Page 1

Log in at www.teachtci.com for more resources.



Program Components Bring Learning Alive! TCI offers programs for elementary, middle, and high school classrooms.

Bring Science Alive! Social Studies Alive! History Alive! Geography Alive! Government Alive! Econ Alive! www.teachtci.com

Student Journal The colorful, easy-to-use, print consumable Student Journal combines standards-based content and rich activities to support student learning.

800-497-6138

Activity Cards The Activity Cards are laminated, reusable handouts for lesson activites that engage students in analyzing powerful images, graphs, maps, and primary sources..

Teacher and Student Account Lesson Guides, customizable assessments, video lessons, learning games, and more are at your fingertips.



My Community Student Journal

Name:


My Community Student Journal Welcome to your Social Studies Alive! Student Journal This journal is your place to read, reflect, and create. It works hand in hand with your online access. In each lesson, you’ll find: • • • • •

Preview Activity Vocabulary Activity Hands-On Activity Reading Show What You Know Activity

In addition, look for the Activity Online Online callouts throughout the journal. These indicate that additional activity directions and interactions are online. Every lesson also includes opportunities to dive deeper online, including: • • • • •

Lesson Games Vocabulary Cards Slideshows Videos and songs Primary Sources and more!

Sign in at www.teachtci.com to see all resources.


CONTENTS

Unit 1  Geography

1

Design a community that includes places to live, work, play, and solve problems. “Fly over” communities to identify them as urban, rural, or suburban. Use map reading skills to explore various places. Act out physical features, such as mountains and rivers. Conduct an inquiry to find out how geography affects your community.

1

What Is a Community?..................................................... 7

2

How Are Communities Different?................................. 19

3

How Do We Use Maps?.................................................. 33

4

What Is Geography?....................................................... 47

Unit 2  Economics

65

Match environments to different types of food, clothing, and shelter. Find out how goods are made by putting the steps of their production in order. Present a skit illustrating a service job. Evaluate the costs and benefits of economic choices. Conduct an inquiry to explore why people buy things and where these things come from.

ii

5

How Do People Use Our Environment?....................... 71

6

How Are Goods Made and Brought to Us?.................. 89

7

Who Provides Services in a Community?................... 107

8

How Can I Be a Smart Consumer?.............................. 121

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Unit 3  History

135

Recreate primary source images to compare Native American cultures. Learn about the history and traditions of families who have immigrated to the United States. Analyze graphs to find out how communities change over time. Use visual clues from historical images to create a timeline. Conduct an inquiry to discover how you can be a historian!

9

How Can We Learn About Native American Cultures?.... 141

10

How Do Families Learn About Their Past?.................. 157

11

How Do Communities Change?.................................. 173

12 11

How Did One Community Change?............................ 185

Unit 4  Civics

201

Discover how four people solved problems in their communities. Categorize actions that community leaders can take to help communities in need. Roleplay being a good citizen at a local swimming pool. Analyze information to find out what communities have in common. Conduct an inquiry to determine why you should be a good citizen.

13 12

How Can One Person Make a Difference?.................. 207

14

How Do Leaders Help Their Communities?............... 219

15 What Does a Good Citizen Do?................................... 231 12 16 What Do Communities Share?.................................... 247 14 Maps.......................................................................263 Glossary..................................................................265 Credits....................................................................275 © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

iii


A Whole New Way to Experience Social Studies Inquiry-Based Unit Structures Each unit starts with an intriguing storyline and compelling question that piques students’ interest and drives instruction throughout the lesson. They are encouraged to draw upon and apply previous knowledge and also use outside resources and Social Studies Stories to expand their answer.

Student-Centered Activities Each lesson utilizes at least one of TCI’s unique, hands-on strategies to get students thinking, moving, and asking big questions. Students are inspired to learn more and engage in fun activities, which they can access both online and in the Journal.

Culturally-Responsive Content Meaningful standards-aligned content with opportunities for making personal connections and participating in an inclusive classroom environment.

iv

Online Resources Ready-to-teach presentations, activities, complete student resources, customizable assessments and more at your fingertips!

