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Exploring Science Practices— Grade 3


Program Components Materials Kits

Online Resources

Ready-to-use Materials Kits are prepped and organized for you to seamlessly integrate into each lesson.

Ready-to-teach lesson presentations, simulations, complete student resources, customizable 3-Dimensional assessments, and more are at your fingertips.

Science Journals

Picture Cards

During Fast Track Lessons, students use the journal to access hands-on investigations, checks for understanding, and text with notes for each science unit.

P I C T U R E

Grade 3

s four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete text with notes, and checks for understanding.

Life Cycles and Traits

Weather and Climate Unit 2

Forces and Motion

Grade 3

unit has a Science Journal, complete How Do People Learn Abouttext Extinct Organisms? with5 hands-on investigations, with notes, and checks for understanding.

1 What Do Forces Do? 4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do? Performance Assessment: Building an Exhibit 6 How Are Weather and Related? 5 What Can Electric Forces Do? 2 What Happens When Forces Are Balanced onClimate Columbian Mammoths

6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of Long Ago?

or Unbalanced? 7 How Does Extreme People? Performance Assessment: Designing the 3 Weather How DoAffect Environments Change? Performance Assessment: Researching How

Performance Assessment: Creating Infographics on 1 What Makes Weather?

2 How Is Temperature Measured?

Environments and Living Things

Jan.

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Engineering

Assessment: Evaluating Roof Designs 5 How Isand Weather Predicted? Are Traits Affected by Both Inheritance 7 What Are the Life Cycles of AnimalsPerformance Without

Unit 3 Weather and Climate

Backbones? Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

Picture Cards

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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

L e s s o n 5 - H ow I s We a t h e r P r e d i c t e d?

Engineering

Performance Assessment: Evaluating Roof Designs 5 How Is Weather7Predicted? 3 How Are Traits Affected by Both Inheritance and What Are the Life Cycles of Animals Without Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data the Environment? Backbones?

Not Others?

Performance Assessment: Creating Infographics on

Unit 4 Life Cycles and Traits Life Cycles

Performance Assessment: Writing for Science Monthly 1 Why Do Offspring Look Similar to Their Parents?

Name:

6 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones?

3 How Are Traits Affected by Both Inheritance and

7 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals Without

the Environment? Not Others?

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5 What Are the Life Cycles of Plants?

2 How Does the Environment Affect Traits?

4 Why Do Some Members of a Species Survive and

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6 How Are Weather and Climate Related?

2 How Is Temperature Measured? 7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People? mance Assessment: Writing for Science Monthly 3 How Is Wind Measured? 8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather 1 Why Do Offspring Look Similar to Their Parents? 5 What Are the Life Cycles of Plants? Damage? 4 How Are Rain and SnowAre Measured? 2 How Does the Environment Affect Traits? 6 What the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones?

4 Why Do Some Members of a Species Survive and

Nov.

100

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or Unbalanced? Performance Assessment: Designing the 7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People?

Performance Assessment: Infographics Name: on 1 WhatCreating Makes Weather?

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Year 3: Average Temperature

5 What Can Electric Forces Do? 2 What Happens Forces Are Balanced 6 When How Are Weather and Climate Related?

Cycles Unit 4 Life Cycles andLife Traits

40 20

Science Journal

Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct

4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do?

onthly 3 HowofCan You 8 Predict of Motion? Plenty-O-Fish Game 3 How Is Wind Measured? How Patterns Can People Reduce Extreme Weather Do Offspring Look Similar to Their Parents? 5 What Are the Life Cycles Plants? Performance Assessment: Testing Carnival Games Damage? 4 How Are Rain and6Snow Measured? Does the Environment Affect Traits? What Are the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones?

