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THE

DESIGNER No. 161, June 2010

building designers association of queensland inc.

building designers association of the northern territory

r.r.p. $5.95


Honour State President 1990 - 1991 1991 - 1992 1992 - 1994 1994 - 1996 1996 - 1997 1997 - 1999 1999 - 2001 2001 - 2003 2003 - 2006 2006 - 2008 2008 -

Board

building designers’ association of queensland inc.

Chris Raymond Jim O’Leary Adrian Pooley Keith Ratcliffe Russell Meikle Russell Brandon Phillip Buchanan Peter Nelson Jeff Osman Max Slade Greg Pershouse

Life Member 1992 1992 1994 2000 2000 2008 2008 2009

Jim O’Leary John Hooker Adrian Pooley Jeff Osman Russell Brandon Glen Place Bert Priest Phillip Buchanan

Fellow 2009 2009

Stephen Kidd Chris Vandyke

Honorary Member 1999 1999 2003

Margaret Hooker Meryl Pooley Barb Priest

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Editor Russell Brandon

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EDITORIAL

Editorial Coordinator Kerrianne Sheppard Phone: 07 3889 9119

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COVER STORY

Advertising Enquiries Russell Brandon Phone: 07 3889 9119

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BDAQ - 3 days in July

Feature Writer Jess Hanrahan

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AUSTRALIAN GLASS & GLAZING ASSOCIATION

Swift house

Residential energy efficiency

Art & Design Jon Walsh Printer ABC Printing Publisher Building Designers’ Association of Queensland Inc. PO Box 651 STRATHPINE, QLD 4500 Phone: 07 3889 9119 Fax: 07 3205 1078 Email: admin@bdaq.com.au Web Site: www.bdaq.com.au

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EasyGas DownUnder TM

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NATIONAL CONFERENCE WRAPUP

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DESIGN FEATURE On the terrace

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Treasurer Ian Darnell Phone: 07 4661 3714 Email: darnell@nspire.com.au

CONSTRUCTION LAW 101 Hopgoodanim Lawyers explain the Building & Construction Industry Payments Act 2004

Vice President Colin Roe Phone: 07 3203 7045 Email: colinroe@bigpond.com Secretary Arthur Martin Phone: 07 4662 1403 Email: arthur@martindesign.com.au

DESIGN FEATURE McTamaney Residence

BDAQ EXECUTIVE President Greg Pershouse Phone: 07 4151 8350 Email: greg@designgp.com.au

ELGAS

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DESIGN FEATURE Saltwater House

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LAST WORD

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Northern Vice President Brad Owens Phone: 07 4772 4205 Email: bowe6163@bigpond.net.au Central Vice President Glen Place Phone: 07 4942 1316 Email: glen@placedesigns.com.au

SALTWATER HOUSE

Mid-coast Vice President Steve Claridge Phone: 07 5445 7434 Email: steve@claridge.net.au Southern Vice President Stuart Osman Phone: 07 5520 3022 Email: stuart@sobd.net Technical and Education Director Steve Gray Phone: 07 4124 0600 Email: hbdg@bigpond.net.au Executive Director Russell Brandon Phone: 07 3889 9119 Email: admin@bdaq.com.au

All information in this publication is provided in good faith but on the strict understanding that neither BDAQ nor the editor nor any other persons contributing to or involved in the

THE

DESIGNER No. 161, June 2010

r.r.p. $5.95

publication shall incur any liability whatsoever or howsoever arising (including but not limited to liability for negligent misstatement) in respect of such information and all liability arising either directly or indirectly as a

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consequence of the use or reliance upon any 95

advice, representations, statement, opinion or conclusion expressed in this publication is, to

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the extent permitted by law, expressly disclaimed. Copyright (c) 2010 Building Designers' Association Queensland Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved.

building designers association of queensland inc.

building designers association of the northern territory

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Cover: Swift House Alterations Latemore Design, p5

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The Building Designer No.161 June 2010

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E

very so often someone puts forward the notion that Queensland should adopt summer daylight saving time. This year we have had the other bright idea that we could split the state into two time zones for the summer. Presumably this is so that those who have great difficulty dealing with southern states in summer can instead experience problems dealing with businesses in Townsville or Cairns. Wikipedia has a map of where daylight saving time is adopted worldwide and this indicates that most of southern Asia, Africa and South America do not change clocks in summer. Interestingly, about half of these have tried daylight saving, decided it was a bad idea and didn't continue. In other words most of the world with a similar climate to Queensland does not like daylight saving. The reason is simple. It makes no sense in warmer climates in summer to take an hour away from the morning which is the cooler part of the day and then to add it to the afternoon when just about any outdoor activity is uncomfortably hot. If you need convincing take a drive (or better still walk) around Brisbane at 5.00am any summer morning and note the large number of people out getting their daily exercise.

