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Features MARCH 2014

52 P. Allen Smith Growing Your Own Chopped Salad Bar

62 In the Mood to Shop Spring Fashion with Attitude

84 BayouIcon Mary Simpson – Our Favorite British Import

90 BayouEats Enoch’s Irish Pub: Libations, Music and Pub Grub

95 Contemporary Chic The Home of Misti and Hardeman Cordell

106 Celtic Routes Family, Culture and History in the Crossroads of NELA

112 Bayou Artist Doug Kennedy: Conjuring the Spirits of Southern Art

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MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 5


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CAN HONESTLY SAY THIS IS THE FIRST publisher's note I've written that I've had to go through and read some of the articles without seeing the pages. I am so grateful that I have a staff who have taken total control and put together this March issue. On February 1st, my husband and I welcomed our second beautiful baby girl, Vivian Livingston, into the world. We feel so incredibly blessed to have two healthy and gorgeous little girls, and we'd like to thank everyone for their well wishes and support. February was a month jam-packed with society events and Toni Navarro and a very pregnant me were able to attend Clyde White's retirement reception before I left on maternity leave. We enjoyed visiting with everyone, including Vada and Eugene Montgomery, Linda and Joe Holyfield, Vee Dickey and many more. Our staff also attended two highly anticipated grand openings: Serendipity Designer Jewelry and Hemline Monroe. We've always enjoyed our relationship with the Hamilton family and are thrilled that they are now just right down the road from us on Forsythe Avenue. If you haven't had a chance to go by, you must see their new space – it is breathtaking. We also had a great time at Hemline Monroe's preview party. Owners Leslie and Joshua Culp, along with manager Natalie Sutor have raised the bar for fashion in northeast Louisiana. Stop by and see their expansive collection of men and women's clothing, shoes and accessories. As St. Patrick's Day fast approaches, we salute all things Irish – starting with Michael DeVault's article on local establishment, Enoch's Irish

TOAST OF THE TOWN, PAGE 90

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Pub and Grill. From their mouth-watering burgers to their plentiful whiskey offerings, this pub is a hot spot for those wanting a pint of Gat and the essence of Ireland. See page 90 for this spirited article. Our photo shoot is the vision of the talented Rain the Salon and Day Spa owner, James McCready. James, along with Rheagan Sutton and photographer Joli Livaudais took us over the top of the Vantage parking garage for this show-stopping shoot. Thank you to our gorgeous models Alex and Savannah. See page 62 for "In the Mood to Shop." I really want to thank Toni, Melanie, Scarlett, Rheagan, Maré and Tess for all their help this month. It is such a relief to be able to spend time with my new family, and I couldn't do it without all of you! I also want to wish my sweet baby, Stella a very happy 2nd birthday. We appreciate your support of BayouLife Magazine and hope you enjoy reading this month's issue.

Cassie Livingston


More Than a Racetrack!

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Revolution Park is a Unique Venue on 55 Versatile Acres for Concerts, Parties and More

EVOLUTION PARK RACING AND ENTERTAINMENT Complex is a regional entertainment hub conveniently located on the Frontage Road between the Millhaven and Garrett Road exits. NASCAR has rated Revolution Park as one of the Top 5 Speedways in their Home Track program featuring the Whelen All American Series. As the people in our community are quickly discovering, Revolution Park is more than just a race track. Featuring a beautiful and versatile 55 acre property including the Track and Pit Area, VIP Suites, the Midway and well-lit ample parking, the corporate and community event possibilities are endless. The facilities are the perfect choice for corporate meetings, retreats, birthday parties, festivals, arts and craft fairs, car shows, job fairs, concerts and so much more. All of the options at Rev Park make it effortless to plan your event. This NASCAR affiliated state-of-the-art three-eighths mile oval asphalt track is a dream come true for the drivers and fans alike. When you attend a race at Revolution Park Racing and Entertainment Complex, you can feel the electricity from the moment you enter the park. The music is blaring from the Burnout Band on the Midway Stage, the drivers are flying around the track during hot laps, and you can smell the Grandstand Nachos being prepared in the Concession Stand. When you make your way into the grand stands and overlook the Rev Park Track, feel the goose bumps as you hear the roar of the engines. As the green flag nears, make your way onto the world class speedway for an on-track experience with the drivers and their teams. Taste the grit as the cars race around the track: beating and banging, bumping and grinding. Celebrate your favorite driver’s victory with family and friends as the checkered flag flies. VIP Ticket Holders enjoy the Turn 1 Patio Suites as a luxurious way to enjoy their evening. The comfortable, quiet air conditioned suites complete with televisions, ample seating and a deck overlooking Turn 1 are the perfect way to spend your night out. A wait staff is there to serve you and to ensure you are able to enjoy your racing experience in comfort and luxury. During concerts, your favorite artists are taking the Speed Stage while we provide the atmosphere and the service. Revolution Park is a great, affordable entertainment venue for the whole family with something for

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everyone. Adult Tickets are $10.00, Children and Military/Law Enforcement Tickets are $8.00, and VIP Tickets are $25.00. Season Passes are available. Become a member of our REV Club for the VIP treatment and many other perks. Revolution Park Racing and Entertainment Complex is located at 8850 Frontage Rd. Monroe, LA 71202. For all inquires on group and corporate ticket pricing or for more information on how to book Revolution Park for an event , please contact Erica Hales at (318)812-RACE(7223). Become a NASCAR Member on NASCAR.com and play NASCAR Fantasy Live in our Revolution Park Fan League. Check out our website at www.revolutionparkentertainment.com for information on upcoming events. Bring your family and come experience what all the buzz is about.

RACING SCHEDULE • March 15 – Pinto Play Day (Saturday Day Event) • March 28, 29 and 30 – Ricky Pace Chase Weekend* (Schedule TBA) • April 24 – Get Revved and Ready Practice (Thursday Afternoon) • April 25 – Media Event/Green Flag Meet and Greet (Friday Night Event) • April 26 – SPEEDFEST, 2014 Season Race #1 (Saturday Night Race) • May 3 – Thunder and Lightning Event (Saturday Day Race) • May 31 – "Faster Paster" Night honoring our local pasters and congregations, 2014 Season Race #2 (Saturday Night Race) • June 14 – Legends, Bandoleros, Thunderstock and Factory Stock, Frank Foster Concert (Saturday Day Race, Saturday Night Event) • June 28 – Firecracker 50 Event for Late Models, 2014 Season Race #3 (Saturday Night Race) • August 9 – Whelen, Law Enforcement & Military Night, 2014 Season Race #4 (Saturday Night Race) • August 23 – 2014 Season Race #5 (Saturday Night Race) • September 6 – The Revolution Park Guitar Festival featuring Guitar Wars, 2014 Season Race #6 (Saturday Night Race) • September 19, 20 and 21 – Last Chance for Points Weekend and Checkered Flag Party (Night Races)


MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 9


Green Beer and Lots of Cheer St. Patrick’s Day Celebrations Around the World

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BY DELIA SIMPSON, CRAFT, SPECIALTY & IMPORT MANAGER, CHOICE BRANDS, INC.

T. PATRICK’S DAY WAS ORIGINALLY OBSERVED AS A religious festival in Ireland over a thousand years ago. In the 1970s it came to be recognized as a celebration of Irish culture and heritage. The day, March 17th, is named in honor of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. There are many different St. Patrick’s day themed festivals and parades all over the world, but they all have one thing in common – beer! Whether you’re fully decked out in all your green glory or just enjoying a beer at your local pub, it’s a great day to appreciate all things Irish.

DUBLIN While it wasn't the first city to have a St. Patty's Day parade, Dublin has some of the most exciting celebrations the world over. Thousands of spectators line up to watch the parade starting at Parnell Square every year. There is also an Irish Craft Beer Village, where you can learn about the emerging craft beer community in Ireland, drin, and enjoy some Irish music. NEW YORK St. Patty's Day in New York is the stuff of legends. The Big Apple's St. Patrick's Parade, over 250 years old, is the oldest and biggest in the world. Led down Fifth Avenue by the 69th Infantry Regiment (a military unit known as "The Fighting 69th"), the procession of roughly 150,000 is filled with firefighters, military and police groups, bands and many more. Though only traveling a mile and a half, the parade often lasts up to five hours. The event draws up to two million spectators each year.

CHICAGO The Chicago parade is held every year on the Saturday before St. Patrick’s Day. The Chicago River is dyed green on the morning of the parade and up to 400,000 people are on hand to watch the 45 pounds of 10 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

vegetable dye work its magic. The coloring only lasts about five hours, so you have to get there early to catch it. The parade itself is packed with all things Irish. There are colorful floats, troops of Irish step dancers, booming marching bands and much more.

BOSTON With its large Irish American population, it is no surprise that Boston has one of the best St. Patrick’s Day celebrations around. With over 600,000 in attendance, it is listed as the second largest in the country. Affectionately referred to as the “Southie,” Boston’s parade is a staple for many groups across the country. There are floats, bag pipers, marching bands and too much more to name.

NEW ORLEANS Of course, we can’t leave out a Louisiana style party. St. Patrick's Day is celebrated in New Orleans and its suburb in the form of another parade. It seems as if the entire city is on the street with picnic baskets, umbrellas and their recreational vehicles, enjoying one of the biggest street parties of the year. Floats and truck floats (those on flatbed trailors created by the riders themselves) respond to the call, "Throw me something, Mister!" Historically, the parade's most famous throws are cabbages, carrots, onions...and moonpies! (You may even see a potato or two in the air!)

This year, our St. Patrick’s Day motto is “Wear green; drink Redd’s!” Show us how you celebrate with Redd’s Apple Ale. Share your St. Patrick’s Day photos with us on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook with the hashtag #weargreendrinkredds and be entered to win a Redd’s Beach Cruiser Bicycle or Redd’s prize pack. Make sure you tag Choice Brands or mention us in the comments: facebook.com/choicebrands, twitter.com/choicebrandsinc, and instagram.com/choicebrands.


A New Perspective on Dating Lyla Corkern Discusses Considering Dating in Terms of a Job Listing

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BY LYLA CORKERN, LPC, MFTI

AVE YOU BEEN FINDING YOURSELF INVESTING repeatedly in the wrong type of person? Can you look back and see a slew of disrespect, frustration, betrayal, apathy or other repeated behaviors through multiple relationships? Have you become defeated, feeling like you will never be able to find a decent person to connect with? Have you ever judged yourself or your relationship choices? Then maybe this perspective may help you begin to re-evaluate your future relationships. Let’s consider dating in terms of posting a job listing. Imagine yourself as a business owner who is looking for help. You can manage on your own but having someone else would improve your situation. There are a couple ways to go about it. You can either put a Help Wanted sign in your business window or you can post a job listing. Let’s review the idea of putting up a help wanted sign. That’s when we open the doors to anyone who might be interested in a relationship with you. This method is easy, convenient and fast. It is probably the most used method of those of you who find yourself in frequent failed relationships. Just like in business, the person that responds to this type of ad is typically not invested, unmotivated and lacks ambition. On the other hand, look at taking the time to create a solid job listing. You can review the prerequisites and requirements that you are looking for. You can consider what sorts of continuing education and benefit packages you are willing to provide. This is a way to narrow what the prospects may look like. So why shouldn’t dating work the same way? Take some time to reflect on what’s important to you within relationships at all their different stages. Let’s break it down. Prerequisites: Similar to diplomas or degrees in the business world, candidates you consider might have to have certain qualities or achievements. You might be looking for education, career, positive relationships with others or family oriented. Similarly, you may have things that are deal breakers including previous children, criminal back12 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

ground, impulsive decision making, etc. You may also consider their commitment to work (e.g., considering if they want to be exclusive or more open to a casual relationship). Make sure your expectations match what the applicant is offering to provide. Continuing Education: All relationships require some compromise and learning each other. However, do you want a relationship that makes you feel like you are constantly explaining yourself or asking someone else to explain, because they aren’t making sense? While relationships require work, it shouldn’t feel like you are a teacher to someone who was put in the wrong grade. It should be a shared experience of listening, explaining and sharing. Benefits: What benefits are you willing to offer and what type do you expect to receive? Why should you continue to employ them and why should they want to work for you? These can be things like willingness to go above and beyond, noticing/rewarding effort made or whatever little things you find meaning in that serve as reminders of their commitment to the job.

Most importantly, once you decide who to hire, remember to do evaluations/reviews. Check that your needs are still being met and that their performance is where you want it to be. This posting method takes more time and reflection, but typically applicants are more qualified to fill the job. Just remember that it is YOUR business. You don’t have to continue with an employee that isn’t serving the purpose he/she was hired to serve. If you want help breaking old dating patterns or making sure you are prepared for new relationships, come talk to us. We can help define what you want and help you feel confident moving forward. Contact the staff at Sanderlin Counseling Services by calling 318.323.7575 or emailing them at info@sanderlincounselingservices.com. Visit their website for more information – SanderlinCounselingServices.com.


Treating Hearing Loss

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Like Bobsledding, Treating Hearing Loss is a Team Effort

F YOU PAY ATTENTION TO OLYMPIC news coverage, you’ve probably heard the story about the Jamaican bobsled team that qualified; something Jamaica hasn’t done since the 1980s! That got us thinking about some of the similarities between bobsledding and hearing loss. It’s very important, in bobsledding, that team members completely understand each other during the race. Lack of communication, trust and respect can make the ride dangerous and unsuccessful. When hearing loss goes untreated, it doesn’t just affect one person, it affects the team, e.g. your extended family, friends, coworkers but most commonly, your significant other. The way you handle your untreated hearing loss in regard to your partner affects how pleasant you are to each other. Untreated hearing loss may make you feel like you’re hurtling without control or brakes and you may want to pretend everything’s all right, but that isn’t fair to your significant other. Being part of a team/ relationship means respecting and accepting your teammate’s guidance. Whether that’s gliding down a racetrack or asking your significant other to get a hearing evaluation, it’s in the best interest of everyone to agree. Your significant other will be so happy when you regain control of your hearing and return to the wonderful person you once were. You will be able to have two-way conversations again and may even find life’s bumps are

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more manageable. If you’d like to be a champion in your significant other’s eyes, call or contact us through our “Contact Us” form on our website www.AudibelMonroe.com. We’ll schedule a hearing evaluation for you and encourage your significant other to visit us as well!

WE CAN HELP! A simple hearing test and video otoscopy can answer a lot of questions about your hearing. We will have a consultation about options to get you on the right track to improve your speech understanding and to make listening in group situations less fatiguing and more enjoyable. We will discuss technologies and fitting options to best fit your lifestyle and budget. The sooner we can get you started with your Aural Rehab, the sooner you will start enjoying those soft sounds. MAKING A DIFFERENCE Our mission is to bring understanding among people through hearing care by focusing on awareness, education, protection and treatment, So the World May Hear! At Audibel The Hearing Center, we care about your well-being and the lives of the less fortunate around the world. As a proud supporter of The Starkey Hearing Foundation’s “So The World May Hear” program, we are changing lives through the gift of hearing. Your support through the purchase of Audibel

Instruments and your donation and trade-in of any model hearing aids goes to the foundation’s programs to provide hearing instruments to children in the most remote and poverty stricken regions of the world.

ABOUT US Audibel The Hearing Center is Northeast Louisiana’s Audibel dispenser. Cherry Phillips, “The Hearing Lady.” has been serving this area for over 25 years. We offer free hearing screenings, free second opinions, extended warranties and repairs on all makes and brands of hearing aids. You can find out more by visiting our website www.AudibelMonroe.com and you can see more and like us on Facebook.com/AudibelMonroe. YOUR HEARING IS OUR CONCERN. HEARING EXCELLENCE IS OUR PASSION. At Audibel, we understand the impact that losing your hearing can have on your enjoyment of daily activities as well as relationships. We treat each patient uniquely by offering personalized hearing care that includes diagnostic evaluations, education and rehabilitation tools to ensure the right hearing solutions are provided. We offer the best value on advanced hearing aid technology in Monroe and Ruston, LA.


MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 15


BayouKidZ

Good Sportsmanship A

Setting a Good Example for Our Children

S I SIT HERE ENJOYING THE WARMTH nd comfort of my home on this “snow day,” I am trying to decide how to broach this month’s column. How do I address the subject of good sportsmanship, when I have in fact, been a parent that yells at the umpire? I have also been the parent that has been verbally assaulted by parents on the “other” team. And while I am in confession mode, I am also the wife that texts or calls her husband (who has been banished to sit in his lawn chair in right field), because we can “still hear you yelling.” So, to set the record straight…I need to practice what I preach. Recently, I witnessed some pretty disappointing “adult” behavior during a church league basketball game, incidentally, for 8 and 9-year olds. The only good news in this story is that this behavior was not demonstrated in front of this coach’s young team. However, the hurt it caused was unnecessary and unwarranted. Most of the time, sadly, this type of behavior is played out in front of young, impressionable children. For instance, several years ago, when my son was playing T-ball, on the field next to ours, imagine our surprise when the sheriff’s car came flying up in the parking lot, lights flashing…sirens on. Two grown men were in an “altercation,” and these two men had wives that also decided to get in on the WWE action. No, really. Unfortunately, this baseball diamond drama was played out in front of children. I was never clear on the details exactly, but I think the “disagreement” involved a call at home plate by an 11-year old umpire.

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by Cindy Foust

Years later, on what is now the eve of baseball, softball and spring soccer seasons once again, I am motivated to write a column for anyone who has children that participates in any type of sporting activities, or for that matter, any type of team sport. For starters, I think I was clear from the beginning, I’m directing this encouragement to my own homestead as well, when I say, “Parents, don’t be the reason the sheriff’s department comes to your ballpark.” I often write of my son wanting to go into the Witness Protection Program, but I truly think he would escape to Australia if one of his parents caused or was involved in such shenanigans. I know this is an extreme circumstance, but I wonder how many parents really stop and think about how their words and actions might be impacting their children? I, for one, have thought about it many times through the years that my children have played team sports, and witnessed many times, the adverse impact a “grown-up” can have on a child. The reality is, it doesn’t and shouldn’t have to be that way, and parents should be the ones setting the example for “how to act.” Parents are, in fact, the biggest influence on their children. Discuss being a good sport with your children frequently. We’ve all been told “somebody has to win and somebody has to lose.” Of course, no one ever wants to lose, but the simple fact is, unless the game ends in a tie, there will be a winner and there will be a loser. Discussing ways to handle winning and losing with your children,

will keep them focused on good sportsmanship. Secondly, parents use caution when critiquing your children, particularly if they’ve had a less than stellar performance. Also, let your children see you encouraging other players on their team, or, even complimenting players from the opposing team. Remind your children to cheer their teammates on, win or lose. This type of behavior builds good leadership skills and will far surpass your child’s sports-playing years. Finally, always encourage your children to have “fun” and to use every game, every outing and every match as an opportunity to improve their performance. I love to watch college and professional sporting events, and our family is really enjoying the Olympics right now. I can assure you that these athletes, no matter what sport they are involved in, all look like they are having fun. With that being said, encouraging your child to work hard, to always give their best and to assume a leadership position on their team will foster good emotional characteristics that will carry them far past their high school athletic careers. In the end, if this article strikes a nerve with any reader, (myself included) I will bask in the success, that I might help prevent someone from being on cela.com for yelling at an 11-year old umpire; or I might help prevent someone from having to go into their 401(k) for emergency funds for plastic surgery after they got into an “altercation” at the ballpark. Maybe for once, that will make me a winner!


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The Power of Words

Words that Impact Us: Inspiring Messages that Change Us

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BY BEATRICE A. TATEM, PH.D., LPC-S, NCC, ACS

NDIVIDUALS OF ALL AGES WERE ASKED TO IDENTIFY words and phrases that inspired them. Some of the responses included but were not limited to… awesome, wonderful, splendid, terrific, gracious, joy, magnificent, greatness, nice, beautiful, strong, courageous, incredible, yes, happy, great, fantastic, survivor, congratulations, goodness, terrific, go-getter, I love you, you can do it, go in peace, thank you, you make me proud, I got your back, you’re the sunshine of my life, I respect you and peace be with you. Oh, the power of words. “Talk therapy” or counseling is an outlet for expressing emotions and feelings in words. While in counseling individuals reveal words frequently associated with less than positive meanings which can result in their experiencing low self esteem, shame and hurt. Counseling is a chance for individuals to redefine self through words. For some it is an opportunity to change the negative messages they have heard and own the words that impact them positively. Words are powerful connectors that bring meaning, formulate concepts, shape ideas and influence thought. They impact our actions and notions and reveal emotional honesty. We can use words to motivate, stimulate and move us to a place beyond the reach of our hands. “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never harm me” is a childhood chant that I used when protecting myself or a friend from unwarranted teasing or taunting. The origins of the saying remain unknown to me; however what I have learned over the years is that this quote is not accurate. Words can and do harm. To the contrary, words can also empower and uplift. We see, hear and speak words. Regardless of how words come to us they impact us. Words that come out of our mouths and words that we write down reflect what is in our hearts and in our thoughts. We form stories using words that meaning18 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

fully reflect our experiences. Words give voice to situations and reflect how we feel. Words reflect our opinions of ourselves and help to shape how others see us. Think for a moment the words you use to describe yourself, your feelings and your thoughts. Words affect our moods and our behavior. I was reminded of this each week by a small child I saw during counseling. Each session I would ask the child, “How are you?” and the response was always, “I’m good.” Although I attempted to move the child to an emotional place where their words accurately reflected their experiences, I admit the child’s description of self as “good” contributed to my seeing the child as good and as a survivor of life circumstances many would regard as daunting. In addition, perhaps most importantly, the child’s belief was the child‘s reality. The words we use influence how we think and affect how we behave. In essence the words we speak often become our reality. Changing your words can change your world. Words in and of themselves are powerful and yet we have the power to make them even more powerful. Words penetrate our souls and help to shape the spirit in which we face the world. Select what you say, how you say it and what you listen too. Be mindful of the impact words can have on you as well as others. Recognize the power of words in you and to you. Choose words carefully. After all, words can and do change us. That is the power of words. For more information about counseling services and outreach programming contact Dr. Tatem at Wellness Initiatives, 1900 North 18 th Street, Suite 414, Monroe, La 71201, 318-410-1555or at btatem.bt@gmail.com.


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1) Chevron Dress–Cutie Patootie 2) Pandora Charm–Serendipity 3) Nail Polish–Fiesta Nutrition Center 4) Colorful Infinity Scarf–A Kid’s Closet 5) Flax Top–Rose Boutique 6) Sunglasses–Haik Humble Eye Center 7) Gold and Emerald Ring–The Diamond Vault 8) Edgy Gold Necklace–Duck & Dressing 9) Tie–King of Hearts 10) Neutral Wedges– Hemline 11) Mint Top–Pearl Pumphrey’s 12) Studded Clutch–Salt & Pepper 13) Fleur de Lis Bracelet–Thurman’s Food Factory 14) Coasters–Material Things 15) Throw Pillow–Paul Michael Company 16) Gold and Green Earrings–Bent Oaks Boutique 17) Emerald and Diamond Ring–Hollis & Co. Jewelers 18) Patterned Pants–HerringStone’s

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It’s Time for Wine Over Water The University of Louisiana at Monroe Invites You to Attend Our 9th Annual Event

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OME ENJOY MORE THAN 40 FEATURED WINES provided by Glazer’s and Marsala Beverage. Glazer’s will be bringing new wines for your enjoyment. Whether you like sweet, dry, red, white, rosé or sparkling wine, there will be something special for everyone. We are proud to have Glazer’s and Marsala Beverage participating in Wine Over Water since its inception!

PATRON PARTY Don’t miss out on the best party in town with our Patron Party, which will be hosted from 5:30 until 7:30 pm on the 7th floor of the ULM Library. You will be able to overlook the bridge where the main event will be held and see the beautiful ULM campus where our unique bayou runs. Tickets are $125.00 per person. This will enable you to enjoy the Patron Party and enjoy specialty foods from Aramark as well as complimentary cocktails. Then you will be able to proceed to the main event on the ULM Bridge.

FOOD, FOOD AND MORE FOOD On the bridge, you will be served delectable food samples from some of the best restaurants in town. Over 30 vendors will be on hand for you to taste their specialty dishes. Everything from appetizers to entrees to desserts!! This will give you a great way to see where you want to go for your next evening out. Here are a few wonderful restaurants you can choose from: Aramark, Cypress Inn, Catfish Cabin, Catfish Charlie’s, Cotton, Danken Trail, Enoch’s, The Fieldhouse, Genusa’s, McAlisters, Newk’s, Pickle Barrel, Chef Pat Nolan, Podnuhs, The Kitchen, Warehouse No. 1, Thurman’s Food Factory, Vieux Carré, Waterfront Grill and many, many more. ENTERTAINMENT, PHOTOS AND BOAT RIDES Entertainment will be provided by MoJeaux, who played for the

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Saints when they won the Super Bowl. MoJeaux is well known for playing to big venues and we are lucky to have them here with us in the Twin Cities. They always put on a great show, so come dance the night away. Letsinger Marine will be hosting beautiful cruises down Bayou DeSiard. Photography for the evening is provided by Patty Stewart. You will be able to purchase pictures from her. Letsinger Marine and Patty Stewart have been with us every year and are great supporters of The University of Louisiana at Monroe. PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE “SPIRIT OF THE WARHAWK SCHOLARSHIP” This Annual Signature Event is hosted on the historic ULM Bridge spanning the scenic bayou. Proceeds from Wine Over Water benefit “The Spirit of the Warhawk Scholarship.” This scholarship is so instrumental in keeping our local students at home and attending our university. By supporting Wine Over Water you are making a great contributions to our students.

