DAYLIGHTING Magazine issue 29 July/August 2021

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Issue 29 July/August 2021

CLIMATE BASED DAYLIGHT MODELLING A REAL WORLD APPROACH

PLUS:

BUILDING SAFETY ROOFLIGHT SPECIFICATION DESIGNING WITH DAYLIGHT AND MORE


Overhead glazing:

The term ‘toughened’ implies a degree of safety which in the case of rooflights, is misleading – as toughened glass can shatter, putting those beneath a rooflight at risk. For more information, visit:

www.narm.org.uk

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F

Always check this with your supplier, as we are aware that some rooflights are being supplied with toughened glass inner panes: a potential danger.

AZING

AF

OI CE H C E

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For the safety of building occupants, NARM advises that inner panes on all glass rooflights must be laminated glass.

ON LY E H T S

For safety’s sake, check for the tick symbol.

D R O A VERHE

LAMINATED INNER PANE ENDORSED BY

RIBA accredited CPD materials Available

THE TRADE ASSOCIATION REPRESENTING LEADING UK ROOFLIGHT SUPPLIERS


CONTENTS

REGULARS

05

Editor’s Comment

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Industry News

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New Projects

FEATURES

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Climate Based Daylight Modelling A Real World Approach Cieran Towse of MBS Software Ltd takes a real world approach to assessing the quality & quantity of daylight and sunlight rooms within a building will receive

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Building Safety

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NARM Daylight Diary Updates from the UK’s influential trade association for rooflight manufacturers

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Daylighting Icons Piazza Città di Lombardia, Milan

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Twitterings What’s trending on social media?

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A Positive View on the new Building Safety Bill Comment by Jane Embury, Wrightstyle Ltd

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Designing with Daylight How to Channel Light Through a Property Peter Daniel of The Rooflight Company makes a comparison between two different approaches...

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Rooflight Specification Getting Glass Rooflights Right A detailed look at the factors affecting glass rooflight specification, by Nick Henton, Lareine Engineering Ltd

Bennett B2B Ltd Pure Offices Lake View House Tournament Fields Warwick CV34 6RG United Kingdom Please note our new land line telephone number: TEL: +44 (0)1295 750519 EDITOR Paul Bennett paul@daylightingmag.co.uk Mobile: 07900 895110 AD SALES info@bennettb2b.co.uk DESIGN/PRODUCTION info@bennettb2b.co.uk WEBSITE www.daylightingmag.co.uk CIRCULATION Daylighting is available by email, free of charge to subscribers, by logging on at www.daylightingmag.co.uk Free access is also available via our website and social media. Average impressions per issue are approximately 5,500, however this varies according to social media activity. Our readership is predominantly UK architects, specifiers, contractors, consultants and roofing professionals. Full details are available on our website. www.daylightingmag.co.uk

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Access Rooflights

More about DAYLIGHTING Magazine

Luxury, daylit access to the roof terrace By Natalie Goodridge, Lamilux UK Ltd

Back issues, free subscriptions & media information

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Roof Windows KeyliteConnect® brings smart home technology to Keylite roof windows Controlling daylight and ventilation via smart devices

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DAYLIGHTING is published by:

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of content, the publisher does not accept liability for errors. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. This publication contains editorial photographs which may have been supplied and paid for by suppliers.

July/August 2021

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of Monovision flat glass rooflights, our solutions deliver performance & peace-of-mind. Lareine Engineering is a preferred supplier to leading architects, engineers & contractors, with a service that includes in-house design, manufacture, installation and servicing.

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O E CH I CE

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THE UK’S TRUSTED DAYLIGHTING & VENTILATION SPECIALIST Head Office: 01506 448140 Midlands Centre: 01788 579307 E: info@lareineengineering.com www.lareineengineering.com


EDITOR’S COMMENT

Speaking from experience... Despite having spent much of my career extolling the virtues of natural daylight, I have to admit to having lived over the years, in a succession of properties with lower than ideal natural light levels. Until now. Since the last issue, I’ve finally ‘put my money where my mouth is’ and moved to a home in which daylight provision was carefully considered as a key part of its refurbishment by the previous owners. We’re only three weeks in, so it’s too early to talk about longterm experiences or energy performance, but so far, living day-to-day with high levels of controllable daylight & ventilation is a revelation – and I feel justified! On the subject of daylight planning & design, this issue carries an interesting mix of articles, on subjects as diverse

as: Climate-Based Daylight Modelling; the relative merits of rooflights and conservatories; access rooflights for roof terraces; and control of roof windows via ‘smart’ devices. On a more technical level, Nick Henton’s article on glass rooflight specification looks at the key factors to consider as well as some important safety-related issues. On the subject of building safety, The recent publication of the UK Government’s Building Safety Bill has received positive comment from many in the industry, including Jane Embury of advanced glazing systems supplier, Wrightstyle. You can read her article in this issue.

Paul Bennett paul@daylightingmag.co.uk

I hope you’ll find it all interesting reading – and as always, if you have any thoughts or comments, please drop me an email.

Issue 26 January/February 2021

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ENERGY EFFICIENCY HOW ROOFLIGHTS CONTRIBUTE Issue 27 March/April 2021 TO SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN

SMART

...and on’t forget, back issues are always available to read on-line at daylightingmag.co.uk PLUS:

DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS SCHOOLS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

GLASS SWITCHABLE SOLUTIONS FOR LIGHT TRANSMISSION & PRIVACY

PLUS:

CONSERVATION ROOFLIGHTS DAYLIGHT PLANNING FIRE SAFETY LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

Previous issues of DAYLIGHTING Magazine are available on-line indefinitely. So you can refer back to old issues whenever you like, right here: http://www.daylightingmag.co.uk/archives/

July/August 2021

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INDUSTRY NEWS

CITB: Construction will need 216,800 new workers by 2025 to meet demand office-based professional, technical and IT support staff (7,850). However, it’s not all good news - the commercial sector faces significant near-term risks while the public sectors could be impacted by tighter government finances.​Despite this, the CSN forecasts UK output to grow annually at an average rate of 4.4% across 2021-2025.​ CITB Policy Director Steve Radley said:

Construction has bounced back quicker than expected from the Covid-19 pandemic and the industry will reach 2019 levels of output in 2022. By 2025, the industry will need to recruit an additional 217,000 new workers just to meet demand. That’s the forecast of the Construction Skills Network (CSN) 2021-25, published by CITB in June. According to the CSN, most English regions will experience an increase in construction workers by 2025, with East Midlands (1.7%) and West Midlands (1.4%) forecast to lead demand. Scotland (1.4%) and Wales (0.7%) are also predicted to fare well. The only region forecast to see a slight decline in workforce is the North East (-0.1%).

