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Exploring Science Practices— Grade 5


Program Components Materials Kits

Online Resources

Ready-to-use Materials Kits are prepped and organized for you to seamlessly integrate into each lesson.

Ready-to-teach lesson presentations, simulations, complete student resources, customizable 3-Dimensional assessments, and more are at your fingertips.

Science Journals

Picture Cards

During Fast Track Lessons, students use the journal to access hands-on investigations, checks for understanding, and text with notes for each science unit.

P I C T U R E

Grade 5

s four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete text with notes, and checks for understanding.

UNIT 2 - EARTH SYSTEMS

Clouds over Mountains

Earth, the Moon, and the Stars Unit 3 Changes in Matter

Do5Ecosystems Change? four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete TCI’s7 How Grade program includes How Do Humans Change Ecosystems? with8 hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding. Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels

Living Things and Ecosystems

Grade 5

Grade 5

P I C T U R E

C A R D

A

UNIT 1 - LIVING THINGS AND ECOSYSTEMS

Science Journal

6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?

Is an Ecosystem?

Is the Role 4ofHow Producers in an and Ecosystem? 7 How5Do Ecosystems Change? Do Farming Industry Affect TCI’sEarth’s Grade program includes four units. Each Is the Role ofSystems? Consumers in an Ecosystem? 8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems?

unit has a Science Journal, complete with hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

Is the Role 5ofHow Decomposers an Ecosystem? Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Do People’sinEveryday Lives Affect Earth’s

Systems? Do Energy Move in an Ecosystem? ? Matter and

Colossal Travels

Unit 1 LivingEarth’s ThingsSystems? and Ecosystems 6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth Systems Performance Assessment: Creating a Public Service

3 What Is the Role of Consumers Systems?in an Ecosystem? Do Earth’s Systems Produce Weather and

Unit 2

Earth Systems

has a Science Journal, complete How Do Humans Change Ecosystems? with8hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

6 How Do Changes toHow Substances Affect Systems? 5 Do Matter andTheir Energy Move in an Ecosystem? Do Earth’s Systems Change Earth’s Surface?

Colossal Travels

Unit 1 Living Things and Ecosystems

Weights? 6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth’s Systems? mance Assessment: Writing an Article on Unit 2 Earth SystemsPerformance Assessment: Creating a Public Service Materials? s Systems 7 How Do Engineers Improve 1 What Is an Ecosystem? 6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy? Performance Assessment: Testing PancakeAnnouncement About Water in Your Community nge? 2 What Is the Role of Producers in an Ecosystem? 7 How Do Ecosystems Change? 1 What Are Earth’s Four Systems? 4 How Do Farming and Industry Affect Earth’s Ingredients 3 What 8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems? Systems? in an Ecosystem? 2 How Do Earth’s Systems Produce Weather and Is the Role of Consumers

Changes in Matter

4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Ecosystem? Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Climate? 5 How Do People’s Everyday Lives Affect Earth’s Colossal Travels 6 How Do Changes to Substances Their How Do MatterAffect andSystems? Energy Move in an Ecosystem? 3 How Do Earth’s Systems Change Earth’s5Surface? Weights? Are Materials Different? 6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth’s Systems? Performance Assessment: Writing an Article on 6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change 2 Earth Systems 7 How Do Engineers Unit Improve Materials? Can Substances Be Identified? Earth’s Systems Performance Assessment: Creating a Public Service Shape?

Is Matter Made Of?

Performance Assessment: Testing Pancake Announcement About Water in Your Community Do Scientists Know Tools WhenDo Substances Change? 7 What Scientists Use to Observe Space? 1 What Are Earth’s Four Systems? 4 How Do Farming and Industry Affect Earth’s Ingredients Causes Substances to Change? Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for Systems? ear? 2 How Do Earth’s Systems Produce Weather and

Unit 3 Changes in Matter the ISS nd Earth, the Moon, and the Stars

Grade 5

Science Journal

4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Everyday Ecosystem? Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of 5 How Do People’s Lives Affect Earth’s

ate?

Grade 5

Science Journal

Grade 5

1 What Is an Ecosystem? 6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy? Announcement About Water in Your Community 2 What Is the Role of Producers an Ecosystem? How Do5 Ecosystems Change?four units. Each unit Are Earth’s Four Systems? 4 How Doin Farming and Industry Affect TCI’s7Earth’s Grade program includes

Living Things and Ecosystems

The air around this ocean is moist. When a moist air mass met the mountain, the air mass was blocked from moving forward. So, it rose instead. As the air mass moved up, it also cooled down. This caused the moisture in the air mass to condense and form clouds.

Science Journal

5 How Do People’s Everyday Lives Affect Earth’s

Climate?