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Unit 1

Geography Design a community that includes places to live, work, play, and solve problems. “Fly over” communities to identify them as urban, rural, or suburban. Use map reading skills to explore various places. Act out physical features, such as mountains and rivers. Conduct an inquiry to find out how geography affects your community. 1 What Is a Community?................................................7 2 How Are Communities Different?..............................19 3 How Do We Use Maps?............................................33 4 What Is Geography?..................................................47

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Unit 1 Geography

1


Unit Inquiry Project

1

Gathering Visual Evidence

List three things you saw in the video you watched.

What types of land and water do you see? How might people use them?

Do you think a lot of people live here. Why or why not?

2

Unit 1 Geography

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


2

Developing the Compelling Question Unit Storyline Quebec City, Canada was founded along the St. Lawrence River in 1608. The river allows for trade with the United States and the rest of the world. A community’s location helps explain why it was settled. It also affects life in that community today.

Unit Compelling Question How does geography affect our community? List three questions you have about the Unit Storyline and Compelling Question.

1.

2.

3.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Unit 1 Geography

3


3

Collecting Evidence

After you complete each lesson, return to this table and answer the questions. You will be gathering key information that will help you complete the Unit Inquiry Project.

4

Lesson

Supporting Questions

1 What Is a Community?

Where in the video do you see places where people might live? Work? Play? Solve problems?

2 How Are Communities Different?

Is this an urban, rural, or suburban community? Give evidence.

3 How Do We Use Maps?

What things would you include on a map of this city? Why?

4 What Is Geography?

What land and water features are in the video? On what kind of map would you find Quebec City, Canada labeled? On what kind of map could you find the St. Lawrence River labeled?

Unit 1 Geography

What I Learned

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


4

Building Additional Content Knowledge

Gather and evaluate additional sources to answer the Unit Compelling Question: How does geography affect our community? Research to find out about your community! When was it settled? Why? Is it urban, rural, or suburban? What land and water features does your community have? How do people use those? You may also use these readings from Social Studies Alive! My Community Social Studies Stories: • Mapping a Trip • Riding for Climate • Using Plants in New Ways Source Title(s)

Additional Evidence

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Unit 1 Geography

5


5

Constructing an Argument

Write a sentence answering the Unit Compelling Question: How does geography affect our community? This is called a claim. Then give at least two pieces of evidence to support your claim. Your evidence can come from the activities you did in class, the readings you completed in your Student Journal or Social Studies Stories, or additional research that you conducted.

Claim:

Evidence:

6

Taking Informed Action

Decide how you want to share what you learned. You could make a poster, a digital presentation, or a video. You might share your presentation with your classmates or with adults in the community.

6

Unit 1 Geography

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Lesson 1

What Is a Community?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

7


Everyone belongs to a community. Look at this photo of a city. All of the

Vocabulary

people who live, work, and play there are

community

a part of that community. People in a community do different things. One person might work as a farmer, while another person might work as a waiter. But all people in a community work together to make that place a better place to live.

8

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Preview Activity

Activity Online

What do you see in your community?

Put a check mark next to each place that is in your community.

Places where people live

Places where people work

apartment

office

house

factory

mobile home

store

other

other

Places where people play playground

Places where people solve problems

movie theater

city hall

museum

community center

other

school other

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

9


Vocabulary Activity Let’s create a pictoword. A pictoword changes a word

Activity Online

into a picture to help you remember the main concept. To create your own pictoword, write each letter in community in a box below the figures. It will help you remember that a community is a place where people live, work, and play.

10

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Hands-On Activity

Activity Online college

community pool

school

park

power plant

grocery store

Social Studies Alive! My Community Unit 1: Geography Lesson 1: What Is a Community?

office

factory

park ol scho

com

munity

pool

colle

ge

e ry stor

co ool

sch park

ity

groce

power

ege

coll ool

yp

mm unit

#

Cut out these station cards.

mmun My Co s Alive! ? l Studie hy unity Socia ograp a Comm 1: Ge at Is Unit n 1: Wh Lesso

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Activity Card: Community Cards Page 1

Soci al St Uni udie t Less 1: Geo s Aliv e! M gr on 1: W aphy y Co hat mm Is a unity Com mun ity?

plant factor

Cut out

park

these station

y community pool

fice schoolof

college

#

Ac tiv

offi tory

fac t

lan

pow er p cery

store

lum Inst

itute

rds ity Ca 1 Page

Curricu

mmun

chers’

rd: Co

© Tea

gro

ce te

ity Ca

titu

Card Page s 1

Ins

unity

culum

mm

Curri

cards.

rs’

: Co

ache

Card

© Te

ity

Social Studies Alive! My Community Unit 1: Geography Lesson 1: What Is a Community?