Do Some Members of a Species Survive and

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Month

Temperature (°F)

3 How Can You Predict Patterns of Motion? Plenty-O-Fish Game Is Wind Measured? 8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather 5 What Are the Life Cycles of Plants? Damage? Performance Assessment: Testing Carnival Games Are Rain 6 and Snow Measured? What Are the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones? Unit 2Evaluating Forces andRoof Motion Performance Assessment: Designs dIs Weather 7 Predicted? What Are the Life Cycles of Animals Without Unit 3 Weather and Climate mance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data Backbones? 1 What Do Forces Do?

Others?

UNIT 1 - ENVIRONMENTS AND LIVING THINGS

Year 2: Average Temperature

Unit 1

w Can You8Predict Patterns of Motion? Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct How Can People Reduce Extreme WeatherPlenty-O-Fish Game 1 Where Do Organisms Live? 4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing mance Assessment: Damage?Testing Carnival Games Environments? 2 How Does Living in a Group Help Some Unit 2Evaluating Forces and Motion Performance Assessment: Roof Designs Animals Survive? 5 How Do People Learn About Extinct Organisms?

Environment?

A

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Science Journal

4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do? 6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of Performance Assessment: Building an Exhibit 5 What Can Electric Forces Do? at Happens When Forces Are Balanced 6 How Are Weather andon Climate Related? Columbian Mammoths Long Ago? Unbalanced? Performance the and Living 7 How Does Extreme3Weather Affect People? Unit 1 Designing Environments Things How Do Environments Change? Assessment: Performance Assessment: Researching How

4 Life CyclesLife andCycles Traits

C A R D

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Grade 3 Temperature (°F)

Animals Survive?

at Do Forces Do?

Is Temperature Measured?

Grade 3

Science Journal

Performance Assessment: thePerformance Do Environments Change? Unit 1Designing Environments and Living Things Assessment: Researching How Plenty-O-Fish Game Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct 1 Where Do Organisms Live? 4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing mes Environments? TCI’s Grade 3 program includes four units. Each 2 How Does Living in a Group Help Some

t Makes Weather?

P I C T U R E

Year 1: Average Temperature Temperature (°F)

Environments? TCI’s Grade 3 program includes four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete checks for understanding.

mals Survive? 5 How Doinvestigations, People Learn About with hands-on textExtinct withOrganisms? notes, and 4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do? mance Assessment: Building an Exhibit 6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of What Can Electric Forces Do? Columbian5Mammoths Long Ago?

3ataWeather and Climate

Grade 3

Unit 3

Grade 3

4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing

Hot Desert

Long Ago?

1 Environments and Living Things Researching How Performance Assessment:

2 Forces and Motion

U N I T 3 - W E AT H E R A N D C L I M AT E

Science Journal

6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of

Does Living in a Group Help Some

A

New York City, Temperature Data

Unit 4

Grade 3

4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing

Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct re Do Organisms Live?

C A R D

Grade 3

TCI’s Environments? Grade 3 program includes four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete 5 How Do People Learn About Extinct Organisms? with hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

nd

Students analyze powerful images, graphs, data sets, and engaging primary sources printed on reusable placards.

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Graphs Graphs Maps Maps Photographs Photographs

Engineering

Backbones?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

12/18/19 5:09 PM

Performance Assessment: Creating Infographics on Name:

Lesson 1 - Where Do Organisms Live?

1

Life Cycles

Performance Assessment: Writing for Science Monthly

Engineering

Name:

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Resources available in Spanish


Bring Science Alive! Exploring Science Practices Grade 3 Unit 1 - Environments and Living Things Anchoring Phenomenon: Paleontologists have found groups of Columbian Mammoth fossils all across North and Central America. These Columbian Mammoths died off thousands of years ago. Storyline: A Natural History Museum has hired you as junior paleontologists! Discover why Columbian Mammoths lived in groups and what their fossils tell you about their environment.

1 Where Do Organisms Live?

Phenomenon: Living things live in different places.

