CHALLENGE

All information in this publication is provided in good faith but on the strict understanding that neither BDAQ nor the editor nor any other persons contributing to or involved in the

the building designer

publication shall incur any liability whatsoever or howsoever arising (including but not limited to liability for negligent misstatement) in respect of such information and all liability arising either directly or indirectly as a consequence of the use or reliance upon any advice, representations, statement, opinion or conclusion expressed in this publication is, to the extent permitted by law, expressly disclaimed. Copyright (c) 2012 Building Designers' Association Queensland Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved.

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

building designers association of queensland inc.

building designers association of the northern territory

No. 168 February 2012

Cover: ‘Spicers Balfour Hotel’ Rowena Cornwell: Coop Creative, p3


DESIGN FEATURE

Spicers Balfour Hotel C O O P

C R E A T I V E

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DESIGN FEATURE

The Spicer's Balfour Hotel, located on a residential street in an inner-city Brisbane suburb, is a private hotel with facilities available only to guests. The hotel was created to provide intimate highend accommodation for professionals who were tired of the usual 5 star offerings. During the 1940's, the hotel was used as a form of short term accommodation for returned soldiers. Coop Creative's client wanted the modest structure of the original 1910 building to remain, which would give the guests an experience of living in a typical tin and timber building.

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

In an effort to reinterpret luxury, personal service, efficient planning and comfort, the designers adhered to the client's brief. Described as a 'private cocoon', the building's external faรงade was derived from the opportunities found within. Due to restrictions given by town planning guidelines, the alteration to the scale of the original house was limited. In compensation, the extensions made were to the rear of the building site. A newly created laneway provides an entry from the side, which adds privacy for the guests. This creates an ambience for the maximum of 18 guests who inhabit the hotel as if it were their own home. Throughout the design process, the designers worked alongside a certifier, who provided support for any design issues. By seeking an alternative solution to the BCA for a

3 Level accommodation building, the designers were able to provide open able windows to all guest rooms. The planning of this project became efficient; as the Council imposed constraints directed the designers towards this position. The rhythm of the spaces, the play of light and shade and the constant manipulation of the scale collectively reinforces a unique guest experience. The exclusive accommodation offers 9 rooms, private/function dining facilities, a rooftop bar and gym. A lack of pattern and movement was integral to maintaining a peaceful and tranquil environment. The interior was designed to develop an aged patina which plays with shadow. The internal palette of mink, purple and grey highlights a rich


DESIGN FEATURE

and often ethereal contrast to the penetrating natural light. In the sub tropics one's experience of the external world is framed by shade. The original central hallway was maintained, acting as a classic buffer between the public spaces to the north, and the guestrooms to the south. In the guestrooms the ceilings are manipulated to form an energetic internal topography. Each guest is greeted by their own lobby space, with functional work areas. Slouchy Italian bed linen relaxes the suite and encourages the guest to unwind. The final resolution of the hotel breaks away from the recent trend in hospitality design, there is no theme and the luxury is understated.

SB H

“...a lack of pattern and movement was integral to maintaining a peaceful and tranquil environment...�

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ROOF TOP BAR

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Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel Spicers Balfour Hotel The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

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DESIGN FEATURE

Rowena Cornwell Coop Creative 07 3852 4979 rowena@coopcreative.com.au

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Spicers Balfour Hotel

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Sustainable Clever Design

Mike Cleaver

This inspirational hard cover book features 224 pages of stunning photography, informative design narratives, cross sections, elevations and three-dimensional renders. It also includes not previously published comprehensive information revealing the Clever Design philosophies and methodologies.

sustainability can be seamlessly integrated into residential design. Emerging from Cleaver’s extensive background in building construction and environmental sustainability, these projects often daring and inventive, yet all 100% buildable – have established Clever Design at the forefront of environmentally-conscious architecture.

