Page 1

City of Houston

Disaster Recovery Round 2 Design Guidebook


Special Acknowledgement to: Horne Limited Liability Partnership City of Houston Housing and Community Development


Contents 02

DR2 Background

04

Project Approach

06

City Context

08

Neighborhood Context Fifth Ward Near Northside Old Spanish Trail / Griggs Acres Homes Independence Heights Sunnyside

68

Design Parameters


Background Hurricane IKE & Disaster Recovery Round 2 [DR2] In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on the upper Texas coast, causing more than $3 billion in damages to single family housing across the Houston metropolitan region. Many low-income homeowners impacted by the storm have not yet been able to repair or replace their homes due to limited financial resources. In response, the Texas General Land Office (GLO) granted $152 million to the City of Houston’s Housing and Community Development Department (HCDD) to administer Round 2 of the city’s Disaster Recovery Program (DR2). Investment will provide relief to affected homeowners while creating areas of opportunity where neighborhood revitalization and recovery can occur. HCDD, through an extensive analysis of Houston’s social and physical conditions, identified six target neighborhoods as high opportunity areas. These Community Revitalization Areas (CRA) and CRA Outreach Areas will collectively receive up to 400 newly designed and constructed homes as part of the DR2 program. (Disaster Recovery - Round 2 Market Analysis/Area Selection, Page 11)

2


Hurricane Ike Storm Damage, Houston Texas 3


Approach Problem Statement The design team, led by bcWORKSHOP and supported by Gulf Coast Community Design Studio, Unabridged Architecture, and the University of Houston Community Design Resource Center, is working to deliver single family DR2 infill home designs. These designs will be used in constructing homes across the six CRA & Outreach Areas. The team is committed to delivering high-quality cost-effective sustainable designs that respect the communities interests and character while offering individual homeowner choice. In order to achieve this, the design team has developed an engagement process involving neighborhood residents, community leaders, and local design architects.

4


2013 2014

Ap pr ov al

1

Pr og ra m

Pr og ra m

Ap pl ica tio

n

R

Community Workshop February 1

LA DT Schematic Design

2

Engagement Process Engagement is an essential part of the DR2 design process. The Community Workshop (1) and Gallery Show (2) are opportunities garnering and share neighborhood and project information with community stakeholders, clients, and designers to garner community interest and input. The diagram, at right, illustrates the process from program application through resident move-in. The Community Workshop (1) will: Set contextual and programmatic design preferences for CRA & Outreach Areas, and Inform schematic home design, including floor plans and elevations. The Gallery Show (2) will: Exhibit schematic designs developed directly from community input; and Ask CRA & Outreach Areas to select their preferred designs for further development and inclusion in the DR2 program.

R LA DT

Construction Documents

LA

March April Home Design Selection Spring Summer Construction

Residents / DR2 Applicants

Home Move In

Local Design Architects Design Team

Gallery Show February 27

DT

R

Resident / Local Design Architect Event

5


City Context CRAs and Outreach Areas In order to maximize the impact and amount of community revitalization as a result of the Round 2 funding, the City of Houston Housing and Community Development Department (HCDD), the Houston Housing Authority (HHA), and stakeholder groups identified six areas of high investment opportunity. The six areas are divided into Community Revitailization Areas (CRAs), or primary investment areas, and CRA Outreach Areas, or secondary investment areas. Although common themes exist between communities, each area has its own unique history, social dynamics, and physical context. Areas include: Community Revitalization Areas (CRA) Near Northside or Northside Village (N) Greater Fifth Ward (F) Old Spanish Trail/South Union (OS) CRA Outreach Areas Acres Homes (A) Independence Heights (I) Sunnyside (S)

6


A

I N F

OS S

7


White Hispanic African American

Vacant Renter Owner

HOME OWNERSHIP

RACE

Acres Homes

Divorced Widowed Separated Married Single MARITAL STATUS

18%

Old Moderate New

34%

Lower Middle Upper

00

90 19

80 19

70

53%

19

60 19

19

50

29%

20

Neighborhood Overview

AGE OF HOUSING STOCK

S Co om lle e ge

H Sc igh ho ol

C Gr olle ad ge

36%

Gr ad

h

30% S Sc om ho e H ol ig

Acres Homes was once considered the South’s largest unincorporated African American community. First platted by the Wright Land Company in 1917, undeveloped lots were sold by the acre, which is how the area derived its name. The rural homesites were inexpensive and afforded low taxes. They were sized to allow small gardens, farm animals, and had no building codes. Despite resident’s efforts to develop infrastructure, the settlement was unable to maintain itself, due to poverty. In the early 1970’s Acres Homes was annexed into the City of Houston, with city water and sewer services planned for the area. When annexed, Acres Homes was a 12½-square-mile, heavily wooded, dispersed settlement without transportation or educational facilities. While 90% of residents were homeowners, much of the housing was in substandard condition at that time. By the 1980’s, the community had become a sprawling working-class neighborhood of well-kept, brick and wood frame homes interspersed with abandoned cottages.