2 How Does Living in a Group Help Some Animals Survive? Phenomenon: Some bison live in groups.

Performance Assessment: Building an Exhibit on Columbian Mammoths

Anchoring Phenomenon: Paleontologists have found groups of Columbian Mammoth fossils all across North and Central America. These Columbian Mammoths died off thousands of years ago.

3 How Do Environments Change?

Phenomenon: The land in front of this forest fire looks different from the land behind it.

4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing Environments? Phenomenon: This coati finds food in a trash can.

5 How Do People Learn About Extinct Organisms?

Phenomenon: This model shows an organism that has not existed on Earth for thousands of years.

6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of Long Ago? Phenomenon: Because of fossils, we know a lot about this type of organism.

Performance Assessment: Researching How Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct

Anchoring Phenomenon: Paleontologists have found groups of Columbian Mammoth fossils all across North and Central America. These Columbian Mammoths died off thousands of years ago.

Unit 2 - Forces and Motion Anchoring Phenomenon: A swing ride spins slow and then fast. The faster the ride spins, the higher the riders swing. Storyline: The carnival is coming to town! Here, things move quickly. Find out how rides and games make objects move by exploring forces and motion in this unit.

1 What Do Forces Do?

Phenomenon: When a ball is thrown at them, some cans fall down but others do not.

2 What Happens When Forces Are Balanced or Unbalanced?

Phenomenon: In tug-of-war, you might pull one direction but end up moving the other direction.

3 How Can You Predict Patterns of Motion?

Phenomenon: A carnival ride swings forward and backward over and over again.

Performance Assessment: Testing Carnival Games

Anchoring Phenomenon: A swing ride spins slow and then fast. The faster the ride spins, the higher the riders swing.

4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do?

Phenomenon: Magnets can move objects, sometimes without even touching them.

5 What Can Electric Forces Do?

Phenomenon: Your hair might stick up when riding down a slide.

Performance Assessment: Designing the Plenty-O-Fish Game

Anchoring Phenomenon: A swing ride spins slow and then fast. The faster the ride spins, the higher the riders swing.


Unit 3 - Weather and Climate Anchoring Phenomenon: Buildings in different places have different designs. Storyline: Learn about weather and climate in different places. Then you’ll design a house that can withstand a snowstorm. 1 What Makes Weather? Phenomenon: The weather is different on different days.

2 How Is Temperature Measured?

Phenomenon: Some days are hotter than others.

3 How Is Wind Measured?

Phenomenon: Some days are windy, and some days are not.

4 How Are Rain and Snow Measured? Phenomenon: Rain sometimes falls on cloudy days.

5 How Is Weather Predicted?

Phenomenon: Reporters can often tell you the weather for tomorrow.

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

Anchoring Phenomenon: Buildings in different places have different designs.

6 How Are Weather and Climate Related?

Phenomenon: Different places on Earth have different climates.

7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People? Phenomenon: Tornadoes can cause damage.

8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather Damage? Phenomenon: Lightning rods can prevent fires.

Performance Assessment: Evaluating Roof Designs Anchoring Phenomenon: Buildings in different places have different designs.

Unit 4 - Life Cycles and Traits Anchoring Phenomenon: These two frogs look the same, but only one of them is poisonous! Storyline: As a science writer for Science Monthly, you’ve been assigned a feature on Ecuadorian wildlife. Investigate traits of different organisms and tell us your findings.

1 Why Do Offspring Look Similar to Their Parents?

Phenomenon: Baby animals look like their parents but not like another type of animals’ parents.

2 How Does the Environment Affect Traits? Phenomenon: Plants will die if they don’t have enough water.

3 How Are Traits Affected by Both Inheritance and the Environment? Phenomenon: By wintertime, some trees have lost all their leaves while some stay green all year.

4 Why Do Some Members of a Species Survive and Not Others?

Phenomenon: Most squirrels match their surroundings. It is very rare to find a pure white squirrel.

