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BELLEVUE CLUB

HOTEL BELLEVUE

AUGUST 2017

BACK-TOSCHOOL BBQ SPORTS MEDICINE FOR THE FAMILY

FA

A WHOLE NEW WORLD OF FAMILY TRAVEL

LL

YOUTH

N

EW

ER

E • INSID SLETT

creative movement in kids Dance instructor Anne Motl talks about why you should encourage your kids to let loose p.48


WENDY M LISTER

A pictorial masterpiece. Provoking Impact • 19,844sf Medina Lot • Built 2014 6,120sf Home • 5 Bedrooms • 6 Bathrooms Offered at $8,168,000


MEDINA DESIGN

There is no compromise. (425) 283-8858 • WendyLister@cbbain.com Coldwell Banker Global Luxury www.WendysGoneDigital.com bellevue club february 2015 | 3

Th e i n fo r m at i o n co n t a i n e d h e re i n h a s be e n o b t a i n e d t h ro u g h s o u rces d e e m e d re l i a b l e b u t ca n n o t be g ua ra n t e e d a s t o i t s acc u rac y . A n y i n fo r m at i o n o f s pe c i a l i n t e res t s h o u l d be o b t a i n e d t h ro u g h i n d e pe n d e n t ve r i fi cat i o n .


INSIDE

august 2017

“One of my wife’s favorite sayings is there’s no downside of exercise.” - Dr. Ron Gregush, orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist

36 •

MEET DR. RON GREGUSH

The orthopedic surgeon shares his thoughts about sports medicine.

4 | august 2017 reflections

42 •

IT’S ELECTRIC

Local installation artists light up the Eastside.

48 •

CREATIVE MOVEMENT FOR KIDS

Dance instructor Anne Motl talks about allowing kids to let loose.

photo by mary dee mateo & mokul soman


Featuring our 20.08 carat Ethiopian Opal 10133 Main Street in Bellevue

425-777-4451

gordonjamesdiamonds.com bellevue club february 2015 | 5


INSIDE

august 2017

16

18

RECIPROCAL CLUB

WELLNESS TOOL

A monthly spotlight on a BC sister club.

22

Explore fun fashion for the family.

CITY SCENE

A guide to enjoying the last days of summer.

24

WHAT TO WORK WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING Personal trainer and expecting mother Christin Tercek gives an example of her workouts.

28

A GUIDE TO A BACK-TO-SCHOOL BBQ Use fresh foods from the Pacific Northwest to create a fun, unfussy event.

32

CLASS PASS How proper glassware affects wine tasting.

53

A WHOLE NEW WORLD Tips on how to travel abroad with children.

Departments 8 UPFRONT

|

70 SERVICE NETWOR K

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10 CA LENDA R |

72 BR AIN TR AINING


You Are Here (So Are We)

Build Your Future From The Inside… Out Cornerstone has been serving Bellevue and the surrounding area with high-touch service since 1984. Our Client Managers – your neighbors – have the experience and expertise to prepare you for anything you might encounter on your life’s path. And the local knowledge to understand what truly matters to you. Whether it’s making the most of your retirement investments, planning for the financial future of your children, managing company stock options, or even solving complex, delicate family matters, our Client Managers deliver at every turn. Washington wealth deserves Olympian wealth management. Cornerstone is here for you. BuildBeyond.com l info@buildbeyond.com l (888) 762-1442 l Bellevue, WA

bellevue club february 2015 | 7


UPFRONT august 2017 MANAGEMENT

A Chat with Jill Clark, Bellevue Club Recreation Director

President S. W. Thurston Financial Manager Jeff Ohlstrom Human Resources Director Donna Gray Communications Director Bonnie Tankovich Membership Director Carissa Ritter Tennis Director Brian Nash Fitness Director Connor Eden Aquatics Director Michelle Streifel Recreation Director Jill Clark Spa & Athletic Services Director Katie Wallis Head Swim Coach Andrew Nguyen Catering Director Jill Parravano

CONTACT bellevue club

425.455.1616 | bellevueclub.com athletic services

425.688.3177

hotel bellevue

425.454.4424 | thehotelbellevue.com

HOURS OF OPERATION hotel bellevue

Club Concierge Desk 24 hours a day, 7 days a week athletic facility

BACKGROUND: Bachelor of Arts in recreation management with a minor in communications from Western Washington University ADVICE FOR BUSY FAMILIES: Stay informed about all the Club’s programs and get involved. Plan out activities using our youth brochure and online calendar.

5 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.* Monday-Friday 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.* Saturday 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sunday *Subject to change, depending on scheduled events. The pool closes at 10 p.m. Monday-Saturday.

REFLECTIONS MAGAZINE VOLUME 34 ISSUE 2 www.BCreflections.com editor

Lauren Hunsberger | 425.688.3162 art director

BC PARENT LIFE-HACK: Enjoy a date night in Polaris and take advantage of our child-care program for your little ones.

Bonnie Tankovich | 425.688.3194

ADVICE FOR TRYING NEW THINGS: Don’t be afraid to let your kid fail when trying something new. Give your kids time and space to grow and figure things out for themselves.

To receive a rate card and media kit, please call 425.445.6800 or visit www.bcreflections.com.

WHAT’S SPECIAL ABOUT THE BC COMMUNITY: As a staff member, I get to see when everyone comes together as a community. Whether you’re a mom waiting to pick up your kids or a regular on our men’s basketball league, our community is all about fun and helping each other out when possible.

BELLEVUE CLUB REFLECTIONS (ISSN 1096-8105) is published monthly by the Bellevue Club, 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004. Copyright 2017 by Bellevue Club. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission is prohibited. Publication number 715390. Periodicals postage paid @ Bellevue, WA, and additional offices. Editorial, Advertising and Circulation Office: P.O. Box 90020, Bellevue, WA 98009 (mailing address); 11200 S.E. 6th, Bellevue, WA 98004 (street address); telephone 425.455.1616. Produced by Vernon Publications, LLC, 12437 N.E. 173rd Place, Second Floor, Woodinville, WA 98072. POSTMASTER send address changes to BELLEVUE CLUB REFLECTIONS, 11200 S.E. Sixth St., Bellevue, WA 98004.

PROGRAMMING FOR THIS FALL AND WINTER: I’m looking forward to all our family events. We’ve added a father-son party, and we still have our traditional father-daughter dance and Santa brunch coming up. We’ve also added a great youth yoga program. We are always refining our classes and encourage feedback.

8 | august 2017 reflections

advertising

Eric Nienaber | 425.445.6800 display advertising

photo by taryn emerick


SUNSET MARINA

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CALL NOW! Russ McClellan Director of Sales and Marketing 509-682-1111

ChelanMarina.com bellevue club february 2015 | 9


CALENDAR bellevue club

AUGUST 2017 SUN

MON

TUES

01

06

07

WED 02

08

09

SPECIAL EVENTS THU

FRI

SAT

03

04

05

Bellevue Club Business Association

Family Gym Night

10

11

Week 8 Summer Camp

13

14

Bellevue Club Youth Basketball Academy: Back to School Clinic

15

16

17

Week 9 Summer Camp

20

21

22

23

24

28

18

19

Complimentary GPX Class Sampler

Ignite Dance Workshop

25

26

Family Gym Night

Week 10 Summer Camp

27

12

29

30

31

Week 11 Summer Camp

SAVE THE DATE! BCYBA: Back to School Clinic, August 12

The Bellevue Club’s Youth Basketball Academy focuses on developing each player as an individual and teammate. For more information, email recreation@bellevueclub.com.

SUP YOGA, September 22

Set sail in the Bellevue Club swimming pool to explore balance, strength, breath and bliss on stand-up paddle boards and to experience the savasana of your lifetime!

WEEKLY EVENTS SUN

MON

TUES

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

Water Runner

Ladies’ Tennis Night

Yoga for Golf

Men’s Tennis Night

Booty Barre

Mixed Doubles Night

Inflatable Obstacle Course

To sign up for these events and more, please visit members.bellevueclub.com. 10 | august 2017 reflections


bellevue club august 2017 | 11


NEWSFEED

bellevue club

SADDLED UP

CONTRIBUTORS

Youth Equestrians Texas Bound

These Capstone Farm equestrian team and Bellevue Club members are happy to be on their beloved Appaloosa horses, ready to participate in the World Championship Appaloosa Youth Show this summer. Behind these smiles are countless hours of training, determination and a respect for the partnership between horse and rider. Regardless of the color of the ribbons won, these riders strive to improve their skills, learn goal-setting techniques and enjoy cheering for their teammates.

MARY DEE MATEO & MOKUL SOMAN

Mary Dee and Mukul are a husband and wife photography duo who have been published by the National Geographic Society and Seattle Met. To see more of their work, visit marydeemateo.com and mukulsoman. com. SEE THEIR WORK IN “SPORTS MEDICINE” [PAGE 36].

JULI E AR NAN

Team members (left to right): Madison Schatzman (12), Gabriella Garner (14), Siena Kitch (15), Taylor Kennedy (12), Anya Leland (11), and Camille Kennedy (9).

KARATE ACCOMPLISHMENTS On May 20, Bellevue Club member Qunilan McCabe took gold in kata and bronze in kumite at the Franco Cup in Richland, Washington. “Qunilan works hard in every class and knows our motto for tournaments: ‘Winners and learners— it’s good to be both.’ His participation and hard work has placed him in the ‘W’ column after learning a lot in class,” says karate instructor James Penor.

Julie Arnan specializes in stories o n l i f e ’s g o o d stuff—food, wine, travel and culture. Follow her ad ve nt u r e s on Instagram @JulieArnan. SEE JULIE’S WORK IN “CLASS PASS” [PAGE 32].

HALEY SHAPLEY

Seattle.

When she’s not on the road, Haley S haple y writes about travel, health and more from her home in SEE HALEY’S WORK IN “NEW

WORLD” [PAGE 52].

CONTRIBUTE TO REFLECTIONS MAGAZINE!

Are you an eager writer or photographer? We are currently looking for talented freelancers to join our creative team. If you are interested, please email reflections@bellevueclub.com. 12 | august 2017 reflections


COMMUNITY newsfeed

Eastside news from our partners at 425 Business magazine. THE CIRCLE IS COMPLETE AT BELLEVUE’S DOWNTOWN PARK Bellevue bills itself as a “city in a park.” It was difficult to argue with that in July when City leaders officially celebrated the completion of the latest phase of Downtown Park. A postcard setting that typifies the “city in a park” moniker, Downtown Park is a 22-acre felt green sanctuary that sits in the southwest shadows of downtown’s towering glass and steel skyscrapers. The park dates to the early 1980s, when the City of Bellevue acquired the land from the Bellevue School District. A master plan for the park was developed, and voters approved a levy in 2008 to help pay for the $20 million project.

NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED BANK SIGNS LEASE AT LINCOLN SQUARE Kemper Development Company announced Bank of America has signed a lease to occupy a 76,000-square-foot office space at 400 Lincoln Square in Bellevue. With client-facing teams from Bank of America’s Merrill Lynch, Merrill Lynch Private Banking & Investment Group, and U.S. Trust lines of business planned to occupy three floors of the office tower, Bank of America said the new location will further help support the bank’s goal of better serving its clients.

Auth0, a Bellevue-based cloud service providing single sign-on capabilities and security for billions of log-ins each year, announced it has raised $30 million in funding from late-stage investor Meritech Capital Partners. The managing director of the venture capital group, George Bischof, also has joined Auth0’s board of directors. Meritech Capital Partners has more than $3 billion in investments in private technology companies and is among the top performing venture firms. In total, Auth0 has secured more than $54 million in Series C funding from investors, funding that will help the company offer additional security features for “modern enterprises” and potentially open the door for a few acquisitions, as well.

To read the full stories, visit 425business.com.

14 | august 2017 reflections

CLOUD-BASED SECURITY COMPANY RAISES MILLIONS IN FUNDING


Come see why everyone lovс The Bellettini!

Call today to join us for a private tour and enjoy a complimentary lunch in your choice of our two on-site restaurants.

It’s not hard to see why people are moving into The Bellettini! Located in the heart of Bellevue, The Bellettini offers comfortable, elegant surroundings and luxurious restaurant dining. If moving isn’t in your near future, learn how you can join Club Bellettini; where your membership has its privileges.

1115 108th Ave. NE, Bellevue, WA 98004 | www.thebellettini.com | 425.450.0800


RECIPROCAL CLUB

august 2017 w r i t t e n b y a n n e c ol e

THE BOISE RACQUET AND SWIM CLUB

The Boise Racquet and Swim Club boasts a family-oriented atmosphere with an emphasis on the love of racquet sports. Whether you’re taking a dip in the pool or sweating it out on the court, everyone will be entertained. LOCATION Located in Boise, Idaho, the club is a perfect getaway for active Northwest families. An opportunity for a short road trip or even quicker flight, it’s a relatively easy commute from western Washington, no matter how many family members you have in tow.

AQUATICS BRSC has a large outdoor swimming pool with both competitive and non-competitive swim programs. They also offer swimming lessons for all experience levels and encourage members to host swim-related birthday parties.

RACQUET SPORTS The BRSC’s racquet sports programs are unparalleled. There is plenty of opportunity for serious competition or a quick social match at Idaho’s premier tennis club. It has 23 courts (9 outdoor courts, 2 clay courts and 12 indoor hard courts) as well as six certified teaching professionals ready to assist players of all levels.

FITNESS AMENITIES Before spending a leisurely afternoon relaxing by the pool or on the courts, try taking a rejuvenating yoga or barre class. Additionally, the gym has a full range of cardio and strength equipment. The BRSC offers many amenities to its members with an emphasis on family fun.

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➔ For more information, visit boisetennis.com.


bellevue club february 2015 | 17


STYLE

august 2017

KLT: WORKS

THE PRODUCT KLT: Works, a local family-run textile and ceramics company, uses hand-mixed dyes and organic and upcycled materials to make screenprinted shirts, pillows and cuddly toys, as well as a number of other great creations. Additionally, the label has a number of stunning and colorful porcelain vessels. THE DETAILS Founder and designer Kristin Loffer Theiss works closely with her husband to create original, hand-drawn designs using thread drawing, screen printing and ceramics. They are located in Mount Vernon, with an Etsy shop. KLT: Works designs are sure to please the entire family.

18 | august 2017 reflections

• Every month Reflections will be highlighting a product we think can boost your health and wellness. Got an idea? Send your recommendations to reflections@bellevueclub.com.

photos by kristin loffer theiss


Jewelry For Every Special Occasion One-of-a-kind pieces, custom designs & repairs. It’s more than just the f inishing touch to your personal style, jewelry makes a statement about you. With extraordinary, contemporary, even one-of-a-kind pieces, Porcello’s is the right answer for every special occasion. Now go tell the world you just got engaged.

425.454.2300 | 10222 Northeast 8th Street | Bellevue, WA 98004 porcellos.com | Monday - Saturday | 10 - 5:30


COMMUNITY

august 2017

BY THE NUMBERS A snapshot of family life on the Eastside

BELLEVUE

18

56.7

16,740

Bellevue was ranked no. 18 in the country for top 25 safest cities to live in by Business Insider.

Percentage of people in Bellevue who are married

According to point2homes.com, there are 16,740 homes in Bellevue housing children.

KIRKLAND

25 •

Kirkland was ranked no. 25 in Livability’s 2016 “Best Places to Live.”

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83,000

Kirkland is the sixth-largest municipality in King County with a population of over 83,000.


Go Big. Go Home. Live Large… Spacious homes, epic views, global brands, unique & adventurous experiences, crafted and personal— All just a sky bridge away.

Live central to everything you love—the work, the style, the delicious dining and the vibrant nightlife. Live it all here, all in one place, at The Bellevue Collection. Visit The Studio, our interactive leasing center, to touch, feel and tour Two Lincoln Tower’s model apartment homes. Located at Lincoln Square, Level 2.

Now leasing for Fall 2017. Schedule your tour today. 425.276.7561 2-LincolnTower.com Dimensions, square footage and features are approximate and may vary. Prices are for base rent only and are subject to change without notice.


22 | august 2017 reflections


CITY SCENE

FUNwith THE FAMILY WASHINGTON MIDSUMMER RENAISSANCE FAIRE

Take an adventure back in time with the entire family at the Bonney Lake Renaissance Faire. Turkey legs and cider will be sold along with other wares from vendors. The live-action performances are the main event with real jousting and pirate shows held every hour. Visitors are encouraged to dress up, but you can also just come as yourself. The event is held the first three weekends in August. For more information, please visit washingtonfaire.com.

FREE STATE AND NATIONAL PARK DAY August 25

Go on a hike, have a picnic or just enjoy a scenic nature trail on the National Park Service Birthday at both national and state parks. Make sure to check in at a visitor center to get the local itinerary from the park rangers.

SNOQUALMIE RAILROAD DAYS August 18–20

75TH ANNUAL MORTON LOGGERS’ JUBILEE August 10–13

This event in Morton may be a bit quirky, but it’s an excellent opportunity to experience the Pacific Northwest at its finest. This festival showcases individuals competing against each other, using their logging skills. In addition, the event will feature live music, vendors, a flea market and lawn mower races! For more information, please visit loggersjubilee.com.

WA STATE INTERNATIONAL KITE FESTIVAL August 21–27

A little-known fact about the state of Washington is that it plays host to an International Kite Festival in Long Beach. The event is held over the course of a week, and you can fly your own kite or enjoy watching hundreds of colorful kites soar along the coast. The festival has scheduled a competition with professional kite flyers and also offers workshops. Be sure to stop in at the World Kite Museum! For more information, please visit kitefestival.com.

This event, held annually for the last 70 years, attracts over 10,000 people. The festival includes a Grand Parade, a Classic Car Show and an Arts in the Park event. The main attraction is the train tour up to the top of Snoqualmie Falls. Saturday morning there’s the Firefighters’ Pancake Breakfast—a time-honored tradition. For more information, please visit railroaddays.com.

written

by

kylah cech

bellevue club august 2017 | 23


WHAT TO WORK WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING photogr a ph y

by

ta ry n e m e r ick

WHILE EACH MOTHER SHOULD WORK AT HER OWN LEVEL AND PACE, PERSONAL TRAINER CHRISTIN TERCEK SHARED HER ROUTINE FOR PRE- AND POSTNATAL STRENGTH TRAINING. THE SERIES FOCUSES ON STRENGTHENING THE HIPS, GLUTES AND HAMSTRINGS, WHICH HELP DURING ALL STAGES OF CHILDBIRTH, AND SHOULDER-SPECIFIC EXERCISES, WHICH PREPARE MOTHERS FOR HOLDING NEWBORNS. WITH A FOCUS ON LIGHTER WEIGHTS AND HIGHER REPETITIONS, THE SERIES SHOULD BE PERFORMED FOR THREE ROUNDS OF 15 TO 20. TERCEK RECOMMENDS ENDING THE SERIES BY STRETCHING THE HIP, HAMSTRING AND GLUTE REGIONS, WHICH ARE HEAVILY IMPACTED DURING PREGNANCY. HER STRETCH OF CHOICE IS CAT/COW. 24 | august 2017 reflections


#�.

FITNESS

GOBLET SQUAT Strengthens hamstrings, glutes and hips Start with your feet wider than your hips and toes slightly turned out. Hold a light kettlebell at chin level, keeping the lats engaged. Shift the tailbone back, and drop into a squat with the chest lifted, weight in the heels. Driving through the heels, return to a standing position.

#�.

MONSTER WALK Strengthens glutes Place an elastic band around your ankles, and stand with a slight bend in your knees. While hinging forward and driving through the heels, pick up one foot, moving it a few inches to the side, keeping tension on the elastic band and your toes pointed directly foward. Walk for 8–10 feet, then reverse and go the other way.

#4.

LOW ELBOW ROW Strengthens lats and posture Place a resistance band around a sturdy anchor, and lean back slightly to put tension on it. Stand with a tall posture, keeping the shoulders back and down and your head neutral. With your elbows tucked in and wrists neutral, pull on the band, using a rowing motion. For additional upper body work, try another variation with the palms facing the floor and your elbows wide.

#3.

STABILITY HIP THRUST Strengthens hamstrings, glutes and core Find a stability ball that allows for your legs to be in 90-degree position when your upper back is resting on it. Starting in a tabletop position, keep your hips level and cross your arms at the chest. Keeping the weight in the heels, drop the tailbone toward the floor, pause, and then raise your hips up toward the ceiling.

