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BELLEVUE CLUB

HOTEL BELLEVUE

NOVEMBER 2017

plus

THE ELECTRIC MAN

sparking interest in innovation A guide to local tech-based museums that will encourage creativity in the whole family

44

DILLON MOYER HITS A HOME RUN DECODING THE OXYGEN FACIAL


WENDY M LISTER

Stunning Moorage & Acreage Elegant Living on 1.88 Acres • 14,940sf Home plus Sport Court • 280’+ Lake Washington Unmatched Privacy and Poise • Exquisite Design Strategy • 5 Bedrooms • 9.5 Bathrooms Significant Price Reduction - Offered at $19,888,000


Nate Berkus Design in Medina A Stylistic Masterpiece • 6,120sf Home of Pure Artwork • Offered at $7,560,000

There is no compromise. (425) 283-8858 • WendyLister@cbbain.com Coldwell Banker Global Luxury www.WendysGoneDigital.com Th e i n fo r m at i o n co n t a i n e d h e re i n h a s be e n o b t a i n e d t h ro u g h s o u rces d e e m e d re l i a b l e b u t ca n n o t be g ua ra n t e e d a s t o i t s acc u rac y . A n y i n fo r m at i o n o f s pe c i a l i n t e res t s h o u l d be o b t a i n e d t h ro u g h i n d e pe n d e n t ve r i fi cat i o n .


INSIDE november 2017

“Lightning strikes several times a day.” —SPARK Museum

36 •

THE ELECTRIC MAN

Member Alex Boyd discusses the state of the electric industry.

4 | november 2017 reflections

44 •

SPARKING INNOVATION

A guide to tech-based museums for the whole family.

50 •

HITTING A HOME RUN

From baseball to business, Dillon Moyer talks about his transition.


Featuring some of the pieces from our Emerald, Tsavorite and Diamond collections 10133 Main Street in Bellevue

425-777-4451

gordonjamesdiamonds.com


INSIDE november 2017

16

18

RECIPROCAL CLUB

TECH TOOL

20

A monthly spotlight on a BC sister club.

Improve your swing to up your game.

STOCK YOUR CELLAR

Join us for an exclusive tasting and buying event.

26

DRY LAND FOR SWIMMERS Try this strength series created by BCST’s new conditioning coach.

32

WANDER WALLA WALLA Discover favorite haunts and hidden gems of local winemakers.

56

DECODING THE OXYGEN FACIAL Learn about the technology behind this powerful procedure.

60

MAKE A DIFFERENCE WHEN YOU TRAVEL Explore the idea of doing good while seeing a new part of the world.

Departments 8 EDITOR’S LETTER 78 SERVICE NETWOR K

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10 CA LENDA R

80 BR AIN TR AINING


EDITOR’S LETTER november 2017 MANAGEMENT President S. W. Thurston Financial Manager Jeff Ohlstrom Human Resources Director Donna Gray Communications Director Bonnie Tankovich Membership Director Carissa Ritter Tennis Director Brian Nash Fitness Director Connor Eden Aquatics Director Michelle Streifel Recreation Director Jill Clark Spa & Athletic Services Director Katie Wallis Head Swim Coach Andrew Nguyen

CONTACT bellevue club

425.455.1616 | bellevueclub.com athletic services

425.688.3177

hotel bellevue

425.454.4424 | thehotelbellevue.com

MUCH LIKE THE CITY OF BELLEVUE ITSELF, THIS ISSUE IS TECH-DRIVEN. For starters, there is a fascinating interview with member Alex Boyd (p. 36), the CEO and president of Power Systems Consultants, who opens up about the electricity industry and what it could look like in the future. He recently completed a global buyout of the company, so he has his finger on the pulse of worldwide trends and areas of growth, including how to incorporate more renewable resources into the grid. Those looking for more ways to explore technology with their families in a healthy and inspiring way should check out our cover story (p. 44). The feature highlights the plethora of tech-themed museums in the local area. Many of them are interactive and encourage kids to explore with hands-on exhibits and galleries. However, if you just want to use technology to up your tennis or golf game, flip to page 18 to learn about a cutting-edge line of sensors that provides an impressive amount of information about your movements. And speaking of swings, be sure to read about member and ex-professional baseball player Dillon Moyer, son of Jamie Moyer (p.50 ). He’s out of sports and diving head first into a new profession.

Lauren Hunsberger, Editor

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HOURS OF OPERATION hotel bellevue

Club Concierge Desk 24 hours a day, 7 days a week athletic facility

5 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.* Monday-Friday 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.* Saturday 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sunday *Subject to change, depending on scheduled events. The pool closes at 10 p.m. Monday-Saturday.

REFLECTIONS MAGAZINE VOLUME 34 ISSUE 4 www.BCreflections.com editor

Lauren Hunsberger | 425.688.3162 art director

Bonnie Tankovich | 425.688.3194 advertising

Eric Nienaber | 425.445.6800 display advertising

To receive a rate card and media kit, please call 425.445.6800 or visit www.bcreflections.com.

BELLEVUE CLUB REFLECTIONS (ISSN 1096-8105) is published novemberly by the Bellevue Club, 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004. Copyright 2017 by Bellevue Club. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission is prohibited. Publication number 715390. Periodicals postage paid @ Bellevue, WA, and additional offices. Editorial, Advertising and Circulation Office: P.O. Box 90020, Bellevue, WA 98009 (mailing address); 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004 (street address); telephone 425.455.1616. Produced by Vernon Publications, LLC, 12437 N.E. 173rd Place, Second Floor, Woodinville, WA 98072. POSTMASTER send address changes to BELLEVUE CLUB REFLECTIONS, 11200 S.E. Sixth St., Bellevue, WA 98004.


The Collection

Eats. Sips. Mingles.

& Plays. All with a New App.

The Collection Eats App connects you to 50 local-to-global restaurants & nightlife adventures, all at your fingertips. All in one place– The Bellevue Collection.

No more arguing over where to eat. #diningdecisiondone Download Now and Do Good! The Bellevue Collection will donate $2 per download to the Bellevue LifeSpring Breaktime-Mealtime™ program through December 31, 2017. bellevuecollection.com/eats

To download the free “Collection Eats” App, visit the App Store ® or Google Play and search “Collection Eats”. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.


CALENDAR

bellevue club

NOVEMBER 2017 SUN

MON

05

TUES

06

WED 01

07

SPECIAL EVENTS

THU 02

08

13

14

15

SAT

03

04

Family Gym Night

BCYBA: Tryout Prep Clinic

09

10

11

Seahawks Night in Polaris, Cosmos and Splash

Stock your Cellar Wine Sale

Schools Out Camps

12

FRI

Float-in Movie Night Schools Out Camps

16

17

18

Father-Son: A Night on the Dark Side

Junior Match Night

Open Masters

19

20

26

27

21

22

28

29

23

24

Thanksgiving To-go Pickup

Family Gym Night

Thanksgiving in Polaris

Day-After Thanksgiving Tennis Workout

25

30

SAVE THE DATE!

SEAHAWKS NIGHT, Nov. 9

Join us for the big game! Everyone dressed in Seahawks gear receives a free happy hour glass of wine or beer. Kids in gear get a free soft serve cone in Splash.