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Major projects such as HS2 are driving growth in some regions and infrastructure (5.2%) and private housing (6.7%) should see the healthiest pace of expansion by 2025. We also expect a growing contribution to come from repair, maintenance and improvement work, as retrofitting existing buildings to meet net zero emissions targets becomes more important. In terms of annual average recruitment requirement (ARR), the most in demand trades are forecast to be in wood trades & interior fit-out (5,500 per year), other construction professionals and technical staff (5,150), construction managers (3,600) and electrical installation trades and (3,400). There will also be a demand for non-construction,

“It’s great to see construction coming back so strongly and creating lots of job opportunities. We need to adopt new approaches to meet these growing skills needs and deliver these quickly. We are working closely with government and FE to build better bridges between FE and work and make apprenticeships more flexible. We are also making significant investments in supporting work experience that make it easier for employers to bring in new blood. “We must also make sure that we invest in the skills that will drive change and meet new and growing needs such as Net Zero emissions and Building Safety. We will be announcing plans soon to tackle specific skills and occupations such as leadership and management, digital skills and skills related to energy efficiency.” www.citb.co.uk

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


INDUSTRY NEWS

Firms must pledge net zero target to bid for public work Construction Enquirer has reported that contractors bidding for public works projects will have to pledge to be net zero by 2050 under new Government rules.

measures that they have in place. Some large companies already self-report parts of their carbon emissions, known as Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (indirect owned) emissions.

From 30 September, contractors seeking to bid projects worth more than £5 million a year will have to publish clear and credible carbon reduction plans before being considered. The move mirrors the prompt payment measure introduced in 2019, which allowed a contractor’s performance in paying their subcontractors promptly to be taken into account when bidding for government work.

The new rules announced at the weekend will go further, requiring the reporting of some Scope 3 emissions, including business travel, employee commuting, transportation, distribution and waste. These Scope 3 emissions represent a significant proportion of an organisation’s carbon footprint.

The Cabinet Office has now warned firms that fail to set out a carbon reduction plan will be excluded from bidding for contracts. A carbon reduction plan sets out where an organisation’s emissions come from and the environmental management

The new rules drive forward the government’s green agenda, while also striking a balance to not overly burden and potentially exclude small and medium-sized enterprises from bidding for government work. The Carbon Reduction Plan should be updated at least annually and published on a firm’s website. Directors will be expected to sign off the pledge to

demonstrate a clear commitment to emissions reduction at the highest level. Minister for Efficiency and Transformation, Lord Agnew of Oulton, said: “The government spends more than £290 billion on procurement every year, so it’s important we use this purchasing power to help transform our economy to net-zero. “Requiring companies to report and commit to reducing their carbon emissions before bidding for public work is a key part of our world-leading approach. These measures will help green our economy, while not overly burdening businesses, particularly SMEs.” The measures will apply to all central government departments and arms-length bodies. Further information is available at https:// bit.ly/354A7qM www.constructionenquirer.com

NARM plans for a busy future NARM, the National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers, has formed a limited company through which it will now conduct its activities. Previously operating as an unincorporated association, the newly formed National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers Limited,

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

will continue to undertake the Association’s roles of: informing government and standards bodies through published research; encouraging and supporting rooflighting best practice; and serving member companies as well as the wider construction industry.

For full details, see NARM’s Daylight Diary column on page 19. www.narm.org.uk

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Canterbury Cathedral stained glass ‘among world’s oldest’ The new dates indicate that the windows may have been in place when Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was assassinated in the cathedral in 1170 by four knights who thought they were acting on the orders of King Henry II. The building was damaged by fire in 1174 and it had been previously thought that the windows were crafted in the thirteenth century.

BBC News has reported that stained glass windows over the south entrance of Canterbury Cathedral, which depict the ancestors of Christ, have been re-dated to the midtwelfth century.

Using a new, non-destructive device called a windolyser to shine a beam on the surface of the glass, Conservator Léonie Seliger and her colleagues subsequently used spectrometry to analyse the the chemical fingerprint of the glass and calculate its age.

“The scientific findings, the observations, and the chronology of the cathedral itself all fit together very nicely now,” commented art historian Madeline Caviness, who noted in the 1980s that the style of these glass panels suggested that they could be older than the cathedral’s other windows. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ science-environment-57768815

‘Best use of a rooflight’ - entries still open The entry deadline for the Pitched Roofing Awards has been extended to midnight on Friday 20th August. This will be the final deadline so any entries must be submitted before this time. One of the categories is for ‘Best use of a rooflight application’. The judges will be looking for a pitched domestic or commercial

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system which can be either a glass, polycarbonate or GRP product used on either a newbuild or refurbishment project that has been completed to a very high standard. The awards are a fantastic opportunity to promote excellence in pitched roofing, showcase professionalism and expertise that will inspire

others, and give exposure to teams who demonstrate a passion for creativity and overcoming challenges. The awards are FREE to enter and will be held at The Midland Hotel in Manchester on Friday 26th November 2021. www.pitchedroofingawards.co.uk

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


INDUSTRY NEWS

RCI Show 2021 MA Business which owns and runs the RCI Show took the decision to reschedule the RCI Show from 8th – 9th December 2020 to Wednesday 29th – Thursday 30th September 2021. The event will now take place at the Stadium MK in Milton Keynes where MCRMA is once again a supporting organisation. The RCI Show is the largest UK event where the entire roofing, cladding and insulation supply chain comes together.

