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THE ADVOCATE Newsletter of The Baltimore County Bar Association VOLUME XXVIII, NO. 8

February 2019

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE by Rebecca A. Fleming I am sure most of you realize this, but I write these messages at least a few weeks before you read them. At the time that I write this message we are in day twenty-six (26) of the government shutdown. For the first twenty days or so I was unaware that this shutdown would affect something so important to so many of us – access to justice. I was speaking with a friend who told me that at a certain date he would become “furloughed” because his company is working pursuant to contract with the Federal District Court to create a website and videos to promote mediation. The funding for that contract will stop if the government does not re-open. During that conversation he also mentioned the cases that will be affected by the shutdown. Right now the federal courts have enough funds to pay its employees for a little more than a week. The federal courts are desperately

trying to remain fully operational, and for two weeks in a row the federal court system has found enough funds to continue to pay its employees for seven days. Additional funding has been secured through “aggressive efforts to reduce expenditures,” according to a statement issued by the U.S. Courts system on January 16th. As the federal courts have some funds that do not come from congressional appropriations, those funds have been utilized to remain operational. The efforts include delaying or deferring expenses, such as new hires, travel and some contracts, like the one that employs my friend. The stated date upon which the courts will run out of funds has changed twice. It has gone from January 11th to January 18th, and it currently sits at January 25th.

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Inside This Edition Bench/Bar Update Calendar of Events Committee News Court Notices District Ct Assignments Judge Levitz Portrait Law Library News Member Ads MDEC Presentation Member News Memorial Service Portrait Committee Professionalism Save the Date flyer Stephanie Medina

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6 3 28 4 4 14 18 34 7 26 10 20 8 23 16

Vallit Dispute & Valuation Advisors THE ADVOCATE

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February 2019


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE by Rebecca A. Fleming According to the statement of the courts, the judiciary will continue its efforts to cut costs in its mission to sustain operations, however, at some point the existing funds will simply run out. Although it is expected that criminal cases will continue to be heard if the funds lapse, many federal courts have already begun to delay civil cases. It is unclear how possible furloughs would impact other court operations and deadlines. The U.S. Attorney’s Office is expected to begin furloughing its staff. U.S. Attorney BJay Pak has vowed that public policy will not be compromised, and lawyers specializing in criminal cases and terrorism would continue to work, but without pay. Office of the Federal Public Defender, the federal counter-part to the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, has stated that it has enough funds to pay its lawyers and staff through the end of January. If the government shutdown does not end by January 25th, court employees will stop receiving paychecks. This would apply to the entire federal court system – the appeals courts, the district courts, and the bankruptcy courts. In addition, jurors who are called to hear federal cases would not get paid. It is possible that the federal courts could close if the shutdown drags on. In anticipation of the shutdown continuing into February, the Justice Department has already begun to request delays in many civil cases. While there are obvious immediate impacts if the federal courts shut down, most of the attorneys reading this will also realize that when Washington pats itself on the back for re-opening the government and makes bold statements about the instant result they have brought about, the reality is that re-opening the federal courts would not be accomplished by the stroke of a pen. Think of how chaotic it is when our local courts have to deal with a one or two day weather related closure.

closures, Sara Sternberg Greene, an associate professor at Duke University School of Law, stated that “Civil courts and bankruptcy courts are just really overburdened as it is. We are going to see a major backlog and courts trying to deal with how to reschedule and how to fit this all in. That is going to be a major problem.” On January 16, 2019 the President of the ABA, Bob Carlson, issued this statement: The American Bar Association is deeply concerned about the effects of the partial federal shutdown, especially on our federal courts and the administration of justice. We call on Congress and the administration to reach a solution that, at the very least, funds agencies not directly implicated in the controversy over a border wall. The federal judiciary is essential to preserving constitutional democracy and the ABA has long advocated for its full and adequate funding. Due to the shutdown, funds for federal courts will run out next week. Immigration courts, which have no current funding and are already dealing with an 800,000-case backlog, have canceled more than 42,000 hearings, forcing people who have waited years for justice to wait even longer. Keeping our courts open and running is not a political issue. Rather, it is essential to the protection of due process and the rule of law. I am not sure what the state of the world is as you read this today, but my hope is that this shutdown is now a thing of the past, and if it is still ongoing, I hope that all of us can find a way, through our work as attorneys or otherwise, to help to alleviate the pressure that this political theatre has put on our fellow citizens.

In discussing the possibility of federal court THE ADVOCATE

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February 2019


C ALENDAR

2018-19 Officers President Pres-Elect Secretary Treasurer

OF

E VENTS

Rebecca A. Fleming Michael W. Siri Jay D. Miller Stanford G. Gann, Jr.

Executive Council John G. Turnbull III Lisa Y. Settles Sondra M. Douglas Richard Grason VI Robert K. Erdman, Jr. Tyler J. Nowicki

Adam T. Sampson, Immediate Past President Craig R. Borchers, Young Lawyers Chair

The Advocate Ari J. Kodeck Committee Chair Adam E. Konstas Committee Vice -Chair

Contributing Writers Michael Barranco Craig R. Borchers Thomas Bostwick Suzanne K. Farace Bruce E. Friedman Ceecee Paisz Aidan F. Smith Carolyn Thaler Alexander Walsh Martha K. White Matt Wyman

The Advocate is a monthly publication of the Baltimore County Bar Association informing its members about current events relating to law. Articles do not necessarily reflect the official position of the BCBA and publication does not constitute an endorsement of views expressed. The contents of advertisements are the responsibility of the advertisers and are not recommendations or endorsements by The Advocate.

February 2019 5. 5. 7. 12. 13. 14. 14. 14. 18. 19. 19. 20. 20. 27. 28.

CLE, 5pm, Grand Jury Room, How to Build a $1 Million Practice Pro Bono Committee Meeting, 5 pm, Women’s Law Center, 305 W. Chesapeake Ave, Towson Criminal Law, 5pm, Grand Jury Room, 4th Amendment Family Law, 12pm, Grand Jury Room, Parenting Coordination Lawyer in the Lobby Clinic, 4:30 —6:30 pm Bench/Bar Meeing, 8am, Courtroom #15 Bar Foundation Meeting, 3:30 p.m., Ceremonial Courtroom #5 Stated Meeting, 4:30, Ceremonial Courtroom #5 Courts and Bar Office Closed, Presidents’ Day Estates & Trusts, 5pm, Grand Jury Room, Fiduciary Responsibility Family Law, 6pm, Liberatore’s, 9515 Deereco Rd, Timonium, Collecting on Judgements Historical Committee Meeting, BCBA Mezzanine Offices Young Lawyers, 5pm, Grand Jury Room, Growing Your Practice ADR, 12-2pm, Baltimore City, Mediation Styles Young Lawyers Happy Hour, 5pm, The Point

March 2019 5. 7. 8. 12. 13. 14. 21. 28. 31.

