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Issue 26 January/February 2021

ENERGY EFFICIENCY HOW ROOFLIGHTS CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN

PLUS:

DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS SCHOOLS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE


Overhead glazing:

The term ‘toughened’ implies a degree of safety which in the case of rooflights, is misleading – as toughened glass can shatter, putting those beneath a rooflight at risk. For more information, visit:

www.narm.org.uk

O

F

Always check this with your supplier, as we are aware that some rooflights are being supplied with toughened glass inner panes: a potential danger.

AZING

AF

OI CE H C E

GL

For the safety of building occupants, NARM advises that inner panes on all glass rooflights must be laminated glass.

ON LY E H T S

For safety’s sake, check for the tick symbol.

D R O A VERHE

LAMINATED INNER PANE ENDORSED BY

RIBA accredited CPD materials Available

THE TRADE ASSOCIATION REPRESENTING LEADING UK ROOFLIGHT SUPPLIERS


CONTENTS

REGULARS

05

Editor’s Comment

06

Industry News

10

New Projects

18

NARM Daylight Diary Updates from the UK’s influential trade association for rooflight manufacturers

32

Daylighting Icons Louis Vutton Foundation, Paris

34

Twitterings What’s trending on social media?

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More about DAYLIGHTING Magazine Back issues, free subscriptions & media information

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

FEATURES

DAYLIGHTING is published by: Bennett B2B Ltd Pure Offices Lake View House Tournament Fields Warwick CV34 6RG United Kingdom TEL: +44 (0)1295 711666

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Energy Efficiency The rooflighting renaissance The role of rooflights in building energy efficiency – and how to identify a thermally efficient rooflight: by NARM.

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Rooflights & energy efficiency at home Andrea Mittelmeier, Head of Marketing at Whitesales, considers how modern daylighting solutions can contribute to energy efficiency in our homes. 14

EDITOR Paul Bennett paul@daylightingmag.co.uk Tel: 01295 711666 Mobile: 07900 895110 AD SALES info@bennettb2b.co.uk Tel: 01295 711666 DESIGN/PRODUCTION info@bennettb2b.co.uk Tel: 01295 711666 WEBSITE www.daylightingmag.co.uk

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Daylight Planning A view on daylight planning in America A UK survey updated in 2020 found that 16 countries had national daylight regulations including seven with Right to Light laws. Conspicuously, the US is not one of them... By Megan Kruse and Edward Clark. 20

26

Industrial Buildings Rooflights Breathe New Life into Historic Railway Pumping Station Case Study by Stella Rooflight.

CIRCULATION Daylighting is available by email, free of charge to subscribers, by logging on at www.daylightingmag.co.uk Free access is also available via our website and social media. Average impressions per issue are approximately 5,500, however this varies according to social media activity. Our readership is predominantly UK architects, specifiers, contractors, consultants and roofing professionals. Full details are available on our website. www.daylightingmag.co.uk

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Schools Bespoke structural glazing systems connect the University of Cambridge Primary School with nature Case Study by VELUX Commercial 30

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of content, the publisher does not accept liability for errors. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. This publication contains editorial photographs which may have been supplied and paid for by suppliers. Full terms and conditions can be found on our website.

January/February 2021

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of Monovision flat glass rooflights, our solutions deliver performance & peace-of-mind. Lareine Engineering is a preferred supplier to leading architects, engineers & contractors, with a service that includes in-house design, manufacture, installation and servicing.

S

AZING O

F

glazed roofs and sophisticated natural & smoke ventilation systems, to our trusted range

GL

of every description, across every sector, throught the UK. From bespoke, self-supporting

ON LY

You’ll find examples of Lareine Engineering daylight & ventilation expertise on buildings

O E CH I CE

THE

LANDMARKS IN LIGHT

AF

R O AD VERHE

LAMINATED INNER PANE ENDORSED BY

THE UK’S TRUSTED DAYLIGHTING & VENTILATION SPECIALIST Head Office: 01506 448140 Midlands Centre: 01788 579307 E: info@lareineengineering.com www.lareineengineering.com


EDITOR’S COMMENT

More daylight in buildings makes life better – whichever way you look at it A lot has happened in the world since our last issue: Brexit has become a reality; new Covid variants have emerged, followed by reports and rows over ‘vaccine nationalism’; and of course the very frightening scenes in the US Capitol in January.

of how daylighting with rooflights can help to reduce energy consumption and building emissions – with two articles by NARM (National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers) and Andrea Mittelmeier of Whitesales, covering the topic from different perspectives.

For me however, the most significant news from a global perspective, has been the inauguration of a new, outward-looking, climate-aware President of the United States – and his move to reinstate the US to the Paris climate agreement, just hours after being sworn in.

Also pertinent to my earlier references in this column, is the revealing article by Megan Kruse and Edward Clark starting on page 20, covering how US daylight planning laws are coming under scrutiny, to protect the right to light of millions of American citizens.

The climate emergency remains as the biggest challenge facing mankind, so divisive politics aside, an urgent, renewed focus on it by the World’s most powerful nation must surely be a good thing for us all. Talking of climate change, our main feature in this issue covers the topic

Paul Bennett paul@daylightingmag.co.uk

To complete the issue, you’ll also find two interesting case studies covering daylighting projects in a refurbished industrial building and a modern school, respectively. I hope you’ll find it all interesting reading – and as always, if you have any thoughts or comments, please drop me an email.