In addition to exhibitors showcasing the latest construction products; the RCI Show provides a multitude of dedicated conference sessions keeping you ahead of the latest trends, technologies, legislation and issues influencing your market. Running alongside the conference programme are the accredited CPD seminars. New for 2021, exhibitors will be running free demonstrations of the latest tools and innovations.

REGISTER NOW! Registration is now open for the 2021 show https://www.rcishow. co.uk/register-now

UK Construction Week Birmingham 2021 The UK’s largest built environment event returns to the NEC Birmingham on 5th-7th October 2021. Along with four conferences, 15 CPD and Workshop hubs and three major award presentations, UK Construction Week Birmingham 2021 will mark a celebratory focal point as construction can share learnings from the recovery and look

to a bright future. The UKCW road to recovery will also be partnered by The Times, with editorial support for the event. To register go to: https:// www.ukconstructionweek. com/uk-construction-weekregister-as-an-attendee www.ukconstructionweek.com

UK Construction Week London 2022 UK Construction Week London will connect the whole supply chain in an event designed to oil the wheels of construction commerce at London’s ExCeL on 3rd-5th May 2022. With Government support and education on how to tap into major investment opportunities in housing and infrastructure,

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

UKCW London will be the must attend construction event this Spring. To register go to: https://www. ukconstructionweek.com/ uk-construction-weekregister-as-an-attendee www.ukconstructionweek.com

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INDUSTRY NEWS

New AI system predicts building energy rates in less than a second

Computer scientists have created an artificial intelligence system that can forecast building emission rates of non-domestic buildings. Loughborough University’s Dr Georgina Cosma and postgraduate student Kareem Ahmed have designed and trained an AI model to predict emission rate values with 27 inputs. Dr Cosma said: “It’s an important first step towards the use of machine learning tools for energy prediction in the UK and it shows how data can ‘improve current processes’ in the construction industry.” Current methods can take hours to days to produce emission rates and are generated by manually inputting hundreds of variables. Th AI model was created with the support of engineering consultancy Cundall’s head of research and innovation, Edwin Wealend. It was trained using large-scale data from UK

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government energy performance assessments to generate an emission value in a split second. They created a ‘decision treebased ensemble’ machine algorithm and validated it using 81,137 real data records for non-domestic buildings in England from 2010 to 2019. The data contained information such as building capacity, location, heating, cooling lighting, and activity. Machine sheds insight on how buildings can be designed better The team calculated the rates of shops, offices, factories, schools, restaurants, hospitals, and cultural institutions - some of the most inefficient buildings in the UK. They did this to get an insight into how energy performance could be improved and influence the design or renovation of a building. Emission rates are used to calculate a building’s energy performance certificate, EPC, and currently takes hours to calculate.

Researchers claim the new algorithm will speed up the generation of EPCs and give insight into how new buildings can be designed and existing ones renovated to be more energy efficient. Dr Cosma pointed out that although commercial properties only make up eight per cent of all buildings they account for a fifth of the UK’s total CO2 emissions. Mr Wealend said: “We hope to build on the techniques developed in this project to predict real operational energy consumption. “By predicting the energy consumption and emissions of non-domestic buildings quickly and accurately, we can focus our energy on the more important task - reducing energy consumption and reaching net-zero.” www.hankzarihs.com

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NEW PROJECTS The Bodmin Jail Hotel, Cornwall All that was left of the powerful-looking Victorian Bodmin Jail in Cornwall, was a ruin without a roof, with vegetation slowly taking over. In 2015, Mallino Development appointed the services of Twelve Architects & Masterplanners to undertake an impressive and stunning redevelopment project of the jail and turn it into a modern and aesthetically quite different hotel. To deliver the modern comforts hotel guests expect during their stay and the thermal efficiency required for sustainable operation of the hotel, a holistic system using VELUX Glazing Panels was designed. It took 214 VELUX Glazing Panels, formerly known as Vitral A98 Glazing, to recapture the original rooflighting sitting above the two historic wings. www.veluxcommercial. co.uk .

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NEW PROJECTS Private Home, West Sussex Stella Rooflight provided a bespoke fixed 316 Marine Grade stainless steel conservation rooflight for a stunning country Grade 2 Listed house in the parish of Stoughton, West Sussex. Comprising 2 glazing bars and a high specification genuine self-clean glazing with solar control. Internally the rooflight was finished with a stunning cedar, white painted solid wood liner. www.stellarooflight. co.uk

Brooke Close, Margate, Kent Over 60 Keylite Roof Windows have been installed to new homes and flats in the Brooke Close housing development in Margate, offering clean and modern aesthetics as well as peace of mind for the building contractor, PCR Projects Ltd. The development was designed by architectural firm Urban Surveying and Design Ltd and built by well-respected local contractors PCR Projects, www. keyliteroofwindows.com

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

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CLIMATE BASED DAYLIGHT MODELLING

Climate-Based Daylight Modelling – A Real World Approach Cieran Towse of MBS Software Ltd asks: In a world with growing concerns about climate, why not take a real world approach to assessing the quality and quantity of natural daylight and sunlight rooms within a building will receive?

As we carry out daylight and sunlight analysis, it is time to embrace climatebased daylight modelling (CBDM). The results provide a more detailed picture of how light interacts with the built environment which we inhabit and provides crucial information to aid designers. Whilst not a new concept, the industry has been slow to adopt this methodology, preferring instead to use ‘static’ metrics which, whilst not inaccurate, can perhaps be best described as sufficient. More importantly, they can be bettered, particularly as the tools to do so are readily available. This article attempts to breakdown and simplify CBDM.