Pro Bono Committee Meeting, 5pm, Women’s Law Center, 305 W. Chesapeake Ave, Towson Criminal Law, 5pm, Grand Jury Room, Cross Examination Portrait Unveiling for Judge John Turnbull, 3:30pm, Courtroom TBD SLLZ, 5pm, CVP, 19 W. Pennsylvania Ave, Towson, Meet the County Council Lawyer in the Lobby Clinic, 4:30 —6:30pm Bench/Bar Meeting, 8am, 4th Floor Conference Room Family Law, 6pm, Sexual Abuse Allegations Professionalism/Young Lawyers, 5pm, CVP, 19 W. Pennsylvania Ave, Towson, Sexual Harassment Young Lawyers Bull & Oyster Roast & Silent Auction, 2 6pm, Towson American Legion

Publication deadline: 10th of the month preceding publication.

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February 2019


COURT NOTICES

MDEC Go Live Date For Baltimore County Tuesday, February 19th, 2019 THE ADVOCATE

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February 2019


MDEC UPDATE MDEC remains on track for our “Go Live” in Baltimore County on February 19, 2019. Registration fairs and local trainings continue, with dates posted on the Bar Association Website. An Attorney Tip Sheet for Circuit Court practices is also posted on the Circuit Court Website, and is available through the Bar Association Website. As both the District Court and the Circuit Court enter the final preparation phase, there are significant demands placed on the staff in our Clerks Offices. In addition to their ongoing work, they are prepping and scanning files. They are attending multi -day trainings to learn the new system. Staff are frequently working overtime to keep as current as possible with normal work flow, and they are gearing up for a three-day push over the President’s Day Weekend. Somehow there is still significant enthusiasm to convert to a new, more efficient system.

expressing gratitude to our staffs for all the hard work that has gone into preparing for this conversion. One final request – please resist the temptation to do a final push of paper filing the week before we “Go Live.” Our clerks will be focused on the conversion and scanning work, so an unusually large batch of paper filings could detract from that focus. Additionally, the on-site assistance available for the weeks following the conversion will be focused on the electronic processing, so the work is more likely to be processed quicker if it is filed in MDEC. Thank you for your patience in the process. Go MDEC! Honorable Dorothy Administrative Judge

J.

Wilson

District Court for Baltimore County

Both courts have entered a phase with reduced dockets, which will continue for a period after we “Go Live” to enable judges and staff to adjust. We anticipate a gradual return to normal scheduling over the month in March. Please be patient as we experience our growing pains. And please join us in

Honorable Kathleen G. Cox Administrative Judge Circuit Court for Baltimore County

MDEC FAQ’s 

FAQ’s and important information regarding e-filing can be found on the Judiciary’s website: http:// www.mdcourts.gov/mdec/efiling.html

MDEC Policies and Procedures: http://mdcourts.gov/mdec/pdfs/manualh5.pdf

Register and e-file (File and Serve): https://maryland.tylerhost.net/

Register and view cases MDODYSSEYPORTAL

Our vendor (Tyler Technologies) technical support line: 800-297-5377 (Monday through Friday, 8 am – 10 pm)

Maryland Judiciary Service Desk: mdcourts@service-now.com

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remotely

(Secure

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Portal):

https://mdecportal.courts.state.md.us/

February 2019


BENCH/BAR UPDATE By Christopher W. Nicholson .MDEC IS COMING! MDEC IS COMING! Yes, if you have not heard, MDEC is coming to Baltimore County, and it goes LIVE on February 19, 2019 for both the Circuit and District Courts. Everyone is working very hard to make it a success in Baltimore County, which is the largest jurisdiction yet to go LIVE. There shall be a Town Hall Meeting on January 17th for Civil/Family Attorneys and a Town Hall Meeting on January 23rd for Criminal Attorneys to discuss MDEC. There are several training programs and educational programs available at no cost. The Clerk’s Office is working hard, including overtime, in preparation for MDEC. The scanning of existing files has begun. As a result, the Clerk’s office is no longer tabbing pleadings in the existing Court Files. The Clerk’s Office made four brochures available, at no cost, regarding: 1. E-filing, 2. E-filing for attorneys, 3. E-filing for State’s Attorney’s Office, and 4. E-filing for the Office of the Public Defender. In other non-MDEC news: Andrew M. Battista was appointed to the Circuit Court for Baltimore County. In addition to Settlement Court, two Judges have been assigned to hear uncontested divorce cases before the end of the year. To schedule the hearing, attorneys are urged to contact the Assignment Office and NOT the Settlement Court. Any Judgment of Absolute divorce signed before the end of the year, shall be docketed before the end of the year as well. For cases before one of the Family Magistrates, attorneys should prepare and bring both a signed Submission for Judgment and a proposed Judgment of Absolute Divorce if they wish the divorce to be finalized prior to year’s end. Interviews are on-going for the Problem-Solving Court Coordinator Position in the District Court. A decision on the position should be made in a couple of weeks. The new Catonsville District is slated for completion in September 2019. A Drug Court and a Mental THE ADVOCATE

Health Court should be approved and up and running sometime in 2019. The District Court will begin testing a Pilot Program of sending Court Notifications to criminal Defendant’s by text message in an effort to reduce the number of FTA’s. Courts entered One hundred and fourteen Extreme Risk Protective Orders throughout the State, with Baltimore County having issued the second highest number of them. Law enforcement commenced the majority of the petitions. Although higher than initially anticipated, the matters proceeded smoothly in Baltimore County. President Fleming noted that here appears to have been a problem with the delivery of the Dues Notices. Even though they were sent out a month early, many Members have not received their Dues Notice. It appears the Dues Notices were mishandled by the Post Office. The Bar Office is working to correct the matter. Emails were sent to Members on December 12th and will continue to be sent. Judge Somerville noted that six new Administrative Law Judges were appointed. They are: Susan Anderson, Mary Pezzulla, Anthony Vittoria, Krystin Richardson, Leigh Walder, and Jocelyn Williams. The portrait of Judge Daniels is complete. A date for his ceremony will be scheduled. The Bench Bar Committee was pleased to have as its Guest Speaker, Senator Bobby Zirkin. Senator Zirkin noted that there is a completely new environment in the Legislature this year. Big changes: new faces, old faces have returned, new committee chairs and new committees. Issues surrounding Medical Marijuana are expected to dominate much of the Legislative session. Other issues that are expected to arise during the Legislative Session are: Overhaul of the Juvenile Justice System; Prison entry and re-entry; Child Support Guidelines; the elimination of adultery as a crime; Cyberbullying; Drunk driving; and Sports betting.