MALE

FEMALE

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Poverty Level

Family Median Income

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

8

0 5, 00 $7

0 0, 00 $5

0 5, 00 $3

0 5, 00 $2

0 00 5,

$1

$1

0, 00 0

Lower Middle Upper


I N F Acres Homes

A

OS S

9


10

Building Footprint

Residential

Commercial

Public Institutions

Homes Damaged by Ike

DR2 Applicants

Schools

Transportation & Utilities

Major Arterials

Metro Routes

100 - 500 Year Flood Plain

Acres Homes


L

RIA MO ME N’S RA TE

Acres Homes VE

SHEPHERD

TE WHI

U AYO B OAK

PINEMOUNT

11


2

4

1 3

12

1

Driveway condition: side yard, paved and unpaved

5

Entrance sequence: bridge connections to street

2

Cladding: wood siding, various applications

6

Stormwater: open system, ditch in public right of way

3

Sidewalk condition: no curb, gutter, or sidewalks

7

Foundation: typically pier and beam

4

Carport: occasionally seen, metal or wood coverings

8

Vegetation: mature trees


Acres Homes

8 2

5

7 1

6

| Burg Street Acre HomesBurg Street Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Home Size: 672 - 2,411 SF

13


2 2

4

1 3

14

1

Driveway condition: side yard and front yard, paved

5

Entrance sequence: driveways used as pedestrian path

2

Cladding: brick and wood siding, various applications

6

Stormwater: closed system

3

Sidewalk condition: curb and gutter, no sidewalks

7

Foundation: slab on grade

4

Garage: front, some garages enclosed for living space

8

Porch condition: semi-private, front stoops


Acres Homes 8

2

7 5 6 Acre Homes Diplomat DiplomatStreet Way

Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Home Size: 672 - 2,411 SF

15


Acres Homes Typical Lot Size Typical Lot Dimensions: 55’ x 104’ Typical Lot Area: 5720 sqft Minimum Lot Width: 45’ Minimum Lot Length: 104’ Maximum Lot Width: 70’ Maximum Lot Length: 317’

Typical Front Setback: 25’

16

Right of Way: Street Curb, Sidewalk, and Storm Drainage Ditch


Notes.

17

Acres Homes


Independence Heights

HOME OWNERSHIP

RACE FEMALE

MALE Divorced Widowed Separated Married Single

MARITAL STATUS

Neighborhood Overview

80 19 9 20 0 00

Old Moderate New

19

70

20% 7%

19

60 19

50

73% 19

AGE OF HOUSING STOCK

H Sc igh ho ol

S Co om lle e ge

Gr ad

44%

20%

Lower Middle Upper

C Gr olle ad ge

36% S Sc om ho e H ol ig h

Developed by Wright Land Company, Independence Heights became the first African American municipality in Texas. The company began selling 25-foot lots in 1908 to middle-class black residents who moved from other areas of the city. It became an incorporated city in 1915. Houses were designed by the new residents and constructed by local African American builders. These homes had electric lights, water, shell streets, plank sidewalks, and were heated by natural gas. The population grew from around 400 in 1915 to more than 3,500 in 1929. The City of Houston formally annexed Independence Heights in December of 1929. Prior to annexation, the City of Independence Heights had a municipally owned water source, electric lights, several churches, and about 40 black-owned businesses. These included grocery stores, restaurants, a railroad terminal, a lumber company, and the Lincoln Theater, the only black theater in Houston at the time. A rail line used for public transportation ran a loop through Independence Heights. Despite annexation, investments that were supposed to bring improvements to the area, were never realized due to the Stock Market Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression.

Vacant Renter Owner

White Hispanic African American

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Poverty Level

Family Median Income

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

18

0 5, 00 $7

0 0, 00 $5

0 00 5, $3

0 5, 00 $2

0 00 5, $1

$1

0, 00 0

Lower Middle Upper


I N F

OS S

Independence AcresHeights Homes

A

19


20

Building Footprint

Residential

Commercial

Public Institutions

Homes Damaged by Ike

DR2 Applicants

Schools

Transportation & Utilities

Major Arterials

Metro Routes

100 - 500 Year Flood Plain

Independence Heights


TE STA ER

INT

Independence AcresHeights Homes

TIDWELL

-45

610

21


8 6 1

22

1

Vacant lot: scattered throughout neighborhood

5

Entrance sequence: driveway connections to street

2

Cladding: wood siding, pops of color

6

Vegetation: mature trees

3

Privacy: metal fences enclose site

7

Foundation: typically pier and beam

4

Carport: rear yard, metal or wood coverings

8

Porch condition: partially enclosed, front stoops


Independence AcresHeights Homes

6

2

3

4

7

Delhi Street Independence Heights Dehli Street Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Home Size: 976 - 21,410 SF

23


4 2

1

5 3

24

1

Driveway condition: side yard, paved and unpaved

5

Entrance sequence: driveway and pathways

2

Cladding: wood and brick siding, various trim details

6

Stormwater: open system, ditch in public right of way

3

Sidewalk condition: no curb, gutter, or sidewalks

7

Porches: space for gathering, front stoops

4

Garages and carports: rear yard, additional storage

8

Yard conditions: typically fenced, well maintained


Independence AcresHeights Homes

7

2

4 8

6

5

Independence Heights Delhi Street Dehli Street Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Home Size: 976 - 21,410 SF

25


Independence Heights Typical Lot Size Typical Lot Dimensions: 55’ x 104’ Typical Lot Area: 5720 sqft Minimum Lot Width: 45’ Minimum Lot Length: 104’ Maximum Lot Width: 70’ Maximum Lot Length: 317’

Typical Front Setback: 25’

26

Right of Way: Street Curb, Sidewalk, and Storm Drainage Ditch


Notes.