FATHER-SON: A NIGHT ON THE DARK SIDE, Nov. 17

Fathers and sons will enjoy the evening on the dark side including dinner and Jedi training from our very special guests.

WEEKLY EVENTS SUN

MON

TUES

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

Water Runner

Ladies’ Tennis Night

Exert Fitness

Men’s Tennis Night

Booty Barre

Mixed Doubles Night

Inflatable Obstacle Course

To sign up for these events and more, please visit members.bellevueclub.com. 10 | november 2017 reflections


e om

H

e h t for

s y il da

Ho

ChiC & Modern | 1849 77th Ave ne, MedinA $3,198,000

Luxury

of

S p a c e | c L y d e H i L L $3,198,000

Luxury View eState | M e y d e n b a u er $9,988,000

Are you where you want to be this Holiday Season2. NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER ARE GREAT MONTHS TO BE A BUYER!

A nnA R iley

For more information on these luxury homes, or to talk about the Eastside Real Estate Market, call Anna, because your success and happiness matter! bellevue club november 2017 | 11

w w w. w e s t b e l l e v u e . c o m | 425.761.8836 | a n n a @ w e s t b e l l e v u e . c o m


NEWSFEED

bellevue club

PNW SECTION CHAMPS Congratulations to the Bellevue Club 2.5 and 3.0 Women’s Teams for becoming USTA section champions!

Lynn Elliott, Ann Lampman, Melissa Brandenfels, Jodi Major, Heidi Scalzo, Jackie Wilkinson, Lisa Cheung, Christine Bloch, Ann Kaill, Maggie Galante-Eskenazi

Susan Janus, MJ Baek, Coach Geof O’Connor, Sue Mystkowski, Angela Ahluwalia, Shari Ojendyk, Renee Sedghinasab, Jan Hawn

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT & CIRCULATION Publication Title: BELLEVUE CLUB REFLECTIONS. 2. Publication No.: 715390. 3. Date of Filing: 9/27/17. 4. Frequency of Issue: Monthly. 5. No. of Issues Published Annually: 12. 6. Annual Subscription Price: $36. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004. Contact person: Bonnie Tankovich. Telephone: 425-688-3194. 8. Complete Mailing Address of the Headquarters or General Business Offices of the Publisher: Bellevue Club, 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Address of Publisher, Editor and Managing Editor: Publisher: Bonnie Tankovich, Bellevue Club, 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004; Editor: Lauren Hunsberger, Bellevue Club, 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004; Managing Editor: Same as Above. 10. Owner, Full Name and Complete Mailing Address: Pacific Recreation Associates (A Limited Partnership), 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities, Full Name and Complete Mailing Address: US Bank, Bellevue Main Office, 10800 NE 8th St., Bellevue, WA 98004. 13. Publication Title: BELLEVUE CLUB REFLECTIONS. 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: October 2017. 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation: A. Total No. of Copies (Net Press Run) — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 6500. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 6500. B. Paid and/or Requested Circulation — (1.) Paid/Requested Outside-County Mail Subscriptions Stated on Form 3541. (Include advertiser’s proof and exchange copies): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 203. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 207. (2.) Paid/Requested In-County Mail Subscriptions. (Include advertiser’s proof and exchange copies): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 5230. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 5197. (3.) Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors and Counter Sales, and Other Non-USPS Paid Distribution: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. (4.) Other Classes Mailed Through the USPS: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. C. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation [Sum of 15b(1), (2), (3), & (4)] — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 5433. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 5404. D. Free Distribution by Mail (Samples, Complimentary and Other Free) — (1) Outside-County as Stated on Form 3541: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 74. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 72. (2) In-County as Stated on Form 3541: Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 254. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 241. (3) Nonrequested Copies distributed through USPS by other classes of mail — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 0. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 0. (4) Nonrequested Copies distributed outside the mail — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 443. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 470. E. Total nonrequested distribution Sum of 15d 1,2,3,4) — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 771. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 783. F. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e) — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 6204. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 6187. G. Copies not Distributed — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 296. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 313. H. Total (Sum of 15f and g): Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 6500. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 6500. I. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation (15c/15g x 100) — Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: 87.5%. Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: 87.3%. 16. Electronic Copy Circulation: None. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership: Publication required. Will be printed in the November 2015 issue of this publication. 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner — Bonnie Tankovich, Communications Director, 9/27/17. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on this form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including multiple damages and civil penalties).

12 | november 2017 reflections


FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @MURRAYFRANKLYNHOMES

MURRAY FRANKLYN FAMILY OF COMPANIES IS AN INDEPENDENT LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY


COMMUNITY

newsfeed

Eastside news from our partners at 425 Business magazine. WESTFIELD PARTNERS WITH UBER

Uber has become synonymous with fast service from one destination to another, and that experience is upgrading at Westfield Southcenter in Tukwila. A new partnership between Westfield and Uber put in motion dedicated Uber pick-up and drop-off stations at 33 shopping centers throughout the nation. IMAGES COURTESY OF UBER

RENTON COMPANY EARNS $100K SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH AWARD The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $1.6 million in Small Business Innovation Research funding for 15 small U.S. businesses committed to developing technologies designed to help protect human health and the environment. ZILA Works, a Renton-based company founded in 2014 that is working to replace toxic everyday products with environmentally friendly alternatives made from carbon sequestering and renewable resources, was named among the 15 funding recipients. The award provides ZILA Works with $100,000 in Phase I funding to support development of the company’s flagship product, a bio-epoxy resin made from industrial hemp oil.

SALISH LODGE & SPA ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR A $12 MILLION RENOVATION TO REFLECT ITS NORTHWEST HERITAGE

Salish Lodge & Spa, a luxury resort in Snoqualmie will be updating all 84 of its guestrooms during a major renovation, the property’s largest since 1988. The lodge will remain open to guests during the extensive two-part remodel, which will be completed in late spring of 2018. The addition of new features and amenities—such as gas fireplaces, soaking tubs, and oversized showers—as well as the creation of a more contemporary and earthy Northwest ambiance are all a part of the project’s plans.

To read the full stories, visit 425business.com.

14 | november 2017 reflections

IMAGE COURTESY OF SALISH LODGE


WEALTH M ANAGEMENT SUMMIT THE

The Puget Sound region’s premier Wealth Planning event

November 16th, 2017 12:45 – 5:30 PM, reception following The Bellevue Club

Nationally Acclaim

Attend all or part of the Summit!

ed S p e a ke r s !

1:10-1:50 p.m. – JOHN SAVERCOOL, Senior Lobbyist and Managing Director of UBS Americas Inc. Post-election public policy update from Washington, DC. 1:50-2:10 p.m. – ELIZABETH STEPHAN, JD, Senior Manager and Director of Estate and Transition Planning Services at Berntson Porter. Top five estate planning takeaways.

3:15-3:55 p.m. – DAVE ASPREY, Founder and CEO of Bulletproof, creator of Bulletproof Coffee, host of the Webby award-winning podcast Bulletproof Radio, and a two-time NY Times bestselling author. His new book, Head Strong, focuses on simple tips to have a smarter, faster, more resilient brain.