Systems? 6 How Do Changes to Substances 3 How Do Earth’s Systems Change Earth’s Surface? Affect Their

1 What Is Matter Made Of?

Weights? 6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth’s Systems? 2 Why Are Materials Different? Performance Assessment: Writing an Article on Does Gravity Do? 6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change Engineering Earth’s Systems 7 How Do Engineers Improve Materials? Performance Assessment: Creating a Public Service 3 How Can Substances Shape? Be Identified? s the Sun Brighter Than Other Stars? Announcement About Water in Your Community Performance 4 How Do Scientists Know When Substances Change? 7 What Tools Do Scientists Use to Observe Space? Assessment: Testing Pancake s There Day and Night? Ingredients What Causes to Change? Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for Do Shadows Change During the5 Day and Year?Substances Unit 3 Changes in Matter the ISS Do Stars Seem to Move During the Night and

Unit 4 Earth, the Moon, and the Stars

1 What Is Matter Made Of?

Name:

2 Why Are Materials Different?

6 How Do Changes to Substances Affect Their Weights?

1 What Does Gravity Do? 6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change 7 How Do Engineers Improve Materials? Engineering 3 How Can Substances Be Identified? Shape? 2 Why Is the Sun Brighter Than Other Stars? Performance Assessment: Testing Pancake 4 How Do Scientists7Know Substances WhatWhen Tools Do Scientists Change? Use to Observe Space? 3 Why Is There Day and Night? Ingredients 5 What Causes Substances to Change? Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for 4 How Do Shadows Change During the Day and Year? 5 How Do Stars Seem to Move During the Night and Year?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

L e s s o n 2 - H o w D o E a r t h ’s S y s t e m s P r o d u c e We a t h e r a n d C l i m a t e ?

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Illustrations Illustrations Photographs Photographs Maps Maps

the ISS

Unit 4 Earth, the Moon, and the Stars

1 What Does Gravity Do? 2 Why Is the Sun Brighter Than Other Stars?

12/9/19 1:39 PM

Name: 6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change

Engineering Shape?

3 Why Is There Day and Night?

7 What Tools Do Scientists Use to Observe Space?

4 How Do Shadows Change During the Day and Year?

Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for

5 How Do Stars Seem to Move During the Night and Year?

Picture Cards

Unit 1

Polar Ocean

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Unit 4

Grade 5

m?

C A R D

Grade 5

6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?

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Students analyze powerful images, graphs, data sets, and engaging primary sources printed on reusable placards.

the ISS

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

12/9/19 1:35 PM

Name:

L esson 1 - W hat Is a n E cos ystem?

1

Engineering

Name:

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Resources available in Spanish


Bring Science Alive! Exploring Science Practices Grade 5 Unit 1 - Living Things and Ecosystems Anchoring Phenomenon: Some organisms can grow really big. For example, the Humongous Fungus grew to be as big as 1,665 football fields. Storyline: The TV show “Colossal Travels” visits some of the largest organisms in the world! How do these trees, animals, and fungi grow so much? Learn more by studying how organisms interact with their ecosystems! 1 What Is an Ecosystem? Phenomenon: All sorts of different animals can meet their needs in the same area.

2 What Is the Role of Producers in an Ecosystem?

Phenomenon: Plants like these bromeliads grow on tree branches instead of in the ground.

3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem? Phenomenon: Pigs grow larger as they eat.

4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Ecosystem? Phenomenon: People save food wastes for compost piles.

5 How Do Matter and Energy Move in an Ecosystem? Phenomenon: Some animals only eat animals. Some animals only eat plants.

6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?

Phenomenon: The wintercreeper plant has taken over this area and toppled some trees.

7 How Do Ecosystems Change?

Phenomenon: Wildebeest migrate to find rainier plains.

8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems? Phenomenon: Fish have trouble surviving in polluted rivers.

Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels

Anchoring Phenomenon: Some organisms can grow really big. For example, the Humongous Fungus grew to be as big as 1,665 football fields.

Unit 2 - Earth Systems Anchoring Phenomenon: For over five years, California’s aqueducts had been drying up, and rain had been scarce. This led to a drought. Storyline: California’s aqueducts have been drying up. Rain has been scarce for years. What is causing this drought? As an intern for the EPA, investigate California’s droughts to learn how Earth’s systems interact with one another. 1 What Are Earth’s Four Systems? Phenomenon: Lakes drain during years of low rain.

2 How Do Earth’s Systems Produce Weather and Climate? Phenomenon: The fog in this valley stays low to the ground.

3 How Do Earth’s Systems Change Earth’s Surface? Phenomenon: These rocks are oddly shaped.

Performance Assessment: Writing an Article on Earth’s Systems

Anchoring Phenomenon: For over five years, California’s aqueducts had been drying up, and rain had been scarce. This led to a drought.

4 How Do Farming and Industry Affect Earth’s Systems? Phenomenon: The miner is digging in the earth.

5 How Do People’s Everyday Lives Affect Earth’s Systems? Phenomenon: You can’t find books in nature, but they come from Earth’s systems.

6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth’s Systems? Phenomenon: Because of pollution, you can’t drink this water.