What is Climate-Based Daylight Modelling? CBDM is the prediction of various radiant or luminous quantities (e.g. radiance, irradiance, luminance and illuminance) using realistic sun and sky conditions captured annually from standardised climate data. These data sets therefore create a realistic representation for an analysis environment, reflecting location and orientation. A climate file contains data for a specific geographic location for many weather variables, such as Illuminance,

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radiation, temperature and wind direction. Data is collected at every hour of every day for the year. A ‘typical year ‘is a climate file which contains data selected over a number of years (normally 10 years or more). For each month, the data is selected from the year considered most ‘typical’. For example, June might be from 2007 and July from 2012.

“.Whilst not a new concept, the industry has been slow to adopt this methodology, preferring instead to use ‘static’ metrics...”

Alternatively, a ‘historic year’ is data collected through a single continuous year rather than a composite one made up from average months. Standardised climate data is a readily available online resource, however not all files contain the relevant information required and can be biased towards particular variables.

How does Climate-Based Daylight Modelling work? The method used when carrying out CBDM is ray tracing, in particular backwards ray tracing, since it uses rays moving in the opposite direction to which photons actually travel. Backwards ray tracing is the process of shooting rays from the individual room grid points to the light source and is used for reasons of efficiency, eliminating any superfluous rays. Ray tracing allows for indirect light as

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


CLIMATE BASED DAYLIGHT MODELLING

Colour, finish and transmittance will all have an impact on how the light interacts with materials

well as direct light and relies heavily upon materials and their properties. The more accurate the reflective properties given to those materials in an analysis model, the more representative of the ‘real world’ the results will be. The ray tracing technique can produce realistic lighting effects and simulates the way light interacts (i.e. reflection, refraction and scattering) with the materials. When constructing a 3D model it is important to determine the materials not only for the room/building you are analysing but also the surrounding landscape. Common materials to consider are: • Interior Walls • Interior Ceilings • Interior Floors

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• Exterior Walls • Glazing • Landscape (Including surrounding buildings) Consider the colour, finish and transmittance as they will all have an impact on how the light interacts with the material.

Which Building Standards refer to Climate-Based Daylight Modelling? Rating systems such as LEED v4, BREEAM and WELL Building Standard all drive the CBDM approach. Most recently, the revised BS EN 17037 also specifies CBDM and it is expected that the revised BRE: Site Layout Planning for Daylight and Sunlight will also incorporate this approach.

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CLIMATE BASED DAYLIGHT MODELLING

How does Climate-Based Daylight Modelling vary from other Daylighting Approaches? CBDM overall paints a more detailed picture, providing greater detail with regards to light distribution and intensity. It takes into account the buildings configuration, orientation and composition. In comparison, Daylight Factor assumes an overcast sky at a static period of time, which is not a true reflection of the overall annual light availability and performance. CBDM is a more complex calculation compared to other daylight

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approaches, however does not require much more user input, the complexity is performed behind the scenes within the ray tracing method. Due to the complexity of the calculation, ray tracing comes at a greater computational cost when compared with other rendering methods. However, MBS are able to process calculations within seconds using the new CUDA computing platform. Cieran Towse can be contacted at: ct@mbs-software.co.uk www.mbs-software.co.uk

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


Daylight Factor

Now you can run BRE Daylight and Sunlight tests directly in Revit and export the results to Excel

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BUILDING SAFETY

A positive view on the newly published Building Safety Bill By Jane Embury, director of Wrightstyle: a supplier of advanced glazing systems to mitigate against fire, ballistic and bomb threat. Not so long ago, fire safety was largely about common sense. Before modern fire and building regulations, responsibility for a building’s safety, and the safety of its occupants, depended largely on how seriously a building owner took that responsibility. Now, responsibility is a legal term because fire regulations in the different UK jurisdictions all require commercial premises to have a named “responsible person” to ensure fire safety. Soon, that concept for building safety will be taken to another level. The UK government has recently published the long-awaited Building Safety Bill, and it’s expected that its passage through parliament will take at least nine months. The government says that the Bill’s provisions for buildings over 18 metres will all come into force in about 18 months from now. These far-reaching provisions will help shape the future of construction by giving a new dimension to fire and building safety.

appointment of a duty holder to manage all aspects of a building’s design and construction. That responsibility covers both main contractors and sub-contractors. As we’ve said, and as the Grenfell inquiry has found, the construction of a complex building can mean proper accountability for fire safety becoming lost. Now, the duty holder will have legal responsibility for fire and building safety, for up to ten years after a building’s completion or refurbishment. Giving that aspect of the Bill real teeth, a failure to carry out that responsibility could lead to criminal charges being brought. There will also be an easier investigative pathway, with a requirement to create, hold and maintain all building and fire safety information. The Bill has many other provisions, including the regulation of construction products. That’s important because a product or system that may be safe in one context could be inappropriate in another.

Once again codifying by catastrophe, the Bill comes as a response to the Grenfell Tower disaster, which claimed 72 lives. We welcome the Bill as it will take building and fire safety several steps forward.

The Bill is a milestone in building safety, and the Construction Industry Council has said that it’s a pivotal moment in the history of UK construction.

A key provision in the Bill is the

However, we believe that the Bill, more than anything, is a wake-up call

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“Now, the duty holder will have legal responsibility for fire and building safety, for up to ten years after a building’s completion or refurbishment.”

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BUILDING SAFETY

Over the years, we’ve seen many examples of badly-fitted glazed systems, often by fabricators lacking in specialist skills.

skill, but it all then depends on having the right systems to meet specifications, and the right people to install them. That’s why, for example, we offer free training for our customers if they intend to fit any of our internal and external advanced glazing systems.

Whatever the building, compartmentalisation is fundamental to its safety. It creates a series of protected fire zones to ensure that any fire is contained.

However, what’s also important is that “responsible people” – and future duty holders - should also ensure that the fire glass and its framing system have proven compatibility.

Fire is spread through three methods: convection, conduction and radiation.