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MARYLAND ELECTRONIC COURTS (MDEC) ATTORNEY SUPPORT PRESENTATION By Emma Twigg Clarke options not actually available in Maryland, causing considerable confusion among several attendees.

On Wednesday, January 9, 2019, a near capacityfilled Court Room Number 12 was filled with young as well as seasoned attorneys seeking information about MDEC, a Judiciary-wide integrated case management system, which will be used by all courts in the Maryland court system. It will go live in Baltimore County on February 19, 2019. Judge John P. Morrissey, Chief Judge of the District Court of Maryland, along with several assistants, presented an informative program to bar members anxious to learn the nuances of the new system. Members packed the jury box, as well as the courtroom itself, and with rapt attention listened as Judge Morrissey walked them through the various steps for registration. He recommended going to www.mdcourts.gov, and then clicking on MDEC à E-Services àand E-Filing. Each attorney must have and register using his/her attorney number.

As the presentation, which lasted just under two hours, progressed there were numerous questions posed and most were answered. Judge Morrissey and his assistants did their best to allay members’ fears and ensure that everyone would be able to navigate the somewhat complex registration procedure. He also suggested that a Webinar session and/or a tutorial be watched so that members can familiarize themselves with the system (see e.g., user guides Odyssey File Card and Serve Site). Members were warned that those who use Hotmail or AOL may have difficulty with the Attorney Information System (AIS) when responding to Pro Bono and IOLTA reporting. Despite some bewilderment caused by a false fire alarm, the presentation successfully concluded, and members were encouraged to attend one of the three registration programs at various locations throughout the county scheduled for January 28, 29 and 30, 2019. At those times, attorneys who have not already registered, will be provided assistance in doing so.

Judge Morrissey and one of his assistants, with a video presentation, showed the various steps to be taken in order to properly register as a firm, member of a firm, or as a solo practitioner. There are two portals to access when filing into the MDEC system: (1) File and Serve - for filing documents; and, (2) the Maryland Judiciary Record Search Portal - to view documents within a case. Note Bene: it is essential to register for both portals in order to access MDEC. A Texas firm, Tyler, was the vendor selected to create the MDEC system, which includes several

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February 2019


THE PROFESSIONAL LAWYER—WHAT TO DO WITH THE ACGUAINTANCE WHO IS UNHAPPY WITH THE REPRESENTATION PROVIDED BY ANOTHER LAWYER By Michael S. Barranco You may find yourself in a situation when a friend or acquaintance starts to complain about the way another lawyer is handling a matter on your friend’s behalf. The complaint could relate to a lack of sufficient or timely communications between the other lawyer and your friend, the perception on the part of your friend that the matter is not receiving sufficient attention by the other lawyer, disagreements between your friend and the other lawyer over strategic decisions being made in the matter, or not uncommonly, unhappiness about the fees being charged by the other lawyer. The situation may be complicated by the fact that in this situation you had referred the friend or acquaintance to the other attorney in the first place, perhaps because the matter was not within the focus of your practice. In a family law case, the situation may be further complicated by emotion, hurt feelings, or anger directed to the opposing party. By complaining to you in this situation, your friend may be seeking legal advice. Your friend may want you to become involved in some way in the case being handled by the other attorney, or may want you to intervene or mediate a disagreement with the other lawyer. Or the friend may simply be venting frustration about an opposing party, the costs of litigation or the legal system in general. Because of the nature of the friendship, you may feel the pull of wanting to be helpful to a friend in need by getting involved. At the same time, you want to respect the attorney-client relationship between the friend and the other attorney, and do not want to interfere with that relationship. What should you do when this happens? Of course, every situation is different and, therefore, there is no single correct answer. However, before THE ADVOCATE

dispensing casual legal advice or jumping into the fray without thought, in many situations the best advice, as a starting point, may be to encourage your friend to clearly communicate the concerns directly to the other lawyer. It could be the case that the other lawyer is unaware, or at least not fully aware, of any dissatisfaction. Many problems and misperceptions can be resolved with better communications between the client (in this case your friend) and the lawyer. If all or most of the communications between your friend and the other lawyer have been by written correspondence or emails, with little direct human interaction, or through support staff of the attorney, you could suggest that your friend call the other attorney directly to discuss the concerns, or have your friend insist on an office consultation with the other attorney. Giving in to the temptation to casually dispense legal advice or intervene in some way could be problematic. First, by doing so, you may inadvertently be creating an attorney-client relationship with your friend, carrying with it the legal and ethical duties and obligations appurtenant to that relationship, when you didn’t intend this to be the case. Secondly, at this point, you are hearing only one side of the story. You may make matters worse in the relationship between your friend and the other attorney, and ultimately make matters worse for your friend, by providing conflicting advice without knowing all the facts. Thirdly, you may be giving advice to your friend which is outside your skill, experience, and competence in violation of Rule 19-301.1, which is why you referred your friend to the other attorney in the first place. If something goes wrong, you may end up harming your relationship with both your friend and the other

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THE PROFESSIONAL LAWYER‌ By Michael S. Barranco attorney to whom you referred the matter, even though you believed your casual advice was wellintentioned and you thought you were just doing your friend a favor. By respecting the role of the other attorney and encouraging better communication as an initial step, you may help your friend without crossing any boundaries.