Performance Assessment: Creating a Public Service Announcement About Water in Your Community Anchoring Phenomenon: For over five years, California’s aqueducts had been drying up, and rain had been scarce. This led to a drought.


Unit 3 - Changes in Matter Anchoring Phenomenon: When pale gooey liquid batter hits the griddle, it turns into a golden fluffy solid pancake. Storyline: Join Chef Lopez in the Pancake Test Kitchen! As her apprentices (sous chefs), you will learn about the science of pancakes.

1 What Is Matter Made Of?

Phenomenon: The balloon changes size and shape when the girl blows into it.

2 Why Are Materials Different?

Phenomenon: This ice looks different after it melts.

3 How Can Substances Be Identified?

Phenomenon: A sugar cube starts to disappear when dropped into a cup of water.

4 How Do Scientists Know When Substances Change? Phenomenon: When wood burns, its color changes.

5 What Causes Substances to Change?

Phenomenon: Bubbles form when the baking soda in the flask comes into contact with vinegar.

6 How Do Changes to Substances Affect Their Weights? Phenomenon: When a reaction creates bubbles, the balloon inflates.

7 How Do Engineers Improve Materials? Phenomenon: Concrete makes a stronger floor than dirt.

Performance Assessment: Testing Pancake Ingredients

Anchoring Phenomenon: When pale gooey liquid batter hits the griddle, it turns into a golden fluffy solid pancake.

Unit 4 - Earth, the Moon, and the Stars Anchoring Phenomenon: Life is different on a space station than it is on Earth. Storyline: Astronauts, your mission is to create a training program for new cadets to prepare them for life on a space station. To prepare your training program, first study gravity and light patterns here on Earth.

1 What Does Gravity Do?

Phenomenon: No matter where you jump on Earth, you will land on the ground.

2 Why Is the Sun Brighter Than Other Stars?

Phenomenon: You can see the stars at night but not during the day.

3 Why Is There Day and Night?

Phenomenon: Daytime is bright, and nighttime is dark.

4 How Do Shadows Change During the Day and Year? Phenomenon: Shadows move and change length throughout the day.

5 How Do Stars Seem to Move During the Night and Year?

Phenomenon: You see Orion in one part of the sky. Later that night, it is on the other side of the sky.

6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change Shape? Phenomenon: The moon looks different on different days.

7 What Tools Do Scientists Use to Observe Space? Phenomenon: Tools help us see space in greater detail.

Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for the ISS Anchoring Phenomenon: Life is different on a space station than it is on Earth.


Material Kits are prepared and organized to seamlessly integrate into each lesson.

Consumable materials can easily be ordered online.

Everything needed for one lesson is grouped together into a clearly labeled bag.


Grade 5 Materials Kit AP-20-1

Materials List Bin 1

Item #LM-9817

Common Materials Bin, plastic, shoe box size

6

Vinegar, white

5

Sand, medium grain

1

Salt, non-iodized

1

Baking soda

3

Plates, paper, pkg/100

1

Baggies, plastic, pkg/100

1

Some chemicals in this materials kit have expiration dates. If you received a chemical that is expired at the time of delivery and you would like a replacement, please contact us at info@teachtci.com.


Grade 5 Materials Kit AP-20-1

Materials List Bin 2

Item #LM-9817

Common Materials

Common Materials continued

Balance, triple beam

1

Cup, paper, 7 oz

100

Beaker, 250 mL, plastic

12

Filter, coffee, pkg/50

1

Flour, 2 lb

2

Toothpicks, flat, pkg/800

1

Light socket, porcelain w/ cord

1

Food coloring, set/4

1

Sponge

9

Graduated cylinder, 100 mL

6

Balloons, round, pkg/35

1

Earth model, inflatable

1

Spoons, plastic, pkg/24

2

Jar, plastic

6

Bulb, incandescent, 60 w

1

Bowl, paper

15

Cotton balls, pkg/300

1

Paper clips, large, box/100

2

Craft sticks, pkg/150

1

Ruler

1

Some chemicals in this materials kit have expiration dates. If you received a chemical that is expired at the time of delivery and you would like a replacement, please contact us at info@teachtci.com.


Grade 5 Materials Kit AP-20-1

Materials List Bin 2

Item #LM-9817

Common Materials continued Yarn

1

Poster, Unit 1

1

Poster, Unit 2

1

Poster, Unit 3

1

Poster, Unit 4

1

Poster, Safety

1

Some chemicals in this materials kit have expiration dates. If you received a chemical that is expired at the time of delivery and you would like a replacement, please contact us at info@teachtci.com.