27

Independence AcresHeights Homes


White Hispanic African American

Vacant Renter Owner HOME OWNERSHIP

RACE FEMALE

Near Northside MARITAL STATUS

Neighborhood Overview

70 19 8 19 0 9 20 0 00

Old Moderate New

19

60

19

19

50

40

80% 11% 9% 19

AGE OF HOUSING STOCK

24%

Lower Middle Upper

C Gr olle ad ge

Gr ad H Sc igh ho ol

S Sc om ho e H ol ig

28% S Co om lle e ge

48% h

Near Northside, also known as Northside Village, was originally developed in the 1890’s and was once part of the Fifth Ward. In the early 1900’s, the area was predominantly occupied by people of European descent who worked at the nearby Southern Pacific Hardy Rail Yard. Houston was a rail town at the time, boasting more railroad traffic than any city south of St. Louis. The Northside expanded with the Ryon Addition in the 1910’s, The Irvington Addition in the 1920’s and Lindale Park in 1930’s. After World War II, as railroad traffic declined, the population changed with increased HIspanic population. The original street grid still remains, with commercial structures facing the major thoroughfares and rows of one-story houses on more residential scaled streets.

MALE Divorced Widowed Separated Married Single

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Poverty Level

Family Median Income

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

28

0 $7

5,

00

0 $5

0,

00

0 $3

5,

00

0 5, 00 $2

0 00 5,

$1

$1

0, 00 0

Lower Middle Upper


I N F Near Acres Northside Homes

A

OS S

29


30

Building Footprint

Residential

Commercial

Public Institutions

Homes Damaged by Ike

DR2 Applicants

Schools

Transportation & Utilities

Major Arterials

Metro Routes

100 - 500 Year Flood Plain

Near Northside


Near Acres Northside Homes

610 + HARDY TOLL

ELYSIAN VIADUCT

-45 STATE INTER

WHITE OAK + BUFFALO BAYOU CONNECTION

31


7 3

3 6 4

1

32

1

Driveway: side yard, paved and unpaved

5

Porch: open, gracious spaces, room for furniture

2

Cladding: wood siding, pops of color

6

Garage and back houses: rear structure

3

Rafter detail: exposed tails, various detailing

7

Roof vent: gable vents

4

Porch detail: exposed beams, various column details

8

Stormwater: open system, ditch in public right of way


Near Acres Northside Homes

7

2 5

4

8 Century Road Program: 2-5 bedroom 1-3 bath Home Size: 951 - 3,042 SF

33


1 2 4

3

34

1

Rafter: kickers supporting fly rafter

5

Front and side yard: narrow setbacks, dense lots

2

Cladding: wood and brick veneer

6

Vegetation: mature trees

3

Privacy: metal fences enclose site

7

Foundation: pier and beam

4

Garage and carport: side and rear yard

8

Porch: somewhat enclosed, dropped beams

8


Near Acres Northside Homes

6 8 2

1

4

7 5

Century Road Program: 2-5 bedroom 1-3 bath

Gentry Road Near Northside Home Size: 951 - 3,042 SF

35


Near Northside Typical Lot Size Typical Lot Dimensions: 50’ x 100’ Typical Lot Area: 5000 sqft Minimum Lot Width: 30’ Minimum Lot Length: 100’ Maximum Lot Width: 50’ Maximum Lot Length: 125’ Typical Front Setback: 25’ Right of Way: Street Curb and Sidewalk 36


Notes.

37

Near Acres Northside Homes


White Hispanic African American

Vacant Renter Owner

HOME OWNERSHIP

RACE FEMALE

Fifth Ward

16%

Old Moderate New

23%

Lower Middle Upper

19 8 19 0 90 20 00

70 19

19

50 19

60

72% 12% 40

AGE OF HOUSING STOCK

46%

31% S Co om lle e ge Co Gr lle ad ge

H Sc igh ho ol G

S Sc om ho e H ol ig

ra d

h

After the American Civil War, newly freed slaves began settling the area today known as Northside and Greater Fifth Ward. In 1866, the City of Houston christened the area the Fifth Ward or “The Nickel” as it came to be nicknamed. By 1870 the population was 50% African American and 50% white residents. By the mid-1880’s, Fifth Ward became home to a nearly all African American working class community. In the 1930’s, the neighborhood was described as “one of the proudest black neighborhoods” in the United States. Black-owned and operated businesses flourished within the community until the 1950’s. In the 1970’s and 1980’s the Fifth Ward became notorious throughout Houston for the violence perpetrated in the community. Since the 1990’s, however, Fifth Ward has undergone multiple revitalization efforts by community organizations.

