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AUGUST 2016 20 / FISHING WITH KENNY Where Old School and New School Meet 26 / A. ALDEN’S MEMO Back to Basics: Make-Up 101 30 / LIFE WITH BEES Tri B Haven Honey 32 / A NEAR CENTURY OF SYRUP Norris Syrup Company 50 / DOING THE RICE THING The Kennedy Sisters Launch KenChaux Rice 56 / I REMEMBER Don’t Let Fear Paralyze You

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66 / WHAT’S IN THE FRIDGE A Look Inside the Refrigerator of Chef Blake Phillips 68 / ASK ERIN Getting Organized the Panache Way 78 / MEET THE TRUCKERS A Guide to North Louisiana’s Growing Food Truck Vendors 93 / HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS Bayou Artist: Nick Bustamante 106 / BAYOU ICON Chef Hans Korrodi 120 / SOLVING HUNGER TOGETHER The Food Bank of Northeast Louisiana

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150 / ARCHITECTURAL REDUX Inside the Home of Aimee and Chad Hill


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BayouLife

HERE IS NEVER ENOUGH

time to plan when someone is having a baby. We had this production planned out and then baby Sydney decided to make her appearance a week before schedule. We are so happy for Melanie, Georgia and Andrew Moffett on their little blessing. This month’s issue is dedicated to our favorite thing: food. It’s the annual food issue, and everyone in the office has gained a couple of pounds just flipping through the pages. It’s no secret that Ashley and I both have Celiac disease. Most of the servers in town know that when we walk in, we are going to ask 20 questions and then ask the chefs to revise their dishes 20 ways. This month, Trent and I took a culinary expedition to New Orleans and succesfully navigated our way through some of the best restaurants without one glutening. One of the things I’ve missed the most are donuts. But, thanks to a local chef, he and his new food truck, Caster & Chicory, are now offering gluten-free beignets. No worries, they offer all the yummy gluten-filled beignets, too! We caught up with Joel and three other local food truck operators for this month’s BayouEats. Meet our truckers on page 82. Driving through downtown Monroe, I always noticed the Chef Hans logo on the side of a building. Honestly, I had seen Chef Hans spices before but really didn’t know if that building was where the magic really happened. In this month’s BayouIcon, Maré Brennan sits down with the chef and walks away with an incredible interview of an accomplished chef and entrepreneur. Read his story on page 106.

1201 Royal Avenue Monroe, LA 71201 Phone 318.855.3185 Fax 318.855.4645 A month ago I was walking through Vieux Carré Market and noticed Tri B. Haven honey. The packaging was cute, so I bought a bottle (I’m a sucker for good packaging). I had no idea that the owner of Tri B. Haven was my friend, Jada Banks! She’s pretty, sweet, funny... and a bee keeper. Read about Jada and her bees’ness on page 30. One of my favorite restaurants is For His Temple. I love Mrs. Dana, and I love her food. I noticed recently that she started carrying a new line of rice, KenChaux. Before long, I started seeing KenChaux in more places. It turns out that this local, organic rice producer has long had its roots in the rice business. Meryl Kennedy Farr and her sisters are at the helm of this growing enterprise. Read about them on page 50. A few weeks ago, I cornered Blake Phillips at Restaurant Sage and asked him to open his fridge to our BayouLife readers. The newly crowned King of Louisiana Seafood graciously obliged and you can take a peek on page 66. I have to thank my amazing photographer, Martin G Meyers, on this month’s issue. I worked his tail off, and he came through 100 percent. Not only did he take the amazing pictures of our Barbie, Ellie Jackson. He also built her Barbie box for this month’s shoot. See it on page 160. I hope you enjoy reading this month’s issue of BayouLife Magazine . Peace and love, Cassie

WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM PUBLISHER Cassie Livingston cassie@bayoulifemag.com EDITOR Maré Brennan mare@bayoulifemag.com ART DIRECTOR Melanie Moffett melanie@bayoulifemag.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Taylor Collins taylor@bayoulifemag.com

ADVERTISING MANAGER Toni Navarro toni@bayoulifemag.com ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Ashley Hubenthal ashley@bayoulifemag.com ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE Amanda Singley amanda@bayoulifemag.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maré Brennan Dan Chason Kenny Covington Lou Davenport Dr. David Finley Cindy Gist Foust Linda Holyfield Janine Hopkins Paul Lipe Erin Love

Meredith McKinnie Dr. Timothy Mickel Kay Rector LaRone Richardson Dr. Kenneth Sanders Delia Simpson P. Allen Smith Brenda Tarver Beatrice A. Tatem Analeise Thomas

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Brad Arender Scarlett Holland Martin G. Meyers ON THE COVER Northeast Louisiana has some of the best restaurants in the state and our pages are packed with great features about local restauranteurs. In this month’s food issue, A Slice of Heaven takes us through some of our area’s best pizza joints. Photograph by Martin G Meyers. Design by Taylor Collins. BayouLife Magazine is published and distributed by Redbird Publishing, LLC. Circulation: 13,000 copies monthly. Postal subscriptions ($20) can be ordered online at www.bayoulifemag. com. BayouLife Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited photographs, manuscripts or other materials. Reproduction of contents without express written permission is prohibited.