Cutting edge sustainable designs signify the collection of 16 residences and one retail refurbishment by award-winning founder and principal, Mike Cleaver of Clever Design. These projects represent an important body of work, which demonstrates how environmental

This awe-inspiring book is much more than a ‘coffee table’ book: rather, it is an invaluable reference for those interested in innovative, sustainable architecture.

innovative

contemporary

sustainable

architecture

clever design

w: cleverdesign.com.au ph: 0362488283 a: 1546 south arm rd sandford tas 7020


Is the steel in your roof BCA compliant? This is the question that could make or break you. If you’re using imported steel, or it’s being substituted without your knowledge, please be aware of the facts. And the serious risks. Where the BCA calls for AS1397:2001 compliance in construction, products that are made to foreign standards may not automatically meet the “deemed to satisfy” requirements of the BCA. Steel made by BlueScope Steel is guaranteed to be 100% compliant.

steelselect.com/check

1800 022 999 ZINCALUME®, COLORBOND®, BlueScope and SteelSelect® are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. © 2012 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved. TBD32723DC


HOPGOODGANIM

Building and construction companies to report payments made to contractors By Justin Byrne, Special Counsel, HopgoodGanim Late last year, the Treasury released draft regulations whereby businesses in the building and construction industry will need to annually report payments made to contractors. The regulations apply to a wide range of building and construction services. Here, HopgoodGanim special counsel of taxation and revenue Justin Byrne outlines what those in the building and construction industry need to know about the draft regulations.

compliance with taxation obligations amongst contractors in the building and construction industry. ATO research has suggested that out of the six major industries, building and construction was responsible for 60 percent of all tax related debt for the 2006 and 2009 income years. The draft regulations follow on from a consultation paper issued in May 2011, and are proposed to apply from 1 July 2012. Who will the regulations apply to? The regulations will apply to businesses that utilise the services of a contractor if: ·

Key points ·

·

The Treasury's draft regulations require businesses operating primarily within the building and construction industry to report any payments they make to contractors to the ATO on an annual basis. The reporting requirements will apply where there has been a supply of building and construction services, or a combination of building and construction goods and services in some circumstances.

Improving compliance in the building and construction industry The draft regulations were introduced as a result of a 2010-11 Federal budget initiative to improve 14

The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

·

·

the business is 'primarily' in the building and construction industry (the regulations will apply if a business derives more than 50 percent of its income from 'building and construction services' in the current financial year or two most recent financial years); both the business and the supplier have an ABN; and building and construction services are supplied, or a combination of goods and building and construction services are supplied (and supplying the services is not merely incidental to supplying the goods).

surfaces or sub-surfaces, from alterations to demolitions. A list of included activities can be found in the draft regulations on the Treasury's website, while the accompanying explanatory statement contains further examples. Where goods and services are supplied in combination, businesses contracting the services will only be exempt from the reporting requirements if the supply of services is simply incidental to the supply of goods. For example, a tradesperson purchasing paint from a store that also provides a tinting service will not be required to report payments made to the store (as the tinting is an incidental service). Who is excluded from the regulations? The regulations will not apply to: ·

payments between members of the same consolidated or multiple entry consolidated group for income tax purposes;

·

payments made to individuals or entities without an ABN; and

·

payments made to individuals or entities whose tax is withheld under the PAYG system (eg employees).

How will payments be reported? 'Building and construction services' encompasses a wide range of activities performed on, or relating to, buildings, structures, works,

The draft regulations require businesses to report to the ATO any payments made to contractors under division 405 of the Taxation


Administration Act 1953 (Cth). Division 405 requires quarterly reporting, and while the consultation paper suggested that only annual reporting would be required, this does not seem to have been adopted in the draft regulations.

qbda12

Businesses will be required to outline the contractor's name, ABN, address (if known), the total amount paid or credited to the contractor over the income year, if GST has been charged, and any other information required by the Commissioner. Submissions on the draft regulations closed recently, and the Government will now work to finalise the regulations, with a view to implementation on 1 July 2012. For more information on how the draft regulations will affect businesses in the building and construction industry, please contact Justin Byrne of HopgoodGanim's Taxation and Revenue team on 07 3024 0467 or email j.byrne@hopgoodganim.com.au

QUEENSLAND BUILDING DESIGN AWARDS

Gala Dinner

The contents of this paper are not intended to be a complete statement of the law on any subject and should not be used as a

July 27 2012

substitute for legal advice in specific fact situations. HopgoodGanim cannot accept any liability or responsibility for loss occurring as a result of anyone acting or refraining from acting in reliance on any material contained in this paper.