Many lifestyle choices are, of course, very personal and there will be those in Queensland and elsewhere who would disagree with my view of daylight saving. What is surprising is that people with such definite ideas about how they seek to live their life will make the biggest lifestyle purchase of their life by selecting an “off the shelf” house design.

...most of the world with a similar climate to Queensland does not like daylight saving. After all, these days you can vary your working hours, but you are stuck with the house you have spent your life savings on. A building designer can create a home which is custom designed for a specific allotment to suit its own characteristics and climate features. A building designer can create an environment that is perfectly matched to the family who will occupy the home. This is how a better lifestyle is created. The internet is meant to make our lives easier and provide a whole range of information available. However, when a web site offers low cost, on-line house plans, the consumer should ask a couple of questions like:

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how does the designer intend to understand the site and its characteristics without seeing it”?

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how the designer will understand the living and lifestyle choices of the occupants without looking the client in the eye?

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how will the home itself fit into the local environment?

In Queensland the first thing consumers should look for when choosing a building designer is a Building Services Authority (BSA) licence number. Any building design work for any site in Queensland must be carried out by a licensed building designer, builder (only for a building to be built by the same builder) or registered architect. So if there is no licence or registration number quoted on the web site, the consumer may not have the same level of protection as that offered by dealing with a Building Services Authority licenced building designer. To select a building designer who is a member of the Building Designers Association of Queensland, consumers can now visit www.findabuildingdesigner.com.au Russell Brandon

For professional building design and documentation look for one or more of these logos when you choose your building designer MEMBER

CHARTERED MEMBER

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DESIGN FEATURE

SWIFT HOUSE ALTERATIONS Room to move

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DESIGN FEATURE

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The Building Designer No.161 June 2010

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DESIGN FEATURE

THE alteration of Swift House at Red Hill by Latemore Design called for an increase in living space with direct connection between bedroom zones and new living areas, as well as good access to the rear yard. Using a modest budget, the design involved opening up the living areas and establishing clearly defined zones, while retaining as much of the existing house as possible. An additional bedroom and bathroom were included and tall volumes over the kitchen and dining areas create a feeling of increased space. Low maintenance external cladding was used throughout; shadow clad grooved ply was used externally for its reduced upkeep properties and creates a style in itself. Engineered timber was also incorporated in the external facade, counterpointing with the existing weatherboards.

The new deck is well shaded from the western sun and close neighbours while stacking doors increase accessibility from the home, enhancing the indoor/outdoor connectivity. Optimal light and air ventilation were achieved through the use of unique voids and openings, also inviting the outdoors into the residence. Simple awnings were used to compliment the pavilion style with concealed steel frames in wall. Obscure glass and Crimsafe screening aid natural light within the home without compromising privacy. Breaks in the facade provide articulation and interest, as well as accentuating the join.

Peter Latemore Latemore Design 07 3356 9051 info@latemoredesign.com.au

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bdaq’s 3 big days in july thursday 29th july friday 30th july saturday 31st july

Building Designers Association of Queensland Inc.

8.00am technical committee breakfast 10.00am bdaq golf day 9.00am professional development seminar 6.30pm queensland building design awards presentation 9.00am pd study tour

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Thursday 29 July

BDAQ GOLF DAY

8.00am

Alabaster Room Victoria Park Golf Club

BDAQ Technical Committee hosts the state of the industry breakfast with a special guest speaker - all welcome

10.00am

Pro-shop Victoria Park Golf Club

Golf teams tee off for 4 ball ambrose competition golf buggies included

Friday 30th July

SEMINARS/AGM/DINNER

9.00am

Program SPONSORED BY Achieving 6 stars with traditional glazing, can it be done? Wade Bosse, Viridian Technical session sponsored by BlueScope Steel Morning Tea Design session sponsored by Karelcad Cleaning up your own backyard - better design Mitchell EcoEnterprise Park Bruce Mitchell

Room M3 & 4 Mezzanine Level Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre Merivale Street, Southbank (Please note this is NOT in the exhibition halls. Take the escalators at the southern end of the centre to the mezzanine level.)