Act iv

power plant

factory

office

out

grocery store

Cut thes e st atio © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Cut out these station cards.

#

rds.

Activity Card: Community Cards Page 1

n ca

#

Recognize the different elements of a community and the role our homes play in the community. Design a community that includes places to live, work, play, and solve problems.

Directions: My Place in a Community (Part 1) 1. Create a home. Cut out a piece of construction paper to create your home. 2. Draw pictures of who lives there. Label everyone by their first name. 3. Read Sections 1–3. Learn that communities have places to live, work, and play. 4. In your Activity Notes, draw a community. Then add your home to it!

Directions: My Place in a Bigger Community (Part 2) 1. Read Section 4. Learn that communities have places to solve problems. 2. Sit with your group. Your teacher will give you a set of Community Cards. 3. Place your homes and Community Cards on the table. 4. Sort the Community Cards into four groups: live, work, play, solve problems. 5. With your group, take your homes and Community Cards to combine with another group. Lay them out on the table. 6. Create a community by taking turns deciding where to place each card. Share your reasoning with your group. 7. Then join another group to build an even larger community. Repeat the steps. Take turns placing each Community Card. Share your reasoning.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

11


1. A Place to Live A community is a place where people live, work, and play. The places

Some people in a community live in apartments.

where we live give us shelter and a place to meet with friends and family. People live in different kinds of homes. Some people live in houses. They do not have to share a yard or space with others. Others live in apartments. An apartment is part of a larger building. People also live in mobile homes, which are homes that can be moved around. What types of homes are in your community? 12

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


2. A Place to Work A community is a place where people work. People work to earn money and provide services in their community. Some people work indoors. For example, chefs work inside restaurants. Scientists work inside laboratories. Some people work outdoors. Park

Electricians help their

rangers work in forests. Lifeguards work at

community by working

the beach. A construction worker might

on construction

build houses. Where do people work in

projects and fixing

your community?

things.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

13


3. A Place to Play A community is a place where people play. Many people have fun outdoors.

People in a community have fun playing in parks.

They might go to a playground or a swimming pool. Some people like to play sports and games outside in parks. Many people also have fun indoors. Some people go to museums. Others go to see movies with friends. There are many different places to play in a community. Where do you go to have fun? 14

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Hands-On Activity Notes Draw a community. Make sure your community has

Activity Online

at least: • one place to work • one place to play Where would you like to live? Put the home that you created somewhere in the community.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

15


People meet at their city hall to solve problems.

4. A Place to Solve Problems A community is a place where people solve problems together. People solve problems in their community to make it a better place to live. People work to improve their communities in different ways. Some people go to meetings at their city hall. Some people volunteer at schools. Others work with their neighbors to clean up local parks. How do people in your community help solve problems? 16

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Hands-On Activity Notes There are many problems that can occur in a community.

Activity Online

On the left side of the T-chart, list three problems. On the right side of the T-chart, list one solution to each problem.

Problem

Solution

Example: A house catches

Example: The fire department

on fire.

arrives to put out the fire.

1.

1.

2.

2.

3.

3.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

17


Summary A community is a place where people live, work, and play. There are many different places in a community to do these things, such as houses, restaurants, and parks. People in a community also work together to solve problems.

Show What You Know Make a badge to show what you know about your community. Write your community’s name on the bottom ribbon. Draw pictures to show how people live, work, play, and solve problems there.

18

Lesson 1 What Is a Community?

Live

Work

Play

Solve Problems

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Lesson 2

How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

19


People live in different communities. Look at this photo of a city. In the front,

Vocabulary

there are lots of trees and houses that

rural

are spread out. But in the back, there

suburban

are large buildings that are crowded together. These are two different types of

urban

communities. In this lesson, you will learn about urban, rural, and suburban communities. People in these places do different things for work and fun.

20

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Preview Activity Write the type of community each photograph shows:

Activity Online

rural, suburban, or urban.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

21


Vocabulary Activity Draw a picture of each type of community.

Activity Online

Rural

Suburban

Urban

22

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Hands-On Activity

Activity Online

Board a helicopter and fly over six different communities. For each, decide which type of community it is (rural, suburban, or urban).