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February 2019


ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE By Peter M. McDowell Association Past Presidents Clark, Friedman, Gilliss, Gontrum, Nolan, Thompson, and Williams. The Honorable Kathleen Gallogly Cox opened the ceremony by welcoming the family members of the recently departed members of our Bar. She noted “that this is one of the nicest ceremonies that the Bar hosts every year,” as it provides an opportunity to share stories of those members of the Bar we knew and to learn something of those we did not know. Robin Coffin, Deputy State’s Attorney for Baltimore County, offered the invocation quoting God’s prophet On December 11, 2018, the Baltimore County Bar Micha, which encourages that we live our lives “to do Association held its Annual Memorial and justice, to love kindness and to walk humbly with your Recognition Ceremony in the Ceremonial God.” Courtroom in the Old Courthouse to honor those Next, Jennifer Aist, the Chair of the Memorial members who passed away since August 2017. The Committee, introduced the first speaker. ceremony was well attended by family and friends Kelly Krumpe spoke on behalf of the family of W. Lee of the ten members who were honored: W. Lee Thomas. She remarked that Mr. Thomas was humble Thomas, Henry Myerberg, Philip Klein, Ellen and did not like to be recognized. Mr. Thomas started Rosenberg, the Honorable Dana Levitz, Lawrence his law career as a JAG for the U.S. Army and had Melfa, J.R. Francomano, Donna Baust, Kevin attended the University of Maryland School of Law. Kamenetz, and Edward Pinder. Mr. Thomas was one of the founding partners at Seated on the bench were Baltimore County Circuit Royston Mueller and Thomas before he struck out on Court Judges Cox and Norman and Baltimore his own creating W. Lee Thomas, P.A. Part of his County District Court Judge Wilson. The balance of legacy to our community was that he was integral in the Circuit and District Bench were seated in the founding Gilchrist Hospice with Jeanne Vance and jury box, along with Magistrates and retired judges. Ladd Dance and the Milton J. Dance Head and Neck Present at the service were the following – Center, GBMC. Mr. Thomas was a wonderful mentor Baltimore County Circuit Court Judges Cahill, and served his community tirelessly. He was a great Cavanaugh, Finifter, Glass, Hanley, Jakubowski, family man and loyal friend. He loved the law, King, Nagle, and Truffer; Baltimore County District working four days a week before he fell, passing Court Judges Chester, Pate, and Phelps; Retired shortly thereafter at almost age 88. Judges Byrnes and Murphy (Joseph); Magistrates Lee Jacobson was then called to remember his partner, Beck and Farmer; State’s Attorney Scott Henry Myerberg. Mr. Myerberg was raised in Shellenberger; Deputy State’s Attorney John Cox; Northwest Baltimore and attended Boys’ Latin where Clerk of the Court Julie Ensor; Public Defender he played varsity basketball. He attended RandolphDonald Zaremba; Circuit Court Administrator Macon College where he played basketball. Upon Timothy Sheridan; and Baltimore County Bar graduating, he followed his father’s path in law, THE ADVOCATE

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ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE By Peter M. McDowell attending the University of Baltimore School of Law, where he first met Mr. Jacobson. He joined his father’s firm after graduation. Mr. Myerberg loved playing softball in both a law league and the Pikesville Men’s league. Not much of a golfer, he owns the distinction of nonchalantly catching his own tee shot two steps off the tee box. He was married and had two sons. For four years Mr. Myerberg joined the staff of the Attorney Grievance Commission, at one point serving as interim bar counsel. He then moved onto the Law Office of Harold Glaser. For 32 years Mr. Myerberg and Mr. Jacobson practiced law together at their firm, Jacobson and Myerberg, where Mr. Myerberg was able to concentrate his practice in the area of family law. Ms. Aist then read the forwarded words of Stanley Klein memorializing his twin brother, Philip Klein. Philip was a devoted Orioles and Ravens fan. He also loved to travel in the U.S. and Europe until health problems rendered him unable. Philip enjoyed swing dancing and was a very active member in the Masons, achieving Grand Master of St. John’s Lodge. He was known as a very honest man and was dedicated to his law practice. A deeply private man, Philip kept the severity of his prostate cancer private. His deep love of the law kept him working until an hour before being taken to hospital where he passed away four days later. Hal Blatt delivered a loving testimonial of his mother, Ellen Rosenberg. With Ms. Rosenberg, family came first. A busy domestic practitioner, she cooked dinner for her children and husband every night. She often told her family about her clients’ trials and cases at the dinner table. She had an intense passion and conviction regarding her clients’ causes. She believed in kindness above all else. This was demonstrated by her passion for charitable work. Ms. Rosenberg was delighted and sincerely happy whenever a friend, THE ADVOCATE

family member, or acquaintance celebrated a joyous occasion and would reach out to that person. She would give the entirety of her mind, heart and soul to the things that mattered most to her. Hal remembered his mother as “the best mother a son could ever have,” and that he hoped he could be as “perfect a parent” to his children as she had been to him and his sister. Leonard Shapiro spoke about his “buddy,” the Honorable Dana Levitz. He grew up in Northwest Baltimore, graduating from City College in 1966. Mr. Shapiro and Judge Levitz met in school in the first class of UMBC in 1970. Judge Levitz majored in theatre. He always wanted to be a lawyer, a prosecutor, and a judge. As a kid he would watch trails in Baltimore City Circuit Court and “he loved them.” Judge Levitz graduated from law school from the University of Baltimore Cum Laude in the Honor’s Society. He worked briefly in the State’s Attorney Office for Baltimore City before joining the Honorable Sandra A. O’Connor in the Baltimore County State’s Attorney Office. There he became the chief of the circuit court division and chief of the sex crimes unit. His dedication to his craft was unending. Judge Levitz had extraordinary work ethic and handled the most serious cases in the office. Judge Levitz became Deputy State’s Attorney. He also coached the softball team. The “softball team was undefeated and Dana, of course, took full credit.” Judge Levitz became a circuit court judge at the young age of 36. He served for 23 years and finished as a senior judge. After retiring from being a judge, he returned to trying cases in both the district and circuit court.

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February 2019


ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE by Peter M. McDowell Judge Levitz was also an adjunct professor at the University of Baltimore for over 30 years, a board member of the Judicial Institute, a founding member of the Simon Sobeloff Society, and a past president of the Jewish Big Brother and Big Sister League. “But the love of his life was Dale.” They were married for 43 years and “he could not have had a better partner, nor could she.” William Butler paid tribute to his law partner of 37 years, Lawrence Melfa. After graduating number one from his high school class, Mr. Melfa attended Harvard, where he graduated number two in his class. While at Harvard he quarterbacked the football team and pitched for the baseball team – once pitching a one hitter against Yale. Mr. Melfa went into the service and graduated from the University of Maryland School of Law. Mr. Melfa was also an excellent tennis player and won the Mid-Atlantic Doubles Championship with his partner. His athletic prowess did not extend to golf. He once hit a tee shot which landed in the basket of Judge Sicone’s golf cart. At one time or another, all three of Mr. Melfa’s children worked at their law firm. Mr. Melfa was a devoted father whose pride was in his children. He was a man who would help anyone who came to him, family, friends, or anyone in need of counseling. He possessed a great sense of humor and was a great law partner. James Francomano spoke on behalf of his brother, J.R. Francomano. J.R. had four loves in his life: family, the law, good food, and humor. J.R. started his career as an Assistant State’s Attorney in Harford County but transferred to Baltimore County. He was regarded as a fierce prosecutor. After he retired from the Baltimore County State’s Attorney Office, he worked tirelessly for his clients. He tried complex cases in both state and federal court. J.R. like to play a game that he referred to as THE ADVOCATE