Grade 5 Materials Kit AP-20-1

Materials List Bin 3

Item #LM-9817

Unit 1, Lesson 3

Unit 2, Lesson 1

Forceps

6

Clay, modeling, pkg/4

5

Owl pellets

6

Bead, navy, pkg/70

1

Unit 1, Lesson 4

Unit 2, Lesson 4

Sugar, granulated

3

Forks, plastic, pkg/24

2

Yeast

6

Knives, plastic, pkg/48

1

Unit 1, Lesson 8

Unit 2, Lesson 6

Container, clear, plastic, 64 oz

6

Gravel, 5 lb

1

Seeds, bush bean, 8 oz

1

Soil, potting, 5 lb

1

Cloth, cotton

2

Some chemicals in this materials kit have expiration dates. If you received a chemical that is expired at the time of delivery and you would like a replacement, please contact us at info@teachtci.com.


Grade 5 Materials Kit AP-20-1

Materials List Bin 4

Item #LM-9817

Unit 3, Lesson 1 Wood, balsa, 12�

Unit 3, Lesson 6 4

Unit 3, Lesson 3

Antacid tablets, pkg/2

2

Unit 3, Lesson 7

Baking powder

1

Talc, powder

1

Iodine solution, starch test

2

Batteries, size D, pkg/2

6

Cups, plastic medicine, 30 mL, pkg/50

1

Flashlight

6

Droppers

6

Hand Lenses

6

Washers, metal, 3/4�, pkg/100

1

Unit 4, Lesson 2

Unit 4, Lesson 4 Chalk, white

1

Unit 3, Lesson 5 Calcium chloride

2

Some chemicals in this materials kit have expiration dates. If you received a chemical that is expired at the time of delivery and you would like a replacement, please contact us at info@teachtci.com.


Grade 5 Materials Kit AP-20-1

Materials List Bin 4

Item #LM-9817

Unit 4, Lesson 7 Tubes, cardboard, 5.86� L

6

Tubes, cardboard, 4.71� L

6

Lens, double convex, FL 15 cm

6

Lens, double concave, FL 10 cm

6

Lens, double convex, FL 10 cm

6

Cardstock, white, letter size

25

Some chemicals in this materials kit have expiration dates. If you received a chemical that is expired at the time of delivery and you would like a replacement, please contact us at info@teachtci.com.


Bring Science Alive! is flexible so that you can science on your terms. WithWith TCI’sTCI’s lesson Bring Science Alive! is flexible so that you teach can teach science on your terms. lesson structure, you’llyou’ll covercover all the structure, allbases. the bases.

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Show What Show What YouYou Know Know

Phenomena Phenomena Support your players with: with: Support your players –Science Journals –Science Journals –Material Kits Kits –Material –Science Background –Science Background and much more!more! and much


A Phenomena-Rich Program TCI believes that phenomena make science more meaningful for students. Bring Science Alive! provides many opportunities for students to engage with, investigate, and make sense of natural phenomena in their own lives.

Anchoring Phenomenon The anchoring phenomenon encourages students to make connections with the world around them. Students then further explore the phenomenon during the Performance Assessment.

Lesson Phenomenon

Local Phenomenon

Each lesson begins with an investigative phenomenon that is used to pique students’ interest and drive instruction throughout the investigations. At the end of a lesson, students use what they learned to make sense of the phenomenon.

Students build a deeper, personal connection to the phenomenon through direct observation. Simple and engaging activities called Try It!, See It! and Research It! are embedded in every lesson to enable students to make real-world connections.


Bring Science Alive! covers a variety of phenomena topics to engage every student.

Multimedia Phenomena

Phenomena are presented through videos, images, and hands-on observations.

Rich multimedia throughout the program provide easy ways for students to interpret the phenomena.


Three-Dimensional Hands-on Investigation and Engineering Students set forth to investigate each lesson’s phenomenon. Each carefully-designed investigation guides students through mastering the lesson’s science practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.

Hands-on investigations challenge students to put together and conduct a science inquiry.

Engineering investigations guide students through solving real-world problems while following the engineering-design process.

Students come together, individually or in groups, to investigate real-world phenomena.


Engage with Data Throughout the investigations, students gather data, observe patterns, and analyze their results. Students make sense of their results, explain phenomena, and build arguments.

Students get first-hand experience making observations and gathering data.

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Investigations provide opportunities to record data and observe patterns.

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The investigation provides opportunities to explain phenomena.

Students analyze their results to build arguments using claim, evidence, and reasoning.

Students make sense of results using graphs, charts, models, and other formats.


Show What You Know Bring Science Alive! offers a variety of assessment types to evaluate student learning.

Formative Assessment

Lesson Game In a Lesson Game, students answer selectedresponse questions about the lesson. Results are automatically tracked in your gradebook.

Making Sense of Phenomena Students apply what they have learned in an investigation to explain the lesson’s phenomenon.

Journal Students build arguments and explain the phenomenon using Claim, Evidence and Reasoning.

Check for Understanding Students can check their own understanding of main ideas with Interactive Tutorials.

Simulations Students explore scientific concepts through an interactive game-like environment, which allows them to check and evaluate predictions.

Wrap-Up Lead a culturally-responsive discussion with carefully designed three-dimensional questions.


Summative Assessment Assessment items evaluate mastery of all three NGSS dimensions. Questions range in Depth of Knowledge levels 1-4.