That means insisting on comprehensive fire test certification that covers both elements because, in a fire, the glass and its frame have to function together to prevent the spread of fire, smoke or toxic gases. If one fails, both fail, with potentially catastrophic consequences.

to everyone in the building industry, not just those involved in high-rise residential building.

Convection is when smoke from the fire becomes trapped by the roof, spreading in all directions. Conduction is the process whereby materials such as metal absorb the heat and transmit it to other rooms. That can cause secondary fires to break out. Lastly, radiation which is the transfer of heat through the air. This too can set off new fires, spreading the danger from its original location. Creating safe and secure compartments is a specialist design

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

We understand that building safety is a complex and multi-disciplinary issue, and the Building Safety Bill, we hope, we lead to a change of safety culture in some sections of the building industry. That, surely, is something we would all welcome. www.wrightstyle.co.uk

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STAY SAFE

with GRP rooflights from Filon Safety is at the front and centre of our product policy: Our technical expertise has contributed directly to UK rooflight non-fragility classification over decades, with Filon personnel playing key safety roles in influential trade associations including NARM (National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers) and ACR (Advisory Committee for Roofsafety). Our unique, patented Fixsafe system is the only solution that allows profiled rooflights to be safely installed from within the building envelope, without the need to access fragile roof areas. We offer a range of fire grades to provide compliance with Building Regulations. Our Supasafe triple reinforced rooflights provide high impact resistance, spanning and load-bearing capabilities. We’re the UK’s longest established manufacturer of profiled rooflights by continuous process, with a successful track record of excellence in design, product performance and customer support. As you’d expect, we’re also currently employing Covid-secure working practices throughout our operations. Filon: truly a ‘safe pair of hands’ for specifiers.

Telephone 01543 687300 Email: sales@filon.co.uk

www.filon.co.uk


SPECIAL FEATURE

daylight diary AUG 2021

NARM gears up for the future Previously operating as an unincorporated association, NARM, the National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers, has formed a limited company through which it will now conduct its activities. The newly formed National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers Limited, will continue to undertake the Association’s roles of: informing government and standards bodies through published research; encouraging and supporting rooflighting best practice; and serving NARM member companies as well as the wider construction industry. The new company will operate under the well established NARM brand and will continue to use the acronym NARM in all communications. The board of directors has been appointed from the former NARM Council, further ensuring continuity. NARM director Tom Ogilvie, said: “As NARM continues to grow, this move allows us to protect member companies in the event of a problem by limiting their liability and allows us to take out liability insurance for the same reason. Our corporate governance will be improved, with directors registered at Companies House. We will also gain access to improved, on-line banking facilities. These changes will help us to expand and improve our operations as we move forward and meet new challenges.”

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

NARM’s new board of directors - clockwise from top left: Tom Ogilvie; Stuart Middle: Ian Weakford; Mark Wilcox; Henrik Dall Lauridsen; Scott Leeder; Chris Avery; Jeremy Dunn

In other news, founding NARM Committee member and former long-standing Technical Chairman Bill Hawker has announced his retirement from NARM and his position as Technical Director at Brett Martin Daylight Systems. “We will all miss Bill’s immense knowledge, commitment and dry sense of humour. We wish him all the very best for the future”, said Tom Ogilvie. www.narm.org.uk For further information about NARM and its activities, please visit www.narm.org.uk

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July/August 2021

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DESIGNING WITH DAYLIGHT

How to channel light through a property Peter Daniel, Product Innovation Director at The Rooflight Company, explains two different ways of channelling natural light in a home.

The importance of natural light is well known. It has been manipulated for thousands of years by every civilization. In the modern day, it is becoming a top priority for homeowners. So, channelling light through a home must be carefully considered during the design process. There are two main approaches to channelling light in open living spaces, installing rooflights or adding a conservatory. In the latter’s case, almost the entire structure is made of glass, so they let the maximum amount of light possible into a room. But that brings drawbacks of its own. There is such a thing as too much light and a room that is too bright is just as unwelcoming as one that is too dark.

Thermal performance Then there is thermal performance to consider. Due to the sheer amount of glass involved in a conservatory, it’s a well-known fact that they often suffer from poor thermal performance, making rooms stiflingly hot in the summer but freezing cold in the winter. This is also off-putting for homeowners, and many will no longer compromise on thermal performance in favour of aesthetics. In fact, many homeowners are now replacing their conservatory

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roofs in favour of a tiled one with smaller rooflights to marry their desire for a finish that is thermally efficient and pleasing to the eye.

Rooflight advantages Rooflights don’t suffer this problem. This is partly because there is a lot less glass involved, but there are also more glazing options available which can reduce the G-value of the glass panes and reduce solar energy transmittance (how easily a room warms up in direct sunlight). This makes them a winner from a comfort point of view for homeowners, and it also saves on their household bills.

“Rooflights can add all important design interest and channel light in a way that a conservatory can’t.”

They can also add all important design interest and channel light in a way that a conservatory can’t. A building’s orientation is a significant consideration when determining how light travels through a property; if a room is South facing, for example, it will benefit from more light then if it were North facing. By using several rooflights instead of a single glass roof, the light level can be controlled, and the light’s direction manipulated to create a desired look, instead of flooding in from all angles – it’s a more focussed and considered approach.

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DESIGNING WITH DAYLIGHT

Architectural features Architectural features are also becoming an essential for the modern homeowner, instead of simply just a nice to have. House pride is only increasing thanks to platforms like Instagram and the internal and external design of a property is considered by homeowners now more than ever. Rooflights can add this desired architectural interest if used intelligently or to create a “spotlight” effect by installing a rooflight directly

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above an existing feature to enhance it further. Light is a significant aspect of a home and one that homeowners are increasingly prioritising when looking for their next property. There are different ways to harness it, but the important thing is that you do. www.therooflightcompany.co.uk

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GLASS ROOFLIGHTS

Getting glass rooflights right Nick Henton of Lareine Engineering looks at the factors to consider for a successful and fully compliant rooflight specification

We all prefer light, airy daylit interiors and the benefits of exposure to daylight are well documented – as well as the potential for energy savings through reduced demand for artificial light.

