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light

the campaign newsletter of boston college

world spring 2011, vol. 4, no. 2

Carney Family Drives Campaign Forward $10-million lifetime commitment underscores deep bc connection Some of Patrick Carney’s most vivid childhood memories are of watching football games with his father in Alumni Stadium. Hugh Carney never had the opportunity to pursue his degree, but he loved Boston College, and that passion left an indelible impression on his young son. Unfortunately, his father died when Patrick Carney was just 13 years old, so when it came time to choose a college, he felt inspired to attend BC. He considers it one of the best decisions he ever made, and he continues to say thank you by making the University a philanthropic priority. His recent gifts to the Light the World campaign—including a $3.5-million legacy provision— have elevated his family’s lifetime commitment past the $10-million mark as they advance some of the campaign’s key initiatives. “Like so many alumni, I’m proud of the special relationship I have with the University,” says Carney ’70, a parent of four BC graduates and a trustee since 1994. “It’s an emotional attachment, one that inspires my wife, Lillian, and me to be part of BC’s continuing success story.” An Enduring Commitment Today, Carney is chairman and CEO of Claremont Companies, a real estate development firm he started as a BC student in the late 1960s. He recalls that period as one of uncertainty, when even the University’s future remained unclear because of financial concerns. And while BC has since become one of the nation’s top educational institutions, the need to secure its long-term prosperity remains crucial. Carney understands this and views his legacy commitment as a step all BC community members should consider. “The campaign’s legacy giving goal deserves serious attention,” says Carney. “When the Carney Family Athletics Scholarship endows permanently the starting center position on the men’s basketball team, Currently held by Josh southern ’11 (right).

28007.indd 1

Benefactors Patrick and Lillian Carney have advanced many areas of the University through their lifetime commitment, recently providing a legacy provision that will help secure BC’s long-term future.

speaking with other alumni, I emphasize the remarkable impact these gifts can have, regardless of their size.” The Carney family is determining where to designate their bequest intention, but they have already earmarked part of their $3-million outright gift for undergraduate financial aid by establishing the Carney Family Athletics Scholarship, which endows the starting center position on the men’s basketball team. As longtime season ticket holders, the Carneys view their gift as a way to ensure the Eagles continue to compete at the highest level. Joining other trustees and leadership donors, the Carney family also contributed $1 million to the 2004 purchase of the Brighton Campus, which currently houses the new School of Theology and Ministry and, in the future, will also include new residence halls and athletic fields. Like Family Most poignantly, Carney commemorated his father’s love by naming the Carney Dining Room in McElroy Commons in his memory—with the dedication occurring in 1985. “I think of BC as a member of the family,” says Carney. “This perspective has enabled me to share in the University’s upward trajectory in a very personal way and reminds me just how much BC has enriched my life.” In addition, Carney and his family are proud to have endowed the Welles R. Crowther ’99 Directorship of Volunteer and Service Learning, named for the young equities trader and volunteer firefighter who sacrificed his life to save others during the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center.

With earlier gifts, Carney also endowed chairs in the philosophy and English departments in honor of his friendships with the late Fr. Frederick Adelmann ’37, H’85, and University Senior Vice President James P. McIntyre ’57, MA’61, PhD’67, respectively. Furthermore, he has supported endeavors such as Pops on the Heights and the Real Estate Council and has served on several reunion gift committees and hosted numerous University events, including a reception during Fr. Leahy’s February visit to Palm Beach, Fla. “There are always inspiring options for those who wish to play a leading role,” says Carney. “I view our gifts and involvement as investments in BC’s Jesuit, Catholic mission, and the return on our investment is evident in the successes of students and faculty.”

inside A Fitting Tribute Volunteers honored for their gifts of time and talent

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Integrated Sciences Breakthrough page 3

Focus on Financial Aid BC community responds to the campaign’s call for undergraduate financial aid

pageS 4–5

Reunion Leader Q&A

back cover

4/29/11 4:46 PM


LIGHT the WORLD campaign leadership Campaign Chairs Charles I. Clough, Jr. ’64 and Gloria L. Clough, MDiv’90, MS’96 William J. Geary ’80 and Kristi J. Geary Kathleen M. McGillycuddy NC’71

coNvening Campaign Chairs Margot C. Connell, H’09 John M. Connors, Jr. ’63, H’07, and Eileen M. Ahearn Connors ’66, MSW’95 Peter S. Lynch ’65, H’95, and Carolyn A. Lynch, H’09 Patrick T. Stokes ’64 and Anna-Kristina L. Stokes