Interactive stimuli engage students and prepare them for digital state tests.

A series of discrete items and performance tasks create a well-rounded assessment.

Performance Assessment

Students work collaboratively or individually to complete the tasks.

Analytical rubrics are provided to assess student work individually.

Hands-on Performance Assessments provide opportunities to check student understanding of the Performance Expectations.



Grade 5 TCI’s Grade 5 program includes four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete with hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

Unit 1

Unit 1 Living Things and Ecosystems 1 What Is an Ecosystem?

6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?

2 What Is the Role of Producers in an Ecosystem?

7 How Do Ecosystems Change?

3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems?

4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Ecosystem?

Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of

5 How Do Matter and Energy Move in an Ecosystem?

Colossal Travels

Unit 2 Earth Systems 1 What Are Earth’s Four Systems? 2 How Do Earth’s Systems Produce Weather and Climate? 3 How Do Earth’s Systems Change Earth’s Surface? Performance Assessment: Writing an Article on Earth’s Systems

Grade 5

Living Things and Ecosystems

Science Journal Sample 4 How Do Farming and Industry Affect Earth’s Systems? 5 How Do People’s Everyday Lives Affect Earth’s Systems? 6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth’s Systems? Performance Assessment: Creating a Public Service Announcement About Water in Your Community

Unit 3 Changes in Matter 1 What Is Matter Made Of? 2 Why Are Materials Different?

6 How Do Changes to Substances Affect Their Weights?

3 How Can Substances Be Identified?

7 How Do Engineers Improve Materials?

4 How Do Scientists Know When Substances Change?

Performance Assessment: Testing Pancake

5 What Causes Substances to Change?

Ingredients

Unit 4 Earth, the Moon, and the Stars 1 What Does Gravity Do? 2 Why Is the Sun Brighter Than Other Stars?

6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change Shape?

3 Why Is There Day and Night?

7 What Tools Do Scientists Use to Observe Space?

4 How Do Shadows Change During the Day and Year?

Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for

5 How Do Stars Seem to Move During the Night and

the ISS

Year?

Engineering

Name:


Grade 5 Bring Science Alive!

Unit 1

Living Things and Ecosystems The TV show “Colossal Travels� visits some of the largest organisms in the world! How do these trees, animals, and fungi grow so much? Learn more by studying how organisms interact with their ecosystems!

1 What Is an Ecosystem?.............................................................6 2 What Is the Role of Producers in an Ecosystem?....................28 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?..................50 4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Ecosystem?..............72 5 How Do Matter and Energy Move in an Ecosystem?...............94 6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?............... 114 7 How Do Ecosystems Change?.............................................. 132 8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems?

......................... 150

Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels...................................................................... 172 Engineering

2


Anchoring Phenomenon Think about this unit’s Anchoring Phenomenon: Some organisms can grow really big. For example, the Humongous Fungus grew to be as big as 1,665 football fields. Complete the chart. • List what you know about this unit’s phenomenon. • Write questions you wonder about this phenomenon. Know

Wonder

3


Unit Checkpoints As you complete each lesson, look for this icon learned in the lesson. Lesson

and return to record what you’ve

What I Learned

1 What Is an Ecosystem?

2 What Is the Role of Producers in an Ecosystem?

3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem? 4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Ecosystem? 5 How Do Matter and Energy Move in an Ecosystem?

6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?

7 How Do Ecosystems Change?

8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems?

4

Unit 1 Living Things and Ecosystems

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Using what you learned in this unit, explain the unit’s Anchoring Phenomenon: Some organisms can grow really big. For example, the Humongous Fungus grew to be as big as 1,665 football fields.

Claim

Evidence

Reasoning

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Unit 1 Living Things and Ecosystems

5


Lesson 3

What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

50

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Observing Phenomena Discuss: Why do animals and people need to eat every day especially when they are growing?

Observe this phenomenon: Pigs grow larger as they eat.

See It!

Describe other animals you have seen grow larger over time. Where do you think they get their energy from?

Think of what you already know about the reasons why animals must consume food consistently. Write questions you have.

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

51


INVESTIGATION

Investigating Owl Pellets Look closely at these three images. What do you think the owl is doing? • W hen owls eat, there are certain parts of their food that they cannot digest. They compress the parts they cannot digest into a pellet. • Then they regurgitate (throw up) the pellet as waste. It might be difficult for you to directly observe an owl hunting and eating, but you can look at the owl’s waste (the pellet) to find out what owls eat! What kinds of things do you think you will find?

52

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Dissecting the Owl Pellet The owl pellets have been sterilized so they are clean and safe to dissect. But we will still follow safe lab practices. • Put on disposable gloves. • Cover your desk with newspaper. When you are finished preparing your work station, gather your materials. Each group needs: • an owl pellet. • a pair of forceps. • a toothpick. Now you are ready to dissect your owl pellet. Using the forceps and toothpick, carefully pull apart the pellet. Then, neatly lay out the remains on your newspaper.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

53


INVESTIGATION

Draw and label each of the remains you find in your owl pellet. Use Handout: Owl Pellets Bone Chart to help you identify each one. (If you cannot identify the remains, you can research online or label the remains with a question mark.)