“hurty ball” which is described as a game of a humorous one-line burn. There are two rules: no timeouts and everyone is always playing. He was a dedicated husband and father who is sorely missed. On behalf of Donna Baust, Ms. Aist read the words forwarded by Jen Berkowitz. Ms. Berkowitz met Ms. Baust at school 13 years ago and they became the best of friends. Ms. Baust was a strong, outspoken and big hearted person. She always spoke the absolute truth and was grounded, determined and hard working. Ms. Baust loved her family, animals, and the water, which brought her “clarity.” Ms. Berkowitz and Ms. Baust graduated with paralegal degrees together and Ms. Baust went on to achieve her dream of becoming an attorney. Ms. Baust found her dream job of working in wills and estates and loved being voice for people who would not speak for themselves. Despite falling ill herself, Ms. Baust expressed more concern for her friends than for herself. Ms. Baust was the “best friend” one could have had. “She was one of a kind.” Arnold Jablon spoke on behalf of his friend, Kevin Kamenetz. Mr. Kamenetz started his career as a city prosecutor and ultimately moved into politics. “Half of his life was as an elected official. He only had one interest in his heart and that was the citizens of the county.” Mr. Kamenetz served on the State Central Committee, the County Council for 16 years and 8 years as County Executive for Baltimore County. He made the decision to run for governor against Governor Hogan. Mr. Jablon told Mr. Kamenetz that he was “nuts.” He implored Mr. Kamenetz to go into private practice and “make a lot of money.” But Mr. Kamenetz wanted to serve the public. So he ran for governor. Mr. Kamenetz made into the democratic primary. Sadly, he suddenly passed away just before the election. Mr. Kamenetz’s unexpected and untimely passing awakened in Mr. Jablon that: “Every moment counts. Every day counts. Your family counts.” The final speaker was Jason Plotkin who remembered

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ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE by Peter M. McDowell his law partner, Edward Pinder. Mr. Pinder was a plaintiff’s attorney for over 30 years and was nicknamed Edward “Strong Like Bull” Pinder. Mr. Pinder was married and had two children. He coached softball to countless young women in Baltimore County. He taught his players the value of self-confidence, teamwork, and compassion. He was honored to receive the Volunteer of the Year Award for the Maryland State Bar Association and in tribute to his lifelong service he was honored with having a softball field in Baltimore County at Belmont Park named after him. Mr. Pinder was the founder of the Pinder Plotkin Legal Team. He balanced family, a thriving legal practice and volunteering in the community perfectly. Mr. Pinder could turn almost any case into a “show tune.” He was a seven-year cancer survivor. “He fought each second of each minute of each hour of each day. He lived the ‘strong like bull’ mantra.” The Honorable Mickey J. Norman then spoke on behalf of the Bench to remember their former colleague Judge Dana M. Levitz. Affectionately referred to as “the Big Man,” he recalled how as a trial lawyer Judge Levitz could take complete command of the courtroom. Judge Levitz’s manner was one of complete confidence in his skill and ability. He was equally passionate whether arguing before a judge or a jury, Judge Levitz’s tone, inflection and every gesture was orchestrated to paint a picture in words every bit as vividly as if painting a portrait. Judge Levitz summoned every form of communication that served his purposes, employing subtle, and sometimes not so subtle elements of theatre to punctuate and dramatize his story, and a great story teller he was. He was also a natural teacher providing lessons about trial work, law and life. Once the butt of a joke himself, Judge Levitz advised Judge Norman that life should be taken seriously, but not to take yourself too THE ADVOCATE

seriously. Judge Norman concluded: “I will be forever grateful for his friendship and guidance.” Ms. Aist then returned to the podium to thank all of the speakers, all those in attendance, the members of the Memorial and Recognition Committee, and Rachel Ruocco, the executive director of the Bar Association. She then moved that proceedings be transcribed and be adopted as part of the official record of the Court in the Baltimore County Bar Association and that the transcription be presented to the family members of the Honorees. After Judge Cox granted the motion, she introduced Rebecca Fleming, the president of the Baltimore County Bar Association. President Fleming echoed all that had previously been said and thanked the assembled for attending the ceremony. She also thanked the BCBA sponsors who made the reception following the ceremony possible, and then invited the assembled to join her at the reception. The proceeding was adjourned and the Baltimore County Bar Association Memorial Service for Members of the Bar Who Passed Away Since August 2017 was concluded. The post ceremony reception on the ground floor of the Circuit Court for Baltimore County was well attended and more stories and memories were shared.

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JUDICIAL PORTRAIT UNVEILING FOR JUDGE DANA M. LEVITZ By Robin S. Coffin On 12/14/2018, Courtroom 2 was crowded with the friends and family of the late Honorable Dana Mark Levitz for Judge Levitz’s portrait unveiling. In attendance were nine of his former law clerks, two of his former court reporters, a former court clerk, his former law clerk from while serving in the State’s Attorney’s Office, a former co-worker, Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger and his one and only judicial assistant, Janis Crew. Judge Vicki BallouWatts provided opening remarks. Judge Watts reminded us that in 2004, she ran for retention on the same slate as Judge Levitz. This was part of what forged their friendship, but it was also their common thirst to learn new things and their ability to see cultural, ethnic and religious differences not as a barrier, but as a bridge. Ephraim Siff, the last law clerk of Judge Levitz, shared how lucky he was to have worked for Judge Levitz and that Judge Levitz frequently reminded him of this. Anyone who ever worked for Judge Levitz knew him simply as “The Judge”. But truly the relationship between Ephraim and “The Judge” was lucky for both of them. It forged an amazing bond. Ephraim noted that after 43 years of serving the County, “The Judge” was returning to the place he loved, the Courthouse. Steve Tully was Judges Levitz’s law partner and one of his best friends. Steve shared the spirt of “The Judge”: In everything Judge Levitz loved, he loved it “The Best!” “The Judge” would share his culinary discoveries and declared them “The Best” in the world. Once “The Judge” declared this so, revenues sky rocketed at restaurants, because people listened to “The Judge”. “The Judge” loved the courtroom, whether as a prosecutor or as a judge he always gave a command performance. “The Judge” majored in drama in college and it was during this time that two great things happened in his life. He mastered the art of drama, which would serve him well THE ADVOCATE

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JUDICIAL PORTRAIT UNVEILING FOR JUDGE DANA M. LEVITZ By Robin S. Coffin for the rest of his career. He also met his future wife, Dale, who was the love of his life. “The Judge” was always looking for a new adventure, whether it was a bus trip to New York to see the “BEST” play, a cruise to the Caribbean on the “BEST” ship or opening borders with a Russian Judge. Everyone would agree that his adventures were a great success with the exception of the Russian Judge incident. “The Judge” invited this Russian Judge to Baltimore to show the best of the American judicial system and the best of Maryland. You can’t be the foodie that Judge Levitz’s was and not invite the visitor to the “Best” restaurant to dine on Maryland’s hard shelled crabs. Indeed, this could and would have been an amazing introduction into American cuisine, until Judge Levitz discovered the Russian Judge only had one arm. Needless to say this incident didn’t improve diplomatic relations.