However, with the extremely wide choice of rooflight types currently available, specification raises a number of points for consideration.

These factors have all contributed to the huge rise in popularity of rooflights and glazed roof structures across all sectors in recent years. Plus of course, the fact that rooflights deliver up to three times as much daylight as the same area of vertical glazing.

How much and what type of light is appropriate? What is the roof construction of the building? Is ventilation required?

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Practical considerations

To answer the first of these questions, the ideal light level for an internal space is largely dictated by its

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GLASS ROOFLIGHTS

Required levels of illuminance: values as listed in Cibse Guide A

proposed use. For example, in stores and warehouses where visual tasks may not need a high perception of detail, 200 Lux is considered appropriate. Whereas for workshops or design studios where accurate detail perception is important, 2000 Lux is recommended. This has a bearing on the size, number and placement of rooflights.1 For most applications, diffused light is the preferred choice, avoiding glare and the potential for unwanted heat build-up. This can be simply achieved, using diffused or solar control variants of the recommended glazing types (see below).

sections for ventilation if required: from a simple hinged roof window, to a fully automated SHEV (Smoke & Heat Exhaust Ventilation) system for fire safety in larger commercial and industrial buildings. SHEV systems are a subject in their own right and Lareine Engineering operates a division specialising in these solutions.

Lareine Engineering AOV (Automatic Opening Vent) rooflight

A wide variety of rooflight designs are available to cater for both flat and pitched roof constructions. Flat glass or lantern style rooflights are the obvious choice for flat roofs and ‘in-plane’ roof windows are popular for pitched roof applications including loft conversions. All types can be specified with opening

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For any rooflighting project, glass specification should be among the first points to consider. In the majority of building envelope applications, glass is fitted as a Double Glazed Unit (DGU), or increasingly, as a Triple Glazed Unit (TGU), in order to provide improved resistance to the passage of heat, thus improving energy efficiency and comfort to building users. These sealed units of differing pane numbers are collectively known as Insulated Glass Units (IGU).

Safety first In respect of safety for people needing to access roof areas, rooflights are classified for non-fragilty according to the ‘Red Book’ ACR[M]0012 issued by

Class 1 applies to rooflights which might be walked on for occasional cleaning/maintenance activities and which will therefore need to support both the weight of people on the glass and their equipment.

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The highest rating, Class 0, applies to rooflights which are designed for unrestricted access by building occupants. These are known as ‘walk-on’ rooflights and are becoming increasingly popular for use on roof terraces, allowing daylight into the rooms below.

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F

Whilst alternative glazing materials are available for rooflights, for most residential and commercial applications, glass remains the preferred glazing choice. It offers excellent light transmission, outstanding aesthetics and longterm durability, with a huge range of options for matching specification to application – including solar control tints, etched surfaces for light diffusion, self-cleaning properties and others.

the ACR (Advisory Committee for Roof Safety) and based on testing by the CWCT (Centre for Window & Cladding Technology).

THE

Glass specification

S

GLASS ROOFLIGHTS

R O AD E H VER

LAMINATED INNER PANE ENDORSED BY

Class 2 covers rooflights for applications where people are not intended to walk on the glass, but which are required to be non-fragile to protect maintenance staff or others who may need to access roof areas. Class 3 rooflights are to be considered as fragile. Adjacent roof areas should be equipped with barriers to prevent access. For safety of building occupants, Lareine Engineering strongly recommends that a hermetically sealed

A typical insulated Glass Unit, with laminated inner pane for safety of building occupants

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GLASS ROOFLIGHTS DGU mounted within a rooflight frame should comprise a toughened glass outer pane, argon filled cavity and a laminated glass inner pane – as supported by NARM, the National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers, of whom we are a member company.3 Toughened glass is sufficiently durable and appropriate for outer panes, but for inner panes, the shatterproof characteristics of laminated glass prevent the possibility of glass debris falling onto building occupants in the event of breakage. In rare instances, toughened glass can shatter spontaneously, due to manufacturing imperfections, so it should always be avoided for inner panes.

Thermal performance Approved Document L of the Building Regulations stipulates appropriate levels of thermal performance for rooflights. The required U-value for rooflights is dependent on their application and whether for new build or refurbishment. These values should be noted at the specification stage. It’s also important to note that the quoted U-value for a rooflight is for the whole assembly, not just the glazing. Some rooflight suppliers quote ‘centre pane’ U-values which apply only to the glazing, not the complete assembly – and are therefore misleading.

to resist crime. To demonstrate this they need to have been tested to one of the security standards listed in Approved Document Q of The Building Regulations and have achieved a minimum performance standard.

Simplifying a complex subject: free Webinar If you’ve read this far, you’ll know that rooflight specification is a fairly complex subject, requiring some knowledge of all the factors involved. Choosing a reputable supplier is always a recommended solution. However, if you’d like to gain greater understanding yourself, Lareine Engineering is running a RIBA CPD accredited webinar on the topic, at 12 midday, on Tuesday 21st September.

Lareine Engineering is hosting a RIBA accredited CPD Webinar on Tuesday 21st September, entitled ‘Daylight Done Right”, covering all the points in this article in greater detail. You can book your free place by using the link opposite.

Book your free registration here. https://zoom.us/webinar/ register/1216269525980/WN_ Os2du9piRp2sTetv_coZSA www.lareineengineering.co.uk References: 1 NARM - An introduction to natural daylight design through rooflighting 2 The Red Book Test for Non-Fragility of Large Element Roofing Assemblies 3

NARM information covering laminated inner panes

Thermal performance of rooflights has generally improved dramatically over recent years and it’s now widely understood that appropriately specified, compliant rooflights make a positive contribution to building energy efficiency.