54

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Scientists try to keep their work areas clean to prevent accidents. To clean up your work area, do the following: • Return the forceps to the teacher to be sanitized. • Roll up the owl pellet pieces, toothpick, and gloves in the newspaper. • Place everything in a disposable garbage bag. The teacher will tie it closed and remove it from the room. • Clean desk surfaces with antibacterial spray and paper towels. • Wash hands with soap and warm water.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

55


INVESTIGATION

Creating a Model Based on Your Findings Create a diagram that models the flow of energy from the sun to the owl. • Below the owl, draw each of the organisms your class discovered that owls eat. Draw arrows to show energy flowing from the organisms to the owl. • Then research what plants and animals are eaten by the organisms the owl eats. • Add those to your diagram. Draw arrows to show the transfer of energy. • Draw arrows from the sun to any producers in your diagram.

56

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Vocabulary Match the term to the correct definition. Word Bank consumer

circulation

digestion

1. The process that breaks down food into simple materials that an animal’s body can use. 2. The process that moves materials through the body. 3. An organism that gets energy by eating other organisms.

My Science Concepts Reflect on your understanding. Draw an X along each line. Models in science can be used to explain observations made during an investigation.

still learning

know it

The owl model accurately shows the direction that energy flows. It shows where each organism gets its energy. However, the model does not show the amount of energy transferred or how much energy the organisms use. It also does not show the organisms to scale or all the organisms in the ecosystem.

still learning

know it

By dissecting an owl pellet, it was discovered that energy is transferred from the animals owls eat. These animals got their energy from eating other animals or plants. Plants got their energy from the sun.

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Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

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1. Consumers Eat Other Organisms

A hawk sits high in a tree watching the ground. It sees a small mammal. Quickly, the hawk swoops down and captures the animal with its sharp claws. It brings the animal to its nest to feed its babies. A hawk is a consumer, an organism that gets energy by eating other organisms. Consumers, like producers, are living parts of an ecosystem. All animals are consumers. Unlike most plants, nearly all animals are unable to make their own food. Instead, consumers get the matter and energy they need by consuming food. The energy in their food was once energy from the sun that was captured by producers during photosynthesis. Food provides animals with the materials they need for body repair and growth. Food also provides the energy animals need to move and maintain other body functions. For example, when a wolf goes hunting in the winter, it is using energy. It needs energy to run after deer. It also needs energy to stay warm. Many animals need energy to keep themselves warm, especially if they live in a very cold place! Animal species vary greatly in the food sources they use to meet their needs. Some animals, such as hawks and lions, eat only meat from other animals. Deer, rabbits, and land snails are some animals that eat mostly plant material. Most animals eat both plant and animal material. For example, brown bears eat fish, insects, berries, and nuts. Humans can eat both plants and animals. 58

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

Hawks are consumers that only eat other animals. Although hawks have no teeth, their sharp claws and beaks help them capture and eat their food.

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Define what a consumer is in your own words. Then give three examples of consumers that you have seen in your life, and explain why you think they are consumers.

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2. Digestion Breaks Down Food to Release Energy

Bricks, steel, and wood are used to build houses, schools, and barns. You can think of the matter in food as the building materials that are used to make body parts. Why is food so important to an animal? Food gives animals the building materials and energy they need to grow and survive. The animal uses the matter to grow larger, to repair body parts, and to reproduce. Growth, repair, and reproduction also require energy. Mammals and birds need energy to keep their bodies warm. In fact, everything an animal does uses energy. Food Must Be Digested Consumers cannot use the building materials and energy in food right away. The food must first be digested. Digestion is the process that breaks down food into simple materials that an animal’s body can use. Most animals have a digestive system where digestion takes place. A mouth, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine are some of the parts of a mammal’s digestive system. Other animals such as clams and worms do not have all these parts, but they still digest the food they eat. Think about a mouse that has eaten a meal. The mouse’s body needs to break down the food in the meal to use it. When the mouse eats, the food is broken down in two ways. First, the mouse chews the food up into small pieces. Then, the food is mixed with digestive juices that break it down into simple materials for the mouse. 60

Mice have digestive systems like yours. Food is taken in through their mouths. The food is then broken down to provide the simple materials and energy that the body can use.