➔ To train with Christin or for more information about personal training, please email fitness@bellevueclub.com.

bellevue club august 2017 | 25


7233 SE 29th St Mercer Island - $2,348,000 MercerIslandCustom.com

4926 111th Ave NE Kirkland $1,136,000 - SOLD

Bellevue Towers Unit #1101 (PENDING) BellevueTowers1101.com

4803 Forest Ave SE Mercer Island - $2,988,000 ForestAvenueEstate.com

4040 140th Ave NE Bellevue - $2,845,000 SerenityCreekBellevue.com

B E L L E V U E LU X U R Y. CO M 6 0 0108th 1 0 8 tAvenue h A v e n NE, ue N E , B e l l eWA vue 600 Bellevue,

Steve Curran

WA

Eastside Director 425.241.3583 steve@nwgrealestate.com

Galya Kirstine

Eastside Luxury Director 206.853.5995 galya@nwgrealestate.com

Nathanael Hasselback

Director of Bus. Development 206.769.2435 nhasselbeck@nwgrealestate.com


NWGREALESTATE.COM

CELEBRATING 10 YEARS 2007 - 2017 NWG TOP 10 EASTSIDE SALES 3

1

Medina - Price Undisclosed - SOLD May ‘17

Newport Shores $6,400,000 - SOLD April ‘10

6

Medina $4,370,000 - SOLD April ‘17

9

7

4

Bellevue - Price Undisclosed - SOLD May ‘17

Enatai $5,500,000 - SOLD January ‘15

5

Mercer Island $4,420,000 - SOLD October ‘13

Clyde Hill $3,578,000 - SOLD May ‘16

1

2

10

Redmond $4,400,000 - SOLD March ‘10

8

Enatai $3,900,000 - SOLD July ‘15

Bridle Trails $3,468,000 - SOLD March ‘16

2

4

5

3 7

8

6

Dicker Cahill

Associate Broker 425.466.2919 dcahill@nwgrealestate.com

10

9

Jody Blohm

Associate Broker 206.295.2504 jody@nwgrealestate.com

Jason Foss

Managing Broker 425.890.9909 jfoss@nwgrealestate.com

Peter Freet

Nick Glant

bellevue club december 2015 | 27 Managing Broker President & Founder 206.972.6775 206.910.4221 peter@nwgrealestate.com nick@nwgrealestate.com


FA M ILY F E ATU R E

a guide to a simple

back-to-school

bbq

August in the Pacific Northwest is something every local looks forward to in the anticipation of outdoor activities—especially dining alfresco. And with school starting up soon, what better way to celebrate the last blissful days of a Seattle summer than with a big barbecue with the family? Use this guide to maximize the products you can find right in your backyard and get inspiration for some fun, unfussy decor. DECOR What’s more classic summer than red gingham or plaid? Add color and texture to your BBQ by using your favorite fabric to set the table. For simple centerpieces, use Mason jars as vases and fill them with bright sunflowers, or the flowers of your choice, from your local Eastside farmers’ market. Finish your tablescape with some complementary-colored paper plates. This easy setup allows for a beautiful dining environment at minimal cost and with minimal cleanup, perfect for a barbecue. TIP FOR KIDS: Make your barbecue kid-friendly by using picnic tables to seat everyone family-style. This will add to the rustic, summer vibe.

28 | august 2017 reflections

HORS D’OEUVRES Keep it fresh with a few easy appetizers to tempt your taste buds. Try a caprese salad with basil and heirloom tomatoes from the Bellevue Farmers Market (bellevuefarmersmarket. org) and mozzarella from DeLaurenti (delaurenti.com), a specialty food and wine store in Seattle. You can never go wrong with a cheese and cracker plate, which appeals to all ages. Source your cheeses from DeLaurenti, and try Lesley Stowe’s Raincoast Crisps (lesleystowe.com).


TIP FOR KIDS: Make some fun and colorful fruit kabobs for the kids to enjoy snacking on before dinner. Try slicing watermelon and using a starshaped cookie cutter to make shapes. Then place the watermelon star on a skewer and put blueberries along the length to create a “firework.�

written

by

a n n e cole

bellevue club august 2017 | 29


ENTRÉES Nothing screams summer more than grilling. Switch up the usual hamburgers and hot dogs for something more Pacific Northwest–inspired—local wild salmon. Source your fresh fish from the Gemini Fish Market (geminifish.com) in Issaquah. (Make sure to stop by the family-owned company’s seafood truck as well!) Grill the salmon to simple perfection by brushing it in olive oil, adding some salt and pepper, and garnishing it with lemon slices and some rosemary for a flavorful main course.

30 | august 2017 reflections

TIP FOR KIDS: Give the kids the fun project of putting together their own kabobs, using an array of colorful, locally grown veggies, like bell peppers, purple onions, and zucchini. Gather your veggies from the Kirkland Wednesday Market (kirklandmarket.org), and brush the kabobs with olive oil. Place them on the grill for the easiest preparation possible.


DRINKS Staying hydrated is vital at barbecues. Make sure to have plenty of both childand adult-friendly beverages to keep all of your guests happy. For the adult crowd, a festive cocktail may be in order. Make a pitcher of watermelon lemonade with award-winning vodka from Glass Distillery (glassvodka.com), which uses Washingtongrown grapes to make its product, or whip up some delicious sangria. TIP FOR KIDS: For the kids, try homemade sparkling limeade! Made with fresh lime juice, sparkling water, organic honey and mint, topped with fresh, locally grown raspberries, this vibrant drink is sure to please. Try honey from Anna’s Honey in Tukwila (annashoney.com). DESSERT Try baking your own delicious peach pie. With fairly simple ingredients, this yummy, seasonal treat is a guaranteed hit among guests. Purchase ripe peaches from Remlinger Farms (remlingerfarms.com). This fun farm is a great place to bring your kids for a tour. The farm has freshly picked and frozen peaches available. If you don’t want to do your own baking, they have daily-made pies available as well. TIP FOR KIDS: For a more interactive dessert, create your own s’mores! Try a variety of different chocolates to make things interesting. This decadent and hands-on treat will be a favorite among guests of all ages!

bellevue club august 2017 | 31


BOTTLE TALK NEW WORLD SHIRAZ, CABERNET & NEW WORLD PINOT NOIR

32 | august 2017 reflections


ffects win e a re a ta ssw s r gla ope How pr

Glass Class amed after the father of the Washington wine industry, the Walter Clore Wine and Culinary Center in Prosser seeks to engage both wine consumers and those within the industry through education and events. Nearly every weekend they offer classes in blind tasting, Washington versus other wine regions, and even cooking. They’ve also partnered with Austrian glassmaker Riedel, facilitating seminars on how varietal-specific glassware affects wine tasting. I’ll admit, I was skeptical as it seemed like a conflict of interest to have a glassware company leading the “why you should buy our glassware” seminar, but after testing it out for myself, I am convinced that proper glassware really does make a positive difference.

N

Riedel is a family-owned company that has been in the glass business for more than 250 years, making everything from windows to coat buttons to computer screens. In the 1950s, ninth-generation owner Claus Riedel turned his passion for wine into another Riedel product—the wineglass. He experimented with shapes, sizes and materials that would make a difference in a consumer’s wine experience. The first official sommelier glasses were hand-blown in Kufstein, Austria. It wasn’t until tenth-generation owner Georg Riedel took over that the first machine-made, varietal-specific glasses were produced. Though Riedel offers dozens of different products, its Veritas line of varietal-specific glasses currently consists of 13 styles. We sampled Pinot Noir, Syrah and Cabernet using the Veritas Red Wine Tasting Set. Visually, the first noticeable attribute are the bowl shapes and sizes—the New World Pinot Noir glass balloons out at the bottom and contains a flared-out or tulip rim, the Old World Syrah glass appears nearly balanced from top to bottom with its widest point located near the middle of the bowl, and the Cabernet/ Merlot glass has a lower center of gravity with sides coming up just shy of vertical after the widest part of the bowl. All the glasses have cut rims as opposed to the rolled rim of most inexpensive stemware. The purpose of the cut rim is to deliver the wine to your palate without impediment—the roll acts like a barrier and leads to an imprecise tasting experience.

t in

g

We smelled and tasted three red wines in each glass, comparing how they performed in the varietal-specific glass and the other two options. The differences were surprisingly easy to quantify. Starting with plain water, the Pinot Noir glass delivered the water to the front of the palate, thanks to the tulip-shaped rim, while the Syrah glass directed the water to the middle and back of the palate. The shape of the Cabernet/Merlot glass actually made the water feel creamy and flooded the palate evenly.

written

photos provided by riedel

by

julie arnan

bellevue club august 2017 | 33


RIEDEL VERITAS SERIES

NEW WORLD PINOT NOIR

34 | august 2017 reflections

OLD WORLD SYRAH


ith the water test complete, we poured a small amount of Pinot Noir into each glass, gave it a swirl and stuffed our noses into the bowls. From the varietal-specific glass, the wine expressed a delicate bouquet of red fruit and a hint of spice compared to a lighter, greener aroma from the Syrah glass and almost nothing from the Cabernet glass. The varietal-specific glass delivered the Pinot Noir to the front of the palate, playing up the wine’s sweeter fruit notes of cherry and raspberry continuing to the sides of the palate, where we experienced a rush of acidity. The Syrah glass delivery completely bypassed the front of the palate, making the fruit notes harder to identify and the alcohol more pronounced on the throat. But the Cabernet glass was the worst, transforming this lush, delicate Pinot Noir into a rough-tasting wine with a terrible finish.