Details page 48


2012 State Design Award Gala Dinner


DESIGN FEATURE

Design CHALLENGE

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012


DESIGN FEATURE

The client brief called for the designer to extend, raise and renovate a modest dwelling in a character precinct with demolition controls. The significant street tree was to be preserved. The tree proved a design challenge, as the Council had requested the maintenance of the tree to be upheld.

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012


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AN INCREASE TO THE FOOTPRINT of the family home, to include a double garage, extra bedrooms and flexible living and entertaining spaces was also to be included in the design. Privacy from six neighbouring residences was also to be retained, while still preserving the maximum level of natural light and ventilation. An extremely close setback, and encroachments from an adjoining property, negated any simple built-to-boundary garaging solutions. A further complication evident during design was existing sewerage infrastructure, which complicated pool and garage placement, and required bridging designs. The relationship and interaction between existing and new areas needed to be addressed in a manner that minimised bulk, presenting the house as a whole. The design of clean and appropriate integration of existing and new areas allows users to move

effortlessly through the building, due to the creation of flexible and adaptable spaces. A punctuation of natural light encourages a natural interaction between living and entertaining areas through the inner courtyard, which also improves the privacy. To further provide privacy screening and cross breezes, carefully placed obscure glass louvres, internal shutters and high windows were placed within the building. An extra personal touch from the designer saw an amount of respect shown to the history of the house by incorporating similar materials for cladding and flooring. A welcoming and secure landscaped entry area now replaces the dark, narrow front external area. Ambience is provided within family friendly spaces by the feature of a warm fireplace. Hidden discreetly away from the eye is a wine cellar, conveniently located under the staircase for easy access. The streamline kitchen design also

compliments the natural colour scheme of the house. A corridor of beaming light is created between rooms through the use of full height window louvers. An extra touch of luxury to the home is found with the open plan ensuite. The inclusion of glass bifold openings turns the courtyard into a natural extension of the indoor area. To keep consistency and character the use of the existing colour scheme was used on the entire house by the designers. To enhance the sense of light and spaciousness within the house, a seamless integration of external and internal spaces was created. A low-maintenance garden was designed and developed to best suit the family. The graceful, tranquil family swimming pool not only provides recreation, but also a conversation topic.

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Is the steel in your roof BCA compliant? This is the question that could make or break you. If you’re using imported steel, or it’s being substituted without your knowledge, please be aware of the facts. And the serious risks. Where the BCA calls for AS1397:2001 compliance in construction, products that are made to foreign standards may not automatically meet the “deemed to satisfy” requirements of the BCA. Steel made by BlueScope Steel is guaranteed to be 100% compliant.

steelselect.com/check

1800 022 999 ZINCALUME®, COLORBOND®, BlueScope and SteelSelect® are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. © 2012 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved. TBD32723DC