Campaign Council Peter W. Bell ’86 and Marilee Denelle Bell ’87 Boston College Fund Matthew J. Botica ’72 and Christine C. Botica Chicago Region Robert A. Ferris ’63 and Evelyn J. Ferris Northern California Region David T. Griffith ’68 Legacy Gifts T.J. Maloney ’75 New York Region Stephen P. Murray ’84 New York Region David P. O’Connor ’86 New York Region Thomas P. O’Neill III ’68 Gasson Society Dineen A. Riviezzo ’89 Boston College Alumni Association

credits Editor: Matthew Bellico Writers: Melissa Baern, Kevin Collins, Laura DeCoste, and Shannon Parks

A Call to Serve bc leaders feted at volunteer tribute dinner Reunion Committee. More than 400 alumni, parents, and friends attended the celebration, which also featured a performance by the student a cappella group BC Dynamics. During the ceremony, University Trustee and Campaign Cochair Kathleen M. McGillycuddy NC’71 praised the awardees, saying, “These individuals have each played a very special and important role in the success of Boston College. They have gone above and beyond the call, whether it is chair-

University Trustee Charles I. Clough, Jr. ’64, P’87, ’93, ’98, led a stellar class of honorees at this year’s Distinguished Volunteer Tribute Dinner. Held March 25 at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston, the annual awards ceremony recognizes those BC community members who best personify the Jesuit ideal of “men and women for others” in their contributions to the University’s advancement endeavors. Clough received the evening’s highest honor, the James F. Cleary ’50, H’93, Masters Award, for his lifetime of service, which includes 17 years as a trustee and his continued leadership as Light the World campaign co-chair. Also accepting awards were Danielle V. Auriemma ’10; Kim D. GassettSchiller and Philip W. Schiller ’82; David T. Griffith ’68, P’00, ’02, ’06; and the Class of 2005

ing reunion committees, chairing campaign committees, endowing scholarships, establishing centers, or hosting countless events. Each honoree exemplifies leadership, inspiration, and strength.” Corey Williams ’04, MA’06 (left), and Chaz Okagbue ’05 enjoy the awards reception.

Special guest speaker Kathleen McGillycuddy greeted attendees on behalf of the Board of Trustees.

Photographers: David Barnes, Gary Wayne Gilbert, Sebastien Girard, Eve Greendale, Channing Johnson, Rose Lincoln, and Lee Pellegrini The Light the World campaign newsletter is published three times a year and distributed to selected Boston College alumni, parents, and friends by the Office of Advancement Communications & Marketing. uacommunications@bc.edu

This year’s Distinguished Volunteer Award recipients were (back row, from left) Philip W. Schiller; Kim D. Gassett-Schiller; Charles I. Clough, Jr.; David T. Griffith; (front row, from left) Timothy Harvey ’05; Danielle V. Auriemma; Stephanie Miles Klock ’05; and Doug Wakefield ’05.

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Under the Microscope: Integrated Sciences

Q&A

Evelyn J. and Robert A. Ferris Professor of Physics and Department Chair Mike Naughton provides his perspective on the importance of integrated sciences, a strategic priority that is taking BC’s academic programming into bold, new directions. From left: Joshua Rosenberg, Krzysztof Kempa, Mike Naughton, and Greg McMahon lead the nanoscale research team whose work recently received a $1-million Keck Foundation grant.

Million-Dollar Idea Breathes New Life into Mature Technology prestigious keck foundation grant places bc squarely in competitive scientific landscape It has been said that what’s old becomes new again. Evelyn J. and Robert A. Ferris Professor of Physics and Department Chair Mike Naughton couldn’t agree more. That’s because the idea upon which he and a multidisciplinary team of University researchers have based their groundbreaking new project has roots in a decades-old technology. Their latest brainchild is so promising that the W. M. Keck Foundation has awarded BC a prestigious $1-million grant to develop it. The project: a nanoscale coaxial optical microscope (NCOM). When completed in three years, the NCOM will join a new class of superlenses, which uses novel technologies to manipulate light and make visible tiny particles at resolutions never before imaginable. The essential feature of the nanocoax is similar in design to coaxial cables—which have been around for more than 150 years and have transported radio and television signals for the past 50—except a million times smaller. “It’s a well-known, old story that’s never been told at this scale,” says Naughton. “When we began discussing our idea with former ham radio operators, they were at first confused. After thinking about it some