MARITAL STATUS

19

Neighborhood Overview

MALE Divorced Widowed Separated Married Single

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Poverty Level

Family Median Income

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

38

0 5, 00

0 $7

00 0, $5

$3

5, 00

0

0 00 5, $2

0 00 5, $1

$1

0, 00 0

Lower Middle Upper


I N F Near Fifth Northside Ward

A

OS S

39


40

Building Footprint

Residential

Commercial

Public Institutions

Homes Damaged by Ike

DR2 Applicants

Schools

Transportation & Utilities

Major Arterials

Metro Routes

100 - 500 Year Flood Plain

Fifth Ward


U

D

WO O

ELYSIAN VIADUCT

BUFFAL O BAYO

LO CK

Near Fifth Northside Ward

COLLINGSWORTH

41


4

2

3 1

42

1

Driveway: side yard, paved

5

Entry Sequence: paved sidewalks to front doors

2

Cladding: wood siding, various applications

6

Sidewalk condition: curb, gutter, and sidewalks

3

Cladding Application: chair rail datum, varying sizes

7

Foundation: pier and beam

4

Roof: minimal overhang and sun protection

8

Garage: rear yard, detached

5


Near Fifth Northside Ward 8 3

7 6

Providence Street Fifth Ward Providence Str

Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Home Size: 768 - 1,704 SF

43


2

4

1

44

1

Driveway condition: front yard, unpaved, curbcuts

5

Porch Details: brick, wood, and metal columns

2

Gable vent: prevalent

6

Window Trim: painted trim board

3

Cladding: wood clapboard

7

Foundation: pier and beam

4

Typology: repetition of home forms, shotgun style

8

Roof: minimal overhang and sun protection

5


Near Fifth Northside Ward 8 6 3 7

Providence Street Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath

Providence Fifth WardHome Size: 768 - Street 1,704 SF

45


Fifth Ward Typical Lot Size Typical Lot Dimensions: 50’ x 100’ Typical Lot Area: 5000 sqft Minimum Lot Width: 25’ Minimum Lot Length: 40’ Maximum Lot Width: 50’ Maximum Lot Length: 100’

Typical Front Setback: 15’

46

Right of Way: Street Curb and Sidewalk


Notes.

47

Near Fifth Northside Ward


White Hispanic African American

Vacant Renter Owner

HOME OWNERSHIP

RACE FEMALE

OST/South Union MARITAL STATUS

Neighborhood Overview

Old Moderate New

42%

Lower Middle Upper

9 20 0 00

23%

19

80 19

70 19

60 19

19

50

68% 9%

AGE OF HOUSING STOCK

33% C Gr olle ad ge

S Co om lle e ge

H Sc igh ho ol G

ra d

25% S Sc om ho e H ol ig h

OST/South Union was rural and suburban when the area began development in the late 1940’s. Heavily weeded lots measuring 50 feet by 100 feet were sold to young, African American WWII veterans and their families. Residents established their own municipal water district in the 1950’s and many homeowners owned at least one car. Until annexation in 1957, the streets were dirt roads with open drainage ditches. This thriving community had its own modern grocery stores, meat markets, service stations, drive-In restaurant, churches, taxi cabs, ice cream parlors, barber shops, beauty shops, drug store, shoe shops, fire station, dry cleaners, and Sunnyside Elementary School. At one point, the nearby OST/South Union area had a private airstrip with two hangars, Baseball stadium, and horse racing tracks, all of which have since been demolished. After annexation South Union’s urbanization and population began to increase rapidly and brought civic improvements to the neighborhood.

MALE Divorced Widowed Separated Married Single

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Poverty Level

Family Median Income

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

48

0 $7

5,

00

0 $5

0,

00

0 00 5, $3

0 00 5, $2

0 00 5,

$1

$1

0, 00 0

Lower Middle Upper


I N F OSTNear / South Northside Union

A

OS S

49


50

Building Footprint

Residential

Commercial

Public Institutions

Homes Damaged by Ike

DR2 Applicants

Schools

Transportation & Utilities

Major Arterials

Metro Routes

100 - 500 Year Flood Plain

OST / South Union


288

TRAIL OLD SPANISH

610

51

OSTNear / South Northside Union


6

2 3

8

1

52

4

1

Driveway: ribbon driveway

5

Porch treatment: open porches, various sizes

2

Garage: detached, rear yard

6

Gable vent

3

Cladding: wood, aluminum vinyl, brick veneer

7

Foundation: slab on grade

4

Vegetation: well kept yards, young trees

8

Window treatment: awnings, shutters


OSTNear / South Northside Union 8 3

5 7

Arvilla Lane Program: 3 bedroom 1 bath Home Size: 1,244 - Lane 1,684 SF Arvilla Old Spanish Trail/ Griggs

53


1

6

3

2 8

54

1

Window: various sizes, floor to ceiling

5

Fence: rear yard

2

Pedestrian Path: walkways to front door

6

Grading: site work grades up to house

3

Cladding: wood, brick veneer

7

Foundation: slab on grade

4

Entry: Double door entrance

8

Sidewalk: curb, gutter, and sidewalks


OSTNear / South Northside Union

3 4 5 7 6

Arvilla Lane Program: 3 bedroom 1 bath Home Size: 1,244 - 1,684 SF

55


OST / South Union Typical Lot Size Typical Lot Dimensions: 60’ x 110’ Typical Lot Area: 6600 sqft Minimum Lot Width: 55’ Minimum Lot Length: 90’ Maximum Lot Width: 80’ Maximum Lot Length: 150’ Typical Front Setback: 25’

56

Right of Way: Street Curb and Sidewalk


Notes.

57

OSTNear / South Northside Union


White Hispanic African American

VACANT

16

%

Vacant Renter Owner

HOME OWNERSHIP

RACE FEMALE

Sunnyside MARITAL STATUS

Neighborhood Overview

25%

Old Moderate New

34%

Lower Middle Upper

80 19 9 20 0 00

9%

19

70 19

60 19

50 19

19

40

66%

AGE OF HOUSING STOCK

H Sc igh ho ol

S Co om lle e ge

C Gr olle ad ge

41%

Gr ad

h

25% S Sc om ho e H ol ig

Sunnyside can be described as “rurban,” a word coined in 1918 which describes an area with a mix of urban and rural characteristics. When the earliest development took place circa 1912, the founder, H. H. Holmes, gave the land the name Sunny Side. In 1915, during the era of “Restricted Communities,” this was the first addition south of the city to be developed and offered exclusively to African Americans. Platted land was sold to individuals and roads were scarce, often needing to be established by residents themselves. In 1949 Brookhaven subdivision became first part of Sunnyside to be annexed into the City of Houston. In 1956 the rest of Sunnyside was annexed. Before annexation, however, the community of Sunnyside had built churches, and hosted the first school for African American children to become part of Houston ISD. A civic club was organized to provide better drainage, lighting, and civic improvements, and created its own water district and volunteer fire department. As new houses began to appear in Sunnyside in 2007, the community still had small churches, horse stalls, original frame houses, open ditches, uncontrolled garbage fires, and many vacant lots characteristic of rural landscapes.