Performance Assessment: Writing for Science Monthly

Anchoring Phenomenon: These two frogs look the same, but only one of them is poisonous!

5 What Are the Life Cycles of Plants?

Phenomenon: Some plants, like this tomato plant, form fruits with seeds inside.

6 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones? Phenomenon: Animals like ducks or birds hatch from eggs.

7 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals Without Backbones? Phenomenon: This cicada insect is leaving behind its old skin.

Performance Assessment: Creating Infographics on Life Cycles Anchoring Phenomenon: These two frogs look the same, but only one of them is poisonous!




Grade 3 TCI’s Grade 3 program includes four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete with hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

Unit 3

Unit 1 Environments and Living Things 1 Where Do Organisms Live? 2 How Does Living in a Group Help Some Animals Survive? Performance Assessment: Building an Exhibit on Columbian Mammoths 3 How Do Environments Change?

Grade 3

4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing Environments? 5 How Do People Learn About Extinct Organisms? 6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of

Weather and Climate Science Journal Sample

Long Ago? Performance Assessment: Researching How Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct

Unit 2 Forces and Motion 1 What Do Forces Do?

4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do?

2 What Happens When Forces Are Balanced

5 What Can Electric Forces Do?

or Unbalanced? 3 How Can You Predict Patterns of Motion?

Performance Assessment: Designing the Plenty-O-Fish Game

Performance Assessment: Testing Carnival Games

Unit 3 Weather and Climate 1 What Makes Weather?

6 How Are Weather and Climate Related?

2 How Is Temperature Measured?

7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People?

3 How Is Wind Measured?

8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather

4 How Are Rain and Snow Measured? 5 How Is Weather Predicted?

Damage? Performance Assessment: Evaluating Roof Designs

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

Unit 4 Life Cycles and Traits 1 Why Do Offspring Look Similar to Their Parents?

5 What Are the Life Cycles of Plants?

2 How Does the Environment Affect Traits?

6 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones?

3 How Are Traits Affected by Both Inheritance and

7 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals Without

the Environment? 4 Why Do Some Members of a Species Survive and Not Others?

Backbones? Performance Assessment: Creating Infographics on Life Cycles

Performance Assessment: Writing for Science Monthly

Engineering

Name:


Grade 3 Bring Science Alive!

Unit 3

Weather and Climate Learn about weather and climate in different places. Then you’ll design a house that can withstand a snowstorm.

1 What Makes Weather?.................................................................6 2 How Is Temperature Measured?.................................................22 3 How Is Wind Measured?............................................................38 4 How Are Rain and Snow Measured?..........................................54 5 How Is Weather Predicted?........................................................72 Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data........................92 6 How Are Weather and Climate Related?.....................................98 7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People?............................ 116 8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather Damage?

....... 138

Performance Assessment: Evaluating Roof Designs.................... 156 Engineering

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Anchoring Phenomenon Think about this unit’s Anchoring Phenomenon: Buildings in different places have different designs. Complete the chart. • List what you know about this unit’s phenomenon. • Write questions you wonder about this phenomenon. Know

Wonder

3


Unit Checkpoints As you complete each lesson, look for this icon learned in the lesson. Lesson

and return to record what you’ve

What I Learned

1 What Makes Weather?

2 How Is Temperature Measured?

3 How Is Wind Measured?

4 How Are Rain and Snow Measured?

5 How Is Weather Predicted?

6 How Are Weather and Climate Related?

7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People?

8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather Damage?

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Unit 3 Weather and Climate

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Using what you learned in this unit, explain the unit’s Anchoring Phenomenon: Buildings in different places have different designs.

Claim

Evidence

Reasoning

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Unit 3 Weather and Climate

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Lesson 3

How Is Wind Measured?

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Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Observing Phenomena Discuss: Do you ever notice that it is windier during certain times in the day? When is it usually windier?