Directions: Flying Over Three Types of Communities 1. Prepare for lift-off. You are about to “fly” in a helicopter over six different communities. 2. For each community you see: • Discuss which type of community it is with your group. • Give one piece of evidence for why you picked that type of community. • Record your ideas in your Activity Notes. 3. Read Sections 1–6. Learn more about urban, rural, and suburban communities. Add evidence to your Activity Notes.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

23


1. Cities Are Urban Communities

People who live in a

Cities have lots of tall buildings and

city live in an urban

people. An area like this is called an

community.

urban community. People often walk from place to place in a city. Sometimes they take a bus or a taxi. Many people choose to ride trains or subways from one part of a city to another. Some people drive cars. Many people live in apartments in cities. Some people live close together in small spaces. Others choose to live in houses. Have you ever been to a city?

24

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


2. Living in Urban Communities Cities are exciting. There are many stores and restaurants. There are parks, playgrounds, and museums. Sometimes cities are noisy. Cars honk their horns. People talk and dogs bark. You might hear music and singing. There are crowds in a city. There are lots of people walking on the sidewalks. Stores and restaurants are busy places, too. What do you like about cities?

Cities are often full of crowds and lots of cars.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

25


3. Small Towns Are Rural Communities Small towns and farms are in the countryside. They are away from

Small towns in the countryside, like this one, are rural communities.

cities. These places are called rural communities. Small towns have fewer people than cities. These people live farther apart, too. Even so, many people know their neighbors well in small towns. Small towns might have just one store. There may be a post office, a bank, a grocery store, and a school. There are few restaurants and theaters. Do you live in a small town? 26

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


4. Living in Rural Communities Some people live and work on farms in rural communities. Others may work at a store. People in rural communities often drive to the store and the post office. Many students ride a bus to school. There are different ways to have fun in a small town. In a city, you might visit a big aquarium. But in a small town, you might go fishing. You might go hiking or

People in rural

on a picnic with your family. What things

communities might go

would you like to do in a small town?

fishing for fun.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

27


5. Communities Outside Cities Are Suburbs Suburbs are communities of small and large towns just outside of cities. They are also called suburban communities. Many people choose to live in suburbs, which are not as crowded as cities. They are usually quieter than cities. Suburbs have stores and gas stations.

28

They have parks and other places to

Suburbs are

play. They have an area with shops and

communities just

restaurants. Do you live in a suburb?

outside or near cities.

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


6. Living in a Suburb Many families live in suburbs. Some people live in houses, and some live in

Many people drive cars in suburban communities.

apartments. Lots of homes have front yards and backyards. Some might even have a pool. Most people drive cars in a suburban community. People drive to work. They drive to shopping malls. To get to school, children might get driven or take the bus. You might see some people biking or walking, too. What else might you see in a suburb? © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

29


Hands-On Activity Notes Circle the type of community you see: rural, suburban, or urban. Give at least one piece of evidence that helped you decide.

Community Type

Evidence

1

rural

suburban

urban

suburban

urban

suburban

urban

2

rural 3

rural

30

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Activity Online

Community Type

Evidence

4

rural

suburban

urban

suburban

urban

suburban

urban

5

rural 6

rural

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

31


Summary Urban, rural, and suburban are three types of communities. Urban communities are in cities, and they have lots of people and buildings. Rural communities are small towns and farms. Suburban communities are just outside of cities.

Show What You Know It’s the weekend! You are going with your family to visit relatives. Some live downtown in urban apartments, some live in the suburbs, and one lives in a rural town. Write about what you will do in each community.

Urban Relatives

32

Lesson 2 How Are Communities Different?

Suburban Relatives

Rural Relatives

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Lesson 3

How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

33


How do people find their way around? They look at maps! Look at these people

Vocabulary

reading a map. They are using the map

compass

to figure out how to get to where they

compass rose

want to go. A map is a drawing of a place or a community. It can show any area of Earth. There are many kinds of maps.

map grid map key symbol

Maps include different tools that people can use to find their way. You will learn how to use these tools to read a map.

34

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Preview Activity Draw a line to connect each sentence with the best

Activity Online

map to use.

Find my way to a friend’s house

Find all the U.S. states that have coastlines

See the path a passenger jet travels from my hometown to China

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

35


Vocabulary Activity

Activity Online

Write the names of the map tools in their correct locations on this treasure map.