MALE Divorced Widowed Separated Married Single

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Poverty Level

Family Median Income

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

58

0 5, 00 $7

0 0, 00 $5

$3

5, 00

0

0 00 5, $2

0 00 5, $1

$1

0, 00 0

Lower Middle Upper


I N F Near Sunnyside Northside

A

OS S

59


60

Building Footprint

Residential

Commercial

Public Institutions

Homes Damaged by Ike

DR2 Applicants

Schools

Transportation & Utilities

Major Arterials

Metro Routes

100 - 500 Year Flood Plain

Sunnyside


Near Sunnyside Northside

OLD SPANISH TRAIL

SOUTH PARK

288 OU S BAY Y A R B

61


3 1 1

2 7

8

62

1

Carport and Garage: front and side yards, metal cover

5

Roof: multiple gable forms

2

Ramp: accessibility path to the front door

6

Stormwater: open system, ditch in public right of way

3

Cladding: vertical wood board, horizontal siding

7

Foundation: slab on grade and pier and beam

4

Exterior living: various sized porches & covered space

8

Sidewalk: no curb and gutter


Near Sunnyside Northside 5 4

3

3

7

6

Davenport Street Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Size: 652 Street - 1,800 SF SunnysideHome Davenport

63


3

4

4 1

2

64

1

Carport and Garage: side yards, metal cover

5

Driveway: side drive, unpaved

2

Fence: front and side yard

6

Typology: repetition of home forms

3

Cladding: vertical wood board, horizontal siding

7

Color: accents used throughout

4

Porch: recessed and protruding porches

8

Sidewalk: no curb and gutter

6


Near Sunnyside Northside 7

5

8 Davenport Street Program: 2-3 bedroom 1-2 bath Size: 652 - 1,800 SF Sunnyside Home Davenport Street

65


Sunnyside Typical Lot Size Typical Lot Dimensions: 50’ x 100’ Typical Lot Area: 6600 sqft Minimum Lot Width: 40’ Minimum Lot Length: 90’ Maximum Lot Width: 70’ Maximum Lot Length: 170’ Typical Front Setback: 25’ Right of Way: Street Curb and Sidewalk and Drainage Ditch 66


Notes.

67

Near Sunnyside Northside


DESIGN Parameters Program Overview This section contains diagrams and potential room layouts based on the Program’s Minimum Construction Standards and Design Guidelines as set by the State of Texas. These documents are also available online. Please see Resources, page 78. Homes will be designed as a type 1(2BR, 1BA), a type 2(2BR, 2BA), a type 3(3BR, 2BA) or type 4(4BR, 2BA) with each having a corresponding square footage range. In all cases the homes will be a single story. Program elements are given on the opposite page and all homes must featue all required program elements.

68

TYPE 1 2 BR | 1 BA 1,000 SF MIN 1,330 SF MAX

TYPE 3 3 BR | 2 BA 1,331 SF MIN 1,425 SF MAX

TYPE 2 2 BR | 2 BA 1,000 SF MIN 1,330 SF MAX

TYPE 4 4 BR | 2 BA 1,426 SF MIN 1,500 SF MAX


KITCHEN

LIVING

[OPEN CONCEPT]

5’-0” MIN DEPTH

DINING

FRONT PORCH

HABITABLE ROOM

25 SF MIN 50 SF MAX

70 SF MIN * ALL ROOMS EXCEPT KITCHENS, BATHROOMS, HALLS, STOREROOMS, AND PORCHES

COAT CLOSET [OPTIONAL]

7’ MINIMUM ROOM WIDTH

UTILITY ROOM WITH STORAGE AND W/D HOOKUPS

1/2 BATH

5 FT MIN

E LB

N

N

I AL

T 1F

IN

M

O AG DI

AL

DR

M OO

S

CLOSET 18SF MAX

2 FT MIN

MASTER BEDROOM

CLOSET REQ’D IN ALL BEDROOMS

1

WALK-IN CLOSET IN MASTER* 25SF MIN

MASTER BATH*

*WALK-IN CLOSET AND MASTER BATH REQ’D IF PLAN HAS 2 OR MORE BATHROOMS

FULL BATH

69


PARKING PAD

3’ WALK

HOUSE

9’ CONC. DRIVEWAY

12

4

12”-18” MIN EAVE

PROVIDE 36” WIDE ACCESSIBLE ROUTE FROM STREET TO AT LEAST ONE ENTRANCE DOOR (PREFER MAIN ENTERANCE)

PORCH

12

5

3’-4’ CONC. WALK 12”-18” MIN EAVE

STREET

Site Design

Minimum Site Standards Sidewalks, driveways and parking pads shall be provided as required by Federal, State or local jurisdiction as follows: 1. A handicap accessible route shall be provided from the street to one entrance door of the house. 2. Sidewalks: 3 ft.- 4 ft. wide concrete sidewalk with specified finish from street to front porch. 3. Driveways and Parking Pads - If driveway or parking pad is required, 9 ft. wide concrete driveway with specified finish from street to parking pad. 70