W

We repeated the experiment with a Syrah poured in each glass. In the varietal-specific glass, the wine expressed full, luscious black fruit and robust spice aromas, followed by a mid-palate hit of leather, defined structure and a lingering finish. In the Pinot Noir glass, the wine smelled herbaceous and the alcohol was highly pronounced; the glass delivered the wine too far forward on the palate and the tannins seared with unbalanced clumsiness. What seemed lush in its proper glass felt dusty, bitter, and sour in the Cabernet glass. North America’s love affair with Bordeaux-style wines has made the Cabernet/Merlot–shaped glass the most popular style, which is why most of us would recognize it as the quintessential wineglass. We poured a Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon into each glass for the final experiment. Its bouquet was powerful with blackberry, chocolate and spice in the varietal-specific glass. The wine flooded the whole palate in a balanced manner without the tannic overload experienced from both the Pinot Noir and Syrah glasses, where flavors were tight and muted. Even though the glasses are varietal specific, they actually can be used for more than just one type of grape. The New World Pinot Noir glass is also recommended for Nebbiolo, rosé champagne, Barolo and Barbaresco. When in doubt, use this glass for sparkling wines instead of a champagne flute to better manage the effervescence. The Old World Syrah glass can be used for any Rhone-style red as well as Barbera, Sangiovese, and Amarone wines. Stick with Bordeaux varietals with the Cabernet/Merlot glass. Of course, Riedel also makes glasses for white wines, differentiating between oaked and unoaked chardonnay, with options for beer and spirits as well. Riedel glasses (which, incidentally are dishwasher-safe) are available in tasting sets and single-varietal sets online and in stores such as Total Wine.

bellevue club august 2017 | 35


SPORTS MEDICINE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY interview

by

l au r en h u nsberger

•••

photogr a ph y

Ron Gregush, MD, is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in active families and sports medicine. Using cutting-edge arthroscopic surgery, he approaches some of the most common injuries from a different perspective. Reflections sat down with him to discuss his thoughts on specialized sports, ACL tears and more. ON ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AND SPORTS MEDICINE:

“I most enjoy working with people who are physically active— anyone from high-performance athletes to people who do a sport recreationally once or twice a week—because I love the idea of helping make people better and getting them back to what they want to be doing. In many fields of medicine, such as primary care or neurology, physicians spend much of their time helping to manage chronic disease, which is incredibly important but involves incremental, slow-paced progress. I like being able to help people fix something so they can move forward in their lives." ON ARTHROSCOPY:

“Arthroscopic surgery involves making little incisions around a joint, which means avoiding unnecessary damage or muscle dissection. The minimally-invasive nature of arthroscopy helps patients recover faster and get back to being active much more 36 | august 2017 reflections

by

m a ry dee m ateo

&

m u k u l som a n

quickly. It's a surgical method that is relatively new, and the advances being made in arthroscopic surgery are incredible. For example, when I was a resident 15 years ago, I learned how to do arthroscopy around knees, shoulders and ankles. In my sports medicine fellowship 10 years ago, I began doing hip arthroscopy to treat young-adult hip problems. Hip arthroscopy is still relatively new and cutting-edge, so there are not a lot of orthopedic surgeons doing it. Because I was fortunate to be trained by some of the pioneers in that technique, I now do a lot of hip arthroscopy on young, active people. I still do plenty of knee and shoulder arthroscopy, but hip arthroscopy is my real specialty." ON YOUNG-ADULT HIP SURGERIES:

“When older people come to me with hip pain, it is usually because they have degenerative arthritis in their hip. The only way to really treat their pain is to do a hip replacement. That is a surgery I do a lot and is very rewarding because people feel so much better after they have recovered, and they can often become much more active than they have managed to be in years. When younger people come to me with hip pain, it may be arthritis, but the pain can also be caused by a labral tear, which happens when the soft tissue or cushioning around the hip socket is damaged. Sometimes that is caused by a subtle deformity of the hip, which causes hip impingement, and sometimes that is caused by an injury due to repeated crouching or squatting. There are a few sports, such as football, ice hockey, ballet and yoga that can require that motion, so athletes in those sports tend to suffer labral tears more than others. No matter what the cause, once you have a labral tear, the only way to truly get the pain under control is to undergo hip arthroscopy. The pain relief that people get after hip arthroscopy can often gain them 20 more active years."


MEMBER PROFILE DR. RON GREGUSH

bellevue club august 2017 | 37


DR. ERICA BRANDLINGBENNETT & ALEXANDER

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DR. RON GREGUSH & ZOE


ON PREVENTING HIP IMPINGEMENT:

“Unfortunately, for most people with a subtle deformity of their hip, which results in hip impingement, the cause is congenital. There is nothing you can really do to prevent it. You are either predisposed to it or not." ON ACL TEARS:

"One area where there is clear evidence that injuries can be prevented, though, is ACL tears. Adolescent female athletes are twice as likely as adolescent male athletes to tear their ACLs. If, however, they do a specific set of exercises to prevent injury to the ACL, they can decrease their risk of injury to the same level as adolescent males."

ON SPECIALIZED SPORTS FOR YOUNG KIDS:

“I don't like that kids have to specialize so early. I have a 5and a 7-year-old, and I don't like that if my kids want to play soccer, they have to get into select or premier level soccer by the time they are 8 years old. If you start playing one sport exclusively too early, your overall physical development can be negatively affected. There are a lot of examples of that. For example, gymnasts' growth can be stunted because their growth plates are affected by all the jumping and pounding they do at such an early age. In soccer, I think it is ridiculous that 10-year-old kids are expected to play four or five games in one weekend. It is no surprise they get injured. The Sounders play a game every other week. Those are grown men who play soccer for a living. It is not healthy for young children and adolescents who are not yet fully developed to handle so much repetitive activity. I think it was much better in the days when kids could be a three-sport athlete. It actually makes them better athletes. Look at professional athletes like Russell Wilson, Steve Young, Ben Roethlisberger and Jimmy Graham—to name a few—they were all athletes who excelled at more than one sport and managed to become some of the best in football." ON PARENTAL EXPECTATIONS:

“Some of these issues arise because of unrealistic expectations from parents. In my clinic, I occasionally have a young athlete who comes in with a sports-related injury caused by excessive practice and playing, and I'll tell them they need to rest for six weeks. Sometimes their parents are realistic about it and agree to get them to rest and be healthy. Other parents argue with me that those six weeks will derail their child's athletic career—from high school, to college, to the pros. Maybe that kid will make it to the pros, but the likelihood is so low that it isn't worth the long-term damage that injury could cause. Sports should just be a way to get kids to enjoy exercise and have fun."

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ON PREVENTING SPORTS-RELATED INJURY AT ALL AGES:

“Cross-training. Warm up, go out, do something, and change it up day to day, week to week, season to season."

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| 39


"I don’t like that kids have to specialize so early. ... I like the days of growing up where you could have a three-sport athlete."

ON AMERICANS’ TENDENCY TO RELY ON SURGERY:

“It is interesting that so many of my patients want me to operate on them—to "fix" them—when that isn't necessarily the best thing. Take ACL tears. Most of my patients want me to operate and repair their torn ACL. But, about 15 percent of people don't need their ACL for stability. It is difficult to know who those 15 percent of people are, but there are NFL players who have played with an ACL tear and never needed surgery. So there are definitely plenty of non-professional athletes who can live just fine with an ACL tear. In Denmark, only about 50 percent of ACL tears are treated with surgery. There, people undergo intensive rehab first, which can often improve the pain and general stability enough for people to be able to do what they want to do. That said, there are plenty of people who can benefit from having an ACL tear repaired. For example, if a 17-year-old athlete has an ACL tear and wants to get back to playing volleyball or soccer, then it is a very worthwhile surgery. If you are over 35 years old and not a professional athlete, I first suggest modifying your activities—get into running or swimming—and be cautious about doing activities that require cutting and pivoting, such as skiing or playing basketball."

40 | august 2017 reflections

ON GENERAL ADVICE:

“I just wish everyone would exercise more. My wife loves to tell her patients that there is no downside to exercise. It helps with everything—diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis pain—literally everything gets better when you exercise. It is the best thing for your brain. Exercise is the only thing that has been shown to delay or prevent dementia." ON HIS FAVORITE ATHLETES:

“In what sport? There are so many athletes I admire, often more for the way they behave off the field or court than on it. Although I grew up a Steelers fan, I am now a huge Seahawks fan and have season tickets. I think Russell Wilson, Richard Sherman and Doug Baldwin are all really admirable guys who use their influence and intelligence to make a difference. Ultimately, the athletes that I admire are the ones who use their fame to help raise awareness about issues or improve the lives of people who are less fortunate than they are. Playing a sport well often lasts a few seasons; making an impact can last forever." > Dr. Gregush currently practices at ProOrtho. For more information, please visit proortho.com.


bellevue club august 2017 | 41


IT’S ELECTRIC Local installation artists light up the Eastside with their recent work Electric Coffin is a four-person design studio that has taken the Pacific Northwest by storm. Their highly conceptual installation art is featured in the halls of giants such as Facebook, Amazon and REI, as well as numerous local businesses and restaurants. The studio has also partnered with local companies to produce impactful community-based art for social awareness (most notably a campaign with Value Village about fast fashion and clothing consumerism). Known mostly for their commercial work, earlier this year, they took a step out of their comfort zone and partnered with Bellevue Arts Museum. For the first time, they had a blank space to fill with whatever they wanted. Patrick “Duffy” De Armas, one of the founders, sat down with Reflections to talk about Future Machine, the exhibition that is available for viewing through September 10. REFLECTIONS MAGAZINE: WHY INSTALLATION ART? PATRICK “DUFFY” DE ARMAS: Electric Coffin lives at the intersection of

art and commerce. We all have art backgrounds, whether it’s design, sculpture or painting, we all have our own skill. The idea was to do things collectively, things larger than ourselves. We found this interesting niche where we were addressing this void in the commercial world, which was coming at things from a different angle.

RM: WHERE DID THE NAME ELECTRIC COFFIN COME FROM? PD: A lot of our work is salvaging or recontextualization existing materials.

So the idea was the studio was this Frankenstein-type space where it’s electrifying the dead, bringing things back to life. In a sense, the studio was the electric coffin. One of the main ethos has always been recontextualization, not just in the physical sense—it could be design, it could be process. It could be trying to rethink how things have been done. Of course it does show itself in objects, too. We’re always picking up and hunting and searching for objects that we think are interesting.

RM: YES, YOUR WORK IS VERY OBJECT-HEAVY. CAN YOU TALK A LITTLE MORE ABOUT WHY? PD: One of the things that really interests us is time and how we exist and

how objects exist and the interaction between the two. There’s an inherent beauty not only physically for us, but you know these objects have stories. They’ve been interacted with and engaged with. No matter how hard we try in a studio and whatever techniques we have, we’ll never be able to replicate time. So to be able to embrace it and show the beauty of it, it’s an acknowledgement that it’s less about being battle-worn and more about survival. They’re not scars. They’re marks of pride. We’re just putting our spin on that. >>>

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photos provided by bam & electric coffin


ARTS FEATURE bellevue club august 2017 | 43


44 | august 2017 reflections


RM: AND HOW DOES THIS RELATE TO YOUR CURRENT EXHIBITION AT BELLEVUE ARTS MUSEUM (BAM), FUTURE MACHINE? PD: Celebrating an object for more than just its commodifiable

value is something we’re interested in. For example, the second phase of Future Machine was all about the value of an object, specifically the stuffed animals. At one point they were manufactured out of raw materials, sold for a price, then used most likely by a child. They were interacted with, engaged with, taken on adventures, hugged, slept with. Intrinsically, they became more valuable through time and through that interaction. But, as people grow older their value became less to the point they were just given away to Value Village. If you think about it, they are embedded with years and years of true emotion—pure love and joy. And so, is that not worth something? What’s the value of that versus our monetary system? Those are a lot of the conversations we have when we’re recontextualizing an object.