12.30pm

BDAQ Annual General Meeting

includes lunch

1.45pm

Timber Queensland Seminar Queensland's New Building Regulations - How, when and where timber fits best Speakers Room M1 & 2 Rod McInnes Mezzanine Level CEO Timber Queensland Glen Brumby Brisbane Convention & Director, Building Codes Queensland Russell Brandon Exhibition Centre Executive Director, BDAQ Darryl O'Brien Certcon Merivale Street, Southbank Michael Chapman Delfin Lend Lease Colin MacKenzie Timber Queensland Hon Stirling Hinchliffe Minister for Infrastructure & Planning

6.30pm

Queensland Building Design Awards Gala Presentation Dinner 6.30pm pre-dinner drinks for Room M3&4 7.00pm dinner commencement Mezzanine Level Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre Merivale Street, Southbank 100

Saturday 31st July

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STUDY TOUR 75

9.00am

BDAQ Study Tour Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre Bus Bays Morning tea and lunch at the Eco Display Centre included Returning approx. 1.30pm

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Travel by coach to the Mitchell EcoEnterprise Park which is the only industrial estate of its kind in Australia. "Our aim is to boast a full carbon neutral footprint, the estate is the first and only industrial property in Australia to become an authorised EnviroDevelopment by the Urban Development Institute of Australia". The ten acre ‘eco-estate’ is located in the highly sought after Yatala Industrial Precinct. Various technologies and processes have been carefully considered and then implemented on Mitchell Enviro Industrial Estate to assist it in being self-sustainable and creating its unique nature.

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AUSTRALIAN GLASS AND GLAZING ASSOCIATION

Sustainable Window Alliance release new findings – glass critical to energy efficiency An 18-month independent study has concluded that in many areas of Australia typical Australian homes can achieve an increase of 2-2.5 stars of energy efficiency by simply changing from the worst-performing windows to the best-performing windows.

The study, conduc ted by the Sustainable Windows Alliance (SWA), follows lengthy and in-depth research into the impac t windows have on residential energy efficienc y. Launched mid-2008, the SWA is a joint initiative of the Australian Glass and Glazing Association and the Australian Window Association, work ing in par tnership with Sustainabilit y V ic toria. The projec t was initiated to investigate the economic and scientific basis for high per formance windows. Now, the industr y, armed with these fac ts, aims to raise communit y awareness, both within the building industr y and the general public. The SWA hopes to create more informed endconsumers, able to mak e more considered decisions about the construc tion or renovation of their homes, suppor ted by a local industr y capable of ser ving their needs. The technical study was conduc ted by building physicist and energy exper t Dr Peter Lyons using a methodology developed and agreed by a panel of leading buildings scientists within Australia and from abroad. The results provide the first collaborative resource of its k ind and clearly demonstrate the impac t of glazing and framing options on building energy efficienc y across a range of house designs and climate zones throughout Australia. “Currently there is a ver y low level of awareness of the role windows and glass play in building energy efficienc y. That k nowledge which does exist in the building industr y and broader communit y of ten ranges from inconsistent to outright misleading, but this study provides a common reference point to assist architec ts, builders, and consumers alik e to mak e better-informed decisions on the most appropriate window for their needs, ” says Lachlan Austin from the SWA steering committee.

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Applying passive solar design principles can provide fur ther improvement by up to 1 star.