The Mouse Digestive System

Lesson 3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

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Materials Must Be Distributed There is one more step in digesting the meal. The broken down materials pass through the walls of the mouse’s small intestine and move into the blood. The blood carries them to all parts of the mouse’s body. Circulation is the process of moving blood in a large, complicated loop through the body. Mice, as well as many other animals, have a circulatory system that is made up of a heart, blood vessels, and blood. The digestive and circulatory systems work together to supply all parts of the body with the materials and energy that they need. Blood moves inside blood vessels. The heart acts like a pump to circulate the blood. You can think of the blood vessels as a highway system that moves materials in the mouse’s body. The blood vessels form a large loop in its body, so the blood moves around in a continuous cycle. The blood picks up a supply of materials as it passes the small intestine. It also picks up oxygen as it passes through the lungs. Then, like trucks on a highway, the blood drops off these materials to the rest of the mouse’s body. When it makes another trip past the small intestine, it picks up a new supply of materials to take to body parts. In the body parts, the materials are further broken down using oxygen to release the energy they contain. As the food and oxygen are used up, the blood continuously supplies more of both. Thus, the mouse’s body always has a supply of the things it needs. As the blood drops off building materials, it picks up wastes that the body parts must get rid of. You will read about how the mouse’s body gets rid of the wastes it makes. © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

This model shows what a mouse’s blood vessel might look like. The blood carries useful materials like digested food and oxygen throughout the mouse’s body. It also moves wastes.

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Draw a line connecting each label to its correct place on the diagram.

Write a detailed caption for your completed diagram. Include these terms in your caption: digestive system, digestive juices, energy, and building materials.

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3. Consumers Store Excess Food

Many birds migrate thousands of kilometers to warmer areas. About two weeks before they leave, they begin a feeding frenzy. How do you think the birds store all of the food they eat before they go? Suppose a bird eats a large meal. It digests the food in that meal into simple building materials. However, the bird does not immediately need all the materials and the energy in them. Instead, it stores the materials and energy to use later, when it cannot find other food. Most of this excess food is stored in a bird’s body as fat. The farther a bird migrates, the more fat it must store. A bird traveling a long distance may double its weight before it leaves. It will rarely eat during the trip. How does the bird’s body prepare for this journey? When an animal eats more food than it needs right away, its body stores the extra food energy for later. An animal stores the extra energy for short periods of time in the form of sugar. The materials can be stored for longer periods of time as fat. When an animal needs energy between meals, it sends a signal releasing the stored sugar or fat into the blood. The blood carries the sugar to all parts of the body. There, it is broken down to free the energy it contains. By storing food, animals can survive when they cannot find other food to eat. They can use the stored food to repair body parts, move, and stay warm. Animals always need a supply of energy, so they either must be eating or using stored food all of the time. © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

This blackpoll warbler doubles its weight before flying thousands of miles from Canada to South America each autumn. It stores extra food that it eats as fat, which it uses as energy during the trip.

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You have learned that birds need to gain a lot of weight before they migrate long distances, because many of them cannot eat while they are migrating. What other consumer might have to store a lot of food, and why?

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4. Consumers Produce Wastes

Recall that a plant is similar to a factory and that all factories produce wastes. An animal’s body is like a busy factory, too. Many processes take place in the body. Food is digested and energy is released from it. The animal grows and repairs damaged body parts. Muscles move the arms and legs. The heart beats and pumps blood. All these processes create wastes. During digestion, much of the matter in food is broken down into materials that the body needs. But some of the matter cannot be used. This matter is waste. The large intestine removes the digestive waste from the body. These solid wastes go into the ecosystem. What happens to the food in the bloodstream? The simple materials from digested food are further broken down in the body using oxygen from the air. This releases energy, but more wastes are made. One of these wastes is carbon dioxide gas. It is picked up by the blood and removed from the body when the animal breathes out. It goes back into the air. Wastes also are made when an animal dies. The once-living matter from the animal’s body is broken down and passes into the soil and air. What happens to all these wastes? They become part of the nonliving things in an ecosystem—the air, soil, and water. The onceliving matter goes back into the environment to be used again by other organisms. Producers reuse the carbon dioxide to make food and grow. Thus, matter is recycled in an ecosystem.

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When this horse breathes out, some of the water its body produces freezes in the cold air. Carbon dioxide waste is also breathed out by the horse, but you cannot see it. The water and carbon dioxide that were part of a living organism are once again nonliving parts of the ecosystem.

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Explain three different ways most consumers produce wastes. Where do the wastes go after they are produced?

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5. Humans Are Consumers

When you are hungry, you look for something to eat. You might choose an apple or a piece of cheese. When you are thirsty, you might pour a glass of juice or milk. Cheese and milk were once part of an animal. An apple and juice are plant products. You decide what kind of food you want to eat and what you want to drink. You may decide that you will eat only plant products or that you want to eat all kinds of food. You have other needs as well. You need a place to live and a family to take care of you. You need clean air to breathe and clean water to drink. You need food energy to keep warm and to power all the activities your body does. You use that energy to move, to breathe, to repair body parts, and to stay warm. You are even using energy while you sleep! Humans, like all other animals, are consumers that have needs that must be met if they are to survive. You have a digestive system that breaks down food into materials that your body can use. You have a circulatory system with a heart that pumps the blood in your blood vessels. Your blood delivers needed materials so that your body can grow larger and repair itself. Like other consumers, all of the food energy that humans use once came from the sun. Even though humans cannot perform photosynthesis, the energy in their food came from a plant at some point. That plant got its energy from the sun. You are one of the living parts that make up the ecosystem where you live. You interact with the other living things and with the nonliving things in your ecosystem. Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Just like other animals, humans are consumers. After humans eat food, their bodies digest it, and their circulatory system moves the materials throughout their bodies.