Observe this phenomenon: Some days are windy, and some days are not.

See It!

Think about a place you have been that was very windy. Where were you? How often was it windy?

Think of what you already know about wind and what time of the day is windiest. Write questions you have.

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

39


INVESTIGATION

Building and Testing Anemometers 1. Use the ruler to find the middle of each of your strips of cardboard. Mark the middle. 2. Bring your cardboard to your teacher. Your teacher will cut holes in the cardboard for you. 3. Align the two holes in the cardboard strips, make a plus sign with the strips. Glue the strips in this position, then staple them together. 4. Thread a piece of yarn through both holes. 5. Tie a knot underneath so the yarn does not slip out. 6. Make sure the cardboard spins freely around the yarn. 7. Color the outside of one of your paper cups with the marker. 8. Staple a cup to the end of each cardboard arm. Make sure the cups are all pointing in the same direction around the circle. 9. Test your anemometer by holding it by the string and blowing into the cups. If it does not spin freely, ask your teacher to widen the hole around the string. Now, let’s test your anemometers. Your teacher will turn on the fan. • Hold your anemometer in front of the fan. • Count the number of full circles the colored cup makes in 30 seconds. • Then, multiply this number by 2. That will tell you how many circles the cup makes in 1 minute. Who wants to go first? Let’s start the timer! 40

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Measuring Wind Speed for Five Days In this investigation, you will use your anemometer to measure the wind for five days. Record the wind speed at the same place for five days. Record the time at which you made the observation.

Day

Time

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Wind Speed (Circles per 30 seconds)

Wind Speed (Circles per minute)

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

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INVESTIGATION

Make a bar graph that shows your data from measuring wind speed for five days. Give your graph a title. Title: _____________________________________

Tit

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Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


INVESTIGATION

Vocabulary Match the term to the correct definition. Word Bank

anemometer

wind vane 1. A tool that measures wind speed. 2. A tool that measures the direction wind comes from.

My Science Concepts Reflect on your understanding. Draw an X along each line. Anemometers measure wind speed by spinning when wind blows into them. They spin faster when the wind blows faster and harder. Wind vanes measure wind direction. They point in the direction the wind is blowing. Windsocks measure both direction and strength.

still learning

know it

The sun heats Earth’s surface unevenly. Warm air tends to float and rise. Cool air sinks or stays low. Cool air moves in to replace the rising warm air. This movement creates wind.

still learning

know it

Looking for patterns that are specific to a location can help make predictions about wind around the world. For example, near a body of water, the direction of the wind depends on whether it is day or night. The strength will likely vary over the course of the day, too. In areas of the United States, the wind may blow west to east most often because of the prevailing winds (Westerlies). Other geographic features, such as mountain ranges, play a significant role as well.

still learning © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

know it Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

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TEXT WITH

NOTES

1. The Sun and Wind You have probably felt a breeze blowing across your skin or seen tree branches bending during a storm. What The air is constantly heating up causes wind? and cooling down, which means Recall that the sun’s energy heats that air is always on the move. Earth’s surface. But it does not heat the This motion of the air is called ground evenly. Some places are sunnier wind. than others. Shadows from clouds can cool an How Wind Forms area. Warm air is lighter than cool air. So, it rises. Cooler air sinks or stays low. When warm air rises, cooler air moves in from the sides to take its place. The air in different places is always heating up or cooling down, which means it is always moving. This movement of air is the wind. The force of the wind pushes on and moves objects. You see this when leaves blow or flags flap. You can feel the force of wind on your skin on a breezy day.

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Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


TEXT WITH

NOTES

Use colored pens. Draw arrows on the image to show how wind forms. Use blue arrows to show cold air and red arrows to show warm air.