THE WHEN AND WHERE Join us on Thursday, April 24, 2014 from 7:00 until 10:00 p.m. The attire is Dressy Casual – no denim or shorts please. Tickets may be purchased at the ULM Alumni Center for $60.00 per person and are available now! This price will include your commemorative wine glass which will allow you to taste all the specialty wines. You won’t want to miss it! Call your friends and come as a group. TICKETS AND INFORMATION If you would like to become a sponsor, purchase tickets to the Patron Party or the Bridge Party or have any questions, please contact the ULM Alumni Center at 342-5420 or 866-WARHAWK. We can’t wait to see you at Wine Over Water 2014.


MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 23


Rock The Night Away Mark Your Calendars For The 6th Annual “Shindig” On March 21st

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ASY EDDIE AND THE PARTYROCKERS WILL BE ROCKING down the barn on Friday, March 21st from 7 p.m. to Midnight at the 6th Annual “Shindig” benefitting Ouachita Council on Aging. This much anticipated event will again be held at MBH farm owned by Dr. Hershel and Mary Beth Harter, located on Britton Road in the rolling hills of western Ouachita Parish. Their huge barn will be decorated with a country and western theme, so dust off those boots, dress casually and comfortably, and prepare to dance all night long! There’s plenty of parking along the road, and as in the past, there will be golf carts available to deliver patrons directly to the front door. You may even be able to catch a ride in the carriage pulled by “Big Mike” the resident Clydesdale. One of our area’s most popular party bands, Easy Eddie and the Partyrockers started out playing mostly ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘70s hits. Today, the band covers an extremely wide range of music from rhythm and blues to rock and country, as well as the most current hits topping the charts. Their song list contains over 200 selections. Band members include four-term Mayor of Ferriday, Glen McGlothin, Jimmy Wheeler and Steve Cagle of West Monroe, Gary Caldwell of Vidalia, Jerry Williams of Natchez and Larry Boland from Houston. Ouachita Council on Aging Executive Director, Lynda McGehee, reminds everyone to come prepared to participate in the Live Auction that will take place midway during the Shindig. After the huge success of last year’s auction, Lynda promises that “this year’s auction will be bigger and better!” Shindig tickets are $100 per couple and are now available at the Ouachita Council on Aging office located at 2407 Ferrand Street, Monroe. Individual tickets are $50. Businesses or individuals may also purchase reserved tables of 8 for $500. Ticket price includes a night of fantastic entertainment, a delicious, catered meal from Catfish Charlie’s and a variety of beverages. 24 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

By purchasing tickets to this event, you help support some 22 programs available for seniors in Ouachita Parish, including the Meals on Wheels Program and transportation to doctors’ offices, dialysis, heart and cancer centers. Due to the success of the previous Shindigs, OCA was able to retire the debt on Carolyn Rose Strauss Senior Center. It is now our goal to eliminate the waiting list of seniors who cannot be served by the Meals on Wheels program due to lack of funding. This list sometimes reaches as many as 100. With your support, we want to assure that all seniors have access to this vital service. OCA is responsible for carrying out a wide range of functions relative to advocacy, planning, coordination, inter-agency linkage, information sharing, brokering, monitoring and evaluation designed to lead to the development or enhancement of a comprehensive and coordinated community based system to serve seniors (age 60+) in all areas in Ouachita Parish. Further, this system is designed to assist older persons in leading independent, meaningful and dignified lives in their own homes and community as long as possible. We want to say a very special “Thank You” to Vantage Health Plan, who has been a major sponsor of this event since its inception. Without Vantage and our other many sponsors throughout our community, this Shindig would not be possible. For more information about the Ouachita Council on Aging and its services, please visit our website at www.ouachitacoa.com, call (318) 3870535, or check us out on Facebook. If you cannot attend the Shindig, but want to make a donation to OCA, go to our website and click on the “Make A Donation” button.


Bayou Pages A N O V EL

RADIANCE OF TOMORROW: BY ISHMAEL BEAH | REVIEW BY CASEY MATTHEWS

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In 2007, Ishmael Beah published his memoir A Long Boy Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier about his horrifying experience fighting for the Sierra Leone Armed Forces in his country’s civil war. After the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) killed his parents, brothers and grandparents, Beah fled into the jungle to avoid death. He was subsequently forced into the army at age 12 and taught to kill any other person (or child) believed to be fighting for the RUF. At the age of 16, Beah was rescued by UNICEF and taken to a rehabilitation camp for boy soldiers; there he had to face the reality of what he had done over the last four years. He was given the opportunity to speak at the United Nations about his experience and found solace in sharing his tragic journey. Beah continues to speak around the United States, and he continues to raise awareness about the plight of Sierra Leone. Radiance of Tomorrow: A Novel is Beah’s fictional story about the aftermath of civil war. The novel opens in a small village in upcountry Sierra Leone, Imperi, a town devastated by the war. Gradually, members of the village return to their homes and begin to rebuild their lives. All around them are reminders of their pasts, and as the villagers attempt to heal themselves, they also begin to reach out and heal each other. They share the legends of their ancestors; just as they had pain in their past, they also discover a source of strength there as well. As the characters begin to adapt to their new lives, new evils begin to make their way into the village. Corruption, greed and exploitation, 26 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

enabled and encouraged by the weakened government, transform and ultimately destroy this village. Mining companies stop at nothing to extract minerals and diamonds to meet the demands of the world’s consumers. Since Sierra Leone’s first civil war precipitated over diamonds, Beah’s criticism of the continued exploitation of his country is apparent. The novel’s political argument is subtly woven through the lives of two teachers, Bockarie and Benjamin, who have returned to Imperi to support and raise their families. Their episodes demonstrate the extent of corruption that faces a still-recovering country. For the reader, Bockarie and Benjamin represent the horrors and struggles that are so foreign to a first-world country. By the end of the novel, the dishonesty and fraud of the system are overwhelming; however, the resilience and hope of the people are inspiring Beah’s condemnation of the mining industry’s exploitation of his country is clear, and he wants the rest of the world to understand the extent to which our desires for goods come at a very high price for others. However, he also wants to show that while the human spirit and struggle for life can be tested, they are never broken. As Mama Kadie, the matriarch of the village, tells the others: “For what is yet to come tomorrow has possibilities, and we must think of it, the simplest glimpse of that possibility of goodness. That will be our strength. That has always been our strength.” Casey Posey Matthews graduated with her Bachelor of Arts degree in English Education from University of Louisiana in Monroe and her Master’s of Arts degree in English from University of New Orleans and is now an English teacher at Beachwood High School in Cleveland, OH.


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Balloon Sinuplasty™

The New Minimally Invasive Procedure for Treating Chronic Sinusitis

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INUSITIS IS ONE OF THE MOST chronic health problems in the U.S., afflicting 37 million Americans each year with symptoms like congestion, fatigue, headache and facial pain. About 12% of Americans under age 45 have symptoms of chronic sinusitis. Here in Louisiana, the number is exceptionally high due to higher pollen counts and year-round humidity. Living with chronic sinusitis can be a full-time struggle. Sufferers often depend on allergy medications, nasal steroids and over the counter pain relievers for sinus headaches to make it through the day. Trouble with sleeping and sleep apnea are common problems because of difficulties with breathing through the nose. Recurring sinus infections, often as many as 4 per year, cause missed work and significantly impact the ability to enjoy regular activities. Now available at Glenwood Ear, Nose and Throat, Balloon Sinuplasty™ is a clinically proven, minimally invasive procedure for treating chronic sinus inflammation and pain outside of the operating room and without general anesthesia. Performed by Brent Metts, MD, PhD, it delivers all the benefits of conventional sinus surgery without the bleeding, pain and prolonged recovery time. Most patients feel immediate relief following the procedure and are able to walk out of the office and work without re28 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

striction the next day. Until recently, the only surgical option available to correct chronic sinusitis has been standard endoscopic sinus surgery, where bone and tissue are cut and removed from the nasal passages to open obstructed sinuses and promote drainage. This more traditional procedure is usually associated with moderate pain, bleeding and a 7-10 day recovery time. Balloon Sinuplasty™ is designed to open blocked sinuses without removal of tissue or bone from the nasal passages. Dr. Metts passes a small, flexible balloon catheter through the nostril and into the blocked sinus. When the balloon is inflated, it gently reshapes and expands the sinus’ natural drainage pathway to permanently restore normal sinus function. A typical procedure lasts approximately 30 minutes. Following the procedure, patients experience less facial pain and improved sleep, use less antibiotics, and are able to perform day-to-day activities at home and work.

ABOUT DR. METTS: Dr. Metts provides adult and pediatric patients with a full range of ENT services. His training began in a M.D, Ph.D. combined training program at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. He completed his residency at the Medical College

of Wisconsin and earned a fellowship in Endocrine – Head and Neck Surgery at the Medical College of Georgia. He was also a member of the teaching staff at Children’s Medical Center in Augusta, GA. Dr. Metts is one of the few surgeons in the nation who is fellowship trained in “minimally invasive” and “endoscopic-assisted” thyroid and parathyroid surgeries. For decades these were inpatient procedures involving large incisions, extensive tissue trauma and scarring. This procedure is now performed by Dr. Metts on an outpatient basis, with a small incision, much less tissue trauma, less pain, a quicker recovery time and little or no noticeable scarring. In addition, Dr. Metts has a Ph.D. in Vestibular Neuroscience. Combined with his medical training in ENT, he specializes in the evaluation of patients with dizziness and equilibrium issues. Dr. Metts also provides treatment of sinus and thyroid disease, hearing loss, voice care, sleep apnea and dysphagia. Glenwood Ear, Nose and Throat is located in the Glenwood Medical Mall at 102 Thomas Road, Suite 202, in West Monroe. For more information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Metts, call 318-329-8458. Office hours from 8:00am to 5:00pm (M-F). Most insurances are accepted.


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Moving Baits for March by Kenny Covington

a shallow running crankbait. There are several, models to choose from in our local tackle stores and all of them will catch fish. The 100 series Bandit crankbait is a good choice, while Strike King’s KVD 1.5 and the Bomber 2A are also good picks. My color choices are either crawfish patterns or bream color schemes. My favorite color for years has always been firetiger. It works well in all water clarities and temperatures, but best of all, it flat out catches fish.

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we endured this past winter, I am ready for longer days and warmer temperatures. The fish that swim in our waters are no different. The bream, white perch, catfish and most importantly, the bass are all ready to begin preparing for the upcoming spawns for their respective species. In simpler terms, they are ready to eat! After dealing with the months of cold water temperatures and various water clarities, bass will use the more stable weather patterns, longer days, and rising water temperatures to trigger their shallow water movements. These movements also trigger major feeding periods. The fish are more aggressive and with the correct lure choices and presentations, they can allow you to have some memorable days on the water. While the month of March can be a fickle time when it comes to weather, it is a great time for bass fishing. On some lakes, you can simply pick out a good-looking stretch of bank and catch some fish. On other lakes, you may have to fish a little deeper than you would expect, but once these areas are located, you can have a productive day on the water. In either occa-

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sion, I like to use lures that I will refer to in this column as search baits. I define “search bait” as a lure that will allow me to cover water quickly in an effort to find and locate catchable fish. The “search bait” may find the right areas but you may have to adjust your lure presentation that will enable you to do a better job of actually catching fish.

Spinnerbait My number one search bait for early Spring fishing is a spinnerbait. I prefer this lure and presentation, because it allows me to cover a lot of water, to fish it at all depths and to fish it no matter what the weather conditions are. Best of all, it is a great fish catching tool! I have found that a 3/8 ounce version is a good all round choice. This is the one time I do start with a single Colorado blade version and will switch to a Colorado/willow leaf version as the water continues to warm. I don’t get picky with colors as Chartreuse/white is usually a solid choice to start with. Retrieve speed is the key. Often times, I will start earlier in the morning with a slow roll technique and end up catching bass later in the day moving the spinnerbait at a pretty good speed. Experiment until the fish tell you what they want. Shallow Crankbait My second choice for search bait would be

Rat L Trap One aspect of early Spring bass fishing is how to combat those early season cold fronts that seems to always come through the day before a weekend fishing trip. Probably the best lure choice for this is a Rat L Trap. Seems no matter how bad the weather changes, the fish will react to and hit this type of moving lure. Red is easily the most popular color, but I have caught them on gold/black and chartreuse base colors. Chatterbait This is the one lure I am still working on trying to figure out where it fits in my arsenal of lures. I have had limited success with the Chatterbait type of lures, but the success I have had encourages me to continue to play with its effectiveness. I have found that this lure works much better when the water temperatures are still below 60 degrees. The black and blue versions tend to work better for me; however, I will use different types of trailers to change the appearance of the bait.

All of these lures are great for water depths of 6-8 feet and shallower. Springtime bass are often in predictable locations, but it still takes some time to find the best areas. I like to start in the mouths of larger spawning pockets and work my way to the back. Once I have done this, I will also take the time to fish the middle sections of a pocket or cover away from the bank. By fishing an area this way, you can cover it more thoroughly and can get a better idea where the fish are located. In closing I hope these tips will help you put more fish in your livewell this Spring, and please be careful on the water. Catch one for me, and I will see you next month!


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Spring Market

Save the Date for the Junior League of Monroe’s Spring Market March 21-23

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PRING IS ON ITS WAY AND WITH it comes the Junior League of Monroe’s Spring Market, sponsored by Community Trust Bank. The 16th annual Spring Market will open to the public on Friday, March 21, 2014. The Market opens Friday morning at 8:30 a.m. with the classic event, Shop ‘Til You Drop!, brought to you by The Mulhearn Corporation. This event features a champagne brunch catered by The Coffee Bean, entertainment by Rod Allen Payne and extended shopping until 11:00 a.m. Tickets for this event are $30. General shopping is open to the public on Friday from 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. That evening, Spring Market’s signature event, Girls Just Want to Have Fun!, brought to you courtesy of Progressive Bank, commences at 6:00 p.m., and includes catering by Thurman’s Food Factory with four buffet stations – that means more time for Shopping! The evening also includes entertainment by Mike McKenzie, door prizes, preferred shopping, and of course, everyone’s favorite “Market-ritas.” Tickets for Girls Just Want to Have Fun are $40. Following Friday’s big kick-off, the Market opens for general shopping Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m., and Sunday from 12:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. General shopping tickets are $6 in advance, and $8 at the door. No Strollers allowed, please. Tickets can be purchased by contacting Terri Arthur at the 32 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

League House at (318) 322-3236. You may also stop by the League House, located at 2811 Cameron Street in Monroe at any time between 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. This year the Junior League of Monroe is thrilled to announce a new event focused on family fun. Breakfast with the Bunnies will make its debut on Saturday, March 22, 2014. This event will feature a light breakfast, a photo shoot with live bunnies by an area photographer with portrait packages available, a visit from Peter Cottontail himself, a book reading, balloons, children’s activities and more! The ticket cost for Breakfast with the Bunnies is $15 per family and will include one general admission re-admittance ticket, to be used on Saturday or Sunday. The Provisional Member class of 2013 -2014 is taking pride in handling this event as part of their Spring Market project. The thoughts of shopping with merchants from all over the country and all of Spring Market’s special events are enough to make anyone wish it were already March! If that doesn’t grab your attention, perhaps you would be interested in a raffle ticket for either a 7 night, Maui Vacation Giveaway or $5,000 cash, your choice! The drawing for this raffle will be on Sunday, March 23rd. Tickets for a Preferred Shopping Event Raffle that no woman can refuse will also be sold at Shop til

you Drop! and Girls Just Want to Have Fun!, with the winner chosen at the Friday night festivities. Spring Market serves as one of the major fund raisers for the Junior League of Monroe. The profits from Spring Market and associated raffles will help fund and support community impacting programs such as Kids in the Kitchen, which serves to educate children between the ages of 9-12 years old on how to eat healthy and prevent childhood obesity. Families Can’t Wait, a program which provides a hospital based primary prevention plan for atrisk mothers and has a positive impact on the health of infants, will also benefit from funds raised. Tools and Literacy for Children (T.L.C.) is a community outreach program which was developed to address the overall needs of at-risk children and families. TLC focuses on the physical, emotional, and educational needs of a selected area elementary school with a high number of free and/or reduced lunches. This is only a few of the outreach programs that are operated through the JLM, giving purpose to the purchase of a ticket to a weekend of events and shopping. Please join us and experience Spring Market’s Gathering of Gifts and Gardening at the Monroe Civic Center from March 21 – 23, 2014. We look forward to seeing you at the Market!


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ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS TO SAY “HELLO” TO MARCH BY RHEAGAN SUTTON

Support our local boutiques and shop the newest Spring merchandise Take your kids to the park and enjoy a family picnic Baseball season is coming up. Go outside to play catch Swimsuit season is right around the corner - get busy! Get outside and be active, put away the electronics Read a book that will enhance your mind Put away the platforms – pointed toe heels are in this season Plan a weekend getaway with the girls or guys Pick up a new hobby – give golf a try if you have the patience It’s running weather! Sign up for a 5k, half marathon or marathon Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and enjoy a green beer Do something spontaneous Invest in a pant suit for Spring - they’re really in Enjoy the warmer weather that is soon coming our way Make an Irish Shepherd’s Pie for the family Try a new lipstick for Spring. Nude is the new red Go see a local baseball game Get crafty with new Spring décor Start making vacation plans for the summer (It is never too early) Plan an unforgettable Spring Break Add a new staple piece to your wardrobe Try a new fitness class Try Navy instead of black for Spring Invest in a new perfume Take up gardening

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Smith and Waters

eah Ruth Waters of Ruston and Matthew Benjamin Smith of Baton Rouge were united in holy matrimony in a six p.m. ceremony on December 21 at First United Methodist Church in Baton Rouge. The double ring ceremony was performed by Reverend Brady Whitton and Reverend Fred Wideman. Leah is the daughter of Marlen May and Roy Stephen Waters of Ruston and the granddaughter of the late Elaine Arendale and William Leonard and May of Homer and the late Ruth Lupo and T.H. “Muddy” Waters of Hammond. Matt is the son of Carol Lambremont and Walter Loclon Smith, III of Baton Rouge and the grandson of Dr. Edward N. Lambremont of Fairhope, Alabama and the late Jane Annis Lambremont and Adeline Landry Smith and the late Walter L. Smith, Jr. of Baton Rouge. Given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father, the bride wore a beautiful gown by the designer Lazaro. The gown featured a French Alençon Lace sweetheart bodice with a tulle A-line skirt adorned with vintage freshwater pearl appliqués at

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the natural waist. Handmade silk flowers and Alençon lace appliqués accented the skirt and chapel train. She wore her hair up with a modified tiara of crystals and pearls and a chapel length veil. She wore her mother’s bracelet, her maternal grandmother’s pearl earrings and a pearl drop necklace. The bride carried a bouquet of white Blizzard and Vendella garden roses, white stock, freesia, seeded eucalyptus, hypericum berries and Court Alford cedar wrapped in Dupioni silk ribbon. Leah’s matron of honor was her sister, Meg Waters Allen of Ruston. Courtney Avis of Monroe, Hannah Morton of Denver, CO, Jennifer Falke, Jill Pipsair and Kathryn Chapman, all of Baton Rouge, served as her bridesmaids. The bridesmaids wore floor-length dresses of black lace over beige with a black ribbon at the waist. Honorary bridesmaids were Sarah Kirksey, Amanda Adams, Kelli Smith and Jennifer Galloway, all of Baton Rouge. Their bouquets were smaller versions of the bride’s bouquet. Flowers for the wedding party were designed by Carren Craft of Nora’s Flowers of Ruston.

Matt’s brother, Brad Smith of Baton Rouge served as best man. Matt’s groomsmen were brother of the bride Thad Waters of Ruston, Derek Smith, Matthew Long, Jacob Simmons and Will Chapman, all of Baton Rouge. Ushers were Jonathan Pixley, Chad Myers, Ryne Smith and Drew Galloway, all of Baton Rouge. The flower girl was Grace Pipsair of Baton Rouge and cousin of the bride, John Rives Wooden of Shreveport, served as ring bearer. Darden Gladney of Homer sang “The Lord’s Prayer” as he did in the bride’s parents’ wedding. Aunt of the bride, Jean Waters Bunce of Connecticut, was the scriptural reader. Music for the wedding was provided by Mr. Dan Talbot of Baton Rouge. Following the wedding, a reception was held at the De La Ronde Hall decorated by the mother and sister of the bride and numerous good friends with lots of candles, rosemary trees, white garden roses, hydrangea, seeded eucalyptus and Douglas fir. The wedding cake was an elegant, three-tiered creation with a vintage bride and groom cake topper and sat upon an embossed silver

plateau. It was adorned with cake pulls (a South Louisiana tradition) holding “fortunes” for the bridesmaids. The groom’s cake was a funfilled chocolate “cake ball” cake. The cakes were made by Annie’s Pantry of Baton Rouge. Wedding favors ranged from reindeer food and candy for the kids to flip-flops, koozies and s’more kits for the adults. Food for the evening was a wide array of the bride and groom’s favorites including blackened chicken pasta, meat pies, spinach and artichoke brochettes, torte de la ronde and much more served in a triangle buffet with a large floral arrangement by the bride’s mother. Catering was provided by Drake’s Catering of Baton Rouge. After champagne toasts, the bride and groom shared a first dance. Music was provided by Soul Juke Boxx of Baton Rouge. Following a send off with sparklers, the couple took a honeymoon trip to Nashville, TN and the Great Smoky Mountains. They have made their home in Baton Rouge. Photography by Brenn Photography of Ruston.


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White Retirement Reception Banking legend, Clyde White was honored at a retirement reception on January 18th at the Bayou DeSiard Country Club. Families and friends gathered to celebrate the over 45 years that White spent as a banker. At the time of his retirement, White was serving as chief executive office of Ouachita Independent Bank, the bank that he founded in 1997. Guests enjoyed cocktails and hors d'oeuvres as well as memorable speeches congratulating the retiree and a slideshow in his honor. Some of the guests on hand were Patricia and John Tolar, Ted and Dr. Janine Hopkins, Linda and Joe Holyfield, Sally and Kevin Koh and many more.

On the BayouScene

1 George and Nan Cummins, Dr. Timothy and Stephanie Mickel 2 Rosemary and Randy Ewing 3 Dr. Janine and Ted Hopkins 4 Elmira Trammell, Lindsey Duplantis, Patti Bates, Diane Miletello and Vee Dickey 5 Clyde White, Pauline and Robert Clark 6 Carole and Tex Kilpatrick 7 Linda and Joe HolyďŹ eld 8 Sally Koh and Patricia Tolar 9 Nell Garwood Garvey and Frances Dufrene 10 Janet Durden and Carol Lewis 11 Vickie Krutzer, Bill Willson and Kevin Koh 7 12 Raymond Winn, Dr. Ron and Pat Woods 13 Buddy and LaVerne Bodron

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Escape to the Alps The Cancer Foundation League took patrons on a journey to the beautiful Swiss Alps, February 8, as they transformed the West Monroe Convention Center into a winter wonderland. "Escape to the Alps" raised funds to help the foundation in its mission to provide financial support to cancer patients in northeast Louisiana. The popular party band "Almost Famous" from Memphis provided guests with music to dance to, while patrons browsed the silent auction, dined on scrumptious delicacies and enjoyed spirits from an open bar. In addition to the silent auction, patrons also bought chances to win a Benelli shotgun and took part in the famous "Champagne and Diamonds Raffle," giving each participant the chance to take home something sparkly. Proceeds from the event benefitted the Cancer Foundation League, which was founded by a donation from Kitty DeGree. Over the last eleven years, the Cancer Foundation has provided more than $1 million in financial assistance to assist some 3,000 patients seeking cancer treatments. The foundation's next big event will be the Theresa Marsala Memorial Classic golf tournament, which is held in May.

On the BayouScene

1 Amanda Barry, Charles and Brenda Marsala 2 Paula Ford and Ollie Dixon 3 Alise and Mac Oliver, Christie Messenger 4 Greg Andrews, Amanda McMullen and Michael Correro 5 Johnette Sellar and Jarrod Sellar 6 Brittany Carter and Jeanette 7 Alana and Clark Cooper 8 Jen Avis, Linda Alford, Margo Albright and Susan Homan 9 Allan and Amanda Martin, Leah and Mac Reitzell 10 Kim Adams, Erin Love and Connie Andrews 11 Dr. Sanjay and Sapna Mary Joseph, Quinci McGrew, Lynn Fabian and Ramona Crow 12 Dionne Saxon and Staci Albritton Mitchell 13 Willie Jones and Kolby Kolo 14 Janet White and Cindy Cameron 15 Fred and Alice Monroe

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Pick Your Party at Eskamoe’s

Bring the Fun and Cool Anywhere with Birthday Parties, Office Parties, Family Reunions, School Events and More

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UNDAES TO GO! A complete sundae party in a bag! We provide everything you need to bring the fun and cool anywhere. All you have to do is customize your custard toppings, and we will do the rest. Included in the insulated bag: custard, toppings, nuts, whipped cream, cherries, cups, spoons, napkins and an ice cream scooper. Single serves six – Double serves fifteen.

TRAVELLING SUNDAE BAR This will be a sure hit for any party or gathering. Our super insulated cooler will keep the custard cold for up to four hours without electricity and serves 35-40 people. It includes your choice of custard, hot fudge,

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nuts, whipped cream, cherries, cups, spoons and napkins. This is a complete self-service bar and can be adjusted to serve more. Delivery and pick up are available.

ICE CREAM CART Our ice cream cart will surely please the crowd, whether young or old. We can customize a party for you with just scoops in cups or cones, scoops with toppings or even a complete sundae bar. The ice cream cart is available for parties with 100+ guests. ESKAMOE’S TOPPING BAR! Bring variety to the party with our fabulous topping bar. We can provide you with pre-packed scoops of custard and a topping

We offer custom cakes for parties. Order online at www.eskamoes.net.

bar with four different toppings for an easy, casual, self-serve party. The topping bar is ideal for groups of 25-100.

SHAVED ICE AND FLAVOR STATION We’ll serve cool and refreshing shaved ice in cups with 6 flavors or syrups using Eskamoe’s Flavor Station. Cups, spoons and napkins are also included to make a Cool Party. Shaved ice parties are ideal for over 100 people. Call today for pricing and availability. Monroe 318-325-5799, West Monroe 318-3257575, Ruston 318-513-9696 or visit our website www.eskamoes.net. Coming soon to Sterlington!


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BayouBuzzworthy

Emerging Artists Competition

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One of the Monroe Symphony’s most anticipated events took place in January. The Marjorie Stricklin Emerging Artists Competition is an annual event established by the Monroe Symphony League and the Monroe Symphony Orchestra to promote and encourage excellence in musical performance. The overall winner of the Monroe Symphony Orchestra’s annual Marjorie Stricklin Young Artist Competition was John Wang, who played the Camille Saint-Saens Piano Concerto No. 2 in g minor. The other winner in the Youth category was Margaret Ann Zentner, who sang arias by Mozart and Handel. Young Adult winners in the competition were Carline Waugh, who sang arias by Charpentier and Puccini, as well as Melissa Morales, who played Aaron Copland's Concerto for Clarinet.

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Molicy Tree Planting The Mollicy Unit of the Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge is a 16,000 acre tract of land which is the site of the largest floodplain restoration project in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley where the Nature Conservancy’s symbolic one millionth tree was planted on Saturday, February 1. The Mollicy tract of land was originally clear cut for farming and surrounded by a 30 foot levee in the 1960s. The Nature Conservancy and US Fish and Wildlife Service acquired the land to restore the natural interior plumbing of the floodplain in order to alleviate flooding downstream, improve water and air quality and restore valuable fish and wildlife habitat. With a master plan to restore the bottomland hardwood forests that were destroyed to make way for farming, a group of 70+ volunteers, along with The Nature Conservancy and US Fish and Wildlife Service, gathered to plant over 3,000 hardwoods grown for the project by the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry’s Monroe District Office. A group of ladies from Monroe Garden Study League were out in force to plant seedlings on the overcast day that couldn’t dampen spirits of those planting trees. Above: MGSL’s Carrie Davidson, Dee Ledbetter, Kristy Farr and Debbie Stockstill braved the elements and planted seedlings along Mollicy Bayou at the Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge on February 1st.


Equinox Jazz Orchestra BY MARLEN WATERS

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s the lights went down in Howard Auditorium on the Louisiana Tech University campus, a deep voice from back stage boomed….Born and raised in the Louisiana Delta and now performing across the nation, Jeremy Davis is proud to present his Fabulous Equinox Orchestra... Two of Louisiana Tech University’s former students returned to where it all started for them to perform in the School of Performing Arts’ scholarship fundraiser concert on Thursday, Feb. 13. Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson with the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra kicked off a series of signature events celebrating the 25th anniversary of Louisiana Tech’s School of Performing Arts. The saxophonist and singer met in the seventh grade at West Monroe Junior High and have been best friends ever since. Many locals might remember their college band “Howard Shaft” that performed for several years in the area. Jeremy Davis and the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra performed more than jazz, more than big band…they put on a SHOW. In his own words, Jeremy describes the band as, “The Rat Pack meets ‘The Dean Martin Variety Show’ with a touch of ‘A Prairie Home Companion.’ It’s plain to see that we love what we do, and we love our fans. We’re not your grandfather’s big band.” Their fresh approach to the Great-American Big-Band revival developing across the nation is revolutionary. Their show included such a wide array of classic American music ranging from Rat Pack standards, Michael Buble and Andy Williams to Ray Charles, Elvis, Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash. The band is now based out of Savannah, GA and is on tour following a January performance at New York City’s Iridium Jazz Club. For more information on the LA Tech University School of Performing Arts contact Judith Roberts, 318-257-4907 or jroberts@latech.edu.

On the BayouScene at the Equinox Jazz Orchestra’s Performance: 1 Orlando Shelly, Alyce Tarver, Rebecca Bayar and Brennan Beams 2 Olivia Loewer and Catherine Asher 3 Clay Johnson 4 Mark Guinn, Director-School of Performing Arts 5 Jeremy Davis 6 Marian Fields and Ben Barton 7 Equinox performing the “Mardi Gras Second Line” 8 Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson 9 Lawrence Gibbs and Penny Humphries 10 Jay and Becky Bennett, Debbie and Tony Inman 11 Jeremy Davis performing with his LA Tech professor, Lawrence Gibbs 12 Equinox Jazz Orchestra 13 Claudine and Jon Barker

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Improving Your Smile

Create The Smile You’ve Always Wanted

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BY DAVID FINLEY, D.D.S.,

O YOU EVER TRY TO HIDE YOUR TEETH WHEN YOU ARE talking? Advances in cosmetic dentistry can make you proud of your smile. A dazzling smile can ignite a room. It projects strength, confidence, and beauty. For decades dentists have worked on ways to treat dental problems. We can now change the way your teeth look, and the way you feel! Because your mouth is one of the focal points of your face, it plays a major role in how you perceive yourself and how others perceive you. And now, taking steps to improve your appearance is an investment in your long-term health and well-being. Here’s a glossary of what the most popular – and quick – treatments can do for your smile... apart from making a lasting impression! Whitening – Erases stains and discolorations for a brighter, whiter smile. It’s so popular because it’s so fast, safe and effective. Veneers – Stains and chips, or overlapping and uneven teeth, may require veneers which are extremely thin but strong porcelain shells that are layered over the surfaces of natural teeth. Veneers can be designed to improve the proportions of your smile.

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BEFORE

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White Fillings – White composite, porcelain, cast glass or resin inlays and onlays replace silver-colored fillings. Patients have options to improve their smile thanks to new materials and advances in cosmetic training. Increasing numbers of adults are improving the appearance and function of their teeth. We often correct cracked, chipped or unevenly spaced teeth using bonding or with veneers. This patient chose porcelain veneers prior to his wedding. What’s so special about cosmetic veneers? Hand-sculpted porcelain veneers, applied to the outside surfaces of your teeth, can dramatically recontour your smile, and they’re long-lasting. Also, applying veneers doesn’t involve moving your teeth. The procedure is quick and your picture-perfect smile will look completely natural! We want your smile to radiate the health you feel. Reward yourself ... ask us about how we can help you to achieve your best smile possible: healthy, vibrant and natural! Give us a call today and get in today! Your smile can be bright and white... just in time for Spring!


Outdoor Furniture and More

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Monroe Welcomes The Patio Place in March 2014

PENING MARCH 2014, THE Patio Place will fill a nichÊ in the outdoor living space market in Monroe and surrounding areas. This unique shopping venue is located in the heart of Monroe in the Northgate Shopping Center on Forsythe Avenue. The resplendent showroom will feature a wide variety of outdoor furniture, firepits, rugs, lamps, art and accessories to complete your outdoor kitchen, sunroom, patio, poolside or lake home. Leading furniture manufacturers include Ebel, Hanamint, Meadowcraft, Jensen Leisure, Breezesta and Ancient Mosaic. Beautiful rugs, lamps, cushions, hammocks and umbrellas are available from Casual Living, Hatteras Hammocks, Kenroy Home lighting, Treasure Garden and Pawley’s Island. Distinctive outdoor art will be avail-

able in a wide variety of themes or customizable for your individual taste. Sunbrella and Outdura fabrics are available to tailor your color design preferences. The Design Center provides an excellent space for designers and their clients to meet while selecting fabrics and styles. The Patio Place also offers the services of an interior designer in the store or by appointment in your home. The knowledgeable staff is available to assist you in creating that perfect outdoor getaway, and we welcome your visit to allow us to share our selections with you. Additional services offered at The Patio Place include full-spectrum water analysis for your pool and spa. We are an authorized BioGuard Platinum Dealer offering chemicals for chlorine and saltwater pools. Visit our sister company, The Pool Place, located

at 611 N. 7th Street in West Monroe, for all your pool and service needs. Owners Lynne and John Carter have been in the pool and spa business for twenty years. They are expanding their offerings to include everything needed to create your outdoor oasis! Joining Lynne at The Patio Place will be Sharon Mouk, manager, and Erin Foster, interior designer. Hours of operation are 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 10:00 am-3:00 p.m. on Saturday. Whether the project is home beautification or commercial needs, The Patio Place has the expertise and resources to help you create the perfect outdoor retreat.

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 49


MRI Exams and Claustrophobia

Northwest Imaging Offers A Helpful Tool on Your Side

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F YOU SUFFER FROM CLAUSTROPHOBIA (THE FEAR OF being in closed or narrow spaces) and find yourself with a health issue that requires you having an MRI exam, you have a helpful tool on your side. MRI machines can be a bit intimidating and even frightening for many people; especially people that deal with claustrophobia. After all, the idea of being slid into a tube for a long period of time, not moving and listening to a continuous knocking can be intimidating for even the heartiest soul. MRI exams are commonly used in the diagnosis of everything from lower back and neck pain to headaches and vascular issues, so there is a good chance that you or someone you know will require this procedure. To help calm your fears, you can ask your physician to schedule your exam at a facility that utilizes an OPEN MRI. Open MRI machines are similar to traditional MRI units but with one major difference. They are designed for large or claustrophobic patients but offer comfort for all patients. Traditional MRI units require the patient to be wrapped with a coil and slid inside a tunnel or gantry, which is a continuous, donut shaped magnet. The experience has been described by some patients as lying in a coffin or culvert for at least thirty-five minutes per exam. Open MRI units also use coils and a powerful magnet but rather than a continuous round tunnel, an Open MRI uses two magnets, one above and one below the patient, which leave plenty of room to the sides. This design change allows the OPEN MRI to produce the same quality images as traditional MRIs but without the tight, cramped spaces. Another benefit of the Open MRI is that a loved one can sit in the room and speak with you during the procedure, which makes many claustrophobics more comfortable. Whether you suffer from claustrophobia or would just like a little more space and comfort for your procedure, you and your physician have a tool and choice for your procedure. For more information about Open MRI and its abilities, go to www.nwimaging.net.

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Time May Not Heal All Wounds

St. Francis Medical Center’s Wound Healing Center

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VERYONE HAS HEARD THAT TIME HEALS ALL WOUNDS, but the truth is that without advanced therapies, some wounds can take years and even decades to heal while others that do not respond to treatment may lead to amputation in extreme cases. St. Francis Medical Center’s Wound Healing Center offers the community state-of-the-art specialized wound healing care. "With the rising rate of diabetes, there is a great need for a specialized care center that can treat the ulcers associated with the disease as well as help patients with other skin, bone and tissue conditions caused by illness or injury," says Pam Bratton, Director of the General Surgery Service Line and Cardiovascular Surgical Services at St. Francis Medical Center. "The center's physicians and clinical staff are skilled in the latest therapeutic methods in wound management and stay abreast of leading information through continuous training. Patients are treated with state-of-the art technology from having their progress charted through digital photographs to, in some cases, being treated in one of the center's two hyperbaric oxygen chambers.” “St. Francis is also proud to offer wound care patients support services through our Lymphedema Clinic, located at the St. Francis Kitty DeGree Breast Health Center and our Diabetes and Nutrition Center, located at the St. Francis Community Health Center,” says Bratton. St. Francis Medical Center partnered with Florida-based Healogics Corporation, which manages wound healing centers nationwide, healing 92% of all wounds, 89% in less than 16 weeks. Although the centers treat patients with chronic and advanced conditions that have not responded to previous therapies, the rate of limb amputation for non-responsive wounds is less than two percent. Program Director Jamie Fontana, explained, “Since opening in 2010, the St. Francis Wound Healing Center has established an impressive record of healing wounds that others thought hopeless. Our treatments are evidence based and best practice driven meaning our patients do not undergo any treatment or progress to a new level of treatment until the need is clearly indicated. Our multidisciplinary team of doctors and nurses are dedicated to healing chronic wounds. Our expert wound care physicians are renowned in their individual areas of expertise and bring clinical insight from many medical disciplines to promote. Our physician panel includes Medical Director Frank Sartor, MD – General and Vascular Surgery, James Eppinette, MD – Family Practice, Thomas Fields, MD – Otolaryngology, Jeffrey Lux, DPM – Podiatry and Charles Simmons, MD – Hyperbaric Medicine.” Likely candidates for treatment are those suffering from diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, infections, compromised skin grafts and flaps, and wounds that haven't healed within 30 days. The center's hyperbaric oxygen chambers can also be used to treat patients suffering from such uncommon ailments as cyanide poisoning, gangrene, carbon monoxide poisoning, brown recluse spider bites and the “bends,” or decompression sickness. CONTINUED ON PAGE 115

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 51


P. Allen Smith

Growing Your Own Chopped Salad Bar Spring is Peak Salad Season PHOTOGRAPHY BY JANE COLCLASURE, KELLY QUINN AND HORTUS LTD.

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After a long winter, nothing makes a better lunch than a chopped salad, the fresher the better, and Spring is peak salad season. Salad greens keep lunch tasty but light, while providing plenty of health benefits. Salad ingredients are fairly easy to grow, and it’s extremely satisfying to walk outside and cut what you want to eat for the day. If you made health or local eating resolutions for 2014, consider growing an edible salad bowl. You don’t have to limit it to just lettuce. Chives, spinach, bok-choy, arugula, mustard greens, kale, parsley, mint, cilantro, scallions, radishes, English peas and strawberries are all easy to grow and will ensure your salad will never get boring. Moreover, you’ll add variety to your diet, have salad greens on hand whenever you need them and save money. Many people find the prospect of starting from seeds intimidating, but don’t fret. You can grow an abundance of low-maintenance veggies from seed. Try sowing radishes, lettuce, arugula, spinach, kale, mustard greens, English peas and cilantro. These can all be started from seed successfully by the novice gardener or if you prefer, you can also easily use young plants to get started. In addition to the obvious plants you can purchase and repot, you can replant a few others that you might find in unexpected places. Scallions, for example, are available at the grocery store in bundles of young shoots you can easily replant in a container. Some plants, and gardeners, prefer containers. Containers save space and facilitate controlling the soil quality with more precision. Plus plants can be moved around the garden as needed and to adapt to weather


Spring Ch

opped Sa lad

Salad Ing redients: Romaine Hearts- 2 Arugula2c Mint - sm ups all handfu l of leave English P s ea Radish- ¼ s- 1/2 cup cup Toasted si lvered alm Feta- ¼ onds- ¼ cup cup

Dressing Ingredie nts: 2 tablesp oons lime juice 1 teaspoo n lime ze st 1/4 cup o live oil 1 clove g arlic, min ced 1 teaspoo nk 1 teaspoo osher salt n black p epper

Chop the Romaine pieces an hearts, a d place in rugula, m int and ra a bowl. A In a sepa d dish into d p eas and a rate bow bite sized lmonds. ing. Add l, whisk li garlic, pe m e ju ice and o pper, salt live oil to Toss sala and lime make sala d with dre zest and d dressmix toge ssing and ther. top with feta. Enjo y!

conditions. Chives, parsley and strawberries are great choices for containers. Mint, often called a garden thug for its tendency to take over, can be reined in by planting it in a container. Sow spring salad greens in containers, raised beds or prepared in-ground beds and follow the spacing parameters outlined by the package. The seeds will germinate within 5 to 7 days and the first crop will be ready to harvest in about 30 days. For edible container gardens, use a large pot (preferably one 24" or larger) and fill soil to 1" below the lip of the pot. • Chive - These blossoms, like most flowers on herbs, retain the lighter Use a pre-blended potting flavor of their leaves. In this case, mix designed for container chive blossoms have a delicate gardening. This will ensure onion flavor. Try them with potathat your soil is disease free toes, asparagus or pasta. and contains the proper • Nasturtium - Add to a salad for a peppery kick. nutrients for young plants. Viola - These flowers taste sweet, • These spring crops almost like nectar. Garnish desserts need about six hours of diwith their petals. I like the contrast rect sunlight a day to of these blooms on white frosting. thrive. Water regularly • Borage - Flowers appear in shades of pink and lavender and taste simand make sure your conilar to cucumber. Add to drinks, saltainers have good ads and dips. drainage. Unsure about the • Dianthus - These blooms pack a quality of your soil? Err on sweet, clove-like flavor. Use them the side of caution—don’t to infuse drinks or add to baked goods. forget to fertilize. Follow • Rose - Sugar these pretty petals the instructions on the ferand add them to desserts. Dry them tilizer package for best reand add to granola or scatter on sults. Because lettuce needs top of muffins for a sweet, slightly nitrogen to grow tender, floral flavor. • Dill - These blooms retain light dill new leaves quickly, side flavor. Use as a savory garnish in dress plants with nitrogensoups or dips. rich amendments like cot• Dandelion - A classic edible bloom, tonseed meal, alfalfa meal dandelions have a sweet, honey-like or kelp meal to your dirt flavor. Fry them, add them to cookies or infuse drinks with the regularly. blooms.

Edible Flowers

P. Allen Smith P. Allen Smith is an award-winning designer, gardening and lifestyle expert and host of two public television programs, Garden Home and Garden to Table, and the syndicated 30-minute show P. Allen Smith’s Garden Style. Smith is one of America's most recognized and respected design experts, providing ideas and inspiration through multiple media venues. He is the author of the best-selling Garden Home series of books. Allen is also very active on social media such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Learn more at www.pallensmith.com.

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Breast Augmentation Frequently Asked Questions

BY TIMOTHY J. MICKEL, MD, FACS, BOARD CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON

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She was a black haired beauty with big dark eyes, and points all her own sittin’ way up high... – Bob Seger, Night Moves

VER 200,000 BREAST AUGMENTATIONS ARE PERFORMED annually by American plastic surgeons. Since I opened my practice in Monroe in 1990, I have personally done well over a thousand. It is by far the most common procedure that I perform, and it is certainly one of the most gratifying. There are very few surgical procedures that in the course of an hour can have such a profound and lasting impact on the way a woman feels about herself. Breast augmentation is an outpatient procedure that takes about an hour. Most are done through a small incision in the fold beneath the breast or around the edge of the nipple. Either approach results in a small scar that is well hidden. Since the FDA moratorium on silicone implants was lifted in November of 2006, roughly 95% of the breast augmentations I perform are with silicone implants. They have either a smooth or a textured surface, have either a round or a teardrop shape, and can be placed either above or below the chest wall muscle. Each of these options has its pros and cons. I use all of them when appropriate, as I try to tailor the operation to the patient’s desires and her anatomy. At the initial consultation, considerable time is spent discussing the patient’s motivation for surgery and the result she hopes to obtain. A series of breast and chest wall measurements are taken and the breast tissue and overlying skin are evaluated so that I have a thorough understanding of the patient’s starting point. Rib and chest wall asymmetries, differences in breast width, height, projection and shape, and differences in nipple level are all noted and discussed with the patient. The surgical significance of pre-existing breast or chest wall asymmetry is that it often leads to some degree of asymmetry (usually minor) postoperatively and the patient needs to understand this beforehand. A large part of the initial consultation is spent discussing desired breast size. My job is to align the patient’s wishes with a result I can realistically deliver. Patients generally describe their breasts in terms of cup size. Unfortunately, while France maintains an International Bureau of Weights and Measures to ensure uniformity in meters, grams and minutes, there is no committee of jaunty and erudite Frenchmen who carry out measurement-related research to ensure uniformity of cup-size. So a “C” cup at Sears-Roebuck may be a “D” cup at Victoria’s 54 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

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Where Dance Meets Designs

Fashion Fusion Set for Saturday, April 5th

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ARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR AN EXCITING NIGHT OF dance, fashion and entertainment! The Debbie Bourg Dancers will present the Fourth Annual Fashion Fusion – “Where Dance Meets Design” to benefit The Children’s Coalition for Northeast Louisiana. The show begins at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 5th, at the West Monroe Convention Center. Fashion Fusion will feature performances by the talented Debbie Bourg Dancers fused with a high energy runway-type style show. Many area boutiques, salons and local artists will be showcased. A special segment with local celebrities will be quite entertaining! We would like to welcome some new boutiques this year including Duck and Dressing, Hemline, Miss Persnickety Joon and Mr. P’s Tees! Also, we are pleased to announce Mr. Zach Wilson as our guest star. Zach has appeared on Dancing with the Stars alongside wife Afton and sisterin-law Ashly Delgrosso. He has numerous television and movie credits including Disney’s High School Musical. Paired with our own Kelsey Bourg Tanner as winners of Dance Wars, the two are excited to be performing together again for this year’s Fashion Fusion! The Debbie Bourg Dancers are an award-winning competition and Performing Company. They are well-known in the community for their strong talent and sensational ability to entertain. The dancers are dedicated students that strive to take their training to a higher level, including using their talent to make a difference in the community! Proceeds from this event will benefit the Children’s Coalition of Northeast Louisiana, an umbrella agency whose mission is to “create communities where children and families thrive.” Ten different initiatives of the Children’s Coalition benefit children from birth to age 21. Among the programs offered are Child Care Connections, Al’s Pals: Kids Making Healthy Choices, Child Health and Safety, Parent Education, Teen Screen and Youth Suicide Prevention. For Tickets or VIP Sponsor Packets, contact the Children’s Coalition at 323-8775. Saturday, April 5th • 7:30 p.m. • West Monroe Convention Center Tickets $50.

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 55


Antique-Inspired Pieces by Pulaski

Burney’s Furniture Features the Accentrics Collection by Pulaski

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THE ARABELLA BEDROOM COLLECTION

HIS MONTH, THE SPECIALFEATURE AT BURNEY’S is from The Accentrics Collection by Pulaski. This offering is yet another fine addition to Burney’s tremendous commitment to style, quality, form and function and is second to none. Accentrics offers chic home furnishing choices with a style of their own. This exquisite collection, complete with sophisticated and timeless bedrooms, dining rooms and accent pieces, is inspired by hand-selected antiques with intricate forms, such as multiple curved fronts and carvings taken directly from decades past. They are then finished with antique wood rubs, antique finished hardware and hand painting. All of these beauty-enhancing qualities are combined with today's finest furniture production technology and functionality to bring only the finest pieces of furniture to your home space. The Arabella Bedroom Collection The Arabella Bedroom, pictured above, consists of elegant style with romantic designs and ornate detailing. This collection has details that make an impressive statement. With many options to complete your bedroom, Arabella brings great function and design. The collection is constructed from pecan veneers and select solids with a rustic aged finish. Rosette carvings, detailed moldings, framed drawers and reeded pilasters give each piece a unique, sophisticated look. The Arabella Bedroom offers a level of luxury to your bedroom that will be with you for years to come.

The Accentrics Collection was created to bring together an eclectic mix of quintessential style and understated glamour. It has a formal influence, but is inspired by the casual, relaxed styles that many homes are finding more comfortable and timeless. Remember, at Burney’s, we offer free in-home designing, so if you want to mix some of these fabulous Accentrics pieces with some of your current home designs, we know just how to do that. Accessorizing a special space or redecorating your entire home? No project is too small or too large, and we always offer interest free financing to help make this process smooth and affordable. That’s Burney’s Furniture, 3111 Louisville Avenue in Monroe. Store hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and by appointment. 56 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014


Transforming Lives at LCWLS

Q&A with Louisiana Center for Weight Loss Surgery Patient Kathy Roberts

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Far Left: Kathy Roberts before her 110 pound weight loss.

Left: Bariatric Surgeon Dr. Walter Sartor is pictured with Kathy Roberts.

ATHY ROBERTS, 56, IS A REGISTERED NURSE IN MONROE. She has maintained a 110-pound weight loss since her gastric sleeve surgery at Louisiana Center for Weight Loss Surgery in 2008. She struggled with obesity for 20 years prior to her surgery. Tell us about yourself. I have been a nurse for 25 years. Working nights during the early portion of my career caused my weight to get out of control. I knew as a nurse with a love for heart patients that if I didn't do something, I would soon be one myself.

What motivated you to have bariatric surgery? I developed metabolic syndrome and was on the verge of diabetes. I had one kidney removed due to cancer, and I didn't want to strain the other kidney. I also had high blood pressure and lower back problems. Now, I don't have any of those problems. What misconceptions did you have about weight loss surgery, prior to your procedure? I thought I would feel deprived, but I never have.

What would you say to someone who is considering bariatric surgery, but is nervous about doing so? Make that first appointment with Dr. Sartor at LCWLS. Have your questions ready, and let him guide you. He is very knowledgeable, his skills are exceptional, and his staff is very accessible.

What activities are you able to enjoy now that were difficult for you prior to your surgery? I love to scuba dive, but it was very difficult carrying all of the gear and my excess weight. I can now dive, carry my gear, and not be self-conscious in a wet suit. Tell us about a moment in which you were most proud of your weight loss success. I was at a birthday party for one of my grandchildren, and people I had known for years did not recognize me. I was so shocked, because I did not realize how different I looked. I think I still viewed myself as obese, but when they didn't recognize me, I knew I was a different person. I was no longer depressed or dissatisfied with myself.

LCWLS is a partnership between Dr. Walter Sartor, P&S Surgical Hospital and St. Francis Medical Center. Like us at www.facebook.com/LCWLS, and call us today at 1-866-821-LIVE.

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 57


Serendipity Preview Party

On January 31st, a crowd gathered for the highly anticipated opening of Serendipity Designer Jewelry in Monroe. Serendipity closed its old location on Antique Alley, but opened its doors to a beautiful new space at 1840 Forsythe Avenue. The preview party included a sneak peek at two new lines Serendipity is welcoming to their already expansive collections of designer jewelry: the everpopular Mignon Faget and KIR. The event was catered by Chef Pat Nolan and included a signature teal cocktail and mouth-watering hors d'oeuvres. Serendipity Designer Jewelry is now open from 10:00 - 6:00 p.m. Monday - Saturday and 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. on Sunday. Stop by today and see their gorgeous new location.

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On the BayouScene

1 Danny and Olivia Pruett 2 Logan Cloessner and Corey Hamilton 3 Tonya Hamilton and Pat Nolan 4 William Arrington and Ashley Janes 5 Therese Barron and Jessica Wisenor 6 Frank and Nicki Sampognaro 7 Kathy Karagin and Jen Klein 8 Francis Lewis and Essence Rice 9 Jennie Head, Judy Grillot, Sean Powell, Lisa Vige, Lance Donald, Marcia Donald, Eric VigĂŠ and and Steve McGowen 10 Glenn Gibson, Jennie Head, Leslie and Josh Culp 11 Josh Sanders, Rebecca Robertson and Blake Mason 12 Josh Culp, Natalie Sutor and Leslie Culp 13 David Brasher and Amanda Wimberly 10 14 Keeley Machen, Jennie Garland, Cary Roussel and Leah Tyler 15 Larkin Banks and Neal Adcock

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We Deliver... Quality Care

Morehouse General Hospital Provides Quality Care and Delivery Services For Mothers and Babies

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OREHOUSE GENERAL HOSPITAL HAS PROUDLY SERVED residents of Northeast Louisiana and Southeast Arkansas since 1930. Delivering babies is one of the things that we do best. We love bringing new babies into the world at Morehouse General Hospital, and we are committed to providing quality healthcare before, during, and after birth for all of our mothers and their babies.

Dr. Martin Young graduated from the University of London in London, England. He completed a fellowship in pediatric endocrinology at Children’s Hospital of Boston and in 1992 was appointed Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Tulane University Medical School. He is a member of the Endocrine Society and the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Young has practiced for more than 30 years and in 2012 joined the medical staff at Morehouse General Hospital. He is accepting new patients at his practice in Bastrop, located at 420 South Vine Street. To schedule an appointment, call (318) 283-3032

Dr. Janos Guoth graduated medical school in Hungary and relocated to the U.S. in 1986. He completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine in Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Guoth has practiced in the U.S. for more than 25 years and has been a valued member of the Morehouse General Hospital medical staff for the last 6 years. He is board certified with the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is currently accepting new patients at his practice in Bastrop, located at 425 South Vine Street. To schedule an appointment, call (318) 281-8555. Dr. Curtis Sanders earned his medical degree from the University of Kansas, School of Medicine in 1996. He completed his internship and residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport in 2000. He practiced at EA Conway in Monroe for 12 years before joining the medical staff at Morehouse General Hospital. Dr. Sanders is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He is accepting new patients at his practice in Bastrop, located at 618 South Washington. To schedule an appointment, call (318) 281-5035.

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NHS Baseball First Pitch Fundraiser

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The Neville High School baseball team got help from the bullpen on Friday, February 7, before the season even started. Parents, alumni, faculty and friends joined with coaches and players for a fish fry catered by Catfish Charlie’s and very successful auction in the lobby of the Strauss Theatre Center to raise funds for the home team during the First Pitch Fundraiser.

On the BayouScene

1 Will Hardy and Raph Rhymes 2 Dessie Thrailkill, Ronnie Shelby and Coach Paul Guerriero 3 Wendy Marsh and Gordon Markle 4 Clint and Sharon Rider 5 Hannah Albritton and Katheryne Nickelson 6 Zeke Brown, Caleb Luey and Michael Green 7 Pat and Bernadette Dayton

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Add Some Color to Your Wardrobe

A Kid’s Closet and Women’s Clothing in West Monroe Has Everything You Need for Spring

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E’VE HAD OUR FIVE GOOD weeks of winter weather temperatures, not all in a row, of course, but it’s time to seriously plan out the next eleven months’ wardrobe. Who better to help you, but, the ladies at A Kid’s Closet and Women’s Clothing! The spring and summer colors are lightening up with sherbets and pastels to match any Easter egg. We’ve expanded our store to accommodate the growing inventory and demand for women’s clothing. Lots of room for you to drop by and shop. The racks for women’s and children’s clothes are full of lace prints, chevron and maxi dresses. A Kid’s Closet has women’s sandals, just in, too. So, paint those piggies

and strut your stuff in the cutest outfit for Spring or Summer. Adorn your outfit with a very personal touch – a handstamped piece of jewelry from A Kid’s Closet. Pen your favorite Bible verse, motivational saying or your children’s names or birthdates for an unique treasure. For the little peeps, there’s Sun San Sandals, in an array of colors and sizes, just waiting to be fitted for summer wear. These are the staples for all children’s closets, carrying them from the warmer temps in Spring and Summer, all the way through fall. Bathing suits are here and they are some adorable. Come by and check out the

summer trends for little ones now. As always, we would love to monogram your outfit, bag or anything you would like personalized. A Kid’s Closet now has two machines for faster monogramming. Bring in something of your own to monogram or pick up an outfit, bag, etc. from A Kid’s Closet. Make sure you check A Kid’s Closet’s Facebook page for special sales, new arrivals and announcements. A Kid’s Closet is open Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday and Monday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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IN THE MOOD TO

SPRI NG FA SHI ON WITH ATT ITUDE. I T ’S I N T HE BAG.

P H O T O G R A P H Y: J O L I L I VA U D A I S • H A I R : L A R K I N B A N K S , R A I N T H E S A L O N M A K E U P : J A M E S M C C R E A D Y, R A I N T H E S A L O N S T Y L I S T: R H E A G A N S U T T O N • A R T D I R E C T I O N : J A M E S M C C R E A D Y


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A Kid’s Closet in West Monroe is making the scene in the perfect navy dress for Spring. Bell sleeves give this dress a hippie-chic vibe that is wearable with everything from fabulous wedges to down-to-earth cowgirl boots! Add a statement necklace to make the outfit pop. At right, Pearl Pumphrey’s in West Monroe combines an open back, mint green blouse with 3/4 sleeves with a pair of classic, white jeans for the ultimate Spring look. Layer on long necklaces for an effortless, totally-pulled-together feel! Accessorize the outfit with a camel colored Frye leather tote, and you are ready for action!


Make a statement in this colorful romper, embellished with beautiful sequins, an impeccable design is sure to make a scene. Grab a leather clutch in bright coral (a Spring color trend that is on point), and spice it up with a leather pump, trendy wedge or a classic flat. Check out these fabulous finds from Hemline in Monroe and you will be ready for fun day shopping or a night out with the girls!

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Keep it elegant in this glamorous outfit from Salt & Pepper on West Monroe’s Antique Alley! Pair a lacy, black blouse with black lace over beige shorts for a look that is sure to turn heads. For a pop of color, add this royal blue blazer with shoulder pads and zipper details for a sophisticated look. Top it off with a fabulous peep-toe heel and you are ready for a night on the town! MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 65


Show off your curves in this stunning knee-length, fitted dress by Karlie that is sure open doors! Add a beautiful Kendra Scott necklace and a Made in the Deep South Chanel bracelet as oh-so-right embellishments. Whether you take this beautiful dress to Sunday brunch or a romantic dinner, you can be sure that this ensemble will be your go-to favorite. When they ask (and you know they will), you can tell them you found it all at HerringStone’s!


Splash into Spring with this precious gold and cream graphic print dress! Add a belt to accentuate your waist or wear it by itself for a more bohemian feel. A statement necklace with harmonizing earrings creates the perfect combination for the Spring season. Find it all at Bent Oaks Boutique on Antique Alley!


Dare to be different in this trendsetting ensemble from Duck & Dressing in Downtown Monroe! With this knit jersey dress and stylish fedora you can do just about anything. Add a leather harness and biker jacket with a classic leather boot to give it just the right amount of edginess! The navy and black clutch with a matching cuff-on-aleash is a must-have in your Spring accessories wardrobe!

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A Well-Rounded Education

Jesus the Good Shepherd School Dedicates Itself to Educational Excellence

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T JESUS THE GOOD SHEPHERD School, we dedicate ourselves to educational excellence by consistently providing a complete, well-rounded education in a safe, loving environment. That high-level of dedication to excellence shows in everything we do. During our last SACS reaccreditation, the school was made aware that they were one of very few schools to receive “Highly Qualified” in all seven SACS standards which are as follows: Vision and Purpose, Governance and Leadership, Teaching and Learning, Documenting and Using Results, Resources and Support Systems, Stakeholder Communication and Relationships and a Commitment to Continually Improve. Being recognized as a SACS accredited elementary school isn’t the only reason Jesus the

Good Shepherd shines as an excellent school. At JGS, all students in Pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade take weekly computer, Spanish, library, religion and Athletic Republic physical education classes. Kindergarten through sixth graders take Art and Music classes weekly and Pre-Kindergarten students have art and music in their classrooms every day. E-textbooks are utilized for reading, math, science and social studies classes, each grade level has a touch screen SMARTBoard, each classroom has a plasma screen television monitor with L.P.B.’s Discovery Education United Streaming, and teachers as well as students are able to utilize Elmo Document Cameras, iPads and portable Neo 2’s computers on a daily basis. Safety and convenience are also top priorities at JGS. A secure fence surrounds the entire

Students in grades 4-6 learn to play the hand bells in music class at JGS. The classes take turns playing in the JGS Hand Bell Choir during Friday’s 8:10 mass and once a month at the 11:00 Mass at JGS Church.

campus, and all visitors must enter through the locked main office. Automatic locks and security glass have been installed as an extra security measure. Administration and various teachers have access to panic button devices that are linked directly to the Monroe Police Department. We understand the needs of today’s families and offer an extended day program with certified teachers on hand to help with homework as well as a host of learning programs such as Yoga, piano, violin, guitar, Boy and Girl Scouts, Taekwondo and a Summer Camp program for registered students. Open enrollment has started and classes are filling up very quickly, so be sure to get your application in as soon as possible. School tours are offered each Tuesday at 9:00 a.m. as well as by appointment by calling (318) 325-8569.

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 69


Papa Dansby’s 80th Birthday

Eighty is a pretty spectacular number by any standard. When you consider that someone has made the journey around the sun eighty times, that’s really something to celebrate. And celebrate they did for Tom Dansby’s birthday on February 7th at the home of his son and daughter-in-law, Tommy and Sandy Dansby. A big tent warmed by good friends and family, propane heaters and an awesome bar filled the backyard. Many guests gathered by a roaring fire inside the home to share their favorite “Papa Dansby” stories, gnosh on Apache cheese bread and gumbo, and steal hugs and kisses from the birthday boy! A very fitting double layer birthday cake created by Thurman’s featured a hunting scene (everyone knows how those Dansby men like to hunt) with chocolate cattails and fleur de lis flourishes. Happy Birthday, Papa! And here’s to many, many more!

On the BayouScene

1 Mossy and Scott Guinn, Sandy Dansby 2 Joe Reljac and Tommy Dansby 3 Lori McJunkins and Tom Dansby, Sr. 4 Cayce and Ryan Sartor, Olive Sartor 5 Minette Saber and Dee Cagle 6 Scott and Maggie Zentner

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Shop Rayville’s Premier Fashion Destination

Rose Boutique in Rayville Welcomes Mood Swings Salon and Boutique

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OSE BOUTIQUE, LOCATED IN THE HEART OF RAYVILLE, Louisiana, is an established shop featuring unique ladies fashions. For 16 years, Rose has provided customers with the linen pieces that are so central to a comfortable wardrobe for those hot southern seasons. Flax is Rose's signature linen line. Matchpoint and Fridaze are other linen lines carried by Rose. If you are looking for comfortable, stylish clothing that is easy to care for, then Rose is the place for you. They offer many styles and colors to choose from. Though they specialize in linen they also carry other lines such as Russ Berens, Produce, Blu Pepper, Tribal, Sacred Threads and many more. Beautiful white cotton gowns are a staple at Rose. Kaye Hill, owner of Rose Boutique, is happy to announce that Mood Swings Salon and Boutique has moved into their building. Michelle Ogden, owner of Mood Swings is a terrific hair stylist. Leslie Franks, another great hair stylist, is also a member of the Mood Swings team. Kelsey Adams, a Toni and Guy trained cosmetologist, rounds out the team. Customers may also schedule a mas-

sage with Mary Beth Dickerson. Two of the brands carried by Mood Swings are Lady Noiz and Elan. Wonderful jewelry and gifts are also available. Give the ladies at Rose and Mood Swings a chance to make you chic and comfortable in a super fun atmosphere. Come shop Rayville’s premier fashion destination in the heart of uptown Rayville. Eunice Gibson, Sis Caston and Ann Jones are the wonderful ladies who will help you in Rose. Rose also has in-house alterations. They try to get your garments back to you as soon as possible. Kaye Hill would like to thank all her loyal customers from the bottom of her heart. Remember to shop small whenever you can! Rose Boutique and Mood Swings are located at 725 Louisa Street, uptown in Rayville, LA. Find them on facebook! 318-7286468

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 71


A Night to Remember

Former Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards proved he still has it, when more than 600 people turned out for a celebrity roast held in his honor, enjoying an evening of fun and food at the Monroe Civic Center. While the jokes may have been at his expense, the night was to benefit the Chennault Aviation and Military Museum. Political luminaries, including Louisiana Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne, state Sen. Francis Thompson and former Gov. Buddy Roemer, all lobbed jokes at 87-year old Edwards and his wife, Trina. Edwards took it all in stride, throwing back a few of his own one-liners at the roasters. It was all in good fun, though, and Edwards thanked the crowd for “remembering an old man,� before spending more than an hour mingling with guests after dinner. Prior to the dinner, Edwards signed books and posed for photographs with area fans and friends. He even took the time to give a few interviews to local media. When asked about a return to public life and his possible run for the Louisiana 6th Congressional District, Edwards smiled.

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On the BayouScene

1 Theresa and Ronald Mayeaux 2 Julie and Tommy Lewis 3 Ally and Justice Marcus Clark 4 Frances Thrasher and Noreen Smith 5 Bob and Starla Noel 6 Janet and Judge Milton Moore 7 Judge Stephens Winters and wife Sandie with Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne and wife Cathy 8 Susan Allain, Kay LaFrance Knight, Phillis Horne and Dessie Horne 9 Bill and Lynne Hodge 10 Brandon Crum and Brad Evans 11 Fred Huenefeld and former Gov. Edwin Edwards 12 Bobby and Jayne Green, Anne Edwards 13 Judge Wendell Manning and Nell Calloway 14 Sen. Bob and Felicia Kostelka, Laura Flynn and Jim Dimos 15 Richard Hartley, Hamilton Winters and Courtney Crain

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Tenth Annual Warriors Wear it Well

Senior Style Show and Luncheon Fundraiser Featuring St. Frederick High School Class of 2014

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HE TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF “Warriors Wear it Well” style show and luncheon tradition features the St. Frederick High School graduating Class of 2014. This year’s event is a groovy ‘70s theme. The event will be held at the Monroe Civic Center at 11:30 a.m. on Friday, March 21st, with lunch provided. The senior class will be modeling the latest clothing styles from: Rustic Rose, Pearl Pumphrey’s, HerringStone’s, The Camouflage Shoppe, River Outfitters, The Toggery, J&H Boots and Jeans, King of Hearts, Anitra’s Attic, K-Sera, Rustico and Jos. A. Bank. Sponsorship opportunities available for you, your family or your businesses are:

• Sapphire ($1500): Twenty-four tickets for lunch and the show at three tables of eight. • Platinum ($1000): Sixteen tickets for lunch and the show at two tables of eight. • Gold ($500): This level includes eight tickets for lunch and the show at one table of eight. • Silver ($250): This level includes four tickets for lunch and the show; table shared with another Silver Sponsor or two Bronze Sponsors. • Bronze ($125): This level includes two tickets for lunch and the show; table will be shared with Bronze or Silver Sponsors. To ensure sponsorship recognition in the event program and other media, please re-

spond as soon as possible. “Thanks to sponsors, last year’s event was a tremendous fund raising success, and helped us prepare for the increase in enrollment,” stated Principal Guy Farber. For sponsorships, tables and tickets contact: Cathy Whipple, Warriors Wear it Well Chair, at 318-372-0312 or ciwhipple@comcast.net. St. Frederick is a Catholic school with a very diverse student body from many religious backgrounds. The school serves grades seven through twelve. St. Frederick students’ ACT average scores consistently exceed the city, state and national averages. www.stfrederickhigh.org

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 73


Consignment At Its Best Mark Your Calendar For Monroe’s Munchkin Market, March 19th-22nd BY CASSIE LIVINGSTON

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PRING IS HERE AND THAT CAN ONLY MEAN ONE THING, The Monroe Munchkin Market Event is around the corner. From March 19th- 22nd, the Spring/Summer 2014 Munchkin Market will be held at 1201 Lamy Lane in Monroe (next to Books-A-Milion). There will be new and gently used children’s clothing (girl’s: newborn to junior; boys: newborn to 18), toys, books, DVDs, baby equipment, furniture and gear, shoes and much more. In addition to the great children’s items listed, Monroe’s Munchkin Market has expanded to meet the public’s demand. Also in store for shoppers are name-brand handbags, totes and wallets, like-new, gently-used furniture and sporting goods. “The sale is open to the public Wednesday, March 19, from 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m., Thursday, March 20, from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Friday, March 21, from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Saturday, March 22, from 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. On Friday and Saturday everything marked in RED is ½ price.” says India Gregg, co-owner. Monroe Munchkin Market is a small business started by long-time friends and moms India Gregg and Amie Smith, both of Monroe. “We are moms and know the expense of trying to keep your children clothed. We saw in other markets that the consignment sales were hugely popular by the public and other moms wanting great clothes at prices that were affordable. We started out 6 years ago in a small location with clothes mostly consigned by our friends and family and have grown to 500+ consignors twice a year for a Spring Sale and Fall Sale,” according to Gregg and Smith. I personally shop every Monroe Munchkin Market Event – I attended the new mom’s slot when my daughter was first born and was addicted right away. This Fall, I walked away with about twenty outfits – it sounds excessive, I know – but I couldn’t pass up name brands like: Peaches n’ Cream, Kissy Kissy, Baby Nay and Feltman Brothers for a fraction of the cost found in major retail stores. I also bought a set of 6 footie pajamas for around $5, and you could not tell they were ever worn. It’s a great feeling to know that in six months when my daughter grows out of everything in her closet, I didn’t spend a fortune to have her look like the princess she is! Believe me, you don’t want to miss out on this event. Once you experience the Monroe Munchkin Market, you will keep it on your calendar for years to come. For more information about the sale visit www.monroemunchkinmarket.com, “Like” Monroe Munchkin Market on Facebook or send an email to info@monroemunchkinmarket.com.

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Now Open in Monroe

Hemline Monroe Opens It’s Doors at The Shoppes on Tower II

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E ARE EXCITED TO ANNOUNCE THAT OUR DOORS are open! We celebrated with a preview party on February 6th, and we were humbled by the amazing turnout. It was great to see our family and friends and we really enjoyed meeting so many wonderful people. Partygoers enjoyed a night of shopping, appetizers from Portico, cupcakes from Ruby’s Bakery and a little vino! We had a great time and would like to thank everyone who came out and joined us. Hemline carries the top lines and latest trends in women’s and men’s fashion while offering superior customer service in a beautiful and inviting atmosphere. Our women’s department features lines such as French Connection, Tolani, Sofia, Trina Turk, Parker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Amanda Uprichard, Ella Moss and Nicole Miller. We also have a large variety of L Space, Trina Turk and Pily Q swimwear. You can even find formal gowns by ABS! Come see us for any of your fashion needs. The men’s department features a variety of Happy Socks, bow ties, pocket squares, ties, dress shirts, t-shirts, sport coats and jeans. We currently carry the following men’s brands: Mizzen and Main, French Connection, DL Denim, Paul Betenly, 9 Brand and Happy Socks, and we will add more lines in the near future. Mizzen and Main is an American-made shirt company that specializes in athletic fit, wrinkle free and moisture-wicking dress shirts. These shirts fit and look great and have been a hot seller for men of all ages. We want to invite everyone to our Grand Opening celebration scheduled for Saturday, April 12th. It will be a full day of shopping fun! SAVE THE DATE; we look forward to seeing you! Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and text “MONROE” to 57711 for our latest arrivals and upcoming events. Should you have any questions, we can be reached at 318-801-3279 or hemlinemonroe@gmail.com. Sincerely,

Leslie and Joshua Culp, Natalie Sutor

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 75


And The Oscar Goes To...

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Predictions On This Year’s Oscar Winners by John Nelson McAdams

013 WAS A YEAR UNLIKE ANY other in film. This was a very strong year in terms of quality...yet it was also the year that Blockbuster Video shut down. The economic model of how people watch and enjoy films is uncertain (at best), but the quality of those films has never been better. The Oscars reflect that quality this year. Any one of these films and actors and scripts would have been an instant awards winner or contender in any other year but this year.

BEST ACTOR: Christian Bale, American Hustle Bruce Dern, Nebraska Leonardo DiCaprio, The Wolf of Wall Street Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave Matthew McConaughey, The Dallas Buyers Club

Who should win: Leonardo DiCaprio or Matthew McConaughey. Who will win: Matthew McConaughey. Why: DiCaprio spent 12 years trying to get 76 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

Wolf financed, and his performance ranks with anything that Scorsese has guided out of any film actor. Having said that, Oscar history dictates that someone who is that unfairly talented will be rewarded at the end of his career, not the midpoint. On the other hand, Matthew McConaughey has finally fulfilled the promise his early career threatened but never delivered. Much like Brad Pitt, McConaughey is a character actor with a leading man's face. The (true) story of The Dallas Buyers Club, Ron Woodruff's attempt to circumvent the FDA and his own illness in the early days of the AIDS epidemic, is tailor made for McConaughey and his film persona. It's the narrative (role fitting actor, as opposed to the reverse) that Oscar awards to itself more often than not. BEST ACTRESS: Amy Adams, American Hustle Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine

Sandra Bullock, Gravity Judi Dench, Philomena Meryl Streep, August: Osage County

Who should win: Bullock. Who will win: Bullock. Why? I have not liked every Bullock film I've ever seen, but Gravity was one of the best film experiences I've enjoyed in a long time. It's a solo showcase for Bullock, and it would be an empty special effects showcase of nothing without her performance. All the other nominated actresses this year shared the screen with a partner or a team of actors for the majority of their screen time. Bullock was solo for all of maybe 10 minutes of screen time. She made the most of the opportunity.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Barkhad Abdi, Captain Phillips Bradley Cooper, American Hustle Michael Fassbender, 12 Years a Slave Jonah Hill, The Wolf of Wall Street Jared Leto, The Dallas Buyers Club

Who should win: Barkhad Abdi. Who will win: Jared Leto. Why? Jared Leto, an accomplished musician/actor with a great career in either field,


puts on a dress and plays a funny and very opinionated gay man in a superb drama. Barkhad Abdi went from driving a limousine in Minneapolis to acting in a film opposite Tom Hanks...and made Hanks work for every second he was onscreen. That's not just insane luck, but application of talent in extreme circumstances, and it should be awarded as such. BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Sally Hawkins, Blue Jasmine Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle Lupita Nyong'o, 12 Years a Slave Julia Roberts, August: Osage County June Squibb, Nebraska

Who should win: Jennifer Lawrence. Who will win: June Squibb. Why? Oscar traditionally awards the supporting actress award to older, comedically inclined actresses. Squibb earned the biggest laugh in a very funny movie, but more importantly, she's a working stage and screen actress with decades upon decades of contacts within the industry. She locks up the older vote by virtue of her experience. But...Jennifer Lawrence made Christian Bale, Amy Adams, and Bradley Cooper look like they were standing still every time she was on the screen. Lawrence was the only actor in the film besides Jeremy Renner who didn't let the wardrobe overwhelm the story. She made a good film great, and she is the most ferociously talented actress in her age range. BEST DIRECTOR: David O. Russell, American Hustle Alfonso Cuaron, Gravity Alexander Payne, Nebraska Steven McQueen, 12 Years a Slave Martin Scorsese, The Wolf of Wall Street

Who should win: Cuaron. Who will win: Cuaron or Scorsese. Why? Scorsese developed and directed a three hour film that feels like 90 minutes of sex, dwarf tossing and Qualudes. That's an amazing accomplishment...tempered by the fact that Scorsese is working against compar-

isons to the rest of his career (this film feels like the next generation’s Goodfellas). Alfonso Cuaron co-wrote the script to Gravity, took three years to help invent the groundbreaking special effects specifically needed for the story, fully animated the film before any of the actors were in front of a camera, and brought to life the most unforgettable film experience of the year. BEST PICTURE: American Hustle Captain Phillips Dallas Buyers Club Gravity Her Nebraska Philomena 12 Years A Slave The Wolf of Wall Street

Who will win, and who should win: I'm going all in and predicting a tie for Best Picture, which has never happened before in the entire history of the Academy Awards, but what the hell: Gravity and The Wolf of Wall Street will tie for Best Picture. Why? They are perfect examples of the micro and the macro, mirror opposites in terms of story, but equal in terms of range of emotion and technically superb examples of film craftsmanship. The other films, while outstanding, will split the Oscar vote among certain demographic lines, leaving the other two films to tie. When John Nelson isn't listening to Holly Williams' "Waiting on June" from the album THE HIGHWAY (the best album of 2013), he can be reached at utfluke@yahoo.com, or @utfluke on Twitter.

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 77


Paul Michael Company Transforms Into a Spring Haven

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New Spring Merchandise Arriving Daily for All Your Home Décor Needs PRING TIME IS THE PERFECT TIME to refresh your home decor and make your house feel like new inside, especially after a cold winter and being cooped up indoors. The Paul Michael Company is ecstatic to finally get their hands on some new, Spring merchandise and play with new, bright colors. As the seasons change and warm weather rolls in, Paul Michael keeps these design tips in mind to change stores from a Christmas Wonderland to a Spring Haven. New and uplifting elements of color can add a fresh touch to your existing décor without overpowering your everyday accessories. Pastels will always be a Spring go-to, but that doesn’t mean you have to stick to the same design scheme every year. Traditional Spring colors translate well in many rooms, and they work especially well in spaces that get lots of

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natural sunlight. Pair a pretty, patterned pastel with a solid color to keep rooms from looking like they were taken over by the Easter bunny. Pantone announced their color pick for 2014 is Radiant Orchid. Pairing this shade with a neutral is a great example of how to tone down a Spring color in the home. Don’t forget the Spring green! This season is all about getting back outside and enjoying nature, and what better color to emulate that feeling indoors than green? Be sure to infuse it throughout your home for an organic touch. Mother Nature-inspired designs are the easiest ways to get ready for Spring. Rooms can be instantly transformed by natural components as simple as fresh bouquets. Botanical accessories or floral patterns can revitalize a room and bring elements from the outside in when you don’t want to go digging in the garden. Paul

Michael Company has great floral wall art, throw pillows and silk flowers to “Spring up” your home. With Easter Sunday approaching, the Easter egg hunts will soon be underway. The folks at Paul Michael Company are fond of decorating with our floppy eared friends for the Easter season, but they also have some useful tips for more understated looks using Easter eggs. Instead of piling them in baskets, pile them in muted metal buckets or pails. To create a seasonal table setting, fill clear glass, vases or bowls with Easter eggs to add a playful touch. For a more unexpected approach, place them in lanterns or candle holders to brighten things up without the flame.


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the first two operas produced for the new Louisiana Opera. Also rejoining the cast is the University of Mississippi’s Jos Milton, singing Beppe. Monroe audiences will remember him as Schaunard in La Boheme. New to the Louisiana Opera is baritone Paul Max Tipton, who will be singing the role of Nedda’s lover, Silvio. Tipton already has a reputation as an up-and-coming young star with several recordings and a full schedule of concerts. He attended school at the University of Michigan and Yale University and now resides in New Haven, CT. The cast of Cavalleria Rusticana is led by Betsy Uschkrat, singing the leading soprano role of Santuzza. She sang the role of Musetta in last year’s production of La Boheme, a role she also sang with the Shreveport Opera. She is a former Miss Indiana and Miss Houston, attending Rice, Indiana University and LSU. Presently she teaches voice at Loyola University in New Orleans. Singing the part of her lover, Turiddu, is Uschkrat’s husband, Tyler Smith, Loyola music professor and worldrenowned tenor, who sang the part of Rodolfo in La Boheme last year. because both operas Joining him will be University of are relatively brief and North Texas professor Wei-Shu both deal with intense Tsai, baritone, singing the role of love stories that end Alfio, while Lola will be sung by tragically. his wife, soprano Meg Tsai. Both These two popular Wei-Shu and Meg Tsai are origioperas will be pernally from Taiwan. Turiddu’s formed here in their mother Lucia will be sung by original Italian, with mezzo soprano Lynn Clark of English translations ULM. Monroe audiences will recprojected above the ognize almost all these singers live action. They will from their previous roles in be fully staged, featurLouisiana Opera productions— Betsy Uschkrat ing professional singerwe’re very fortunate to have them actors from various returning for CAV/PAG this year. cities around the world, including MetropoliAnother returning artist is Dr. Richard tan Opera tenor Allan Glassman singing the Seiler of North Carolina, the pianist for these role of Canio in Pagliacci. Known for enterproductions. He is a professor of keyboard taining audiences throughout the United and the former Emy-Lou Biedenharn EnStates and Europe, Glassman has a vibrant, dowed Professor of Music at the University of expressive voice that has been called “a force Louisiana at Monroe. Dr. Seiler holds degrees of nature.” from the University of North Carolina at Also singing in Pagliacci are ULM’s own Greensboro, Illinois State University, and soprano Claire Vangelisti as Nedda and Texas Louisiana State University (DMA). A Fazioli baritone Ron Ulen in the role of the villainous artist, Seiler has taught master-classes and Tonio. Ulen, who is on the faculty of Texas performed as a solo/collaborative pianist in State University in San Marcos, has sung the United States, Europe, Canada, Japan, and leading roles in Germany for nineteen years China; has soloed with orchestras throughout and sang previously here in Monroe the title the US; and has recorded for MSR Classics role in Rigoletto and Marcello in La Boheme, and twice for Centaur Records. Seiler tours

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Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci

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HE LOUISIANA OPERA WILL present the powerful and passionate operas Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci, both one-act productions, on Friday, May 16, at 7:30 p.m. and again on Sunday, May 18, at 2 p.m. in the Emy-Lou Biedenharn Recital Hall at the University of Louisiana at Monroe. With clowns and lovers, jealousy and desire, religious processions and mother-love, this pair of Italian operas offer a blockbuster plabill. Pagliacci, which is Italian for “clowns,” is a romantic opera with music and lyrics by Ruggero Claire Vangelisti Leoncavallo. Cavalleria Rusticana was composed by Pietro Mascagni with Italian libretto by Giovanni Targioni-Tozzetti and Guido Menasci. This CAV/PAG pairing has been traditional for many years, largely 80 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014


frequently with ULM faculty ensembles. He and Sandra Lunte (flute/piano duo) won the Northeast Louisiana Arts Council’s 2006 Artist of the Year Award. Dr. Seiler was also the recipient of the 2011 ULM Foundation Award for Excellence in Creative/Artistic Activity. Many local residents know him as organist/choirmaster at Grace Episcopal Church in Monroe. Finally, directing these and all the Louisiana Opera productions is ULM’s Dr. Mark Ross Clark, author of three books on opera and musicals, and teacher of opera workshops for over twenty years, including nine years at Indiana University School of Music. He has directed operas in England and Brazil and has led workshops in Italy, Germany and throughout the United States. Dr. Clark has adjudicated Metropolitan Opera auditions for many years. His doctorate in opera production was awarded by the University of Washington in Seattle, with performance degrees in vocal performance and pedagogy from Indiana University as well as diplomas from the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. Dr. Clark was contracted to sing at the Giessen Stadtheater in Germany for three years and has soloed with the Roger Wagner Chorale and many symphonies in the U.S. He also created and performed in Sing Out America! which toured the country for community concerts for five years. Locally, Dr. Clark often sings at Temple B’nai Israel and other venues.

The Story of Pagliacci: Before the opera begins, the clown Tonio steps before the curtain to say that the author of the opera has written about actors who know the same joys and sorrows as other people. Part I. A small theatrical road company arrives at the outskirts of a town. Canio, head of the troupe, trying to promote the performance that night, describes what the audience will see. When someone jokingly suggests that the hunchback Tonio is secretly in love with Canio’s much younger wife, Nedda, Canio shows his tendency toward a violent temper, warning that no one is to flirt with his wife. As vesper bells call the women to church, the men go to the tavern, leaving Nedda alone. Disturbed by her husband's smothering anger and suspicious behavior, she envies the freedom of the birds soaring overhead. The clown, Tonio, appears and

tries to kiss her, but she rebuffs and mocks him. Enraged, he grabs her, and she strikes him with a whip. He leaves, but not before spewing an oath of vengeance. Nedda in fact does have a lover, Silvio, who now arrives and persuades her to run away with him at midnight. But Tonio, who has seen them, hurries off to tell her husband, Canio. Before long the jealous husband bursts in on the guilty pair, but it is too late. Silvio, unseen by the jealous husband, escapes, and Nedda refuses to identify him, even when threatened with a knife. Beppe, another performer in the troupe, has to restrain Canio, and Tonio advises him to wait until evening to catch Nedda's lover in the act. Alone, as he prepares for the show, Canio sobs that he must play the clown though his heart is breaking. Part II. The plot becomes even more intricate as the villagers, with lover Silvio among them, assemble to see the play within a play, Pagliaccio e Colombina. In the absence of her husband (Pagliaccio, played by Canio), Colombina (played by Nedda) is serenaded by her lover Arlecchino (Beppe), who dismisses her buffoonish servant, Taddeo (Tonio). The “sweethearts” in the play dine together and plot to poison Pagliaccio, who soon arrives; Arlecchino slips offstage. With pointed malice, Taddeo assures Pagliaccio of his wife's innocence, firing Canio's real-life jealousy. Forgetting the script, Canio demands that Nedda reveal her lover's name. She tries to continue with the play, the audience applauding the realism of the "acting." Maddened by her defiance and continued refusal to name her lover, Canio is consumed with jealousy, and the opera ends tragically and dramatically. The Story of Cavalleria Rusticana: Early on Easter morning, Turiddu sings about his former beloved, Lola, now the wife of a wine carter named Alfio. As the town stirs, Santuzza, Turiddu's neglected sweetheart, comes looking for the handsome youth at

the tavern of his mother, Lucia. The girl reveals she has been excommunicated, but before she can explain why, Alfio comes by with friends, boasting about his pretty young wife. A religious procession fills the square and enters the church for Easter mass, leaving Santuzza to tell Mamma Lucia that Turiddu has taken up with Lola again. After Lucia has gone to mass, Santuzza confronts Turiddu with his betrayal. Lola passes by, and Turiddu follows her into church. Santuzza hurls a curse after him, then, consumed by jealousy, tells Lola’s husband Alfio of Lola's infidelity. Santuzza immediately feels remorse, but it is too late to take her words back. When the mass ends, Turiddu and the villagers drink wine, after which Alfio insults Turiddu, who accepts a challenge to duel with knives in a nearby orchard. Turiddu begs his mother to take care of Santuzza if he does not return, saying goodbye with “one last kiss.” This production of CAV/PAG is an opportunity for northeast Louisiana music lovers to enjoy exciting stories, beautiful voices, drama and romance to remember. Both long-time opera aficionados and opera novices will be delighted with the experience.


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Dancing with the LA Stars The stars shone brightly in February, as more than 1,000 people turned out to see their favorite local celebrity cut a number on the dance floor for Louisiana Delta Ballet's sixth annual Dancing With the Louisiana Stars contest. The event was held at the Monroe Civic Center Arena with ULM Quarterback Kolton Browning claiming victory. All told, eighteen stars partnered with LDB dancers to wow the crowd with ballroom, Latin, and even a few rock inspired dances. This years competitors included BayouLife's own Michael DeVault, Preacher's Daughters star Victoria Koloff, KTVE's Nina Criscuolo, Abby Campbell, David Lewis, Michael Sawyer, Mick Essex, former Saints receiver Michael "the Beer Man" Lewis, Mike McGee, KNOE's April Dovrany, Matt Mabry, School Board member Vickie Krutzer, Jush Kutz, Marty French and U.S. Rep. Vance McCallister. LDB President Mike Downhour joined KNOE anchor Mark Boyle and Linnea Fayard Allen to emcee the event. Monroe Mayor Jamie Mayo, Gregory Hudgins, Drew Alleman, the Arts Council's Tommy Usrey, and 2013 People's Choice winner Johnna Allen judged the competition.

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Reverse Mortgage – A Good Choice!

Bank of Ruston’s Warren Post Explains the Benefits of Reverse Mortgages

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Matt Winkelpleck, left, and Warren Post, right, of Bank of Ruston's Mortgage Division

CCORDING TO THE CENSUS BUREAU, BY 2035, SOME 70 million people, of whom 60 million will be elder boomers, will be age 65 and older. This is a number more than twice the current population of Canada.” (Source: Age Power: How the 21st Century Will Be Ruled by the New Old by Ken Dychtwald) This is an incredible statistic to say the least. And today, with all the ads that are now flooding the TV airwaves, there is a lot of confusion about reverse mortgages. Some see reverse mortgages as a last resort, while others view them as a viable financial planning tool. Reverse mortgages are not a new phenomenon. Actually, the first reverse mortgage was funded in Portland, Maine in 1961! But it was really in the late 1980s that the industry took off. Formal regulations, rules of conduct and compliance standards by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) were established. Today, reverse mortgages are a hot topic among leading senior advocacy groups. Every situation is unique. Probably the most typical use for a reverse mortgage is to extinguish a mortgage on the property to halt forward payments. This use relieves the borrower from ever having to make payments on the home and allows them to live in the property for the rest of their lives with no payments. The good news is the loan never has to be repaid by the borrowers or the heirs of the borrowers. The loan will be covered by the property, regardless of the balance on the loan. With the changes that occurred on September 29, 2013, the percentage of the equity that a client could receive changed. This amount was revised downward and depends upon the lowest age of the individuals involved. In choosing your disbursement options, you can receive a lump sum, credit line or monthly payments. If you’re interested in learning more about reverse mortgages, please call Warren Post at 318-232-1490. He and his team will be happy to determine whether a reverse mortgage can be beneficial to you. Bank of Ruston is located at 505 North Vienna Street and 2109 Farmerville Highway, Ruston, LA 71270. www.bankruston.com Member FDIC & Equal Housing Lender

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 83


The life and times of Mary Simpson article by Michael DeVault photo by Joli Livaudais


M

ary Quinn Simpson was born in a castle and lives today in a spacious Park Avenue flat. Yet, as with so many facets of Mary’s life and career, things aren’t always quite what they seem. “I was born in the Castle & Anchor, my family’s pub,” says Mary, her north English accent still heavy, even after four decades of southern living. That pub, a centerpiece of life in Stockton-on-Tees, still exists, was completely innocent, Mary insists. But that was little comfort to though it has long been out of the Quinn family’s hands. “It’s still Fame’s fiancé, Nicollette, Marchioness of Londonderry, a woman of standing there on the High Street in Stockton-on-Tees.” noble birth from a prominent English family. When Lady Londonderry From those earliest years on the channel in northern England, arrived at the Middlesboro restaurant and found her fiancé with two through a marriage and immigration to the United States, even into young women from the club circuit, she became incensed. her retirement today, Mary has never strayed far from the spotlight “She knew working in the clubs was a terrible temptation for and, as her friends tell it, a jovial spirit, convivial attitude, and natural, stars,” Mary says. “But Georgie wasn’t interested in anything dirty.” gracious ease make her a steadfast centerpiece Instead, Georgie explained to his glamorous of life for anyone who knows her—and a Bayou and elegant fiancé that he and Mary were kindred Icon. musical spirits with similar tastes in jazz standards “It was love at first sight,” says John Deniand ballads. Mary described Fame as a “musical son, about meeting Mary. “She just has that way compatriot.” about her. She’s your best friend immediately.” “He loved all the things I loved musically,” Of course, Denison notes, Mary has had a Mary says. lot of practice being hospitable over the years. It was no surprise, then, that Fame made He refers, of course, to the time Mary spent sure Jo, Mary, and Mary’s sister Mardi were on working for the Bailey Organization, a system hand a few weeks later when he played Royal Alof working men’s clubs in 1960s England. The bert Hall with the Count Basie Orchestra in LonBailey clubs – akin to supper clubs in America – don. Mary remembers the event as if it were were the cradle for musical talents in England yesterday. The girls arrived together and were at a critical time in the development of music. shown to their seats—at the front and in the center From a perch at a coat closet or a tableside, Mary section. The music began and, as soon as Fame took did much more than just watched musical histhe stage, something magical happened. tory unfold. She took an active part in it. “He waved to me in Royal Albert Hall!” JOHN DENISON She recalls how young singer-songwriter Mary says, bringing to a close her tale of Georgie Georgie Fame took a shine to her. At the time, Fame. But Georgie was hardly the only brush with Fame was one of the biggest hits in England. He celebrity Mary had during the Bailey era. In fact, played the Bailey circuit in the 60s, and it was at along with Jo and Mardi, she watched an entire generation of British one of those performances he first met Mary and her friend, Jo McCue, musicians come of age. who says Mary’s singing voice was “absolutely divine.” Working at a Bailey’s club one night, when Fame asked her to sing “Everybody knew Mary no matter where we went because she had with the band “Moody’s Mood For Love,” she jumped at the chance. Little a wonderful voice,” McCue recalls. So it was no surprise that Fame did she recognize then that Fame wasn’t the only person on the stage took an interest in Mary, according to McCue. who would leave a mark on entertainment history. Joining Fame on Mary recalls the Georgie Fame story with a little more detail. Fame bass that night was Jimmy Tarbuck, who would rise to fame as a telesent a chauffeured car to retrieve the girls and bring them to a restauvision presenter and comedian. rant in Middlesboro, a nearby town. While at the restaurant, Fame “On piano was a little Irish man who never said a great deal,” asked Mary to sing for him one of his favorite songs. The friendship Mary says. That Irishman’s name? Van Morrison. The Van Morrison who would go on to pen some of the greatest hits of the 1960s—including “Brown Eyed Girl.” And with them all, Mary was a constant figure, as popular with them as they were with audiences. There’s a reason for that, according to McCue.

‘She just has that way about her. She’s your best friend immediately.’

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 85


“Mary was just a great singer! She loved to get up on the stage and do her thing,” McCue says. That’s just what Mary did, time and again, with each of the stars who invited her to perform. To Mary, these famous musicians were colleagues, coworkers and even friends. After all, this was 1962 and the British Invasion hadn’t swept across the United States—yet. And what of those mop-headed boys from Liverpool? When it comes to the Beatles, Mary’s coy, but she’s direct. “I’m sure I made them tea and sandwiches,” Mary says. “I’m sure I did their lights.” She plays down her memories of the young, pre-America Beatles and notes that no one paid them much attention before the Ed Sullivan Show appearance. No one had any reason to, she says, because “we didn’t know who they were and what they were going to be.” That revelation would come soon enough, in 1964, when the Beatles did play the Ed Sullivan Show and swept America with Beatlemania. “My God, they exploded in America!” Mary says. “It was absolutely insane. We couldn’t get over the reception they got!” Georgie Fame, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones all played the Bailey’s circuit before eventually making their way to explosive fame in America. And for each of them, there was Mary, Mardi and Jo, making sure their lighting was good, that they got into the club on time and out of it. All of it was just part of their jobs, handling the artists from club to club. In fact, Mary recalls how on one particular visit, her job was to accompany the band from one Bailey’s Club to the next. “They played two gigs a night,” she says. So someone had to get them into the car and to the next gig on time. On this particular night, that was her job. She declined to name the star or his band, but she shared what happened when she climbed in the band wagon and someone produced a joint. She watched as they passed around a “hand-rolled cigarette” and Mary, then in her early twenties, said, “You don’t have to share! I have cigarettes.” She laughs now, and probably laughed then. “I didn’t even know there was such a thing! Someone should have told me,” she says with a laugh. All the while, she constantly reminds that this was a time before any of these names—Van Morrison, the Beatles, Georgie Fame, or even Tom Jones—had made a mark on music or put a significant amount of money into their pocketbooks. Which is why, one evening, a young performer bummed ten shillings (roughly a dollar, which was then, Mary points out, a significant amount of money) off Mary and Jo. The performer, Gerry Dorsey, was playing an extended engagement and was holed up in a hotel in the town. His last night, Mary and Jo paid a visit to his hotel room and knocked on the door. “Gerry,” she says she called out. “It’s Mary! We

need our ten shillings!” She says Gerry paid back the ten shillings before moving on to the next town and, eventually, to America—where he’d get a new set of music and a new name: Englebert Humperdink. Being several years older than her sister and Jo, Mary became a surrogate chaperon of sorts, and for the most part she kept her sister and Jo in line and far from trouble. “She didn’t get us into any trouble at all! We’d just go out and really enjoy our life,” McCue says. McCue describes the trio as a Three-Musketeers style of groupies. But groupies back then were far different than groupies today. “It wasn’t like today’s groupies,” McCue says. “We were very young and naïve.” But, like the British Invasion would forever change the landscape of American music, a different invasion would forever change Mary Quinn’s life. At the same time musicians were traveling to the states, engineers and contractors were coming to England, Ireland and Scotland to build pipelines to transport oil from the North Sea to refineries in North England. By 1970, the Bailey organization had transformed the working men’s clubs into a chain of hotels, many of which hosted the oilmen from America. Mary was still with Bailey’s, and she was asked to organize a musical soirée to welcome the workers. She played a number of British standards from some of her old musician friends and some jazz standards before she opened the floor to requests. A young, handsome American stepped up. “Y’all got any Johnny Cash?” Mary says, affecting a deep, baritone Southern drawl. “Those where his first words to me.” That request came from Ervin Simpson. Eight months later, Mary and Ervin married and Mary the entertainer was quickly supplanted by Mary the mother, when her daughter Katie was born. The Beatles eventually returned to England, and likewise, the time came for the Simpsons to make the journey to America. Ervin, Mary and young Katie booked passage on the Cunard Line’s Queen Elizabeth II and set sail for the family’s first voyage to the United States. After they returned to England, two more children followed— Delia and James—and six years after marrying, the Simpson family made their way back to Ervin’s relatives in the Monroe area, where the Simpsons “bought a home and tried to fit in,” Mary says. While her children became “Americanized,” Simpson did her best to find a home for her entertainment persona. She didn’t have to look very far, and within just a few years, she was a stalwart performer at Monroe’s Little Theatre. One of her earliest roles required her to portray an Irish Mother Superior in Nunsense. At the time, Chris Ringham was the director, and Mary recalls how shocked Chris was when she went from a proper English accent to a full-Irish brogue. The part even won her a coveted Christopher Award for best supporting actress. Meanwhile, she continued to pop up at nightclubs and bars. Enoch’s became a favorite watering hole of the Simpson clan—her son, James, plays the venue regularly. And it was at a popular nightspot, The Aperitif, where she met Denison in the 1980s.

...like the British Invasion would forever change the landscape of American music, a different invasion would forever change Mary Quinn’s life.

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Ba A young Miley’s Girls: a and her frie ry Quinn (right) nd for a quickJo McCue pose snapshot

Youn McCue descr g Glamour: ibed y “always gla oung Mary as morous.”

Denison was in the club with a group of friends, one of whom was playing songs on The Aperitif’s grand piano. When Mary walked in, she approached the piano and asked if the pianist “knows any Cole Porter.” Without missing a beat, entertainer Mary took over. “She launched into a great Cole Porter song, and we were just mesmerized by this woman with a British accent in Monroe, Louisiana, belting out a show tune,” Denison says. Over the years, Denison developed a close friendship with Mary, who has developed an almost cult following in northeastern Louisiana as a comedienne and singer. She’s spent a lot of time working with Monroebased Elvis impersonator Todd Martin. It’s through this comedy and musical routine that Mary’s sense of humor became widely known. Denison laughs when he thinks of some of Mary’s “great one-liners.” “Mary can be, as the British say, ‘cheeky,’ when she wants to be. She likes a good joke that will make you blush—and she can tell them very well, too,” Denison says.” That sense of humor has helped Mary in more ways than one, according to Denison. A few years ago, Mary was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. The cancer had spread, but she sought aggressive treatment. “I really believe it was Mary’s indomitable spirit that got her through that. That brassy, bawdy personality took over and fought that cancer,” Denison says. Mary recalls it slightly differently. The cancer scare, and the treatment that followed, was a particularly dark time for her. She didn’t let it win. Faced with a radical mastectomy, Mary did what any good,

The Happ Mary and Ervy Couple: in on their wedd Simpson ing day

The Big Mary, Ervin Crossing: daughter Ka and their young during one tie on the QEII of their man y crossings

bawdy comedienne would do. She attended a party. The party, hosted at the Little Theatre, was ostensibly for her birthday. But it was clearly “a going away” party of sorts, Mary says. The message on her cake summed up the party’s theme, the tone, and Mary’s attitude to fighting her cancer. That cake read, simply, “Thanks For the Mammories.” “That’s just what you get with Mary,” Denison says. “There is no pretense about her at all. She’s unfiltered. Period.” That party, the jokes, even the cake, are no surprise to Jo McCue, who’s kept in touch with Mary over the years. Though McCue still lives in England, her daughter recently moved to Texas and she and Mary have plans to visit on McCue’s next trip to this side of the pond. She’s sure, too, that there will be plenty of memories shared and plenty of laughter. “Mary was very free spirited, very glamorous, very much fun to be with,” McCue says. “We just had some great laughs.” Today, Mary Quinn Simpson still performs a comedy routine and sings. During this interview in fact, she broke into song at least three times—flipping seamlessly between lilting soprano and sultry jazz, even throwing in a bit of Amy Winehouse for good measure. She talks frequently of her “retirement,” though, and thinks fondly of her regular trips to New Orleans, whose jazz roots and musical atmosphere speak to her soul. “Having a French pastry shop on every corner doesn’t hurt anything, either,” she says, winking. She also suggests, almost wistfully, that she might like to move to New Orleans one day, to more enjoy her “retirement.” “I’d love to move to New Orleans and maybe get some gigs there, maybe sing some Horace Silver, some Jobim, or maybe Amy Winehouse,” Mary says.

‘She’s unfiltered. Period.’

JOHN DENISON

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 87


BayouOutdoors

The Legend

MEMORIES OF HUNTING WITH ELI HAYDEL article by Dan Chason

he world of hunting and music lost a legend recently, with the passing of my friend Eli Haydel. It was in the late 1990s when Eli's son, Rod invited me to Cameron Parish for a teal hunt with him and his legendary Dad. Although I have hunted with Rod on many occasions, it was the first and last time I ever hunted with his dad, Mr. Eli. At the time, I was an avid duck hunter and my two heroes were Eli Haydel and Phil Robertson. Both of these men had the same mantra: Build a duck call that sounded like a duck. Eli's niche came from the world of music as he was a world class saxophone player. By taking the same reed configuration as his musical instrument of choice, he designed a duck call that not only sounded like a duck, it was famous for blowing when wet. Every duck hunter knows that wet is part of duck hunting. Eli's sales pitch was simple: Put a decoy in a bowl on the sales counter with a duck call

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around its neck with a sign that said, "Blows when wet". And blow it did. I arrived in Cameron Parish to a world that I knew nothing about. Marsh hunting in South Louisiana and timber or rice hunting in North Louisiana are two completely different worlds. I had brought along my trusty Lab named Ranger. I was fortunate as I had two good working Labs. Ranger was my favorite as he was old, pushing 11 at the time but was steady as a rock. Ranger had been dismissed as a "AKC trial dog" as he preferred to leave on command but get off line on his mark and use the wind to track a duck. It didn't matter to me if he went by Pecanland Mall to retrieve the duck, just as long as he brought it back to me was all that mattered. As I pulled up to the Haydel camp, Mr. Eli came out and greeted me. He and Rod assisted me in unloading my gear and showing me where I would be bunking. It was the opening weekend of the September teal season, and Mr.


Eli told me that the flights were good and that he hoped I had brought plenty of tapes for filming and lots of shells. As he walked over to my truck and looked into my dog box, I saw a somewhat disappointed look. In his familiar Cajun drawl, he looked at me and said, "Hey Dan. 'Dat dog ‘dere...he kinda old ain't he? ‘Dis marsh huntin' is hard on a dog, even a young dog. Why don't you let me take one of my young dogs an' let dat ole'man rest in the morning." I smiled as I am sure from the outside, Ranger's grey muzzle and his slow walk would tend to make a seasoned hunter wonder if he could do the job. I, myself have hunted with guys who bragged on dogs that couldn't cut it, but I was confident when I looked at Eli and said, "He'll do just fine, Mr. Eli. Don't let looks deceive you." Mr. Eli relented and walked towards the porch with Ranger following, slowly shaking his head as he sat down. We sat and visited and Mr. Eli talked about his children, grandchildren and the history of his company. Ranger sat at Mr. Eli's feet as the patriarch scratched his muzzle as he enlightened me. You could see the pride as he talked about his boys and their accomplishments. He didn't talk about the numerous duck calling championships or his World Goose Calling Championship he won himself. He talked about how they had stepped in and took his business to the next level and how he could depend on them. When I could get him to talk about duck calls, he had a simple analogy. Too many people blow a duck call to draw judges and not ducks. Ducks call in subtle tones and even ducks can't call ducks sometimes. I barely slept that night as I couldn't wait to hear and watch this man in action. Rod Haydel is an accomplished caller, but there was something about the way that Mr. Eli worked a duck that was special. Maybe it was his trying to call while attempting to not smile as the teal worked over and over to our spread. On the first shots, we dropped 4 teal that went in 4 opposite directions. Two of them hit about 50 yards from the blind. My instincts kicked in, and I stepped out of the blind to work my dog. Big mistake. Marsh grass looks like hard ground and it isn't. After filling my waders and being pulled back to the blind by Rod, I learned real quick that marsh grass isn't for fat boys. Ranger sat patiently while I fought the muck and mud until he jumped at my command of "Back!" Sure enough he retrieved the first teal and waited for me to send him again. This retrieve was what we call a "blind." The meaning of a blind retrieve is the dog cannot or did not see the duck fall and has to rely on hand signals or commands. That is most dogs, but not Ranger. I sent him back, and I will admit, I was worried as he stayed gone a long time. Even Mr. Eli noticed as he cautioned me about all the alligators and asked if we may need to get in the boat to look for my dog. Just as I was about to give in and go on a search, I could see the grass moving to the left of the blind. Not only was Ranger coming back to the blind, he was coming back with not one, but two teal in his mouth. Needless to say, my smile could not be disguised. As Ranger returned to the dog box and I handed him a well deserved bite of honey bun, Mr. Eli broke the silence and gave not only me but my dog the highest of compliments...."Hey, Dan....about 'dat ole dog ‘dere....you wouldn't consider selling him, would you?" A great memory of a great hunt with a legend in the hunting industry. Mr. Eli will be sorely missed by friends, family and by this hunter who was honored to have shared a blind with him. Rest in peace, my friend.

MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 89


E NO CH ’ S

Yvette Jeter behind the bar at Enoch’s Irish Pub

IR I S H

PUB

article by Michael DeVault photographs by Joli Livaudais


f you're looking for a touch of the Irish this St. Patrick's Day, drop into Enoch's Irish Pub on Louisville Avenue in Monroe. But you'll want to get there early. St. Patrick's Day marks the biggest party of the year. And it's all for a good cause, too, according to proprietor Doyle Jeter, who has operated Enoch's with his wife, Yvette, since 1980. "We don't open the doors unless we're raising money for charity," said Doyle of the St. Patrick's Day celebration. Over the course of the day, more than 2,000 people will make their way through the establishment, where they'll have their pick of traditional Irish beers and whiskeys – and a feast fit for an Irishman, with bread pudding, Shepherd's Pie and other traditional Irish offerings. Proceeds generated from the party go to benefit the St. Vincent de Paul Community Pharmacy, which Doyle says provides a vital service to the community and falls perfectly in line with the mission of the patron saint of March 17th. "You can't get any closer to the mission of St. Patrick than St. Vincent de Paul," Doyle said. But St. Patrick's Day is but one day of the year. The rest of the time, Enoch's is a full-service restaurant and pub, as close to an authentic Irish pub as you'll find in these parts. When you show up, though, expect there to be a certain touch of "Laissez les bon temps rouler" thrown in for good measure. "This pub was designed off the feeling we get in Irish pubs when we're in Ireland," said Yvette. "We kind of took the feeling of what that was, but we really wanted to stay true to our Louisiana roots, too. So we try to keep it a real combination of the two." To that end, Enoch's isn't just a pub. It's also a live music venue that frequently highlights local, regional and even national musical acts in genres ranging from Celtic folk music to bluegrass. Every October, Enoch's hosts the longest running John Lennon birthday party. Over the years, Doyle and Yvette have grown Enoch's Irish Pub into the region's premier live music venue. And then, there are the burgers. "We're known for our burgers—even before we veered farther into the Irish feel," Yvette said. Enoch's menu features eleven different burger variations, starting with the Eddie Collins—a plain hamburger without cheese, though at Enoch's, "plain" is relative. Order the

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Conly’s Full Irish Cheese Fries are a savory, indulgent snack that pairs perfectly with a pint. Dip them in ranch and ketchup. Or, for an added kick, try the curry sauce instead.

Collins "dressed" and you'll still have a flavorful, challenging meal complete with fries and Guinness gravy, a savory take on a traditional gravy with just enough kick to make you want more. If you just can't stand the thought of a burger without cheese, don't despair, though. Because the County Cork with its ounce of cheddar is just what you need. Enoch's burgers don't stop there, either. With each additional topping, you've moved on to a new stop on your tour of Ireland. Sautéed mushrooms get you a Galway Mushroom Burger. The Chieftan features chili and cheddar. If cheddar's not your thing, consider the Irish Channel Burger, complete with provolone cheese and Enoch's signature olive mix. If you ask Yvette, she'll recommend right away her personal favorite—the Blarney Stone, a dining destination that includes bacon, provolone and

bleu cheese dressing. Another favorite for those without fear of cholesterol is the Full Irish Breakfast Burger. This monster comes topped with ham, bacon, mushrooms, tomatoes, cheddar and a fried egg for good measure. Be sure to save room for fries and a pint of Harp Lager to wash it all down. Burgers aren’t their only fare, though, as Enoch's also offers a selection of delectable nachos and cheese fries. Their most popular basket of fries is the Conly's Full Irish Cheese Fries, which come topped with two cheeses, bacon, jalapeños and sides of ketchup and ranch. For an interesting kick, ask for a side of curry sauce or whiskey sauce. It doesn't stop there, either. Yvette noted that Enoch's continues to feature a number of dishes that cater to the vegetable lovers among us, as well. "We've always done our vegetarian items," MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 91


Yvette said. "The Roselawn is the original 'Very Veggie.' Older customers still come in and ask for the Very Veggie." Other vegetarian offerings include the Auburn, a grilled Portobello mushroom, provolone, grilled onions, parmesan and a hearty marinara. If mushrooms aren't your idea of a good sandwich, though, try the Forsythe, with a healthy serving of avocado, rich cream cheese, provolone and olive mix. Whatever your culinary tastes, you're sure to find something that will sate your appetite on the Enoch's menu. While you're there, be sure to check out the "snug", featuring more than thirty years of Enoch's musical history. It's just one small touch of atmosphere in an establishment steeped in history and regional folklore. Among the stars smiling down from the walls, you'll see Willie Nelson and Marcia Ball. Blues musicians join Zydeco master Michael Doucet. And there are more than a few local favorites, with Kenny Bill Stinson, Doug Duffey and others. The musical wall of fame underscores Enoch's place in Monroe musical history—and reminds you pretty quickly that this is a functioning, working neighborhood pub. What would a pub be without a few spirits? Regulars start arriving for happy hour at 4 p.m., and the earliest of them are usually sitting on the patio waiting for the doors to open. Happy hour runs from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., with drink specials varying throughout the week. Monday nights are pint nights. Tuesdays are two-for-one burger nights. Wednesday, you can enjoy all-night happy hour. If traditional Irish and Scottish spirits are what you're looking for, Enoch's is the place to be. The bar is stocked with more than a dozen Irish whiskeys and scotches, ranging from Powers and Bushmills to Middleton. Have a Guinness on tap or try the more recent addition of Smithwick's (pronounced Smid-icks), an amber ale. Harp is also available if you prefer a pale beer. A well-stocked selection of other spirits is also available for martini drinkers, bourbon sippers and even wine lovers. If you like your beer but the Irish drafts don’t appeal, Enoch's maintains a cooler filled with the most popular brands out there. "It's probably not the biggest," Yvette says of the Enoch's beer selection. "But it's certainly one of the best." Domestic stalwarts such as Pabst and Bud Lite feature along side selections from Abita, Sam Adams, and Rolling Rock. A host of European imports also call the beer rail home, with frequent visitors from Belgium such as Chimay joining residents like Stella Artois and Heineken. Yvette said the pub loves its "eclectic" beer selection. "We'd love to have a wider selection of it all, but space is the dictator of what we can and can't have," Yvette said. So, they rotate stock, bringing in Fat Tire and Strongbow, or the occasional Angry Orchard seasonal variety. And at the heart of it all, the Jeter family operates the pub just like pubs from the Old World. Doyle and Yvette both continue to work at Enoch's, but as time moves forward, a new generation of Jeters is taking their place beside them. Daughter Molly will continue to work the bar while, as is the tradition back in the old country, Doyle's son John will take over as owner when his father finally decides to hang up his apron. Until that day comes, though, you'll find the entire Jeter clan at the pub, waiting to pull a pint and chat about the day's happenings. 92 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

The Blarney Stone, one of Enoch’s most popular burgers, comes topped with bacon, provolone and a healthy dollop of bleu cheese dressing. Don’t worry about your fingers, because the helpful staff will bring extra napkins.

Just like their counterparts from across the Irish Channel, Irish whiskeys come in a variety of quality, expense and makeup, from the blended Powers to the single malt Middleton.


What’s on tap at Enoch’s Irish Pub? Smithwick’s Harp and Guinness, of course.


CONTEMPORARY CHIC THE HOME OF MISTI AND HARDEMAN CORDELL BY MARÉ BRENNAN | PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOLI LIVAUDAIS FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS BY STUART SCALIA AND MISTI CORDELL | INTERIOR DESIGN BY MISTI CORDELL, EMBELLISH, BY MISTI

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his is a house of boys,” laughs the vibrant woman of the house, Misti Cordell, designer and owner of Embellish, by Misti. “I am so outnumbered. Even our dog, Buster, and cat, Socks, are boys.” And so she begins the tour of the home she lovingly redesigned to fit the needs of her family. With seven acres over the levee that runs through the Cordell’s backyard, this property is the ultimate river playground for the two active sons she raises with her husband, Hardeman. To make this house work, “I had to center this home around outdoor living. It’s the perfect house for crazy boys and all their neighborhood friends,” she says. When Cordell’s good friend and realtor Misti Hajj

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found a buyer for the Cordells’ last house, Misti knew she had to quickly find a place to live. “I stuck a note in the Marshall’s door asking if they were interested in selling and letting them know we were serious about buying.” Luckily, it was perfect timing and a match was made. While renovations were underway that doubled the home’s footprint, the Cordells rented a house next door. The home’s circular drive is softened by mature plantings which are interspersed with gravel and stepping stone paths that lead to the back gardens and pool. The front veranda sets the welcoming tone for the home, with copper gas lanterns flickering and rocking chairs with linen cushions with round horn embellishments lending a chic earthiness to the front


porch seating area. A glass topped table is home to a terracotta pot overflowing with pansies. Custom, glass-paned doors with contemporary transoms and a solid paneled door with sidelights and a transom of the same design are a unique design feature that sets the tone for the home’s play on traditions with a modern twist. Misti had her contractor, Joey Hodnett, widen the foyer, creating a more inviting space when entering the home. Black and white photographic portraits of the couple’s boys, John and Hank, rise along the staircase wall in oversized frames. Two, distressed black demilune console tables with carved legs reminiscent of those of a gazelle are placed on either side of the arched entrance to the home’s dining room. Dramatic oil on wood panel paintings by Lissy Sanders Compton create focal points above the consoles. Wide planks of Acacia Asian Walnut hardwood flooring create a unifying element throughout many of the home’s public spaces and flow through to the bedrooms. Misti uses neutral colors for the home’s walls, like Sherwin Williams’ Stingray – “a chameleon that looks different in different light” and Aloof Grey – “a soft grey that allows the furnishings to take center stage.” These are the colors, she says, which remind her of the coast. “I love the beach,” she laughs. “I must have lived there in another life. I love all the muted, tranquil colors of the beach, with healthy doses of turquoise added to the mix.” In the dining room, Misti treats the ceiling as a fifth wall with verdigris copper squares expertly applied by Cindy Green. The texture and color on the ceiling draws the eye upward and toward the large-scale drum pendant chandelier centered over the oval dining room table. The drum pendant itself is a conservative dark bronze shade on the outside, but while seated at the table, dinner guests are treated to a sweet surprise as they gaze upwards. The inside of the shade is hand-painted with gold and Asian red florals on a background the turquoise of a Bahamian cove. The Staffordshire china, made by Ashworth & Bros. of Hanley in the late 1800s, is a family heirloom handed down from Hardeman’s grandmother and is used to set the dining table, the first table that Misti and Hardeman bought together. The chairs, covered in a natural linen with nailhead trim, are French antiques that were found at Traditions on Trenton with the help of the late Victor Cascio. The intricately carved buffet from Inside Indigo and a pair of lamps from Paul Michael Company anchor one end of the light-filled room. Custom made panels of turquoise silk intersect with a band of sand-hued silk with a Greek key border to add drama to the space. On the wall nearest the foyer, a pair of Flambeau Armory demilune console tables with gold and silver leaf faces and gilded swirl feet are illuminated by a pair of two-arm Flambeau gilded sconces which pick up the gold accents of the central pendant lighting. The sitting room, which lies just beyond the foyer, is Misti’s favorite place to read a book or just relax. Two French bergère chairs from Traditions on Trenton covered in natural linen and a plush sofa with nailhead trim and accented with linen and turquoise blue chevron striped pillows create a cozy spot for conversation beneath an Uttermost contemporary, drum shade chandelier of woven gold leafed metal bands. Misti had built-in cabinetry installed to hide a television and to create added storage. Hardeman’s grandmother’s desk is a repository for a myriad of family photos (Misti proudly points out a photo of a dashing young fellow who is her soon-tobe 100-year-old grandfather) and is sited beneath a large Art Nou-

Above: The outdoor living room addition features a vaulted ceiling with reclaimed beams, a fireplace with river rock wall, a full kitchen and a custom made picnic table and benches. Remote controlled mesh screens raise and lower at every outdoor entrance to allow for access to the gardens and pool.

Bottom: A pair of intricately carved arm chairs and a charcoal linen sectional sofa are warmed by a cozy fireplace in the living room. The pair of antlers were trophy bucks taken by Hardeman and his son, John.

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The open concept of the home is evident looking through the sitting room with views into the kitchen, dining room and foyer.

veau poster that Misti found in Shreveport. Walking toward the spacious den, one passes a large hall mirror with a realistic copper verdigris hue, which was painted by Misti’s favorite faux finisher and friend, Amy Peters. The den is a handsome space which features a fireplace surrounded by floor to ceiling built-ins and a hearth that spans between them. The antlers on either side of the Audubon style print above the charcoal upholstered sofa were deer taken by Hardeman and his sonm John. “Jethro,” the sock monkey given to Misti when she was 3 by her beloved grandmother, keeps a watchful eye over the family. The room with stone floors opens out onto the pool area through large French doors with an arched transom. A conveniently located shower room and built-in cabinet loaded with personalized towels makes for easy clean ups when the boys are muddied up from trips over the levee. The family’s most enjoyed room; however, is the multipurpose outdoor living space which opens directly into the open-concept kitchen through a set of sliding French doors and out onto the garden and pool areas. The areas which 96 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

open into the garden are easily screened in or opened fully to nature with the touch of a remote control which can simultaneously lift the mesh screens for unfettered access or lower them to keep pesky critters at bay. “We live outside,” explains Misti. “We are out here all the time.” Adds her friend Stuart Scalia, “This is our flower arranging spot,” as she points to the outdoor kitchen’s granite-topped island.The vaulted ceiling features extraordinary, salvaged beams that give the outdoor space and the home’s main kitchen a distinct lodge-like feel that is certainly fitting as hunting is the Cordell men’s favorite pastime. River rocks that cover the fireplace wall were sourced from Arkansas Stone. On the wall nearest the fireplace hang two iron crosses which Misti’s daddy, a ferrier, made for Misti and Hardeman with his forge and rasp. Building contractor Hodnett built the picnic table and benches from left over beams from the renovation project. Says Misti, “That table is staying right where it is. It is so heavy and built to last.” Blue stone floors throughout the outdoor pavilion are laid in a Versailles pattern.

Inside, the home’s main kitchen is a study of contrasts. Glass front cabinets provide spaces to show off heirloom china while an innovative “coffee and microwave garage” keeps appliances behind closed doors when not in use. Misti credits Sandy at Key Millwork for helping design an efficient kitchen. “There’s not an ounce of wasted space,” marvels the homeowner. A generous T-shaped island features glacier white granite on the end where the 6-burner gas range is located and a dark-stained wenge wood top on the other. Counterstools in alternating colors of turquoise and a dark espresso stain line the edges of the island. Above the island, task lighting comes in the shape of a pair of gilded iron chandeliers with amber crystals and candle-like lighting sources. Misti, along with Mark Parker added layer after layer of color and glaze to create the metallic finish on the island, cabinetry and selected tall cabinets at either end of the kitchen, using a dark gray, copper, metallic silver and blue washes to create the end result. The remainder of the kitchen cabinetry is painted a grey with a warm brown wash, to create an aged effect. A cool, stainless


Clockwise from Left: Hardeman’s grandmother’s china creates a beautiful and cherished table setting. Tiny blue and white, antique bud vases are filled with ranunculus and tulips. Demilune consoles and sconces by Flambeau are used to glamorous effect in the dining room.

The Cordell’s kitchen is a study of contrasts – muted versus metallic; cool granite versus warm wenge wood; stainless steel versus honed soapstone. The backsplash is a black lip oyster mother of pearl mosaic tile. Gilded wrought iron pendant lighting above the island adds drama to the space.

Antique French chairs are upholstered in natural linen with nailhead trim. Neutral walls paired with a verdigris ceiling finish draws the eye upwards to the interior of the oversized chandelier’s hand-painted interior.

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The master bath’s intricate tilework was designed by the homeowner and combines Carrera marble and Lunada Bay glass tiles. The delicate chandelier was a find from Stuart Irby.


Master Bedroom Master Bath Detail

Boys’ Bathroom John and Hank’s Bedroom

steel farmhouse sink is juxtaposed against the warmth of a matte soapstone countertop and a backsplash of black lip mother of pearl mosaic tiles. In the master bedroom, Misti designed the custom-made, button-tufted charcoal velvet headboard. Mirrored side chests are topped with lamps found at River City Lighting. Roman shades in a matching charcoal velvet were found at market. A pair of zebra stools lie at the foot of the bed. A trio of seashell prints hang on the wall reminding the homeowners of the beaches that they love to frequent. Double doors lead to the en suite master bath resplendent in Carrera marble mosaic tile interspersed with glass tile from Lunada Bay. Says Misti of planning her bathroom tile design, “It was fun to do, like putting together a puzzle.” A tall, antique silver leaf pier mirror with shell design was acquired from Jeff Moody. A reproduction claw foot tub takes center stage beneath a 6-arm chandelier from Stuart Irby “that Mrs. Sarah (Hayward) helped me pick out,” explains Misti. The walk-in shower features a bench and frameless glass shower door. Duravit’s low-profile modern sinks sit atop matching his and her vanities with crystal door pulls from Anthropologie that shimmer like jewelry. Flambeau Fragment sconces in a silver leaf add light to each side of the vanities’ beveled mirrors. A hallway lined on one side with built-in storage and on the other with family photographs leads to the boys’ bedroom and bath. The bathroom features a matte limestone countertop with Lunada Bay glass tile in a herringbone pattern as its backsplash. A hand-hammered oval vessel sink in copper adds visual interest to the vanity which also features interesting drawer pulls the homeowner acquired at Anthropologie. The boys’ room is all boy, with a set of twin beds beneath each boy’s prized trophy deer mounts. Between the beds is an unusual round side table holding the boys’ turtle, “Terry,” and his turtlescape. Antique trunks lie at the foot of each bed. Panels of grey and ivory striped fabric give privacy and add a graphic punch to the room. To create a home that reflects its family so succinctly is a gift that Misti frequently shares with others. The Cordells’ home reflects Misti’s unique vision of how to live comfortably and maintain the chic style she loves. Misti is currently coordinating the interiors of the 2014 St. Jude Dream Home, which will be raffled away on April 27. Tickets ($100 each) for a chance to win the St. Jude’s home are available at Paul Michael Company, D&D Cleaners and Regions Bank. You can follow the home’s progress on Facebook at Monroe La St Jude Dream Home or you can call 1-800-726-9874 MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 99


Raise the Roof

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Restoring the Strauss Theatre Center

N AN EPIC MAN AGAINST NATURE battle like those that have been acted out on its legendary stage, the Strauss Theatre Center was in for the fight of its life after the high winds of December 21, 2013 tore the building’s roof off, destroying priceless costumes and props and wreaking havoc on the actor’s dressing rooms backstage. But Mother Nature soon learned she has met her match in the Theatre Center’s Board president, Bobbette Prince, and her loyal band of theater devotees and a community determined not to let the past 82 years of groundbreaking theatre vanish like their roof. The Theatre Center is currently undergoing a Raise the Roof campaign to cover the cost of replacing the roof with a goal of raising $50,000. You can donate to Raise the Roof online at www.strausstheatrecenter.com or by sending your donation to Raise the Roof Campaign, c/o Strauss Theatre Center, 1300

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by Maré Brennan

Lamy Lane, Monroe, LA 71201. Because the storm happened just before the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, the Theatre was laid bare to the elements for weeks before workmen and roofers could attend to the gaping hole in the roof. With any rain water was pouring through the hole in the ceiling, soaking box after box of costumes and wigs and creating a waterlogged mess of mattresses, pillows, curtains and upholstered furniture that had been used as props and scenery. The crumbling ceiling destroyed the unheard actors, if you will, of many a play and musical – the furniture, props and costumes that make the scenes more believable and real. Perhaps the saddest for Prince and her volunteers was the trip after trip to dumpsters with mildewed pieces of the Strauss’ illustrious past, including countless furs from Field’s, the Palace, and Silverstein’s. Prince and Jason

Rinehart, vice-president of the Strauss Board, described how hard it was to see the World War I and II uniforms that were rendered unusable by the storm’s damage. “We are attempting to have one restored,” says Prince. “It was a custom suit by Hickey Freeman, made for Henry Hayes. If it can be restored, we would like for the Chennault Museum to have it.” The Strauss’ stage curtains were also destroyed in the deluge and their replacements will not be in place for the next MainStage play, “Noises Off” in March. However, Rinehart and Prince say fortuitously, this production lends itself to having no curtains since it’s a play within a play. The Strauss Lobby, which was largely untouched by the storm also gets a workout with the Dinner Theatre crowd as “The Demise of Dorothy Dingle” brings murder mystery and delicious dining to north Louisiana on February 21, 22, 28 and March 1. Prince says with the moxie of a seasoned performer, “You know, we’re doing everything we can to come back from this. ‘The show much go on’ is our philosophy. The old lady is still kicking, and we’re just getting dressed up to dance again.”


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Hemline Monroe’s Opening

New boutique Hemline Monroe, focusing on all things – from stylish clothing for men and women to must-have accessories and shoes, hosted its Preview Party on February 6th. Hemline Monroe, owned by Leslie and Joshua Culp and managed by Natalie Sutor offered a sneak peek of the stylish apparel that will be offered to residents of North Louisiana. The event featured delicious hors d'oeuvres and cocktails before their grand opening on the following Friday. Hemline Monroe is located at 2360 Tower Drive, Suite 106 in Monroe, LA.

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On the BayouScene

1 Josh Culp, Natalie Sutor and Leslie Culp 2 Sarah Nerren and Amanda Debnam 3 Sarah Hendrix and Jessica O'Quinn 4 Cate Creed and Evyn Caples 5 Caroline and Sarah Raymond 6 Jayne Green, Sallie Jayne and Janelle Snellings 7 Haley Brecheen and Brittany Jordan 8 Margaret Barker and Annie Greco 9 Randall, Erin and Alicia Hutson 10 Meagan Shackleford and Allie Sivils 11 Laura and Sadi Hunt

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HOME SWEET HOME Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita ReStore Helps Change Lives BY ANGELA GENUSA

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eed a new door to replace that your old one? A porcelain sink for the bathroom? A computer desk that’s as good as new? Or perhaps just some kitchenware at bargain prices? Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita ReStore may have just what you’re looking for. The local ReStore, which is already open to the public for shopping, will celebrate its grand opening on Friday, March 14, at 11 a.m. with a ribbon cutting by the Monroe Chamber of Commerce at the store at 2308 Washington St. in Monroe. The nonprofit home improvement store and donation center sells new and gently used items, such as furniture, home accessories, building materials and appliances to the public at a fraction of the retail price. The ReStore focuses on home improvement goods donated by manufacturers, distributors, dealers and residents. And by shopping and donating to the ReStore, you are supporting a good cause: All proceeds from sales go to Habitat of Humanity of Ouachita, which makes home ownership affordable for low-income residents of the parish. “The mission of the ReStore is to further the ministry of Habitat for Humanity,” said Larry Head, executive director of the Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita ReStore. “We do that by providing additional funding through the sale of merchandise so that Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita, Inc.—a nonprofit Christian housing ministry that seeks to eliminate poverty and substandard housing—can achieve its goals.” Habitat for Humanity is not a giveaway program, Head said. Houses are sold to partner families at no profit, financed with afford-

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Charlie Cascio, ReStore Manager, Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita, Inc.


able, no-interest loans. Mortgage payments are used to build still more Habitat homes. Since becoming an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International in 1994, Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita has built 49 houses for people in Ouachita Parish, counting homes in Monroe, West Monroe and Sterlington, Head said. The 49 homes provide safe, affordable shelter for 161 people (116 of whom are children). The business plan of the ReStore calls for generating enough funds from its sales to fund the building of one additional house every year. The funds generated by sales at the ReStore go toward building homes for people like Lynn Sherman of Monroe. Sherman helped build her own home and move into it in March 2009 with Habitat of Humanity of Ouachita’s assistance. The working mother of four sons had been renting a house that had been damaged by a fire, but never repaired. Her application was approved in 2008. “I’ll never forget the night I found out I was getting my own home. I was in the beauty shop getting my hair done. I jumped straight up out of that chair I was so excited.” A person must meet four basic criteria to apply: 1) be a northeast Louisiana resident for 6 months; 2) have a housing need; 3) have the ability to pay (with minimum and maximum income guidelines); and 4) invest “sweat equity” in the house and partner with Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita. “We require that the individual or family has to help build their house and other folks’ houses and work within the spirit of the program and with the staff,” he said. The benefits of home ownership to both residents and communities are well-documented, Head said. “For low-income families, the benefits are much more empowering than for others who are more fortunate,” he said. “One of the biggest benefits of home ownership is improved childhood outcomes. For low-income families, opportunities are not as widespread as for others. Renters tend to move around more than homeowners, and if you have kids you move them from one school or from one class to another. Iin general, you’re not as transient and you have that stability.”

Head said home ownership also leads to more involvement and activity in the community and in local neighborhoods, such as in church and school. It also boosts the local economy, Head said, by adding to the tax base for the city and the parish. Homeowners also buy materials to repair their houses, furnishings and other goods. Home ownership is a good deal for all involved, Head said. Sherman agrees. “Having my own home changed my life tremendously,” she said. “Since I’ve been living in this house, I am more content, more satisfied.” Sherman said she helps take care of the neighborhood, by doing things like mowing an empty lot next to her house. “It’s nice and quiet here; I sleep good. I’m at peace here.” Not only did home ownership change Sherman’s life, it transformed the lives of her sons, now 18, 21, 22 and 24. Two of them have graduated from college, one is in the military and the youngest is now enrolled at Grambling State University in Ruston. “They have a home to come to and it makes a difference to them,” Sherman said. “They still have their rooms with all their medals, trophies, everything. And they are so happy that they have somewhere to call home.” Sherman sums up the ministry of Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita nicely: “It’s a blessing to have something that you can call your own home.

Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita ReStore is located at 2308 Washington St in Monroe, LA, 71201, (318) 737-1112. Store hours are 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday. ReStore currently needs prayers, donations, volunteers and customers. The following volunteer positions are available: cashiers, show room salespersons, donations pickup/processing and warehouse attendants. For more information, call the store or see its web site at http://www.hfho.org/restore/index.php or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/monroerestore.

Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita ReStore Donations Needed Have leftover building materials, appliances, furniture and other items from your last remodel? Your donation to Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita ReStore may be tax deductible. Your donation helps the community. Recycling helps waste in our landfills. And your donated items help Habitat for Humanity of Ouachita make remodeling projects more affordable, improving our neighborhoods one home at a time. Here’s a list of what to donate: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Appliances: clean and working Brick and Block: no broken pieces Cabinets: not damaged, wood and metal Carpet: up-to-date, no stains or odors Doors: no broken glass or rotted wood Electrical: usable fixtures, parts and supplies Furniture: good usable condition Hardware: knobs, hinges, locks, nails, cabinet pulls, nuts, bolts, screws, and assorted misc. Lumber: dimensional – 6 ft. or longer, sheets – 1/2 or larger, no nails or scraps. Paint: full cans, residential use Plumbing: usable fixtures, parts and supplies, cleaned and drained Roofing: bundled, no scraps Tile: wall and floor, boxed and clean Tools: hand, garden, working power Windows: no broken glass or rotted wood

Self delivery is encouraged, but pick up can be arranged. Call (318) 737-1112 to schedule a donation delivery or pickup.

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Krewe of Janus Mardi Gras Ball

The Arabian Nights came alive at the West Monroe Convention Center, as the Twin Cities Krewe of Janus held its annual Grand Ball kicking off this year's carnival season. And, for the first time ever, the Krewe opened the doors and allowed members of the public to take part in the festivities. On hand for the evening were Mardi Gras King Janus XXXI LeeBo Alderman and his sister, Queen Janus XXXI Lynda Alderman. Together, the king and queen led the Royal Court for the night of food and dancing. Keeping the royal chalice full was a challenge, though, as patrons boogied to the grooving sounds Dr. Zarr and the Funk Monsters. The Royal Court included Dukes Kevin Caston, Blake LeBlanc and Anthony Perkins. Duchesses for this year were Tiese Ardito, Lynne LeBlanc and Lori White. The 31st Annual Krewe of Janus Mardi Gras Parade rolled through the Twin Cities Feb. 15, marking yet another successful event. Organizers are already at work planning for next year's Grand Ball and parade. For more information about how you can take part in the 32nd Annual Krewe of Janus Mardi Gras celebrations, visit them online at www.kreweofjanus.org.

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On the BayouScene

1 Mignon Spearman and Steve Corteau 2 Onya Kelan and Lupe Sanchez 3 Mike and Dianne Gibbens 4 Robert Brooks and Marla Emory 5 Mark and Catherine St. John 6 Sissy Ford and Tiki Mason 7 Robert Cone and Ashley Cochran 8 Diane and Wayne Van with Valerie Matherne and Kenny Krinson 9 Jessica Thomas and Rhonda Joyner 10 Jiles Davis and Keith Joyner 11 King Janus XXXI LeeBo Alderman and Mignon Spearman 12 David Leach and Sharon Hakim 13 Donna Antley and Steve Turner 14 Catherine and Art Edwards 15 Robyn Rankin and Lavon Beckley 16 Darren Sutton and Rheagan Sutton 17 Sheri Rosales, Martha Mobley and Robin Johnson

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CELTIC ROUTES F a m i l y, C u lt u r e and History in the cr ossr oads of n ort he a s t e r n Louisiana

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article by Michael DeVault photography by Joli Livaudais

Sunlight glistens through a Celtic cross standing watch over St. Matthew's Cemetery. More than two thirds of the headstones in the shadow of this cross highlight the region's Irish roots.

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ick up a phone book or a map of the region and look at the names. There, you'll find names like McHenry, MacDonald and McManus. Fitzgerald and Donaldson also appear. Flip through a newspaper and you can read about the latest political volleys of the Mayos or the McAllisters. One of the major thoroughfares—Forsythe Avenue—belongs in this club, too. These names underscore a common thread shared by many residents of the region—a thread that one individual described as an "almost mystical bond" with her ancestors. For these names are all common Celtic ancestors. And for local pub owner and proud IrishAmerican Enoch Doyle Jeter, how these names came here is part of a grand story. "It's one of the biggest misconceptions about how this region was settled," says Jeter, who has spent a fair amount of time researching various migrations into this region from Ireland, Scotland and England. That misconception: that all of the Irish and Scottish settlement in northern Louisiana came via the port in New Orleans. That isn't


necessarily the case, according to Jeter. "The majority of people who settled this area came through North and South Carolina, Georgia—Savannah in particular," Jeter says. All told, more than 50 percent of Celtic settlers to the region came via overland routes from the eastern seaboard. Even a cursory examination of family trees on Ancestry.com will confirm Jeter's point. Over the centuries, three great migrations of Celts—people of Scots-Irish or English descent—made their way into the area and settled permanently. The first great overland migration began in the late 1700s, shortly after the American Revolution. A second migration in the mid-1840s followed the El Camino Real, a 1,700 mile path connecting Savannah, GA, to San Antonio, TX. A third and final migration occurred post-Civil War and, like the previous migrations, followed more of an overland route than a path from the port of New Orleans. Just as Tom McCandlish, whose ancestors travelled the El Camino to arrive in the New World in the late 1700s. McCandlish has done some research to determine who and where the first of his family arrived and was surprised to find his roots stretched back that far. "I don't think it was as early as the Pilgrims, but we think probably around the time of the Revolution or maybe a little after, our family arrived here," McCandlish says. The McCandlish tribe didn't waste much time making their way to Louisiana, either. By 1814, they were living in Louisiana. Once the first McCandlish clan arrived, other members of the family continued to follow—a pattern that is seen repeated time and again in countless families. Such was the nature of immigration in the 1800s. An immigrant went to where they had relatives, support, and usually, a job waiting. Those earliest settlers appear to have plied trades in the hunting and trapping field. In fact, according to Ouachita Parish Public Library genealogy associate Lora Peppers, the earliest founders of Monroe frequently complained about the Irish and Scots settlers in the region. "That's one of the things Filhiol fussed about," Peppers says. "They wouldn't settle down and be farmers." Drawn by relative freedom and an abundance of fertile land, the earliest settlers came in, trapped and hunted, some farmed, but they all made northeastern Louisiana home. "It doesn't surprise me this is the area they'd want to come, especially for the Irish," Peppers says. "Louisiana was pretty much wide open at that time. Even Monroe was barely a town. It didn't boom until after the Civil War, really." By the mid-1800s, Irish and Scottish settlers had a significant foothold in the region. Though trapping was still a lucrative business, farming had begun to take over. For men in McCandlish's family, that meant work—and work with family. "The lower income folks who had to work for a living tended to follow agricultural seasons or the hunter-gatherer paths of fishing and trapping, being self-employed," McCandlish said. Migrant farming is what drew much of his family to the region. Still, it's hard to dismiss the impact New Orleans shipping

routes had on Celtic migration. McCandlish notes that there isn't a lot of farming going on in Ireland, which is mostly rock, or Scotland, where sheep are a major staple. Fishing and sailing were then, as they are today, significant trades in Ireland and Scotland. For men of those days, that meant steady jobs. "If they were any kind of decent fisherman or sailor, they were put to work on boats," McCandlish said. Today, New Orleans still bears the marks of the Irish wave that came in the late 1800s. One area of the French Quarter is known as the Irish Channel and has historically been home to a number of Irish pubs and businesses. McCandlish likens it to “Little China” in New York or San Francisco, calling it "Little Ireland." And still, the migration continues. Just look at the Simpson clan, who came to the region in the 1970s. (See Bayou Icon, page 84) Or, just ask Sheila Hoh. Hoh is a member of the Scottish Society of the Louisiana Highlands and also serves as director of the Scottish Tartan Festival, a celebration of Scottish roots held each April in Minden. Though Hoh is married to a man of "solid, solid German" descent, don't let the name fool you. She's Scottish through and through. "I am, in a convoluted way, a 23rd great granddaughter of King James IV of Scotland," Hoh says. "That's the furthest connection I have." Hoh lives in Louisiana now, but her ancestors settled near Magnolia, AR, after making their way across the continent from the Jamestown colony, where her first immigrant ancestor landed. "He was in that first group of soldiers, ended up meeting someone, and then ended up staying instead of returning to England," Hoh says. The family made its way through North Carolina, spent some time in Alabama, but by the mid-1800s, had arrived in Louisiana. Jeter points out that Irish and Scottish roots run deep. Towns such

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The tombstone of St. Patrick Comerford, a Franciscan sister who was born in Ireland and died in Monroe. Sister St. Patrick was one of dozens of Irish Catholics who immigrated to America in the late 1800s.

as Delhi, Kelley, Tullos and Jena (formerly Hemp's Creek) are all named for places in Ireland. "All of those towns were settled by Irish settlers who came from County Cork or County Mayo," Jeter says. He points out they came to the region because they were awarded land grants by the Spaniards, who then controlled the area. Returning to those names in the phone book, Jeter points out that more than 70 percent of the names are Scottish or Irish. Also, three quarters of all Native American mound sites in the region have Irish or Scottish names. Galloway, Kilbourne, and Balmoral are just a few examples. Names aren't all these individuals left behind, either. In the cases of Jeter, McCandlish, and Hoh, Celtic roots run deep. Jeter visits Ireland yearly, where he spends time with family and friends. Hoh has made the trip to Scotland and Ireland, and McCandlish has 108 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

visited his family's old tromping grounds, as well. "There was something about touching Scottish soil, about being there, that told me I was home somehow," McCandlish says. "It's not something I can really describe. You just have to feel it to understand it." While he was in Scotland, McCandlish met distant relatives and formed instant, deep bonds. "We still have kin there, so we've made some good connections with them, ac-

tually been there and stayed with them." During one of the trips, McCandlish traced his roots all the way back to the Norman Conquest. Those deep Scottish roots have also had an effect on the present McCandlish clan, he says with a chuckle. "It's strange because almost all of the male children in our line, all the way back into the mid-1800s, have all married Scots. It's been a Mac marrying a Mac since 1814," McCandlish says. Hoh puts this mystical connection another way. She points out she's always loved plaid, loved Celtic music and enjoyed those parts of history. Yet, she didn't know she was of Scottish ancestry until she was 40 years old. "It's almost an intrinsic thing," she says. "I don't know where it comes from."


Andy’s Match Fundraiser

On Thursday, February 6th, The Fieldhouse hosted a benefit for Andy Trahan. Supporters of the Trahan family came in droves to support Andy and his family as he battles lung cancer. Owners Holly and Joey Trappey donated a percentage of sales, and Carson Thompson provided entertainment for dine-in guests. There was also a silent auction throughout the day and raffle tickets sold for trips to Perdido Key, FL, Branson, MO and Gulf Shores. Thank you to all who donated and made this special day possible. Keep fighting, Andy!

On the BayouScene

1 Karen and Phil Trahan 2 Leslie and Andy Trahan 3 Ashtie Young and Sarah Hutchinson 4 Joey Trappey and Steven Ingram 5 Charlie and Karen McDuďŹƒe, Amelia White 6 Leslie Trahan and Catherine Marsala 7 Ryan Hemrick and Courtland Coates 8 Angie and Josh Baldwin

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NLAC ArtWorks Awards

The Northeast Louisiana Arts Council’s 2014 ArtWorks Awards were hosted at the Masur Museum of Art and sponsored by Community Trust Bank. Chairs for this 29th annual event were Cathy Myrick, Leigh Ann Goff and Rhonda Neal. Matt West of CTB addressed the crowd that gathered to celebrate the Arts and the businesses, volunteers and artists who make our scene one of the most vibrant in the state. Before the ceremony got underway, artist Alberto Rey presented a gallery talk regarding his masterful exhibit. The BART Award which recognizes businesses that make philanthropic contributions to the Arts was won by the Monroe/West Monroe Convention and Visitors Bureau, nominated by Twin City Ballet Company. Executive Director Alana Cooper accepted the award, an exquisite piece of pottery thrown by renowned local artist and arts educator Gary Ratcliff. Also nominated for the BART were Hixson Autoplex, Home Depot, Marsala Beverage and ULM’s School of Visual and Performing Arts. The Artist of the Year Award, renamed in 2009 for the late local artist Edmund Williamson, was awarded to fine art photographer and arts educator Joli Livaudais, who was nominated by the Downtown Arts Alliance. The award, a pyramidal stained glass sculpture by stained glass artist Bruce Fleming, was presented by chairman of the Louisiana State Arts Council, Michael Echols. Other artists nominated were Daniel Addison, Jenny Ellerbe, Joe Istre and Dr. Jason Rinehart. Jeanine Patton, last year’s Volunteer of the Year award winner, presented the 2014 Volunteer Award to George Prince, the outstanding volunteer for the Strauss Theatre Center. The award itself is a beautiful bowl sculpted of wood by master craftsman, Audie Maxey. Other nominated volunteers were Carolyn Gates, Jason Grisham, Michele Kolb, Ann Bloxom Smith and Beth Swanner. Congratulations to all the nominated artists, volunteers and business for making 2013-2014 a year for the Arts!

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1 Regina Lynch and Karen Bennett 2 George and Bobbette Prince 3 Mimi Collins and Caitlin Lewis 4 Cruse and Katherine Flowers 5 Jason Grisham, Charlie Heck and Joli Livaudais Grisham 6 Evie Stewart and Mary Ann Riddle 7 Beth and Jeff Swanner 8 Jenny Burnham and Kaitlin Sanson 9 Michele Kolb and Jeanine Patton 10 Michael Caire and Emily Caldwell 11 Steve Brennan and Jay Curtis 12 Alana and Clark Cooper 13 Marilyn Koepke and Camille Peterson 14 Jamie Pettway and Hunt Neely 15 Jenny Ellerbe and Jana Giles 16 Joe Ford, Lamar Mullican, Linda Lavender Ford and Steve Brennan 17 Al and Camille Peterson 18 Bobbette Prince, Maggie and Scott Zentner 19 Regina Lynch and Tommy Usrey 110 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

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L

ong before La Salle claimed this land and consecrated it La Louisiane in honor of the French King, the soil was fertile with a haunted, shadowy history. From the murky bayous thick with mystery to the lush, charming gardens surBAYOU ARTIST rounding plantation homes, the ghosts of our past whisper memories of decadence and darkness. There is a mystical presence in this magical land. It may not be spoken of during mannerly luncheons or at church socials, but it most certainly exists. One heavy breath of the humid air or glimpse of Spanish moss dripping from skeletal cypress trees, and the intoxicating enchantment of Louisiana is undeniable. The uninhibited, earthy, uniqueness of this land has permeated into every ounce of artist Doug article by Mary Napoli Kennedy's being. It pours from his soul as he conjures images that pay homage to the distinctive beauty and rich culture that exists here. When speaking of his hometown of Monroe, he smiles with that look one gets when recalling the mem-

DOUG KENNEDY

Conjuring the Spirits of Southern Art


ory of their high school love. He sees below the surface of our small town and values its eccentricities and natural charm. He is perceptive, playful, undeniably mischievous and appreciates the aspects of growing up in Monroe that may not immediately come to mind. He is inspired by memories of golden sunlight filtered through Live Oak branches, the curling tendrils of lush wisteria and the earthy fragrances of the delta soil, as well as the more wild, uninhibited qualities of our culture. Lady Louisiana is his muse. She's part Southern belle and part voodoo queen, like a shot of moonshine chased with sweet tea. Kennedy's artistic talents take on many forms. He has earned significant praise for his etherial abstract paintings, continues to have success illustrating children's books and dabbled in music once upon a time, but in the place where he grew up, he is most recognizable as the artistic talent behind Mojo of Louisiana--the art infused apparel company that has grown in popularity since its inception. Mojo Boutique is located in historic downtown West Monroe on Trenton Street and is owned by Kennedy and his siblings, twin brother John Kennedy and sister Kim Kennedy-Bryan. Before Mojo set up shop, the building served as the studio of Kennedy's mother, who was also an artist. In 1989, Kennedy and his twin began the family business with a simple idea that evolved into the successful business it is today. Kennedy explains, "I had just finished my graphic design degree at Louisiana Tech. Everything was done by hand then; there were no computers. I remember getting out of school and wanting to do some t-shirts, since that was a big part of fashion in the 90s. We took $75.00 and bought one silk screen and a kit. It was during the summer, and I drew this sun design for the first t-shirt...We had a friend who worked at a record store in Pecanland Mall, so we brought the shirt up there, and it sold. Our friend was like, "Hey man, y'all should do some more of these!" So, we did. We made more, and they sold...then we set up a rack of shirts in my mom's studio on Trenton, and those sold. That's basically how Mojo got started," The homegrown venture developed strong roots and grew locally, but the ingenious Kennedy boys took the shirts to another level. Doug Kennedy designed the graphics for the shirts that began as pen and ink drawings in a sketch book. They took the whimsical, edgy designs to apparel and boutique shows in Dallas and New York, where they received significant attention. At the Los Angeles Magic Show, an

international apparel market, Mojo found substantial exposure and was picked up by a popular apparel company in Japan. The relationship between Japanese buyers and Mojo still exists today, and the shirts remain a fashionable item there. Mojo's t-shirts gained popularity quickly at home and have remained a steady part of the local culture. Inspired by the sultry, natural beauty of Louisiana and the mystical, haunted lore of New Orleans, Kennedy creates designs that are striking and completely original. Each shirt is a wearable canvas and is hand crafted by silk screen, making each piece an individual work of art. Kennedy's imaginative pen and ink style is as intricate as the wrought iron balconies of the French Quarter and has a playful Southern Gothic essence. He designs two t-shirt lines each year that are released seasonally in the Summer and Fall. Traditional Mojo archetypes are always quick to sell, as well as shirts that feature images that give a nod to fictional vintage advertisements, like Cat Daddy's Moonshine and Mojo's Old Time Gospel Revival. Residents also appreciate Kennedy's designs that wink at local nostalgia, like Howard Griffin Motorcycles, the Tonga Lounge (Drink the Zombie!), Jack Hayes Elementary Phys. Ed., and NLU circa 1972. The labyrinthine graphics range from the obscure to the obvious, but each contains a hint of backwoods humor that displays Kennedy's love for the region. The historical building that served as Mrs. Kennedy's studio space slowly scaled back as Mojo steadily expanded. What began with a tshirt line and a silk screen kit is now a fashion forward boutique that includes seasonal lines of Mojo t-shirts, as well as stylish, contemporary women's apparel, extraordinary accessories, handbags, candles, home dĂŠcor, and fragrances. The boutique's shelves also feature the outstand-

ing collection of children's books--such as the imaginative Pirate Pete and Mr. Bumble series-authored by brilliant Kim Kennedy-Bryan and illustrated by her artist brother. Mojo tapped into a new market when it introduced its own fragrance line in 2013 with the debut of Mojo Magique. The intoxicating fragrance was instantly successful and has received substantial attention in large markets. The scent was designed by notable French perfumer JeanMarc Chaillan, who created fragrances for prominent brands, such as Burberry, Calvin Klein and Carolina Herrera. Magique opens with subtle citrus notes before revealing delicate florals like jasmine and lily of the valley and finishes with woody notes of sandalwood, cedar and patchouli. The unisex fragrance is sensual and complex and has been so successful that it spawned two additional fragrances--Shady Lady and Voodoo Child, which will become available this Spring. Shady Lady is a feminine scent with stirring notes of gardenia and rose that are enlivened by subtle hints of moss and sandalwood. InVoodoo Child, the Kennedys have created another unisex fragrance that is enticingly complicated and layered. Keeping with the mystical, magical, voodoo theme, this fragrance includes notes of orange flower and vanilla bean from Africa along with hints of cedarwood and leather. The Mojo aesthetic reveals itself in the creative packaging, designed by Kennedy. With a breath of these fragrances, one might imagine that Mojo has somehow managed to bottle the humidity of the swamp and imbued it with that sense of romantic, earthy sensuality that only exists in the South. "When we started working with the perfumery, we went to New York with a storyboard of images with elements of Louisiana we wanted to include...All of the scents are worn close to the body and are light and fresh--not MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 113


heavy. We wanted them to be wearable in the heat down here and not be overpowering," says Kennedy. It seems there is no end to the magic of Mojo. In addition to the bayouinspired, wearable artwork and provocative fragrances, the Kennedys have also begun to design a line of handbags that are bewitchingly beautiful and distinctly sSouthern in an imaginative way--by crafting the bags from local alligator skins and leather. The modern designs are sophisticated, yet casual, and constructed with the greatest attention to detail and quality by the same craftsmen who produce high-end handbags for brands like Chloe and Coach. Although a release date for the bags has not been determined, it will no doubt be worth the wait. Kennedy also has creative endeavors beyond Mojo. He is an accomplished and successful painter of abstract art. It has been a part of his life for decades, although Mojo has been at the forefront at times. "It is a completely different, separate existence for me. The medium is looser, more organic and more physical. The artwork for Mojo is more concrete. My paintings are more about impressions and memories of light and shapes," explains Kennedy. "It’s very of the moment. I make a mark and react against it. Each action leads to another action that either supports or connects it. " His work is often layers of acrylic and oils on canvas, but he also creates mixed media images on paper. Once again, the Louisiana landscape serves as his inspiration. He often chooses colors representative of nature in his native Louisiana--the muted tones found in the swampy areas shrouded with Spanish moss, the saturated pink of an azalea blossom, the rich purple hue of a blooming iris. The natural palette brims with emotion and captivates the eye. The tinted, bold shapes can be as opaque as bayou water or as transparent as the morning fog in early Fall. Representative of shadowy memories or live inspiration, the brushstrokes mingle and collide. For the artist, the process of creation is as important as the work of art, itself. He divides his time between his studio in Austin, Texas and the region of Louisiana that continually inspires him. At his twin brother's home in rural Calhoun, the open fields serve as an outdoor studio, and the earth as his easel. Kennedy communes with his medium in a way that 114 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

is natural and intuitive. He spreads large, loose canvas panels on the ground, often several at once. This way, he can walk around each canvas as he paints and create multiple works of art in the same session, capturing a multifaceted point of view. "Paintings that are created together have a base relationship. They are all related, but once I get them back in the studio and stretch them, the become more individual," he reveals. His art has been included in countless galleries across the nation and can be viewed currently in Ann Connolly Gallery in Baton Rouge, Jules' Place in Austin and Addison Gallery of Boca Raton. In 2006, Kennedy received the prestigious honor of being chosen one of the four American artists to participate in the Art in Embassies (AIE), which has been championed by the Department of State in Washington, D.C. for over fifty years. As an AIE artist, Kennedy engaged in a cross-cultural exchange of art within international embassies and consulates to foster global creative dialogue. His work was featured in the United States Embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam and later in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. It’s a long way from home, but apparently those Yankees know a good thing when they see it. The sultry Southern heat surrounds us almost constantly and finds its way into our food, our celebratory nature and our passion for our beliefs. And as sure as the temperature will once again rise, Doug Kennedy will continue to create artwork that is as intriguing as it is visually sublime. Although he is based in Texas, Kennedy has an emotional attachment for his hometown and the artwork he creates here that has only intensified over time. "Monroe is a different place when you go away and come back. You learn to appreciate it so much more and in different ways. The light is so beautiful, and the culture is so distinctive. I'm influenced by all of it," he says with sincerity in his voice. "There really is something special about that region. One of my friends said once, ‘What is it about you people from Monroe? Do y'all have a magnet in your ass or something?’ It’s true. People always come back." Stay current with Mojo of Louisiana online at www.shopmojo.com or find them on Facebook. Mojo is located at 206 Trenton Street in West Monroe, 318-


TIME MAY NOT HEAL ALL WOUNDS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51

Patients covered by Medicare, Medicaid and most insurance plansmay self-refer to the St. Francis Wound Healing Center. However, one focus of the center is relationship building with each patient’s primary care physician. "We become a partner in the patient's medical care," said Frank Sartor, MD, who serves as medical director at the center. "While we dedicate our efforts to healing the patient's wound, the primary care physician is free to focus on treating the underlying cause or disease. Through regular physician visits, wound progress reports, digital photographs and phone calls, we work with the patient’s healthcare providers and other experts in the program to develop a total approach to treatment and care." St. Francis Wound Healing Center offers specialized treatments such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, vascular studies, tissue culturing and pathology, revascularization, skin grafting, and clinical or surgical debridement. For more information call the St. Francis Wound Healing Center at (318) 966-1870. The center is located at 411 Calypso Street, Monroe, LA 71201, inside the Northeast Louisiana Cancer Institute.

BREAST AUGMENTATION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54

Secret, and there is no such thing as a “D minus, minus” or a “C plus.” Moreover, breast implants don’t even come in cup sizes; they come in volume sizes and base widths. So, a 300cc implant may make one woman a “B” cup and another a “D” depending on her chest wall width, the pliability of her skin, the amount of breast tissue she starts out with and where she buys her bra! So choosing the appropriate implant size is a bit more complicated than simply looking at pictures on the Internet and picking a number. It requires thoughtful discussion and assessment of many variables. I try to listen carefully and provide guidance and advice on implant size so the patient can be realistic about the surgical result. In the end, I rely mostly on the patient’s measurements and my clinical judgment. It pays off. In over twenty-three years of breast implant surgery, re-operation simply to change implant size has occurred in only 1-2% of my patients. Overall, complications from breast augmentation are few. In my experience, the infection rate and the risk of a hematoma (blood collection) around the implant are both less than 1%. The risk of a scar tissue capsule around the implant or of implant rupture is around 5%. Most patients can return to work within a wee, and can return to full unrestricted activity in three weeks. If you have been considering breast augmentation, call Mickel Plastic Surgery at 388-2050 for an initial evaluation and a thorough discussion of the procedure, the recovery and the risks. I also encourage you to visit www.mickelplasticsurgery.com and browse the “before” and “after” gallery. Then decide for yourself. Just one hour of surgery can have a positive impact for years to come.

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MGSL Educational Program On Thursday, January 30th, the Monroe Garden Study League and Vantage Healthcare welcomed Dr. Douglas J. Meffert, Vice President of the National Audubon Society and Executive Director of Audubon Louisiana and Audubon Louisiana’s Marketing and Development Manager, Nancy Hotchkiss. Over 175 people came out to enjoy the educational lecture. Participants included students and professors from ULM and Louisiana Tech, people from Black Bayou, The Nature Conservancy, and many interested community leaders. It was a very informative and enjoyable evening. A GCA Club Conservation Commendation to a Non-Member was given to CenturyLink by MGSL Awards Chairman, Caroline Brown. In attendance representing CenturyLink were Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Perry, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Cheek, Mr. and Mrs. Stacey Goff and Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Hanks. The lecture was entitled, “From Wetlands to Woodlands: Integrating bottomland hardwood forest and coastal restoration into a successful Louisiana conservation strategy.” Dr. Meffert provided an in-depth look at coastal conservation and showed the audience where we have been and where we are going. Audubon Louisiana believes that where birds thrive people prosper. Nowhere is this more evident than in Louisiana. Audubon Louisiana is part of a growing, powerful collaborative to deliver ground-breaking approaches to coastal conservation. Audubon's mission is to conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth's biological diversity. In his role, Dr. Doug Meffert leads Audubon Louisiana’s programming which includes large scale coastal and Gulf of Mexico restoration, state coastal master plan development, state-of-the-art hydrodynamic applied research, bottomland hardwood conservation in central and northern Louisiana, and chapter activist engagement as part of Audubon’s Mississippi River Delta Restoration Initiative. In addition, he leads the management of the Paul J. Rainey Sanctuary, Audubon’s oldest and largest sanctuary, and he stewards the protection of Louisiana’s 23 Important Bird Areas in coordination with Audubon’s Mississippi Flyway and Gulf Initiative programs. MGSL was honored to share this important lecture with the Northeast Louisiana community.

On the BayouScene

1 Cynthia Ryan and Caroline Brown 2 Bill and Cathy Cheek 3 Babs Oakley, Larry Cavalier and Lenece Laseter 4 Gay Davis and Pam Henry 5 Carol McDonald and Dee Ledbetter 6 Nancy Hotchkiss, Doug Meffert and Dee Ledbetter 7 Harris Brown and Chris Rice 8 Patrick Trisler and Kathy Van Veckhoven 9 Carrie and Dan Davidson 10 Sue Sartor and John Ledbetter 11 Ricky and Lynná Caples 12 Nancy Williams and Regina Lynch 13 Meredith Hayes, Susan and Brian Crawford, Tommy Hayes 14 Laura and Matt Beal, Nova Clarke

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Downtown Gallery Crawl

The freezing temperatures did not keep the crowds from exploring the art featured in February's Downtown Gallery Crawl. The River Gallery presented the works of Donna McGee whose images are inspired by the essence of nature – energy, motion and change. Arender Studio and Gallery was once again a popular spot for art lovers and featured photographs by one of our very own BayouArtists, Steini Hrafnsson. Other galleries included in the crawl were MAD Art Gallery, Luna Blue, Livaudais Studio, The Palace, DOWNSTAIRS, The Big Room, UPSTAIRS gallery and Sugar Gallery. With so much phenomenal beauty to enjoy, it was a memorable event for all patrons of local art.

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1 Andy Bloxham and Mariam Gaviola 2 Joli Livaudais Grisham and Frank Hamrick 3 Jess VanAlstyne and Rhyan Taylor 4 Jacob Perkins and Mary Thompson 5 Carol Ransom, Cori Massey and Sheri Carter 6 Kaitlyn Sanson and Jenny Burnham 7 Hannah Bustamante and Julie Pearson 8 Stacy Medaries and Burg Ransom 9 Jeanette and Steini Hrafnsson 10 Lenece Laseter and Jeanette Hrafnsson 11 Brad Arender, Nick Oskian and Cory Bahr 12 Devin Haywood and Cadence Smiley

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y grandparents' home in rural Tensas Parish was a magical place to visit. During the sunny hours, my favorite cousin and I would chase each other through the cotton fields that my grandfather farmed and explore the overgrown creek bank to dig for worms in the soft mud. We cooled off by drinking purple Kool-Aid on the front porch and listening to my grandfather entertain the adults with stories of bygone days. It was truly an idyllic setting. As the afternoon hours waned, we looked forward to watching the sun sink into the horizon of the cotton fields. The vibrant colors cast across the sky were breathtaking, but my favorite part was always after the sun went down. As the sky darkened, the stars would come to life, shiny and twinkling. Out on that country dirt road surrounded by miles of farmland, I saw a different sky than was visible from my backyard in my neighborhood in Monroe. The night sky was a glittering work of art in my young eyes. Staring heavenward, I would imagine God sitting happily on a fluffy white cloud with a bag full of stars in His lap. In my imagination, He would reach into the bag, scoop up sparkling stars by the handful and cast them out into the air. They would scatter in the darkness and land suspended in the atmosphere. This dreamy scene was similar to the real life observance of watching my grandmother feed chickens by tossing corn that she held in the lap of her apron. But in my mind, this was how the Almighty decorated the heavens. To this day, when I sit on the porch of that old house, I still think of that childhood memory as I watch the sun approach the horizon. As much as I have always found the heavens to be fascinating, I have never taken the time to learn much about them. I know the basics, but not as much as I would like. The bright lights of big cities obstructed my view for many years, but coming home, it reminds me how beautiful the starry sky truly is. I have a friend who grew up gazing at the stars above his family farm in Richland Parish. As a kid, his interest in the stars was piqued during his years as a Boy Scout. Flying with his father in their small private aircraft, he became fascinated with what was visible in the night sky. My friend grew up to become a successful commercial airline pilot and is known as “The Captain" in our house.

The Captain has seen the sky from nearly every vantage point possible during his flights around the world, and he is quite knowledgeable about what he sees. Recently, I was visiting with him and his beautiful wife on a cool winter night and when the subject of stargazing came up. "So much more is visible when there is no ambient light to interfere with your view. It magnifies what you can see in the night sky. The view from 35,000 feet in the cockpit is quite impressive. There is no ambient light and less atmosphere to interfere," said the Captain. Part of what is intriguing to me about staring into the heavens is that it gives me a comforting feeling. The world we live in changes every single day, but the stars remain constant. The North Star that we see every night is the same that sailors guided their ships by hundreds of years ago. It is the same star that my grandmother saw and the same star that my future grandchildren will wish upon. "You know, the North Star is only visible within the northern hemisphere," the Captain said. "It is also known as Polaris, the star that has been used for centuries for navigation." He explained that it is possible to determine your latitudinal location by measuring the distance between the horizon and the North Star. In Monroe, the North Star is visible thirty degrees above the horizon. Thus, we are located at thirty degrees latitude. "What do you know about the Southern Cross?" asked the Captain. "I'm not much of a singer, but I love the original version by Crosby Stills and Nash. Jimmy Buffett has a great version, too," I said in all seriousness. "I meant the constellation," said the Captain. "The Southern Cross is the principal navigation point in Southern Hemisphere and is made up of four stars built around the central star, Crux. Both the Southern Cross and Polaris remain stationary. Although it appears that the sky is moving, it’s actually the Earth that is." The air was cold, but we went outside to take a look at what was visible. The sky was somewhat cloudy, and it wasn’t easy for an amateur like me to make out the constellations. The Captain took his iPad out from under his arm, opened an app called Star Walk, and held it up to the sky. To my utter amazement, the screen instantly became our own personal planetarium. Looking at the iPad was just


like looking through a window to the sky above, only each constellation was identified and labeled. Orion, Cassiopeia, Aquarius, Andromeda...they were all artfully displayed before us. The guide followed our every movement in real time and updated the map to reveal and locate every celestial body in the night sky. “What is that bright star over there?” I said pointing over the trees to my left. The Captain moved the iPad in the direction that I was pointing until the star that I was curious about was visible on the screen. Instantly, the app identified it. “That is actually Jupiter,” explained the Captain. “You know, we can even find the International Space Station with this. We can find satellites or see what the sky looked like on a past date or in the future. Look, here, at the moon. This tells us that it is 97% full tonight. Pretty impressive, isn’t it?” Star Walk is an incredible way to view the constellations and to learn about the world above us. This is 21st century star gazing. So much precise and extensive information available at our fingertips--it is difficult to wrap my head around. Technology is often mind boggling to me. It changes the way I view the stars, but not how they make me feel. When something memorable happens, some people remember what they were wearing.

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Others relate memories to songs. For some reason, I always seem to recall what the sky looked like when something fantastic happens. As clearly as I can see her soft, chubby, little face and bubble gum pink lips in my mind, I can see the technicolor sunset on the day I brought my first daughter home from the hospital. Early last Spring, I remember the bright, full moon overhead and the happiness I felt cruising down the Ouachita River on Glen Northcott's yacht after a photo shoot with my BayouLife friends. The night breeze was chilly, but we kept warm huddled together under blankets and laughing at each other. And the night I ended up off the beaten path and way out in the sticks, when I first realized that it might be possible to fall in love again, I remember how amazing and breathtaking the stars looked. At that moment, the night sky looked hopeful and full of possibility. Stars and sunsets--those are as much a part of my memory as the actual event. As much as the precious memories that come to mind, the beauty of a dark night reminds me of the countless lifetimes that have been lived under that singular sky. The stars and planets remain long after we are gone, connecting us to our personal past and the generations of the future. Looking up at the heavens above, the night wraps itself around me like a dark blanket, dotted with sparkling stars that watch over us and whisper promises of a new day.


Calendar of Events Through June 14 51st Annual Juried Competition The Masur Museum of Art’s Annual Juried Competition (February 27th – June 14th, 2013) showcases contemporary artists throughout the United States of America working in any medium. Masur Museum of Art • (318) 329-2237 • www.masurmuseum.org Through March 2 Agility Dog Trials Time: 7:00 am-6:00 pm Come watch as the Ike Hamilton presents this canine competition of agility, conformation and obedience. Ike Hamilton Expo Center Arena (318) 325-9160 www.westmonroe.com March 2, 7-9 Monroe Symphony League Book Fair Time: Saturday 9:00 am-5:00 pm; Sunday 1:00 pm-5:00 pm The Monroe Symphony League Book Fair will be held the first and second weekends in March. Come purchase moderately priced books from a vast array of subjects. Proceeds from the sale benefit the Monroe Symphony Orchestra. Monroe Symphony League Book Room (318) 410-1002 March 1 Cold Desert Bull Riding Classic Time: 7:00 pm Come and enjoy all the thrill that bull riding is, at this year's Cold Desert Bull Riding Classic. Frank Foster and famous rodeo clown, Lecile Harris, are the cherry on top to this rodeo show! Monroe Civic Center • (318) 329-2225 www.ci.monroe.la.us Strauss Youth Academy for the Arts presents: The Little Mermaid Time: Saturday-2:00 pm-3:00 pm In a magical kingdom beneath the

sea, a beautiful young mermaid named Ariel longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. Set under and above the high seas, The Little Mermaid tells the story of Ariel, an adventurous young mermaid who’s got a thing for disobeying the rules and following her heart. Follow Ariel’s misadventures at Strauss Youth Academy for the Arts as her fascination with the human world often leads her to the sea surface, a zone that’s designated as “off-limits” by her father Triton, the sea king. Strauss Youth Academy for the Art (318) 812-7922 • www.straussyouthacademyforthearts.com March 6-9, 13-15 Strauss Theatre presents: Noises Off Time: Doors open at: 6:00 pm; Show begins: 6:30 pm Called the funniest farce ever written, Noises Off is an outrageously funny look at the love, lies and deceit that take place behind the scenes as a group of ridiculously inept stage actors rehearse a Broadway-bound play! Just when members of this chaotic cast finally get their performances right everything starts to go wrong! Strauss Theatre Center • (318) 3236681 • www.strausstheatrecenter.com March 6 Downtown Monroe Renaissance Pub Crawl: Shamrock Shuffle Time: 5:00-9:00 pm Grab your friends the Shamrock Shuffle Pub Crawl! Pub Crawl locations include Live Oaks, The Corner Bar, Don Tomas, Restaurant Cotton, River & Rail Cantina, Shananigans, and finish up at Enoch's Irish Pub! Anyone 21 or older can check-in at Bry Park anytime after 5:00 pm, where you'll receive a FREE Pub Crawl Passport to direct you to participating locations. Join anytime

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MARCH 2014 BayouLife Magazine 121


before 9:00 pm, as there will be plenty of drink specials! Bry Park March 7-8 Shop Til' You Drop Arts, Craft and Gift Show Time: Friday- 3:00 pm-7:00 pm; Saturday- 9:00 am-6:00 pm Come join the fun! Preview night is Friday, come enjoy a free glass of wine, while you shop over 60 booths inside and outside. The first 25 customers on Friday and the first 25 on Saturday will receive market money to be spent at the show. This show features women and children's clothing, hair bows, personalized items, tasty foods, one-of-a-kind handcrafted jewelry and home based businesses, and so much more! West Monroe Convention Center (318) 470-6714 www.westmonroe.com March 7-8 BMX Bike Cajun National Competition Tricks, speed, jumps and more will make this year's BMX Bike Cajun National Competition thrilling for the entire family! Come cheer on your favorite competitor at the Ike Hamilton Expo Center. Ike Hamilton Expo Center Arena (318) 325-9160 www.westmonroe.com March 7-9 Barak Shrine Circus Time: Friday-7:30 pm; Saturday-10:00 am, 2:30 pm & 7:30 pm; Sunday-2:00 pm & 6:00 pm Bring the kids out to see the lions, the elephants, the acrobats and silly clowns – the whole works! And don’t forget to get your Cracker Jacks at intermission. Money raised assists with the Shriner’s activities. Monroe Civic Center • (318) 329-2225 www.ci.monroe.la.us/monroe-civiccenter.php March 8 Landry Vineyards presents: Nathan Williams & the Zydeco Cha-Chas Time: 3:00 pm-6:30 pm Landry Vineyards winery outdoor concert featuring celebration mix and live music. Make sure you pack your lawn chair, blanket and picnic dinner and enjoy the outdoor show.

Landry Vineyards • (318) 557-9051 www.landryvineyards.com March 9 The Spice and Tea Exchange presents: Teas From Around the Globe- Examine Asian Tea Ceremonies & Traditions Time: 2:00 pm- 3:00 pm The Spice and Tea Exchange invites you to join them for a Sunday series of unique teas from around the world. During this five week series, a flight of three teas will be enjoyed with food pairings from a variety of cultural regions. Reservations are required, may be done per class or for the entire series. Spice and Tea Exchange Westmonroe@spiceandtea.com (318) 388-3920 3/15/2014 2nd Annual St. Paddy's Bicycle Parade and Festival Time: 10:00 am-2:00 pm Bring your friends and family to the 2nd annual St. Paddy’s Day Bicycle Parade and Fun Fest at Kiroli Park in West Monroe on Saturday, March 15. This is a family fun community event sponsored by the Love Your Community initiative. Parade members are encouraged to decorate their bikes, trikes, wagons, scooters and pets for a ride around the field in Kiroli Park. Parade line-up is at 11:00 a.m. It will begin at 11:30 a.m. and will be followed by a contest with awarding of prizes for “most festive” kid’s and adult’s bikes, and “most festive” pet’s attire. The event will include free activities such as face painting, inflatable jumpers and temporary tattoos. There will also be live Irish music by Emerald Accent. Free refreshments including green lemonade and popcorn will be served. There will also be food trucks on site with more substantial fare available for purchase. The St. Paddy’s Bicycle Parade and Fun Fest is the 2nd annual event organized by Love Your Community, an organization formed to promote community pride in Ouachita Parish. This event is open to the public. Kiroli Park • (318) 396-4016 www.westmonroe.com St. Patrick's Day Celebration Saturday Enoch's Irish Pub hosts its 35th Annual St. Patrick's Day Cele-

122 BayouLife Magazine MARCH 2014

bration, and for the 11th year the event benefits the St. Vincent De Paul Society Pharmacy. The festivities begin at 3pm with Irish food, drink, music and bag piping! Enoch's Irish Pub 318-388-3662 enochsirishpub.com The Monroe Symphony Orchestra and the Monroe Symphony Chorus present Faure’s stunning Requiem Time: 7:00 pm Flutist Sandra Lunte and harpist Elizabeth Richter joins this orchestra for Mozart’s Concerto for Flute and Harp. First Baptist Church Monroe (318) 812-6761 • www.monroefbc.com www.monroesymphonyorchestra.com March 21-23 Louisiana Quarter Horse Show Bring the family out to the Ike Hamilton Expo Center for the Louisiana Quarter Horse Show. Enjoy fine horses and a day out with the family. Ike Hamilton Expo Center Arena (318) 325-9160 www.westmonroe.com Junior League of Monroe presents: Spring Market Time: General Admission Shopping Hours-Friday-11:00 am-5:00 pm; Saturday-9:00 am-6:00 pm; Sunday-12:00 pm-5:00 pm; Breakfast with Bunnies (Sat)-8:00-10:00 am; Shop Til' You Drop (Fri)-8:30-11:00 am; Girls Just Want to Have Fun (Fri)-6:00-10:00 pm Spring is on its way and with it comes the Junior League of Monroe's Spring Market, sponsored by Community Trust Bank. The 16th Annual Spring Market will open March 21, 2014 and continue through the weekend. Bring the family, the girls, your friends, wallets and more because this year's Spring Market is sweet! No strollers please. See page 32 for more details! Monroe Civic Center • (318) 322-3236 www.ci.monroe.la.us March 22 Landry Vineyards presents: Hands On! Time: 4:00 pm-7:30 pm Landry Vineyards winery outdoor concert featuring Classic Rock, Country, Blues, Soul and R&B. Make sure you pack your lawn chair, blanket and picnic dinner and enjoy the outdoor show. Landry Vineyards • (318) 557-9051 www.landryvineyards.com

March 23 The Spice and Tea Exchange presents: Teas From Around the Globe- Enjoy a Traditional Garden Tea Party Time: 2:00 pm- 3:00 pm The Spice and Tea Exchange invites you to join them for a Sunday series of unique teas from around the world. During this five week series, a flight of three teas will be enjoyed with food pairings from a variety of cultural regions. Reservations are required, may be done per class or for the entire series. Spice and Tea Exchange Westmonroe@spiceandtea.com (318) 388-3920 March 26 Sesame Street Live Time: 10:30 am, and 6:30 pm Join Elmo and friends in the Sesame Street Live event at the Monroe Civic Center. The "Make a New Friend" program will have kids and the entire family enjoying every second. Don't miss out on this great time! Monroe Civic Center • (318) 329-2338 www.ci.monroe.la.us March 29 Louisiana Delta Ballet presents Cinderella Time: 7:30 pm The fairy tale of all fairy tales comes to life in this exquisite, ultimate classical ballet featuring original choreography and the dancers of the Louisiana Delta Ballet. W.L. "Jack" Howard Theatre Monroe Civic Center • (318) 345-1155 www.louisianadeltaballet.com March 29-30 Masur Museum of Art presents: Letter Never Sent, a Bookmaking Workshop with Frank Hamrick Time: Saturday- 9:00 am-12:00 pm, 1:00 pm-5:00 pm; Sunday- 1:00 pm5:00 pm In this weekend workshop, participants will make two books. The first book will be a simple hardbound, pamphlet stitch book. The second book will be a more complex Coptic bound book. All of the essential bookmaking materials and tools will be provided. No previous experience is necessary. Students will have a good foundation in bookmaking after completing this workshop. There will be an hour break for lunch on Saturday. Masur Museum of Art • (318) 3292237 • www.masurmuseum.org


BayouLife Magazine March 2014  
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