2:25-3:00 p.m. – RICHARD BERNSTEIN, CEO and CIO of Richard Bernstein Advisors (RBA), frequent guest to CNBC and named one of Fortune Magazine’s All-Star analysts. 3:00-3:15 P.M. – TERRY COOK, CFP, CIMA, Managing Director of UBS Private Wealth Management. Assessing Your Personal Exit Plan: The Basics Business Owners Should Consider to Achieve Maximum Value.

4:10-4:45 p.m. – JEFF ROSENBERG, CFA, Managing Director, Chief Fixed Income Strategist and a member of the BlackRock Investment Institute. 4:45-5:30 p.m. – COLONEL TIM KARCHER, Colonel, U.S. Army (Retired), Consultant for Sutherland Partnership, Director of Outreach Development and Strategic Planning for No Greater Sacrifice. Colonel Karcher’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, and the Presidential Unit Citation.

Presented by: Berntson Porter & Company, PLLC and UBS Private Wealth Management

RSVP to Carrie Young of Berntson Porter at 425.289.7658 or cyoung@bpcpa.com.


RECIPROCAL CLUB november 2017

CALGARY WINTER CLUB Situated in beautiful downtown Calgary, Alberta, the Calgary Winter Club is a premier social and athletic facility, and the perfect escape for the entire family. w ri t t e n by a n n e c o l e

LOCATION

ATHLETICS

DINING & DRINKS

SPECIALTY SPORTS

In 1960 the club opened its doors in downtown Calgary with stunning views of the city’s skyline and the Rocky Mountains. With programming and facilities to accommodate the entire family, the central location is perfect for keeping an active lifestyle while traveling. With the completion of a 2015 expansion, the club offers a variety of formal and informal restaurants. Options include Bin 818, a private dining room with seating up to 16 guests; Elevation, the club’s family restaurant complete with patio seating; and Rock N Racquet, a casual sports bar, among others.

The club’s athletic facilities are extensive. Choose the Fitness Centre for a traditional workout or try yoga, Pilates, spin, TRX, dance or other options from the long list of classes utilizing more than 60 trainers and instructors. The club offers a number of opportunities to hone your skills in squash, tennis and swimming. But what really sets it apart are the unique programs such as ice skating and hockey (they have a full-size rink), gymnastics, bowling, climbing and the club’s specialty: curling. → For more information, visit calgarywinterclub.com.

16 | november 2017 reflections

photos provided by calgary winter club


LUXURY WATCHES At Porcello’s you’ll always find exceptional values on a wide selection of pre-owned Rolex watches, as well as other name brand men’s and women’s watches. Should you ever need your Rolex serviced, we have a Rolex certified watchmaker waiting to help. We offer free estimates on all watch repairs and expedited Rolex service is available.

Porcello Jewelers serving you since 1952 family owned and operated three generations strong. Our team of professioals are here to assist you, stop by and say hello.

Buy, Sell, Trade porcellos.com (425) 454.2300 1 0 2 2 2

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S t r e e t ,

B e l l e v u e ,

WA

9 8 0 0 4


WELLNESS

november 2017

PERFECT YOUR SWING

TECH TOOL

Whether you’re wielding a tennis racquet, golf club or baseball bat, Zepp has a smart sensor to help you perfect your swing. Pick from a product line that is sport-specific and caters to equipment you already own. The sensors, via an app on your phone, provide a variety of information in regards to power, accuracy and energy expenditure. For more information, please visit zepp.com.

18 | november 2017 reflections

photos provided by zepp


CHOICES.

WHO WOULDN’T TOAST TO THAT? Join us in the Toscano restaurant and see why so many have made The Bellettini their new home! Call today to schedule a personal tour and enjoy a complimentary lunch in our Toscano restaurant or Panini Bistro. The choice is yours. 1115 108th Ave. NE | Bellevue, WA 98004 | 425.450.0800 www.thebellettini.com


BOTTLE TALK

november 2017

STOCK YOUR CELLAR November 10, 6 – 8 p.m. Bellevue Club Ballroom

Please join us for our Bellevue Club Stock Your Cellar Extravaganza. We will be tasting still and sparkling wines from around the world. All wines will be available for purchase at prices well below retail. There will be everything from 15 to 25-year cellar cabs to everyday drinking whites and reds. Chateau St. Michelle, Mark Ryan, Stevens Winery and Noble Distributing are just a few of wineries being represented. Members and guests welcome. $20 per person, no registration required.

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DESIGN / BUILD Redmond, Washington

. MAINTENANCE . SEASONAL COLOR . HOLIDAY . 425.868.2200 . www.sandergroves.com . info@sandergroves.com


We are honored to be a part of your family’s tradition by offering our Thanksgiving To-Go menu. Below are this season’s packages and pricing information.

PACKAGE 1: $210 SERVES 12–14

• An oven-roasted free-range turkey, 16 to 18 pounds • Turkey gravy, 2 quarts • Orange-cranberry chutney, 1 quart • Apple-sage stuffing, 4 pounds • Garlic mashed potatoes, 4 pounds • Green beans Almondine, 4 pounds • Roasted butternut squash, 4 pounds • Rolls with butter, 2 dozen • Pumpkin and pecan pies PACKAGE 2: $155 SERVES 6–8

• Half an oven-roasted free-range turkey, 8 to 9 pounds • Turkey gravy, 1 quart • Orange cranberry chutney, 1 pint • Apple-sage stuffing, 2 pounds • Garlic mashed potatoes, 2.5 pounds • Green beans Almondine, 2 pounds • Roasted butternut squash, 2 pounds • Rolls with butter,1 dozen • Choice of pumpkin or pecan pie PACKAGE 3: $335 SERVES 12–14

• Rosemary-rubbed slow-roasted prime rib • Au jus gravy, 1 quart • Creamed horseradish, 1 quart • Garlic mashed potatoes, 4 pounds • Green beans Almondine, 4 pounds • Rolls with butter, 2 dozen • Pumpkin and pecan pies

PACKAGE 4: $205 SERVES 6–8

• Rosemary-rubbed slow-roasted prime rib • Au jus gravy, 1 pint • Creamed horseradish, 1 pint • Garlic mashed potatoes, 2.5 pounds • Green beans Almondine, 2 pounds • Rolls with butter, 1 dozen • Choice of pumpkin or pecan pie SIDE ITEMS

• Au jus, $17 • Orange-cranberry chutney, $18 • Gravy, $18 • Creamed horseradish, $17 • Green beans, $26 • Garlic mashed potatoes, $30 • Apple-sage stuffing, $25 • Butternut squash, $26 • Half a prime rib, $105 • Half a turkey, $65 • A whole prime rib, $195 • A whole turkey, $95 • Pumpkin pie, $20 • Pecan pie, $20

➸ ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 1. Orders may be placed, changed and canceled by calling the catering coordinator at 425.688.3382. Orders will be taken starting November 1. There are no online orders. To-go orders must be placed by November 17 at 8:00 p.m. 2. Members can pick up their to-go meals on Thanksgiving Day from 9:00 a.m. to noon. Orders should be picked up at the refrigerated truck located in the parking lot. 3. Additional side items will be available for purchase at Luna on Thanksgiving Day. 24 | november 2017 reflections

WINE

• Lachini Pinot Gris, $19 Lachini Estate Pinot Noir, $45 Lachini Sparkling Rose, $34

OR EAT AT THE CLUB! Reservations for the sit-down Thanksgiving meal can be made by calling Polaris at 425.637.4608.