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Different locations within Australia require different glazing solutions, and within that, even different orientations of the building benefit from different window solutions

Nigel Carpenter, Executive Direc tor of the AGGA says the study clearly shows that better per forming windows significantly reduces energy consumption for homeowners, and therefore provides the oppor tunit y for substantial savings on the household budget, and reduc tion in household carbon footprint. Windows have a long lifespan, work ing 24 hours a day, year in year out, without the need for any great human inter vention. As an investment for the comfor t and value of a home, they should rate far ahead of some discretionar y spends beloved by consumers such as benchtops, and door handles. Nigel proposes:“ Viewed against improved windows, these are dead assets, which ser ve only to date depreciate in value. In contrast, windows should be better categorised as investments in occupant comfor t, operating cost reduction, and a higher proper ty value at resale”. Copies of the study are now available through Nigel Carpenter at the AGGA. To obtain your copy, contact the AGGA on 03 99413130. Photo courtesy of G James 100 95 75

Key findings from the study

·

Moving from the worst-per forming windows to the best per forming windows can give a home an AccuR ate star increase of 2-2.5 stars;

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W E N

Cool

Cooler Coolmax™

Take the heat off cooling costs Compared to our own COLORBOND® steel and ZINCALUME® steel, new COLORBOND® Coolmax™ steel sets even higher standards in thermal efficiency. A roof made from new COLORBOND® Coolmax™ steel in Whitehaven™ could reduce the annual cooling energy costs of your building by up to 7.5%1 compared to COLORBOND® steel in Surfmist®, and it can payback your initial investment premium within 5 years2. For an understanding of the possible savings on your particular building or for more information, visit colorbond.com/coolmax or call 1800 022 999.

WIN $20,000*. What’s your cool idea? In 25 words or less share your cool idea for creating a more thermally efficient workplace. Any architect, building designer or specifier resident in Australia can enter at colorbond.com/coolmax

1. COLORBOND® Coolmax™ steel in Whitehaven™ has a 9% higher solar reflectance than COLORBOND® steel in Surfmist®. Based on independent roof studies of the solar reflectance of roofing contained in a report by the US Environmental Protection Agency (http://www.epa.gov/hiri/resources/compendium.htm), we calculate this difference could result in cooling energy savings of up to 7.5%. Savings will vary and depend upon the level of insulation, location of air-conditioning ducts, building shape and function. 2. Based on expectation for a daytime occupied and air-conditioned single storey commercial building in BCA Climate Zone 2. COLORBOND®, ZINCALUME®, Surfmist® and BlueScope are registered trade marks and Coolmax™ and Whitehaven™ are trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. © 2010 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved. Promotion commences 22/4/2010 and closes 5pm AEDST on 30/11/2010. *For full terms and conditions of this promotion visit colorbond.com/coolmax TBD32632D


ELGAS

EasyGas DownUnder™ wins Australian International Elgas has been named as a 2010 winner of the prestigious Australian International Design Award in the building and Housing category for its revolutionary underground LPG underground storage system, EasyGas DownUnder™. The underground LPG storage system was designed by Elgas and further cements the company's reputation for design excellence. Elgas also won a 2009 Australian International Design Award, for it's SWAP'n'GO GREEN® product. The simplicity of EasyGas DownUnder™ appealed to the panel of international judges who came from New York, Seattle, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Japan and Australia. “Why hasn't this been done before? This is a simple idea with an endless array of benefits.” the judges commented. The EasyGas DownUnder™ system is the first and only residential underground storage system for LPG in Australia. It cleverly solves environmental issues, enhances the aesthetics of landscapes, improves safety, offers extraordinarily practical convenience and – like SWAP'n'GO GREEN® – targets a gap in the LPG marketplace. Lewis Nottidge, the Elgas EasyGas DownUnder™ Project Leader, said he was honoured to have won the award. “This underground storage system for LPG may be a simple concept but it had many technical challenges to overcome before we could explore its far reaching advantages,” Mr Nottidge said.

The environmental benefits were also a consideration in design. The EasyGas DownUnder™ unit uses recycled materials and has an added advantage of providing end-oflife recycling. LPG is also a more environmentally friendly fuel that emits lower greenhouse gases and offers an excellent alternative to coal-generated electricity in areas without reticulated gas. “As a company Elgas has always been focused on its customers. We constantly look for solutions to the difficulties they face with gas storage and appliances,” Mr Nottidge said. “EasyGas Downunder™ is an example of how through understanding the challenges of our LPG users, we have been able to explore and implement a practical and innovative solution to gas storage that could benefit all Australians.”