Vocabulary Word Bank compass

compass rose

map key A

is a

map grid symbol

A

is

picture or color that stands

a set of lines that help us

for something on a map.

find places on a map.

Land

Water

Route

Treasure A

A

A

shows directions on

shows directions.

what the symbols on

a map. 36

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

tells

a map mean. © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Hands-On Activity

Activity Online

Explore the key components of a map. Use map reading skills to answer questions about three different locations.

Directions: Using Maps to Explore Places 1. Read Sections 1–4. Learn that maps show places. A map has a key, a grid, and a compass rose. 2. With your partner, find the three maps in your Activity Notes. Large versions of the maps are also around the room. 3. Choose a map to start with. Look carefully at its grid, compass rose, symbols, and key. 4. Answer the questions about the map. 5. Check your answers with your teacher. If they are incorrect, you will get another try.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

37


Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C. Map

1. A Map Shows a Place A map is a drawing of a place from

A map shows certain things in a place.

above. Maps are much smaller than the places they show. Maps only show certain things that are in that place. For example, a map might show the roads in a place but not all of the trees that are there. Look at the picture of Washington, D.C. Now look at the map of that city. In both images, you are seeing the city as if from above. Which things from the picture does the map show?

38

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


2. A Map Has a Key Some keys open doors. Other keys are clues about new things. A map key explains what the pictures and colors on a map mean. A map key is also called a legend. The pictures and colors on a map are called symbols. The symbols on a map stand for real things. By looking at the map key, you can figure out what the symbols on the map stand for. How many symbols do you see on the map below? Farm

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Map keys help us know what the symbols on the map mean. Farm Map

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

39


3. A Map Has a Grid A map grid is a set of lines that cross each other. The lines create squares all over the map. Each row has a letter, and each column has a number. The labels on a map grid help people find places on a map. You can follow a letter and a number to find squares on the grid. This makes it easier to locate specific things on the map. Look at the grid on this map. What is located in Square A1?

People can use the map grid to find objects on the map.

Downtown Centerville

40

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


4. A Map Has a Compass Rose A compass points to the directions north, south, east, and west. People use a compass when they want to know what direction they are going. A compass rose is a drawing of a compass on a map. A compass rose lets people know which direction a map is pointing. This makes it easier to figure out how to get to a place. Look at this map of downtown Centerville. Which building is north of the hospital? What street is east of First Street? Streets of Centerville

The compass rose helps people know the directions on a map.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

41


Hands-On Activity Notes

Fatima’s Farm 1

2

3

N W

4

E S

Map Key

A

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Use this map to answer the questions that follow.

Activity Card A: Fatima’s Farm Page 5

Activity Online

Cow B Chicken

Hay D Flowers

1. How many chickens are on Fatima’s farm?

Social Studies Alive! My Community Unit 1: Geography Lesson 3: How Do We Use Maps?

Corn

C

2. Which square is most of the hay located in? 3. Look at the two farm buildings located in square B4. What is directly north of them? 4. How many square-shaped flowerbeds are there? 5. Which crop is located in square B1?

42

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


1

2

3

N W

4

E S

Map Key

A

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Patel’s Amusement Park

Activity Card B: Patel’s Amusement Park Page 9

Use this map to answer the questions that follow.

Splash Tube B Roller Madness

Twirl Time D Amazing Maze

Social Studies Alive! My Community Unit 1: Geography Lesson 3: How Do We Use Maps?

Skull Mountain

C

1. Which attraction is directly north of Amazing Maze? 2. Which attraction is located in both square B1 and square C1? 3. Is most of Roller Madness in square C3 or square B3? 4. Which attraction is directly south of Twirl Time? 5. In which two squares does Splash Tube empty its riders?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

43


1

2

3

W

4

E

Map Key

S

Passenger jet

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

N

Cheesecake City

Activity Card C: Cheesecake City Page 13

Use this map to answer the questions that follow.

A Ship

B

Train

Highway

Crane D

Cheesecake Pavilion

Social Studies Alive! My Community Unit 1: Geography Lesson 3: How Do We Use Maps?

C

1. In which direction does the train run? From north to south or from east to west? 2. Which square is the passenger jet flying over? 3. In which direction are the three biggest ships in D2 pointing? 4. In which square can you get cheesecake? 5. Is the west side of Cheesecake City mostly rural or urban?