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Yuengling Now Available in Louisiana America’s Oldest Brewery Hits the Pelican State

BY DELIA SIMPSON, CRAFT, SPECIALTY, AND IMPORT MANAGER, CHOICE BRANDS, INC.

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FFICIALS FROM D.G. YUENGLING and Son, Inc. recently announced that the brewery is expanding distribution of its brands to Louisiana. Four wholesalers have been assigned to distribute Yuengling products in the state. Yuengling welcomes into their network Choice Brands, Inc., Venture Marketing Corporation, Crescent Crown Distributing, and Eagle Distributing. “When it comes to celebrating rich heritage and tradition, the Yuengling brands and Louisiana culture go hand in hand,” said Frank Elkins, President of Choice Brands (Monroe) and Venture Marketing (Alexandria). “The Choice and Venture family is honored to have been selected to be Yuengling’s preferred distributor partner covering 20 parishes throughout our Northeast and Central Louisiana territory. Our team is energized and prepared to build upon Yuengling’s rich history within the U.S. beer industry and looks forward to a long and successful partnership with the Yuengling family and their impressive lineup of high quality brands.” While Yuengling might not yet be a household name in Louisiana, the ever popular brewery, despite only being distributed in 19 states, was listed as 2015’s number one independently owned brewery by the Brewers Association. It owes its ongoing success to a remarkable combination of pride, determination, tradition and innovation. This is evident in the quality products produced throughout Yuengling’s challenging history. Founded in 1829 and originally named the Eagle Brewery, today the Yuengling Brewery is still identified with the qualities of

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strength and pride, symbolic of the American Eagle. Each Yuengling label bears the eagle trademark chosen by young David Yuengling so long ago. Previously located on Centre Street, current site of Pottsville’s City Hall, the brewery was completely destroyed by fire after only two years of operation. A new brewery was then constructed on Mahantongo Street, where operations continue today. In 1873, when David Yuengling’s second son, Frederick, joined his father in the original operation, the brewery name was officially changed to D.G. Yuengling and Son. It was Frederick’s steady management that helped guide the company through economic uncertainty and eventually saw him add a bottling line. In 1976, during America’s Bicentennial, the brewery captured national attention. D.G. Yuengling and Son was placed on both the national and state historic registers and was officially recognized as America’s Oldest Brewery. This honor generated renewed interest in the company and its beer brands. However, even as this milestone of longevity was being celebrated, the company looked to begin a new chapter in American brewing — the rebirth of the classic American beer. Richard “Dick” Yuengling, Jr., started working at his family’s brewery in 1958. As a teenager, he helped stack cases, lug empty kegs, clean the cellar tanks and load trucks. He watched as his father and uncle struggled when they took the company’s reins in 1963. After his high school graduation, his parents sent him off to Lycoming College to prepare for another line of work. Even so, he left Lycoming after only one year and returned to

the brewery to pursue his passion. From 1997 to 2001, the brewery doubled its volume output. A loyal consumer base continued to grow. What started as word-ofmouth accolades turned into award winning product recognition. The name “Lager” became synonymous with Yuengling. While the sixth generation plans to take the helm of America’s Oldest Brewery, Dick’s four daughters remain committed to preserving the qualities and heritage that make Yuengling unique. Every effort is made to ensure that Yuengling’s popularity and mystique will continue to expand for generations to come. Three beers from Yuengling will be available on tap and in stores in Louisiana, beginning in August. Yuengling Lager, the brand’s flagship beer, is a rich amber lager with roasted caramel malt and cluster and cascade hops. Yuengling Light Lager is an exceptional brew that appeals to consumers who don’t want to sacrifice character for a low-calorie light beer. The flavor is akin to the flagship brand, but has only 99 calories per 12-oz. serving. Yuengling Original Black and Tan models a traditional English Half and Half. Black and Tan combines 60% Dark Brewed Porter and 40% Premium Beer to create a brew that is rich and dark in color with hints of caramel and coffee from the dark roasted malts. Like us on Facebook at facebook.com/ choicebrands to find information on brands, events, and specials around town. Search #YuenglingNELA to keep up with the launch events!