RM: YOU’VE RECENTLY WORKED A LOT WITH AMAZON, THE KING OF CONSUMERISM? DO THEY UNDERSTAND YOUR THEMES? PD: I think they do, that’s why they work with us. Even though

our installations might be in a restaurant or in Amazon, there tends to be these underlying themes our clients relate to and want to participate in. Also, how can you affect change if you’re not willing to have a dialogue with people you might not agree with? RM: DO YOU DISAGREE WITH SOME OF THE PHILOSOPHIES AT AMAZON? PD: No, don’t get me wrong, I have a newborn child and I love

Amazon. They have a bunch of great systems put into place. And I embrace the fact that things are changing, evolving. One of the things we’ve talked a lot about is that in a sense they are pushing out mediocrity. If you’re going to have a store, if you’re going to sell something, you have to do it really well or be very efficient, because the bar of expectation from consumers has been raised. They are forcing people to better themselves. So I don’t personally have any angst towards them, but again it goes back to if you’re not willing to engage and participate in dialogue, how can you affect change? RM: WHAT’S THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE IN WORKING WITH BAM VERSUS YOUR CORPORATE CLIENTS? PD: Working with BAM has been great. Typically, we’re in more

of the commercial world and we’re bringing all the tools from the art world into that space. It’s been interesting to flip flop that. Now, we’re at an art institution creating art that doesn’t have to have compromise and client parameters. We’re allowed to explore and be creative without the inhibitions of client work.

RM: HAS A BLANK CANVAS BEEN MORE INTIMIDATING? PD: Yes, there’s always a bit more pressure when you can do

whatever you want. It’s been a great opportunity to really develop an idea from the beginning and nurture it to fruition. This is a little different than when we get a design prompt from a client. The show has been nine months, which is a long time, but something that is an opportunity for us. We wanted to do something that wasn’t just a static installation that we delivered to the museum and stays the same over the course of the exhibition. The process is indicative of how we work and our process.

| 45


RM: WE BRIEFLY TOUCHED ON IT, BUT CAN YOU EXPLAIN A LITTLE MORE ABOUT THE PURPOSE OF FUTURE MACHINE? PD: When we were approached by Jennifer, the curator at BAM, the

stipulations were two-fold. It had to be semi-autobiographical and portray the story of the studio. And she wanted it to be craft-based.

RM: AND WHAT DID THAT PRODUCE? PD: Future Machine is a metaphor. It’s a machine, which is a set of systems

that creates an outcome. Within a system are parameters. And there are three guidelines, or parameters, we wanted to express, three ideas from our studio: unconventional collaboration, an art filter, and non-linear thinking. The questions we posed through the process, through this machine, were: What will we create? How will it affect humanity? And we’re really talking about technology.

RM: WHAT’S IN STORE FOR THE FUTURE OF ELECTRIC COFFIN? PD: The last phase of the Future Machine is all digital technology. We’re

ELECTRIC COFFIN LEFT TO RIGHT: TAYLOR REED, STEFAN HOFMANN, PATRICK "DUFFY" DE ARMAS, JUSTIN KANE ELDER

working with Microsoft and a digital studio outside of Vancouver called Tangible Interaction. The whole show is culminating with a video, and we have plans for a whole aftermath once it leaves the museum. We’re also working with a developer and the The Seattle Times landmark building. We’d love to do more in a public space. We’re meeting with the city about some stuff downtown and want to get more into the public sector. Just things for the community. > For more information, please visit electriccoffin.com and bellevuearts.org.

MORE FROM BAM

Cut Up/Cut Out through October 22 Bellevue Arts Museum is featuring a unique art exhibit this summer called Cut Up/Cut Out, which highlights over 50 international artists who explore the history of cutting and crafting various mediums.

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fostering creative movement in kids FROM THE OUTSIDE, IT LOOKS LIKE ANNE MOTL’S PRIMARY JOB IS SIMPLY TO ENCOURAGE KIDS TO HAVE FUN. DURING HER CREATIVE MOVEMENT CLASSES, CHILDREN MIGHT DANCE AND SING TO NURSERY RHYMES OR THEY MIGHT JUMP, LEAP, SKIP AND CRAWL THEIR WAY ACROSS THE FLOOR WHILE LAUGHING WITH THEIR FRIENDS. Motl says having fun is an important theme, but she’s after something much more significant—using creative movement to help children develop healthy patterns in their minds and bodies. “Creative movement can mean many different things and take many forms,” Motl says. However, she uses her extensive dance background combined with the philosophy behind the BrainDance system, which was created by Seattle native Anne Green Gilbert, to organize a specific structure meant to stimulate young children. Motl grew up in Minnesota and began dancing at the age of 5. At 18, she followed her passion to Bellingham, where she studied modern dance, before transferring to Cornish College of the Arts and graduating with a bachelor of fine arts in modern dance.

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WELLNESS FEATURE bellevue club august 2017 | 49


“I started teaching creative movement a year after I graduated, and I worked with all ages from that point on,” Motl says. Building upon the knowledge she gained from her degree, Motl began incorporating philosophies from BrainDance. “Anne Green Gilbert is from Seattle, and she created the BrainDance program based off eight developmental stages healthy human beings naturally move through in their first year of life. The movements start with the breath then you work on tactile, core-distal, head-tail, upper and lower body, side body, cross lateral and vestibular movement patterns. Eye tracking is also incorporated,” Motl explains. “Nursery rhymes help with language development as well. I’m big into language and talking with the kids.” While all of this might sound a bit technical, Motl says it’s really just about encouraging certain kinds of movement that are known to help develop coordination, proprioception, rhythm and an overall confidence in their connection to their bodies. And then letting the kids take it and run. “It’s all about being open and free. Coming from a classical ballet background, I never had creative movement as a child. But I realized kids don’t have to keep their heels together and stand perfect when they’re four or three. I always say to the kids, ‘You’re beautiful. You’re doing it. And they’re having so much fun.’” Motl also offer classes in which caregivers can participate. She says this time together can create a beautiful bonding experience. “There’s a lot of cuddle time, a lot of good eye contact and time to speak with your child.”

➔ For a complete list of Anne Motl’s classes, please turn to page 008 in the Youth Newsletter in this issue.

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bellevue club august 2017 | 51


w r itten by ha ley sha pley

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Shining, shimmering, splendid, the world is waiting to be explored—here’s how to do it with kids in tow.

L

ong flights, unfamiliar cuisines and days packed with walking may not seem compatible with children, but international vacations and kids can be a match. Sure, you might have to adjust your travel habits a bit—think less hostel hopping and more ice cream bribes—but taking your family to a new country preps your little ones to be informed citizens of the world, not to mention creates wonderful learning opportunities and amazing bonding experiences.

LITTLE DECISION-MAKERS Eighty-five percent of U.S. parents give their kids at least some say in deciding where they want to go on vacation, according to a survey from HomeAway, an online vacation rental marketplace. It can be worthwhile to get their input—60 percent of parents think doing so ensures the kids get more out of the vacation, 53 percent say involving them in the planning process gets them excited about the trip, and 24 percent use vacation planning as an educational opportunity. So if your children are old enough, start your trip research by asking what interests them—it can’t hurt to have their buy-in for your next big adventure.

bellevue club august 2017 | 53

T R AV E L F E AT U R E

A WHOLE NEW WORLD


Join us for an Open House this fall! High School November 15, 6:30 - 8 p.m. Middle School & High School December 6, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Inspiring

lifelong learners, global citizens, compassionate leaders

54 | august 2017 reflections

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ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS How do you pack all your baby’s stuff? How many activities should you cram into a day? And when does it make sense to splurge versus save? Here’s what those in the know say: “My recommendation is always to pay for convenience, whether it be Global Entry, private transfers or private guides. It will make traveling as a family much more enjoyable to have extra assistance. Additionally, have your guided tours customized for the family—perhaps a scavenger hunt through Rome hitting all the hot spots and eating gelato along the way.” —Susan Butler, founder, The Travel Butler “Parents, especially those with babies, always overpack. While there are a few key things you need—a baby carrier, a portable crib and maybe a stroller—you don’t need to pack the entire nursery when you travel. Many everyday items, like diapers and wipes, can be picked up at your destination. Even better, ship those items to your destination via  Amazon.com  or other mail-order services so they are waiting for you. Pack enough diapers to get you through your travels to your destination and the first day or two in case you are delayed en route, but leave the rest at home. Rent any big gear you think you might need at your destination as well. If you can rent a condo or grab a hotel with a washer/dryer on property, you can pack less clothing and do laundry while you travel, which will save space in your suitcase, too. The only thing you want to make sure you pack is medication and any specialty formula if your baby requires it. The rest, leave in the nursery. It will still be there when you get back. You will be amazed by how much you can live without while traveling with a baby.” —Keryn Means, founder, WalkingOnTravels.com “Exposing children to different cultures and having them experience different smells, surroundings, foods can only benefit them. Besides making sure passports are up to date and any necessary visas and shots are taken care of, I would suggest knowing your children’s (and your) limits as far as how far they can walk, deal with time differences, and what type of food is available. One or two activities should be planned per day, and there should be some time open for spontaneous activity. Also consider picking a property with a pool and have drinking water and snacks available.” —Jeff Traugot, travel agent, Traugot Travel Dreaming Up

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DESTINATIONS When the whole world is your oyster, it can be tough to decide where to go. The perfect destination for your family depends on your interests and travel style; here are a few ideas: ROMANIA The Romanian countryside is the stuff of fairytales, which makes this Eastern European country appealing to children. Castles, horse-drawn carriages, farm stays, bat caves and all sorts of other delights await. Any vampire fans in the fam will love Transylvania, but you don’t have to be enamored with spooky stories to enjoy the medieval landscape. BELIZE This small Central American country has a wide variety of terrain, from island beaches to tropical forests to pine savannas, so you can experience a lot without traversing huge distances. English is the official language, which makes communicating fairly easy in comparison to other Latin American countries for those who don’t speak Spanish or other local languages. KENYA Forget the zoo—when it comes to seeing animals, you can’t beat a safari. Kenya is a fantastic location for that, particularly the wildebeest migration from July to October. Watching animals in their natural habitat will make a lifelong impression on your little ones (and you), and a safari can be a great way to explain the circle of life.