more, they said, ‘Of course it will work!’” In addition to Naughton, the NCOM research team includes Professor of Physics Krzysztof Kempa, Microscopy Imaging Facility Manager Joshua Rosenberg, and Research Associate Greg McMahon in the University’s Integrated Sciences Clean Room and Nanofabrication Facility. The project also provides funding for a postdoctoral student, three graduate students, and at least 12 undergraduate students over the next three years. “None of our work can happen without students,” says Naughton, who is also the proud father of two Eagles. “The best part is seeing them get it, take ownership of it, and live for it.” Far-Reaching Impact With the proposed NCOM aiming to achieve a 10-fold improvement in resolution, scientists would be able to see in much finer detail what is occurring inside living systems at the cellular, sub-cellular, and sub-protein level. Therefore, this technology has broad implications for biology, medicine, genetics, therapeutics, and related fields. The research team has already

envisioned some unique applications, for which BC holds several issued and pending patents. One example is optical nanosurgery, which would use arrays of coaxes that convert light into electricity so that doctors can illuminate their surgical path while simultaneously frying diseased cells. This could hold particular promise for patients with neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, because the pinpoint accuracy would enable surgeons to avoid healthy regions of the brain that affect speech and other functions. Based in Los Angeles, Calif., the W. M. Keck Foundation was established in 1954 by the late William Myron Keck, founder of Superior Oil Company, who envisioned a philanthropic institution that would provide far-reaching benefits for humanity. The foundation supports pioneering discoveries in science, engineering, and medical research, as well as the effective involvement of students in research. “This grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation gives us the ability, and puts tools at our disposal, to find and follow through on ideas,” says Naughton. “Ideas are important, but it’s more important to execute on them.”

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HOW DO YOU DEFINE INTEGRATED SCIENCES? “I define it as uncompartmentalized, because the best work can no longer be executed or conceived in just one scientific discipline. For example, I can make an array of coaxes that might work as a retinal implant, but I cannot get it into the human eye without the help of biochemists, electrical engineers, and others.” ONCE YOU HAVE AN IDEA, HOW DO YOU IDENTIFY WHOM TO WORK WITH TO DEVELOP IT? “I Google it. This allows me to search published literature to determine whether similar work has already been published and to identify whom we might partner with to make the idea a reality.” WHAT’S THE BEST PART ABOUT COLLABORATING ACROSS DISCIPLINES? “The fun part is that integrated sciences encourage dreaming. If I can imagine it, then I can find someone who can help me get it there. A little bit of knowledge is no longer extremely dangerous.”

The nanocoax (pictured here), patented by Boston College in 2009– 2010, is the basis for many promising new applications.


The Illuminating Effects of Financial Aid Meghan and Michael Caponiti ’90, MA’90 Rye, N.Y.

M “

I have been at BC for only a short time, but I can already tell that there are many driven and enthusiastic young people here with diverse interests. I feel very fortunate to be able to learn from and associate with them.”

ichael Caponiti ’90, MA’90, had a great experience as a Boston College student. Today, he’s the owner of Archimedes Capital Group and a loyal BC volunteer who co-chaired his 20th Reunion Gift Committee. But his greatest motivation to support financial aid at BC was shaped by someone who didn’t attend the University at all. “Fifty years ago, my father received a full-ride scholarship to Villanova University.

—Narintohn Luangrath ’14 was one of only 20 freshmen selected for BC’s Shaw Leadership Program, a student formation initiative focused on community service and peer education. A political science major from Tigard, Ore., Luangrath loves to teach and hopes to become a college professor one day.

Somebody helped him out when he needed it,” says Caponiti. “We were always very proud of that scholarship. It broadened him, and it made a big difference for our family.” Compelled to pay that kindness forward, Caponiti and his wife, Meghan, have endowed the Caponiti Family Scholarship Fund to provide financial aid for a deserving BC undergraduate. The couple believe that Catholic education will play an increasing role in 21st century America and that BC is poised to lead the way. “Catholic schools offer structure and a moral framework that is needed,” he says. “BC emphasizes morality, and that comes across in the student experience.” They hope many—or all—of their five children will someday attend the University and bring them to football games each fall. The Caponitis are teaching their children about service through their BC philanthropy—and creating future Superfans in the process.

Claudia ’85 and Carlos de la Cruz, Jr. ’85 Key Biscayne, Fla.

C

There are so many doors open to me right now, and it is largely due to the philanthropy of the de la Cruz family. They are making dreams come true for me.”

—Marlena Papavaritis ’11 of Miami, Fla., is in her third year as the de la Cruz BC Fund Scholar. Currently, she is contemplating a host of appealing opportunities after graduation, applying to a variety of law schools and graduate programs in public administration and Eastern European studies.

laudia ’85 and Carlos de la Cruz, Jr. ’85 fell in love at Boston College and, while they remember BC with great fondness, they appreciate the University for more than its role in their own romance. “BC has that Jesuit social conscience, that commitment to helping out, which is so important,” says Carlos de la Cruz. Today, both the de la Cruzes have made service to children central to their lives and are particularly concerned with at-risk youths.