There was a theme throughout this ceremony: “The Judges’” great capacity to live life to the fullest. With a larger than life presence in and out of the courtroom and his soft side for those he loved, it was clear who he loved the most…Dale. Dale made sure that when you see his portrait, you will see his spirt. A twinkle in his eyes that expressed that love of life and love of justice. “The Judge” will remain in the hallowed venue of a place he loved and be-

The portrait was unveiled by Dale Levitz and the artist, Lisa Egeli. The crowd let out an audible gasp and everyone in attendance marveled at the quality of the portrait and the fact that Ms. Egeli captured the true spirit of “The Judge”. Judge Ruth Jakubowski responded on behalf of the bench. She shared that “The Judge” approached her at her investiture and said he was willing to help her as she learned the new job. “The Judge” told her to call anytime with a question and he was true to his word, interrupting his trial to help with her trial. Judge Jakubowski spoke of his role as a mentor and his inspiration for her to act in kind to new judges to the bench. Anyone who worked for and with him knew his love of the role of mentor. He always had great advice. To Ephraim, “always do the right thing”. To Judge Jakubowski, “make a decision, move on and don’t look back”. Judge Jakubowski also spoke of “The Judge’s” soft side, making him one of the girls. A compliment that he loved. THE ADVOCATE

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STEPHANIE MEDINA—DEPUTY COURT ADMINISTRATOR By Ari J. Kodeck Having cut her teeth in the Circuit Court for Baltimore City as the Deputy Court Administrator, Baltimore County became a natural transition for her. Ms. Medina hails from Belize, Central America and studied in Hawaii for her undergraduate degree and then moved to Pennsylvania for graduate studies. Asked why she ever left Hawaii, Ms. Medina’s response was obvious: because of the amazing weather of the Mid-Atlantic region and the wonderful Baltimore County attorneys! Actually, her schooling brought her to the area, along with the location of her family. Ms. Medina loves to travel and spent three (3) years working for the Belize Red Cross; she represented the Belize Red Cross at various international meetings and conferences in Central America, the Caribbean and Europe.

Triage. Most of us consider that term in a medical context. However, for the new Deputy Court Administrator, Stephanie A. Medina, triage is all in a day’s work. Ms. Medina, who comes to the Circuit Court for Baltimore County by way of the Circuit If you find yourself on the fourth floor on the Court for Baltimore City, is well versed in managing courtyard side of the courthouse, stop in and various administrative aspects of the Court. She is welcome Ms. Medina to our fair county! responsible for leading and directing program development and operations. Ms. Medina provides supervision to departmental managers in areas such as: family and civil law, family support services, mediation, permanency planning, and juvenile drug court. She is also tasked with streamlining court policies and procedures. Additionally, she assists the Court Administrator in budget and fiscal planning, human resources management, and continuity of operations planning. As expected, most of Ms. Medina’s resources are currently devoted to the MDEC rollout.

Mark Your Calendar! Wednesday, May 29

BCBA Golf Tournament

Eagle’s Nest Country Club

Ms. Medina is well suited for this position. She is a graduate of the National Center for State Courts Institute for Court Management program where she earned the prestigious, national Certified Court Executive credential. Ms. Medina also has two master’s degrees, one in Criminology and the other in Organization Development and Leadership. THE ADVOCATE

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Phoenix, MD

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BALTIMORE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT LAW LIBRARY NEWS MDEC at the Law Library

New Titles

The Law Library staff will be available to help ease your entry into the world of e-filing both before and after MDEC’s launch on February 19. Some of the services you can expect at the library include:

The following titles were added to the Law Library’s collection:

Accessing your MDEC Portal (for File and Serve)

Viewing case documents in Kiosk mode

Scanners for importing your documents to your USB drive

Assistance saving your Word documents to a useable PDF

FREE access to West and Lexis for your legal research needs

As always computer prints and photocopies are 25 cents per page.

Opposing the Adverse Expert: A Comprehensive Guide for Every Stage of Litigation by Stephen Easton – ABA, 2018. KF 8961 .E17 Parenting Plans: Meeting the Challenges with Facts and Analysis by Daniel Hynan, PhD – ABA, 2018. KF 547 .H97 Probate Inventory and Final Accounting by Elizabeth Goldberg, et al – NBI, 2018. KFM 1344 .G65 The Sources of Public-Private Partnerships for Security and Resilience 2018: A Compendium of Laws and Policy Documents by Susan Ginsburg – ABA, 2018. Reinventing Witness Preparation: Unlocking the Secrets to Testimonial Success Kenneth Berman – ABA, 2018 KF 8950 .B47

If you have not received your 2019 BCBA Dues Invoice, please contact the Bar Office immediately. Invoices were sent out to all members at the end of October, but it was brought to our attention that a large number of members did not receive theirs. Call Rachel Fuller at 410-337-9100 x106 or email her at rfuller@bcba.org if you have any questions or if you did not receive yours.