HOLIDAY FEATURE bellevue club november 2017 | 25


DRY LAND FOR SWIMMERS P H O T O G R A P H Y b y TA RY N E M E R I C K

While a lot of the work is done in the pool, a good strength-training regimen can greatly complement water workouts and transform a swimmer into a faster, more powerful athlete. Bellevue Club Swim Team’s strength and conditioning coach Ash Milad gives an example of a circuit perfect for anyone looking to up their game in between the lane lines.

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FITNESS FEATURE

#ďż˝.

WEIGHTED SQUAT Builds strength in the legs for kicking power Start with your feet a little wider than hip distance and hold the kettlebell by the handle upside down. Lower the hips into a squat position, and drive through the heels as you return to standing. Complete 10 to 12 squats.

#ďż˝.

WEIGHTED QUICK JUMP Builds isolated explosiveness through the lower body, which aids in creating powerful starts and flip turns. Start the exercise on your knees, while holding a weighted medicine ball out in front of your body. Without moving your arms, jump into a squat position. Slowly, carefully return to your knees, and repeat the action. Complete 10 to 12 jumps.

#3.

WEIGHTED BALL SLAM Increases explosive strength through the upper back, shoulders and arms, which is good for powerful arm strokes Stand with your feet a little wider than hip distance, and raise your arms above your head (but slightly in front for safety) while holding the weighted ball. Pressing on top of the ball with your hands, slam it as hard as you can. Pick it up and repeat. Complete 10 to 12 slams.

bellevue club november 2017 | 27


#4.

SIMPLE KETTLEBELL SWING Improves explosive strength in the hips, lower back and legs, which aids in creating powerful starts and flip turns Start with your feet a little wider than hip distance and the kettlebell a few inches in front of you on the floor. Squat down, keeping your back extended, knees bent and hamstrings loaded. Swing the kettlebell behind you in between your legs, and then snap the hips to raise the weight up to chest height. Keeping the back extended, return to the bent-knee start position. Complete 10 to 12 swings.

#5.

STATIC PLANK Increases core stability, which is important when simultaneously performing different actions with the legs and arms Get into an upper push-up position, making sure to slightly tuck the pelvis for complete core engagement. Hold for 30 seconds, and complete four to five rounds. Ash is also a certified personal trainer. To train with him, please email fitness@bellevueclub.com.

28 | november 2017 reflections


3904 147th Ave SE, Bellevue - (PENDING) HomeInEastgate.com

4438 94th Ave NE, Yarrow Point $3,198,000 - YarrowPointLiving.com

19754 SE 128th Way, Issaquah - (PENDING) LuxuryInIssaquah.com

Bellevue Towers #3708 - $888,000 BellevueTowers3708.com

9217 NE 5th St, Bellevue - $3,798,000 WestBellevueCustom.com

B E L L E V U E LU X U R Y. CO M 600 108th Avenue NE, Bellevue, WA

Steve Curran

Eastside Director 425.241.3583 steve@nwgrealestate.com

Galya Kirstine

Eastside Luxury Director 206.853.5995 galya@nwgrealestate.com

Nathanael Hasselback

Director of Bus. Development 206.769.2435 nhasselbeck@nwgrealestate.com


NWGREALESTATE.COM

515 98th Ave NE, Bellevue - $3,800,000 HomeInWestBellevue.com

16020 230th Ave SE Maple Valley $1,100,000 - CedarMountainEstate.com

2605 Sahalee Dr E, Sammamish $810,000 - SOLD

Dicker Cahill

Associate Broker 425.466.2919 dcahill@nwgrealestate.com

Jody Blohm

Associate Broker 206.295.2504 jody@nwgrealestate.com

Jason Foss

Managing Broker 425.890.9909 jfoss@nwgrealestate.com

Peter Freet

Managing Broker 206.972.6775 peter@nwgrealestate.com

Nick Glant

President & Founder 206.910.4221 nick@nwgrealestate.com


32 | november 2017 reflections


WRITTEN by JULIE ARNAN

Discover Favorite Haunts and Hidden Gems of Local Winemakers

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ome 4.5 hours southeast of Bellevue, the heart of Washington State wine country beats in the Walla Walla valley. Verdant vineyards form the epicenter in an otherwise vast rolling landscape of dryland wheat. Local wineries are known for robust Bordeaux varietals like Merlot and increasingly for funky, savory Rhone varietals like Syrah grown in river-stone vineyards. Falling in love with the wines and forging relationships with the valley’s winemaking personalities happen almost immediately, but visitors often find themselves just as enamored with the charming downtown and bustling culture of Walla Walla itself. It doesn’t take long for wine-tasting visitors to catch the urge to belong to this community seeking inside tips from winemakers on how to live like a local. In response to this observation, the Walla Walla Valley Wine Alliance (WWVWA) polled some of the region’s favorite winemakers for their favorite spots to eat, drink, relax, explore and enjoy life. They compiled several single-day itineraries into a limited-run curated experience spanning the fall season. Each Saturday from October 14 through December 16, 2017, participants will gain access to a new winemaker’s itinerary for a self-guided pay-asyou-go local experience. Prior registration is free online at WallaWallaWine.com/WWander but required for itinerary access and includes additional perks like complimentary tastings at select wineries, wine club privileges for the day, property tours and winemaker talks. The itineraries are completely unedited by the WWVWA and therefore reflect the personalities of the individual winemakers in refreshing ways.

photos provided by wwvwa/duval images

A group of writers convened in the valley earlier this fall for a sneak peek into the campaign. We followed Woodward Canyon’s Rick Small’s itinerary. He grew up in the area and is considered one of the Walla Walla valley’s wine industry godfathers, along with Gary Figgins of Leonetti Cellars. Because the winery is transitioning to the next generation, the itinerary also includes picks from his daughter, Jordan Dunn-Small. We started the day with coffee and pastries at Colville Street Patisserie, a popular morning hangout, which opened in 2005. Owners David Christensen and Tiffany Cain bought the patisserie in 2008 and source many of the ingredients locally. The wheat for the pastries actually comes from Small’s Family Farm, the plums for the gelato from a local orchard. Coffee is roasted at Walla Walla Roastery out at the airport. The shop is best known for its laminated dough French pastries, particularly the kouign-amann—like a croissant taken to the next level with more sugar, salt and shattering crust. Fortified, we headed to Pioneer Park for a morning stroll. The park was designed by John C. Olmsted, brother of Central Park designer Frederick Law Olmsted, and contains all of the signature Olmsted features including waterfalls, a gathering place, an educational component and recreational facilities. Sprawling lawns thick as emerald carpet spread out under massive 100-year-old sycamore trees. Ducks and geese frolic on the pond while an aviary houses peacocks, a collection of exotic pheasants and other birds. From the bandstand, it’s easy to imagine families enjoying Fourth of July activities on the lawn like an episode of the Gilmore Girls.