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CLUB REFLECTIONS your community. your club. Bellevue Club Summer Camps

Youth of all ages came together to explore a variety of summer camps, including everything from preschool science to karate.

PRESCHOOL ART AND SCIENCE CAMPS

KARATE CAMP

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photography by taryn emerick


youth

Bellevue Club

2017/2018

school break camps

SWIM, TENNIS, BASKETBALL

activities sESSION

CLASSES family events +MUCH MORE!


FAMILY EVENTS FAMILY GYM NIGHT

First and fourth Friday of each month* 5:30-8 p.m., Basketball Gym Meet in the gym for bouncy house fun. All children must be accompanied by at least one supervising adult. Complimentary. *Not open on 10/27.

FAMILY INFLATABLE DAYS

Sa, 6–7:30 p.m. Challenge your skills and race across the surface of the water! Swim tests required. Complimentary.

WATER RUNNER RACES

Su, 5–6:30 p.m. Like a slip ‘n’ slide on the water! Complimentary.

KIDS’ TAKE OVER

October 20, January 19, May 18, 6-9 p.m. Ages 3-10, Meet in the Basketball Gym Get ready, the kids are taking over the Club! Children will enjoy an evening of bouncy houses, basketball, swimming, crafts and dinner. $36/member

WELCOME!

FAMILY LEGO NIGHT

F, Sept. 15, 6-8 p.m. Bring the whole family for an evening of dinner and Legos with expert Dan Parker. $27/member

From tennis, basketball and swim lessons to art classes and special holiday events, the Bellevue Club and our roster of excellent instructors have lots of plans for your family this school year. With this comprehensive guide, pick and choose what interests your little one(s) and get the details icon, on how to register. Be on the lookout for the which indicates a new program. The dates and times of each program are subject to change. For the most up-todate offerings, please visit bellevueclub.com/youth.

0-5 years, Basketball Gym M, Sept. 8-May 21, 9:30 a.m.-noon Bring your children, ages 5 and younger, for some fun and games. This is unsupervised, so parents must accompany their children. Complimentary. *Please note: There is no open play on dates of School Break All-Sports Camp.

KARATE CLUB

For ages 7 and older. The cost for one class/week is $80 a month and $105 a month for two classes/week.

OO2 | 2017/2018

HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL

F, Oct. 27, 6-8 p.m., Basketball Gym Young and old, dress in your favorite costume and join us for games, crafts, bouncy houses and more! $17/ages 1 & older; adults & ages 11 months & younger are free.

FATHER-SON: A NIGHT ON THE DARK SIDE

ONGOING PROGRAMS TODDLER OPEN PLAY

FAMILY PUMPKIN CARVING

M, Oct. 16, 6-7:30 p.m., Kids’ Camp Room Leave the mess with us as you spend the evening transforming your pumpkin into a work of art! $38/adult/child pair; $12/ additional pumpkin. *Please indicate how many seats you’ll need when registering.

BEGINNER: W, 6-7 p.m.; Sa, 9:15- 10:15 a.m., Multipurpose Room INT./ADVANCED: W, 7-8 p.m. Sa, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Aerobics Studio

SQUASH

Learn the game or improve on it with expert Latasha Khan! Private lessons: 30 min/$50; semi-private lessons: 60 min/$60 per player. JUNIOR SQUASH CLINICS: BEGINNER: M, 6:45 p.m., $18/member ADVANCED: Tu, 4:30 p.m., $25/member

MEMBER EVENTS

F, Nov. 17, 6-8 p.m., Ballroom Fathers and sons will enjoy the evening on the dark side including dinner and Jedi training from our very special guests. $54/ father-son pair. $27/additional participant

GINGERBREAD HOUSE DECORATING PARTY

M, Dec. 11, 6-8 p.m., Ballroom You provide a little imagination and we’ll take care of the rest! (We suggest adult assistance for those under age 8.) $54/ gingerbread house. *Please indicate how many seats you’ll need when registering.

RECREATION

AQUATICS

TENNIS


BRUNCH WITH SANTA

Sa, Dec. 16 and Su, Dec. 17, Reservations begin at 9 a.m. Bring the whole family and join us in celebrating the holiday season. Adults and children will enjoy a customized seasonal buffet, entertainment and a visit and photo with Santa. $55/adult, $25/child, 2 and under free. *Reservations will open Sept. 11. in Polaris at 425-637-4608.

MOTHER-SON: GLOW IN THE DARK DANCE PARTY

F, Jan. 12, 6-8 p.m., Ballroom Get ready to move at the mother-son party of the year! From dancing, treats and airbrush tattoos, this is one party you don’t want to miss! $54/mother-son pair. $27/additional participant

MOTHER–DAUGHTER GAL-ENTINES DAY BASH

F, Feb. 9, 6-8 p.m., Ballroom Calling all ladies – this night is for you. Enjoy treats, drinks, crafts and minimanicures during a night like no other. $54/mother-daughter pair. $27/additional participant

FATHER–DAUGHTER MASQUERADE BALL

F, March 9, 6-8 p.m., Ballroom Dust off your dancing shoes and dress to impress for a magical night that will be talked about for years to come! $54/ father-daughter pair. $27/additional participant

UNDERWATER EASTER EGG-STRAVAGANZA

Sa, March 31, Noon-2 p.m. Join us for an Easter EGG-stravganza! An underwater Easter Egg Hunt for kids ages 2 to 12 years old, participants will hunt eggs and redeem them for prizes. There will also be other games and activities, including an appearance from the Easter Bunny for photos. $21/member

SCHOOL BREAK CAMPS KIDS’ CAMP

Ages 3-6, Kids’ Camp Room 9:30 a.m.-noon Veterans Day Break: Nov. 9, 10 Winter Break: Dec. 18-22, 26-29 MLK Jr. Day: Jan 15 Mid-Winter Break: Feb. 19-23 Spring Break: April 9-13 No school days: Oct. 13, Jan. 29, Mar. 16 & 19 Register for individual days of Kids’ Camp! Children enjoy arts and crafts, activities, story time and more! Bring a swimsuit for open swim. All snacks are provided. Registrants must be able to use the toilet and change in and out of their swimsuits independently. $18/member per day KIDS’ CAMP EXPRESS (No swimming) 9:15-11 a.m., $14 per day

ALL-SPORTS CAMP

Grades 5-12, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Veterans Day Break: Nov. 9, 10 Winter Break: Dec. 18-22, 26-29 MLK Jr. Day: Jan 15 Mid-Winter Break: Feb. 19-23 Spring Break: April 9-13 No school days: Oct. 13, Jan. 29, Mar. 16 & 19 Youth enjoy a variety of sports—no camp is exactly the same! The day ends with swimming. Please bring a swimsuit and NUT-FREE lunch. Drop-off and pick-up in the gymnasium. $43/day per member

SWIM CAMP

Ages 6–12; 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Veterans Day Break: Nov. 10 Winter Break: Dec. 18-22, 26-29 Mid-Winter Break: Feb. 19-23 Spring Break: April 9-13 We know your kids need to burn off some energy, so why not send them to the pool? Swim camp includes two swimming sessions, each complete with group activities, swimming and water safety lessons and FUN! $43/member per day

party @ BC! TWO WAYS TO REGISTER!

MEMBERS.BELLEVUECLUB.COM

LEGO CAMP

Grades 5-12, 2-4 p.m., Kids’ Camp Room Winter Break: 26-29 This is the perfect camp for any LEGOmaniac! Explore the four formats of LEGO building: miniature, mosaic, sculpture and mechanical, all in different daily themes. $35/member per day

ART CAMP

Grades 5-12, 2-4 p.m., Kids’ Camp Room Oct. 13, Nov. 10, Jan. 15 & 29, March 16 & 19 With Club favorite Ms. Debra Mason, this camp lets your child express his or her artistic side. Cost includes all art supplies. $40/member per day

BASKETBALL CAMP

Grades 5-12, 2-4 p.m., Gym Nov. 9, Mid-Winter Break: Feb. 19-23 Participants will increase their basketball skill level and knowledge of the game. They’ll focus on drills, skill building games and scrimmages. $30/member per day

CRAFT CAMP

Ages 5-12, 2-4 p.m., Kids’ Camp Room Winter Break: Dec. 18-22 Spring Break: April 9-13 Get crafty in this fun camp! Participants will explore a variety of craft types, learning new ways to create fun projects each day! $35/member per day

AFTERNOON PRE-SCHOOL CAMP

Ages 3-6, noon-2 p.m., Kids’ Camp Room Veterans Day Break: Nov. 9, 10 Winter Break: Dec. 18-22, 26-29 MLK Jr. Day: Jan 15 Mid-Winter Break: Feb. 19-23 Spring Break: April 9-13 No school days: Oct. 13, Jan. 29, Mar. 16 & 19 Children enjoy themed arts and crafts, activities, story time and more! Please pack a NUT-FREE Lunch. $17/member per day

BC BIRTHDAY & TEAM PARTIES

Visit bellevueclub.com/recreation/ birthdayparties.html to learn more and fill out a request form.

425.688.3177

2017/2018

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SESSION DATES SESSION 1 Sept. 11 - Oct. 22 (6 weeks) SESSION 2 Oct. 23 – Dec. 17* (7 weeks) SESSION 3 Jan. 8 - Feb. 18 (6 weeks) SESSION 4 Feb. 26 - April 8 (6 weeks) SESSION 5 April 16 – June 10** (8 weeks)

*No class week of Thanksgiving **No class May 28

SESSION CLASSES PRE-BALLET

Ages 3-5, M, 4:15-5p.m., Tu, 5-5:45 Multipurpose Room Children will learn basic ballet steps and terminology while discovering rhythm and coordination, using their own creativity and lively imaginations. Ballet and pretty dressup clothes encouraged. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $110/ member; Ses. 2: $128/member; Ses. 5: $146/ member

BALLET LEVEL 1 & 2

Ages 5½-8, M, 5-6 p.m. Multipurpose Room Ballet Level 1 &2 allows ballerinas to begin developing the main concepts of ballet including coordination, spatial awareness, position of the feet and an introduction to movement vocabulary. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $132/ member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/ member

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BALLET LEVEL 3

Ages 5½-8, Tu, 4-5 p.m. Multipurpose Room Upon successful completion of Ballet Level 1 & 2 or instructor permissions, ballerinas will focus on basic ballet technique, proper body alignment and musicality. Class lessons will also explore on barre work, positions of the arms and comportment of classical ballet. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $132/member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/member

LITTLE OLYMPIANS

Ages 3-4, M, 4-4:45 p.m. Racquetball Court 2 Does your 3 or 4-year-old love to go, go, GO? This class is the perfect fit! Each youth sports class is designed to meet your child right where they are in their physical, mental and social development. Boys and girls learn to follow rules, listen to directions, work as a team and focus on different sports and games each week of class. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $110/member; Ses. 2: $128/member; Ses. 5: $146/member

INTRO TO SPORTS

Ages 5-6, Th, 4-4:45 p.m. Racquetball Court 2 This fun, Into to Sports class will focus on a new sport each day. Class lessons will teach basic rules and skills while continuing to develop their ability to focus and follow directions in a fun, sport oriented manner. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $110/member; Ses. 2: $128/ member; Ses. 5: $146/member *Parents, Intro to Sports is a prerequisite for the Bronze

MEMBER EVENTS

Basketball Class!