“The Elgas team has never been shy of taking on a challenge and this attitude led to the creation of an underground system that surpasses every safety standard and is suitable for residential and commercial properties.” Because EasyGas DownUnder™ is concealed underground, it saves on valuable yard space and, with its fire resistant lid, offers enhanced safety. The cylinder is be placed in front yards, so that it is easy to refill from a delivery tanker. “Even zero lot line buildings with no side or backyard access, such as multi-unit homes and commercial structures can now be serviced with LPG,” Mr Nottidge said. “Access problems like locked gates and unfriendly pets are eliminated making it easy for scheduled tanker deliveries to occur without any problems.”

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DESIGN FEATURE

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Located at Sunshine Beach is the

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sensational beachfront dream home, McTamaney Residence, beautifully renovated by Kidd + Co Designers.

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DESIGN FEATURE

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DESIGN FEATURE

Stephen Kidd 07 5447 5633

Kidd + co Designers info@kiddco.com.au

McTamaney Residence

The existing house was constructed in the 1980's and was substantial in size but lacked good planning and did not take advantage of the fabulous location. The design concept involved maximising the sweeping views on offer as well as updating and expanding the home to create the ideal modern holiday house. The most significant change was the addition of a new master bedroom suite to the top level, extending out to a new roof terrace which previously was an inaccessible concrete slab with upstand beams. The result is a luxurious and spacious retreat with panoramic views providing the perfect backdrop to the pristine sanctuary within. A revamp of the lower floor enabled a double garage, maid's quarters, laundry, living room and games room to be incorporated into an existing space which previously contained a study and car parking. With the eastern facade of the main floor level demolished, new concrete beam portal and frameless glass stacking doors maximise the views available. A number of existing masonry walls were also removed to achieve a large, open planned kitchen, living and dining area.

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A one metre wide “Juliette� deck achieves a terrific extension of the living to the outdoors and an outdoor entertainment area was incorporated to the eastern facade with spectacular ocean views.

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NATIONAL CONFERENCE

2010

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

THE 2010 National Conference at Twin Waters was a huge success. A big thanks to those who attended and participated – you all contributed to a thoroughly enjoyable and informative time on the Sunshine Coast. With keynote speakers Professor Ian Lowe and Simon Divecha setting the tone for the conference, additional presentations from our sponsors and fantastic speakers including Dick Clarke, Cam Leitch, Darryl O'Brien, Sidonie Carpenter, Jim Burgess, Neon Abbato and Patsy Rowe ensured there was something for everybody and really brought the Rain, Wind and Fire issues back home to building design. It was also great to see so many partners and families come along and enjoy the events with us. One of the major highlights of the conference was the National Design Awards Gala Dinner; jampacked with first class entertainment, great food and terrific company, it was definitely a night to be remembered.

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The Building Designer No.161 June 2010

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NATIONAL CONFERENCE

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DESIGN FEATURE

ON

THE

TERRACE

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DESIGN FEATURE

SUBTROPICAL OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE The vibrant and visually exciting On the Terrace, by Andrew McKellar Design is a mixed-use, multi-residential unit complex on the riverfront in Noosaville featuring a ground level retail and eatery component as well as ten three bedroom apartments. With two separated blocks of apartments, the development features a raised central podium accommodating the large communal pool and barbeque facilities. Block One is made up of six apartments spread over the top two levels. The three uppermost of these feature rooftop terraces including spas and barbeques. The pleasantly landscaped central pool area is overlooked by the balconies of the rear units of Block

Two, and is comprised of four apartments with the top two featuring roof terraces. These units also benefit from secure direct lift access from the carpark below. The design incorporates generous outdoor living areas with all apartments opening onto deep balconies from the living spaces and bedrooms. These areas ensure the enjoyment of an outdoor subtropical lifestyle for all occupants. Shop fronts are set well back from the street creating a public space for outdoor dining and pedestrian browsing. This forecourt is fronted with an undulating facade, obliquely referencing the river meandering alongside. Soft landscaping completes the scene.

Galvanised steel awning elements front each shop giving a stall-like outdoor space for display of merchandise. The cafĂŠ features an outdoor dining area covered by this galvanised steel awning including an operable louvre roof to allow access for sunlight in the colder climate. Simple legible construction and detailing reflect the coastal context with the angled rooflines and graphic facade affording the building its individuality and appeal.