4

Claudia serves on the board of the Centro Mater Foundation, which provides day care, education, nourishment, health services, and after-school programs to Miami-area children in need. Carlos, president and CEO of The de la Cruz Companies, chairs the board of Our Kids, an agency committed to caring for abused, neglected, and abandoned children. “You dream of having these kids going to a place like BC,” he muses as he talks about the difficult issues Our Kids and Centro Mater confront daily. By underwriting a BC Fund Scholarship, the de la Cruz family has made it possible for a deserving student to benefit from a BC education. They are also supporting BC’s commitment to educating leaders with a social conscience—leaders not unlike themselves.

BC BENEFACTORS ANSWER CALL TO STRENGTHEN CORE UNIVERSITY VALUE

THE LIGHT THE WORLD campaign’s $300-million commitment to undergraduate financial aid is much more than a fundraising goal—it is an affirmation of one of the University’s most deeply held Jesuit, Catholic ideals. As other universities grapple with budget pressures and market difficulties, they are often forced to turn away deserving applicants because of their financial situations. But Boston College—founded out of a deep sense of social justice to educate a poor, largely immigrant population—maintains its commitment to providing financial aid on the broadest scale possible. To this day, BC accepts students based on their qualifications alone, with no consideration to their ability to pay tuition—a policy of “needblind admission.” Once a student is accepted, the University will meet his or her full demonstrated financial need. BC is one of only 21 private institutions to do so. The result is an extraordinary student body, chosen for its excellence and richly diverse in its socioeconomic background. Since the campaign’s inception, more than 16,580 alumni, parents, and friends have given to financial aid in some way, including these BC community members who have demonstrated extraordinary support of this vital priority.

John Fish

Milton, Mass.

T

he chairman and CEO of Bostonbased Suffolk Construction Company, John Fish is an expert on a welllaid foundation—and the Fish Cornerstone Scholarship that he and his wife, Cynthia, have endowed with their gift of $1 million will help talented student-athletes build bright futures for years to come. A strong advocate for Catholic education, John was struck by how many of his colleagues in the Boston business community were BC alumni. In Boston College, he saw his own values made tangible: a University grounded in principles of faith and service, dedicated to the highest academic standards, and committed to providing an education for every deserving student. Fish has been a BC trustee and supporter for several years, but his newest role at BC is that of parent—his daughter Christina is a firstyear law student. “The quality of her education and overall experience is simply the finest it could be,” he says. “She is being exposed to truly brilliant faculty members who are leaders in the community, as well as talented students who contribute a great deal to the shared learning experience.”

During his own school days, Fish struggled with undiagnosed dyslexia, which led him to pour his intense drive into athletics. “I used sports to bolster my performance and focus,” he explains. “I continue to have a strong interest in the value of education and sports. BC has an impressive reputation in both arenas.” So it was a natural choice for the Fishes to direct their scholarship to a member of the varsity football team. The Fish Cornerstone Scholarship will further strengthen the University and its Eagles; but, most importantly, it will enable generations of talented young people to lay the foundations for their own success at Boston College.

Being a student-athlete at BC means being a talented athlete and being able to succeed in academics. I’m grateful for the opportunity to do both.” —Thomas Claiborne ’10 studied communication at BC and was the Fish Cornerstone Scholar for two years. The Wellesley, Mass., native played 10 games at offensive tackle in the 2010 season, helping lead the way for a running attack that averaged 133 yards per game.

Judith and Edward Crane, P’09, ’11, ’12 Hinsdale, Ill.

B

efore Judith and Edward Crane’s oldest son, Michael, began looking at colleges, the Cranes had no connection with BC. But their initial visit to the Heights made a lasting impact. “We were extraordinarily impressed,” recalls Edward Crane, who leads the litigation practice in the Chicago office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP. “We could see that Boston College was a place of academic excellence, but was also committed to Catholicism; truly, a living-faith community. That was evident in so many aspects of the University.” Michael Crane went on to earn a degree in psychology from the College of Arts and Sciences, and his two siblings followed him to Chestnut Hill. Mary Crane will graduate from the Lynch School of Education in May and return for her master’s degree, while Eddie Crane is a finance major at the Carroll School of Management. The University has exceeded the Cranes’ high expectations. The couple have found that no matter their area of study, BC students are intellectually curious and service oriented. “The leadership of the Jesuit community, and the talent of

the faculty and staff, is incredible,” says Edward Crane. The couple established the Matthew E. Crane Memorial Scholarship to celebrate the experiences of Michael, Mary, and Eddie, while also honoring the memory of their youngest son, who died shortly after birth. “Endowing this scholarship was a way for our family to make a contribution to BC consistent with our values,” explains Edward Crane. “We’re delighted to empower students to attend BC who otherwise might be unable to do so.”