LITTLE PICASSOS

Ages 3-6, Sa, 10:15-11 a.m. Kids’ Camp Room In this hands-on educational art class, preschoolers will experiment with a variety of art techniques while being inspired by famous artist and their works. Preschoolers will develop their creativity, problem solving, social skills and self-esteem. Tuition includes all class materials. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $132/member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/member

PRESCHOOL YOGA

Ages 3-5, Tu, 4-4:45 p.m. Kids’ Camp Room While participating in engaging stories, songs, games and simple yoga poses, preschoolers will exercise their social, sensory and motor skills while building confidence and body awareness. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $132/ member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/member

ELEMENTARY YOGA

Ages 5 and up, Tu, 5-5:45 p.m. Kids’ Camp Room Each elementary yoga class offers a new experience while the children work together in storytelling, partner poses and yoga games as they improve their flexibility, coordination and self-esteem. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $132/member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/member

RECREATION

AQUATICS

TENNIS


JUNIOR TENNIS (10 AND UNDER)

VARSITY USTA

The USTA requirement is for all players under the age of 10 to use lower compression tennis balls during play. This is to help play “slower” and allow younger players greater opportunity to rally, learn the game and have fun.

TEENIE TENNIS (RED BALL)

Ages 4-5, Tu, 3:30–4 p.m. The main focus of this class is to learn basic stroke techniques, sportsmanship and hand-eye coordination. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $120/member; Ses. 2: $140/member; Ses. 5: $160/member

SMASHERS (ORANGE BALL)

Ages 6-8, Tu, 4–5 p.m., Th, 4–5 p.m. This class focuses on advanced stroke production, hand-eye coordination, camaraderie and competition. Sign up for 1 or 2 classes a week. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $120/member; Ses. 2: $140/member; Ses. 5: $160/member

Ages 11-17, Th, 6–7:15 p.m., Su, 1–2:15 p.m. Players participating in this class must be able to do the following: 20 in a row mini with a partner, use both semiwestern and continental grips, hit a flat and slice serve and must play matches regularly. The focus of this class is on hitting with more consistency and depth, court positioning, shot selection and conditioning and footwork. Sign up for 1 or 2 classes a week. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $150/ member; Ses. 2: $175/member; Ses. 5: $200/member

ELITE USTA

Ages 13–17, Tu, 6–7:15 p.m., Su, 1–2:15 p.m. Players must be able to do the following: 40 in a row mini with a partner; variety of strokes – spin, drive and lob. Tournament experience required. This class will focus on strategy, court positioning, tactical set up and solutions, conditioning and footwork. Sign up for 1 or 2 classes a week. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $150/member; Ses. 2: $175/ member; Ses. 5: $200/member

TENNIS REGISTRATION DATES SESSION 1: Th, Aug. 10 at 7 a.m. SESSION 2: Th, Sept. 28 at 7 a.m. SESSION 3: Th, Nov. 30 at 7 a.m. SESSION 4: Th, Jan. 25 at 7 a.m. SESSION 5: Th, March 15 at 7 a.m.

SLAMMERS (GREEN DOT BALL)

Ages 9-10; Tu, 5–6 p.m., Th, 5–6 p.m. In this more competitive class, players will learn to keep score and play more accurately. We will also focus on strategy and footwork. Sign up for 1 or 2 classes a week. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $120/member; Ses. 2: $140/member; Ses. 5: $160/member

TENNIS (11 AND OVER) ROOKIE

Ages 11-17 M, 4:45–6 p.m., W, 4:45–6 p.m. The focus of this class is on basic technique, stroke production, scoring, friendly competition and team camaraderie. Sign up for 1 or 2 classes a week. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $150/member; Ses. 2: $175/member; Ses. 5: $200/member

JR. VARSITY

Ages 11-17, M, 3:30–4:45 p.m., W, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Su, 1–2:15 p.m. The first 15 minutes of this class contain an optional conditioning workout. Players participating in this class must be knowledgeable of and able to do the following: place groundstrokes and volleys in a given area of the court and serve in the diagonal service box. Players are required to understand how to keep score, including tie-breakers. This class will focus on advanced stroke production, competition, consistency and repetition. Sign up for 1, 2 or all three classes in a week. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $150/member; Ses. 2: $175/member; Ses. 5: $200/member

TWO WAYS TO REGISTER!

MEMBERS.BELLEVUECLUB.COM

425.688.3177

2017/2018

| OO5


SESSION DATES SESSION 1 Sept. 11 - Oct. 22 (6 weeks) SESSION 2 Oct. 23 – Dec. 16* (7 weeks) SESSION 3 Jan. 8 - Feb. 18 (6 weeks) SESSION 4 Feb. 26 - April 8 (6 weeks) SESSION 5 April 16 – June 10** (8 weeks)

*No class week of Thanksgiving **No class May 28

GROUP SWIM LESSONS Group swim lessons are available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday evenings and Saturday morning in six week-long sessions. Evening and Saturday lessons allow you the convenience of choosing what days to attend. Most classes are 30 minutes long. Youth 5 is 45 minutes long. Class times may change depending on availability. Ages 3–12 years. Lessons beyond level 1 have prerequisites.

All Preschool & Youth 1-4: 30 min. lessons Sessions 1, 3 & 4: $72/member Sessions 2: $84/member Sessions 5: $96/member* *Session 5: Monday classes are only 7 weeks $84/member

PRESCHOOL 1

INTRODUCTION TO WATER SKILLS Ages 3–5, class size 4 M, 10 a.m or 4 p.m Tu, 10:30 a.m or 5:30 p.m W, 10 a.m or 5 p.m Th, 10:30 a.m or 4:30 p.m Sa, 10 a.m P1 is designed to orient young children to the aquatic environment and help them gain basic water skills. Floating, gliding and blowing bubbles are introduced. All skills are performed with instructor support. Developing water comfort is the primary goal.

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PRESCHOOL 2 INTRO TO INDEPENDENT WATER SKILLS Ages 3–5, class size 4 M, 10:30 a.m. or 4:30 p.m. Tu, 11 a.m. or 4 p.m. W, 10:30 a.m. or 5:30 p.m. Th, 11 a.m. or 5 p.m. Sa, 10:30 a.m. In P2, students develop independent forward motion for skills on their front and back. Children continue to explore arm and leg movement. Skills are performed with minimal support from the instructor.

PRESCHOOL 3

ELEMENTARY WATER SKILLS Ages 3–5, class size 4 M, 11:10 a.m. or 4:35 p.m. T, 4 p.m. W, 10:35 a.m. or 3:30 p.m. Th, 4:35 p.m. Through guided practice, students are taught to coordinate arm and leg motions with breathing, enabling them to perform skills for longer distances and times. All skills are performed independently.

PRESCHOOL 4

FUNDAMENTAL WATER SKILLS Ages 3–5, class size 4 M, 5 p.m T, 4:30 p.m W, 4 p.m Th, 5:30 p.m Sa, 11 a.m Students build on the fundamentals of front crawl with side breathing, backstroke and treading water. Students are introduced to the breaststroke and dolphin kick. P4 students also learn dives and safe diving rules.

PRESCHOOL 5

STROKE DEVELOPMENT Ages 4-5 years, class size 6 *Must be approved by instructor Tu,5 p.m. Th, 4 p.m. Sa, 11 a.m. The objective of P5 is to refine stroke technique and to continue stroke coordination with the addition of butterfly. Swimmers will work toward swimming a full 20 yards with side breathing, increasing their endurance and continue to gain confidence in their skills.

YOUTH 1

INTRODUCTION TO WATER SKILLS Ages 5–12, class size 4 M, 4 p.m. Tu, 5:30 p.m. W, 5 p.m. Th, 4:30 p.m. Sa, 11:30 a.m. Y1 Introduces simple arm and leg motions, efficient floating and gliding positions, as well as breath control. Focus is on teaching students to be independent and comfortable in the water.

MEMBER EVENTS

YOUTH 2

FUNDAMENTAL WATER SKILLS Ages 6–12, class size 4 M, 4:30 p.m. Tu, 4 p.m. W, 5:30 p.m. Th, 5 p.m. Sa, 10:30 a.m. Y2 is the foundation for future stroke development, focusing on changing directions and body position, while swimming greater distances. All skills are performed with independent forward motion and without support.

YOUTH 3

STROKE DEVELOPMENT Ages 6–12, class size 4 M, 5 p.m. Tu, 4:30 p.m. W, 4 p.m. Th, 5:30 p.m. Sa, 11 a.m. Students build on the fundamentals of front crawl with side breathing, backstroke and treading water. Students are introduced to the breaststroke and dolphin kick.

YOUTH 4

STROKE IMPROVEMENT Ages 6–12, class size 6 M, 5:30 p.m. T, 5 p.m. W, 4:30 p.m. Th, 4 p.m. Sa, 11:30 a.m. Y4 participants improve endurance and confidence by swimming strokes for greater distances. Participants also begin to learn coordinated breaststroke and butterfly as well as basic turns at the wall.

BLUE WHALES Our goal is to develop young swimmers’ stroke proficiency in a fun, supportive environment. Blue Whales coaches encourage swimmers to swim farther, with more power and ease. Focused instruction leads swimmers to a more efficient stroke, in turn allowing them to swim greater distances. Assessments are required. Contact the Aquatics Coordinator for assessment information and scheduling. Level determined by swimmer’s endurance, technique and age. BEGINNER: Ages 5 – 10 M, Tu, W, TH, 4:15 – 4:45 p.m. Workouts run for 30 minutes and range from 600 to 900 yards, including warm up and cool down. Swimmers will continue to refine all four competitive strokes as well as their dives and flip turns. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $72/member; Ses. 2: $84/member; Ses. 5: $96/member

RECREATION

AQUATICS

TENNIS


INTERMEDIATE: Ages 7 - 12 M, Tu, W, Th, 4:45-5:30 p.m. & Sa, 9 a.m. Workouts focus on technique development as well as improving efficiency in the water. Swimmers will learn to understand more complicated sets and incorporate drills into workouts to further improve performance. Ses. 1, 3 & 4: $108/member; Ses. 2: $126/member; Ses. 5: $144/member

BELLEVUE CLUB YOUTH BASKETBALL ACADEMY PRIVATE SWIM LESSONS Private swim lessons offer the greatest flexibility and one-on-one attention for swimmers of any age and ability. Private swim lessons allow for focused instruction specific to the individual needs of swimmers of all levels. We try to tailor the instructor to the skill level and goals of the child or children. Private swim lessons are a great complement to group lesson instruction. SERIES 1: SEP. 11-JAN. 7 Registration opens: W, Aug. 16 at 10 a.m. *Lessons Dec. 18–Jan. 7 dependent on instructor availability SERIES 2: JAN. 8-APRIL 15 Registration opens: W, Dec. 13 at 10 a.m. *Lessons Feb. 19–23 dependent on instructor availability SERIES 3: APRIL 16-JUNE 10 Registration opens: W, March 14 at 10 a.m. *Lessons April 9-13 dependent on instructor availability Cost: Prices listed are per member Private lesson: 30-min. $37; 45-min. $49; 60-min. $71 Semi-private lesson: (2 people) 30-min. $25; 45-min. $29; 60-min. $40 Semi-private lesson: (3 people) 30-min. $21; 45-min. $25; 60-min. $31 Registration: Private swim lessons can be scheduled as a series of ongoing lessons with a sign-up date approximately four weeks prior to the start of a series. Register with the Aquatics Coordinator, 425.688.3223. Online registration is not available.

BELLEVUE CLUB SWIM TEAM For more information and tryout details, visit www.bcst.com

TWO WAYS TO REGISTER!

The Bellevue Club’s Youth Basketball Academy focuses on developing each player as an individual and teammate, placing a high value on both skill and character development. Youth Basketball Class curriculum follows a natural skill progression, allowing players to reach their full potential.

BRONZE: INTRODUCTION TO BASKETBALL

Th, 4-4:45 p.m., Sa, 9:30-10:15 a.m., Basketball Gym Bronze is designed to train players on the fundamentals of basketball. Basic skills such as dribbling, passing and shooting are introduced. Once players are able to show basic proficiency with their skill development, hand-eye coordination and sportsmanship, they will be ready for the next level of training. Bronze players must have completed one session of Little Olympians. Ses. 1, 3, & 4: $110/member; Ses. 2: $128/member; Ses. 5: $146/member

SILVER: BUILDING FUNDAMENTALS

BASKETBALL LESSONS

T, 4-4:45 p.m., Sa, 10:30 - 11:15 a.m., Basketball Gym Silver focuses on building fundamentals. Players will begin to refine their shooting technique, dribbling ability and learn in-game competition. Intermediate skills such as crossovers, running the floor, playing defense, chest passing and jump shots are introduced. Players must display confidence while performing skills, working in a team and following instructions. Silver players must pass the Bronze skills assessment prior to registration. Ses. 1, 3, & 5: $110/member; Ses. 2: $128/member; Ses. 5: $146/member

GOLD: FUNDAMENTALS REFINEMENT

Ages 6 and older, Basketball Gym Private lessons are the most effective way to improve your game. Customized workouts utilize multiple resources including the Shoot-A-Way, weighted balls, adjustable hoop and more! INDIVIDUAL TRAINING 50-minute lesson: $55/member 25-minute lesson: $28/member GROUP TRAINING 50 minute lesson for two players: $71 $17/additional player for up to 4 participants. Charges are split evenly between players.

TEAM TRAINING

Tu, 4:45-5:45 p.m. , Basketball Gym Participants will go through an intense hour-long skill-building workout. Each class will focus on a different essential aspect of the game. The goal of these workouts is to focus on skill development and increased confidence through proper repetition. Gold players must pass the Silver skills assessment prior to registration. Ses. 1, 3, & 4: $132/member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/member

MEMBERS.BELLEVUECLUB.COM

BASKETBALL CONDITIONING

Th, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Basketball Gym Join Coach Lawrence for an intense workout focusing on overall strength, stamina and endurance. The best basketball conditioning drills use sportspecific skills and exercises to prepare players for the movements they will perform on the court. As players learn to perform basic skills while exhausted, their in-game performances will dramatically improve. This is the perfect way to supplement your training and take your game to the next level! Ses. 1, 3, & 4: $132/ member; Ses. 2: $154/member; Ses. 5: $176/member

425.688.3177

Available for teams between 4 to 10 players who are looking to bring their playing to the next level. Fees are charged to a single sponsoring member. Guests allowed under a sponsoring members account. 50-minute session: $170/team

SPECIAL EVENTS

Stay up to date with the latest youth basketball events and clinics by subscribing to our email alerts. Email basketball@ bellevueclub.com to sign up!

2017/2018

| OO7


REGISTRATION AND CANCELLATION POLICIES REGISTRATION FEES: Payment is due at the time of registration and all payments will occur through member accounts. No other forms of payment will be accepted. No prorating of program fees. CANCELLATIONS: A 7-day cancellation notice prior to the start of programs is required for a full refund. Late cancellations or no-shows will be charged full price. Services require a 24-hour cancellation. (Cancellations not available online.) Classes that do not meet the minimum number of participants are subject to cancellation MAKE UP LESSONS: There are no refunds for missed classes. Every effort will be made to offer make up times.

EXPLORE WITH ME SESSION DATES SESSION 1 Sept. 11 - Nov. 19 SESSION 2 Nov. 27 - Feb. 18* SESSION 3 Feb. 26 - May 13** *No Class Dec. 18-29 **No Class April 9-14

Explore with Me Programs Bellevue Club Explore with Me programs allow children under the age of 4 to discover the world around them through music, art, athletics and swimming. Children will develop their langue skills, literacy, listening, problem solving and social skills all alongside their caregiver in an encouraging environment designed just for them!

ART WITH ME Ages 18 months-3 years with caregiver Sa, 9-9:45 a.m.; Kids’ Camp Room Caregivers come alongside little ones who will spend time in this fun class exploring their creativity as their self-esteem and social skills begin to flourish. Class fee includes all materials. $210/member

LIL’ KICKERS

Join in the popular Lil’ Kickers programs as instructors incorporate activities that are geared toward a toddler’s unique way of learning and include parachutes, bubbles, noodles, cones, lots of goal scoring and more. Adult participation is required. All first-time participants will receive a Lil’ Kickers soccer jersey. $180/member LIL’ KICKERS: BUNNIES Ages 18-24 months; Tu, 9:30-10:10 a.m., Basketball Gym LIL’ KICKERS: THUMPERS Ages 24-36 months; Tu, 10:20-11:10 a.m., Basketball Gym

MUSIC & MOVEMENT

Each Music & Movement class is full of energy, imagination, music, dance and playful delight. You’ll witness your child’s developmental evolution in language skills, literacy, listening, problem solving, social skills and self-esteem over the course of our carefully planned curriculum. $180/ member *Note: Music & Movement will be offered during sessions 2 and 3 only Ages 0-18 months with caregiver W, 11-11:45 a.m.; Multipurpose 2 Ages 18 months-3 years with caregiver W, 9-9:45 a.m.; Multipurpose 2 NEW! Ages 2.5–4 years W, 10-10:45 a.m.; Multipurpose 2 Our toddler program is designed for caregivers to participate in the first four classes. As the child grows comfortable, caregivers will remove themselves, allowing the child’s independence to flourish.

PARENT-CHILD AQUATICS

Ages: 6 months-3 years with caregiver Tu, 10-10:30 a.m., Th, 10-10:30 a.m., Sa, 10-10:30 a.m. Under the guidance of an instructor, parents are shown how to teach their children swimming and water safety skills. Each week’s lessons build upon the skills from previous weeks. Skills include water balance exercises, flotation devices and basic water posture. Classes are themed by the week, so attend class on a Monday evening one week and Tuesday morning the next and you and your child won’t miss out on a thing. No need to register for parent and child aquatics, just drop in. You can also pre-purchase classes and receive a discount. The classes you pre-purchase are valid for an entire year. Cost: 6 classes: $66; 12 classes: $110; 15 classes: $135; Drop-in: $15/class

LATE REGISTRATION: Fees will be prorated for late registration only based on space availability. CHECK IN/CHECK OUT: Parents or Legal Guardian of program participants younger than 12 must check their children in and out of services and programs with the instructor daily.

GUEST POLICIES MEMBER SPONSOR: A guest may participate in a program when sponsored and registered by a member. The sponsoring member is required to be in the Club while their guest attends the camp/activity. Members have priority over guests on camp/activity rosters. REGISTRATION: Members can sign up guests by calling or visiting the Athletic Services Desk (guest registration not available online). FEES: Guests pay approximately 20 percent more than members. ACTIVITY LIMITATION: Guests are only allowed to attend one program at the Bellevue Club per year. BILLING: All guest fees are billed to the sponsoring member’s account. No other forms of payment will be accepted. PLEASE NOTE: Policies apply to all services and programs listed in this brochure. Fees subject to change.

TWO WAYS TO REGISTER! Register online at: members.bellevueclub.com It’s quick, easy and you receive a confirmation email. You also have the opportunity to review all your family’s classes and camps. Call Athletic Services at 425.688.3177 or for more detailed information call: RECREATION425.688.3102 AQUATICS 425.688.3223 TENNIS425.688.3174 FITNESS 425.688.3172

2017/2018

| OO8


CLUB REFLECTIONS your community. your club.

ART CAMP

LITTLE OLYMPIANS

PRINCESS CAMP

SEE THE YOUTH NEWSLETTER IN THIS ISSUE FOR MORE CAMP OFFERINGS.

68 | august 2017 reflections

photography by taryn emerick


1/2 PAGE AD VERTICAL

bellevue bellevue club club december august 2013 2017 | 69


BRAIN TRAINING august 2017

Working out your brain is just as important as working out your biceps, so consider this your monthly dose of cognitive strength training.

SUDOKU INSTRUCTIONS: Fill the grid so that every column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1-9.

*SOLVED PUZZLE: Flip the magazine upside down to view the solved puzzle.

72 | august 2017 reflections


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Reflections: August 2017  

The Community Magazine of The Bellevue Club

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