Security The Building Regulations state that rooflights deemed as easily accessible need to be proven to resist criminal attack or incorporate features proven

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LAMILUX FLAT ROOF ACCESS HATCHES COMFORT IN EXCLUSIVE DESIGN Designed for exclusive access to the roof terrace, the LAMILUX Flat Roof Access Hatch Comfort range brings daylight into the building, whilst creating a comfortable room climate from the high energy efficiency of the systems and their unlimited use as ventilation devices. Comfort Solo

Comfort Duo

Comfort Swing

Comfort Square

NEW

LAMILUX U.K. LIMITED | Tel.: 01284 749051 | mail@lamilux.co.uk | www.lamiluxskylights.co.uk


ACCESS ROOFLIGHTS - advertorial

Luxury, daylit access to the roof terrace By Natalie Goodridge, Lamilux UK In densely populated urban areas of cities, where the number of floors in housing is sometimes limited and private gardens are rare, a rooftop terrace or patio is becoming a popular design choice. However, many residential buildings with rooftop gardens don’t see much daylight and careful consideration is required to determine an access point to the roof terrace. For such rooftop projects, a new dimension of roof access is offered by the LAMILUX Flat Roof Access Hatch Comfort range, designed to give a generous daylight intake in attic apartments alongside convenient access to the roof terrace creating an air of grace and beauty both internally and externally. The LAMILUX Flat Roof Access Hatch Comfort range now introduces its fourth product into the family, giving more choice and flexibility when creating a luxurious living space with an exclusive ambience. Featuring unrestricted use as a natural ventilation device and convenient access to the roof terrace, the indoor climate also benefits from the high energy efficiency of the range thanks to the thermally broken frame and excellent air tightness values.

its one meter by 3000 or 3500 mm long aperture to 84 degrees in just 25 seconds. The fourth, and newest addition to the Access Hatch Comfort repertoire the Square, makes it possible, for the first time, to also use spiral and platform staircases underneath. Until now, access to the roof was limited to straight stairways due to the elongated rectangular shape of the roof access hatch range. The Square only takes 45 seconds for the concealed hydraulic drives to silently open the 4m² glass element of the skylight by 70 degrees. As with the Swing, the new variant does not require any additional space on the roof terrace than its own size in closed form, even when open, thanks to its swing mechanism.

“... the new variant does not require any additional space on the roof terrace than its own size in closed form, even when open, thanks to its swing mechanism.”

The existing Solo and Duo Flat Roof Access Hatch products from LAMILUX open laterally by moving one or two panels horizontally to create direct access to step onto the roof terrace, whilst the space-saving hinged opening Swing variant swiftly opens

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ACCESS ROOFLIGHTS - advertorial

Visually, the aluminium border frame throughout the product family, attracts attention as an architectural highlight. The aluminum profiles and the reveal surface can be coated in all RAL colours offering further choice and exclusivity. Since the glass panes and frame feature a flush edge detail both internally and externally, and all variants are designed with an inclined surface, the range boasts not only a visually appealing seamless design, but also ensures that rainwater can run-off easily without leaving any dirty edges or water ponding. Safety is standard in the Flat Roof Access Hatch Comfort product family with fall-resistant glazing which can be walked on to a limited extent for cleaning purposes. As an additional safety feature, a light barrier is installed as standard which prevents the closing of the access hatch as soon as it detects something in the entrance area.

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In terms of energy, the new roof access hatch continues the tradition of all LAMILUX skylights: The overall system, which is free of thermal bridges and isothermally balanced and the option of special glazing meets modern demands for sustainability, energy efficiency and climate protection which ultimately save heating costs and minimizes condensation. All four products in this family have one further thing in common: They are delivered completely pre-assembled to the construction site, lifted onto the roof by a crane provided by the customer and then installed swiftly and easily. This minimizes the risk of errors and saves valuable time – both for the contractor and for the apartment user who ultimately gains access to the roof terrace. www.lamiluxskylights.co.uk

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ROOF WINDOWS - advertorial

KeyliteConnect® brings smart home technology to Keylite roof windows UK based manufacturer of roof windows, Keylite Roof Windows (Keylite), has launched its new range of smart roof windows, blinds and technology, allowing homeowners to control daylight and ventilation in their home via smart devices.

The new keyliteConnect® product range aims to transform the way we experience natural light and ventilation in our homes by utilising smart home technology. With the keyliteConnect® app and keyliteConnect® hub, homeowners are able to monitor and engage with their smart app-enabled Electric and Solar Roof Windows and Blinds from anywhere in the world. This allows users to operate one or multiple applications at once, set pre-timed

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actions such as airing the building for a certain duration, or automatically lower blinds in the evening. To provide peace of mind for those days where you just can’t predict the weather, the smart rain sensor will automatically close windows in the event of a downpour, even when homeowners are away. If you leave home and forget to close your windows, one tap of a button closes all your windows on the keyliteConnect® app.

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ROOF WINDOWS - advertorial By switching roof windows to the trickle ventilation position, fresh air is able to enter the property while ensuring the building’s safety is not compromised, as windows remain in the fully locked position. The keyliteConnect® app enabled Solar Powered Roof Windows and Blinds are powered completely by solar energy, with no requirement for mains electricity. Harvesting solar energy, the roof windows retain power in the window’s battery system, enabling operation day and night. Installation of the technology is made as easy as possible for end-users. The straight-forward set-up procedure within the app allows homeowners to pair windows and create personalised settings for each room or individual person’s operational needs. The keyliteConnect® hub can be purchased after the installation of an app-enabled Keylite Electric or Solar Roof Window making it an ideal product for a smarter home. The keyliteConnect® hub is the heart to controlling the app-enabled Keylite Electric and Solar Roof Windows and Blinds. Once connected to Wi-Fi, the

hub ensures only those chosen can operate the applications remotely via the keyliteConnect® app. Colin Wells, Head of Technical at Keylite Roof Windows, comments: “Keylite has always been at the forefront of innovation, and we are extremely proud of this latest product development. With over 15 million ‘smart homes’ in the UK and Ireland, it’s clear that the need and desire for smart technology is prevalent amongst consumers.