Issue 24 September/October 2020

Don’t forget, back issues are always available to read on-line at daylightingmag.co.uk

DAYLIGHT PLANNING Is the new European Standard measuring daylight in buildings is too complicated? Issue 23 July/August 2020

PLUS:

ROOFLGHT REFURBISHMENT SOLAR SHADING GLASS RECYCLING NEWS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

PLUS:

SMARTER, BRIGHTER HOME DESIGN USING DAYLIGHT

Previous issues of DAYLIGHTING Magazine will be available on-line indefinitely. So you can refer back to old issues whenever you like. It’s also on our ‘to-do’ list to set up a features index, so if you can’t remember in which issue you read that fascinating feature about XYZ, you’ll be able to find it in a moment.

DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING ENERGY EFFICIENCY HEALTH & WELLBEING NEWS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

January/February 2021

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Construction output rebounds to pre-Covid levels

Construction output in Great Britain rose past prepandemic levels in November 2020 for the first time, latest official statistics indicate. The Construction Index website reports that the level of construction output in November 2020 was 0.6% (£80m) above the February 2020. This was thanks to repair & maintenance work, which was 7.4% above the February figure; new work remained 3.1% below its pre-pandemic level. However, February 2020 was a somewhat poor month itself, with construction output inhibited by poor weather. November’s output is still down 0.3% (£40m) on January 2020. Month-on-month GB construction output grew by 1.9% in November 2020 (compared to October), the Office for National Statistics reports. A 3.5% increase in new work more than offset a 0.6% fall in repair & maintenance; this was the seventh consecutive month of

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growth since the record decline (40.7%) in April 2020, when much of the industry shut down. In the three months to November 2020 construction output grew by 12.4% compared with the previous three-month period, because of growth in both new work (11.9%) and repair and maintenance (13.2%). Commenting on the numbers, Fraser Johns, finance director of construction contractor Beard, said: “For the first time we’re seeing output returning to prepandemic levels which is clearly cause for cheer, particularly as November was a lockdown month. In recording a seventh consecutive month of growth, the construction sector has bucked the national trend where the economy shrank overall during the period. But what is also encouraging is the reverse in the slow rate of growth that we’ve seen, going from 1.0% in October to 1.9% in November.

“But while we hope that the vaccine rollout and a Brexit trade deal in place should lead to less uncertainty broadly, we are still faced with new strains of the virus and a national lockdown, with the impact that has with schools closed and restrictions at every level. “Realistically the fallout for businesses from Brexit could yet take months to fully understand which means an element of volatility in the short to medium term. However, the new business secretary’s open letter to the construction industry is welcome reassurance in this current period. “As we now face several more weeks of lockdown, it’s clear that the construction sector has had to adapt but that keeping sites open and projects going was the right thing to do, for jobs and the wider economy.” www.theconstructionindex.co.uk

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


INDUSTRY NEWS

CIOB launches Fire Safety in Construction Certificate The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) is set to launch a new Certificate in Fire Safety for Construction, due to begin on 17th February 2021. Construction Manager Magazine reports that the course follows the recommendations in Dame Judith Hackett’s Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety, which outlined the improvements that the sector should make to prevent incidents such as the Grenfell Tower fire from re-occurring in the future. It is aimed at improving the fire safety awareness for managers in the construction

industry and for those who are faced with managing fire safety in the workplace. It looks at current and future legislation, building design and building construction, fire risk assessments, fire science and human behaviour, and how to manage and implement fire safety systems. Brad Walker, course leader, said: “We are pleased to be able to offer this Certificate in Fire Safety. A crucial aspect of building safety, it has been designed for those who are looking to gain an improved understanding of how fire safety principles are applied

in the built environment. It will also provide the delegates with a stepping stone to competency for those who have fire safety management responsibilities.” More information is available at https://www.ciobacademy. org/course/certificate-in-firesafety-for-construction/ www. constructionmanagermagazine. com

LOW CARBON GRP DAYLIGHT SOLUTIONS

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INDUSTRY NEWS

The VELUX Group and Schneider Electric announce partnership to pursue renewable Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs). to secure a long-term commitment to purchase power at a fixed price. A PPA provides renewable energy developers the business case needed to establish new, clean power generation. For VELUX, a PPA will ensure stability and predictability in electricity prices and enable the company to address its scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions.

The VELUX Group and Schneider Electric, the global leader in the digital transformation of energy management and automation, have announced that they will pursue renewable Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs), in a partnership. This will further the world’s leading roof window manufacturer’s efforts to deliver on its 100% renewable electricity (RE100) target by 2023, which is part of its company carbon neutral goal for 2030. The prospective PPAs aim to enable the development of new renewable energy projects across Europe, with Schneider Electric supporting the VELUX Group in the procurement process as a full-service buyer’s advisor. The VELUX Group’s primary motivation is to achieve its RE100 target and

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bring new renewable energy onto the grid. This effort is one part of the VELUX Group’s commitment to become a 100 percent carbon neutral company (scope 1 and 2). Furthermore, it is working to halve carbon emissions across its value chain (scope 3) by 2030. At the same time, the Group will capture its entire historical carbon footprint – dating back to its founding in 1941 – through forest conservation projects, identified and managed by Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF). Together, these initiatives are expected to support the VELUX Group’s overall commitment to be Lifetime Carbon Neutral by 2041.

The VELUX Group is seeking to pursue new non-subsidised renewable energy projects in EU countries, ensuring clean energy is added to the grid and thereby replacing “brown” power produced from fossil fuels in the most additional way. Jörn Neubert, Senior Vice President of Supply, the VELUX Group, said: “The planet is facing dual climate and nature crises and we are committed to doing our part to achieve a more sustainable future. We’re proud to be among the first companies in the world – and the first company in the construction industry - to take responsibility for both past and future carbon emissions with our Lifetime Carbon Neutral commitment, and this partnership with Schneider Electric is an important part of this.” www.velux.co.uk

The prospective PPAs aim to represent a mix of clean technologies, with VELUX looking

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


INDUSTRY NEWS

Twinfix joins Manufacturers Alliance Twinfix has announced that this year the Company has joined the Cheshire Manufacturers Alliance. The Manufacturers Alliance brings together like-minded manufacturing businesses to share ideas and best practices. Through its many group events as well as coaching and mentoring between the members the organisation is a great place for members to work together to help their businesses grow and develop.

a good fit with the profile of manufacturing businesses we support; progressive, open to learning and sharing with others, and very much down to earth. Joint MD Vicky Evans will be joining one of our established peer support groups based in Cheshire and will meet monthly to develop her leadership skills, work on the Twinfix strategy and share best practice ideas with other local SME manufacturers.

Future Building www.twinfix.co.uk Standards Consulation New appointments at Kawneer published Gary Sheader, Founder and Managing Director of the Manufacturers Alliance shared, “We are happy to welcome Twinfix to the Manufacturers Alliance community. They are

Consultant. In recent years Gary has been an integral part of the business’s success helping drive market leading, innovative project solutions for Kawneer’s customer base. Gary Ledger

Harry Keable

Architectural aluminium specialist Kawneer UK Ltd, has made two new key appointments. Gary Ledger has been promoted to Technical Director. Starting his life in design with the Product Development function and subsequently moving into the Training Manager role and more recently for the past 3 years as Technical

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

Harry Keable is Kawneer’s new Architectural Adviser for the South East and part of London. Harry has a design and technical background in aluminium facade systems and gained a degree in Architecture at Leicester’s De Montfort University, which coincidentally features Kawneer systems. He lives in London and lists rugby, watersports and photography among his wide ranging interests. www.kawneer.com

The Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government has published The Future Building Standards Consultation covering changes to Part L (Conservation of fuel and power) and Part F (Ventilation) for non-domestic buildings and dwellings as well as overheating in new residential buildings. Relevant documents include: • The consultation document • Impact assessment • Draft guidance for Approved Documents L, F and overheating. These can be accessed at https://www.gov.uk/government/ consultations/the-future-buildingsstandard The consultation closes on 13th April 2021.

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NEW PROJECTS Crown Place, Norwich Architectural glazing systems developed and supplied by leading UK manufacturer Kawneer successfully met a trio of criteria for the £50 million award-winning redevelopment of two existing commercial office blocks into premium student accommodation. A large part of the façade features Kawneer’s AA®100 curtain wall system with 50mm sightlines and AA®720 top-hung glazed-in and AA®720 standalone windows. www.kawneer.com

SEGRO Park Amsterdam Airport Logistics Centre Consideration was given to a way of daylighting between the aisles in this warehouse, to meet the requirements of “BREEAM Excellent”. Techcomlight have supplied and installed ninety-six type 330-O Solatubes, including prefabricated insulated roof curbs, to provide the solution. A further two-hundred and forty three Solatubes are due to be installed over the course of the project. www.techcomlight.co.uk

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www.daylightingmag.co.uk


NEW PROJECTS Spencer Norton House, Bristol Wrightstyle installed a protected escape route for Spencer Norton House, a ten-storey residential block. An old aluminium non-fire rated curtain wall screen also had to be removed from the core of the stairway. Wrightstyle installed a double-glazed screen from its SR60 range, with a roof maintenance access door. The entire screen, from the ground floor upwards, is firerated to 30/30, greatly enhancing fire safety. www.wrightstyle.co.uk

Pembroke Dock Station Twinfix worked with Principal Contractor AmcoGiffen, restoring this glazed canopy at Pembroke Dock Station. Twinfix supplied its innovative Georgian Wired Multi-Link-Panel NF (nonfragile) roofglazing to replace the old discoloured glazing. Georgian wired polycarbonate is a 6mm solid polycarbonate sheet with a dimpled surface that mimics the Georgian wired glass that it replaced, to maintain the appearance of the canopy. www.twinfix.co.uk

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

January/February 2021

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ENERGY EFFICIENCY

The rooflighting renaissance The role of rooflights in building energy efficiency – and how to identify a thermally efficient rooflight: by NARM, The National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers, the UK’s trusted trade association for rooflights No-one likes to spend time in dark, gloomy indoor spaces. A high level of daylight has become an aspirational feature in modern homes – and is also recognised as highly beneficial in work environments. It’s widely known that a bright, daylit interior doesn’t just make us feel better: it can have a significant beneficial effect on our health, wellbeing and performance. However, there’s another clear, but less welldocumented advantage that carries equal significance in today’s world:

More daylight in buildings means lower energy consumption and fewer harmful emissions Government figures from around the world estimate that artificial lighting accounts for between 15% and 20% of global energy consumption. Think about that in relation to your home or workplace. Simply relying less on artificial light during daylight hours, can result in big energy savings and therefore significant reductions in C02 emissions. So what’s the simplest and most efficient way to increase daylight levels in virtually any kind of building? Rooflights. Rooflights and roof windows can let in up to twice as much light as the same area of conventional vertical windows

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and up to 3 times as much light as dormer windows, because the glazing is pointing directly at the light source (the sky & sun) with very little diffused or reflected light. Carefully positioned rooflights can also reduce demands on heating, due to the effects of ‘solar gain’ – although it should be noted that unwanted overheating can result during summer months, if rooflights or shading are poorly specified or positioned inappropriately. As recently as the turn of the millenium, there was still a perception amongst many construction industry professionals, that rooflights had a negative effect on the energy efficiency of buildings. This view was borne out of the fact that even the best insulating rooflights of the time generally offered lower thermal performance than surrounding roof areas.

The rooflighting renaissance More recently, advances in product design and increasingly stringent building regulations have changed the landscape of rooflighting and building design. Today’s high quality rooflights and roof windows provide exceptionally high insulation values – in many cases comparable with surrounding roof structures. This fact, together with the opportunity for maximising light levels,

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


ENERGY EFFICIENCY NARM Technical Document NTD01.2 2017

An introduction to natural daylight design through rooflighting

“Today’s high quality rooflights and roof windows provide exceptionally high insulation values – in many cases comparable with surrounding roof structures. ”

GETTING

ROOFLIGHTS RIGHT

What to ask your builder or architect

NARM has published a number of informative technical documents covering rooflighting & energy efficiency. These are available for free download from www.narm.org.

has made rooflights an important contributor to maximising energy efficiency in all kinds of buildings.

because the structure around the glazing is often subject to higher thermal losses than the glazing itself.

How to identify a thermally efficient rooflight

There are many excellent UK suppliers of properly designed rooflights which will offer years of safe, reliable and energy-efficient service. One simple and certain way to ensure you’re dealing with such a company, is to establish whether your supplier is a NARM member company or subscriber. NARM has stringent membership criteria, a key part of which is that any product supplied by a member company is fully compliant with Building Regulations and meets all required standards. NARM member companies are listed on their website, together with other useful information covering topics including energyefficiency, safety and general design considerations.

The thermal efficiency of all building products is indicated by a ‘u-value’: the lower the value, the higher the thermal efficiency. For domestic dwellings, the Building Regulations require a rooflight u-value of 2.0 or less for new build projects and 1.6 or less for refurbishment. These figures apply to the whole assembly, including any upstand, kerb or frame to which the rooflight is fixed. However, to flatter the efficiency of their products, some rooflight suppliers quote ‘centre pane’ u-values which apply only to the glazing, not the complete assembly. It’s therefore extremely important to confirm with your supplier that the quoted u-value is for the whole assembly, not just the glass. This is

www.daylightingmag.co.uk

www.narm.org.uk

January/February 2021

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ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Rooflights & energy efficiency at home Andrea Mittelmeier, Head of Marketing at Whitesales, considers how modern daylighting solutions can contribute to energy efficiency in our homes.

Energy efficiency is a hot topic… excuse our appalling pun but we couldn’t resist the opportunity to inject a little humour – most definitely needed at the moment. However, it is still a true statement – with ambitious targets of net carbon zero by 2050, and heavy government investment in cutting-edge technologies and incentive schemes, it seems the spotlight is shining particularly brightly on this important subject right now. Net zero refers to achieving a balance between the amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced and the amount removed from the atmosphere. There are two different routes to achieving net zero, which work in tandem: reducing existing emissions and actively removing greenhouse gases. According to the Technology Strategy Board, the UK’s built environment accounts for 45% of total carbon emissions (27% from domestic buildings and 18% from non-domestic), and 73% of domestic emissions arise from space heating and the provision of hot water. With percentages like these it’s easy to understand why ambitious targets for the reduction of energy use in homes

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specifically are on the agenda.

Educating homeowners about energy efficiency Energy efficiency considerations are of course considered at the design and build stage of any new home – but what happens after that? The ‘joy of homeownership’ brings a litany of costs – running costs, on-going maintenance to name a couple. So naturally, homeowners are always looking out for ways to decrease these costs. However, how and where to start is often the problem. For professionals in the industry, understanding the changes that can be implemented in a home to increase energy efficiency are easy to grasp – but maybe not so for homeowners themselves.

Incentives to change

“According to the Technology Strategy Board, the UK’s built environment accounts for 45% of total carbon emissions (27% from domestic buildings and 18% from nondomestic), and 73% of domestic emissions arise from space heating and the provision of hot water.”

With the Green Homes Grant Scheme, the government is offering homeowners in England vouchers worth up to £5000 to cover up to twothirds of the cost of energy-efficient and low carbon heat saving measures. The voucher must be used for at least one “primary” improvement, which includes measures such as installing new loft insulation – then covering the same amount for “secondary” improvements, such as replacing old single glazing with efficient new roof windows.

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


ENERGY EFFICIENCY

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January/February 2021

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ENERGY EFFICIENCY

The good news Although flat roof glazing does not qualify for the scheme, many homeowners are realising this is the perfect time to invest in their whole property. Savvy consumers also understanding that energy-efficient rooflights, when properly selected and installed, can help minimize heating, cooling, and lighting costs.

A breath of fresh air Sometimes, the priorities of good airflow and energy efficiency can seem at cross-purposes with one another. The techniques used for air sealing a home to make it more energy efficient can also significantly decrease its ventilation. This can reduce air quality and lead to increased risk of allergy and asthma complications, as well as a less pleasant living environment. This doesn’t have to be the case, however. Releasing the hot air that naturally accumulates near the ceiling can be efficiently achieved with the installation of an opening rooflight. With manual or electric opening options incorporated

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into many rooflight designs, effective ventilation can be an integral part of a rooflight installation.

A drop in the ocean… How ambitious are government targets? Will efforts to encourage energy efficiency deliver tangible results? Commentators with far more expertise and knowledge on the subject have plenty of insight to proclaim. But surely, all of us being more focused on our energy use is no bad thing. I’ll close with a quote from David Attenborough “We are at a unique stage in our history. Never before have we had such an awareness of what we are doing to the planet, and never before have we had the power to do something about that. Surely we all have a responsibility to care for our Blue Planet”. And also, the old adage, every bit helps…

“Sometimes, the priorities of good airflow and energy efficiency can seem at cross-purposes with one another... this doesn’t have to be the case, however. ”

www.whitesales.co.uk

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


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SMARTER


SPECIAL FEATURE

daylight diary Reasons to be optimistic for 2021 Considering the challenges we have all faced over the last year, as we enter 2021 the UK’s rooflight industry appears to be performing well. During the early part of the first UK lockdown in back in March 2020, manufacturing at our member company sites was suspended and construction sites were temporarily closed, while management functions generally remained active through work-at-home initiatives and on-line communications. However, most, if not all of our members resumed manufacturing in April/May under new Covid-safe guidelines and demand held up surprisingly well in most sectors, particularly in the period immediately after the first lockdown. As a trade association with many members normally engaging in meetings and working groups, we remained highly active using Covid-safe on-line communications throughout 2020 and will continue to so so into 2021 - until such time as face-to-face meetings can resume. NARM representatives have been working closely with other influential industry bodies including CPA, the Construction Products Association, Eurolux, the European trade association for rooflights and BSI,

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the British Standards Institute.

Jan/Feb

Following on from this work, in 2021 we will be publishing a number of new technical documents and continuing to promote our recently launched safety campaign to promote the use of laminated inner panes on glass rooflights.

2021

It’s difficult to predict how the industry will fare over the coming months, faced with so many variables. However, now with the approval and roll-out of the new Covid-19 vaccines, there’s a case for increased optimism - particularly in view of the continued high demand for rooflighting products across many sectors. Whatever 2021 holds in store, we’ll be maintaining our focus on supporting the industry and promoting safety and best practice. You can find out more about NARM and download our technical documents at: www.narm.org.uk Access our on-line RIBA CPD seminar and other CPD materials at: www. ribacpd.com Become a NARM member

Stay up-to-date with NARM on LinkedIn and Twitter

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STAY SAFE

with GRP rooflights from Filon Safety is at the front and centre of our product policy: Our technical expertise has contributed directly to UK rooflight non-fragility classification over decades, with Filon personnel playing key safety roles in influential trade associations including NARM (National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers) and ACR (Advisory Committee for Roofsafety). Our unique, patented Fixsafe system is the only solution that allows profiled rooflights to be safely installed from within the building envelope, without the need to access fragile roof areas. We offer a range of fire grades to provide compliance with Building Regulations. Our Supasafe triple reinforced rooflights provide high impact resistance, spanning and load-bearing capabilities. We’re the UK’s longest established manufacturer of profiled rooflights by continuous process, with a successful track record of excellence in design, product performance and customer support. As you’d expect, we’re also currently employing Covid-secure working practices throughout our operations. Filon: truly a ‘safe pair of hands’ for specifiers.

Telephone 01543 687300 Email: sales@filon.co.uk

www.filon.co.uk


DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING

A view on daylight planning in America By Megan Kruse and Edward Clark A UK survey1 updated in 2020 found that 16 countries had national daylight regulations including seven with Right to Light laws. Conspicuously, the US is not one of them...

In the 1950’s, a US landmark legal decision rejected this common law provision. Since then American cities have determined how or if daylight protection is considered in local design. Most have prioritized the efficiencies of dense urban housing, office space and mass transportation over focus on environmental and human health impacts. But that’s changing. A decade of unchecked density and rising awareness of health risks have prompted new urban towers to promote access to daylight as the ultimate amenity. Unfortunately, daylight access is only considered and optimized for the new buildings. This unilateral approach is leaving neighbors of new developments in the dark. Seattle is among the country’s fastest growing cities. Here, downtown neighbors have begun pressing the case for daylight preservation standards. As an urban livability advocate and sustainable design professional involved in this effort, we see the following themes driving the

daylight discussion and preservation movement.

“The pandemic has made access to daylight more urgent as millions worldwide are forced indoors and dependent on daylight available from their windows.”

Circadian Health Recognition of daylight’s function in regulating circadian rhythms has sparked international research on its role in heart disease, diabetes, cancer dementia and more. In Seattle, scientists are analyzing the connection between low levels of daylight and the severity of autoimmune diseases such as MS, a condition found in the overcast Pacific Northwest at triple the national rate. Likewise, poor mental health has been associated with lack of sustained sun exposure, most notably in Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), and its lesser form, winter depression common here and other northern cities.

COVID-19 The pandemic has made access to daylight more urgent as millions worldwide are forced indoors and dependent on daylight available from their windows. Prompted by the sudden work from

1 https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk/w/images/1/1d/David_Strong_(1of2)The_Daylight_Factor_TSB-BRE_ paper_v_3.pdf

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www.daylightingmag.co.uk


DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING

Seattle is among the fastest-growing cities in the US. Currently, daylight access is only considered and optimized for new buildings, leaving neighbors of new developments in the dark.

home phenomenon now considered a long term trend, the Rensselaer Institute conducted a daylight survey2 last spring. It found those working from home who had access to “somewhat to very bright light� experienced fewer sleep disturbances, less anxiety and depression, and increased happiness. Beyond Circadian health benefits, scientists have confirmed sunlight’s ultraviolet, antibacterial properties to kill viruses including Covid-19 on surfaces. They foresee sunlight will be key in post-pandemic building design. The pandemic has also caused urban centers to see a dramatic loss of population as occupants seek more space in a healthier setting. If we hope to restore our cities, the quality of the urban environment must be improved.

Designing Green Development for the inside and out Fortunately, the push for urban density has come with a renewed interest in the environment and public health. Green certified buildings once aimed at energy savings and conservation now seek to incorporate health and wellness benefits associated with access to daylight, fresh air and access to nature through biophilia design strategies. Commercial developers advertise these green building features as maintaining a happier, healthier workforce with higher productivity. Residential towers have followed suit making daylight and views central to their marketing campaigns.

2 https://www.lrc.rpi.edu/resources/newsroom/pr_story.asp?id=464

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DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING “High land and construction costs and small building envelopes leave little room or incentive to provide creative, equitable lighting solutions for dense urban neighborhoods. ”

While desirable, green certification standards only apply to the building certified without considering its impacts to adjacent buildings. Hence a development proposed recently under Seattle’s Living Building Challenge is under fire by neighbors. They say the bonus height and floor ratio it received for meeting green standards exceeds current zoning and substantially reduces their access to daylight.

Introducing light literacy and analysis to Design Review After years of frenzied building activity, Seattle has reached the stage where small urban infill lots are slated to hold towers over 150 metres. High land and construction costs and small building envelopes leave little room or incentive to provide creative, equitable lighting solutions for dense urban neighborhoods. Even with incentives or directives, there’s no standard or framework to analyze daylight. Environmental review happens after design review where

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project designs are set . Both reviews briefly consider glare or shadows a building may cast but not the absolute loss of daylight to existing buildings. This allowed the recent permit approval for a tower that daylight modeling shows will reduce up to 100% of existing daylight to residents of two adjacent buildings.

Heading for the Light To paraphrase Thomas Fuller, daylight planning in the US may be in the ‘darkness before the dawn,’ however, the horizon is in sight. The pace of progress will be determined by the success of individual permit appeals and other factors in play. Among them is federal government recognition of daylight’s role in health. Another is support from local politicians who embrace Green New Deal policies but have been slow to check big developments that feed the City budget. But there is movement in these areas.

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DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING Government recognition Removed from local zoning, the federal government is laying the foundation for daylight preservation by confirming its role in human health. To-date, two of America’s preeminent health organizations have acknowledged daylight’s role in healthy urban housing and development. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) website3 states “housing environment constitutes one of the major influences on health and wellbeing” and cites daylight in three of nine housing elements crucial to “fundamental physiologic needs.” In 2019, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a technical bulletin4 reviewing EU EN17037. It said, “Daylighting has proven to be beneficial for the health and well-being of building occupants.” Concluding, “With the increased awareness of healthy design in the US, similar requirements may be adopted here in the future.”

The US General Services Administration, the largest landholder and building operator in the US has actively funded and participated in light and health research. It also issues publications encouraging the use of daylight in building design. At the Washington state level, two legislators representing Seattle’s urban core have offered their support for Daylight for All legislation to introduce daylight as a required element in the state’s Growth Management Act. Additionally, the City Council Member representing downtown Seattle has agreed to study daylight in future livability legislation.

Standardizing daylight analysis and measurements

“The immediate need is to develop a common literacy and understanding of daylight at all levels of planning and establish metrics for analysis applied consistently across jurisdictions. For this we’ve looked to pioneering work in the UK and EU. ”

The immediate need is to develop a common literacy and understanding of daylight at all levels of planning and establish metrics for analysis applied consistently across jurisdictions. For this we’ve looked to pioneering work in the UK and EU.

3 https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/publications/books/housing/cha02.htm 4 https://www.orf.od.nih.gov/TechnicalResources/Documents/Technical%20Bulletins/19TB/Daylighting%20 %E2%80%93%20European%20Standard%20EN%2017037%20October%202019-Technical%20Bulletin_508.pdf

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DAYLIGHT & SUNLIGHT PLANNING

Coalescing around daylight measurements, methods and standards will propel urban daylight into wider global consideration. It will greatly reduce the learning curve for decisionmakers and reduce the burden for practitioners. The holy grail will be achieving consistent results and establishing a set of minimum daylight thresholds to evaluate daylight at the street level and on adjacent building facades. Consistency can be achieved by applying pertinent variables including annualized climate data and a building’s function for work or residential occupancy.

Looking to the horizon The world is at an historic inflection point, with cities being challenged and redefined by a global health crisis. In Seattle and elsewhere, an extended development boom has sacrificed daylight relevant to the pandemic’s

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impacts and to the long term quality of the urban human habitat. Global practitioners already have the tools and knowledge to quantify and illustrate daylight loss. We hope sharing our experience will add data points for consideration in creating standards for a sustainable and bright future.

Megan Kruse is a communications consultant who works on urban livability issues and resides in downtown Seattle.

Edward Clark is director of Circa Dies, a sustainable design consultancy experienced in IES, WELL AP, LEED AP, RESET and AP. He was formerly in-house consultant for ZGF Architects LLC, an award winning North American design firm.

www.daylightingmag.co.uk


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INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS

Rooflights Breathe New Life into Historic Railway Pumping Station Case Study by Stella Rooflight

Shore Road Pumping Station is a Grade 2 Listed building in Birkenhead on the Wirral peninsular, Merseyside. The three-storey Italianate style building was designed by engineers James Brunlees and Charles Douglas Fox and constructed in conjunction with the Mersey Railway in order to house steam pumping engines, which drew water from the rail tunnels. The building housed two ‘Grasshopper’ Beam Engines (manufactured by Andrew Barclay of Kilmarnock), which powered pumps designed to remove water from the railway tunnel under the River Mersey. These steam driven pumps have today been replaced by modern electric versions, however one of the original pumps, the ‘Giant Grasshopper’, remains in the building, although it is no longer operational. Up until 2014 the building served as a public museum, however today the building is closed to the public and maintained and operated by Network Rail. The property is primarily constructed from red brick and comprises six bays of blind arcading with engaged brick columns and round headed arches subdivided by brick buttresses to the longitudinal elevations and three bays to the gables elevations. Each elevation is supplemented by small round arched single glazed metal framed windows, decorative brick dentils / articulation and stone hood moulds / string courses. To the southwest gable end of the main building is a single storey duo pitched roof

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outshoot of similar style. The roof structure is of hipped construction covered with Welsh slate and clay ridge tiles, supplemented by ornamental finials at each apex. The internal roof structure is of timber queen post construction (a truss in which two posts are placed on a tie beam to support the principle rafters above, with the vertical posts held in place laterally by a collar beam). These roof trusses are in turn engaged into the external masonry walls. Shore Road Pumping Station is located within the Hamilton Square Conservation Area – an area designated in recognition of the architectural qualities and historic significance of the realised portion of the Grand Georgian Development. Network Rail is currently undertaking an extensive package of works to the Shore Road Pumping Station building to secure the building’s fabric in a historically appropriate and sensitive manner. As such, a programme of works were recently authorised for the refurbishment of the building, consisting of the replacement/repair of various elements of damaged fabric.

“The building housed two ‘Grasshopper’ Beam Engines.. which powered pumps designed to remove water from the railway tunnel under the River Mersey.”

As a major part of the refurbishment and preservation work, contractors MFG Construction appointed Stella Rooflight to design and manufacture the Conservation rooflights to replace the original skylights sited in the principle roof slopes of the buildings’ Welsh slate roof. MFG commissioned Stella to produce

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INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS

four bespoke rooflights, of two sizes, the first two with a size of 15,260mm (w) x 1310mm (h) and the second pair at 2842mm (w) x 1304mm (h).  Stella divided the large rooflight into five frames to ensure that framework was kept to a minimum and the amount of glazing maximised, while still providing manageable sizes. Each section consisted of five glazing bars and six glass units giving a total of 30 panes for each rooflight. The smaller rooflights were produced as single frames with a total of six glass

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units. Each pair of rooflights were linked together with a 316 stainless capping, giving the impression of two large individual rooflights, sitting adjacent to each other in the roof structure. Due to the height of the building and the inaccessibility of the rooflights, regular cleaning was not going to be straightforward, therefore carbon or mild steel frames were not an option due to the problems that can occur with rusting if they are not regularly

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INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS

maintained. As all Stella rooflights are manufactured using a Marine Grade 316 stainless steel frame and finished with a C5 marine powder coating, they were the ideal choice for the project. Furthermore, the flush fit offered by the thin lines of steel and genuine glazing bars on each unit, would perfectly replicate the original Victorian design and satisfy the Planning and Conservation officers involved. As the rooflights needed to be individually designed to exactly match the size of the originals, a set of complex, detailed drawings were created by Stella, each showing the full assembly of the linked frames as well as files for each individual component, based on the precise measurements provided. Due to the sheer size and weight of each rooflight, one of the major

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challenges for the MFG team was the positioning and installation of the rooflights, three storeys up in a building situated on a busy main road. To help overcome this challenge Stella allowed for four lifting eyes, which were welded to each individual frame during the manufacturing process, allowing the contractor to lift the frames into position with a crane. The entire design and manufacture process took a total of 8 weeks, despite facing the unprecedented challenges that the early stages of the Covid-19 crisis posed. Having the entire supplier, manufacturing and assembly process based in the UK, enabled Stella to overcome these challenges and ensure that the remaining refurbishment works were unaffected by any delay. www.stellarooflight.co.uk

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January/February 2021

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SCHOOLS

Bespoke structural glazing systems connect the University of Cambridge Primary School with nature Case Study by VELUX Commercial

350 square metres of structural glazing from VELUX Commercial was installed to bring natural light and ventilation to the University of Cambridge Primary School – part of a much larger expansion project. The Northwest Cambridge development is a self-sustainable, modern urban space aiming to create a vibrant area for the university’s key workers. The Cambridge Primary School, designed by Marks Barfield Architects, was the first building completed in readiness to serve the local community.

Bespoke structural glazing brings natural light and fresh air to the visionary design The unusual shape of the building, coupled with the 15˚ pitch roof, required more non-standard shapes of glazing, kerbs and upstands to be installed effectively whilst maintaining the required performance. A natural ventilation system adequate for the

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high ceilings was also essential for the energy efficiency of the building envelope.

“To provide the right level of illumination, nine The specification mandated application of a bespoke roof glazing system. bespoke rooflights The solution was a combination of were recommended customised modular and bespoke and designed to designed structural roof glazing with additional ventilation elements to specification” bring fresh air and daylight to the main building.

Maximising daylight and natural ventilation with bespoke roof glazing The doughnut-shaped steel frame main building has an outer radius of 46m and an inner radius of 24.5m accompanied with a pitched lightweight roof. To provide the right level of illumination, nine bespoke rooflights were recommended and designed to specification. Whilst the daylight requirements dictated the optimal size as 4.1x7.3m, the circular shape of the building was reflected in

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SCHOOLS

the final trapezium shape of the glazing pane (the length tapers from 7.3m to 6.5m). A vertical back frame sits 1.6m above the outer radius roof to account for the opposite 15o pitch and to accommodate the louvre damper system. The thermally enhanced rooflight system with insulated gable ends was designed for optimum thermal performance of the roof openings. The louvre damper system provides natural ventilation in the high ceiling rooms and works in conjunction with the mechanical ventilation incorporated into the additional seven flat glass rooflights in two sizes. Three units of 1.2x1.2m were fitted to the outer radius and four larger, 1.5x1.5m units to the inner radius. All the units are manufactured from thermally broken aluminium and glazed with 6mm toughened outer and 6.4mm laminated low ‘E’ inner glazing with 16mm air

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gaps to comply with both the thermal insulation and the leakage criteria of Building Regulations Part L. All seven units are equipped with chain motors to facilitate roof access. The steel frame communal block is a two-storey building with a flat roof, 36x26m in size, and is home to the hall, reception, seminar rooms and atrium dining room. Three 1.3x1.3m active roof terminals were installed above the seminar rooms and the small hall to provide ventilation and illumination optimal for creation of a positive teaching and learning environment. The main hall saw two bespoke rooflights (8.2m long and spanning 1.4m) installed whilst the dining room area benefited from a spectacular 8.2x3.8m (tapering to 0.7m) rooflight system. www.veluxcommercial.co.uk

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DAYLIGHTING ICONS The biggest: the best: the most awe-inspiring; the most outrageous; the most influential... In this regular feature we indulge ourselves and our readers with images of daylighting projects throughout the years that simply deserve a double page photograph...

Louis Vuitton Foundation, Paris Designed by Architect Frank Gehry, this unique two-story structure has 11 galleries of different sizes, a 350-seat auditorium on the lowerground floor and multilevel roof terraces for events and art installations Gehry had to build within the square footage and two-story volume of a bowling alley that previously stood on the site; anything higher had to be glass. The resulting glass building takes the form of a sailboat’s sails inflated by the wind. These glass sails envelop the “iceberg”, a series of shapes with white, flowery terraces. The galleries on the upper floors are lit by recessed or partially hidden skylights.

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DAYLIGHTING ICONS

Roman Babakin / Shutterstock. com

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@Daylighting_Mag

Twitterings Follow us for regular updates between issues... in the meantime, more highlights...

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DAYLIGHTING MAGAZINE

DAYLIGHTING Magazine back issues Click on the cover images below to open back issues Issue 2 Jan/Feb 2017

Issue 3 Mar/Apr 2017

Issue 4 May/Jun 2017

Issue 5 July/August 2017

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

IN THIS ISSUE:

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Passivhaus Daylighting

Daylighting in education

DAYLIGHTING & HEALTH PATENT GLAZING NON-FRAGILITY GLAZING INNOVATION AND MORE

DAYLIGHTING & VENTILATION TUBULAR DAYLIGHT SYSTEMS GRP ROOFLIGHTS RIGHTS TO LIGHT AND MORE

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DAYLIGHTING AT HOME DAYLIGHTING IN FARMING DAYLIGHT & NEIGHBOURLY MATTERS AND MORE

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Issue 8 January/February 2018

Issue 9 March/April 2018

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DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY FOR BETTER BUILDINGS

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ENERGY SAVING WITH LIGHTING CONTROLS CURTAIN WALLING AND MORE

Issue 13 November/December 2018

Issue 11 July/August 2018

SUN TUBES DELIVERING DAYLIGHT DEEP INTO BUILDINGS • ROOFLIGHTS & NON-FRAGILITY • PASSIVHAUS • DAYLIGHTING IIN MUSEUMS & GALLERIES AND MORE

Issue 20 January/February 2020

THE INNOVATION ISSUE

DELIVERING DAYLIGHT TO DUNDEE’S NEW V&A

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CONTROLLING

HEAT& GLARE • DAYLIGHTING IN SCHOOLS • LISTED BUILDINGS • ROOF SAFETY • FIRE SAFETY AND MORE

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RETAIL SECTOR • DAYLIGHTING IN EDUCATION • LIGHT TRANSMISSION: FACTORS TO CONSIDER • ROOF SAFETY • TRANSLUCENT CLADDING AND MORE

Issue 24 September/October 2020

Is the new European Standard measuring daylight in buildings is too complicated?

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ROOFLGHT REFURBISHMENT SOLAR SHADING GLASS RECYCLING NEWS LATEST PROJECTS AND MORE

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EDITOR Paul Bennett paul@daylightingmag.co.uk Tel: 01295 711666 Mobile: 07900 895110

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of content, the publisher does not accept liability for errors. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. This publication contains editorial photographs which may have been supplied and paid for by suppliers. Full terms and conditions can be found on our website.

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DAYLIGHTING Magazine is published by Bennett B2B, a UK communications and publishing business offering a complete range of specialist services for companies serving the construction sector: • On-line publishing • Copywriting • Design for web and print • Photography • Video & drone services • 3D imaging • PR • Consultancy Telephone 01295 711666 Email: paul@bennettb2b.co.uk www.bennettb2b.co.uk

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