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BOTTLE TALK

WANDER WALLA WALLA


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einvigorated by the fresh air, we began the wine-tasting portion of the day at Woodward Canyon a few miles west of town out on highway 12. The renovated farmhouse serves as a tasting room and is adjacent to L’Ecole No 41’s schoolhouse winery. We gathered out back on the patio surrounded by beautiful flowers, trees and a pizza oven. Jordan Dunn-Small poured Woodward Canyon Bordeaux blends while telling us about her family’s commitment to the valley and sustainable farming practices. From there, we drove to Long Shadows Vintners’ production facility with a beautiful appointment-only tasting room and event space. Shiny black surfaces and colorful Chihuly glass sculptures, including a purple chandelier, made our tasting feel festive as we watched puffy clouds dapple the hills with shadows through floor-to-ceiling windows lining two sides. The wine lineup featured a different world-class winemaker for each style—some of Rick Small’s favorites are Feather Cabernet Sauvignon by Randy Dunn and ChesterKidder by Allen Shoup and Gilles Nicault. Back downtown, we lunched at Brasserie Four, a French bistro serving classic dishes like Small’s favorite, moules frites. My bouillabaisse was easily the best I’ve ever tasted, with a slightly spicy tomato-fennel broth and succulent scallops, mussels and tender halibut. As Small suggested, I ordered “something foreign” to wash it down—in this case, a rich Côte de Beaune Chardonnay.

photo by joann arruda

LONG SHADOWS VINTNERS’ TASTING ROOM

Heading south of town, we stopped in at Tertulia Cellars. Latin for a “social gathering,” Tertulia has a modern tasting room lit by its signature red lamp lined by a circle of friends dancing around the edges. We tasted Syrah and a stellar G-S-M from their Riviere Galets Estate Vineyard in the Rocks District of Milton-Freewater while taking a lesson from winemaker and pétanque aficionado Ryan Raber. Pétanque players will roll their eyes when the game is compared to betterknown boccie ball, but it is a similar concept, though played on gravel instead of grass. Our pétanque diversion ran a little long and we weren’t able to stop at Klicker’s Antique and Fruit Store, the retail storefront for famed Klicker’s Strawberry Acres. Small suggests picking up fall décor and pumpkins there. Instead, we picked up tacos from Mi Pueblito and headed to Burwood Brewing Company in the airport district’s incubator project. The shrimp fajita taco went swimmingly with the light-bodied pilsner. While snacking on some of the best tortilla chips I’ve had in recent history, who should roll in the door but local “rock star” winemaker Charles Smith and an entourage of visiting industry folks. Against our better judgment, we finished the itinerary with one last food stop—dessert at Whitehouse-Crawford downtown near the Marcus Whitman Hotel. Several rounds of twice-baked chocolate cake with salted caramel ice cream later, many of us chose to walk back to our hotel, letting the crisp autumn air bathe our faces in its charming small-town glow.

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→ For more information, visit

WallaWallaWine.com/WWander. Share your experiences through social media with #WWander and #WallaWallaWine.

photos provided by wwvwa/duval images

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making Connections We talked with member Alex Boyd, president and CEO of PSC Group, about the current state of the electric industry and his recent global buyout of the company. Reflections magazine: How did you get into the electricity industry? Alex Boyd: It wasn’t something popular at the time I graduated. Everyone was going into IT. But it was interesting to me because the projects involved, what I would call, real engineering. You go to the substations and they have all these massive turbines. You’re dealing with very significant pieces of the plant, and they all have an important electrical component. An opportunity was presented to me through a personal relationship when I got out of college, and I took it. RM: What brought you to the Pacific Northwest? AB: I started working for a big French company [Alstom Grid] in New Zealand, which is where I'm from. After a short period of time, I transferred to Sydney, Australia and spent three years there. Through them, I transferred to a software division they had here in Seattle. I was about to get married, and Katharine, now my wife, saw moving to Seattle as a great opportunity. RM: When did PSC come into the picture for you? AB: I left the French engineering firm and went to Dartmouth for my MBA. I had known PSC for a while and wanted to do something entrepreneurial. PSC offered that opportunity. It’s a company founded in New Zealand, and it now works in eight countries to provide power system and control systems services to utilities in a range of geographies. After my MBA, I put my hand up and said I’ll start the North American business. I was lucky my wife worked at Microsoft. She was the secure income; I was the at-risk income. And yeah, I pretty much started it in the basement of our home in Kirkland.

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MEMBER PROFILE

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"The opportunities are bigger than ever, so the need to do our due diligence is greater."

RM: Under your leadership, this year the North American division celebrated 10 years and consults locally for Puget Sound Energy, Seattle City Light and Snohomish PUD as well as operates offices in Canada and on the East Coast. Can you explain where PSC fits into how we consume our energy? AB: Utilities have control centers, and in them are operators who monitor the grid—usually what you see is a dark room with banks of computers showing a range of information. The operators are monitoring everything and making decisions about how the network should be switched. Take Puget Sound Energy for example: they have a lot of connections to assets that are owned by other utilities. They want to know what’s happening at those connection points and if they’ve had a failure so they can take action to make sure it doesn’t impact the consumer. It’s relatively sophisticated and complicated control. We’re the engineers who do the work to make sure those control systems are implemented and stay up and running. We also do a lot of work advising our customers on how to develop their networks, including the addition of renewable generation resources, like wind and solar, or distributed assets such as battery banks. RM: Also notably, in April, you personally completed a global buyout of PSC when the founders of the firm showed interest in selling. How did you come to that decision? AB: The company was founded in 1995, and the founders were at a point where they decided it was time to decrease their risk profile, and they were looking for buyers. A very common approach is to go out to a larger firm, and they buy you out and absorb you into their organization. More often than not, the identity of the organization being acquired disappears. I asked the founders if they would accept an equivalent offer I put together. They viewed an offer from me as riskier, especially as I had a lot of capital to raise to get the deal done. However, they also saw that it would likely be better for our employees and customers. They said if I could get it done they would sell the company to me.

RM: What did that goal mean for you personally? AB: For me personally, I was faced with the prospect of raising a lot of capital and restructuring what is a fairly complex business for its size. But, if there’s one little nugget of wisdom I learned, it’s although something like that can seem daunting, it is a sequence of business problems. I just had to identify all the smaller problems within the big problem. For many of the challenges, I asked the advice of many smart people that were supporting me. I am really proud to have achieved everything I needed to close the buyout. That said, this was a complicated transaction that will be completed over a period of time, so there is still some work to be done. RM: Have you always embraced risk? AB: Yes, I think so, but I have moderated that to some degree. I chose to take the risk to start the North American business, but it was not a level of risk that would have thrown me on the street if it had not worked. People I know have taken much higher levels of risk. I purchased an operating company that’s profitable, not a start-up. RM: How are you going to lead the growth of PSC in the next 10 years? Will you be bringing significant change to the company? AB: That’s a tough question to answer. No, not radical change. However, I think we were at a point where change was needed as the company has been getting more complex. There are some changes we can make based on the opportunity for growth available. The opportunities are bigger than ever, so the need to do our due diligence is greater. We need to have the skills in PSC to analyze these things, and I’m in the process of developing the team so we can do that. RM: Where do you see the most growth opportunities coming from? AB: There really are growth opportunities in most of our geographies. But especially in North America, which is where roughly a third of our business is today, and in the UK, where we have only just started. We are also starting to push into Asia. Mainland Europe is in our sights for when we are ready. Technology development in our industry is evolving at a significant rate as electricity becomes a bigger part of the energy economy. RM: What are you excited about right now as an engineer? AB: The transition away from bulk generation and transmission to distributed, local generation is very interesting and presents significant opportunity for innovation and the presence of non-utility participants in the industry. For example, developers can decide to build wind or solar generation and sell the capacity into the market. Some of the questions to address are: how is the electricity sold, and how do you manage the overall grid when the electricity unexpectedly disappears?