BORGER RESIDENCE

Borger Residence


DESIGN FEATURE

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DESIGN FEATURE

Shane Kunkel Arenkay Designs 07 4638 4766 shane@arenkaydesigns.com.au

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012


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DESIGN FEATURE

THE INDOOR/OUTDOOR connectivity required was to be seamless, using the north-east aspect. As the external appearance of the house had not yet been planned, the client asked for design options to be presented, with a decision being made from there. A requirement for the home included the lower floor presenting facilities to operate a small home-based hairdressing salon, for the client to operate from. In order to present the home with a modern, elegant appearance, quality standard materials, finishes and fixtures were used. Careful selection of these was made, as the client also wanted to undertake minimal maintenance of these in the future. Located at the end of a cul-de-sac in North Toowoomba, the site was elevated slightly, presenting slight views toward the city. However, the location was south facing, with considerable fall over the site. To compensate for this, engineering for retaining walls and earthworks was used to form a substantial part of the design. Before the building designs were drawn up, and after analysing the building brief, a topographical survey was taken to determine the extent of fall over the site (4.0m), and whether there would be any issues with slope stability.

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

Furthermore, an investigation looked into the possibility of a front boundary setback relaxation. The 'Borger Residence' is a modern, warm and elegant home that has been designed to suit the professional couple. The clients' high expectations were exceeded, as every aspect of their wish list was met. A variety of materials were used in the design of the residence, including rendered brick veneer/brick base for the lower story and Scyon Stria external cladding for the upper story. Cantilevering has been used on the upper story to ensure the external cladding finished inline with the rendered brick veneer, which was requested by the client. An aesthetically pleasing faรงade was created using the Stria, along with awning windows which produced a grid style pattern, providing horizontal and vertical joins. A further element to the modern faรงade is evident through the 1200 wide aluminium framed glass entrance door. Internally, a lasting impression is made throughout the executive residence. The spacious light filled open plan living areas are oriented towards the north-east to provide a sense of comfortable living all year round. From here, a large alfresco area is connected via corner

opening stacker sliding glass doors, which enhance indoor/outdoor interaction. The master bedroom is privately located off the dining area and includes the clients' wish for a grand ensuite and 'Sex and the City' style walk-in-robe. The front of the residence contains the guest bedroom and study, capturing the limited views across the city. To protect the remainder of the residence from the hot afternoon sun, either the garage or wet areas are positioned over both levels. Windows are also minimised to this orientation.To reduce energy use, the walls and ceilings of both levels were well insulated. A 23,000 litre rain water tank was also installed to minimise water use. To create effective cross-ventilation, the windows in the residence were carefully selected. Downstairs, along with the garage and storage areas, is the client's hairdressing salon and amenities. This location was chosen as the west of the site allows for easy external access for customers. The fittings, fixtures and finishes of this executive residence are of a high standard. Overall, the client was exceedingly pleased with the design, construction and outcome of the home. It complied with the brief given and is well suited to their needs.


DESIGN FEATURE

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For cost-effective, quality termite control... you can’t go past HomeGuard Only HomeGuard delivers a safe, no-compromise solution for termite protection in every building application. Put the building industry’s best termite management system in place on your next project and get the backing of the FMC 25 year $1,000,000 warranty.

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horizontally in a way that locks them together. In fact, a correctly installed and maintained Gerard roof is completely worry-proof.

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DESIGN FEATURE

Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256

Ecovillage 256

Ecovillage 256

Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256 Ecovillage 256

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DESIGN FEATURE

This

energy efficient and functional house was to be designed to a budget. The house was to have low impact on the environment, utilising recycled timber as much as possible. The use of Natural materials was to be incorporated into the design and passive design principles were used to create efficient spaces. The design created access to views over public greenway, billabong and creek corridor. Cross ventilation in all rooms was also provided by good design principles.

Travis Quennell QUBD 07 5598 8755 travis@qubd.com.au

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The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

From the brief a high set house was designed using minimal cut and fill to retain natural ground, which preserved site hydrology and avoided erosion. To create aesthetic appeal and offset carbon, a green living roof was placed over the carport. In order to keep in accordance with the

brief, the materials used were sourced from Australia, including the timber frame and cladding. The recycled timber used came from two local houses and was used widely in the construction of the house. This included in the deck and carport structures, part of the floor structure, and the joinery of the house, screening, stairs, architraves and skirting boards. The flooring and ceiling linings are of old pine flooring and a mix of hardwood was used for other areas. A thermal mass floor running the entire length of the house (in a circulation space) was built. This incorporated a 35mm thick slate floor (direct from mine) on 65mm screed bed, fitted with solar water pipes was also installed to warm the house in winter. Angled louvres provide sun in winter and block summer sun.