I’m still discovering all that BC has to offer— and I’m so grateful for the opportunity to be here. I can’t thank the Cranes enough for my scholarship.”

—Kayla Morse ’14 of Dousman, Wis., is the 2010–11 Crane Scholar, majoring in political science. She came to BC a violinist, an athlete (track and soccer), and a lover of the sciences, and she is finding new ways to pursue her many passions here.

5


The Illuminating Effects of Financial Aid Meghan and Michael Caponiti ’90, MA’90 Rye, N.Y.

M “

I have been at BC for only a short time, but I can already tell that there are many driven and enthusiastic young people here with diverse interests. I feel very fortunate to be able to learn from and associate with them.”

ichael Caponiti ’90, MA’90, had a great experience as a Boston College student. Today, he’s the owner of Archimedes Capital Group and a loyal BC volunteer who co-chaired his 20th Reunion Gift Committee. But his greatest motivation to support financial aid at BC was shaped by someone who didn’t attend the University at all. “Fifty years ago, my father received a full-ride scholarship to Villanova University.

—Narintohn Luangrath ’14 was one of only 20 freshmen selected for BC’s Shaw Leadership Program, a student formation initiative focused on community service and peer education. A political science major from Tigard, Ore., Luangrath loves to teach and hopes to become a college professor one day.

Somebody helped him out when he needed it,” says Caponiti. “We were always very proud of that scholarship. It broadened him, and it made a big difference for our family.” Compelled to pay that kindness forward, Caponiti and his wife, Meghan, have endowed the Caponiti Family Scholarship Fund to provide financial aid for a deserving BC undergraduate. The couple believe that Catholic education will play an increasing role in 21st century America and that BC is poised to lead the way. “Catholic schools offer structure and a moral framework that is needed,” he says. “BC emphasizes morality, and that comes across in the student experience.” They hope many—or all—of their five children will someday attend the University and bring them to football games each fall. The Caponitis are teaching their children about service through their BC philanthropy—and creating future Superfans in the process.

Claudia ’85 and Carlos de la Cruz, Jr. ’85 Key Biscayne, Fla.

C

There are so many doors open to me right now, and it is largely due to the philanthropy of the de la Cruz family. They are making dreams come true for me.”

—Marlena Papavaritis ’11 of Miami, Fla., is in her third year as the de la Cruz BC Fund Scholar. Currently, she is contemplating a host of appealing opportunities after graduation, applying to a variety of law schools and graduate programs in public administration and Eastern European studies.

laudia ’85 and Carlos de la Cruz, Jr. ’85 fell in love at Boston College and, while they remember BC with great fondness, they appreciate the University for more than its role in their own romance. “BC has that Jesuit social conscience, that commitment to helping out, which is so important,” says Carlos de la Cruz. Today, both the de la Cruzes have made service to children central to their lives and are particularly concerned with at-risk youths.

4

Claudia serves on the board of the Centro Mater Foundation, which provides day care, education, nourishment, health services, and after-school programs to Miami-area children in need. Carlos, president and CEO of The de la Cruz Companies, chairs the board of Our Kids, an agency committed to caring for abused, neglected, and abandoned children. “You dream of having these kids going to a place like BC,” he muses as he talks about the difficult issues Our Kids and Centro Mater confront daily. By underwriting a BC Fund Scholarship, the de la Cruz family has made it possible for a deserving student to benefit from a BC education. They are also supporting BC’s commitment to educating leaders with a social conscience—leaders not unlike themselves.

BC BENEFACTORS ANSWER CALL TO STRENGTHEN CORE UNIVERSITY VALUE

THE LIGHT THE WORLD campaign’s $300-million commitment to undergraduate financial aid is much more than a fundraising goal—it is an affirmation of one of the University’s most deeply held Jesuit, Catholic ideals. As other universities grapple with budget pressures and market difficulties, they are often forced to turn away deserving applicants because of their financial situations. But Boston College—founded out of a deep sense of social justice to educate a poor, largely immigrant population—maintains its commitment to providing financial aid on the broadest scale possible. To this day, BC accepts students based on their qualifications alone, with no consideration to their ability to pay tuition—a policy of “needblind admission.” Once a student is accepted, the University will meet his or her full demonstrated financial need. BC is one of only 21 private institutions to do so. The result is an extraordinary student body, chosen for its excellence and richly diverse in its socioeconomic background. Since the campaign’s inception, more than 16,580 alumni, parents, and friends have given to financial aid in some way, including these BC community members who have demonstrated extraordinary support of this vital priority.