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RM: So you spend a lot of time thinking about how to integrate renewable resources into the traditional electricity model? AB: Yes, renewable energy creates a challenge due to its intermittent nature. The problem with wind and solar is that they can be there one minute and gone the next. The challenge with electricity in general is that it must be consumed the instant it is created, so keeping the system in balance is very challenging. This challenge can be helped with storage such as batteries, but the capacity of storage is limited although increasing. With the grid overall, the utility’s number one concern is making sure the lights stay on. It is not easy!

RM: How vulnerable is a virtual grid to hacking? AB: It’s being talked about a lot. The electric grid is classified as critical infrastructure, and it is an obvious target for anyone wanting to do society harm. It is an issue that is being extensively addressed from a technology and procedural perspective. From a cloud-based infrastructure perspective, all the big providers are spending many times more on security than any one utility can realistically spend. So the willingness of the industry to accept this approach is increasing.

RM: Is automation something you’re hoping can help with the regulation of these sources? AB: Absolutely. We’re working with Microsoft on some pilot projects to perform optimization of distributed energy resources. They have customers using cloud networks to run optimization to determine the best usage of the resources at any point in time. Things that affect it are: when the sun is shining, when the wind is blowing, how much energy is needed, and those sorts of things. We’re getting traction on that, and it’s a great opportunity for smaller utilities and us because the cloud is a cost-effective way to do that. However, the industry is hesitant because there are a lot of security implications involved with that.

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RM: Any other notable changes in the industry? AB: The other thing that’s changing a little bit is that we are seeing a lot more nontraditional industry participants. Traditionally, the utility builds transmission lines, generators and other assets, and they own and operate them. But more and more third parties are building and owning those assets and effectively get a return on the operation of that asset. They want to put their capital to work. We do a lot of work for those types of organizations. RM: Any projects you’re hopeful for? AB: Yes, one of our service areas is High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission. In the US, there is a lot of HVDC project development work going on, and we are working with some of our customers that are developing these projects to bring them into reality. We are hopeful that some of them will be built to help with bringing renewable energy to market and to provide security of supply in general. This trend is also occurring in the UK and Europe, but many of the projects are further developed and PSC is playing a key role. HVDC is used to get electricity back to land for off-shore wind generation, and some of our team members have gone out to the platforms to work on these projects. There is a lot of off-shore wind being developed for the US. → For more information, please visit pscconsulting.com.

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SPARK MUSEUM

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photos courtesy of spark museum


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ecause Seattle and its greater area are steeped in the history of technology, there is no shortage of museums paying homage to the industry. Below is a guide to visiting these museums this winter and inspiring a spark of creativity for you and your family.

SPARK MUSEUM OF ELECTRICAL INVENTION

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In need of a little inspiration? Curators claim that “lightning strikes several times a day” at the Spark Museum of Electrical Invention in Bellingham. Following threads of invention, innovation and science, the museum incorporates exhibits about electricity, radio, music, light, telephones and much more. During the month of November, they are offering a few different options to have fun and learn a thing or two about the history of technology, including an exhibit with the “MegaZapper” Tesla Coil, which produces nine-foot lightning bolts right in front of your family’s eyes. → For more information, please visit sparkmuseum.org.

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TECHNOLOGY FEATURE

SPARKING INTEREST IN INNOVATION


MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND INDUSTRY Photos by Daniel Sheehan

BEZOS CENTER FOR INNOVATION

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photos courtesy of museum of history and industry


YOUR LOCAL PNW CREDIT UNION

Now open in downtown Bellevue MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND INDUSTRY

In looking at how Seattle has changed technology and how technology has changed Seattle, this museum is extremely diverse in its offerings. One of the most popular attractions is the Bezos Center for Innovation, which is a permanent exhibit created to give visitors a hands-on experience in innovation. This November, the museum is especially excited to host Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith, a look at Smith’s 65 years’ worth of documentary photography based in Seattle’s Central District.

Come see us on the corner of 108th Ave NE & NE 2nd St

→ For more information, please visit mohai.org. THE MUSEUM OF FLIGHT

The claim to fame for the Museum of Flight is that it’s “the largest independent, nonprofit air and space museum in the world.” Incredibly expansive in size and subject matter, the museum houses more than 175 air- and spacecrafts, as well a library and plenty of other exhibits dedicated to the art of human flight and space travel. This winter, the museum has lined up an exhilarating list of events including a space course led by the International Space University. → For more information, please visit museumofflight.org.

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LIVING COMPUTERS: MUSEUM + LABS

A shrine to the invention and evolution of computers, the Living Computers: Museum + Labs, started from Paul Allen’s private collection, encompasses exhibits ranging from supercomputers to microcomputers. Recently added galleries include robotics, self-driving cars, video gaming and more. There is also an education lab on-site to help foster the imagination of the whole family. → For more information, please visit livingcomputers.org.

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photos courtesy of living computers: museum + labs


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Hitting a

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MEMBER PROFILE

Home Run Member Dillon Moyer talks about the lessons he learned from his father, Jamie Moyer, and how he’s applied them to everything from professional baseball to business. written

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FOR FANS

of Jamie Moyer, the retired pitcher for the Seattle Mariners known for his longevity, it probably comes as no surprise that hard work and consistency created the backbone on which he raised his family of eight kids (six biological and two adopted), including Bellevue Club member Dillon Moyer, his eldest son. “Definitely hard work and giving your all was something he taught all of us. As a pitcher, my dad didn’t have any crazy tools or ways of pitching. His trick was about learning to work smart,” Dillon, age 26, says. “And he figured out how to be consistent on his own.”

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Although he eventually followed in his father’s footsteps and played professional baseball, Dillon says he adopted the family philosophy early on and deployed it in variety of situations growing up. “He didn’t really push us too hard to play baseball specifically. My brother and I played a bunch of other sports too—soccer, basketball, hockey, baseball, tennis, but also academics were really important,” Dillon says. “I was first drafted [by the Minnesota Twins] in high school, but my parents were strict on getting an education.” Dillon didn’t sign with the Twins at the time, but kept a vigorous training schedule while attending the IMG academy, an elite sports training facility in Florida. After high school, he attended University of California, Irvine, where he played for two

years until transferring to University of California, San Diego to play a third year. “I was determined to get drafted again as soon as possible, so I graduated from college in three years,” he says. “That goes back to the whole work smarter thing.” After graduating from UCSD with a sociology degree, Dillon fulfilled his goal of getting drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2013 and played for their minor league team, the Ogden Raptors. “I was extremely honored. The Dodgers organization has a ton of history and obviously a ton of great players,” Dillon says. “It was also cool because my dad retired from the league in 2012 and I started in 2013. So for awhile we didn’t skip a year without there being a Moyer in professional baseball.”