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You have learned that humans, like all consumers, have needs that must be met if they are to survive. What are some needs that must be met for you to survive? Describe at least three.

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FOR

UNDERSTANDING

Show What You Know The flowchart below models how energy flows throughout an ecosystem. Follow the directions next to each box to complete the model. I get the energy I Draw yourself. Then, complete the caption.

need to live and grow from…

.

This consumer got Draw a consumer that a human might eat. Complete the caption.

its energy by...

.

Producers get their Draw a producer that might be eaten by the consumer above. Complete the caption.

energy by…

.

Draw the most likely source of energy for the producer above. Complete the caption.

Almost all of an ecosystem’s energy comes from… .

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CHECK

FOR

UNDERSTANDING

Making Sense of the Phenomenon Let’s revisit the phenomenon: Pigs grow larger as they eat. Think about: • Is the pig eating a producer or another consumer?

Use your findings from the investigation to answer this question: How do consumers get energy? Claim

Evidence

Reasoning

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Performance Assessment:

Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels

Colossal Travels is hiring you as a producer for an episode on big organisms. You will: • develop a model for how matter cycles through an ecosystem. • use a model to show and explain how energy flows through an ecosystem. • find a local plant and support an argument for how it gets materials to grow.

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Planning a Segment on the American Bison A viewer sent Raul this e-mail.

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Raul wants to respond to this viewer in the episode. Write a script for this segment that explains this phenomenon to the viewer. Your segment should: • identify and describe energy, the sun, the animals, and the plants in the ecosystem. • state the relationships between different parts of the ecosystem. • describe the way energy is transferred between different parts of the ecosystem. • explain how energy from the sun is related to how the bison got so big.

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Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Use this space to plan your segment. Choose the visuals you will use in this segment. Consider if you will use props or real organisms. Label each drawing and describe how it will be used in the episode.

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Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Planning a Segment on a Local Ecosystem Colossal Travels wants to feature an ecosystem near you! Find a large plant in your area. What is the plant? What is its ecosystem?

Write a script that tells how matter is transported in this ecosystem to support plant growth. This segment should: • state a claim about what materials plants need to grow. • describe evidence from the other storyboards in the previous segments. • use reasoning to support the claim by connecting the evidence to the claim and explaining how the science concepts you learn support the claim.

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Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of Colossal Travels

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Choose the visuals you will use in this segment. Consider if you will use props or real organisms. Label each drawing and describe how it will be used in the episode.

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Grade 5 TCI’s Grade 5 program includes four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete with hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

Unit 1

Unit 1 Living Things and Ecosystems 1 What Is an Ecosystem?

6 What Makes an Ecosystem Healthy or Unhealthy?

2 What Is the Role of Producers in an Ecosystem?

7 How Do Ecosystems Change?

3 What Is the Role of Consumers in an Ecosystem?

8 How Do Humans Change Ecosystems?

4 What Is the Role of Decomposers in an Ecosystem?

Performance Assessment: Planning an Episode of

5 How Do Matter and Energy Move in an Ecosystem?

Colossal Travels

Unit 2 Earth Systems 1 What Are Earth’s Four Systems? 2 How Do Earth’s Systems Produce Weather and Climate? 3 How Do Earth’s Systems Change Earth’s Surface? Performance Assessment: Writing an Article on Earth’s Systems

Grade 5

Living Things and Ecosystems

Science Journal Sample 4 How Do Farming and Industry Affect Earth’s Systems? 5 How Do People’s Everyday Lives Affect Earth’s Systems? 6 What Can People Do To Protect Earth’s Systems? Performance Assessment: Creating a Public Service Announcement About Water in Your Community

Unit 3 Changes in Matter 1 What Is Matter Made Of? 2 Why Are Materials Different?

6 How Do Changes to Substances Affect Their Weights?

3 How Can Substances Be Identified?

7 How Do Engineers Improve Materials?

4 How Do Scientists Know When Substances Change?

Performance Assessment: Testing Pancake

5 What Causes Substances to Change?

Ingredients

Unit 4 Earth, the Moon, and the Stars 1 What Does Gravity Do? 2 Why Is the Sun Brighter Than Other Stars?

6 How Does the Moon Seem to Move and Change Shape?

3 Why Is There Day and Night?

7 What Tools Do Scientists Use to Observe Space?

4 How Do Shadows Change During the Day and Year?

Performance Assessment: Training Astronauts for

5 How Do Stars Seem to Move During the Night and

the ISS

Year?

Engineering

Name: