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THE ADVOCATE Newsletter of The Baltimore County Bar Association VOLUME XXX, NO. 1

July/August 2020

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE By Jay D. Miller From the President—When I was selected to serve on the Executive Council over 9 years ago, I assumed, of course, that this would involve attending a few meetings and maybe learning a little more about the BCBA. I had no appreciation at the time that I would be given the opportunity to serve under some of the best and brightest leaders our profession has to offer; men and women previously selected to join the Executive Council that worked their way to the office of President of the BCBA. All of us on the Executive Council have the opportunity to attend leadership training in Chicago. We learn management techniques and important ways to make sure we convey our message the right way. I believe, however, that the best leadership training comes from having the opportunity to serve under, and learn from, other great leaders. I have had that opportunity. Ed Gillis, T. Wray McCurdy, Bob Lazzaro, Judge Phil Tirabassi, Judge Vicki BallouWatts, Judge Robert Thompson, Judge Keith Truffer, Adam Sampson, Rebecca Fleming, Judge Michael Siri are just some of the former BCBA Presidents and bar leaders I have had the opportunity to serve with. I had the unique opportunity to learn how to be an effective leader from each and every one of them. As a result of their leadership, your BCBA is strong, relevant and member-driven in every respect. I am happy to inform you the BCBA is on solid ground financially notwithstanding the extraordinary circumstances brought upon by the COVID-19 crisis. We are continuing to expand our services and stay on

the forefront of technological advances. Through a generous grant from the Baltimore County Bar Foundation, we are undertaking a major change in our software member management program which will involve creation of a new portal that will benefit all BCBA members. Also, we have created a new standing committee for the first time in many years. The new Diversity and Inclusion Committee will ensure that the BCBA continues to be a diverse, progressive members- first organization. You have my promise that I will do my best to serve the Association this year and hopefully continue the tradition of great leadership inspired by my predecessors over the course of the past 9 years. Also, I welcome with an open mind the suggestions of all members as to how we can continue to improve and grow as an organization, and look forward to seeing many of you throughout the year at our bar events, whether virtually, or to be optimistic, in person. One of the most satisfying opportunities presented to the incoming President is the selection of his or her charity for the year. I am happy to announce that my charity is CASA of Baltimore County (Court Appointed Special Advocates). The best way for me to explain the purpose and mission of CASA is to allow the Director, Jennifer Stine to explain it. In her own words Jennifer explains: CASA is a non-profit organization that trains and supports volunteers who are mentors and advocates to children in foster care. Continued on page 2

Vallit Valuation Advisors THE ADVOCATE

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July/August 2020


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE The volunteers come from various backgrounds, most with limited experience in the human services field, but all with the compassion and desire to help children. Before being sworn in as a CASA Volunteer Advocate, volunteers participate in a 33hour training program to learn about the child welfare and court systems, family dynamics, child development, trauma, and more. Once sworn in, the CASA Volunteer Advocates (“CASAs”) visit their assigned child regularly, getting to know them on a one-to-one basis and forming a trusting relationship. They also join a team of professionals working on behalf of the child, including social workers, biological and foster families, therapists, teachers, and many others. Twice a year, volunteers attend court hearings and present an overall picture of the services and resources provided to the child and make best-interest recommendations to the judge. Most of all, CASA volunteers are consistent, caring adults who give voices to children in foster care. CASA began in 1977, when Seattle Superior Juvenile Court Judge David Soukup was frustrated while determining outcomes in the best interests of abused and neglected children. Social workers and attorneys representing the children, though highly competent, simply could not know the children nor obtain detailed information directly from people like family, teachers, therapists and social workers at the intimate level a one-to-one advocate could. Judge Soukup asked community volunteers to each meet and get involved with one child, interview all parties involved, and report to the Court what they learned so he could make more informed decisions about the children’s futures. He deputized willing volunteers who were able to present informed and well-researched best-interest recommendations at the children’s hearings. These individuals became the first Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASAs).

According to Jennifer, there are now nearly 950 CASA programs across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. This year marks CASA of Baltimore County’s 20th anniversary. In 2000, a group of citizens in Baltimore County came together to start a CASA organization, seeing that these advocates would greatly benefit abused and neglected children involved in local juvenile THE ADVOCATE

court proceedings. Over the next year, they incorporated the organization and formed a board of directors. After securing start-up funding from the Maryland Administrative Office of the Courts and the National CASA Association, a part-time executive director was hired in July 2001. The program expanded rapidly. In 2002, two employees supported 35 volunteers who advocated for 51 children. Today, the CASA staff of 11 employees supports a capacity of 141 CASA volunteer advocates at any one time. Throughout the course of a year, a total of 170 volunteers serve just over 200 of the almost 600 Baltimore County children who have been removed from their homes and are living in temporary foster or group homes annually. Since 2000, more than 650 citizen volunteers have provided advocacy for children in need; nearly 850 children have been served.

I cannot think of a better organization to support for this next year. Without CASA, foster children would be voiceless. CASA gives them a voice to speak on their behalf to help end poor care or abuse. Upon learning of CASA’s selection as our charity partner, Jennifer noted “we couldn’t be prouder of the work we have accomplished and continue to do, thanks to the dedication and support of our volunteers, community partners, and funders. We are thrilled to have been chosen as this year’s BCBA designated charity, and we look forward to a wonderful year working together!” When we get back to real-life events that are not held by video (remember?), I encourage you to meet Jennifer and talk to her. Her enthusiasm and passion for foster children is infectious. I was hooked right after I met her. My goal is to help CASA of Baltimore County reach the foster children that it is unable to reach at this time without additional funding and resources. Members, you can do your part by attending events throughout the year. Have a great end of summer and thank you for allowing me to serve each of you as President of our BCBA, as it prepares to celebrate it’s 100th year anniversary.

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Jay D. Miller BCBA President, 2020-2021

July/August 2020


2020-21 Officers President Pres-Elect Secretary Treasurer

Jay D. Miller Stanford G. Gann, Jr. John G. Turnbull III Lisa Y. Settles

Executi v e Council Sondra M. Douglas Richard Grason VI Robert K. Erdman, Jr. Tyler J. Nowicki Michelle D. Siri Alaina L. Storie Hon. Michael W. Siri, Immediate Past President Nicole E. Rush, Young Lawyers’ Chair

Calendar of Events Please go to www.bcba.org and click on ‘calendar’ for an up-to-date listing of programs & events and to register for all programs & events.

The Advocate

Michael S. Barranco Committee Chair Tracee O. Fruman Committee Vice-Chair

Cont ributi ng Writers Fred Allentoff Marissa Joelson Ceecee Paizs Mary Sanders Richard Seitz Jennifer Stein Laurie Wasserman

The Advocate is a monthly publication of the Baltimore County Bar Association informing its members about current events relating to law. Articles do not necessarily reflect the official position of the BCBA and publication does not constitute an endorsement of views expressed.

The contents of advertisements are the responsibility of the advertisers and are not recommendations or endorsements by The Advocate. Publication deadline: 10th of the month preceding publication.

THE ADVOCATE

Inside This Edition Annual Charity Bar Year Kick-Off Bench/Bar Update Civil Law Update Client Management Court Notices EC Spotlight Law Library Member Ads Member News Parent Coordinators Pro Bono Services School Supplies Drive

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PROPOSED CHANGES TO CONSTITUTION & BYLAWS The date has been extended for feedback and suggestions regarding the proposed changes to the Constitution and Bylaws of the BCBA. To read the proposed changes to the Constitution, please visit https://www.bcba.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/ProposedConstitution-Revisions.pdf and to read the prosposed changes to the Bylaws, please visit https://www.bcba.org/site/wp-content/ uploads/2020/07/Proposed-ByLaws-Revisions.pdf . Email all suggestions to rruocco@bcba.org All feedback must be received no later than Thursday, September 10 at 12:00 p.m. Page 3

July/August 2020


COURT NOTICES

MD JUDICIARY UPDATE Posted August 25, 2020 The spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to impact the daily operation of the Maryland Judiciary. Maryland’s courts are now in Phase 3 of its reopening plan. Clerks’ offices in the circuit courts and District Court of Maryland are now OPEN. Visit the local court page for the latest information on hours of operation BEFORE arriving to court. PLEASE NOTE: Beginning on Monday, July 20, the Maryland moved into Phase 3 of the Maryland Judiciary’s reopening plan. The plan guides courts across the state of Maryland as to how they should gradually return to full operations throughout the next several weeks and months. During Phase 3, clerk’s offices in both the District Court of Maryland and circuit courts will reopen throughout the state and additional court matters will be scheduled and heard.

There are five phases in the plan and each phase will represent an increase in the level of activity within each courthouse and court office. Depending on the current state of COVID-19 throughout Maryland, it may be necessary for a court and/or jurisdiction to adjust phases. The Judiciary is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation and evaluating its ongoing response to this

public health emergency. Some courts will continue using technology for remote proceedings, either by video or telephone, but please note that this will vary by court location. The general public, members of the media, and attorneys should reference the COVID-19 webpages for the latest information on individual court operations. Court closings related to coronavirus. Additionally, the courts are requiring any individual, including employees, seeking access to a courthouse or court office location to:

Answer a set of screening questions; Be subject to temperature checks; Wear a facial covering or mask; and Practice social distancing. The Maryland courts started implementing the reopening plan on June 5. If COVID-19 conditions allow, the Maryland Judiciary will move to Phase IV on August 31, 2020. Phase IV will mark the resumption of non-jury trials and other contested matters in the District Court of Maryland and circuit courts.

A link to the entire Start-Up Plan for the Circuit Court for Baltimore County Following COVID-19 Emergency Closure can be found by visiting www.bcba.org and clicking on ‘COVID-19 Updates’. THE ADVOCATE

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July/August 2020


JUNE STATED MEETING This year has been a year of firsts (and in some cases, hopefully the last). Thursday, June 18 was the first ever Virtual Stated Meeting of the Baltimore County Bar Association. The meeting was via Zoom and was well attended by members of the BCBA. Outgoing President, Judge Michael Siri thanked all of the committee chairs and the rest of

SPOTLIGHT

the BCBA leadership for their dedication during the past year. Jay D. Miller took over as President of the BCBA for the 2020-2021 Bar Year. Jay expressed his hopefulness for a successful and engaging year despite the challenges we have faced and will be facing.

ON THE EXECUTIVE ALAINA STORIE

COUNCIL -

as Committee Chair of the Family law Committee, the Law Day Committee, the Young Lawyers Committee, and the Membership Committee in two different years.

Alaina is married to Rob, an electrical engineer and her full time passion is being Mom to Sam, a 4 year old son, and Skyer, her now 7 month old daughter. Her full time career passion is being a partner at Turnbull, Nicholson & Sanders where she represents clients in Family Law matters. Alaina graduated from the University of Baltimore in 2007 and has been on an upward trajectory ever since. In 13 short years, in addition to marriage and the birth of her 2 beautiful children, she has been a Baltimore County Bar Association dynamo, serving THE ADVOCATE

Now, her proud service to the BCBA has been her appointment to the Executive Council, a 10-year term, which will culminate with her Presidency of the BCBA in 2029-2030. Alaina has developed a reputation as a fierce but fair advocate for her clients, a difficult yet highly valued combination of attributes. Her talents have been recognized as she has repeatedly been chosen as a Super Lawyer rising Star. Although I am not sure where she has the time for it, Alaina has been a 7-day a week gym rat. The only time she has been absent from the gym was during the government imposed gym shut down, forcing Alaina to become a beach body program aficionado. The Baltimore County Bar Association Executive Council is fortunate to have this dynamo on board.

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July/August 2020


BENCH/BAR UPDATE By Fred Allentoff

In light of the current COVID-19 pandemic and its impact upon all of us, and resulting need that members be kept current on developments, President Jay D. Miller elected to convene the 2020/2021 iteration of the Bench/Bar Committee on July 9, 2020 rather than await September as had been customary in the past.

although remote hearings shall continue to be encouraged when possible. Judges will be hearing VOP’s in criminal matters, contested motions in civil matters and contempt hearings in family law cases. Additionally, family law contempt cases shall resume as well as pendente lite hearings and child support establishment cases.

On behalf of the Circuit Court, Judge Kathleen O. Cox reported that recently appointed Magistrate Michael McBee who began on June 8, 2020 has seamlessly transitioned to the position and had already begun taking regular dockets. Judge Mickey J. Norman is retiring in August but has agreed to be recalled to periodically sit beginning in September. Meanwhile, whereas the Court was previously precluded from using Zoom to conduct remote hearings due to security concerns, as those concerns have been abated, the Judiciary will be transitioning to Zoom from Skype for Business in the Fall. She also reported that Settlement Court is up and running with Family Law matters being conducted in person except upon request that they be conducted remotely. Such requests should be made through MDEC and will be liberally granted by Judge Ruth Ann Jakubowski. Settlement conferences in civil matters will continue to be conducted remotely.

Circuit Court Administrator Timothy Sheridan explained that significant attention has been paid to making the courthouse as safe as possible from the point of entry and throughout the building. In addition to steps to promote social distancing, trial tables have sanitizing wipes to be used to disinfect them. These physical changes will be noticeable and are necessary given the expected increase in activity which accompanies Phase III. Should anyone encounter a procedure or policy which may benefit from refinement, Mr. Sheridan welcomes the input.

With reference to criminal matters, the Grand Jury is up and running; pleas are being done remotely in cases where the State is seeking a period of incarceration of less than one (1) year. This does not apply to those charged with crimes which would result in being placed on the sex offense registry. A plea docket is conducted every day and the Court is trying to avoid transporting incarcerated individuals whenever possible. On July 20th the Court shall enter Phase III of its reopening plan. The Plan itself remains available on the Bar website. The major change which accompanies Phase III is the re-opening of the clerk’s office to the public. However, continued use of the drop box in the lobby should be encouraged in an effort to reduce traffic inside the courthouse. Civil trials of less than one day shall be heard as scheduled, THE ADVOCATE

Julie Ensor, Clerk of the Circuit Court, reported that 40% of her staff is on site with the balance of employees teleworking. This will continue into Phase III. This has resulted in the clerks being flooded with telephone calls. To rectify this, attorneys are urged to make contact via email. A list of the departments and corresponding email addresses are being included in the Advocate for this purpose. Similarly, the “Licensing” Department has been overwhelmed. Many of these calls relate to swearing in of notaries, and those seeking to obtain marriage licenses and arrange for marriages at the courthouse. Rachel Ruocco shall try to coordinate outdoor weddings. Additionally, Julie reported that MDEC has been a blessing for Baltimore County and that her office is current with all filings. Magistrate Wendy Schenker stated that Scheduling Conferences in family law cases, CINA cases, Juvenile cases and Uncontested Divorce hearings shall continue to be conducted remotely during Phase III. Delinquency pleas will be held on Mondays with dockets beginning at either 1:00 p.m. or 3:00 p.m.. Orphan’s Court Judge Arthur Frank relayed that they

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July/August 2020


BENCH/BAR UPDATE By Fred Allentoff

will continue to conduct hearings remotely. The Register of Wills is open by appointment only through the summer and documents may be filed by depositing them in the drop box located in the courthouse lobby. District Court Administrative Judge Dorothy Wilson reported that she is engaged in moving the court toward Phase III and regular meetings are focused on evaluating adjustments and changes to facilitate the safe expansion of services and consequent traffic in the courts. Domestic violence and peace order case types are increasing dramatically. Entering into Phase III there will not be substantial changes nor will they be adding case types as the DV matters need to be resolved. Matters previously being handled by commissioners will be heard by Judges, with the exception of matters presented outside of normal court hours. Criminal matters and VOP’s will be handled remotely to the extent possible in an effort to reduce traffic within the court buildings. Judge Tirabassi who has been sitting on the Eastern Shore has continued to conduct civil pre-trial conferences in Baltimore County and this will continue during Phase III. As work continues on the Towson District Court building, there is not yet a firm date of completion.

President Jay D. Miller acknowledged receipt of a generous grant received from the Bar Foundation which has enabled the Bar Association to acquire a new software program. He also reported the resignation of Rachel Fuller who served as Executive Assistant. The Bar Association now has two (2) openings. One is the position of Lawyer Referral [LRIS] Director which is a thirty (30) hour per week position. The other is the Executive Assistant position which is full time. Job descriptions for these positions may be obtained by contacting Rachel Ruocco. If you know of anyone who may be interested and a good fit, please do not hesitate to make the referral. The Association would appreciate it. Jay also announced that all Association events and programs scheduled between now and November shall be held virtually. The Bar Association office shall open for attorneys only on July 20th. The KickOff party in September will be a virtual event and the official announcement of CASA of Baltimore County as this year’s charity shall be announced. A variety of fundraising events have been planned, the first of which shall be a gift card drive and collection of school supplies. Further, Jay reported that publication of the Advocate is back on track. Planning meetings for the various committees are scheduled and will be conducted via Zoom. The dates of such meetings will be reflected in regular announcements and also may be found on the BCBA website. Finally, the Diversity & Inclusion Committee which was established last year by President Michael Siri shall be elevated to the status of Standing Committee. The Honorable Michael Siri shall be the first to serve as Bench/Bar liaison.

Judge Dorothy Wilson, filling in for Maria Fields, District Court Administrator, informed us that the clerks’ offices and cashiers shall re-open on July 20th and able to accept cash payments. Drop boxes shall remain available to deposit papers in an effort to limit traffic as well as in person contact. More staff shall be brought in while some will continue to telework. More partitions have been installed to enhance safety of both the public and staff. Not surprisingly, call Deputy States Attorney John Cox advised that the volume to the clerks has markedly increased. Grand Jury is moving along nicely. There are a lot of The Honorable Will Somerville of the Office of indictments with priority being given to those folks Administrative Hearings advised that OAH is incarcerated and approaching preliminary hearing conducting limited in-person hearings. Two Judges, dates. The Office shall continue to stagger staff namely, ALJ Douglas E. Koteen and Michael J. within the courthouse and increase the District Court Wallace have retired. No information was available staff. Due to a positive COVID-19 test of an Essex on filling those positions. courthouse employee, five ASA’s were potentially THE ADVOCATE

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July/August 2020


BENCH/BAR UPDATE By Fred Allentoff

exposed and had to be quarantined, four of whom are awaiting test results. Despite this temporary staffing shortage the office is functioning as more is being done remotely.

Turning to substantive issues, beginning July 20th the Circuit Court will begin hearing one day criminal bench trials as long as there is an agreement with the States Attorney’s Office. To schedule this you may call Criminal Assignment (x2694) or Criminal Case Manager, Philip Pokorny (x2853). These hearings can be held in person or remotely. Judge Cox or Judge Cahill can then put them on the docket. To contact the assigned ASA it is best to send an email. Email addresses are typically first initial last name followed by @baltimorecountymd.gov.

Deputy Public Defender James Dills was pleased to report that their Case Management System is now somewhat operational. This process has been quite challenging and efforts are underway to recover old data maintained in the prior system. Jim also reported that they have employed a staggered staff schedule and temporarily lost three Assistant Public Defenders who are now quarantined as a result of the Family Law Chairperson Wendy Meadows stated that Essex event. a planning meeting was scheduled for July 14th. The Gregory E. Gaskins of the Baltimore County Office annual Legislative and Case Law update program was of Law announced that two attorneys, Susan Dubin held via Zoom on June 24th and Judge Jakubowski and Glenn Marrow, have been promoted to Deputy provided information regarding Family law procedures and practices. Meanwhile, Anna Marie status. Two other attorneys in the office have retired. Walsh of the Office of Family Mediation has sought Lenny Shapiro, representing the Criminal Defense volunteers to provide limited scope representation to Bar expressed serious concerns upon learning of the otherwise self-represented litigants in the hope of positive COVID-19 test result and temporary closure assisting and potentially resolving such matters. of the Essex District Court on July 1st . His primary concern was that no notice was provided to the bar. On behalf of the Diversity & Inclusion Committee, The Office of the States Attorney and Office of Judge Michael Siri stated that a Plan has been Public Defender became aware of the event as the formulated and is available on the Association’s courthouse was closed in the middle of the afternoon website. The fundamental purpose of the committee docket. Lenny expressed his belief that failure to is to promote diversity within the legal profession notify the bar and indirectly clients, was reckless. through clerkships, relationships with local law firms Although Judge Wilson did not disagree with these and mentorships. Development of a database to track concerns and assured the committee that she was diversity in the BCBA is planned. The committee then contacting Annapolis to convey them, she also wants to promote diversity in CLE’s and other explained that she strictly followed the established programs where there are multiple speakers to enhance engagement and participation which is more protocols including immediate notification of the Health Department and District Court headquarters in reflective of the legal community. The committee Annapolis. Additionally, the courthouse was closed, also hopes to establish relationships with other cleaned and sanitized prior to its re-opening. As such specialty bar associations and to sponsor an annual an event could easily occur in the Circuit Court, event. The planning meeting is set for July 21st. Judge Cox stated that she would be in contact with Debra Schubert, liaison to Harford County reported Judge Laura Ripken as a change in notification that if you have pleas that are worked out, you can protocol may be appropriate. It was also suggested contact the assistant to Judge Angela Eaves and that President Miller include such notification to resolve the matter remotely. Association members through the twice weekly email The meeting was adjourned at 8:50 a.m. The next updates sent to members by Rachel Ruocco. meeting is scheduled to be held on August 13, 2020. THE ADVOCATE

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July/August 2020


CASA

OF

BALTIMORE COUNTY By Jennifer Stine

CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) of Baltimore County is a non-profit organization that trains and supports volunteers who are mentors and advocates to children in foster care. The volunteers come from various backgrounds, most with limited experience in the human services field, but all with the compassion and desire to help children. Before being sworn in as a CASA Volunteer Advocate, volunteers participate in a 33-hour training program to learn about the child welfare and court systems, family dynamics, child development, trauma, and more. Once sworn in, CASAs visit their assigned child regularly, getting to know them on a one-to-one basis and forming a trusting relationship. They also join a team of professionals working on behalf of the child, including social workers, biological and foster families, therapists, teachers, and many others. Twice a year, volunteers attend court hearings and present an overall picture of the services and resources provided to the child and make best-interest recommendations to the judge. Most of all, CASA volunteers are consistent, caring adults who give voices to children in foster care. CASA began in 1977, when Seattle Superior Juvenile Court Judge David Soukup was frustrated while determining outcomes in the best interests of abused and neglected children. Social workers and attorneys representing the children, though highly competent, simply could not know the children nor obtain detailed information directly from people like family, teachers, therapists and social workers at the intimate level a one-to-one advocate could. Judge Soukup THE ADVOCATE

asked community volunteers to each meet and get involved with one child, interview all parties involved, and report to the Court what they learned so he could make more informed decisions about the children’s futures. He deputized willing volunteers who were able to present informed and well-researched best-interest recommendations at the children’s hearings. These individuals became the first Court Appointed Special Advocates, or “CASAs.” There are now nearly 950 CASA programs across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. In 2000, a group of citizens in Baltimore County came together to start a CASA organization, seeing that these advocates would greatly benefit abused and neglected children involved in local juvenile court proceedings. Over the next year, they incorporated the organization and formed a board of directors. After securing start-up funding from the Maryland Administrative Office of the Courts and the National CASA Association, a part-time executive director was hired in July 2001. The program expanded rapidly. In 2002, two employees supported 35 volunteers who advocated for 51 children. Today, the staff of 11 employees supports a capacity of 141 CASA volunteer advocates at any one time. Throughout the course of a year, a total of 170 volunteers serve just over 200 of the almost 600 Baltimore County children who have been removed from their homes and are living in temporary foster or group homes annually. Since 2000, more than 650 citizen volunteers have provided advocacy for children in need; nearly 850 children have been served. 2020 marks CASA of Baltimore County’s 20th anniversary, and we couldn’t be prouder of the work we have accomplished and continue to do, thanks to the dedication and support of our volunteers, community partners, and funders. We are thrilled to have been chosen as this year’s BCBA designated charity, and we look forward to a wonderful year working together!

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CLIENT MANAGEMENT DURING COVID-19: AVOIDING COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN By Richard P. Seitz

One of the most common complaints from clients, both in online reviews and to the Attorney Grievance Commission, is lack of communication from their attorney’s office. In Maryland, for fiscal year 2019, nearly 13% of all docketed cases involved complaints regarding diligence (Rule 1.3) or communication (Rule 1.4). Clients who come to attorneys with tort claimswhether plaintiff, defendant or insurance carrierexpect us to lay out the normal course of a case, with the potential forks in the road, at the beginning of the attorney-client relationship. But what happens when the world turns upside down, toppling litigation timelines and scheduling orders on their heads? The year 2020 has presented novel challenges to attorneys, courts, and of course, our clients. Courts and office buildings have been, and to a certain extent remain, shuttered or limited. Trials have been canceled, the manner in which many depositions and mediations are conducted has changed drastically, and even the way we “meet” with our colleagues, the courts, and clients have moved to digital platforms. Explaining these shifts to our clients and offering alternative means of communication, being proactive in updating our clients, as well as addressing safety concerns, all begin with open and clear communication. YOU CAN TALK TO ME

What is the most common thing an attorney does first when meeting a prospective client? We hand them our business card. The purpose of course is not to show off which font or cardstock we selected, but rather it is to pass on our contact information- how to reach us! Beyond that, we provide staff’s contact phone numbers, their emails, and even the number to the facsimile machine, just in case they prefer 1980’s technology. We provide every-which-way to reach us at the outset. Right now may be a good time to remind clients of THE ADVOCATE

how to reach us, provide (and get) updated phone numbers or email addresses, or simply reintroduce yourself and reassure the client that you are still hard at work on their case during this health crisis. Such a check in offers a great opportunity to assess their preferences for communication. Perhaps a client who previously could speak freely during the day can now only text during work, or now prefers email over phone calls. Simply checking with them and noting your file so you and your staff can best serve the client by reaching them via their preferred method is an easy task that can help maintain client satisfaction. HELLO, IS IT ME YOU’RE LOOKING FOR? Simply answering your phone when it rings, or returning calls you may have missed, is not enough. While serenading your client with a smooth 1980’s smash hit is probably never a good idea, pandemic or not, picking up the phone to check in is always a good call. Whatever method you have used to monitor client contact, now is a great chance to review your system. Ensure you are getting the most out of your client management software; most systems provide ticklers to remind you to call each client on a certain interval of days. Even when there is no news, most clients will be glad to hear you have them on your mind and are monitoring their file. If you do not use that kind of software, set a recurring calendar event to, “Call client Jane Doe.” Not only is checking in with the client part of our required diligence, but often the client will have information or questions they forgot to bring to you, or a new matter or referral, or just be impressed with your degree of professionalism- which can lead to additional work or referrals down the road. SAFETY DANCE Each person involved in a case, whether a litigant, counsel, witness, expert or other interested person, has a unique situation and life experience which will

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CLIENT MANAGEMENT DURING COVID-19: AVOIDING COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN By Richard P. Seitz

shape their perception of risk during this pandemic. While one client may be glad to get out of their house and come to your office for a deposition, another may not. Clients at higher risk for negative outcomes from the virus may well prefer remote depositions or video meetings to discuss their case. Understanding their access to technology, unique health concerns or travel restrictions will help us as attorneys avoid putting the client in an unnecessarily stressful, risky or uncomfortable situation. At the same time, diligent representation, good customer service and zealous advocacy need not require avoidable risk to ourselves as lawyers. When we do meet in person, following the applicable health guidelines from government authorities shows not only care for ourselves, but for our client’s wellbeing, too. An open conversation about the comfort level of another before meeting with them ensures everyone is comfortable and on the same page. It may be a bit awkward at first, but having the conversation is in the best interests and health of all those involved. Rosner, Seth; “Keeping Clients Happy and Avoiding Complaints.” April, 2, 2019, GPSolo Magazine, American Bar Association. https:// www.americanbar.org/groups/gpsolo/publications/ gp_solo/2011/january_february/ keeping_clients_happy_and_avoidingcomplaints/ Attorney Grievance Commission of Maryland Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 2019. https:// mdcourts.gov/sites/default/files/import/attygrievance/ docs/annualreport19.pdf

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CIVIL LAW UPDATE By Ceecee Paizs

Attorney and an Advance Health Care Directive, naming her daughter, Marybeth Meek, as attorney-in -fact and Health Care Agent when both parties THE COURT OF SPECIAL APPEALS: resided in California. Subsequently, Ms. Hansen Jimmie B. Allred v. Passaporn P. Allred, No 672, moved to Maryland and remarried in 2010. After a September Term 2018, filed November 21, 2019. diagnosis of dementia, Ms. Hansen’s mental health Opinion by Sally Adkins, Judge declined in 2017. After discovering that his mother Husband and Wife entered into a Marital Settlement was living with her husband in terrible conditions, Agreement that stated that Wife was entitled to Ms. Hansen’s eldest son, Thomas Linton, made receive a “specific sum of Husband’s 401(k) plus or arrangements for the home to be cleaned an a team of minus investment experience, dating from March 1, professional health care providers, along with family 2013 to the date of Judgment of Divorce”. More members, to provide care for Ms. Hansen in her than three years later, Wife filed a Complaint for home. Even with these improvements, Ms. Meek Entry of a Qualified Domestic Relations Order attempted to exercise her authority as attorney-in-fact (“QDRO”) providing for her share plus or minus and Health Care Agent to move Ms. Hansen from her investment experience including from the date of home to a long-term care facility. Mr. Linton filed a divorce through the distribution. The value of the petition for guardianship of the person and property. 401(k) had increased significantly in the three years The trial court ruled that (1) there was no less since the date of divorce and Wife was claiming a restrictive form of intervention available, other than share of that increase. The trial court agreed with guardianship, that was consistent with Ms. Hansen’s Wife that the intention was that she should share in welfare and safety; (2) there was “good cause” to any investment gain or loss until the funds were pass over Meek’s higher priority under E.T. §13-707 (a) and appoint Linton, a person of lower priority distributed. under that section, as guardian of Ms. Hansen’s The Court of Special Appeals reversed, finding that person; and (3) there was “good cause” to pass over the language in the Marital Settlement Agreement Meek’s higher priority under that E.T. §13-207(a) was clear and that Wife was not entitled to more than and appoint Barrett Kin, Esq., a neutral third party the her share of the 401(k) as determined as of a date and a person with lower priority under that section, certain, plus or minus any investment experience as as guardian of Ms. Hansen’s property. of the date of divorce. The Court of Special Appeals did note that if express language in the marital The Court of Special Appeals affirmed, finding that settlement has dictated otherwise, Wife would have Ms. Meek’s plan to move Ms. Hansen to a long term care facility was not “consistent with the person’s been entitled to the additional investment experience on her share of the 401(k), noting Salkini v. Salkini, welfare and safety”, as (1) Ms. Hansen was well cared for at her home; (2) Ms. Hansen’s health and 243 Md. App. 277 (2019). well being may actually be negatively impacted if Review of the Amicus Curiarum for May 2020 she is moved from her home to a long term care revealed the following civil cases of interest: facility; and (3) Ms. Meek intended to place Ms. Hansen in a long term care facility if she was THE COURT OF SPECIAL APPEALS: permitted to act as Ms. Hansen’s Health Care Agent. Marybeth Davis Meek v. Thomas Warren Linton, et For similar reasons, the Court of Special Appeals al., No. 682, September Term 2019, filed April 29, held that there was good cause to pass over Meek’s 2020. Opinion by Woodward, Patrick L., Judge statutory priority and appoint Linton and Barrett, In 2008, Lois Hansen executed a Durable Power of

Review of the Amicus Curiarum for February 2020 revealed the following civil case of interest:

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CIVIL LAW UPDATE By Ceecee Paizs

persons of lower priority, as guardian of Ms. Hansen’s person and property respectively. Linton and Barrett would act in Ms. Hansen’s best interest by allowing her to remain in her home. Therefore, the trial court did not err in finding that there was no less restrictive form of intervention than the appointment of a guardian, and guardians of lower priority in this case.

though he intended to continue to have the child in the primary custody of the child’s paternal grandfather in New York. In denying Father’s motion to stay pending his appeal, the court further stated that while it considered evidence of the prior abuse of Mother against Father, the distance between the parties at this time would provide the necessary protection from abuse required by the statute.

Frank Gerard Gizzo v. Kaycee Lauren Gerstman, No. 3236, September Term 2018, filed April 1, 2020. Opinion by Arthur, Kevin F., Judge

The Court of Special Appeals affirmed, finding that the court met the requirements of specific findings related to either prior abuse or neglect of a child (Family Law §9-101) or prior abuse of a party (family Law §9-101.1). While not making the specific finding of required under FL §9-101.1 in its original decision, the court did make those specific findings in its denial of the motion to stay and therefore addressed any deficiency. Although a reasonable fact-finder might have made a different custody decision, the trial court’s findings were supported by sufficient evidence and the court’s reasoning was not an abuse of discretion.

Father and Mother lived together for one year after the birth of the child, during which time Mother became pregnant with a second child. After an incident in August 2015 when Mother punched Father, a police trainee, in the presence of his coworkers, after which Father sued and Mother counter -sued for custody. In December 2015, the child sustained injuries while in Mother’s care, and ultimately pled guilty to one count of child neglect, receiving supervised probation. The child was placed in the care of Father. Mother then spent one year at a treatment center for pregnant women and women with young children. In 2017, Mother moved with the youngest child to California to live with her parents, at which time she met and married a man who had custody of a young child from a previous relationship. She became pregnant with her third child. Father continued to work as a full time police officer in Maryland. In 2017, Father determined that the child should live with his parents in New York where he visited 3-6 times per month. After a trial in 2019, the trial court granted sole legal custody and primary physical custody of the child with regular access to Father through FaceTime and visitation during school breaks and vacations. The trial court fount that while there were reasonable grounds to believe that Mother had previously neglected the child, the court found that there was no likelihood of further child abuse of neglect by Mother due to the change in circumstances in her life. The court found that Father was nominally seeking custody even THE ADVOCATE

Andrew Lasko v. Amanda Lasko, No. 2702, September Term 2016, filed April 1, 2020. Opinion by Woodward, Patrick L., Judge Husband filed a complaint for limited divorce and other relief. Wife filed an answer to the complaint as well as a counter complaint for limited divorce and other relief. In her answer, Wife requested, among other things, that the trial court determine and value the parties’ marital property and grant her “all relief to which she may be entitled pursuant to the Family Law article of the Annotated Code of Maryland.” Husband subsequently filed an amended complaint for an absolute divorce and other relief to which Wife did not file an answer. At trial Husband argued that Wife did not have a right to request a monetary award as she had not property pled that claim due to her failure to file an answer or counterclaim to his amended complaint for absolute divorce. The trial court held that Wife’s answer to the limited divorce complaint sufficiently pleaded a request for a monetary award and subsequently granted her a

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monetary award.

The Court of Special Appeals affirmed in part, vacated in part and remanded for further proceedings. The Court of Special Appeals examined the trial court’s factual findings with respect to the statutory alimony factors. The COSA emphasized that the trial court did not acknowledge Wife’s mental health history and its impact on her ability to becoming self-supporting. Finding that the trial court should have awarded Wife indefinite alimony, the COSA held that even after Wife makes as much progress toward becoming self-supporting as could be reasonably expected, the standards of living of the parties would be unconscionably disparate when Wife’s imputed income of $35,000 per year is compared to Husband’s earned income of over $1.5M per year. The COSA determined that the trial court could readdress the issue of the value of the funds held in Husband’s business and the computational error in the grant of child support on remand.

The Court of Special Appeals affirmed, noting that under Maryland case law and Maryland Rule 2-323 (g), a defendant must contain sufficient language to place the plaintiff on notice that the defendant is requesting a monetary award and/or a transfer of property. Further, Rule 2-341(a) provides that when a pleading is amended and no new or additional answer is filed, “the answer previously filed shall be treated as an answer to the amendment.” Wife’s answer to the complaint for limited divorce became Wife’s answer to the amended complaint for absolute divorce. Further, Wife’s answer sufficient set forth a claim for a monetary award as she affirmatively requested that the court determine and value the marital property and grant her “all relief to which she may be entitled pursuant to the Family Law Article.” Wife therefore articulated the three-step process that a trial court must undertake in order to grant a monetary award, putting Husband on notice that the Anthony Martinez v. Daniel Ross, et al. No. 2374, trial court could grant Wife a monetary award. September Term 2018, filed April 29, 2020. K.B. v. D.B., No. 2860, September Term 2018, and Opinion by Arthur, Kevin F., Judge No. 1155, September Term, 2019, filed April 29, Mr. Ross and his companies own and control a 2020. Opinion by Berger, Stuart R., Judge property known as Penn Shop Farm. The property K.B. (Wife) and D.B. (Husband) were married for 17 is not open to the public and the entrance is years before they separated and Wife filed Complaint controlled with fencing, a locked gage and multiple for Absolute Divorce, seeking custody of their child warning signs that prohibit entry. Mr. Ross invited in addition to other issues. Following a 12 day trial, a group of family and friends totaling 90 guests for a the trial court granted primary physical custody of the social event on the property which included rides on child to Husband and held all economic issues sub all terrain vehicles on courses he had constructed on curia. Wife appealed. On appeal, the Court of the property. Mr. Martinez was one of the invitees Special Appeals vacated the trial court’s custody and as a result of an ATV accident on one of the determination and remanded for further proceedings. courses was injured and rendered a quadriplegic. He Less than one month later, the trial court issued a sued for damages claiming negligence on the part of Memorandum of Opinion and Judgment of Absolut Mr. Ross. Mr. Ross and his companies moved for Divorce resolving all non-custodial issues which did summary judgment claiming immunity under the not address child support and referred to Husband Maryland Recreational Use Statute. The trial court having primary physical custody of the child. The granted the motion. trial court awarded Wife rehabilitative alimony for 30 months and a monetary award which was modified The Court of Special Appeals reversed holding that by $10,000 subsequently, along with disposition of the Maryland Recreational Use Statute only applies to a landowner who opens his land to the general the parties’ real property. Wife noted an appeal. THE ADVOCATE

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CIVIL LAW UPDATE

Save the Date!

By Ceecee Paizs

public for recreational or education purposes, the owner owes no duty of care to those persons except in cases of willful or malicious failure to guard or warn against a dangerous condition or in cases where the owner charges a fee. It is a statutory quid pro quo: in exchange for opening lands to the general public for recreational or educational use, the owners receive a special statutory immunity from suit by those users. Such immunity does not extend to situations where the users ore invitees or licensees of the owners, no matter how large the group is.

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Virtual Bar Wars TEAM Trivia Competition Thursday, October 29

6:00 p.m. $100/team All $ raised Benefits CASA of Baltimore County

July/August 2020


TOP 10 REASONS

TO

USE

A

PARENT COORDINATOR

By Laurie M. Wasserman

Parent Coordinators are specially trained to resolve disputes in high-conflict custody matters. Instead of long drawn out court battles, Parent Coordinators can draft a parenting plan, monitor continued compliance of the parenting plan, and can help resolve minor disputes between parents. Most importantly, when the parents cannot reach a consensus, the Parent Coordinator has the ability to decide on their behalf. Here are the top 10 reasons why using a Parent Coordinator can help with custody disputes:

1. Parent Coordination addresses day-to-day issues. Parent Coordination provides a time and place for parents to meet and resolve day-to-day disputes. The overarching goal is to reduce the effects of conflict on the parents’ child(ren). 2. Parent Coordination is designed to assist high -conflict families in making minor decisions. The Parent Coordination process is designed to resolve minor disputes between the parents. For example, the Parent Coordinator can assist with the selection of sports or camps, making temporary changes to a schedule or establishing rules for communication. Note: A Parent Coordinator is not permitted to decide a legal or physical custody issue, as it would be an improper delegation of judicial authority. 3. Parent Coordination saves money. The cost of one Parent Coordinator— shared by two parents— for a Parent Coordination meeting is significantly less than the fees each parent will pay to his or her lawyer to resolve a dispute.

Coordinator decides the issue. 6. Parent Coordination is child-focused. Parent Coordinators assist parents with establishing and maintaining a healthy co-parenting relationship. The Parent Coordination process tends to reduce child conflicts, which, in turn, reduces the potential effects of conflict on a child. 7. Parent Coordination is not confidential. Unlike mediators, Parent Coordinators can be called to testify as a fact witness at trial about what took place in session and how these parents make decisions. The lack of confidentiality tends to incentivize good-faith behavior from participants. 8. Parent Coordination results in written decisions. Since the Parent Coordination process is not confidential, the Parent Coordinator will issue a summary of the discussions at Parent Coordination meetings, and those notes are admissible as evidence in Court. The agreements can then be used by the lawyers as the template for a Consent Agreement. 9. Parent Coordination is a long-term resource. After the custody dispute is resolved, the Parent Coordinator can continue to work with the parents as long as they consent to the process.

10. Parent Coordination benefits the legal profession. Parent Coordination will decrease the number of client calls to their lawyers, improve cooperation with Court orders, and reduce the number of litigated cases.

4. Parent Coordination saves time. Parent Coordination provides a prompt resolution to daily child-related decisions. The parents do not need to wait for the lawyers to call each other and attempt to work out the issue. 5. Parent Coordination encourages joint decisions. The Parent Coordinator is trained to first work with parents to try to reach a shared decision on the disputed issue, using mediation style techniques. If, after a good-faith effort, the parents still cannot resolve their dispute, then the Parent THE ADVOCATE

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USING

THE

LAW LIBRARY DURING COVID-19 By Stephanie Levesseur

The Law Library reopened to the general population developing a vaccine quickly, but safely. The on July 20th with the following limitations and hurricane season runs from June 1 to November procedures: 30. Allegedly, the 2020 season will be an active one for the Atlantic Coast. Therefore, the Hurricane There is a limit of 10 people in the law library. Season FAQ: Federal Disaster Assistance for Masks MUST be worn at all times per court order. Hurricanes During the COVID-19 Pandemic database could be an important document to keep in mind if Visitors are limited to 1 hour. your clients are devastated by a hurricane this season. Entering the Library New Titles When arriving at the library door The law library staff added the following titles to the CALL our number collection: If the library has not reached capacity, we FEDERAL SENTENCING: the basics / United States will open the door. Sentencing Commission – United States Sentencing If the library has reached capacity, we will Commission, 2015. KF 9685 .Z9

Take your phone number

FIELD GUIDE TO LEGAL RESEARCH / Callister, Paul – West Academic Publishing, 2019. KF 240 .C35

Ask you to wait in the jury room Call you when space is available Social distancing must be maintained.

New from HeinOnline: Impeachment Databases

COVID-19

and

Along with issues of legal journals and the entire historical CFR, the Law Library’s HeinOnline subscription also includes two new databases. Only four presidents in U.S. history were impeached. The U.S. Presidential Impeachment Library includes a plethora of documents arising from those impeachment proceedings such as articles of impeachment, testimony, scholarly analysis of impeachment and so forth. The COVID-19 in America: Response, Issues, and Law library contains scholarly articles and Congressional Research Service reports on how COVID-19 impacts health, society, economics, and the world. For example, COVID-19 and China: A Chronology of Events (December 2019-January 2020) details what happened when and where as the world-wide pandemic started to unfold. The Legal Issues in COVID-19 Vaccine Development database discusses the laws and regulations related to THE ADVOCATE

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MVLS EXPANDS HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION PROJECT

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The Baltimore County Lawyer Referral & Information Service is fully operational. Please direct the public to call 410-337-9100 Monday—Friday from 9:00 a.m.—3:00 p.m. to be referred to a lawyer. Interested in more clients? The 2020-2021 Lawyer Referral & Information Service Panel Application is available now so please renew. If you are considering joining Lawyer Referral for the first time and have any questions, contact LRIS Coordinator, Jacob Bengel at jbengel@bcba.org. All current panel members should have received the new application via email. Remember...You can join or renew at any time!

BALTIMORE COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION HISTORICAL COMMITTEE Do you have old photos of past Baltimore County Bar Association events and programs? We would love to have them! Please email Rachel Ruocco at rruocco@bcba.org to coordinate. Do you have a favorite memory of the Baltimore County Bar Association you would like to share? Or maybe a funny story? Email those too. The BCBA Historical Committee is hard at work on a yearbook to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Baltimore County Bar Association and your photos and stories will make great additions.

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PRO BONO SERVICES & COVID - HOW YOU CAN HELP By Marissa Joelson

As the incoming Chairperson of the BCBA Pro Bono Committee, I have been considering ways in which Baltimore County attorneys can best respond to the critical Pro Bono needs of our community, particularly in this time of financial downturn and uncertainty, and amidst social distancing restrictions and the necessary limitations on in-person contact. Early on in this pandemic, many of us were able to convert our existing offices to “home offices” and the transition was surprisingly quite seamless. We got used to the remote technology and cloud-based software systems while mastering videoconference platforms. We were fortunate that we had the ability to transition almost every aspect of our work environment to suit our professional needs in an effort to continue our businesses safely in as uninterrupted fashion as is possible. Unfortunately, we know the reality for many people under COVID has not been as fortunate. Due to the pandemic, local businesses have had to close their doors with a multitude of layoffs in the retail and hospitality sectors, the parts of our population that suffer from physical, mental health and substance abuse problems have had interrupted access to healthcare, and elderly and lower-income families do not have access to the resources they need for essentials – all of which affects every aspect of the legal ties that holds our society together. We have learned that there has been an increase in domestic abuse and the inability to make child support payments. There is a coming wave of evictions due to the aforementioned job losses. The legal needs multiply while people are unable to pay for even initial consultations related to evictions, wrongful terminations, denial of health care, and other related concerns. In response, many of us have been thoughtful in making food bank donations and making PPE for those in need. However, I believe there is more we can do as a legal community… We are a sector of service providers. Financial constraints and social distancing have limited our community’s access to much needed legal assistance. THE ADVOCATE

This means that, more than ever, there is a huge need for legal assistance. While Baltimore County has a variety of wonderful pro bono programs that provide legal services and information to nonrepresented individuals, we must begin to tailor these resources to meet the needs of our community remotely. In the pre-COVID era, the BCBA Pro Bono Committee was successful in reaching those in need of legal support and services by way of programs such as “Lawyer in the Lobby” and pro bono clinics in our public libraries. However, today’s climate has restricted us from planning these in-person events. We are now looking to find ways to leverage technology and share strategies that will improve access to justice for all our underserved communities. This will have to be a collective effort from practitioners across specialties, as we look to provide remote access to lawyers specializing in family law, health care, bankruptcy, housing, immigration, elder law, and criminal defense, among others. As the incoming Committee chair, I have been provided a list of the existing BCBA Pro Bono Committee members. Ideally, I would like to compile a list of additional attorneys who specialize in the areas of family law, landlord/tenant law, immigration, elder law, bankruptcy, and criminal defense, as well as any other areas that routinely assist members of our underprivileged community, and who are willing and able to dedicate a small portion of their time to providing legal advice during the ongoing COVID crisis. The Pro Bono Committe its Planning Meeting on August 20, 2020 at 4:30 p.m. by Zoom. I anticipate discussing the option of a “call-in” phone line at that time, as well as any other suggestions to effectively provide legal services to our community during the pandemic and ways to advertise these services. If you are willing Please contact me at mjoelson@lawpga.com for the Zoom link information or with any suggestions on how we can effectively provide pro bono services remotely.

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TOM RIES RECEIVES BEVERLY GRONER AWARD By Mary R. Sanders

American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and the Maryland State Bar, Family and Juvenile Law Section. He is generous with his time volunteering to present before the Baltimore County, Maryland and National Family Law Bars on topics ranging from Tax in Divorce, Bankruptcy in Divorce, Business Issues, Retirement Benefits, Marital property issues, Drafting Effective Agreements, etc.. Tom’s breadth of knowledge regarding Family Law matters is extensive.

Thomas C. Ries, renown family law practitioner, has been honored this year by being awarded the Maryland State Bar Association, Family & Juvenile Law Section prestigious Beverly Ann Groner Award. This award is given annually to a lawyer who has served the Maryland legal community through his dedication to the practice of family law and has exemplified the highest professional standards during a distinguished career. Past recipients include a list of the Whose Who of Family Law, including Judge John Fader and 9 other Judges, a State Senator, a State Delegate, and other well-known attorneys. Tom checks every box for this award and is a deserving awardee!

The list of awards and accolades that Tom has received over the years is impressive. He has been included in the Best Lawyers in America and named Baltimore Family Law “Lawyer of the Year” in both 2010 and 2014. He is an AV5+ attorney and a long term Super Lawyer. He, along with Judge Cynthia Callahan have taken over writing the quintessential Family Law treatise Fader’s Maryland Family Law, which has helped every family law attorney doing research. Tom is a mentor and friend to many, including me. He will always pick up the phone if you have a question, or problem and offer sound advice. I think we should all thank Tom for his contributions to the Family Law Bar and congratulate him on this well deserved award.

I first met Tom Ries in 1987 at Frank, Bernstein, Conaway and Goldman where he was working with Ann Turnbull and I was a law clerk. I was impressed by his professional, yet pleasant manner. He was an encyclopedia of family law cases, and was always willing to help, mentor and advise. Over the last 34 years, I have worked with Tom on cases and been against him on many. He is always the consummate professional, trying to find a resolution to difficult family law issues. “A Prince among lawyers” is how Tom has been described by his peers in the Bar. He is practical, respectful and creative when it comes to resolving cases.

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS!

Tom has served in leadership positions for many organizations, including being the Chair of the

Thomas Hale

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Law Students Michael Blanchard 2-5 Years Nicholas J. Pappas Larry Rogers 6-plus years

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YOUR AD COULD BE HERE! Contact Rachel Ruocco at rruocco@bcba.org or 410-337-9103 for advertising rates THE ADVOCATE

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Baltimore County Bar Association

Presort Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 1262 Baltimore, MD

100 County Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue Towson, MD 21204-4491 410-337-9103-Telephone 410-823-3418-Facsimile www.bcba.org

Member Advertisements CATONSVILLE. Office space available; 1007 Frederick Road; one to four rooms. Prime location along Frederick Road with signage. Call 410-744-3256

TOWSON. 2536.

Nicely furnished office space with parking, half block from circuit court. Pete McDowell 410-960-

TOWSON. Furnished office available in beautifully appointed suite in the heart of Towson. Use of conference room and other amenities. Contact Susan at 410-583-7007. TOWSON. Second floor office for rent with space available for admin/secretary. On site parking with shared conference room. Email nfick@neurolaw.com or call 410-321-5000 if interested. TOWSON. Small firm in Towson looking for an experienced part-time legal assistant/secretary two to three days a week. Any experienced candidates should contact Robert Jacobson at 410-583-8883. TOWSON. 303 W. Pennsylvania Avenue, Towson across Bosley Avenue from the Circuit Court Building, three offices with bathroom on the second floor, 3rd floor four offices available, conference room, bathroom and kitchen on first floor, free parking space available, rent negotiable $50 to $100 less than comparable spaces. $400-$500 per office, great satellite office with possibility of overflow work. Contact Joe Glass at 410-823-4214 or 410-790-1980. CATONSVILLE. Office Space for Rent. Catonsville, 1002 Frederick Road, 2nd floor office. Private entrance, semi private restroom, use of conference room and kitchen on first floor. Free parking. Would be a great satellite office. Please contact Lou Weinkam, Jr. at 410-744-3256 ext. 103. TOWSON. 309 Allegheny Avenue. 2nd floor offices with private restroom, 3 regular offices, partially furnished, 1 executive office (can be made into five offices) fully furnished. Private restroom. Tenant will have available to them a conference room, print/scan/fax center and kitchenette on 1st floor. Additionally, 2nd floor has 2 private entrances, 5 free parking spaces, and approximately 800 sq. ft. of combined dry/secure storage on 3rd floor and basement. TOWSON. Sublease available one block from courthouse. Space in excellent condition. Spacious conference rooms, 34 offices, reception area, copy/supply room, and kitchen. Sublease until August, then take on new lease. Rent negotiable. Contact towsonfirm@gmail.com to schedule a tour or get more information.

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Profile for Baltimore County Bar Association

Advocate July-August 2020  

Advocate July-August 2020  

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