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ON

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TERRACE

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DESIGN FEATURE

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Andrew McKellar Andrew McKellar Design 07 5449 9066 amacdesign@ozemail.com.au

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CONSTRUCTION LAW 101

Construction Law 101: The Building & Construction Industry Payments Act 2004 By Jon Erbacher, HopgoodGanim Lawyers

Since its introduction in 2004, the Building & Construction Industry Payments Act (Qld) 2004, known as the BCIPA, has dramatically changed the landscape of the construction industry. Those aware of the BCIPA and its benefits have found it a useful tool to recover payment for outstanding debts. The BCIPA enables eligible claimants to recover progress payments based on a statutory entitlement. However, those who wish to issue a payment claim under the BCIPA need to meet the strict timeframe and process requirements set out in the legislation. Making a claim under the BCIPA Eligible claimants can issue a payment claim under the BCIPA if they are entitled to receive progress payments for construction work or related goods and services performed under a construction contract. The BCIPA applies to written or oral construction contracts. However, it does not apply to all contracts, with some of the exemptions including:

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Loan agreements, guarantees and insurance policies

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Domestic building work contracts performed for resident owners

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Employment contracts for construction work

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Work performed outside Queensland

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Contracts entered into before 1 July 2004

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Any construction contract where the amount paid for the construction work is calculated other than by the value of the work carried out or the services supplied

In addition to contracts for construction work, the BCIPA applies specifically to “related goods and services”, which include:

· ·

The main steps in the recovery process under the BCIPA are as follows:

FLOOR PLAN

Supply and hire contracts Labour hire or supply contracts

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Architectural, design, surveying or quantity surveying services

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Engineering, decoration and landscape advisory services

Although there are some restrictions on the type of contracts to which the BCIPA applies, it does encompass a wide range of contracts not traditionally considered to be construction contracts. The services provided by building designers are related services, and the BCIPA therefore applies. Claimants have successfully recovered progress payments under the BCIPA for construction work and related goods and services such as architectural services, design services and consulting services. The BCIPA aims to level the playing field in the construction industry by introducing legislation that is favourable to claimants seeking payment for construction work. The BCIPA:

·

The recovery process

creates a statutory right to suspend work if payment is not received by the due date by giving two business days notice;

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outlaws “pay when paid” and “pay if paid” provisions;

·

prohibits contracting out of the BCIPA; and

·

acts as an alternative to the Subcontractors' Charges Act for subcontractors.

1. The claimant issues a payment claim

Claimants must comply with all the requirements under the BCIPA to issue a valid payment claim. Preparing and issuing a payment claim is a critical step in the recovery process.

2. The respondent pays the claim or issues a payment schedule Within 10 business days of receiving the payment claim, the respondent can either pay the amount due or issue a payment schedule setting out the amount (if any) they propose to pay. If the respondent chooses the second option, they need to set out the reasons why they think the claimant is not entitled to the full payment. Respondents should note that the contract may alter the 10 business day limit to a shorter timeframe. 3. If the respondent doesn't pay the claim or issue a payment schedule, the claimant can choose court or adjudication If the respondent doesn't pay the claim or issue a payment schedule, the claimant may choose to take one of the following courses of action: a. Court: In the event that the respondent doesn't submit a payment schedule in response to a payment claim within 10 business days, the claimant can apply for judgement in an appropriate Court. In these circumstances, the respondent will not be entitled to raise any defence arising under the construction contract.

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CONSTRUCTION LAW 101

b. Adjudication: Alternatively, the claimant can issue the respondent with a notice of their intention to proceed to adjudication within 20 business days from the due date for payment. 4. If the respondent issues a payment schedule which the claimant disputes, the claimant can lodge an adjudication application

respondent needs to pay the claimant within 10 business days of receiving the adjudication response.

If the claimant lodges an adjudication application, the respondent will need to respond to this within five business days of receiving the application (or two business days after the adjudicator accepts the application whichever is later).

Although any decision made by the adjudicator will be an interim measure, the BCIPA gives claimants the opportunity to quickly and cheaply recover payment where the construction contract may not otherwise give them the same opportunity.