12

6

12”-18” MIN EAVE


GLAZING AREA PER ROOM

30 SF 45 SF

LIVING ROOM/ MASTER BR

30 SF MAX

DINING ROOM/ BEDROOMS

15 SF MAX

KITCHEN

9 SF MAX

BATHROOM

*ALL HABITABLE ROOMS TO HAVE AT LEAST ONE OPPERABLE WINDOW OR SKYLIGHT **NOT REQ’D IN BATHROOMS, KITCHENS, ETC. IF EQUIPED WITH VENTILATION SYSTEM

COVERED PORCH REQ’D MIN FRONT PORCH DEPTH 5FT 5’ X 5’ STOOP AT SECONDARY ENTRANCE - RECESSED OR COVERED

25 SF MIN 50 SF MAX 5’ M IN

AT LEAST 50% OF ROOM MINIMUM WINDOW AREA TO BE OPERABLE 10’ STEP-UP OK IN LIV/DIN RM

8’ MIN CLG HT 9’ MAX CLG HT

71


6

6

KITCHEN - OPEN

APPROACH 3'-6" SPACE REQ’D @ KITCHEN - U-SHAPED ACCESSIBLE FT OF TUB

1'-0"

ACCESSIBLE

HALF BATH LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT ACCESSIBLE

12'-0" MIN FURNITURE WALL

7'-0" 2'-10" MIN

2'-4" MIN

10'-0"

10'-0"

RANGE

5'-6"

3'-0" MIN

W

SINK

MIN BEDROOM UTILITY ROOM SIZE

CLEAR WORKSPACE

25 SF MIN SIZE

6'-0" 2'-4" MIN 4'-0" MIN

REF

REF

- OPEN MASTER KITCHEN BEDROOM

KITCHEN - U-SHAPED WALK-IN CLOSET

ACCESSIBLE

ACCESSIBLE

2'-4" MIN

Bedroom and Closet Requirement Minimum Design Standards

12'-0" MIN FURNITURE WALL A master bedroom with a walk-in closet and master bathroom is required if the home has two or more bathrooms.

5'-0"

2'-10" MIN

All bedrooms must include a min 5ft x 2ft closet (18sf max).

STORAGE

2'-10" MIN 10'-0"

HANGING SPACE 72

8'-0"

-6"

Coat closet is optional.

5’ MIN TURNING RADIUS

2'-6" MIN

N

MI

RANGE

ACCESSIBLE

SINK

2'-6" MIN

' 11

2'-10" MIN

BATHROOM LAYOUT

2'-10" MIN

4'-0" MIN

8'-0"

5'-0"

1'-0"

5'-0"

ACCESSIBLE

D

3'-6"

5'-0"

MIN BEDROOM SIZE

3'-0" MIN

1'-0"

3'-6"

6'-0" 2'-4" MIN


UT

6'-6" BATHROOM LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT

2'-10"ACCESSIBLE MIN

NON-ACCESSIBLE 2'-10"

NON-ACCESSIBLE

MIN

1'-3"

2'-6"

RANGE

2'-0" 7'-6"

3'-0" 2'-0"

BATHROOM LAYOUT REF

STOOP RANGE REQ’D AT SECONDARY ENTRY Kitchen Design Requirements - COVER PREF. 4'-0" 5'-0"linear feet 5'-0"adequate MIN food storage facilities including at least three All kitchens shall have MIN MIN of counter area for food preparaation and adequate cabinet space.

KITCHEN - OPEN

ACCESSIBLE

12'-0" MIN FURNITURE WALL

4'-0" MIN

REF

RANGE

All kitchens shall have a working refrigerator/freezer, cook-top and oven. A dishwasher is not required, but space for one is encouraged to accommodate homeowner preferences. 5'-0" MIN

2'-4" MIN

REF 25 SF MIN SIZE

5'-0"

10'-0"

CLEAR WORKSPACE 6'-0"

2'-6" 5’ MIN MIN TURNING RADIUS ACCESSIBLE ROUTE TO FRONT PORCH OR SIDE ENTRY REQ’D

3'-0" MIN

ENTRY DOOR

5'-0" MIN

3'-0" MIN SINK

3'-0" MIN

SINK

2'-6" MIN

10'-0"

RANGE

HALLWAY/CORRIDOR

ACCESSIBLE

5'-0"

2'-6" MIN

2'-10" MIN

NON-AC

KITCHEN - WITH ISLAND

5'-0"

4'-0" MIN

BATHROOM L

ACCESSIBLE

ACCESSIBLE

2'-4" MIN

INTERIOR DOOR

2'-10" MIN

SINK

1'-0"

6"

3'-6"

APPROACH SPACE REQ’D @ FT OF TUB

KITCHEN - U-SHAPED

BLE

3'-0"

KITCHEN - U-SHAPED

ACCESSIBLE

2'-4" MIN

5'-0"

3'-0" MIN

ENTRY DOOR

CLEAR WORKSPACE

3'-4" MIN

ACCESSIBLE

EN

CLEAR WORKSPACE

2'-6"

2'-0" 7'-6" 2'-0"

1'-0"

BATHROOM REF LAYOUT

CCESSIBLE

ZE

3'-6"

2'-6" MIN

4'-0"