"I felt sports and real estate were pretty similar because there’s a competitive nature, and in the end we’re problem solvers."

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Dillon played in the minors until 2016, and he says the experience was positive for a variety of reasons. First, it allowed him “to fulfill a childhood dream and make some really great friends.” The other reason Dillon appreciates the opportunity to play professional sports is because it helped him hone a healthy sense of competitiveness, a trait he says carries perfectly into his new profession as a real estate broker for Avenue Properties. “I always loved real estate. When I was traveling with the team on the bus, my go-to apps were always Zillow and Redfin. I loved traveling to new cities and looking at cool houses, and I’ve always appreciated the details. I felt sports and real estate were pretty similar because there’s a competitive nature, and in the end we’re problem solvers,” Dillon says. “I like hard work and discipline and being your own boss. It’s what’s engrained in me.” Dillon adds that the Seattle and Eastside areas are the perfect place for him to settle into a career. “The community in Seattle is so unique and you can’t find that everywhere. We moved around a bit when I was younger, but the 10 years we spent here was my foundation. It feels like home here,” he says. → For more information or to contact Dillon,

please visit avenueproperties.com/agents. 54 | november 2017 reflections


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decoding the oxygen facial The list of celebrity endorsements for Intraceuticals oxygen facials is extensive, including everyone from Chelsea Handler, Miranda Kerr and Naomi Campbell to Justin Timberlake and Channing Tatum. Bottom line: those who make a career of putting their best face forward turn to this cutting-edge procedure because of the technology used. We talked with Desiree Cannon, an Intraceuticals representative, about bring the technology to the Club.

WHAT IS AN INTRACEUTICALS OXYGEN FACIAL? DC: It’s often called the Red Carpet Facial because we do

so many celebrity treatments pre-Oscars, pre-Grammys, Emmys, everything. And it works so well because it’s all about feeding your skin hydration. It’s all about health and getting your skin revived and replenished, but then also protected.

HOW DOES IT DO THAT? DC: It rehydrates the skin using very tiny, low-weight

molecules of hyaluronic acid that are stacked and then pushed into the skin using oxygen. The game changer is actually in the hyaluronic acid in our serums, because it’s hydrating for many levels. We just deliver it in a unique way with hyperbaric oxygen, which pushes the molecules into the skin for instant and visible results. The serums actually do the work, and the oxygen is the mode of transportation.

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WELLNESS FEATURE bellevue club november 2017 | 57


"It really is for all ages, and for men and women. We have five collections in our line, and depending on your skin health, we have protocols for everyone."

WHAT TYPE OF RESULTS CAN PEOPLE EXPECT? DC: One of the big perks is instant

gratification. It immediately increases skin hydration levels and smooths the texture.

WHAT IS AN OPTIMAL TREATMENT PLAN? DC: Results are cumulative—the more

you use it, the better results. I recommend six treatments, one treatment per week, and then maintenance once or twice a month. Plus we have a home care system with products of the same molecular size. It reinforces the treatment, feeding your skin.

IS THERE ANYONE WHO SHOULDN’T USE THIS TREATMENT? DC: It really is for all ages, and for men

and women. We have five collections in our line, and depending on your skin health, we have protocols for everyone. From teen clients with acne to clients with sun-damaged skin, the oxygen facial will help with any kind of inflammation and basically rejuvenates the skin. I like to say hyaluronic acid doesn’t choose sides; it just works.

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DC: Initially, oxygen was used mostly

for medical and therapeutic reasons. We use that same technology to feed our unique ingredients to skin cells.

WILL FULL-BODY TREATMENTS EVENTUALLY BE OFFERED? DC: Body is coming. I can’t say when

just yet, but it’s coming.

HOW DOES THIS OXYGEN FACIAL STAND OUT COMPARED TO OTHERS ON THE MARKET? DC: Oxygen in general is great for the

skin; it’s antimicrobial and antibacterial, and it can be a very relaxing procedure. But we have sneaky great technology in our product. Our treatment goes a step further: we took oxygen to the next level and integrated hyaluronic acid layering technology, called intralayering, and we use unique plant-based molecules that enhance your skin. ARE THERE ANY SKIN-RELATED TRENDS THAT DRIVE YOU CRAZY RIGHT NOW? DC: The whole at-home lip-plumping

thing. Our treatment will plump your lips without a suction cup. Also, a big one is diversion—when people buy skin-care products online. I recently

heard a great quote about how buying skin care online is as questionable as buying underwear online—you don’t know where they came from, what’s in them or how fresh they are. And that’s a perfect comparison. Get your products from an authority so you know exactly what’s in them and that they are for real. That’s a huge issue in the industry. ANY OTHER ADVICE FOR SKIN HEALTH? DC: Wear sunscreen: we talk about it un-

til we’re blue in the face, but it’s so true.

ANYTHING ELSE ABOUT THE OXYGEN FACIAL? DC: Yes, it’s actually very complemen-

tary to many other treatments. You can do it with a HydraFacial, dermaplaning, anything. It plays very well in the sandbox, especially with those procedures that exfoliate.

For more information, visit intraceuticals.com. To book an appointment, call The Spa at 425.688.3114.


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TR AV EL FE AT UR E

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haley shapley

MAKE A

DIFFERENCE WHEN YOU

TRAVEL On a recent trip to Charleston, South Carolina, I struck up a conversation with a woman while on a boat tour of the harbor. As we cruised past Fort Sumter, the USS Yorktown and gorgeous homes, I learned that Amie Sanders was visiting the city on better circumstances than previous trips. For a year she traveled several hours from her home to undergo treatment for breast cancer. The driving there and back was too much to do in one day, but finding a doctor closer to home wasn’t a path she wanted to go down. “There are good doctors in the Charleston area, and the reputation here is so good,” she told me. “I have little kids, so it wasn’t an option not to be here.” That’s when Hotel Keys of Hope stepped in. The program is a collaboration between Extended Stay America and the American Cancer Society to offer free and deeply discounted rooms to those who are undergoing cancer treatment far from home. Nearly 85,000 rooms have been donated since the program began in 2013, helping more than 12,000 patients and their families save over $5.5 million in travel costs.