Describe what is happening in the image above. Use these terms: warm air, cold air, wind, sun, and Earth’s surface.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

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TEXT WITH

NOTES

2. Measuring Wind Speed A storm can bring fast, strong winds. How do you know how fast the winds move? Wind can be described by its speed, or how fast it is moving. An anemometer is a tool that measures wind speed. Some use cups attached to rods. Wind pushes the cups, and the rods turn. They turn faster if the wind is stronger. In the United States, wind speed is measured in miles per hour (mph). In other places around the world, speed is measured in kilometers per hour (km/h). The speed is the same, but the numbers are different. Winds with different speeds are called different things. If the wind speed is slow, you feel a gentle breeze. If the wind is fast, large tree branches start bending. Winds that blow during hurricanes are very fast and strong. They can damage buildings or uproot trees. The faster the wind, the stronger it is.

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Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

This tool is called an anemometer. It uses spinning cups to measure the speed of the wind.

The faster winds blow, the stronger the effects they have. Strong winds affect people and objects.

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


TEXT WITH

NOTES

In each box, draw a picture of a tree affected by the wind labeled below. Calm (No Wind)

Gentle Wind

Strong Wind

Hurricane Force

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

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TEXT WITH

NOTES

3. Measuring Wind Direction If you see a storm in the distance, will it come your way? Knowing how the wind is blowing might help. A wind vane is a weather tool that shows the direction the wind is blowing from. On a wind vane, a pointer is attached to a pole. The pointer moves with the wind. The arrow points in the direction the wind is coming from. Winds are described by the direction they come from, not the direction they are headed. If the arrow points to the west, the wind is a west wind, or a wind coming from the west. Windsocks show wind direction, too. A windsock is a cloth tube attached to a pole. When the wind blows, the narrow end of the sock goes downwind. So, the windsock points in the direction that wind is blowing. The pole stays on the side the wind is coming from. Windsocks also give an idea of how fast, or strong, the wind is.

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Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

A windsock shows the direction the wind is blowing and how strong it is. Windsocks can be seen from far away. The arrow of a wind vane points in the direction the wind is coming from. This is the opposite of the way a windsock points.

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


TEXT WITH

NOTES

Draw an arrow on each of these wind vanes. Each arrow should correctly show the direction the wind is blowing from.

S

E

S

E

W

N

W

N

The wind is blowing from the north.

The wind is blowing from the south.

S

E

W

N

The wind is blowing from the west.

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

49


TEXT WITH

NOTES

4. Wind Patterns Wind patterns depend on changes in the air temperature. Winds often blow from cool areas to warm areas. Near the ocean, land is warm during the day. Cool breezes blow from the cool ocean onto land. At night, the land cools and the ocean is warmer. Cool breezes blow from During the day, cool winds blow land to the ocean. from the water onto land. At night, Some wind patterns happen during cool winds blow from the land out over the ocean. certain times of the year. The Santa Anas are dry, dusty winds How Sea Breezes Form that blow in southern California. They blow from east to west, from the deserts to the ocean. The Santa Anas blow each year from fall to spring. Different places on Earth have different wind patterns. Some winds blow across large areas of Earth’s surface. Westerlies are winds that move from west to east. Westerlies blow across much of the United States. Easterlies, or Trade Winds, are winds that blow from east to west in warm, tropical areas. 50

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


TEXT WITH

NOTES

Look at this satellite photograph of North America taken from space. Draw the direction of the Westerlies and Easterlies. Use a different color for each wind pattern.

How do you think these wind patterns got their name?

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

51


CHECK

FOR

UNDERSTANDING

Show What You Know Look at the table. Use this data to answer the questions. Average Wind Speed (kilometers per hour) Month

Honolulu, Hawaii

Denver, Colorado

Los Angeles, California

Phoenix, Arizona

January

14

16

11

8

February

15

16

13

9

March

16

17

13

10

April

19

19

15

12

May

17

18

14

12

June

19

17

14

12

July

20

17

13

12

August

19

16

13

12

September

17

16

12

10

October

16

16

11

9

November

15

15

10

8

December

15

16

11

7

• Which city has the fastest wind? In which month? • Which city has the slowest wind? In which month? • Think about all the cities. Which two cities are the windiest? • Which two months are the least windy?