44

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Summary A map is a drawing of what a place looks like from above. Maps have keys to explain symbols, a map grid to help find places quickly, and a compass rose to help find the direction of the map.

Show What You Know Make a map of your community. Think about what could be found in your community and where those things are located. You may draw many things on the map, but only place four items on the map key. 1. Label the grid going down with letters. 2. Label the grid going across with numbers. 3. Give your map a title. 4. Label the compass rose with N, E, S, and W. 5. Fill in the map key with items from the map.

Flip the page

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

45


Title of Your Map:

Map Key

46

Lesson 3 How Do We Use Maps?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Lesson 4

What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

47


Earth has many places and people. This image shows mountains, plains,

Vocabulary continent

ocean

physical features. This

country

physical map

place’s features and the

desert

plain

people that live there make

geography

political map

island

river

study the geography of

lake

valley

different places. You will also

mountain

and a river. These are called

up its geography. In this lesson, you will

learn how people use maps. 48

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Preview Activity Number the continents in order from largest to smallest.

Activity Online

Sing the song below to the tune of “Do-Re-Mi.” The Seven Continents Song One, Asia, the biggest one Two, amazing Africa Three, is North America Four, is South America Five, is cold Antarctica Six, is Europe la, la, la, la Seven, tiny Australia That will bring us back to one, one, one, one . . .

ARCTIC OCEAN

EUROPE NORTH AMERICA

AS I A

ATLAN TI C OC EAN PAC I FIC OC EAN

A FRI CA

PA CIF IC OCE A N

I N DI AN OC EAN

SOUTH AMERICA

AT LAN TI C OC EAN

AUSTRA LI A

N W

E S

S OUTHERN OC EAN A NTAR CTI CA

SSA2_BM02.23 Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Second Proof TCI11 23

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

49


Vocabulary Activity

Activity Online

Use the word bank to fill in the table. Put the correct word next to its definition.

Vocabulary Word Bank continent

country

desert

geography

island

lake

mountain

ocean

physical map

plain

political map

river

valley

Picture

Definition

Word

a body of water with land all around it the tallest kind of land on Earth a large, flat piece of land the largest kind of salt water body on Earth a place with very little rain

50

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


a low place between mountains a body of water that moves through land land with water all around it one of the seven large bodies of land on Earth a place where many people live together under the same rules the study of Earth’s physical features and people 0 0

130˚W

500 miles

250 250

500 kilometers

N

W

50˚N

E S

CANADA 125˚W

Washington

45˚N

North Dakota

Montana

New Hampshire Vermont

Maine

New York

Massachusetts

Minnesota

Oregon Wisconsin

South Dakota

Idaho

Michigan

40˚N

Nebraska

Pennsylvania

Iowa

Nevada

Illinois

Utah

Indiana

Ohio

Kansas

Missouri

Kentucky

35˚N

Maryland Virginia

North Carolina

Tennessee Oklahoma

Arizona

South Carolina

Arkansas

New Mexico Mississippi Alabama

120˚W

Georgia

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Texas

PAC IFIC PACIFIC O CEAN

Louisiana

70˚N

75˚W

MEXICO

Alaska 60˚N

Gulf of Mexico

160˚W

Hawaii 160˚W

170˚W

0 0

PACIFIC OCEAN

150˚W 140˚W PACIFIC OCEAN 800 miles 400 400

800 kilometers

0

75 150 miles

0

150 kilometers

20˚N 90˚W

95˚W

85˚W

80˚W

E

W S

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Desert

PACIFIC OCEAN

Forest Plain Mountain Gulf of Mexico

0 0

325 650 kilometers

cities

N

SSA3_SE_2.1 Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Fourth Proof TCI12 18

PACIFIC OCEAN 650 miles 325

countries, states, and

Florida

ARCTIC OCEAN

25˚N

a map that shows

Delaware West Virginia

Colorado

California

30˚N

Rhode Island Connecticut New Jersey 70˚W

Wyoming

150

River

a map that shows Earth’s features

300 miles

PACIFIC OCEAN

0

0 50100 miles 0 100 kilometers

0 150 300 kilometers

SSA2_SE_4-5a Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Second Proof TCI11 08

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

51


Hands-On Activity

Activity Online

With a group, act out one physical feature—lake, mountain, plain, ocean, desert, valley, river, or island—while the rest of the class guesses which feature is being depicted.