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Lawyer in the Lobby Clinic Wednesday, February 13 4:30—6:30 p.m. County Courts Building, 1st Floor, 401 Bosley Ave, Towson Lawyer in the Lobby is held the 2nd Wednesday of every month. Walk-ins are assisted in General Civil and Family Law matters. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Rae Wyatt at rwyatt@bcba.org or 410-337-9100. Thank you to our volunteers for February: Richard Lebovitz James Nolan, Jr. E. David Silverberg Eric Steiner

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Committee News ADR COMMITTEE February 27, 12-2pm, Baltimore city, Mediation Styles from the Mediator, Attorney, and Client Perspectives April 9, 5-7pm, Grand Jury Room, Mediator Mindfulness ADVOCATE COMMITTEE Please submit any ideas for articles to Rachel Ruocco at rruocco@bcba.org or Ari Kodeck at akodeck@oag.state.md.us BENCH/BAR COMMITTEE This committee (appointed by the BCBA Presidents) meets the second Thursday of each month, 8 a.m., in Judicial Conference Room 412. If there are issues to be brought to the attention of this committee please contact Chairperson Fred Allentoff, 443-588-0066 or fallentoff@aol.com. CRIMINAL LAW COMMITTEE Date TBD, 5pm, Baltimore County Detention Center Programs, Grand Jury Room. February 7, 5pm, 4th Amendment, Grand Jury Room March 7, 5pm, Effective Cross Examination, Grand Jury Room CLE COMMITTEE February 5, 5pm, How to Build a Million Dollar Practice, Grand Jury Room April 23, 5pm, Accounting & Bookkeeping for Lawyers ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE May 29, 12pm, Golf Tournament, Eagle’s Nest Country Club ESTATES & TRUSTS COMMITTEE February 12, 5pm, Fiduciary Responsibilities, Grand Jury Room May 21, 5pm, Annual Dinner

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FAMILY LAW COMMITTEE February 12, 12pm, Brown Bag Lunch on Parent Coordinators, Grand Jury Room February 19, 6 pm, Collecting on Judgements, Liberatore’s Restaurant March 21, 6pm, Sexual Abuse Allegations, Woodholme Country Club April 17, 6pm, Multi Jurisdictional Dinner May 16, 5 pm, Legislative Update & Happy Hour, Grand Jury Room HISTORICAL COMMITTEE February 20, 5pm, Committee Meeting, BCBA Mezzanine Offices LAW DAY COMMITTEE May 1, 7:30 am, Breakfast May 1, Noon Ceremony, Ceremonial Courtroom #5 This year’s theme is Free Speech, Free Press, Free Society Nominations are being sought for the Law Day Award and the Judith P. Ritchie Award. Nominations must be submitted in writing to the Bar Association Office no later than 4:30 P.M. on Friday, January 4th. Each nomination should include information in support of the candidate. Nominations will be reviewed by the committee for recommendations and forwarded to the Executive Council for selection. Awards will be presented at the Law Day Noon Ceremony on May 1st. Law Day Award Criteria are: 1. Bar Association Member 2. Impact on the status or administration of the law 3. Participated in bar related activities over the course of several years 4. Service to the Bar Association over the course of several years Judith P. Ritchie Award Criteria are: 1. Bar Association member. 2. Significant constructive impact on Bar Association activities during the past year. 3. Largely unrecognized for these efforts. 4. Adding to the proficiency, respect and reputation of the Bar Association.

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Committee News LRIS COMMITTEE Please renew or consider joining the LRIS at this time. Application can be found on the website: LRIS Application. Contact Rae Wyatt at rwyatt@bcba.org or 410-337-9100 for more information.

April 27, 9am-1pm, Pro Bono Day, Woodlawn Library

The 2018-2019 LRIS Panel Registration and Renewal Packet is now available. Join now! Current panel members, remember to renew!.

PUBLIC AWARENESS & SPEAKERS COMMITTEE AKA CIVICS & LAW ACADEMY Civics & Law will resume in the Fall of 2019. Please contact Rachel Ruocco if you are interested in participating.

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE Online Membership Application can be found here MEMORIAL COMMITTEE Please notify Rachel Ruocco at the Bar Office of the passing of any BCBA member. If this information is received in a timely manner, it will be emailed to all members. Thank you. BCBA members who will be honored at next year’s service on November 21, 2019 at 3:30 p.m. If you know of any BCBA Member who passed away (since August 15, 2018), please advise Rachel Ruocco immediately, so they can be included in the service. Thank you. The reception for family and friends to honor and remember loved ones will be held immediately following the service.

PROFESSIONALISM COMMITTEE March 28, 5pm, Sexual Harassment, CVP, Towson

REAL PROPERTY COMMITTEE Stay tuned for programming news. SOLO & SMALL FIRM COMMITTEE Stay tuned for programming news. STATE & LOCAL LAWS (SLLZ) COMMITTEE March 12, 5pm, CVP, Towson, Meet the County Council April, SLLZ Annual Dinner TECHONOLGY COMMITTEE Stay tuned for programming news

YOUNG LAWYERS COMMITTEE Bull & Oyster Roast, March 31, 2-6 pm, Towson Monetary contributions are greatly appreciated to American Legion contact Craig Borchers at support the Memorial Reception, and can be made **Please craigb@towsonfamilylaw.com or Whitney Wilder at payable to the BCBA, 100 County Courts Building, 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, MD 21204. Donors will wwilder@bodie-law.com if you are interested in helping out with the Bull and Oyster Roast. We be acknowledged on the printed program. need many hands to make this a successful event. NEGLIGENCE, INSURANCE & WORKERS’ COMP Last Thursday Happy Hour COMMITTEE 5pm, The Point, 523 York Rd, Towson. Come join Stay tuned for programming news. young lawyers, judicial law clerks, and a special monthly guest to relax and network. PRO BONO COMMITTEE February 5, 5pm, Committee Meeting, Women’s Law February 28 March 28 Center, 305 W. Chesapeake Ave. March 5, 5pm, Committee Meeting, Women’s Law April 25 May 30 Center, 305 W. Chesapeake Ave. April 2, 5pm, Committee Meeting, Women’s Law June 27 Center, 305 W. Chesapeake Ave. May 7, Committee Meeting, Women’s Law Center, 305 W. Chesapeake Ave. THE ADVOCATE

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MEMBER NEWS New Partners Elected at Whiteford Taylor & Preston David M. Stevens focuses his practice primarily on labor and employment matters. He advises businesses on a broad range of human resources and compliance issues, in addition to representing employers in employment-related litigation, including claims involving federal and state wage statutes, antidiscrimination laws and restrictive covenants. He has also represented employers in connection with union organizing campaigns and in proceedings before the National Labor Relations Board. Mr. Stevens is based in the firm’s Baltimore, Maryland, office.

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Morgan Carlo Downs and Ward & Herzog merge to form Downs Ward Bender Hauptmann & Herzog, P.A. Law firms Morgan Carlo Downs and Ward & Herzog have merged to form Downs Ward Bender Hauptmann & Herzog, P.A., effective Jan. 1, 2019. The merger fosters the expansion of services and growth of both firms. The women-owned firm is located in Hunt Valley, practices in Maryland, the District of Columbia and Virginia and represents clients nationwide Partners in Downs Ward Bender Hauptmann & Herzog, P.A., are Mary Alane Downs, Margaret Fonshell Ward, Steffany K. Bender, Robin E. Hauptmann, Karen M. Herzog, Morrisann Martin and Christian W. Kintigh.