3'-4" MIN

LAYOUT

3'-0"

2'-6" 3'-0" MIN 4'-0" MIN

3'-0" MIN

4'-0" MIN

RANGE

5’ MIN TURNING RADIUS

2'-6" MIN

6"

2'-0"

3'-0" MIN

SINK

1'-0"

L

4'-0"

6"

7'-0"

3'-0"

2'-0"

4'-0"

3'-0"

1'-3"

LE

SINK

SIZE: 25 SF 50 SF KITCHEN

73


6'-0" 6'-0"

7'-4" 7'-4" 4'-4" 4'-4"

BATHROOM BATHROOM LAYOUT LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT BATHROOM LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT BATHROOM LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT BATHROOM LAYOUT

NON-ACCESSIBLE NON-ACCESSIBLE

NON-ACCESSIBLE NON-ACCESSIBLE

NON-ACCESSIBLE NON-ACCESSIBLE

NON-ACCESSIBLE NON-ACCESSIBLE

3'-0" MIN

2'-0" 2'-0"

3'-0" 6"

1'-9" 1'-9" MIN MIN

MANEUVERING SPACE 4'-0"

3'-6"

1'-9" 1'-9" MIN MIN

2'-6"

7'-0"

3'-6" 3'-6" 10'-0" 3'-6" 10'-0" 10'-0" 10'-0"

2'-6" 2'-6"

3'-0"

2'-10" MIN

2'-6" 2'-6"

1'-3" 1'-3" MIN MIN

2'-0"

4'-0"

4'-0"

4'-0" 4'-0"

2'-6" 2'-6"

4'-2"

1'-3" MIN 1'-3" MIN

2'-0" 3'-0" 2'-0" 2'-0" 2'-0" 10'-0" 2'-0" 3'-0" 2'-0" 10'-0" 10'-0" 10'-0"

2'-6" 2'-6"

6'-0"

7'-4" 7'-4" 4'-4" 4'-4"

4'-0" 4'-0"

3'-0" 3'-0"

4'-2" 4'-2"

4'-0"

6'-0" 6'-0"

4'-0"

4'-2" 4'-2"

3'-6"

1'-0"

HALF BATH LAYOUT ACCESSIBLE

7'-0" 2'-10" MIN

REF REF

SINKSINK

REF REF

2'-10" MIN 2'-10" MIN

2'-10" 2'-10" MIN MIN

3'-4" 3'-4" MIN MIN

3'-4" MIN 3'-4" MIN

4'-0" MIN 4'-0" MIN

RANGE RANGE

SINK SINK

10'-0"

N

RANGE RANGE

74

MI

3'-0" 3'-0" MIN Shown MIN above are possible layouts for bathrooms that meet the design guidelines. accessible bathrooms are only required when the customer requests them, 2'-6" 2'-6"Although 3'-0" CLEAR CLEAR 3'-0" should be easily adaptable and therefore should include at least one “accessible MIN MINdesigns WORKSPACE WORKSPACE 3'-0" 3'-0" MIN MIN INTERIOR INTERIOR ready” bathroom. In this case the second bathroom need not be accessible or “accessible 2'-6" 2'-6"CLEAR DOOR DOOR ready”. CLEAR MIN MINWORKSPACE 3'-0" 3'-0" WORKSPACE INTERIOR INTERIOR Where two bathrooms are included, only one must contain a bath tub. The other may DOOR DOOR contain a walk-in shower stall.

' 11

4'-0" 4'-0" MIN MIN

Bathroom Design Requirements

RANGE


6'-0" 4'-2"

4'-0"

4'-0"

2'-6" 1'-3"

2'-10" MIN 1'-3"

1'-3"

2'-10" MIN

6'-6"

1'-0"

ACCESSIBLE

2'-0" 7'-6"

2'-0"

2'-0"

3'-0"

2'-0" 7'-6"

3'-0"

2'-6"

APPROACH APPROACH 3'-6" SPACE REQ’D @ SPACE REQ’D @ FT OF TUB FT OF TUB

BATHROOM LAYOUT BATHROOM LAYOUT

ACCESSIBLE

2'-6"

2'-0"

3'-0"

4'-0"

3'-6"

1'-0"

3'-6"

6"

1'-0"

6"

3'-0" MIN 3'-6"

6"

6"

2'-0"

2'-6"

3'-0" MIN 2'-6"

4'-0" 3'-0"

7'-0"

2'-0"

3'-0" MIN

1'-0"

LAYOUT HALF BATH LAYOUT

CCESSIBLE

9'-6"

6'-6"

3'-0"

6"

4'-0"

2'-0"

3'-0" 6" MIN 3'-0"

2'-0"

3'-0" 3'-6"

2'-0"

4'-0"

1'-0"

7'-0"

3'-0"

2'-6"

2'-10" MIN

6'-6"

2'-0" 7'-6"

2'-10" MIN

2'-10" MIN

6'-6"

9'-6"

1'-3"

4'-2"

9'-6"

2'-0" 7'-6"

9'-6"

6'-0"

1'-0"

BATHROOM LAYOUT BATHROOM LAYOUT

ACCESSIBLE

ACCESSIBLE

BATHROOM LB

ACCESSIBLE

NON-AC

7'-0" 2'-10" MIN

CLEAR REF WORKSPACE

REF

2'-6" MIN

4'-0" MIN REF

REF

2'-6" CLEAR MIN WORKSPACE 4'-0" MIN 3'-4" MIN

CLEAR SINK WORKSPACE

4'-0" MIN

5’ MIN TURNING RADIUS 4'-0" MIN

3'-0" MIN

RANGE

5’ MIN TURNING RADIUS

2'-6" MIN

SINK

3'-0" MIN

RANGE

3'-0" MIN

SINK

2'-6" MIN

10'-0"