John Fish

Milton, Mass.

T

he chairman and CEO of Bostonbased Suffolk Construction Company, John Fish is an expert on a welllaid foundation—and the Fish Cornerstone Scholarship that he and his wife, Cynthia, have endowed with their gift of $1 million will help talented student-athletes build bright futures for years to come. A strong advocate for Catholic education, John was struck by how many of his colleagues in the Boston business community were BC alumni. In Boston College, he saw his own values made tangible: a University grounded in principles of faith and service, dedicated to the highest academic standards, and committed to providing an education for every deserving student. Fish has been a BC trustee and supporter for several years, but his newest role at BC is that of parent—his daughter Christina is a firstyear law student. “The quality of her education and overall experience is simply the finest it could be,” he says. “She is being exposed to truly brilliant faculty members who are leaders in the community, as well as talented students who contribute a great deal to the shared learning experience.”

During his own school days, Fish struggled with undiagnosed dyslexia, which led him to pour his intense drive into athletics. “I used sports to bolster my performance and focus,” he explains. “I continue to have a strong interest in the value of education and sports. BC has an impressive reputation in both arenas.” So it was a natural choice for the Fishes to direct their scholarship to a member of the varsity football team. The Fish Cornerstone Scholarship will further strengthen the University and its Eagles; but, most importantly, it will enable generations of talented young people to lay the foundations for their own success at Boston College.

Being a student-athlete at BC means being a talented athlete and being able to succeed in academics. I’m grateful for the opportunity to do both.” —Thomas Claiborne ’10 studied communication at BC and was the Fish Cornerstone Scholar for two years. The Wellesley, Mass., native played 10 games at offensive tackle in the 2010 season, helping lead the way for a running attack that averaged 133 yards per game.

Judith and Edward Crane, P’09, ’11, ’12 Hinsdale, Ill.

B

efore Judith and Edward Crane’s oldest son, Michael, began looking at colleges, the Cranes had no connection with BC. But their initial visit to the Heights made a lasting impact. “We were extraordinarily impressed,” recalls Edward Crane, who leads the litigation practice in the Chicago office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP. “We could see that Boston College was a place of academic excellence, but was also committed to Catholicism; truly, a living-faith community. That was evident in so many aspects of the University.” Michael Crane went on to earn a degree in psychology from the College of Arts and Sciences, and his two siblings followed him to Chestnut Hill. Mary Crane will graduate from the Lynch School of Education in May and return for her master’s degree, while Eddie Crane is a finance major at the Carroll School of Management. The University has exceeded the Cranes’ high expectations. The couple have found that no matter their area of study, BC students are intellectually curious and service oriented. “The leadership of the Jesuit community, and the talent of

the faculty and staff, is incredible,” says Edward Crane. The couple established the Matthew E. Crane Memorial Scholarship to celebrate the experiences of Michael, Mary, and Eddie, while also honoring the memory of their youngest son, who died shortly after birth. “Endowing this scholarship was a way for our family to make a contribution to BC consistent with our values,” explains Edward Crane. “We’re delighted to empower students to attend BC who otherwise might be unable to do so.”

I’m still discovering all that BC has to offer— and I’m so grateful for the opportunity to be here. I can’t thank the Cranes enough for my scholarship.”

—Kayla Morse ’14 of Dousman, Wis., is the 2010–11 Crane Scholar, majoring in political science. She came to BC a violinist, an athlete (track and soccer), and a lover of the sciences, and she is finding new ways to pursue her many passions here.

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IRA Option Enables Donors to Maximize Gifts

Two Paths to Excellence endowment and current-use funds make scholarships a reality Right now, talented young men and women are deciding where to attend college. For many, that decision will rely in large part on the financial aid they are offered. When members of the Class of 2015 arrive at the Heights, they will come from every state and more than 60 countries. They will be excellent students with broad interests and curious minds—and more than two-thirds of them will receive financial aid. By empowering seven out of 10 students to attend BC, financial aid donors have a tremendous impact on the University and its students. Many find that the impact goes both ways. As they receive letters from their scholars or meet them at Fr. Leahy’s annual scholarship dinner in the spring, donors often develop relationships with their students that last for years. BC community members can make a difference by creating endowed funds and by contributing annually to financial aid—both are vital to meeting the University’s commitment to open its doors to all deserving students. Endowed gifts provide the University with permanent resources devoted exclusively to financial aid. Endowed funds generate income in perpetuity

Boston College donors can see the impact of their gifts across the Heights, and now they can increase that power through charitable IRA rollovers. Extended by federal legislation for 2011, charitable IRA rollovers enable benefactors to make tax-free distributions of up to $100,000 annually from their individual retirement accounts to qualified charities such as BC.