Directions: Acting Out Physical Features 1. Read Sections 1–6. Learn about Earth’s features and physical maps. 2. Analyze a physical map. With your class, answer the questions on the slide. 3. Learn about your assigned physical feature. With your group, examine the Activity Card you are given. Then complete your Activity Notes. 4. Think of ways you can use your bodies to act out your physical feature. You may not use words, but you can use sounds to help you. Rehearse your act-it-out. 5. When called on, perform your act-it-out. Present the definition of your feature and one example of it on the map. The class will guess which of Earth’s features you are showing! 6. Read Sections 7–8. Learn about political maps. Then complete your Activity Notes.

52

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


1. Earth’s Features The places on Earth are not all alike. Each place has different features. The different kinds of land and water found in a location are the features of that area. Geography is the study of Earth’s physical features and people. The people in a place are affected by

The river and the

the features around them. What land and

mountains in this

water features are found in the place

image are features of

where you live?

this place.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

53


There are seven continents and five oceans on Earth.

2. Continents and Oceans Land features are found on continents. Continents are the seven large land areas on Earth. Millions of people can live on one continent! Continents are surrounded by

Islands are land

oceans. Oceans are the largest bodies

features surrounded

of water on Earth. The world’s five oceans

by water.

help separate the continents from one another. There are many islands in oceans. An island is land with water all around it. They are much smaller than continents. Have you ever been to an island?

54

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


3. Rivers and Lakes Not all water is found in an ocean. Rivers are bodies of fresh water that move through land. They bring water to farms, towns, and cities. People and goods can also travel on them. Rivers flow through and connect communities. Lakes are bodies of water with land all around them. Rain, rivers, and melting snow bring water to lakes. Lots of people go fishing, swimming,

Rivers and lakes are

and boating in lakes and rivers. Do you

bodies of water found

live near a river or lake?

on land.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

55


4. Mountains and Valleys Land features have different heights.

Valleys lie between mountains.

Mountains are the tallest kind of land on Earth. They have many trees, and some have snow on them in the winter. Valleys are low places that lie between mountains. Most valleys have rivers that run through them. Snow melts off of the mountains and fills the rivers and lakes. There are communities in areas with mountains and valleys. Do you live near these land features? 56

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


5. Deserts and Plains Land features get different amounts of rainfall. Deserts are dry places that get very little rain. Deserts get very hot during the day and are not good places to grow crops. People in desert communities learn not to waste water. Plains are large areas of flat land. Some plains get more rain than deserts and are good places to farm. Its easier

Having more rain

to live on a flat plain than on a mountain

makes it easier for

or in a desert. Are there farms and plains

crops to grow in plains

where you live?

than in deserts.

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

57


Physical Map of the United States N E

W

0

PACIFIC OCEAN 650 miles 325

0

325 650 kilometers

S

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Map Key PACIFIC OCEAN

Desert Forest Plain Mountain River

Gulf of Mexico PACIFIC OCEAN

0

0 50100 miles 0 100 kilometers

0 150 300 kilometers

SSA2_SE_4-5a Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Second Proof TCI11 08

6. Physical Maps

Maps help people understand Earth’s

150

300 miles

Physical maps show the geography of the land.

geography. Geographers use many kinds of maps to study Earth’s features and people. One kind of map they use is a physical map. Physical maps show many features, including land and bodies of water. They use different colors and symbols to show mountains, plains, and deserts. You can also find rivers, lakes, and oceans on this kind of map. What kinds of land and water do you see on this map of the United States? 58

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Hands-On Activity Notes Draw a picture of each landform in the correct box.

Activity Online

Map Key desert

island

lake

mountain

ocean

plain

river

valley

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

59


7. Political Maps Some maps show where people live. A political map shows countries, states, and cities. A country is a place where people live together and follow the same rules. Political maps also show borders. A border is where one country or state ends and another country or state

Political maps show

begins. What states share a border with

countries, states, and

your state?

cities.