RANGE

2'-6" MIN

N

MI

RANGE

4'-0" MIN 2'-6" MIN

' 11

10'-0"

4'-0" MIN

SINK

RANGE

SINKRANGE

75


KITCHEN - WITH ISLAND

HALLWAY/CORRIDOR

ACCESSIBLE

BATHROOM LAYOUT

NON-ACCESSIBLE

ACCESSIBLE ROUTE TO FRONT PORCH OR SIDE ENTRY REQ’D 3'-0"

5'-0" MIN MIN 2'-6" CLEAR MIN WORKSPACE

5'-0" SINK MIN

5'-0" 4'-0" MIN MIN

5'-0" MIN

5'-0"

5’ MIN TURNING RADIUS

2'-6" MIN

RANGE

3'-0" 4'-0"MIN MIN REF

ENTRY DOOR

3'-0" MIN RANGE ENTRY

3'-0"

SIZE: 25 SF MIN 50 SF MAX

SINK

REF

INTERIOR DOOR

DOOR

KITCHEN - WITH ISLAND FRONT PORCH

SECONDARY KITCHEN - ENTRY U-SHAPED 2'-4" MIN

HALLWAY/CORRIDOR

ACCESSIBLE

ACCESSIBLE

0" N

NON-ACCESSIBLE

2'-10" MIN

5'-0"

STOOP REQ’D AT SECONDARY ENTRY - COVER PREF.

25 SF MIN SIZE

BATHROOM LAYOUT

BATHROOM LAYOUT

ACCESSIBLE

3'-4" MIN

SPACE REQ’D @ FT OF TUB

5'-0"

Other Design Elements

76

3'-0" MIN

ENTRY

ACCESSIBLE ROUTE TO FRONT PORCH OR SIDE ENTRY REQ’D 5'-0" MIN

5'-0" MIN

5'-0" MIN

5'-0" Exterior entrance doors shall be 3’-0” wide, while interior doors shall be 2’-10” wideMIN min. 25 SF Closet doors shall be min 2’-4” wide where accessibility is not required. 6'-0" MIN 2'-4" SIZE Bay windows - optional in living and/or dining rooms - shall not be deeper than 1’-6”. MIN

5'-0"

10'-0"

5'-0"

STOOP REQ’D AT SECONDARY All homes must include an entry porch and a secondary entrance. The secondary ENTRY COVER PREF. entrance should be covered and located in the rear or on the side of the home.

3'-0" MIN

ENTRY

SIZE: 25 SF MIN 50 SF MAX


Simple Construction Homes shall be simply constructed of durable quality detailing over design expression is preferred. While designs should be unique and contextually based, this exercise must Homes shall be simply constructed of durable materials. An emphasis on quality detailing over design is preferred. While designs should be unique and contextually be seen asexpression an opportunity to provide well detailed, based, thisdesigned exercise must beon seen as anscale opportunity to provide well detailed, architect architect homes a large to a typically designed homes on a large scale to a typically underserved segment of the population. underserved segment of the population.

Simple materials.Construction An emphasis on

77 33


Resources

City of Houston Housing & Community Development Department houstontx.gov/housing

Project Standards and Guidelines Disaster Recovery - Round 2 Market Analysis / Area Selection houstontx.gov/housing/pdf/DR2_Planning_Study.pdf Disaster Recovery Program Ike and Dolly Round 2 Minimum Design Standards houstontx.gov/housing/pdf/DR2_Planning_Study.pdf The Housing Design Standards glo.texas.gov/GLO/_documents/disasterrecovery/housing/subrecipients/designstandards-combined.pdf The Housing Design Specifications glo.texas.gov/GLO/_documents/disasterrecovery/housing/subrecipients/housingconstruction-specs.pdf The GLO Construction Manual glo.texas.gov/GLO/_documents/disaster-recovery/housingconstructionmanual.pdf The Hurricane Ike Round 2 Guidelines glo.texas.gov/GLO/_documents/disasterrecovery/housing/subrecipients/ike-round2housing-program-guidelines.pdf

78


Houston Recovery Grant Administrator Horne LLP www.horne-llp.com

Design Team

Local Design Architects

buildingcommunityWORKSHOP bcworkshop.org contact Ann Panopio at Ann@bcworkshop.org

Brett Zamore Design brettzamoredesign.com

Lantz Full Circle/Enter Architecture lantzfullcircle.com

Cedric Douglas

Logan and Johnson loganandjohnson.com/

Community Design Resource Center University of Houston cdrchouston.org contact Susan Rogers at skrogers@central.uh.edu Gulf Coast Community Design Studio gccds.org contact Mike Grote at mgrote@gccds.msstate.edu unabridged Architecture unarch.com contact Steve Miller at steve@unarch.com

Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects gsmarchitects.net M+A Architecture Studio maarchitecturestudio.com

Taft Architects+MetaLAB taftarchitects.com

MC2 Architects mc2architects.com McIntyre and Robinowitz mcintyrerobinowitz.com MetaLab studio metalabstudio.com

79


Profile for buildingcommunityWORKSHOP

City of Houston DR2 Design Guidebook  

City of Houston DR2 Design Guidebook  

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