DESIGN FEATURE

Water was supplied through water tanks only. AAA fittings were used throughout the house. The waste water treatment plant provides water for toilets and garden use. Insulation to all walls was used and vents were included to exhaust stale hot air from the fridge. Each habitable room was fitted with high level louvres, with ventilation paths identified. E Zero paints were used throughout the house. The addition of solar hot water, photovoltaic panels, natural gas and IMCS monitoring system add to the energy efficiency of the design. Each room is a practical size which compliments the furniture locations. There is also maximised storage above wet areas. An undercover laundry line allows for all weather drying. A dark sky policy has been used, which calls for no exposed light fittings to provide minimal visual impact at night time. All lighting in the house is of a low voltage. The passive solar design of the house works, with the angled louvres helping to heat the thermal mass in winter and the same louvres aid ventilation so the house remains cool in summer. There are many breezes flowing through the house, creating cross ventilation from all directions. By designing the house in this way the client no reason to add extra heating or cooling devices. This also meant the client would save money on electricity and gas bills. The construction costs were reduced by using a recycled timber, and an added charm from the recycled timber was that it created a warm, natural feel to the house. Overall, the project was completed to budget, with the client happy at the end result.

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...recycled timber created a warm, natural feel to the house. The Building Designer No.168 February 2012

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Clayfield Showroom 797 Sandgate Road Clayfield Q 4011 Contact: Hannah Biddle Phone: 3862 4640 Email: Hannah@stocksretravision.com.au

Ashgrove Showroom 79 Stewart Road Ashgrove Q 4060 Contact: Kristy Keegan Phone: 3366 4041 Email: Kristy@stocksretravision.com.au

Our showroom is your showroom


BDAQ EVENTS CALENDAR 2012 BDAQ DESIGN AWARDS & PD

BDAQ/BEDI TRAINING Gympie Toowoomba Mackay Townsville

May 18-19 & 25-26 May 24-25 & June 1-2 June 6-7 & 29-30 June 8-9 & 27-28

BRISBANE CONVENTION CENTRE Awards Dinner PD

July 27 July 27-28

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ROADSHOWS AUTUMN March 12 - 16; 22-29 2012

SPRING October 10 - 12 ; 15 - 18; 24-25 2012

BRANCH MEETINGS Branches occasionally change meeting details. Please contact the branch if you are attending for the first time or haven’t attended for a while. Far North Queensland: 5.30pm first Monday each month Contact: Tony Lawson, Ph 07 4053 2058 Townsville: 12.00 noon first Tuesday each month Contact: Barry Switzer, Ph 07 4728 2339 Mackay: 6.00pm first Wednesday each month Contact: Naomi Otto, Ph 07 4954 8452 Central Queensland: 1.00pm second Wednesday, of these months: February, April, June, August and October Contact Rebecca Doak, Ph 0438 166 530

Sunshine Coast: second Wednesday each month Contact: Ian Gorton, Ph 07 5447 5394 Brisbane North: 6.00pm third Monday each month Contact: Peter Latemore, Ph 07 3356 9051 Brisbane South: 6.30pm third Tuesday each month Contact: Susan Hobbs, Ph 07 3376 0480 Ipswich: 5.30pm fourth Monday each month Contact: John Musters, Ph 07 3282 7004 South West: 6.30pm fourth Tuesday each month Contact: Russell Leicht, Ph 07 4630 8954 Gold Coast: 6.30pm last Wednesday each moth Contact Stuart Osman, Ph 5520 3022

Wide Bay: 2.30pm second Wednesday every third month Contact: Michael Russell, Ph 07 4123 3654

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The Building Designer Feb 2012