“The keyliteConnect® app enabled Solar Powered Roof Windows and Blinds are powered completely by solar energy, with no requirement for mains electricity.”

“keyliteConnect® technology gives homeowners total control over their Roof Windows and Blinds – controlling as and when their property needs daylight and natural ventilation, and providing peace of mind that their property is secured whilst they’re away.” For more information on Keylite Roof Windows and its keyliteConnect® range, please visit www. keyliteroofwindows.com/connect, call 01283 200 158 or email info@ keyliteuk.com.

KeyliteConnect® hub

KeyliteConnect® app

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DAYLIGHTING ICONS The biggest: the best: the most awe-inspiring; the most outrageous; the most influential... In this regular feature we indulge ourselves and our readers with images of daylighting projects throughout the years that simply deserve a double page photograph... Piazza Città di Lombardia, Milan Piazza Città di Lombardia is 4,000 m2 area in the shape of an oval and is part of the Palazzo Lombardia complex of offices, cultural facilities and open spaces. This covered open air space can be rented out to host functions and events of various kinds, seven days a week, 356 days a year. It can accommodate nearly 3,000 spectators. Piazza Città di Lombardia—is sheltered by a roof composed of transparent pillows of ETFE film. At ground level, the interweaving strands are occupied by entry lobbies, public amenities, and varied cultural facilities that engage popular interest, animate the public spaces, and promote social interaction.

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DAYLIGHTING ICONS

Roman Babakin / Shutterstock. com

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@Daylighting_Mag

Twitterings Follow us for regular updates between issues... in the meantime, more highlights...

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DAYLIGHTING MAGAZINE

DAYLIGHTING Magazine back issues Click on the cover images below to open back issues Issue 2 Jan/Feb 2017

Issue 3 Mar/Apr 2017

Issue 4 May/Jun 2017

Issue 5 July/August 2017

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

IN THIS ISSUE:

IN THIS ISSUE:

Passivhaus Daylighting

Daylighting in education

DAYLIGHTING & HEALTH PATENT GLAZING NON-FRAGILITY GLAZING INNOVATION AND MORE

DAYLIGHTING & VENTILATION TUBULAR DAYLIGHT SYSTEMS GRP ROOFLIGHTS RIGHTS TO LIGHT AND MORE

Receive every issue of DAYLIGHTING Magazine direct to your inbox SUBSCRIBE

IN THIS ISSUE:

IN THIS ISSUE:

Daylighting at work

Controlling heat & glare

CLIMATE BASED DAYLIGHT MODELLING BIM GLASS ROOFLIGHTS DAYLIGHTING INNOVATIONS AND MORE

DAYLIGHTING AT HOME DAYLIGHTING IN FARMING DAYLIGHT & NEIGHBOURLY MATTERS AND MORE

DAYLIGHTING is published by: Issue 6 September/October 2017

Issue 7 November/December 2017

Issue 8 January/February 2018

Issue 9 March/April 2018

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DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

Please note our new land line telephone number: TEL: +44 (0)1295 750519 IN THIS ISSUE:

Daylighting for dramatic effect RETAIL SECTOR REFURBISHMENT & ENERGY SAVING MODULAR ROOFLIGHTS AND MORE

Issue 13 November/December 2018

IN THIS ISSUE:

Daylighting in FACTORIES & WAREHOUSES ENERGY SAVING WITH LIGHTING CONTROLS CURTAIN WALLING AND MORE

Issue 20 January/February 2020

THE INNOVATION ISSUE

DELIVERING DAYLIGHT TO DUNDEE’S NEW V&A

IN THIS ISSUE:

PLUS: • ROOFLIGHTS & SECURITY • TRANSLUCENT CLADDING • ROOF SAFETY • NEWS • PROJECTS AND MORE

DAYLIGHT MODELLING REFURBISHMENT SMART GLAZING PLUS • NEWS • PROJECTS • AND MORE

IN THIS ISSUE: DAYLIGHTING & VENTILATION IN THE

IN THIS ISSUE:

SUN TUBES DELIVERING DAYLIGHT DEEP INTO BUILDINGS • ROOFLIGHTS & NON-FRAGILITY • PASSIVHAUS • DAYLIGHTING IIN MUSEUMS & GALLERIES AND MORE

Issue 24 September/October 2020

DAYLIGHT PLANNING

RETAIL SECTOR • DAYLIGHTING IN EDUCATION • LIGHT TRANSMISSION: FACTORS TO CONSIDER • ROOF SAFETY • TRANSLUCENT CLADDING AND MORE

Issue 26 January/February 2021

HOW ROOFLIGHTS CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN

PLUS:

ROOFLGHT REFURBISHMENT SOLAR SHADING GLASS RECYCLING NEWS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

PLUS:

DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS SCHOOLS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

2021 Media Info Information for advertisers is contained in our media pack, which is available on our website.

MEDIA INFO

2021 THE BI-MONTHLY DIGITAL MAGAZINE FOR SPECIFIERS & CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONALS

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WEBSITE www.daylightingmag.co.uK

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Is the new European Standard measuring daylight in buildings is too complicated?

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EDITOR Paul Bennett paul@daylightingmag.co.uk Mobile: 07900 895110

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of content, the publisher does not accept liability for errors. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. This publication contains editorial photographs which may have been supplied and paid for by suppliers. Full terms and conditions can be found on our website.

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DAYLIGHTING Magazine is published by Bennett B2B, a UK communications and publishing business offering a complete range of specialist services for companies serving the construction sector: • On-line publishing • Copywriting • Design for web and print • Photography • Video & drone services • 3D imaging • PR • Consultancy Telephone 01295 750519 Email: paul@bennettb2b.co.uk www.bennettb2b.co.uk