6. Once the respondent serves an adjudication response, the adjudicator makes a determination

For more information about the Building & Construction Industry Payments Act (Qld) 2004, please contact HopgoodGanim's Construction, Infrastructure and Major Projects team.

The adjudicator will make a determination of the amount the

The contents of this paper are not intended to be a complete statement of the law on any subject and should not be used as a substitute for legal advice in specific fact situations. HopgoodGanim cannot accept any liability or responsibility for loss occurring as a result of anyone acting or refraining from acting in reliance on any material contained in this paper.

Timeline - business days (excludes Saturdays, Sundaysm public holidays and 27 - 31 December)

If the respondent issues a payment schedule but the claimant disputes the amount that the respondent has proposed to pay, the claimant can lodge an adjudication application within 10 business days of receiving the payment schedule

5. If the claimant lodges an adjudication application, the respondent needs to serve an adjudication response

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Helping build your future 25

77 Barolin Street, Bundaberg Ph (07) 4150 1500 Fax (07) 4151 5650 The Building Designer No.161 June 2010 PO Box 1115 Bundaberg, QLD, AUST 4670

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DESIGN FEATURE

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DESIGN FEATURE

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LANDSCAPE LIGHTING CREATES THE ILLUSION OF THE ENTIRE MAIN LIVING PAVILION FLOATING ON WATER.

altwater House by Chris Clout

Design, located at Noosa Waters, is an extraordinary structure featuring every possible luxury wrapped into a family friendly and comfortable residence.

With a Japanese style and Asian resort persona, the home is comprised of four self-contained bedrooms, each with a unique style and character, as well as a guest suite at ground level. Inside the living area, gloss-polished spotted gum flooring, Indonesian ply panelled ceiling, and a feature wall of metallic bluestone-look porcelain tiles enhance the Asian sensibility. Giant glass sliding doors open completely to draw in the poolside terrace, and inside a lava stone feature wall and full size palm trees blur the boundaries between indoors and out. Curved formed concrete columns wrap the internal palm trees, separating the kitchen from the entry and draw the eye through the main living area to the canal on the other side. The features of the home come alive at night, where landscape lighting creates the illusion of the entire main living pavilion floating on water. Indonesian marble and plywood features ensure durable surfaces while retaining the Asian expression throughout and Shoji screen sliding doors with custom-made handles hide the ensuite to the master bedroom. Shoji-style awning windows in bedroom two also underscore the Japanese style.

The use of water maximises the open space and gives the sense of being on a boat. The upper floor emphasises this with a large porthole overlooking the canal. A timber bridge with bolted-on glass sides over the dining area and stainless steel angled railings.

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The volume of the central living space is doubled by a void over the kitchen, entry and dining areas and door handles to all interior doors are custom designed from ceiling ply offcuts and stainless steel handrails, presenting a distinctly artistic Asian aesthetic.

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DESIGN FEATURE

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Chris Clout Chris Clout Design 07 5474 8107 info@chriscloutdesign.com.au

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LAST WORD

Abraham Lincoln is reported as saying; “You can fool some of the people all the time and all the people some of the time; but you can't fool all the people all the time.” Some people try. I was once told by a southern sustainable design guru that, “you Queenslanders are a bunch of rednecks who don't understand a thing about sustainability and don't care about climate change”. Well, now it's official! Queenslanders and Northern Territorians can hold their heads high and the rest need to lift their game. The Australian Conservation Foundation has released its 2010 Sustainable Cities Index which “tracks the progress on sustainability in Australia's 20 largest cities” against fifteen different performance indicators under the broad headings of “Environmental Performance; Quality of Life; and Resilience”.

Australia's most sustainable city is Darwin with Sunshine Coast, Brisbane and Townsville coming in two, three and four respectively. In fact six out of the top ten performers are located in Queensland and Northern Territory. Of the other capitals, Canberra came in fifth, Melbourne was seventh, Sydney twelfth, Adelaide fourteenth and Perth twentieth. Townsville topped the Quality of Life table, Canberra was the most Resilient but when it came to Environmental Performance, Brisbane and Sunshine Coast came in equal best in the environmental indicators which include air quality, ecological footprint, green building, water and biodiversity. Not a bad performance for a “bunch of rednecks”.