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MEMBER NEWS Renee Bronfein Ades joins Wright, Constable & Skeen as a Partner in the Family Law Group

Ms. Ades focuses her practice on family law with individuals seeking a divorce, pre-nuptial agreements, custody and other related issues. Her clients, colleagues and referral sources know her to be a problem solver crafting creative solutions to complex issues. She has held leadership positions in various bar associations and was on the Governor’s Commission on Child Custody Decision Making, which met for a year culminating in a comprehensive report on its findings.

Have you moved? Added a partner to your firm? Received an award? Have other news to share? Email it to Rachel Ruocco at rruocco@bcba.org and we will include it in The Advocate.

Mark Your Calendars! Maryland Lawyers’ Day of Service April 27 Join us as we serve the homeless inBaltimore County More information to be included in the March and April issues of The Advocate ASSOCIATION SPONSORED GROUP DENTAL PLAN OFFERED BY ICS-INSURANCE Did you know that we are currently offering an Association Sponsored Group Dental plan through Dominion Dental? Association plans enable us to enhance the benefits of being a member of the BCBA. These plans would allow us to offer group products with more liberal underwriting and potentially lower cost than products available on the individual market. In the past we have offered association sponsored Long Term Care and Life Insurance coverage and are considering investigating the opportunity to offer an association Health Insurance plan. If you have interest in any of the mentioned products, please reach out to Rachel Ruocco, Executive Director 443-652-3228 or send an email to her at rruocco@bcba.org. THE ADVOCATE

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Property for sale in the heart of Timonium/Lutherville, MD Move in ready and perfect for small practice of attorneys. 3,000 sq. feet with additional storage, 4 private offices, conference room, reception area and many more advantages. If you’re paying rent now, why not consider investing instead? Also ideal for shared offices. Listed @ $459,900. Call realtor, Bob Mikelskas @ 410-375-2990 or email him @ bmikelskas@gmail.com for an appointment or questions.

Rosario Realty, 12202 Happy Hollow Road Cockeysville, MD 21030

ARE ALCOHOL AND DRUGS CAUSING PROBLEMS IN YOUR LIFE? There is a way up and a way out — for ABSOLUTELY CONFIDENTIAL help, call us today ... BALTIMORE COUNTY LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM A CONFIDENTIAL resource for Baltimore County attorneys, assistants and judges. Our services include help for a broad range of problems and personal concerns, such as: Gambling Depression Internet Addiction Marital and Family Relationships Sexual Addiction Alcohol and Drug Abuse Compulsive Spending Stress and Burnout Eating Disorders Prescription Drug Concerns Balancing Work and Family Career Concerns WE DO NOT KEEP RECORDS. Our sole purpose is to provide help. We can assist with providing access to treatment facilities and provide emergency practice management, as well as referrals to professional counselors. RICHARD LYNAS, Chair STUART AXILBUND JIM BEACH MARY CHALAWSKY MARISSA JOELSON JAY MILLER JOSE MOLINA SAM MOXLEY JOE MURTHA

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410-288-1099 410-832-7579 410-241-8538 410-649-2000 917-226-6472 410-951-7165 443-851-7353 410-733-3306 410-583-6969

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COOPERATING ATTORNEY PANEL Established, respected Legal Services Fund providing legal benefits to thousands of members seeks Washington D.C. and surrounding vicinity counsel (Virginia and Maryland) practicing in the areas of immigration, civil, criminal, family, divorce, bankruptcy and real estate law (combination or individual areas). Bilingual attorneys a plus. Potential for practice growth. Please contact Joy Khan at: lfadmin@32bjfunds.com and request an information packet.

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YOUR AD COULD BE HERE! Contact Rachel Ruocco at rruocco@bcba.org or 410-337-9100 for advertising rates and to place your ad.

Divorce, or probating an estate. Your client has options when it comes to the real estate. Hawk Mortgage Group can help you and your client sort out the options and strategies they have at hand, to help at this time ‌ and down the road. Jeffrey T. Hawk, President 443-619-7900 - Office 410-241-7071 - Cell Jeff@hawkmortgagegroup.com

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Baltimore County Bar Association

Presort Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 1262 Baltimore, MD

100 County Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue Towson, MD 21204-4491 410-337-9103-Telephone 410-823-3418-Facsimile www.bcba.org

MEMBER ADVERTISEMENTS TOWSON. Sublease available one block from courthouse. Space in excellent condition. Spacious conference rooms, 34 offices, reception area, copy/supply room, and kitchen. Sublease until August, then take on new lease. Rent negotiable. Contact towsonfirm@gmail.com to schedule a tour or get more information. TOWSON. Office for Rent: $990/month for one office with reception area right off the elevator. Located in Towson within walking distance to courthouse. Newly renovated and furnished. $1,200 to add an additional office connected to entire suite. Includes electric, internet and one parking space. For more information email doug@dbmcommunications.com or call 410-825-7400. TOWSON. Three Office Spaces Available: Rent one office, four offices with reception area, or whole floor. Two blocks from circuit courthouse. Free parking. Rent and utilities are negotiable. More info at nicole@whitakerlegal.com or 410-207- 9272. TOWSON. Office sharing available. One block from Courthouse. Use of phone system, copier, fax and secretarial available. Please call Beverly at 410-296-6820. PERRY HALL/NOTTINGHAM. Real Estate Firm is hiring a title processor for residential real estate closings. Some experience in real estate closings, real estate title work and/or residential lending preferred but not required. Salary commensurate with experience; pleasant work environment. Please send resumes to Lisa Eisemann, Esq. at leisemann@mcrllaw.com , or mail to Moore, Carney, Ryan & Lattanzi, L.L.C. Attn: Lisa Eisemann; 9649 Belair Road; Suite 302; Nottingham, MD 21236 REISTERSTOWN. Office(s) available for rent. Includes electric and use of conference room/library, reception area & kitchen. Secretary/paralegal assistance and expense sharing opportunities also available. For more information, call Scott Westerberg at 410-526-7373. TOWSON. Towson office space available to share. Large, windowed office and secretarial space, shared reception area and conference room, copier, internet, etc. available. Free parking and easy access to I-695. Contact Rich Desser at 410-821-5435x104 or dresser@desserlaw.com. TOWSON. Office for rent in the heart of Towson. One block from the Circuit Court. Rent includes one parking space. Available in September 2018. Rent is negotiable. Call 410-494-1494 to schedule a tour. Ask for Dilip.

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Profile for Baltimore County Bar Association

Advocate February 2019  

Advocate February 2019