Hak Kim ’14, recipient of the Harry and Marie Muller Scholarship, speaks with donor couple Bernadette Muller Broccolo ’77 and Timothy E. Broccolo ’77 at the 8th annual Boston College Scholarship Dinner, held April 14.

that each year underwrites a specific student’s financial aid package. With a contribution of $250,000, a fully endowed scholarship can be named and directed to support a student from any region of the country in a particular school, sport, or area of study. These funds create an enduring tribute to the mission of Boston College by supporting students now and for generations to come. On the other hand, annual gifts fill an immediate need. The University’s undergraduate financial aid budget has increased dramatically—35 percent over the last five years. Endowment alone cannot support that level of growth. Annual gifts directly aid today’s students and thus are crucial

to achieving the Boston College mission. With an annual contribution of $25,000, a donor can establish a named scholarship for one year—with the entire gift applied to a student’s financial aid package in the year it is received. Donors can give to the BC Fund Scholars Program to provide aid for a deserving undergraduate or support the Flynn Fund ScholarAthlete Program, funding a single student-athlete in any school or athletics program of the donor’s choice. With either option, benefactors can be assured that their gifts will have a lasting effect on a student’s life. Learn more about supporting financial aid at www.bc.edu/alumni/invest.

DID YOU KNOW? Endowed Scholarships

68

Percentage of Boston College undergraduates who receive some form of financial assistance*

$30,979

13

260

Average need-based financial aid package for BC undergraduates*

Percentage of total undergraduate financial aid budget funded by endowment*

Endowed scholarships established since the Light the World campaign launch

*Figures from 2009–10 fiscal year

$156 million Endowed funds pledged for financial aid since the start of the campaign

“The tax benefit makes this type of donation very appealing.” —Mary Trepanier Sylvia, MSW’56

This popular giving option allows donors to avoid paying federal and, in many cases, state income taxes, while satisfying IRA requirements for annual minimum withdrawals. Because of these advantages, donors can provide critical support to the University at higher levels than might otherwise be possible. “The tax benefit makes this type of donation very appealing,” says Mary Trepanier Sylvia, MSW’56, who has provided several IRA rollover gifts to Boston College. “This giving option enables me to show my appreciation for the quality education I received while supporting today’s students in the Graduate School of Social Work.” Like Trepanier Sylvia, donors can direct their commitments to the BC department, school, or initiative of their choice—or make unrestricted gifts that enable the University to bolster current priorities, such as undergraduate financial aid and student-faculty research. To qualify, benefactors must be at least 70½ years old at the time of distribution. For both traditional and Roth IRAs, donors should have their account administrator transfer the funds to Boston College directly. To discuss giving options in confidence, contact Gift Planning Director Sue Warren Ramsey ’91 at 617-552-3423 or sue.ramsey@ bc.edu. Learn more about the benefits of charitable IRA rollovers and access sample gift language at www.bc.edu/irarollover.

Financial aid of all kinds enables BC students to reach new heights—both in the classroom and on the playing field.

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Casting a Light on the

sunshine state

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Fr. Leahy and members of the Board of Trustees sought to “light the world” in the Sunshine State by spending two weekends in Florida this winter. With visits to Naples Feb. 5–6 and Palm Beach Feb. 25–27, more than 600 alumni, parents, and friends enjoyed a series of campaign leadership events, featuring presentations on both the Institutional Master Plan and student formation. The BC community in Florida represents an enduring base of involvement and support in the Southeast region. In keeping with tradition, the weekends concluded with Mass presided over by Fr. Leahy, followed by brunch.

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James Derba ’51, P’78 (left), and James Carr, P’09, ’11, at the Palm Beach Mass and brunch

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From left: President William P. Leahy, S.J.; Convening Campaign Chair Eileen M. Ahearn Connors ’66, MSW’95, P’93, ’94; and University Trustee and Convening Campaign Chair John M. Connors, Jr. ’63, H’07, P’93, ’94, at the Naples President’s Reception hosted by the Connors family

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From left: Leo Vercollone ’77, P’06, ’08; Joanne Vercollone, P’06, ’08; Legacy Gifts Chair David T. Griffith ’68, P’00, ’02, ’06; and Vice President for University Mission and Ministry John T. Butler, S.J., STL’06, at the Naples Spotlight Luncheon