Designers Get Sustainable Edge Construction Skills Queensland and the Building Designers Association of Queensland have joined forces to ensure that building designers and students, who will be future building designers, in regional Queensland are equipped to take a leading role in the move towards a more sustainable future through better building design. With funding assistance from Construction Skills Queensland, BDAQ has delivered Building Sustainability Seminars under its Endorsed Sustainable Building Designer program in Townsville, Mackay and Gympie. A capacity attendance of 60 participated in the three series of four day workshops which included modules on: ·

Thermal Performance

·

Energy Services

·

Water Management

·

Materials and Waste

The program, based on materials initially developed for the Australian Government, aims to raise the knowledge levels and design skills of participants in the area of sustainable building design. Consumers seeking sustainable building design will recognise BDAQ endorsed sustainable building designers by looking for the ESBD logo. BDAQ is planning a similar program in more parts of regional Queensland in the next twelve months. 100 95 75

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The Building Designer No.161 June 2010

June10_030 Wednesday, 30 June 2010 11:39:24 AM


Win your share of $45,000 Weathertex 2010 Design Awards – for the most innovative use of Weathertex products in residential, non-residential and sustainability designs. The awards will be judged on the best design solution submitted from each of three categories: s¬ Best use of Weathertex, Residential design

s¬ Best use of Weathertex, Non-Residential design

s¬ Best use of Weathertex, Sustainablity design

Design projects can include renovations, extensions or new projects – any project that has been completed in the last 24 months.

First prize in each category WINS $10,000 cash Runners-up receive $5,000 cash

6 snaps or more to go in to the draw! (write us a little story too!)

You’re already a winner for building with Weathertex! Good luck! Enter online at: www.weathertex.com.au/2010designawards Entries close on Saturday 31 July 2010 at 5.00pm AEST * Terms and Conditions Apply. See website for details.


BDA EVENTS CALENDAR 2010 BDA NATIONAL CONFERENCE SUNSHINE COAST

BDAQ DESIGN AWARDS WEEKEND

TWIN WATERS RESORT, May 6-8 2010

Golf Day July 29 Awards Dinner July 30 Professional Development July 30

ENDORSED SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGNER PROGRAM

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ROADSHOW

MACKAY May 21 - 22, 28 - 29 GYMPIE June 18 - 19, 25 - 26

Darwin Cairns Townsville Mackay Rockhampton

October 09 October 11 October 12 October 13 October 14

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

Brisbane Gold Coast Toowoomba Sunshine Coast Bundaberg

October 18 October 19 October 20 October 21 October 22

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

BRANCH MEETINGS Branches occasionally change meeting details. Please contact the branch if you are attending for the first time or haven’t attended for a while Far North Queensland: 5.30pm first Monday each month Contact: Rod Butland Ph 07 4051 9722

BDAQ online store now open!

Townsville: 12.00 noon first Tuesday each month Contact: Mark Hall Ph 07 4772 4626 Mackay: 6.00pm first Wednesday each month Contact: Naomi Otto Ph 07 4954 8452 Central Queensland: 5.30pm Second Wednesday, of these months: February, April, June, August & October Contact: Carolyn Ramsay Ph 07 4978 3171 Wide Bay: 2.30pm Second Wednesday of every third month Contact: Mark Alderton Ph 07 4157 7897 Sunshine Coast: 6.00pm second Wednesday each month Contact: Ian Gorton Ph 07 5447 5394 Brisbane North: 6.00pm third Monday each month Contact: Peter Latemore Ph 07 3356 9051 Brisbane South: 6.30pm third Tuesday of each month Contact: John Stones Ph 0449 132 821

100

Ipswich: 5.30pm Fourth Monday of each month Contact: John Musters Ph 07 3282 7004 South West: 6.30pm fourth Tuesday each month Contact: Bob Steger Ph 07 4638 4766 Gold Coast: 6.30pm last Wednesday of each month Contact: Stuart Osman Ph 07 5520 3022

June10_032 Thursday, 8 July 2010 10:27:47 AM

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Just go to www.bdaq.com.au and click on the PURCHASE PRODUCTS button.

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The Building Designer  

Issue No 161. Featuring BDAQ design award entrants and winners from 2010

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