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Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


CHECK

FOR

UNDERSTANDING

Making Sense of the Phenomenon Let’s revisit the phenomenon: Some days are windy, and some days are not. Think about: • What evidence of wind do you see? • What might be causing this wind?

Use your findings from the investigation to answer this question: How can you measure how windy it is? Claim Evidence

Reasoning

Go back to page 4 and fill out the unit checkpoint for this lesson. © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Is Wind Measured?

53


Performance Assessment:

Graphing Weather Data Why do you see different types of buildings in different places around the country? Graph weather data. See how weather patterns are related to home designs. You will: • find and graph data for where you live. • use the data to predict weather.

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Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Graphing Local Data Find data for your own area. Find the average high temperature for each month for the past two years. Use trustworthy web sites such as NOAA. Average High Temperature (°F) Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 1

Year 2

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Precipitation (cm) Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 1

Year 2

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Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Graph data for your local area below. Graph the Year 1 average high temperature data by month. Year 1: Average High Temperature (°F) 100 80 60 40 20 0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Oct

Nov

Dec

Graph the Year 1 precipitation data by month. Year 1: Precipitation (cm) 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Jan

Feb

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sep

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

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PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Graph the Year 2 average high temperature data by month. Year 2: Average High Temperature (°F) 100 80 60 40 20 0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Oct

Nov

Dec

Graph the Year 2 precipitation data by month. Year 2: Precipitation (cm) 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

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Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

June

July

Aug

Sep

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Predicting Local Weather Find patterns in weather for your area. What is the weather like each season? Winter

Spring

Summer

Fall

Use the patterns to make predictions. When is it most likely to rain? How do you know?

When is it going to be hottest? How do you know?

Š Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

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Grade 3 TCI’s Grade 3 program includes four units. Each unit has a Science Journal, complete with hands-on investigations, text with notes, and checks for understanding.

Unit 3

Unit 1 Environments and Living Things 1 Where Do Organisms Live? 2 How Does Living in a Group Help Some Animals Survive? Performance Assessment: Building an Exhibit on Columbian Mammoths 3 How Do Environments Change?

Grade 3

4 What Happens to Organisms in Changing Environments? 5 How Do People Learn About Extinct Organisms? 6 What Do Fossils Show About Environments of

Weather and Climate Science Journal Sample

Long Ago? Performance Assessment: Researching How Columbian Mammoths Went Extinct

Unit 2 Forces and Motion 1 What Do Forces Do?

4 What Can Magnetic Forces Do?

2 What Happens When Forces Are Balanced

5 What Can Electric Forces Do?

or Unbalanced? 3 How Can You Predict Patterns of Motion?

Performance Assessment: Designing the Plenty-O-Fish Game

Performance Assessment: Testing Carnival Games

Unit 3 Weather and Climate 1 What Makes Weather?

6 How Are Weather and Climate Related?

2 How Is Temperature Measured?

7 How Does Extreme Weather Affect People?

3 How Is Wind Measured?

8 How Can People Reduce Extreme Weather

4 How Are Rain and Snow Measured? 5 How Is Weather Predicted?

Damage? Performance Assessment: Evaluating Roof Designs

Performance Assessment: Graphing Weather Data

Unit 4 Life Cycles and Traits 1 Why Do Offspring Look Similar to Their Parents?

5 What Are the Life Cycles of Plants?

2 How Does the Environment Affect Traits?

6 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals with Backbones?

3 How Are Traits Affected by Both Inheritance and

7 What Are the Life Cycles of Animals Without

the Environment? 4 Why Do Some Members of a Species Survive and Not Others?

Backbones? Performance Assessment: Creating Infographics on Life Cycles

Performance Assessment: Writing for Science Monthly

Engineering

Name: