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The exclusive community companion for Tauranga Moana inhabitants Issue 11 - Winter 2018 

Maungatapu underpass

etting close! Connecting the new tapu underpass to Welcome Bay Road

Tauranga's By-election Do cast a vote!

will be connecting the pass project to Welcome Bay n lane diversions, speed ed surfaces, and off peak and come Bay Road near Near Awanui Place there will be lace, speed restrictions, night ry pedestrian diversions.

We will do as much work as we can during the April school holidays and at night to minimise the impact on traffic, however there will be some delays during the day due to the speed restrictions. We know delays can be frustrating but we urge you to take care when travelling through these areas, and understand the responsibility you have to protect yourself, your passengers, as well as other road users and construction workers. Resurfacing work of the SH29A Hairini and Maungatapu roundabouts is expected to take place in mid-May, while work to connect the underpass with Turret Road and Hairini Street is expected to start in late-May. * This work is weather dependent.

or cycle through the underpass at the Page unity day6-9

baywaka.nz

Nga hapu tour of Maungatapu underpass Local hapu are an important partner in the Maungatapu underpass project, and kuia and kaumatua of Ngai Te Ahi, Ngati He and Ngati Ruahine whanau, hapu and iwi saw first-hand the overall progress and development on a recent bus trip through the site. In addition to going through the underpass, the bus trip was an opportunity to see and hear about the wetlands restoration for Te Pahou and the aspirations of nga hapu, the work that has been done on the Kaitemako culvert to enhance fish passage, the Tongaparaoa wetlands area near Ila Park, and the shared cycle way on SH29A from Poike Road. Hapu Project Coordinator Rondell Reihana said the cultural significance and unique regard given to the whenua was fully embraced by all kuia and kaumatua on board.

Front seat view: from left Eva Tawa and Kamiria Farrell in the underpass. Ninety-nine-year-old Hariata Ririnui is in the seat behind.

y is being planned for 27 May 2018 to give you a chance to walk or cycle through the new underpass before it opens to traffic. We’ll about the day, and park and ride options on our website, in community notices, and the media later this month. In the meantime, y.

Aerial view of the landscaping and wetlands area

Once completed, the Maungatapu underpass will be a two-lane link underneath the Maungatapu roundabout, improving the traffic flow around the Maungatapu and Hairini roundabouts. It will separate state highway and local traffic, and make travel safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

ooking pretty impressive. Come along to the community open day on 27 May and see if for yourself!

Maungatapu Underpass Community Day

ing you informed

0800 772 532

NZTAWaikatoBoP

nzta.govt.nz/hairinilink

NZTAwaibop

Page 24-25

We want to take you for a ride! Special offer... Page 12, 19

Entering the underpass: from left Gladys Richardson, Hinerongo Walker and Hinewai Taingahue.

SIGN UP

Stay up-to-date by signing up to the mailing list www.nzta.govt.nz/hairinilink


Community CONTENTS...

NoticeBoard

pg. 2 Noticeboard pg. 3 Editorial 4 pg. Feature pg. 6 Our Community 16 pg. Social pg. 26 Culture & Art kets pg. 30 Learning le pass Rialto tic10 b u o D Food & Recipes pg. 32 previous issue m o fr Sport & Wellbeing pg. 36 Abbie Crossley 40 pg. e Pets & Wildlif Lesley Ayers ng pg. 42 Business Murray Armstro en es Sue Andr pg. 46 Classifieds n Susie Marti pg. 47 Index

SOME BARIGNASIINDSE & STUFF

pg. 2 Rialto Tauranga WIN seats unity pg. 5 Aongatete Volunteer Comm pg. 6-9 TCC by-election pg. 10  Tauranga's Urban Strategy pg. 11 Our Mayoral Musings u !! pg. 12 Transpower in Maungatap pg. 12, 19 E-bike special offer to you! pg. 14  Are you a Risky Landlord? pg. 16 s Computer support - 7-day nics pg. 17 Todd Muller Constituent Cli pg. 22 FREE Garage door opener pg. 26 FUN ZONE & WIN !! p pg. 28 Travel Safe - Winter Pit Sto ats pg. 29 16th Ave Theatre - WIN Se pg. 32 Farm Shop open 24/7 icspg. 33 10% disc. at Hyalite Hydropon g. 34-35 Recipes - Gateau & Falafelp ls pg. 35 Oak Tree Restaurant specia ort pg. 38 Join Neighbourhood Supp pg. 46 Mobile Library timetable

ions ive quest f g in w o ll : he fo Answer t by 31 July 2018 Waka correctly ase in Bay

the incre is issue? (pg. 3) is t a h W •  for th e circulation you find th n a c e t o n h bank over? (pg. 4) • On whic n front c ) o i g n u f e blu e? (pg. 6-9 t o v r u o y cast y • Did you ir compan a p e r r e t u ) . 16 comp • Whichorts Bay Waka? (pg ride... on supp a r o f u o y t to take 19) • We warnopean e-bike? (pg. which Eu s to: r answer Email you ywaka.nz rialto@bao: or post t 37 PO Box 1 , 3140 Tauranga

ranga Taonga Tau

keen to Professionsalscussion about promote dis idea ... the museum

More info: nga /taonga-taura BayLive .co.nz z @baywaka .n Email : taonga

What’s on in Ohauiti Settlers Hall? Monday 6pm - Zumba classes Phone Barb, 544 9224

2nd Tuesday afternoon - The Ladies Social Circle Meets once a month Contact Jill Newall, 544 1860 Wednesday 7:15pm - Indoor Bowls All Welcome! Thursday 9am - Walking group phone 027 2867 7398 for more info .

Facebook: ‘Ohauiti Settlers’ or ‘Ohauiti Market’ (LIKE, to stay in touch) Functions up to 100 people For more information, availability and hire costs. Phone: 0800 042 848


May - July 2018

About us Editor:

Antoon ( = Un-Tone ) Moonen

Contact 7-days: 022 673 8006 editor@baywaka.nz Sub-editor:

Our Famous Fungi

Shirley Kerr Andy Belcher

Front Cover - Issue 11 Entoloma hochstetteri mushroom Photo: Shirley Kerr Circulation:

( +3,000 ) = 35,000

Publication Frequency:

Quarterly

Issue 12, Aug-Oct 2018, final reminder: Friday, 29 June 2018 Designed, produced and published by: Bay Media Ltd, T/A Bay Waka PO Box 137, Seventh Avenue Tauranga, New Zealand Phone: +64 (0)7 262 1000 International Standard Serial Number: ISSN 2538-077X (Print) ISSN 2538-0788 (Online) Material content in Bay Waka may be reproduced in part or in whole, provided appropriate credit and attribution is given, including any changes that were made, and you must also distribute your contributions under this same licence. DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Publisher.

Jim Peterson -

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A most welcome back!

Lisa Hickling Keith Woodcock

Photographers:

Bay Waka

Shirley Kerr, our local fungi enthusiast and photographer.

First off, I’d like to extend special thanks to Shirley Kerr, fungi photographer extraordinaire who has opened our eyes to the surprising beauty of fungi and mushrooms growing in the native forests surrounding Tauranga. We were so taken with her images that in the Feature section we didn’t leave any room for a picture of Shirley, so here she is... Her generosity in allowing us to share her photos with our readers is highly appreciated.

Have you cast your TCC Councillor vote yet? Or are you one of the 60% who doesn’t make an effort? What impresses me, is that 20 people have stuck their neck out and said, “I’m ready to work for the City”. You have to admire and respect their tenacity and goodwill extended toward our community – good on them! If you’re reading this and there is still time to vote, do so and carry that votingpaper to the nearest library to be sure it is counted. Be at the ‘big day out’ of the Maungatapu Underpass Community Open Day on Sunday 6 May, 10.00am – 2.30pm, in preparation for the ribbon cutting event on Wednesday, 6 June 2018 (see page 24-25). It has been fantastic to have the NZTA on board keeping us informed about this project and we look forward to tracking other NZTA projects after this one winds down. Finally, TCC’s terrific initiative organising the purchase of e-bikes for their staff (and 52 took up the offer!) got us thinking at Bay Waka. How could we help to facilitate a similar arrangement for our community at large? With a little fast talking to one of Europe’s leading e-bike suppliers, a deal with Bizobike was struck and we are about to offer their e-bikes in the $1,800-$3,000 price range. Bearing in mind they are the most popular e-bike supplier in their range, so we know their CE certified quality is something to be sure of. Register your interest to be kept informed and to take a test ride (page 12 and 19). Thank you for YOUR ongoing support and feel free to email us your feedback, comments and critique! P.S. We’ve got 5 double passes to give away to Rialto and also 16th Avenue Theatre, not to mention a remote-control cockroach on page 26, so Antoon M. why not have some fun and enter to win everything!

Achieving premium house prices for over

25 years!

 No auctions, just straight forward marketing which allows all buyers to participate

 Cost effective fees - savings of up to $4,600  Prior ex builder tips to maximise your value. Contact Jim on 0800 220 012

“LET MY EXPERIENCE PROFIT YOU” Email me today to acheive the best price for your property... jim@westbay.nz


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Hygrocybe firma Nikon D200, Lindemann Track.

Mycena interrupta - Panasonic FZ300, Puketoki Reserve.

Feature - Our Famous Fungi

Fascinating fungi H

aving gained a degree in botany and taught for nearly 30 years, I had a yearning for nature photography. So in 2000, after the kids left home and having the time and money to do something interesting, I began photographing fungi, mosses and ferns. The first track I visited was the Lindemann Pack Track near Katikati. It happened to be a good year for fungi and they soon got my full attention and believed that after going up the track five or six times, I would have photographed all the fungi that were there and I could start visiting other tracks. How little I knew! Even this year, 19 years later, I am still coming across species which I have not seen before on the Lindemann Track!

Gliophorus viridis scanned from a slide taken with a film camera Nikon F70-, Lindemann Track.

Having visited many other areas in the Kaimais over the years I find myself often surprised by new finds. It all depends on the weather and being in the right place at the right time. Given the right conditions, Otanewainuku, Puketoki, Ngamuwahine and Aongatete are all great areas for finding fungi. I have become involved with FUNNZ – the Fungal Network of New Zealand - and over the years have visited many parts of the country with their annual forays. It is always exciting to find species I haven’t seen before. Apart from photographing fungi, I have spent many hours peering down a microscope looking at cellular details of fungal specimens and referring to scientific descriptions that enable me to identify them. In doing so, I have come across a some species that have not been previously recorded in NZ. In the spring and summer my focus is on mosses, liverworts, ferns, orchids and lichens that are found in the bush.

Ramariopsis pulchella Nikon D200, Lindemann Track.

All species I have recorded in the Kaimais – and elsewhere - are on my website www.kaimaibush.co.nz. By Shirley Kerr I write for this magazine in the hope that people have their attention drawn to the lesser known flora of our country and visit my website! Front cover: Entoloma hochstetteri mushrooms are little, just seven centimetres high, so they’re not easy to find. But, if you’re lucky enough to have a $50 bank note in your pocket, have you ever noticed that little blue mushroom printed on that note, right next to the kokako? Location: Aongatete Forest. Photgrapher: Shirley Kerr

Clavicorona piperata Panasonic LX7, Lindemann Track.


May - July 2018

Bay Waka

Breakfast with the Birds – past Autumn 2018

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Aongatete Forest Project (AFP) held their 3rd Breakfast with the Birds, based at Aongatete Outdoor Education Centre on April 20th. The Aongatete Forest forms a tiny 1.3% of the entire Kaimai – Mamaku State Forest, the bulk of which has no pest control activity and is infested with rats, possums, stoats, wild cats, hedgehogs and browsing animals. Volunteers have been carrying out pest control since 2006. At the recent annual Breakfast with the Birds, some 60 participants were treated to an evening at Aongatete Lodge to learn more about the Project’s activities, a scrumptious meal, and a walk in the forest when it got dark. Armed with torches, our guests discovered the invertebrates which come out to play at night. Local entomologist, Dr Peter Maddison lead a team of volunteers who helped our visitors find huge sheet-web spiders, wetas, millipedes and beetles along the easy graded Nature Walk in the forest. The following morning, it was up early to listen to the ‘Dawn Chorus’. The amazing sound of New Zealand’s iconic dawn chorus has disappeared from many places, but because the Aongatete volunteers have managed to keep pest levels low, the dawn chorus is a delight. After a delicious breakfast, participants were able to participate in a ‘fungal foray’ led by Shirley Kerr on a search of the forest for the amazing fungi (left) which is abundant in autumn. Shirley encouraged all participants to take photos of the fungal treasures they discovered. These photos were then shared with Shirley who was able to inform us about our finds without having to destroy them.

Mycena parsonsii Nikon D200, Aongatete Short Loop Track.

This Gliophorus pallidus is found in Aongatete Forest and Kaimai Ranges.

Aongatete Forest is flourishing because we try to control the constantly invading possums, rats and stoats. The trees are green and lush, threatened species like kokekohe browsed by possums are making a come-back. North Island Robin and rifleman are flourishing again. Aongatete is a showcase for what the entire Kaimai Mamaku forest could be like if pest control was widespread. If you would like to help us keep the forest healthy we hold regular work days. Go to our website www. aongateteforest. org/volunteerspage to find out more! By Barbara McGillivray, Chair, Aongatete Forest Project

Mycena flavovirens Panasonic FZ300, Aongatete Swimming Hole Track.

I write for Bay Waka magazine because I like to spread the word about the great work volunteers do at Aongatete Forest.

Feature - Our Famous Fungi

Mycena sp. - Olympus TG5, Otanewainuku.


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Bay Waka

Vote for those that can’t

Issue 11 - Winter 2018

I’m 16 years old. The only elections I can vote in are my school's Board of Trustees student representative elections. I wish I could vote in this by-election. I’ve read every leaflet, examined every hoarding and even go to ‘meet the candidate’ events and enjoy questioning candidates about their policy platform. The reason I’m writing this, is because I want you to use your voice, to represent those of us young people who can’t vote.

What is the big picture? In this by-election there are 20 candidates standing! You’ll have a tough choice trying to decide whom to vote for but make sure when you vote, think about the bigger picture. You might think, “Well that doesn’t really affect me”, or, “I wouldn’t need it, so I won’t support it”, but try and look beyond that. Think about those of us who can’t vote. Those who need you to make a good decision on our behalf.

How I would vote if I could When you open your voting paper please consider for yourself:

Our Community

• Who would be the best for Tauranga’s future? • Who would be the best for my family? • Who would be the best for me? Louis Donovan, Year 12, Tauranga Boys College

Think in that order and you might get a completely different candidate than the one you thought you’d prefer.

Young people need your vote to make a difference for us I’m deeply involved in politics, from this by-election, last year’s general election, and pretty much anything with the word vote in the title. I want to have a say and have my voice heard. So do a lot of other young people. In the last local body elections 60% of people didn’t vote. If you can vote, please do. Do it for us who can’t. You have the chance to have your voice heard and tell politicians what you really think. If we leave voting up to a certain demographic who always vote, politicians will tailor their policies to them.

Vote for all our futures

www.LesterGray.nz For too long Tauranga has survived on a beach, a hill and a retirement village.

S1815kdlester

Vote Lester Gray for a new age in city management. Positive, Forward-thinking, Transparent and Accountable!

I Will Back Residents and Rate Payers

I Will Back Residents and Rate Payers

Local politics mightn’t excite you, but it only takes a few minutes to read up about the candidates, tick a name, and send it in the post. It’s not just about the by-election, it’s about everyone's voice being heard, democracy flourishing, and holding local government to account for our future. Vote for you, vote for me, and vote for our future. There is probably still time when you read this. Thank you in advance, for your answer my letter by casting your vote on time. By Louis Donovan I write for this magazine because young people have a voice that needs to be heard.


Your community needs your vote “I have a dream” proclaimed Martin Luther King 50 years ago in Memphis, the night before he died and the content of the character shown by Dr King personified what he and many other great leaders expounded - the freedom to exercise one’s democratic right to vote. In this land of the long standing right for women to vote we paved the way for other countries to follow. The right to vote has been earned by a whakapapa, a history of brave and wise leaders who understood how important the voice of the people is, and without that voice the country and its communities would never reach their full potential. When we don’t exercise the right to vote and we leave it up to those who have a common opinion we leave ourselves wide open to onesided outcomes and for the most part these outcomes do not assist the poor. A classic example is the recent submissions held to say yes or no to the TECT proposal. Too often here in our own back yard we let

opportunities slide by because we are not motivated to exercise our right to vote and until that motivation changes nothing else will. Right now, in Tauranga Moana we are being asked to vote for a local councillor and there is a myriad of members plastered all over billboards putting their hand up and saying, “Pick Me!”. We as voters have choices and we base our final tick on what we want most in a candidate, and for most voters it’s all about rates, so whoever promises a hand-break on rates walks into council. But here’s the kicker as I see it and maybe Martin and Bobby did back in the day. Ask not what your vote can do for you, but what you and your vote can do for the wider community. If we collectively put our priority on the needs of the have-nots and start to measure success with the currency of mana and not money, we will get the full richness of the balanced community Doctor King believed in. And one he died for fifty years ago.

Bay Waka

Tauranga’s very own Tommy Kapai Wilson, CEO, Te Tuinga Whanau Trust

Haere mai Tauranga Moana, share the dream and VOTE for a councillor who represents us all and not just the rich, the ratepayers and the self righteous. By Tommy Kapai Wilson Why do I write for this magazine? Because I have a dream where democracy and the right to vote is the cornerstone of a country that allows its communities to flourish.

VOTE

ANNE PANKHURST A Councillor who listens. A Councillor who cares. A Councillor with experience.

WHO STANDS FOR

• Better transport solutions • Investment into the city

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• Unlocking the huge investment potential • Experience in governance and leadership

Our Community

May - July 2018


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

When a central government gets involved with local body politics What concerns me is local elections are filling up with candidates who are aligned with a political party from central government. My question is,

'Is it good for our city that we are getting less of the local in local government?'

Our Community

I wonder if we are losing something very important; that is, our independence of thought and the ability to see local issues from a local perspective rather than through the lens of party political central ‘messaging’. Our local issues become diluted into a blend that best suits small groups of ‘party strategists’ in Wellington. For a couple of decades now central government has infiltrated and sought to gain control of various arms of our community, regional, local government and even benevolent trusts as a means of high level mind-screw. It is not happening without intent, even where political parties seek control of local trusts that dish out money to community groups. Are we even aware of how many central government party people are on the ballot in the current Tauranga City Council by-election? I am increasingly concerned with the infiltration of central government pundits into local Tauranga politics because they operate off the song sheet of their party mantras, not mine and your local needs. They can voice opinions but when it comes to a vote, everyone reverts to party positions – and Local Government becomes just Government. Perhaps we should be asking quite strategic questions of these candidates that seeks to tease out how much independent thought they will bring the council table. Why do you think political parties seek to implant their voice in our affairs at a local body level? Should we even be concerned?

I believe we should be sure those on our local payroll are not limited by their allegiance elsewhere. By Paora Stanley, Chief Executive, Ngai Te Rangi Iwi I write for this magazine because I am really supportive of the efforts of Bay Waka to share ideas in the community.

Paora Stanley Chief Executive, Ngāi Te Rangi Iwi

The case for Māori wards Living in Tauranga city, I don’t have a say about the idea of implementing a single Māori ward seat in Western Bay of Plenty District Council and I have largely not engaged with the whole debate. Others however, led by Councillor Margaret Murray-Benge, supported by Don Brash and the Hobson’s Pledge brigade seem to be incensed with the idea to say the least, and that got me thinking. Having recently returned to New Zealand after over a decade living in Europe where I learned a new language and was exposed to many cultures that I didn’t know, I became worldly in a way I never could have, by staying put at home in New Zealand. Coming from a population-dense highly westernised Europe and returning home to see the incredible beauty of NZ with fresh eyes, I suddenly saw Māori culture differently. I was able to identify with the holistic approach to living in, and with the environment, that is recognisable all over the world amongst first nation peoples, but sadly not so much in westernised culture. It is vital that we recognise Māori, their centrality to our national identify and their role as guardians (kaitiaki) of our land. This role can be enshrined structurally in Māori wards. Yes, I know, regional, not district council is responsible for “environment” but the whole point is that in a holistic paradigm, you can’t separate people from environment, from infrastructure – they are all interrelated. Facing the environmental and climate challenges we do today, we need to ensure there is a place for this voice to be heard and that Māori are shown to hold a unique and special role in governing our country. This should be especially visible to the steady incoming stream of people seeking a better life here with us; people who may be refugees from war, economic hardship, Trump or even climate change, and actually know little about NZ. Let’s think positively and take Māori wards as an opportunity to lock in our national identity at a local level, in preparation for the potential future influx of displaced people who will need new homes in this turbulent world. Māori culture is New Zealand culture, we own it and there may come a time when we have to fight for it, to keep it, like now! Having Māori wards will make our community-work easier, to protect and cherish our national treasure, in unknown future happenings and times ahead. By Antoon Moonen I write for this magazine to share in positive thinking.


LOVE TAURANGA?

Vote for Council

Voting is now open for the 2018 at large Council by-election Make sure you have your say on the future of Tauranga by voting. Voting packs are now in the post for people to have their say on a vacant at large position on Council, and in the museum referendum. Voting is open from Monday, April 9 to 12pm Tuesday, 1 May. All special votes are to be made at Council’s customer service centre, 91 Willow St.

desktop tauranga.govt.nz

phone 07 577 7000

 info@tauranga.govt.nz

BY-ELECTION


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Density done well – Tauranga’s new Draft Urban Strategy

P

Our Community

ublic Inspirational leadership consultation is needed today Draft Tauranga Urban Strategy by each of Tauranga The worrying issues that A SUMMARY City Council, Western we see in Tauranga of Bay District Council, homelessness, lack of and BOP Regional housing affordability, poor Council for the physical and mental health, current cycle of their inequity and poverty have long-term plans all been influenced to is happening, or some extent (sometimes has now finished. a large extent) by the way We have each we have planned the city been asked for our – either through missteps thoughts on a limited by Council management number of issues or resistance by us to and the number of accepting the need to Our long term approach to managing growth and change within Tauranga submissions suggests change. There is no there is not much question that inspirational interest in matters leadership is needed to that will affect the future of development in the Bay of guide us through the changes ahead. Plenty. Tauranga City Council (TCC) will shortly enter a period of public consultation over its ‘Draft Tauranga Urban Strategy (TUS)’. By law, TCC must consult with us – which is a good thing. Similarly, TCC is under significant pressure to meet certain obligations contained in the Government’s National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity 2016.

Time to shift our thinking from ‘Me’ to ‘all of Us’ This is important stuff. This is going to determine the quality of Tauranga well into the future. Change is required and while change is hard, it is do-able provided we each prepare to shift our thinking a little bit from ‘me’ to ‘all of us’. Tauranga cannot afford to stay still, we cannot afford for the CAVE people (Citizens Against Virtually Everything) or the NIMBY’s (Not In My Back Yard), to resist the changes that must come. This is where a really good consultation process by TCC will promote a whole-community undertanding of why we must move boldly ahead.

Many thousands of homes are needed When people retire now, they have 20 or 30 years of living to do. Retired people are healthier, wealthier and more active than ever before. The grey bloom in Tauranga means that new homes being built should only be 1 or 2 bedrooms as the elderly downsize. Retired people want social engagement, not isolation. The draft TUS confirms that many thousands of homes are needed and that these homes need to be close to work, transport and entertainment.

Vibrant cities make happy people We need to ensure that Tauranga becomes a more vibrant city. Vibrant cities make happy people. Vibrant cities create a sense of community well-being, solidarity and security for people. We need places for community engagement, where activities and sharing take place. We need to open our public places to people, not to cars.

Intensification instead of urban sprawl Traffic congestion and housing go hand in hand. It now takes a long time to drive from Papamoa to central Tauranga and it is worsening as more and more homes are being built in Papamoa. But what if, instead of housing sprawling out into new suburbs we find ways to regenerate and build more compact homes in townhouse, row-house and low-rise apartment style collections closer to the urban centres? Many of us are saying we’d love to have this lifestyle close to town without the hassles of a section to maintain. But where is this housing? How can we build it affordably and quickly?

Co-design solutions to our city’s problems together with Council These are questions that the Draft Tauranga Urban Strategy wants us to think about and devise answers to. We’ll find answers when we sit down to talk with our Council. TCC has a set of problems it needs to solve so that the city operates more efficiently and effectively. We each have a set of problems that prevent us from being healthier, wealthier and happier citizens. They say a problem shared is a problem solved. We can sit around the consultation table with our Council and co-design the solutions to these problems. To find out more, and how to engage with the Draft Tauranga Urban Strategy, visit the website: www.tauranga.govt.nz/urban-strategy. By Peter McArthur I write for this magazine to encourage us all, that making Tauranga a better place need not be as difficult as it currently appears.


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

Recently, I read an article bemoaning the fact that some foreign leaders have visited NZ without even seeking a meeting with the Prime Minister. Although not on the same level, I get the same feeling when our own NZ officials visit Tauranga and sometimes I’m the last to know. Of course, a mayor has many commitments and can’t be everywhere, but it is nice to be kept informed. This is because for Tauranga to progress and solve its issues, from housing supply and traffic congestion, to social issues on our streets such as begging, we need to work together with Government and other agencies. The new Government is settling in to its role and at Council we are seeking every opportunity to meet and liaise with MPs and Cabinet Ministers and put our case for funds the Government is proposing to support the regions. We have the most efficient and busiest port in the country and want to ensure that roads and rail links in and out of Tauranga are maintained and very importantly, improved. I believe there’s a good case for Government to urgently proceed with the Tauranga Northern link road and improvements from Bethlehem to Omokoroa, then right on through to Katikati. Fifteenth Ave/Turret Rd four-laning, which was the subject of a previous political promise, needs to be actioned now. Public transport has to be increased to the point where it is the most desirable option. Meantime, traffic around Tauriko and Barkes Corner continue to build up at peak times. So, there are plenty of areas for Government to spend its regional funds.

Steady as we grow I often find it challenging to put pen to paper for a ‘Mayoral column’, as the work that council does is a reflection of the work the TEAM does, and that team includes councillors and staff. Looking back at the last 18 months, I’m proud of what we have achieved, especially the finalisation of our Long Term Plan which is currently out for consultation. That plan sets the priority projects for the District over the next ten years and how much this work will cost. Over the last 12 months, as we have moved into our “Community Led Planning Initiative”, hundreds of people across the District have turned up to community meetings, open days, workshops or gone online to have their say on the plan and what they want for their neighbourhood, community and the wider Western Bay. The key message that Council heard was, “Take a steady as we grow approach” to planning and managing our finances. This can be a difficult message to manage in an environment of high population growth and increasing demands on services. Having said this, council has been able to keep ahead of most requests for new initiatives whilst reducing our debt from $140m in 2013 to under $100m by June this year. I’m well aware though that there is still work to do! Roading, traffic congestion and road safety on State Highways remain ‘front and centre’ for council.

Last week I was excited to almost meet Minister for Housing and Urban Development and Transport, the Hon Phil Twyford. Unfortunately, his flight was cancelled (perhaps he was mistaken for Shane Jones!), but the meeting is being rescheduled. I really want to show him how Tauranga contributes to NZ’s economy and how we are deserving of support to solve these issues.

While I’d like to push the ‘fast forward’ button, the wheels of central government move slowly but please rest assured that I and your councillors continue to lobby, cajole and more recently demand that action is taken to address these very important issues.

By TCC Mayor, Greg Brownless

By Mayor Garry Webber, Western Bay of Plenty District

I write for this magazine because it's a great way to communicate.

I write for this magazine as it reaches many of our residents and is informative for them.

I remain extremely proud of the District and the people I’m privileged to represent and serve.

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It costs nothing to talk to us, call now for a FREE one hour consultation and see how we can help with your day to day running and yearly accounting services. Phone: 021 575 003 181 Welcome Bay Road, Tauranga 3112 pierre@theaccountingstudio.co.nz www.theaccountingstudio.co.nz

Our Community

Working together with Central Government

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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

‘Outstanding Natural Feature and Landscape’ to be compromised once again by Transpower’s lowest cost option for new 110,000-volt line. A Transpower support pole sits high at the very northern end of Te Ariki Park, Maungatapu, overlooking Rangataua Bay toward Matapihi. Te Ariki Park is owned by Ngāti He hapu, original owners of the Maungatapu peninsula whose marae sits below Te Ariki Park on the shores of Rangataua, visible to all traveling south on SH29A. Te Ariki Park is home to the Rangataua Sports and Cultural Club and its rugby grounds and tennis courts are enjoyed by the wider community.

Breach of the Act causes ongoing offence

Our Community

The Transpower support pole is part of the 110,000-volt transmission network which delivers electricity to Papamoa and Mount Maunganui. This section of line was erected by the Ministry of Works / NZ Electricity Department in the late 1950’s following access to Ngāti He land pursuant to the Public Works Act. The Crown Law Office admitted in 1999 that a breach of the Act had occurred in that Ngāti He had not been specifically advised of this activity.

Compensation outstanding While the trustees of the Maungatapu Marae always objected to the erection of the line, no compensation was ever paid and the Ministry stated that any claim for compensation was then outside the time-frame permitted

for a claim. Later, this line was vested to Transpower, a new state-owned enterprise, but in ongoing discussions with Transpower the trustees were told that Transpower was not the Government and was not responsible for any previous failings of the Crown.

Mt Maunganui and Papamoa A-Line at risk of collapse This ‘A-Line’ hangs low directly over the rugby field and tennis courts at Te Ariki Park and is then supported by a double pole atop the cliff overlooking Rangataua Bay. Following heavy rain in 2013 a large slip appeared directly in front of these poles after a section of the cliff face and trees fell into the harbour below. Transpower obtained urgent Resource Consent to install additional ground anchors in the park, and to place concrete anchor blocks on the foreshore below to reduce the risk of its poles toppling into the harbour.

B-Line tucked away on Maungatapu Bridge Transpower also has a duplicate line (B-Line) running in parallel to this section of its line, from Te Hono Street overbridge, on 18m poles alongside SH29A to the end of Maungatapu Rd, where the cables are buried, cross the harbour attached to the road bridge, then run over Matapihi orchards on poles before continuing again alongside SH29A. This line alone does

not have the capacity to supply all of the power required by Mt Maunganui and Papamoa.

Transpower’s cheapest solution Transpower has recently stated that, ‘Some of the support structures on the A-Line require extensive maintenance to ensure their continued reliability but due to their present location, ... ongoing maintenance will be more prohibitive’. Transpower’s solution is to remove the A-Line and erect a new line. This proposed new line would require that the 18m high B-Line poles from Te Hono St bridge be replaced with new poles 10 metres taller, and with additional conductors attached to these as far as the Maungatapu Rd / SH29A intersection. Between that point and the harbours edge beside the Maungatapu Bridge would be three new poles up to 34 metres tall. The new cables would then be slung across the harbour to poles 47 metres tall on the Matapihi harbours edge.

Rare view shaft and outstanding natural character compromised This means that as one drives south across the SH29A Matapihi bridge, the high-tension power lines would then pass through the view shaft, in between the bridge and the unique, iconic Maungatapu marae. Continues on page 15...

Have we got a deal for you YES, E-Bikes are a thing of the future, for fun, health, lifestyle and mobility. Reduce vehicle costs, petrol costs, parking problems, and stress! Bay Waka has entered into an agreement with one of Europe’s largest sellers of e-bikes, Bizobike, to offer our readers a very special, one-off opportunity to enjoy the benefits of using an e-bike. We are finalising the deal at the moment, but we intend to be offering a deal to you, our readers, equal to the inspirational special offer the Tauranga City Council recently arranged for its own staff. To register your interest to receive information about purchasing a new e-bike from this wide range of top quality e-bikes, please register your interest at www.bizobike.co.nz/baywaka or phone Tauranga (07) 262 3014. Refer to special offer page 19.

Directors of leading e-bike suppliers Bizobike Group in Belgium, Bjorn and Michel (right). Bay Waka is facilitating a special one-time offer of a range of Bizobikes to its readers who register today, to receive more information in near future.


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

Transpower states that it has considered alternative options such as burying cables in both land and below seabed, and also a new cable bridge alongside the existing road bridge, but has discounted these on basis of cost, although independent studies have shown over the lifespan of the cables, due to the low maintenance of submarined cables, the lifetime costs are similar.

BOPRC and TCC legislation can protect the Tauranga community A number of aspects of Transpower’s proposed new line are outside national policies which enable the operation of our high voltage transmission network and are also not ‘permitted’ activities under legislation administered by BOPRC and TCC. To proceed Transpower has applied for Resource Consents to erect structures where, and in the style that they are not automatically permitted. A number of local residents have claimed that Transpower’s public consultation process was not done in good faith and done with a ‘take it or leave it approach’.

Community seeking to avoid repeat of 1950’s behaviour Public submissions have now closed with 55 submissions listed on the TCC website. No submissions object to the removal of the current A line, while 34 strongly oppose the erection of the new line as it is proposed, between two very high poles, beside the bridge and directly in front of the Maungatapu Marae view shaft. Submitters have also suggested that as well as adverse effects on them, health risks, and loss of property value, the new line would breach Transpower’s own stated goal of undergrounding all new HV lines in urban areas, and numerous local authority policies highlighting the ‘High Natural Character’ and ‘Outstanding Natural Feature and Landscape’ classifications given to this location.

The iconic Maungatapu marae is visible from the Maungatapu bridge.

all parties involved, especially our community. Transpower’s full application, and all public submissions can be viewed online at: baywaka.nz/transpower

Right approach, within right timeframe would deliver right outcome

Does allowing Transpower to use its lowest cost option, suspending new high voltage lines through our valued urban, coastal and historic location align with Tauranga City Council’s own claim to be one of NZ’s most progressive local authorities, dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for residents?

Local residents have suggested that if our local authorities and SOE’s would stop working in silos, Transpower’s need to replace its failing line could well result in a win-win situation for

We invite you to have your say, and we will forward that to Tony Ryall, now Chairman of Transpower, and your local Authorities to remind them of their own goals. Email: transpower@baywaka.nz

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Our Community

Continued from page 14...

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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Are you a Risky Landlord? Can you answer these questions? • If you have entered into a tenancy since July

2016, do you have a signed Insulation Statement attached to your tenancy agreement?

• Do you know if your investment property contains asbestos? If it does, do you have a management plan in place?

• Are you covered with your insurance company

if you don’t test for Methamphetamine between tenancies?

• If your tenant presents you with a positive

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Exemplary damages - failure to provide an insulation statement

$200.00

the fines are to landlords under the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 and the Residential Amendment Act 2010?

Exemplary damages - failure to lodge the bond

$500.00

tenants?

Reimburse water rates

$200.00

Methamphetamine test, what do you do and how will it affect you as a landlord?

• Do you know what an Unlawful Act is and what

Our Community

• Are you having difficulties with your current Free investment property and tenancy check-up!

Call me now! Karen Silby, 021 465 257

Filing fee reimbursement

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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Digging for our country ANZAC Day is particularly poignant for New Zealanders. The Battle of Gallipoli is often seen as a reference point for the coming of age of what had been a colony, then a dominion, and finally the nation of New Zealand.

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For Māori there was much going on that also forms a part of the ANZAC story. Life hadn’t been good for Māori following the formation of the colonial government with the arrival of Governor Hobson in 1840. Disease swept through, land was confiscated, warfare decimated the population. Racism was so pervasive it was unseen by the nonMāori population. With the turn of the century the future of Māori as a race and as a culture was in doubt. For a warrior race being in retreat and being disrespected cut deep.

Our Remarkable Ancestor When the Boer War erupted, native people across the Empire were not allowed to join up to fight the Boers. The last thing colonial powers wanted was for natives to be given guns and training in how to use them. But one of our Ngāi Te Rangi ancestors, our tupuna, Walter Callaway slipped through the net and in 1899 shipped out to Cape Town with the First New Zealand Contingent New Zealand Mounted Rifles – the first to form as a New Zealand regiment. By the time the tour was over, as a corporal

he immediately signed up to return to South Africa, this time with the Seventh Contingent with the rank of Sergeant Major. During that tour Callaway was severely wounded in an attempt to ride out with two others to rescue two Australian troopers who were caught in the open under Boer fire, and was repatriated home. Miraculously, Callaway recovered enough to argue he was fit to be sent back to South Africa for a third tour. He left for South Africa again, this time as a commissioned officer, a lieutenant in the Ninth Contingent and served until five months after the Boer surrender in 1902. The only New Zealand solider to do three tours in the Boer War and the first Māori to become an officer, Callaway’s remarkable story is told in a fascinating book by Mike Dwight and can be bought from the Ngāi Te Rangi Iwi office.

Shut Up and Dig Māori were also involved in Gallipoli where they had to fight the New Zealand Government for the right to fight the enemy, the Turks. The Māori Contingent sailed out of Wellington in early 1915 but they were prevented from taking part in combat, due once again to unease about arming natives within the Empire. Instead they were given garrison duty and were used as battlefield labourers – ever wondered who dug the trench systems? But

back home some powerful Māori voices in Parliament were arguing for Māori to be allowed into combat. Āpirana Ngata and Māui Pōmare were active in Parliament, and Te Rangi Hiroa/Peter Buck made the pleas from within the contingent. With depleted forces the Empire relented, and Māori joined the New Zealand Mounted Rifles in July 1915 just in time for the offensive that briefly claimed the highest point at Gallipoli, Chunuk Bair. Seventeen of the Māori Contingent were killed during the assault on Chunuk Bair and 89 wounded. They were later involved in the assault on Hill 60. By September, of the 16 officers and 461 other ranks who had arrived just two months before, just 60 remained. Fifty Māori lost their lives at Gallipoli. What followed was a series of reorganisations. With redeployment to France, the Māori Contingent was disestablished, and the Pioneer Battalion was formed comprising of two Māori companies and two pakeha companies until they were again reorganised with Māori distributed among the existing companies of what became the New Zealand Division. Māori didn’t like the loss of identity and eventually the Pioneer Battalion was reformed again with remnants of the Otago Regiment. The Pioneers were once more used as

labourers digging the long deep trench system, Turk Lane, at the Somme which was to provide cover as troops moved up from the rear to the front lines. They were under constant artillery fire as they worked with picks and shovels. Twelve Pioneers were killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme and 40 wounded, but the digging continued with communications trenches at Messines Ridge under artillery fire, this time losing 155 casualties with 17 killed. Then digging of positions and establishing telephone cables alongside the French Army. By August 1917 there were enough Māori reinforcements to have all four companies consisting of Māori so the battalion was renamed the New Zealand Māori Pioneer Battalion. After fighting at Passchendaele and to the Armistice, the Māori Pioneer Battalion was ordered to Germany to garrison occupied towns, but that order was withdrawn when the British High Command decided use of native troops as an occupying force would be inappropriate. A final insult after many hard fought campaigns and huge losses but at least no more digging. By Paora Stanley, Chief Executive, Ngāi Te Rangi Iwi I write for Bay Waka because I delve more into our history every time I do.

Phone Tauranga . 07 262 1000 . 7 days info@silverservice.co.nz silverservice.co.nz SilverServiceIT

Keeping technology running seamlessly - Home & Small Business Support


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

17

Have your say on roading, be loud, act now!

Roading priorities I was amazed, as I’m sure you were, to see what our Regional Council put on their priorities list. Yes, it was great to see SH29 from the Kaimai Summit to Tauriko ranked at number 5, but for the upgrade of 15th Avenue and Turret Road to be ranked number 18 in the regional priorities list is disgraceful. Our community is screaming out for that road to be upgraded. We must get the traffic flowing again. I was just as confused to see SH2 north of Tauranga, New Zealand’s deadliest stretch of road, ranked at number 11. Thankfully our community really rallied to the cause with astounding 7000 submissions made to set these priorities straight. I’m sorry to confirm that the two local Roads of National Significance announced by the previous National government are off the table. The first of these roads would have seen a continuous four lane expressway from Katikati to Tauranga, and the second from the foot of the Kaimai Ranges to State Highway 1. Both have been cancelled. To add to the frustration, there is still uncertainty about whether

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the Tauranga Northern Link will go ahead. I’m hearing rumblings that the tendering process has been put on ice, and the Minister is refusing to comment in the House.

Reduced road funding… more consumer tax A few things are for certain in the Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport though. There will be an 11 per cent reduction in funding for State Highways, cutting over $5 Billion in investment over the next decade. The Government are also proposing a 9 – 12 cents per litre fuel excise duty and increased road user charges over the next three years – kicking in September 1st this year. This will cost the average motorist an extra $15 each time they fill up. This is a regressive tax that is going to hurt lower income families who live in our outer suburbs, it’s going to hurt our businesses and primary producers, and it’s going to hurt our rural communities who have less access to public transport.

The money raised will go into the Land Transport Fund which will be opened up to be used by Kiwi Rail for the first time. To give some context, they plan to use $4 billion of the money to pay for trains and trams in Auckland, and only $800 million to improve safety on our regional roads. Our community will be paying more, and getting less. This Government’s priorities are so far out of step with what our community expects that I have to wonder what planet they live on. This document is currently a draft, so there is still time to act. Please do ensure you submit so your voice is heard in the process. You can do so by emailing ps2018@transport. govt.nz Submissions close at 5pm on the 2nd of May. By Todd Muller, MP for Bay of Plenty I write for this magazine because it's a great way to get important information out to the community.

TODD MULLER

MP FOR BAY OF PLENTY Welcome Bay Constituent Clinics: 3rd Monday of the month Feb - Nov 1.00pm — 3.00pm Welcome Bay Community Centre 242 Welcome Bay Road No appointment necessary.

Upcoming clinic dates May 21st | June 18th | July 16th

All enquiries E P

Todd.MullerMP@parliament.govt.nz (07) 542 0505

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Our city’s transport has certainly been a hot topic over the last few months, and that has only been heightened by the release of both the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s draft Regional Transport Plan and more recently the Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport. It has started what I sense is a serious conversation about transport and what our community wants to see prioritised moving forward.


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

What is an E-Bike? E- Bikes have a battery-powered motor to help make your ride or commute less strenuous. How is the power applied?

The Gears

Built-in sensors monitor how much pressure you're putting on the pedals and then applies power from the motor relative to the pressure you’re putting on the pedals, and the level of motor assistance selected by the rider.

‘Old time’ bikes were single speed, and then came along the 3 speed hub. Racing bikes are often 21 speed, which is achieved by moving the chain between one of 3 sprockets at the pedal, and seven sprockets on the wheel hub. (3 x 7 = 21 choices). Bikes used as commuter bikes, bikes on sealed pavements, and bikes not used for cross country or racing, and certainly E-Bikes seldom if ever need such a large choice of gear ratios to enable easy riding.

Components on an E-Bike E-bikes are typically made from a range of components from specialist manufacturers, such as frame, rim, suspension, gears, motors, batteries, and power controllers. Typically these specialist manufacturers are large multinational companies who offer a range of quality levels. These parts are widely available worldwide, and most bike shops can service most components on an e-bike.

The Battery

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A quality Lithium ion battery is usually the most expensive component on an e-bike. Many different battery sizes are available, and this will dictate how much energy the battery will provide between charging. It is difficult to say what distance this will allow as this depends on many other factors such as the level of assistance you want from the motor, headwind, weight etc. E-bikes can attain speeds of up to 25 km/h, or higher...

The Motor Maximum motor size allowed in NZ is 300 watts. This is ample for most situations, against headwinds, up hills, and for heavy riders. Motors are fitted in one of the following locations, each of which has different pros and cons: • Rear Hub – Motor is mounted in hub of the rear wheel. This is common in Smartmotion, Magnum, Onya, and Pedego e-bikes in NZ. These hub motors are relatively cheap and quite ‘powerful’ for their size and weight. Rear hub motors can give a feeling of acceleration, typically enjoyed by riders in America, much more than a mid motor for example. Because the motor is in the hub, these bikes must use derailleur type external gears (like a racing bike). Punctures are a nightmare. • Front Hub - Motor is mounted in hub of front wheel. Putting power in the steering wheel creates some adverse features, however enables hub gears to be used on rear wheel. • Mid Drive - Motor is mounted on the frame near the pedals. This is the typical configuration for European, and also more expensive bikes. The application of power is considered more gentle, smooth, and results in safer operation of the bike. Mid-drive is arguably the best location as it allows for a balanced bike and it uses your gears, so you have a choice of gear types (e.g., hub gears, derailleur).

• Derailleur Gears - Gearing choices obtained by moving drive chain between different sized sprockets while riding. On an E-Bike, this may likely be 1 or 2 sprockets at the pedal, and up to 8 sprockets at the wheel hub. Seldom do ‘commuter’ or ‘pleasure’ riders use the full selection available. Derailleur systems often require adjustment, and the risk of chains coming off the sprockets is ever present. • Hub Gears - Gearing choices provided by changing the gearing inside a sealed rear wheel hub. The pedals are attached to one sprocket, and the hub has one sprocket so no chain transfers are required. The gear changes are between sealed meshed gears inside the hub much like a motorcar. These need little adjustment and the risk of chains coming off are much reduced.

Controller The controller is used by the rider to set the level of power assistance required from the motor relative to the power applied to the pedals at any time. This is a high current device and a quality controller provides a continually changing, smooth and efficient flow of power to the motor. A good controller is likely to be more significant than a ‘bigger’ motor.

Sensor • Cadence Sensor – detects if you are turning the pedals and gives power according to the riders selected setting on the controller. The power typically comes with a rush, and the controller setting then controls the speed. This can create a safety risk. Most hub motors have cadence sensors. • Torque Sensor – this detects how much effort the rider is applying, and multiplies that according to the riders selected setting. Always, the harder you pedal the faster you go with a level of assistance you select. Most middrive motors use torque sensors.

Frame and Wheel Type Step through bikes are traditionally referred to as ‘women’s’ bikes, however they are also very practical as commuter bikes for ease of mounting and disembarking, allowing loads to be carried on rear carriers, and accommodating a wide range of riders clothing styles. Cross bar frames offer a more up-right, or more ‘racey’ appearances. For ease of use, loading into cars, apartments, offices etc folding 20” bikes are the most popular bike type in Europe, and becoming increasingly popular for their versatility in NZ.


We want to take you for a ride... Recently, Tauranga City Council generously facilitated a deal that has seen more than 50 Council staff get to own an electric bike. Media release / 15 Feb 2018 Bay Waka felt our community could benefit from a similar arrangement. Bizobike New Zealand Ltd are about to introduce one of Europe’s high-quality CE certified, top-selling e-bike brands to NZ and Bay Waka is negotiating a special introductory offer for our readers. The following bikes will be available between $1,800 – $3,000, including finance options.

Florence

Verona

Vienna

Amsterdam

Berlin

Stockholm

Monaco

Lyon

Madrid

To register your interest and be kept informed, phone Tauranga (07) 262 3014 or email baywaka@bizobike.co.nz or register online at www.bizobike.co.nz/baywaka Registrants will be kept informed about the special offer and invited for a test ride.


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

I’ve Started Cycling to Work – It’s Fantastic! It started out on a business trip to China three years ago, we visited an e-bike factory. The world wobbled a little bit on its axis when I hopped on an (e-)bike for the first time since my late teens, hit the power button and pedalled effortlessly to the end of a dusty Guangzhou service lane. Wow!

I bought an e-bike because I hate traffic congestion and the hassle of finding a carpark. Sitting in traffic is a waste of time, a waste of my life and while I could not imagine giving up my car any time soon, I could see an opportunity to bike to work each day and reduce my dependence on driving.

Slopes, what slopes? The first ride on my new e-bike was around the neighbourhood very early one Sunday morning. I was nervous, careful and slow but there were no mishaps and it felt good. Whenever it got difficult, I powered up and rested my aching thighs. It was a shock to discover how much power the lithium battery provides, slopes flatten and cycling really becomes effortless. Ignore those people who say it’s cheating, for someone my age e-bikes are perfect.

Door to door, e-bike to car, equal time

Feeling like a kid again! There were more practice rides, lots of watching other confident cyclists, always checking my route before riding it. The pull to keep at it was strong, I feel like a kid again on my bike, it’s great to start out on a beautiful morning and be part of the day, where there are views and outdoor smells and neighbours I miss when I drive my car, I like the feeling of sailing past the creeping traffic, getting fitter, saving money, doing my tiny bit for climate change. The evening that Cyclone Gita arrived in Tauranga I left work to cycle home as torrential rain arrived ahead of the wind. There were few cars and no cyclists on the streets. My new rain jacket performed and the rain was warm, wonderful, quite harmless. It could have been my cycling baptism.

Street markings and signage are inadequate They say that cycling is unsafe in Tauranga. There are on-road cycle lanes or quiet side streets that allow you to cycle most places – but the street markings and signage are inadequate and do not provide driver or cyclist with the clear guidance of who belongs where on the road. Where the road narrows or is complicated by a roundabout, the cycle lane vanishes, leaving the inexperienced cyclist with few options but to hop off and morph into a pedestrian.

City-wide cycling network the answer

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Separated cycle lanes are the solution that will encourage drivers to take up cycling as a commuter option, and the fastest, cheapest way to achieve this is to remove roadside car parking. Is this option palatable to Tauranga residents? Each of us feels differently according to circumstances but, for me, the problem of the daily commute is solved, I’ll carry on regardless of what we choose.

e Ducks N ut s

Th

J us t

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I replaced the seat for something more spacious, added mud-guards and better aligned handle bars. I bought a great Kathmandu backpack and rain-jacket. There were more tentative rides around the neighbourhood and after studying a route on Google Street View, I cycled into the city

to test out my commuting route. Twenty-five minutes, doorto-door, about the same time it would take to drive, find a park and walk along to work.

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Bay Waka

May - July 2018

21

It’s the putting right that counts Dear reader, it seems we had a really bad hair day in the last issue 10 and we would like to make apologies to the people so affected. Two were careless, one was software glitch and one provided to us as such:

FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS

Page 15. Opinion: We believe everything we are told. Yeah right. By “Jim Swan” Page 26. My father “Awanuiārangi Black”: unveiling

The Bays Biggest Fujitsu Dealer

Page 45. Ships, like whiskey, are all good. Neil Turner and his son “Matthew” Respectfully yours, Antoon Moonen

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• Fishing rod and reel repairs • Fleet servicing a specialty • Some light engineering • Eftpos / credit card facilities

If we haven’t mentioned it - then please ask! Honest, reliable & friendly service

Call Rex or Gwendolyne: 07 578 9062 Unit 3, 11 Glen Lyon Avenue, Greerton, Tauranga

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Page 41. Books from our own backyard. Thoughts, Twinks and Truths From Me to You, author is “Matthew Schwass”


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Strange creatures from our back yards This peculiar looking bird took a few weeks to positively identify, but it is absolutely confirmed to be a male blackbird living in Maungatapu. While it is rare to see such a bird (first time for this resident), it is known to naturally occur from time to time in nature. He certainly appears to be happy in his speckled feathers although, quite flighty, so it took a while to get the picture. Discovered in a garden in Pyes Pa in early April, Tomato

Hornworms are green caterpillars the exact shade of tomato leaves, with white diagonal stripes on their sides and a fleshy pointed tip at their tails. When tomato leaves are mysteriously missing, following trails of pebbly, dark green excrement will lead you to the hornworms. Young hornworms are tiny green caterpillars, but they gradually grow to 4 inches (10 cm) long. Tomato hornworms are the larvae of a mottled brown hawk moth that flies at night.

If you have a good photo of an odd creature or critter from your backyard, why not send it through to editor@baywaka.nz and we’ll let everybody have a gander at it!

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Bay Waka

May - July 2018

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@WESTERNBAYCOUNCIL

WESTERNBAY.GOVT.NZ


Maungatapu underpass

We’re getting close! Connecting the new Maungatapu underpass to Welcome Bay Road From mid-April we will be connecting the Maungatapu underpass project to Welcome Bay Road. This will mean lane diversions, speed restrictions, unsealed surfaces, and off peak and night works on Welcome Bay Road near Greenwood Park. Near Awanui Place there will be lane diversions in place, speed restrictions, night works and temporary pedestrian diversions.

We will do as much work as we can during the April school holidays and at night to minimise the impact on traffic, however there will be some delays during the day due to the speed restrictions. We know delays can be frustrating but we urge you to take care when travelling through these areas, and understand the responsibility you have to protect yourself, your passengers, as well as other road users and construction workers. Resurfacing work of the SH29A Hairini and Maungatapu roundabouts is expected to take place in mid-May, while work to connect the underpass with Turret Road and Hairini Street is expected to start in late-May. * This work is weather dependent.

Walk or cycle through the underpass at the community day A community open day is being planned for 27 May 2018 to give you a chance to walk or cycle through the new underpass before it opens to traffic. We’ll have more information about the day, and park and ride options on our website, in community notices, and the media later this month. In the meantime, put the date in the diary.

We think the underpass is looking pretty impressive. Come along to the community open day on 27 May and see if for yourself!

Keeping you informed

0800 772 532

NZTAWaikatoBoP

nzta.govt.nz/hairinilink

NZTAwaibop


Nga hapu tour of Maungatapu underpass Local hapu are an important partner in the Maungatapu underpass project, and kuia and kaumatua of Ngai Te Ahi, Ngati He and Ngati Ruahine whanau, hapu and iwi saw first-hand the overall progress and development on a recent bus trip through the site. In addition to going through the underpass, the bus trip was an opportunity to see and hear about the wetlands restoration for Te Pahou and the aspirations of nga hapu, the work that has been done on the Kaitemako culvert to enhance fish passage, the Tongaparaoa wetlands area near Ila Park, and the shared cycle way on SH29A from Poike Road. Hapu Project Coordinator Rondell Reihana said the cultural significance and unique regard given to the whenua was fully embraced by all kuia and kaumatua on board.

Aerial view of the landscaping and wetlands area

Front seat view: from left Eva Tawa and Kamiria Farrell in the underpass. Ninety-nine-year-old Hariata Ririnui is in the seat behind.

Entering the underpass: from left Gladys Richardson, Hinerongo Walker and Hinewai Taingahue.

Once completed, the Maungatapu underpass will be a two-lane link underneath the Maungatapu roundabout, improving the traffic flow around the Maungatapu and Hairini roundabouts. It will separate state highway and local traffic, and make travel safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

In the previous issue, we offered up a pretty cool remote controlled cockroach as a prize on the children’s page. Well, we thought they were pretty cool, but apparently not so much, as sadly not a single entry was received... although we did receive some interest from adults – go figure!

Culture & Art

This issue reinvents the childrens page as one that will appeal to those of all ages but young at heart. If you are a joker, riddler or master puzzler and would like to contribute to this new section – now’s your opportunity to shine! Send contributions to, or contact editor@baywaka.nz.

Late one night a burglar broke into a house and while he was sneaking around he heard a voice say, "Jesús is watching you." He looked around and saw nothing. He kept on creeping and again heard, "Jesús is watching you." In a dark corner, he saw a cage with a parrot inside. The burglar asked the parrot, "Was it you who said Jesús is watching me" The parrot replied, "Yes." Relieved, the burglar asked, "What is your name?" The parrot said, "Clarence." The burglar said, "That's a stupid name for a parrot. What idiot named you Clarence?" The parrot answered, "The same idiot that named the rottweiler Jesús."

AAAAAAAA There are two cows standing in a field. The first cow says to the other, "I was artificially inseminated this morning." The second cow replies, "No way, I don't believe you." The first says, "It's true, no bull."

AAAAAAAA This farmer is lucky enough to own a talking sheepdog. After the dog gets all the sheep in the pen, he says to the farmer: "Right, that's all forty sheep accounted for." The farmer says, "But I've only got 37 sheep." The sheepdog says, "I know. I rounded them up."

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Bay Waka

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Culture & Art

May - July 2018


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Through Andy’s lens Welcome to my new column in Bay Waka. It's great to be on board this wonderful magazine.

Culture & Art

Photography is my job but I love it so much that even when I’m not working I still take photos. Why? Because it opens up my creative brain and enables me to learn new techniques. I have never received any training so I don’t follow any rules or see any boundaries. I just keep on exploring new ideas. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don’t. I watched Frank Doorhof’s tutorial on You-Tube creating some amazing images with models and smoke. I liked his images so much I bought a smoke machine and started exploring some new crazy ideas using multiple Speedlight flashes with coloured filters. I hung some black plastic sheeting around the sides of my garage and turned it into a studio. I first concentrated on photographing smoke from an incense stick. To my amazement it worked very well and created gorgeous shapes and patterns. So all I needed now was a

slightly adventurous model. I placed a listing on the Star Now website and found Sarah who donned a cat suit and respirator to give the appearance of a rather photogenic fire-fighter! We got the smoke machine cranked up and thanks to a very patient model we took a series of images placing her in the left-hand side of the frame. My Nikon D810 has a special feature called image blending. So, in camera, I carefully selected the best two images. The camera did an amazing job and put together the model and the smoke images to make one. So please pick up your cameras and try something new. The results may surprise you!

Contact me today: Facebook: www.baylive.co.nz/andy-facebook Internet: www.andybecher.com, Phone: 021 444 830 By Andy Belcher I write for this magazine because it’s colourful and has a happy positive outlook.

Smoke machine creates a pretend burn-out with Lotus in garage studio.


Bay Waka

A whole lot of Waka! Some interesting stuff about the Bay Waka up to July 2018 • Grown from a 9,600 idea to a 35,000 circulation, in under three years • 12 publications, including 2016 Local Body Election Special Edition • 256,000 magazines • 11.3 million pages • 100+ collaborators per issue • Online readership per issue, 663 at 6m 16s read time (2017) • Shelf life – 3 months -- Summer – November to January -- Autumn – February to April -- Winter – May to July -- Spring – August to October • Subscribers – 896 -- To be notified via email before each deadline, write to editor@baywaka.nz and write SUBSCRIBE in the Subject line.

16th Ave Theatre Dirty Dusting (Comedy) 15 to 30 June 2018 By Ed Waugh and Trevor Wood Directed by Denis Smith Another comedy at 16th Avenue Theatre. When three cleaners, Olive, Gladys and Elsie, are threatened with redundancy they feel that their lives are coming to an end until a chance wrong number gives them a new business start-up idea – why not run a telephone sex line? They’ve got motive, opportunity and a lifetime of experience – some more than others, mind you. Provided Elsie can teach the other two a few new tricks there’s no reason why they can’t get rich quick providing they can keep their operation a secret from their bosses… and their husbands…and their children…and their grandchildren.

Fundraise with 16th Ave Theatre Create memorable and profitable experiences for your special cause or

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5 double passes for opening night to give away. Answer the following Q: On what day is opening night? Send your answer to PO Box 137 or email: win@baywaka.nz organisation by hiring 16th Avenue Theatre for your own private performance and fundraiser. 150 Seat Capacity Auditorium - Greenroom Bar - Fantastic Shows Pricing options $1950 for full house booking (150 seats) or half house (80 seats) at $995. Variable pricing options to suit your fundraising needs - potential to raise $2000 or more in one evening at the theatre. Find out more: info@16avetheatre.co.nz

Culture & Art

May - July 2018


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka Our Mission

'Inspiring our students to believe in themselves and realise their potential within our rural community, so they can move forward as confident, contributing members of society.' 'Toi tu te mana, toi tu te whenua, toi tu te tangata'

Play Based Learning Here at Oropi we think the best thing about Play Based Learning is that children can learn through play. So what is Play Based Learning? It’s exactly that, children learning through play. It is when students get to follow their interests and follow what they want to learn about. Through play, children learn to communicate, practice problem solving and learn how to be independent. Students learn to be resilient, to persevere and value each other’s ideas.

Learning

At Oropi School the children’s favourite things to do during Discovery or Play Based Learning time is to go into our school ‘Gully’. This is an area of our school covered with bush where students can build huts, participate in messy play and play with others. Another popular activity is going to the ‘Shed’. In the Shed, students can try carpentry and create things. Materials in the shed include wood, nails, saws, paint, hot glue guns and other construction materials. Other activities during Play Based Learning can include painting, drawing, bubbles, water play, messy play, mud play…anything!!!

Our Values Ako, Manaakitanga, Rangatiratanga, Whanaungatanga, Kaitiakitanga, Whakaaro •

Relating, Caring & Respect (for others and the world)

Leading, Self-Managing, and Responsibility

Belonging

Thinking and Creativity

Play Based Learning is fun and people need to know that children learn through play. Play is learning. When learning is interesting children will learn because it’s relevant to what they need to learn. When learning is fun, children will learn.

Garden to Table

Teacher Interviewed: Mrs Weston.

Does your school have a school garden? Well, ours does, and it’s awesome!

Interview completed by and writing by Caitlyn Salmons, Y6, Oropi School.

This year at Oropi School we have started the Garden to Table program. Garden to Table is a program that we have taken on this year to get our kids to enjoy and improve their skills in the garden and kitchen. It teaches students to grow, harvest, prepare and share food. Eventually the whole school will be involved in this program, but we have one class this term, building up to 3 or 4 classes by the end of the year. We split the class in two, one group works in the garden and the other group in the kitchen. We are lucky enough to use Oropi Memorial Hall’s kitchen, which is walking distance from our school. The group in the garden learn about how to look after, plant, and harvest food from our garden. The group in the kitchen learn about cooking and eating the produce from the school garden. This includes food safety such as washing hands, how to use knives safely, wearing closed shoes in the kitchen, and how to cook hot things safely.

1334 Oropi Road, RD 3, Tauranga Phone: 07 543 1479 Email: office@oropi.school.nz Website: www.oropi.school.nz facebook.com/OropiSchool/


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

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Languages and Bilingual Classroom Kia ora. Oropi School has just started up a new bilingual unit and I interview one of the teachers, Whaea Raelene, to find out more. She told us how the bilingual classroom got its name. It was gifted by our three kaumatua. It is special and unique to where we are. Under Otanewainuku, our kokako bird is our school bird. The kokako birds speak their own dialect depending on what area they are in. So the Kōkako in Oropi sound different to Kōkako from Queenstown. Having a bilingual classroom and lessons in Te Reo Māori in all classrooms is awesome because as Whaea Raelene said, “all our tamariki get access to quality Reo and culture. Our tamariki can walk with confidence in both Te Āo Māori and the European world.” Whaea Raelene is also involved in the Mandarin Language programs that all classes participate in at our school. Our school has invested in specialist Language teachers since 2014. We even have Mandarin Language Assistances who work with the teachers in our school. Whaea Raelene said

“The learner’s ability to communicate is at the centre of our program with two supporting strands of developing linguistic and cultural awareness to achieve communicative competence”. There are many benefits of having languages and a bilingual classroom at Oropi School. For example you can learn about celebrations, festivals, and food from other cultures. You can talk with friends from around the world via social networking opportunities. Also learning languages is fun and it can offer many jobs opportunities in the future. Don’t you wish your school learnt Te Reo Māori and Mandarin too? Teacher Interviewed: Whaea Raelene Interview completed by and writing by Ben McKinlay, Y5, Oropi School. Oropi School Feature Photographers: Naomi Baldo, Y6, Lucy Wright, Y7, Estelle Wright, Y7, Grace McHannigan, Y6, and Alana Burling, Y6.

Why should other schools have a school garden and kitchen? If you have a school garden and kitchen, you can run programs like Garden to Table. They provide a massive variety of learning opportunities that would not be possible without them. Talk to your school principal today about starting a school garden and kitchen at your school. Teacher Interviewed: Mr McKinnon Interview completed by and writing by Elodie Broad, Y8, Oropi School.

Be all you can be - Whaia te Matauranga

Learning

Ko Ben taku ingoa.


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Walnut Tree Farm Shop open 24/7 The girls and I have been living here at Walnut Tree Farm for just over three and a half years now. In that short time we have seen a lot of changes around the farm. There has been a lot of work happening. Our farmer and his Mrs have demoed buildings and barns, moved on a preloved house, built sheds, planted trees and there seems to be an everexpanding range of fresh produce that humans seems to like. The Farmer gets a bit jumpy if any of us girls wander near the vege garden though!

Happy producing food for the community

Food

An auditor visiting the farm recently commented how much she enjoys seeing us girls because we all look so healthy and happy. The farmer is happy because he’s really enjoying learning new ways (and sometimes old ways) of farming. He’s learning a lot about organic dairy farming methods and organic market gardens and he’s also enjoying meeting people from all walks of life. He loves knowing that the food our little farm is producing is going out genuinely fresh, not just a marketing angle type of ‘fresh’ to feed families throughout the Bay.

Milk – daily fresh raw (unpasteurised) (Bring your own bottles, or buy reusable 1 litre glass bottles from us)

When Our Farmer puts his feet up at the end of the day with a nice cold one in hand, (raw milkof course! Why, what were you thinking?) He’s happy knowing that all the hard work is making a pretty special place for the locals and that seems like a job well done. By Ellie the Cow, Walnut Tree Farm, 512 Welcome Bay Road I write for this magazine because it’s working hard to make something special for the Bay!

No sprays are applied to the fruits and vegetable growing at Walnut Tree Farm.

Eggs – free-range, from really happy hens Honey – from local bees Fresh Produce – spray-free seasonal fruit and veges from Walnut Tree Farm Visiting hours: Milking daily at 3.30pm Phone: 027 379 8494

512 Welcome Bay Road (4 mins from Welcome Bay, 10 mins from Papamoa) Open 24/7, self-service (cash only)

Fresh produce is available on a daily basis and the shop is open 24/7.


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Chef Stephen’s - The Happy Puku Catering Co. Gateau - Chocolat Parisian with Sauce a l’Orange There is a story behind this gateau. When I first arrived in Paris in the early 80s I was fortunate to live in the Ponsonby of Paris near the Arc de Triomphe in the 16th Arrondisement. I would often go past a Chocolatier (Artisans of chocolate) and as the French say "je resiste a tout sauf a la tentation!" (I resist everything except temptation) and in I would go into the world of sensuous and such tres bon chocolate creations. La patronne was very nice to me and I soon had in my hands the recipe for Le Gateau Chocolat Parisien"... which I have dearly held on to for over 30 years! ..now my daughters make this sublime dessert for friends and family... so enjoy because once you have tasted this you will be ruined for the ordinary!

Food

Chef Stephen

Instructions Break up into small pieces the chocolate and with the butter place in microwave 2 minutes on high heat.

For 8 servings Ingredients 250g Whittaker’s dark chocolate 70% 200g sugar (I like to use refined sugar as it assimilates much better) 125g butter (if possible unsalted) 4 eggs –preferably free range (size 7). Separate the egg yolks from the whites.

Take out and let it rest two minutes. Stir until well mixed and it becomes silky. Put aside. Now stir the sugar and the egg yolks until nice and creamy. I use a simple rubber spatula to cream the mix. Then add the corn flour. Keep mixing! Add the chocolate mix into the bowl and then put aside (it should be just set and no longer wobbly when you move it). Let the gateau cool down. Resist the temptation to eat by licking the bowl which had the chocolate mix! Place in refrigerator 30 minutes.

2 Egg yolks

Just before serving, beat up the egg whites until they stiffen nicely (you should be able to turn the bowl of egg whites upside down!). Gently fold in little by little the egg whites into the mix, taking care not to be too vigorous! Pour mix into a buttered baking mould and bake at 180 degrees for 20 minutes. Take out once cooked.

The juice and zest of two sweet oranges (spray free if possible)

La crème a l’ orange (orange sauce)

40g Corn flour Crème a l’ orange

The juice of half a lemon - Guy’s Gourmet Produce ½ teaspoon Corn flour if necessary to thicken.

In a bowl beat the egg yolks, the sugar, and part of the orange and lemon juice and the orange zest. Let it gently bubble 5 min. and if necessary thicken with corn flour. Dress the dessert plate with a drizzle of the sauce and place the slice of gateau on top…et voila!

Stephen Kapai | The Happy Puku Catering Co. | stephenkapai@googlemail.com | 021 140 5515


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

They will be about the size of large walnuts. Set on a plate. When the oil is hot, gently lower the balls into the oil with a slotted spoon. Work in batches so you don't crowd your pan. Fry the falafel for about 4 to 5 minutes, until they are a nice deep brown. Drain on paper towels, fried.

Kia Ora and Bonjour and welcome aboard the Kai Waka! - Bon appetit, Chef Stephen

The best Falafel

Serving suggestion:

Makes approx. 2 dozen small falafels – serves 4-6 people Ingredients Felafel 3 cups dried chickpeas 1/2 medium red onion 2 cloves of garlic 1 small hot chille pepper a large handful of parsley, large stems removed (1 packed cup) a large handful of coriander, large stems removed (1 packed cup) the zest of 1 lemon 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp ground coriander 1 Tbsp ground cumin 1/2 Tbsp salt 1/2 tsp baking soda 2 Tbsp all purpose flour, or you can use any alternative flour you like vegetable oil for frying Yoghurt dipping sauce 1 cup plain Greek yogurt (Yoplait is good) 1/2 tablespoon lemon zest 1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp freshly chopped coriander leaves 2 teaspoons freshly chopped parsley leaves 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin salt, as needed

Cooking instructions To soak dried chickpeas, rinse them and then put them in a large bowl. Cover with lots of cold water and soak for 12 hours, or overnight. Drain and rinse them, and then measure out 3 cups, which should be about 1lb. Note, you will have some leftover chickpeas. Cut the half onion into quarters and drop into the food processor as the machine is running. Follow with the garlic cloves. Cut the pepper in half and drop that in too. Stop the machine and add in the fresh parsley and coriander. Use lots of herbs, if you need a way to measure, use a firmly packed cup of each. The herbs filled my processor to the top before I processed them. Process the herbs until finely minced. Stop and scrape down the bowl as necessary. Add the drained chickpeas to the machine and pulse until they start to break down. Scrape down the sides of the machine, and process until the mixture is even and finely ground, but not pasty. It is ready when a bit of the mixture holds together when you press it between your fingers. Remove the mixture to a bowl and lightly mix in the salt, baking soda, flour, cumin, ground coriander, lemon zest and juice. Make sure it is well combined, but don't compact the mixture. Heat your oil to 180, or put in a small piece bread and if it fries immediately the oil is hot enough. Your oil should be at least 3 inches/7 and ½cm deep. Using a 1½ inch scoop (4cm), scoop out the mixture and roll between your palms to form into round balls.

Heat up pita bread in oven or toaster, cut halfway around. Put in some yoghurt sauce, your choice of veges and the falafels. Finish with some more sauce. Try with a mixture of red and white cabbage, diced cucumber (without seeds), diced fresh tomato, and fried eggplant in sliced rounds and cooked off with olive oil. Pre-prepare a big batch for an easy, healthy dinner or in the kid’s lunch boxes!

Food

Falafel with Pita bread. This Fresh fried falafel balls, pickled vegetables, herbs, Greek yogurt, and a quick and easy lemon garlic tahini dressing are stuffed into a warm pita and drizzled with hot sauce if desired. mmm... Heaven on earth!

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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Eat to Beat Arthritis Many types of Arthritis, but only one you

At the Bay Health Clinic recommendations consider the type of arthritis, and individual health issues you may have. All types of arthritis can be relieved with common dietary changes. The damaging foods which trigger inflammation in arthritis are the sugary foods and drinks, refined foods (such as white flour, white breads and white rice). These foods cause overacidity, inflammation and deplete important minerals.

High Quality Fats decrease Inflammation

Sport & Wellbeing

Fats influence health for good or ill. Processed overheated fats increase inflammation and arthritic pain; strictly avoid them! High-Quality Fats such as cold pressed oils do the opposite and can relieve arthritic symptoms; pour a few teaspoons on your food each meal.

Individual Responses to certain foods Some foods such as dairy food, tomatoes, citrus can increase arthritis for some people, but are not a problem for others. We help by identifying your problem foods.

Arthritis relieved with Herbal Medicine, Nutrition, Massage, EFT

Eat to Beat Arthritis Natural Therapies to Relieve Arthritis and Help You make Changes for Optimum Health

Our friendly team have the experience and skills to help you enjoy Great Health

As well as diet changes, the natural health practitioners at the clinic use other therapies to relieve arthritis and help you make changes for optimum health. Call us today; help us help you build great health naturally. I write for this magazine because it’s a great way to help a whole community communicate to become happier and healthier.

JAINE KIRTLEY Naturopath & Nutritionist Registered Nurse - (Mental Health)

SERINA GARDNER Naturopath & Medical Herbalist

VANESSA KING Naturopath Massage Therapist Workplace Wellness Groups & Individual

CHATELLE JERAM Meditation Yoga EFT Emotional Freedom Technique

Groups & Individual

Book online or email ask@bayhealth.nz or phone 07 571 3226

Contact: Jaine Kirtley, Bay Naturopath – Bay Health Clinic Phone 07 571 3226 or Email ask@bayhealth.nz. www.bayhealth.nz


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

on Home and Away. Oh, the drama! He displays disgusting behaviour against all nations, except India, because the Indian IPL is worth millions to him on an annual basis and he has decided not to bite the hand that feeds. In other words, he is an egg unless there is cash. The Australian public have tolerated this behaviour for years, no wonder the cricketers thought they were impervious when it came to ball tampering. I like Aussies, they’re not too bad for a bunch of seventh generation shackle draggers. As a nation they are renowned for their doggedness and competitiveness. In fact, so are Kiwis. My grandad fought alongside the Aussies during WW2 in the desert and had a high level of brotherly respect for them. The diggers certainly weren’t self-entitled but forged their reputation through determination and toughness. Maybe its time for them to rediscover these qualities and listen to Rod Marsh.

Sports Reporter Duncan McCallum

No. No. Or you could listen to old Duncan, and I say don’t be a bunch of eggs. No, Bro. Kiwis could be not prouder of the manner their national cricket side conduct themselves on and off the field. Brendon McCullum led the charge with honour, and we have gained worldwide respect for essentially ‘cutting the crap’. The Black Caps not only represents strength and skill of cricket, but strength and mana in character. It is an example we wish our children to follow. We’re not eggs.

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Sport & Wellbeing

As a kid, I vividly recall the 1981 underarm bowling incident when Greg Chappell instructed his younger brother Trevor to deprive the kiwis of a chance of victory, by committing a ‘win at all costs’ act of grubbery. Of course, the outrage was not restricted to New Zealanders – the magnificent Richie Benaud expressed his disgust on live TV in Australia. Let’s acknowledge, at that time the underarm bowl was not an act contrary to the rules of cricket. To coin a classic Australian phrase, it was a dog act, contrary to the spirit of the game. As you know, Duncan is an optimist and always sees the good in a bad situation. As Trevor Chappell was about to launch his underarm, the Aussie wicket keeper Rod Marsh was yelling “no, no”. A voice of reason and sportsmanship. He made a public stand against his skipper and his brother because it was the right thing to do. I appreciated his voice of reason. I reflect on the recent ball tampering scandal that has beleaguered the Australian cricketers. Let’s be frank, the shitstorm that has enveloped them couldn’t have happened to a nicer bunch of blokes, and for that I am tickled pink. It has been true theatre. How good is it, that David Warner has finally gone too far? Here is a bloke that is calculated and mean spirited when it comes to on field antics and sledging. I don’t think I’d really be too bothered if he could take what he could dish out, but he clearly cannot. And it makes me happy. What an egg. Everyone enjoys a good sledge, my personal favourite was former Hurricanes and Hawkes Bay number 8 Gordon Falcon subtly caught on live TV telling a rotund South African prop, ‘bro, you wouldn’t have dropped that if it was a cheese burger’, when he knocked the ball on in the process of scoring a try. The said prop, with a beaming smile, slapped Falcon on the back with their on-field comraderie and rivalry intact. The Aussies, with Warner leading the charge, have frequently crossed the line of intimidation and vile behaviour in an effort to find an edge in a game. A GAME. David-grub-Warner knows the game only too well. His crocodile tears during his press conference belonged

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Bay Waka

Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Move it… or lose it! As children, emphasis is on movement development, increasing our confidence through strength and balance to be able to perform everyday activities as we grow. So why as we age, do we decrease our fundamental movement training when we need it most? This is the theory behind a new programme of strength and balance classes aimed at older adults. Keep on your Feet has been designed to maintain fundamental movement, and in turn reduce falls and fractures, and help our people live stronger for longer. Co-ordinated by Sport Bay of Plenty, the programme involves simple but effective exercises to improve leg strength and challenge participants’ balance in a fun and safe environment. “Falling over and losing your strength and balance shouldn’t be considered a natural part of ageing,” says Keep on your Feet Project Leader Jen Riley. “Improving your strength and balance is considered to be one of the most modifiable risk factor with regards to having a fall.”

Sport & Wellbeing

Regular attendees report everyday activities and chores have become much easier, their walking has improved, and overall confidence with movement has significantly increased. Keep on your Feet Greerton instructor Lynda Hitchfield says, “Coming to the classes regularly participants will definitely improve their overall mobility and balance to avoid falls – but most of all we have fun, laugh and make new friends.” Thirty-five strength and balance classes are now available around the Western and Eastern Bay of Plenty, with hundreds of older adults reaping the benefits of attending a class every week. If you, or someone you know, could benefit from a strength and balance class, visit www.sportbop.co.nz/keep-on-your-feet for class locations or times, or ring Sport BOP, (07) 578 0016, or email jenr@sportbop.co.nz.

or call 07 578 0016.

www.sportbop.co.nz/keep-on-your-feet

A safe supportive environment with qualified instructors suitable for all abilities.


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

What is acupuncture?

39

Acupuncture is a complementary medical practice that entails stimulating certain points on the body, most often with a needle penetrating the skin, to alleviate pain or to help treat various health conditions. it is effective in a wide variety of conditions through its power to stimulate our own healing responses.

How does it work? In Traditional Chinese medicine theory, health is the result of a harmonious balance of the complementary extremes of "yin" and "yang" of the life force known as "qi," pronounced "chi." Illness is said to be the consequence of an imbalance of the forces. These meridians and energy flows are accessible through 350 acupuncture points in the body. Inserting needles into these points with appropriate combinations is said to bring the energy flow back into proper balance.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Home Visits Professional Consultation Personal interview Skin Analyzer Analysis of scans using software Reported results Personalised product solutions

Uses

What to expect At our Wellbeing Acupuncture and Massage clinic, our fully medically trained acupuncturist will examine the patient and assess their condition, insert one or more thin, sterile needles, and offer advice on self-care or other complementary therapies, such as Chinese herbs. The patient will be asked to lie down on their back, front, or one side, depending on where the needles are to be inserted. The acupuncturist only uses single-use, disposable, sterile needles. As each needle is inserted, the patient may feel a very brief stinging or tingling sensation. After the needle is inserted, there is occasionally a dull ache at the base of the needle that then subsides. Acupuncture is usually relatively painless. The number of treatments needed depend on the individual. A person with a chronic condition may need one to two treatments a week over several months. An acute problem normally improves after 8 to 12 sessions. By April Zhou, Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioner

Call today for an appointment... Phone: (07) 576 4891 Mobile: (021) 042 1434 81A Grange Road, Otumoetai, Tauranga (parking available) Web: aurorahealthandbeauty.co.nz E-mail: advice@aurorahealthandbeauty.co.nz

Wellbeing Acupuncture and Massage

April Zhou Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioner Acupuncturist ACC provider

I write for this magazine because it reaches my lovely clients.

Maungatapu Clinic Open 7-days, 9am-9pm, by appointment Phone: 021 0879 0276 E-mail: aprilzhou@wellbeingacu.com Web: www.wellbeingacu.co

MAINTAINING WELLBEING

Sport & Wellbeing

Acupuncture has been proven effective by the World Health Organization (WHO) in the treatment of many conditions including high and low blood pressure, pain, morning sickness, inducing labour, gastric conditions, back pain, fibromyalgia, infections, whooping cough and Tourette syndrome.


40

Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

ARRC Hosts Arataki School’s Montessori Class Educating our community about the importance of our wildlife and natural heritage is part of ARRC’s mission. As part of Seaweek, we were delighted to host the first exciting event of many more to come – a tour of our facilities and a talk about our work to enthusiastic Montessori school children. If you would like to arrange a booking for your school, please get in touch.

The children were enthralled to see our wildlife patients, composting and recycling area, surgery and x-rays of patients. After a talk explaining more about the work that we do rehabilitating our wildlife and what they can do to help our wildlife, they were keen to read our ARRC Kids Adventure Series books. These books are based on true stories

about wildlife that we have treated and help to outline important messages about conservation, environmental sustainability and responsible pet ownership. We look forward to hosting more of these tours / talks. If you have a school group that you would like to bring through, please let us know.

Contact: Phone: (07) 579 9115 E-mail: info@arrc.org.nz 56 Fraser Street, Tauranga By Dr. Liza Schneider, ARRC Wildlife Trust I write for this magazine to educate and empower people to help animals and the environment.

Penny’s urinary incontinence dried up

Pets & Wildlife

Penny, a cute little dachshund, suffered from urinary incontinence. This is a relatively common condition that we see especially in older female dogs where they are unable to control their bladders and often leave their bed wet. It can have an impact on their quality of life but thankfully help is at hand. Penny was treated with medication which worked well to stop her “accidents” but unfortunately a side effect is that it occasionally causes increased aggression in some dogs. Montessori school children toured ARRC facilities during Seaweek in April 2018.

Although Penny was delightful, she developed some aggression towards other dogs. Being concerned about these side effects, her owners wanted to explore other options. Penny was treated with herbs and homeopathy. After about two weeks, Penny was weaned off the medication and after another four weeks she was weaned off the homeopathic drops as well. Her owners reported, “We were so impressed as there was no relapse of her incontinence. The homeopathic treatment is amazing - now, a little short of a year later Penny is still receiving no treatment and her incontinence has not returned – not even one little accident. Penny is much happier now - more sociable with other dogs and we’re so pleased she doesn’t have to have any harmful medication”. By Dr. Liza Schneider, Holistic Vets I write for Bay Waka because supporting our community and doing what we can to help animals is important to us.


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

Watch out for Little Stinkers

One such threat to be aware of is the brown marmorated stink bug. A native of China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, it has spread to the United States, Canada and Europe, and is considered by our horticulture industry as one of their top pests of concern. These bugs suck fluids containing sugars and nutrients from fruit, disfiguring it and making it unsuitable for sale. As they feed heavily on a wide variety of plant species, including grapes, kiwifruit, apples, citrus, stone fruit, and corn, a recent study estimated that if the pest becomes established in New Zealand it could cost $4.2 billion in exports by 2038. However, overseas they also infest homes in large numbers, especially in winter. As they can’t be easily treated with insecticides and they emit a pungent odour when squashed (hence the name), they are hard to eradicate.

slip in through airports or seaports will likely attack urban gardens first. So, keep watch for these stink bugs. If you think you’ve found one – catch it and call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. What they look like: Adults are about the size of a $1 coin and have: • white banding on the antennae • alternate black and white markings on the abdomen • eggs that are light green, barrel shaped, and found in clusters of 20-30. By Jane Nees, Deputy Chair, BOP Regional Council I write for this magazine because it is interesting and informative and is a great way of communicating with people in the community.

The brown marmorated stink bug is a native of China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, it has spread to the United States, Canada and Europe, and is considered by our horticulture industry as one of their top pests of concern.

So far our biosecurity system has managed to keep them out, so far as we know. However, the threat is real. Earlier this year, three ships carrying cars were turned away from New Zealand after an infestation of brown marmorated stink bugs was found and the cargo had to undergo heat treatment before coming back to NZ. The little stinkers have also been found in suitcases at the border. So while MPI maintains its security screen, we should check our luggage on return to New Zealand and check our packages from overseas. In our gardens we should keep a look out for them, because any bugs which

58 58 58

58

58 58

58

Pets & Wildlife

Biosecurity is very important for a country like New Zealand that relies heavily on our primary produce for our economic wellbeing. We had a hard lesson on this in the Western Bay when our kiwifruit industry was hit by a Psa-V incursion a number of years ago. Fortunately, we have a sophisticated biosecurity system which monitors for incursions and responds rapidly when we detect new, harmful pests and diseases that may impact on our future wellbeing. Led by the Ministry of Primary Industry (MPI), the biosecurity system includes regional councils, other government agencies and industry organisations who all work together to identify and manage biosecurity threats. However, as residents and landowners we also have a role to play to be vigilant and manage pests.

41


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Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

Young People and Volunteering What’s in it for Me?

I saw a need and was motivate d – we all have the ability to enable and empower others… - Susan, volunteer and Nana

DO SOMETHING GOOD TODAY. Be part of our community, meet new people, gain work experience, boost your CV, learn new skills, make

Business

a difference, enrich your life and your community through volunteering.

Ph

(07) 571 3714 or visit our website: www.volbop.org.nz

Volunteering in New Zealand is changing. We have an aging population of volunteers of a more traditional era with a work ethic of turning up for unpaid work and being told what to do, no questions asked. The older generation are not wholly concerned about work experience, adding to their CV. Nor do they have to juggle volunteering with school, study and child commitments. We have relied on their generosity and pliability for decades and most not-for-profit organisations couldn’t survive without them. Except one day we’ll have to. Young people today, e.g. Millennials still want to volunteer but for some it’s not so much about what they can offer the organisation, but what the organisation can offer them. Millennials are more likely to walk away from a volunteer role if their expectations are not met. They’ll even expect a reference if they’ve been reliable and productive after several months. Smart not-for-profits should be offering this when recruiting. Organisations can capitalise on this by providing good volunteer engagement which will impress savvy young people. These organisations need to manage recruitment, induction and training of volunteers as a professional process, no different to engaging paid employees. The professionalisation of volunteering demands that organisations get clued up to the needs of younger volunteers because there’s never been an easier time to find a volunteer role with the advent of the internet.

KITCHENMAKEOVER.CO.NZ

Volunteering Bay of Plenty provides an online Database of volunteer roles available in the Bay of Plenty at: www. volbop.org.nz. By Theo Ursum, General Manager, Volunteering Bay of Plenty Before

I write for the Bay Waka Magazine because I want to get the message out to the community about the benefits of volunteering.

Lighthouse Church After Make over your existing kitchen with designer finishes and save THOUSANDS compared to replacing it!

Call 0800 48 77 48 for your free

See us at no-obligation consultation and quote booth 330 at the Tauranga Showroom: 48 Birch Ave, Tauranga Home Show for up Mon - Fri - 8.00 - 4:30 to $500 credit towards Sat - 9:00 - 12:00 new handles! (T's & Cs apply)

260 Welcome Bay Road

Phone 544 5383 Regular Sunday Services - 10am


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

43

Real Estate Challenges – Deceased Estate

EMATION CARE

PROOF TIME 21/11/2017 3:37:06 p.m. LAST RUN: 12/21/17 The complexities of selling real getting the house cleaned inside10801478AA and offer on the table at this point waiting 12.4X3 SIZE: estate often presents problems and out and then staging the house for to see if the CCC was issued.

Travel Safe

obstacles above and beyond marketing photos and video. That deal didn’t go through, but and selling a property. A Building Inspection was carried we did get a CCC, (apparently there Late last year a local law firm out and repairs identified and rectified. are approximately 18,000 properties approached me to sell a property. The On checking the Council File without a valid CCC in Tauranga – owner had passed away in hospital it became apparent that no Code worth checking as your insurance some months earlier. The lovely home Compliance Certificate (CCC) had been could be invalid!) looked like he had gone to work, issued, for a property built in 2003; Happily the property has now sold everything was just as he had left it. this was not an easy fix. to lovely purchasers who, with all Our challenge involved many aspects, An inspection by Laurie“En Hubbard couraging primary the detail available were able to go or mine was to create a property that from Tauranga City Council resulted a relatively short dren to walk, bike unconditional Seint th school chil e scene for y man ngs bri ool sch to ter would have appeal and potential and in a list of requirementsscoo that needed e mor time. Job done….. NEXT….. e y’r the a ns h mea It e s. would althier, safer achieve the best price possible for the to be completed beforebenaefit CCC By Shirley Wells lly active which brings physica e beneficiaries. be considered. In the week before n v s.” ir efit onment arou significant health ben Clearing the house of all the Christmas we had a painter, electrician, I write for this because I nd youmagazine r s c h o o l…helpful personal effects, chattels and furniture, glazier, plumber, gas fitter, handyman love sharing knowledge and garden equipment, everything. plus my husband and son completing information. and more importantly for Our bodies are made for movement and children to school under your own ‘steam’ Bringing the gardens back into order, Getting the tasks set before us. We did have an your child learning life skills are happiest when they’re physically active. Our can be a great social opportunity to catch up

Safer Journeys

How can you become part of the solution?

The answer lies with you!

Healthy outlo

ok in every da y active life Safety and pe rception skills Independence

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MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH

Social skills alo

ngside others

1. Pre-plan Qualified and FiXED PricE FUNErAl PlANs experienced Funeral Directors From $1799 incl gst

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• Check out your safest route • Identify safe crossings • Check bike, Pre-paid scooter, skateboard

It is great that our e to be students are abl rney active on their jou ps to school. This keeduces re them healthy andour school. congestion around Damien Harris ARY UNT PRIM

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TO CYCLE, “At WALK, a difficult time, know that you won’t pay a fortune for your ALISTAIR BLACK SCOOTER ORbe JOIN Reduced and traffic loved oneDirector to looked withchaos dignity and respect.” Funeral andafter Embalmer congestion around school gates A KIDS ON FEET WALKING BUS • Join a walkin

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g school bus • Walk with a friend • Scooter/skateboard to school • Drop the kids off away from school and walk/ available. scooter/skateboard the rest

environmentally friendly form Pre-arranged andAnPre-paid Funerals of transport to and from school “At a difficult time, know that you won’t pay a fortune for your loved one to be after Children arrive at school fresh looked and ready to learn AlistAir BlAck with dignity and respect.”

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Use your feet to get to and from school! Let’s keep moving ahead! For more information contact Tauranga City Council - Phone: 577 7000

2. Live too far from

school?

• Look for a saf e dro

p-off point away fro

m school

4. Kids Can Ride • Year 5/6 students take part in Kids Can Ride cycle safety programme • Kids Can Ride students cycle with a friend • Younger students cycle with an adult

The walking school pace, allowing children to bus sets a more-relaxed worthy decisions. It fosters learn about making good, road a great it is an invaluable part sense of community and of our week. Mel Young

OMANU VOLUNTEER

PARENT

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/TravelSafeBOP

Travel Smart Students

MVM 61617

role as their parents and caregivers is to ensure we provide protected and attractive environments so children can be themselves and safely explore their surroundings. One alternative to driving kids to school for parents is to walk, bike or scooter with their children, at least occasionally. This gives parents and their children some time being active and exploring new things together.


44

Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

PAID CONTENT

Is Ball Tampering really that bad? the foreseeable future, but severely damaged his reputation as a skilled craftsman of his trade. Because he was well respected, relatively young in his career and extremely good at what he did, he was placed on a higher pedestal than other players involved in the cheating behaviour. Warren Scobie, BiznessWins – Diversity Managers

Apparently, it is!

Business

This can be especially true for those that perpetrate the act, so when Smith, Warner and Bancroft embarked on this course of action in the recent Australian vs South Africa cricket test, they would not have dreamed the reaction that they would receive, especially from their own fans. Mind you, they probably didn’t plan to get caught either. Many commentators are questioning the severity of the punishment dished out in comparison to other cheating behaviours of sports people in the past, but cricket cheats do seem to cop lengthy punishments (remember Lou Vincent). But this isn’t just about ball tampering; it is about the integrity of the team that most Australians hold in higher esteem than that of the Australian Prime Minister. Steve Smith especially at the height of his career, can do no wrong, or so we thought, had a mind explosion and not only forfeited a great deal of income in

MULTIMODAL STATION 021 138 3739

And that is the problem; Smiths reputation has been significantly damaged and so has the trust people have in his ability to lead a team and make the right decisions. Whether we like it or not, we all are judged by the decisions we make and the actions we carry out. Personal Branding is what it is all about at this level. The ability to capitalise on yourself as a brand rests entirely on how you present yourself to the wider public.

What is Personal Branding? It is establishing and promoting what you stand for. It is a combination of skills and experiences that make you unique. Effective personal branding will differentiate you from other professionals in your chosen field. Personal Branding is about building an additional channel for growing your own success. Whether as an individual or a business, your brand is built up over time and reflects your values and your vision as to where you see yourself in the wider community, whether it is sport or business. We all know how Corporate sponsorship is critical to

providing that additional income for successful individuals, but as we have seen it is hard fought but easily lost. How quickly Corporates will ditch a celebrity if they don’t fit the corporate profile. Ask Tiger Woods if you have any doubts. Will Steve Smith once again reach the heights previously gained in his career? Who knows. But one thing is for sure, he has a tough job ahead and only time will tell. At the very least he has started by accepting responsibility. By Warren Scobie, BiznessWins – Diversity Managers warren@biznesswins.com I write for the Bay Waka because I wish to contribute to the diversity of the magazine informing the wider community.

Warren Scobie delivers Scrutiny for Successful Business to Improve Outcomes and Performance. Phone 027 692 7736 9am – 9pm

• • • • •

WILLS TRUSTS RELATIONSHIP PROPERTY COMMERCIAL BUYING AND SELLING PROPERTY • EMPLOYMENT Sam Messenger

07-928 9000 enquiries@balaw.co.nz Monmouth House, 41 Monmouth Street, Tauranga


Bay Waka

May - July 2018

45

Councils should stick to their knitting

You can understand the Library providing computer learning courses for people needing help to put together a CV for a job. But for our Councils to shell out nearly $500k of ratepayers’ money – mostly levied on commercial ratepayers - to subsidise boutique digital education programmes - is another matter. Correct me if I’m wrong, but last time I checked there was no shortage of ‘digital’

trainers in Tauranga. If anything, there seems to be a glut of people who will happily teach your children how to code and help small business owners make better use of the Internet. So why the need for Council subsidies in a market sector that appears to have no shortage of enthusiastic providers? Just because ‘digital’ is the latest fad, and we are in the midst of rolling out highspeed Internet across the region, is that enough reason for Councils to rush into yet another area of non-core business? Never mind that the business community did not ask for this project. Never mind that, after 15 months of a

so-called ‘pilot’ phase, there is no transparency or public accountability for the D.E.P. (the project instead appears to answer to a handful of council bureaucrats behind closed doors). Never mind that the contractor has carried on with the same activities it was doing prior to receiving the council subsidy. To continue with such a wasteful use of business ratepayers’ money for another ten years puts into question the whole credibility of the Council’s current rates proposals. No wonder the city’s business owners are seeing red at the thought of being treated as a cash cow for the Council’s pet projects. As far as the focus on ‘digital’ goes, I would suggest

that, no different to when the telephone, power and reticulated water came into their day, high-speed internet will soon enough be something we can all take for granted. How would it have looked if, in 1920 say, the Councils had decided to levy ratepayers so that businesses and school children could learn to master the new ‘soon-to-sweep-the-world’ technology of – wait for it the telephone? The Tauranga City Council should stick to its core business. It’s time the digital enablement project was put on the digital scrap heap. By Stan Gregec CEO, Chamber of Commerce, Tauranga

Mortgage brokers the borrowers best friend Mortgage brokers are the best. When we were looking to get a mortgage our financial situation (both had companies of less than two years and an 18% deposit) was always going to make it easy for banks to reject us. We approached Tim from Mike Pero on recommendation of one bank and together we looked at all the options available and applicable to our particular situation. The advantages of using a mortgage broker are manifold and include; reducing your risk of loan rejection from your bank (so you get to keep a good bank record), having someone experienced negotiating with the bank for you (we were offered very competitive rates, and in one case less than the banks advertised “special interest rate” and no stress for you), expert advice on structuring the loan to meet your individual repayment plan and wishes, and the absolute kicker – mortgage brokers are completely free for

you the borrower!! No fees! (they are paid by the banks – and no, the costs aren’t passed onto you the consumer). Consequently, due to Tim’s advice and great service, the process for getting our mortgage was quick and stress free. If only I could say

the same about the next 25 years of repayments! If you are considering getting a mortage or renegotiating your current mortgage, you have nothing to lose and everything to gain by using a broker – give it a try!

Build your dream home with help from Mike Pero

Mike Pero

Approved applicants only. Lending criteria apply.

Tim Ross

Adviser/Franchise Owner Mike Pero Rookie of the Year 2017

T 07 571 5047 M 021 520 593 A 299 Cameron Road Tauranga 3110 W mikepero.co.nz/timothy-ross

Business

I just don’t get it. With some businesses facing rates increases of 60% or more this year, what sort of message is Tauranga City Council sending by continuing to fund fluffy nice-to-have projects like the Digital Enablement Programme, (D.E.P for short)?


46

Issue 11 - Winter 2018

Bay Waka

CLASSIFIEDS Support Services

Our Community

Struggling with living costs? Contact Tauranga Budget Advisory now for free friendly assistance on 578 0969. For an appointment, text us 021 0817 7107 or email: info@tgabudget.org.nz. DIABETES HELP TAURANGA YOUTH. Aged under 18 years with diabetes? Join us for fun events and support. Call 07 571 3422 now.

Classifieds

COMMUNITY CONTACTS Merivale Comm. Centre 578 6450 Ohauiti Settlers Hall0800 042 848 Oropi Comm. Hall: 0800 146 767 Rangataua Sports: 021 0261 6996 W.Bay Comm. Centre: 544 9774

Our Community

A PLACE TO BEE, free craft session Thursday’s 11am-1pm at Welcome Bay Lighthouse Church. Knitting, crochet, adult colouring, handmade cards. Pop in to play, or call Mel: 027 576 3105. CHESS CLUB RSA Mount Maunganui, 544 Maunganui Road, Mondays, 6pm9.30pm, includes casual chess.

FREEMASONRY Composed of men of character with high ideals and worthwhile values who strive to make a difference in themselves and in our community. Learn more about one of the world’s oldest and largest fraternal organisations. Phone, or text Glen today 027 918 9096.

CHESS CLUB GREERTON RSA Tauranga, 1237 Cameron Road, Greerton, Fridays, 5pm-7pm, Includes casual chess. Email Caleb at chess@baywaka.nz.

Lighthouse Church

FIREWOOD by Welcome Bay Lions Club. Mixed load with old man pine, gum and avocado. $100/m3, minimum two m3 delivered. Phone: Doug on 544 6383. GOOD FAIRY HOME SERVICES, staging homes for sale, sorting, removing clutter, and for quick sale. Carolyn (021) 029 77 572.

260 Welcome Bay Road

Phone 544 5383 Regular Sunday Services - 10am

Welcome Aboard the Mobile Library 

Welcome aboard the Mobile Library

The Tauranga mobile library visits locations throughout the city six days a week. You’ll find us near shopping centres, on residential estates, by Primary schools and at several re homes. Check out the timetable below to locate a convenient stop near you!  You can check out the full timetable details on the library website at: www.library.tauranga.govt.nz.    

You can check out the full timetable details on the library website at: www.library.tauranga.govt.nz. 2018 Mobile Library stops 

Weekday

Time

Maungatapu Shops 

Monday

9.15 – 10.30 am 

14

28

11

Change Point (Poike Rd) 

Monday

10.45 – 11.30 am 

14

28

129 Haukore Street (Hairini) 

Monday

11.40 – 12.15 pm 

14

28

Welcome Bay Primary School 

Wednesday

10.00 – 12.15 pm 

16

Greenwood Park Village 

Wednesday

1.45 – 2.20 pm 

77 Victory Street (Welcome Bay) 

Wednesday

Short Place   (Off Karewa Pde ‐  E. Papamoa)  54 Osprey Drive (Welcome Bay)   

 

Mobile Library Holidays

May

June

July

August

25

9

23

6

20

11

9

23

6

20

11

25

9

23

6

20

30

13

11

25

8

22

16

30

13

27

11

25

8

22

2.30 – 3.45 pm 

16

30

13

27

11

25

8

22

Wednesday

3.15 – 3.45 pm 

9

23

6

20

4

18

1

15

29

Thursday

2.10 – 3.45 pm 

10

24

7

21

5

19

2

16

30

Love your library? Become a friend of the library!

Friends of the Tauranga City Libraries and Papamoa Libraries. is dedicated to supporting the Visitors and new members are always libraries' services. We welcome the welcome to join us at any of our Queens Birthday - Monday 4 June No service to schools during school holidays:   Tauranga City Council's decision to activities. There is always friendly and include the building of a new central   No service to schools during school lively discussion over a tea or coffee. holidays: Friday 6 July – Saturday 21 July library in their draft Long Term Plan NB: All patrons are welcome to visit school stops but please note that these are very busy stops where school classes must be given priority of service.  (2018-2028). Keep a watchful eye on NB: All patrons are welcome to visit For more information check our website this idea at www.tauranga.govt.nz. school stops but please note that these www.fol-tauranga.org.nz or contact are very busy stops where school classes Jenny: secretary@fol-tauranga.org.nz Book Groups - Monthly morning book must be given priority of service. groups at Greerton, Mount Maunganui phone 543 4760 or Betty 542 4322. No service on Public holidays: No service on Public holidays:   ANZAC Day - Wed 25 April


47

Bay Waka

May - July 2018

Please support our Supporters… BusinessPage

BusinessPage

15th Avenue Tyre & Suspension Centre

21

Lester Gray

16 Avenue Theatre - Dirty Dusting

29

Lighthouse Church

Accupuncture and Massage

39

LJ Hooker Property Management

14

AJ's Bar Maungatapu

37

Mike Pero Mortgages - Tim

45

Andy Belcher Photographer

28

Mobile Library - Tauranga City Council

46 38

7

Neighbourhood Support

Aongatete Forest Project

5

Ngai te Rangi Iwi

42, 46

8, 16

ARRC Wildlife Trust

40

Nicola Cooke - Eves Realty

Aurora Health & Beauty

39

NZ Transport Agency

Barry Fredheim - LJ Hooker

17

Oak Tree Restaurant - Greerton

Bay Cremation Care

43

Ohauiti Settlers Hall

Bay Health Clinic

36

Oropi Hall - Sunday Market

Bizness Wins - Warren Scobie

44

Oropi School

30-31

Bizobike New Zealand 

19

Party Starter

17

Burley Attwood Law

44

Rialto Theatre

Chef Stephen Wilson - The Happy Puku 

34-35

48 24-25 35 2 36

2

RWL Car Park Markings

47

Design Engine Architects

44

Silver Service IT

16

First National Real Estate - Papamoa

27

Snowden Electrical

21

First National Real Estate - Te Puke

27

Tauranga City Council

9

First National Real Estate - Welcome Bay

27

The Accounting Studio

11

Friends of the Library

46

Todd Muller MP

17

Holistic Vets

40

Travel Safe - Tauranga City Council

Hyalite Hydroponics

33

Volunteering Bay of Plenty

42

Ideal Buildings

22

Walnut Tree Farm Shop open 24/7

32

Welcome Bay Four Square

22

28, 43

Jim Peterson - Westbay Real Estate

3

Just the Ducks Nuts - Accomadation

20

Welcome Bay Vet Clinic

41

Keep on your feet - Sport BOP

38

Welcome Sushi - Welcome Bay

13

Kev ‘n' Shirl - First National Real Estate

43

Western BOP District Council

23

Williams Automotive - warrent of fitness

21

Kitchenmakeover.co.nz42

Over 30 years experience in all types of road markings, FREE quotes and site inspections

Lining the Way Ahead

Specialists in all types of paint markings:

Car Parks – Sports courts – Warehouses – Safety markings – Airfields – Playgrounds – Coloured walkways 34 Palm Springs Boulevard, Papamoa Phone: 07 542 0652 I Mobile: 027 363 9155 I E-mail: sales@carparkmarkings.nz I Web: carparkmarkings.nz

Classifieds

Anne Pankhurst

6


SOLD

SOLD

Glue Pot Road

SOLD

Waitao Road

SOLD

Solander Drive

SOLD

Welcome Bay Road

GET SOLD

SOLD

WITH NICOLA COOKE Goldfinch Place

SOLD

After many successful marketing campaigns, here is a selection of properties sold recently in the local area with many satisified owners and purchasers.

Awaiti Place

We are still working with buyers from these campaigns.

SOLD

Please contact me today if you would like to discuss a tailor made marketing campaign for your property. Discovery Avenue

SOLD

Kind regards

Ballintoy Park Drive

NICOLA COOKE AREINZ

SOLD

Graduate Diploma of Business Studies (Real Estate) Massey Licensed Agent under the REAA 2008

Coopers Road

nicola.cooke@eves.co.nz M: 0274 763 553 DDI: 07 579 0813

Oropi Road

www.eves.co.nz

SOLD

Glue Pot Road

Call me today

SOLD

Awanui Place

SOLD

Hammond Street

PH: 0274 763 553 / 07 579 0813

SOLD

Kaitemako Road

BAY WAKA, issue 11 - Winter, MAY-JUL 2018  

[ Issue 11 - Print run 35,000 ] This exclusive community companion delivered to mail boxes in the suburbs of Tauranga City, The Avenues, Pap...

BAY WAKA, issue 11 - Winter, MAY-JUL 2018  

[ Issue 11 - Print run 35,000 ] This exclusive community companion delivered to mail boxes in the suburbs of Tauranga City, The Avenues, Pap...