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For Amie and her family, having a place to stay, especially one with a kitchen, was a huge relief. “It offered some normalcy, being able to get away and relax,” said Amie’s husband, Gibby. “It gave us the opportunity to pretend we were going for a date night.” Amie’s treatment was successful, and when we crossed paths, she was back in Charleston to meet other cancer survivors. Inspired by her story, I dropped my hotel room key in a box in the lobby when I checked out—for each guest who does the same, Extended Stay America donates one dollar in hotel room value to the cause. It was a small gesture on my part, but I wanted to show my support and appreciation of the program. The experience got me thinking about what other ways I can make a difference, however small, when I travel. Here’s what I found: bellevue club november 2017 | 63


BRING YOUR OWN WATER BOTTLE

In the US alone, 86 percent of the single-use plastic water bottles we drink find their way to a landfill—and in other countries, that number can be even higher. With 2.7 million tons of water bottle plastic used annually across the globe, the environmental impact is huge. You can avoid leaving a trail of plastic bottles behind you by simply packing your own water bottle. This works virtually anywhere in the US, but what if you’re traveling internationally in a destination where the water isn’t safe to drink? In this case, purify it on your own. The easiest way I’ve found is via a SteriPEN, a handheld device that uses ultraviolet light to destroy more than 99.9 percent of the bacteria, viruses and protozoa that lurk in water. There are other methods too: visit Travelers Against Plastic (travelersagainstplastic.org), an organization founded locally, to learn more.

www.travelersagainstplastic.org

VOLUNTEER ON THE ROAD RESPONSIBLY

“Voluntourism” is controversial in the travel world, as parachuting in to a faraway destination and helping out for a few days can sometimes do more harm than good. Orphanages, in particular, don’t make ideal volunteer vacations for a variety of reasons— consider that bonding with children for a short period of time and then leaving can be detrimental to their well-being, and some orphanages sadly exist more to cater to tourists than because the children are benefiting. So how do you take your good intentions and channel those into the right volunteer opportunity? Research, research, research—the organization you’re working with should have a proven track record of contributing positively to the community. Ask questions, read reviews and look for projects that are more concerned with how volunteers can help than how the experience will help volunteers. Also be sure to assess your own abilities and ensure that what you’re planning to do matches up with your skill set. COMBINE A TRIP WITH A DONATION

www.redlanternjourneys.com

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When I decided to climb Mount Rainier, I chose to do so as part of the Climb for Himalaya Children, a fund-raiser for the MitrataNepal Foundation for Children. Beforehand, I spent some time researching the nonprofit and liked what I found out about the work they’re doing for children’s education in Nepal. To participate in the climb, I donated approximately the same amount that it would have cost to sign up with a tour company, and a handful of friends and family contributed as well. Local tour operator Red Lantern Journeys organizes the annual trek on a volunteer basis so that the funds raised can go directly to the charity. There are lots of other opportunities like this all over the world, often related to adventure travel and bucket-list-type experiences.


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S P E C I A L

2017 A D V E R T I S I N G

66 | november 2017 reflections

S E C T I O N


HORSE CAROUSEL / HOLIDAY TRAIN 15 NEW MERCHANTS

r e t n i wonderland

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nd at redmo

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BENEFITTING:

bellevue club november 2017 | 67

2017 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

SANTA’S WORKSHOP / SYNTHETIC SKATING RINK


2017 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

HaystackAntiques

144 105th Avenue NE

Bellevue, WA 98004

425·455·1515

Bellevue’s Premier Antique Mall 25 Dealers Open 7 days a week For details and exhibitor list visit www.haystackantiques.com

VILLAGE THEATRE

VILLAGE THEATRE’S PRODUCTION OF

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NEWSIES THE GIN GAME STRING HAIRSPRAY

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ING N N I -W GIC D R A W EY MA A Y N TO OF DISN PLOSION E GY EX FULL NER D DANC E H G AN A HI

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2017 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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2017 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

Cultural Tours, Yoga Retreats and More! Trips to Africa, China, Cuba, Ecuador, India, Nicaragua & Peru

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Convenience, Quality, and Selection in Downtown Bellevue 70 | november 2017 reflections

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2017 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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2017 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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CLUB REFLECTIONS

your community. your club.

Family Lego Night

Families of all sizes and ages came out for dinner and a night of creativity and fun.

Dan Parker, the owner of CITY BLOCKS, the world’s only public commercial LEGO art studio, led the event.commercial LEGO ar

t

The little builders spent the night exploring and building their own unique pieces of art.

74 | November 2017 reflections

photography by john bang


3500 Factoria Blvd. S.E., Bellevue, WA

. 425.643.2610 . www.dacels.com


CLUB REFLECTIONS

your community. your club.

→

Parents enjoyed making memories and dining with their little ones.

�

For more Bellevue Club events, please visit bellevueclub.com.

76 | November 2017 reflections

photography by john bang


WINDERMERE│$4,850,000

DENNY BLAINE│$8,950,000

WASHINGTON PARK WATERFRONT│$7,898,000

MEDINA | $2,850,000

WASHINGTON PARK WATERFRONT│$12,850,000

MAGNOLIA WATERFRONT│$2,495,000

BETSY Q. TERRY & JANE POWERS 206.322.2840 │ luxuryrealestate.com


BRAIN TRAINING month year

Working out your brain is just as important as working out your biceps, so consider this your monthly dose of cognitive strength training.

SUDOKU INSTRUCTIONS: Fill the grid so that every column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1-9.

*SOLVED PUZZLES: Flip the magazine upside down to view the solved puzzles.

80 | November 2017 reflections


YOUR LIFE. YOUR WEALTH. YOUR LEGACY. Significant wealth requires sophisticated, highly customized strategies. For a select group of clients, Merrill Lynch offers the Private Banking and Investment Group to help manage the complexities of substantial wealth. Our singular experience is both powerful and personal. We’re dedicated to building a lasting relationship and helping you pursue your goals for today while shaping your legacy for the future.

Weese Harris Group 800 Bellevue Way NE, Suite 350 Bellevue, Washington 98004

Call us in Bellevue at 844.990.2208 or visit us online at pbig.ml.com/advisor/weeseharrisgroup Minimum relationship: $10 Million

Merrill Lynch makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (“MLPF&S”), a registered broker-dealer, registered investment adviser and Member SIPC, and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”). The Private Banking and Investment Group is a division of MLPF&S that offers a broad array of personalized wealth management products and services. Both brokerage and investment advisory services (including financial planning) are offered by the group’s private wealth advisors through MLPF&S. The nature and degree of advice and assistance provided, the fees charged, and client rights and Merrill Lynch’s obligations will differ among these services. The banking, credit and trust services sold by the group’s private wealth advisors are offered by licensed banks and trust companies, including Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC, and other affiliated banks. Investment products offered through MLPF&S:

© 2017 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. | AR9TGQ9N | AD-09-17-0018 | 09/2017


www.vdbluxury.com

ESTATES P R E S E N T S

CLYDE HILL VILLA

MEDITERRANEAN ESTATE

This Gated Estate was created for extraordinary entertainment spaces that flow seamlessly through the home into first-class alfresco living. Unique custom features of soaring ceilings and architectural elegance emphasize the quality of craftsmanship and design. Bedroom en suites, two offices, wine cellar, butler’s pantry, recreation and media room as well as a chef’s dream kitchen.

Offered at

$5,795,000

Learn more about this listing at vdbestates.com/villa

Mark von der Burg Coldwell Banker Global Luxury® DIRECTOR mark@vdbrealty.com SEATTLE

206.245.9185

EASTSIDE

425.882.8821

全中文网站 : www.xiyatufangchan.com 国际业务部中文查询 : 425.749.1928 VDB628


CONFIDENT STYLE BELLEVUE | $2,698,000 vdbestates.com/bellevuestyle

MODERN VIEWS KIRKLAND | $4,498,000 vdbestates.com/modernviews


Reflections: November 2017  

The Community Magazine of The Bellevue Club.

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