Political Map of the United States 70˚N

ARCTIC OCEAN

130˚W

0

50˚N

0

500 miles

250 250

500 kilometers

Alaska

N

W

60˚N

E

CANADA

S

170˚W

150˚W 140˚W PACIFIC OCEAN 800 miles 400

160˚W 0 0

400

125˚W

Washington

45˚N

Montana

800 kilometers

North Dakota

New Hampshire Vermont

Maine

New York

Massachusetts

Minnesota

Oregon Wisconsin

South Dakota

Idaho

Michigan

Wyoming

40˚N

Nebraska

Pennsylvania

Iowa

Nevada

Illinois

Utah

Indiana

Ohio West Virginia

Colorado

California

Kansas

35˚N

Missouri

Kentucky

30˚N

Oklahoma

Mississippi Alabama

160˚W

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Louisiana

Florida

75˚W

MEXICO

Gulf of Mexico

Hawaii

PACIFIC OCEAN

60

Georgia

Texas

PACIFIC OCEAN

25˚N

South Carolina

Arkansas

New Mexico

120˚W

Maryland Virginia

North Carolina

Tennessee Arizona

Rhode Island Connecticut New Jersey 70˚W Delaware

0

75 150 miles

0

150 kilometers

20˚N 95˚W

SSA3_SE_2.1 Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Fourth Proof

90˚W

85˚W

80˚W

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


8. Uses of Maps People use maps for many different reasons. Maps can help people find

These girls use a map to find where they are going.

places. Some maps show streets and roads that help people find things in their community. People also use maps to describe and understand places. Maps can show where crops are grown or the number of people in different areas. There are even maps that show the weather. What kinds of maps do you use? © Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

61


Hands-On Activity Notes

Activity Online

Look at each map. In what map would you find each feature? Circle physical, political, or both.

Physical Map 70˚N

N W

0

PACIFIC OCEAN 650 miles 325

0

325 650 kilometers

ARCTIC OCEAN

130˚W

0

50˚N

E

60˚N

Political Map

0

500 miles

250 250

500 kilometers

Alaska

N

W

E

CANADA

S

S

170˚W

150˚W 140˚W PACIFIC OCEAN 800 miles 400

160˚W 0 0

400

125˚W

Washington

45˚N

Montana

800 kilometers

North Dakota

New Hampshire Vermont

Maine

New York

Massachusetts

Minnesota

Oregon

PACIFIC OCEAN

Nebraska

Iowa Illinois

Utah Kansas

35˚N

River

Gulf of Mexico 0

0 50100 miles 0 100 kilometers

0 150 300 kilometers

150

Ohio West Virginia

Missouri

Kentucky

Arizona

30˚N

Oklahoma

Mississippi Alabama

120˚W

Maryland Virginia

South Carolina

Arkansas

New Mexico

Georgia

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Texas

PACIFIC OCEAN

Louisiana

Florida

300 miles

75˚W

25˚N

160˚W

MEXICO

Gulf of Mexico

Hawaii

PACIFIC OCEAN 0

75 150 miles

0

150 kilometers

20˚N

mountain

physical

ocean

95˚W

SSA3_SE_2.1 Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Fourth Proof TCI12 18

90˚W

85˚W

political

both

physical

political

both

state name

physical

political

both

scale

physical

political

both

river

physical

political

both

plain

physical

political

both

country name

physical

political

both

lake

physical

political

both

compass rose

physical

political

both

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

Rhode Island Connecticut New Jersey 70˚W Delaware

North Carolina

Tennessee

Forest

PACIFIC OCEAN

Indiana

Colorado

Desert

Mountain

62

Pennsylvania

Nevada

California

Plain

SSA2_SE_4-5a Black Cyan Magenta Yellow Second Proof TCI11 08

Michigan

Wyoming

ATLANTIC OCEAN

Map Key

Wisconsin

South Dakota

Idaho 40˚N

80˚W

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


Summary Geography is the study of Earth’s land, water, and people. Communities are affected by the geography of where they live. Maps can also be used for many other things. People use physical maps to look at geography in an area.

Show What You Know Now it’s time for you to create your very own continent. Your continent should: • Fill up most of your drawing space • Include at least five physical features from the word bank • Be colorful • Have a fun name Word Bank desert

island

lake

mountain

ocean

plain

river

valley

Flip the page

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

63


64

Lesson 4 What Is Geography?

© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute


My Community Explore the content in these units: Unit 1: Geography

Activity Online

Unit 2: Economics

Unit 3: History

Unit 4: Civics

Sign in at www.teachtci.com for more resources Reading Support Spanish

Play

Games Highlighting

Main Ideas

Add Note

Even More Maps

Biographies

Primary Sources