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Reunion Classes Poised to Break Records As the University prepares tO welcome thousands of alumni back to campus during Reunion Weekend June 3–5, two classes are gearing up to reach new heights in donor participation. Hoping to eclipse the Class of 2005’s stellar reunion fundraising in 2010, the Class of 2006 has set an ambitious goal of 1,000 alumni donors— securing a 48-percent participation rate. Thanks in part to their winning efforts in the GOLD Rush Challenge— for which the class received the naming rights to a $25,000 scholarship— this year’s 5th reunion class acquired more than 500 gifts by the end of the calendar year, a BC first. “The strong community tie between our amazing volunteers and the University is one element that has driven our success so far,” says Victoria

Reunion offers alumni the chance to reconnect with friends and the life of the University—and to be counted through class-based participation goals.

O’Kane ’06, co-chair of the 5th Reunion Committee. “Sometimes young alumni don’t realize the impact they can have on the University. By getting involved, either financially or as volunteers, we can change BC for the better and really help future students.” The Class of 2006 is not the only reunion class poised to realize record giving. Committee members from the Class of 1986 hope to surpass all previous 25th reunion classes by raising $12.6 million—$3.1 million more than the previous mark set by the Class of 1984. “We want to break all the records,” says University Trustee and 25th Reunion Co-chair David O’Connor ’86. “We’ll be successful because our classmates’ individual efforts are great. That support adds up.” The Class of 1986 is no stranger to

achieving milestones, having raised nearly $3.6 million in its 20th reunion year, the first class to do so. Five years later, they are no less focused and motivated to make an impact through class-wide contributions. “Education is so much more expensive today, and many of our gifts go to financial aid and scholarships,” explains O’Connor. “That is the number one reason we ask alumni to participate, no matter if the amount is $19.86 or $1 million. Every gift counts.”

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The early efforts of committee members like O’Kane and O’Connor may pay off in yet another big way. As part of the Race to the Finish Challenge, $100,000 in scholarships will be named in honor of each of the first four classes to reach their participation goals. Both the 5th and 25th reunion classes are leading the pack and hope to carry that momentum all the way through Reunion Weekend. To register for reunion or to be counted for your class, visit www.bc.edu/reunion.


Q&A: 25th Reunion Co-chair University Trustee Drake G. Behrakis ’86 and his wife, Maria, have shown their support for Boston College in a number of ways over the years, both financially and as volunteers. In his current role as co-chair of his 25th Reunion Committee, Behrakis wants his classmates to know that, although more than two decades have passed since graduation, the University’s traditions and alumni are still what make BC special. WhY Do You ConTinue To Be CounTeD aT BC, Year aFTer Year? Excel”—to continue to strive to be the best and en-

in Your role as a 25Th reunion Co-Chair, hoW have You goTTen Your ClassmaTes eXCiTeD aBouT giving BaCK?

sure that each student becomes a better person—is

The best way to connect with classmates is

a huge part of this mission. Our combined efforts

to be open and honest with them. BC has a

can elevate BC to an even higher level. There are ex-

lot to offer, so I try to help fellow alumni find

ceptional individuals who are truly committed to this

a personal way to dedicate their resources. It

place, and I enjoy sharing my passion with them.

could be a specific school, program, or activity.

I believe in the mission. The motto “Ever to

What is important is that they know that their gift to the University, regardless of size, truly

WhaT are You looKing ForWarD To mosT aBouT Your upComing reunion?

makes a difference. For more than 148 years, the institution has been built, protected, and

Campus always looks so beautiful, especially at that

sustained by thousands of people who made a

time of year, but it’s all about the people—class-

commitment so that future generations would

mates, alumni, faculty, and administration. BC alum-

have the opportunity to live value-filled lives.

ni share a special bond. I always enjoy meeting them and hearing about how the University has made a

Joining drake G. Behrakis as co-chairs of the Class of 1986 reunion Gift Campaign are Peter Bell; Michaela “Mikey” Murphy hoag, P’14; and david o’Connor, all of whom serve on the Board of Trustees.

difference in people’s lives. Reunion Weekend is the perfect time for those conversations.

light

world

the campaign newsletter of boston college spring 2011, vol. 4, no. 2

help bc cross the finish line Just days remain for alumni and parents to help BC meet its participation goal. PLEASE MAKE YOUR GIFT BY MAY 31 AT WWW.BC.EDU/GIVE.

office of university advancement more hall 220 140 commonwealth avenue chestnut hill, ma 02467–3808 www.bc.edu/ltw

presorted first class us postage paid boston, ma permit no. 54465

Light the World Spring Campaign Newsletter  

Light the World Campaign Newsletter of Boston College Spring 2011, Vol. 4, No. 2

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