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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H O P K I N S D E R M AT O L O G Y I N T R O D U C E S

Dr. Elizabeth Shane French B OA R D C E RT I F I E D G Y N E C OLO G I ST HOR MON E R E PL AC E M E N T T H E R A P Y F OR M E N A N D WOM E N I N T E R N AT I O N A L F O T O N A L A S E R E X P E R T

Hopkins Dermatology/MD Minerals Layers and Levels

IN THE CLINIC Dr. Elizabeth Shane French, Board Certified Gynecologist from New Orleans, has joined Dr. Hopkins in bringing a new dimension to Hopkins Dermatology. Her focus will be on women and men’s antiaging treatments and procedures. Dr. French will be treating men who will benefit from the hormone testosterone in order to treat Andropause, the “Male Menopause.” For both sexes the issues include: Muscle Loss, Weight Gain, Fatigue, Sleep Problems, Hot Flashes, Night Sweats, Lower Sex Drive, Depression, Hair Loss, Erectile Dysfunction (in Men), Urinary Problems, Memory Loss, Vaginal Dryness (in women) Treatments for Men and Women include but are not limited to: Biodentical HRT with Estrogen, Progesterone and Testosterone in the form of gels, patches, pills, creams, or pellets. These treatments can be systemic or locally applied: • Hormone Pellets (that last 6 months) • Monthy Injectable HRT • Vulvo/Vaginal non-surgical and painless Laser therapy with Er-Yag Fotona Laser • RenovaLase treatment for menopausal painful intercourse and vaginal atrophy • IncontiLase treatment for mild to moderate stress incontinence IN THE STUDIO What lies beneath? Not the sea… but in the makeup that you put on your face, lips and eyes everyday. We want you to know everything about the MD Minerals and Minerals Black Tie cosmetic grooming selection. Why? Because 10 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

we are so proud of the ingredients that go into each product. Paraben Free. Gluten Free. Cruelty Free. The Tinted Face Primer adjusts texture and shine… as well as delivers the perfect prep for the skin. Beautiful botanicals Lemongrass and Orange oil. Plumps fine lines and smoothes wrinkles. The Liquid Foundation transforms instantly from a velvet liquid to a seamless dewy finish. It provides a buildable coverage and hides most imperfections. Think… Aloe, Jojaba and Sesame in a water-based delivery. Camouflage Cover Crème for concealing circles, bruising or to dab on a blemish. A little goes a long way. Sunflower Seed Oil and Coconut Oil are in the mix to neutralize redness as well. MDmagic is the ultimate concealer. Highly pigmented, it delivers the power to hide most skin imperfections. Red/pink blemishes, facial blue veins or a bruise on your skin… use very little, a dry formula doesn’t look oily on the skin and stays in place. The Baked Mineral Foundation is just that…a beautiful cake that is baked for 24 hours. Not even a bit of fly-away messy powder. This light refracting foundation works with your skin tone to even out problem areas. Natural botanicals are hydrating and calming. Balance and brighten. Rosemary. Thyme. Green Tea. Lavender. Great for men, women or teens. The Mineral Highlite Powders … versatile, delicate pressed powders with a hint of frost. Bronze, Gold, Pink. Brightens. Warms. Lifts. Elements... Zinc Oxide and Titanium Dioxide. Use it on eyes, face cheeks.

Tinted Brow Gel deposits natural looking color on the fine hairs of the eyebrow and keeps them in place all day. Waterproof Mascara with ALL natural colorants and clays are used in the formula for the mascara. Mineral eye crayon is a highly pigmented eye pencil that glides on the lid. Sunflower Seed Oil. Vitamin E. Coconut Oil. BUFF lip pumice scrub in a tube. Use the castor oil/jojoba oil infusion to gently massage in circular motions. Removes dry and flaking skin. QUENCH Vitamin E Stick, an antioxidant that softens and protects lips and reduces water loss… Shea butter. Castor Seed Oil. Mineral Volume Lipstick packed with natural plant based oils. Avacado. Jojoba. Restores suppleness. Volume perception. MD Minerals and Minerals Black Tie by Dr. Janine Hopkins, are premier collections and have many advantages over traditional makeup and loose powder minerals. As a board certified Dermatologist she has recommended these products for the last six years and has seen the results first hand. Along with natural sun protection and healing properties, the confidence that comes with wearing the most healthy and beautiful formulas available is unsurpassed. Together Drs. Hopkins and French provide anti-aging and rejuvenation for overall prime wellness and vitality for men and women. Hopkins Dermatology and MD Minerals Studio are located at 2509 Broadmoor Blvd in Monroe. 318-325-0600 318-360-4877


Glenwood Regional Medical Center Now Offering Lung Cancer Screenings

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RE YOU AT HIGH RISK FOR LUNG CANCER? EARLY detection could save your life. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women worldwide. Nearly 160,000 Americans die of lung cancer each year. Results of a recent National Lung Screening Trial Study (NLST) reveal that participants who receive low-dose CT Scans had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest x-rays. Improved detection at earlier stages, when lung cancer is more easily treated, is key to increased survival. Glenwood Regional Medical Center, an accredited American Board of Radiology (ACR) facility, was recently designated as a Lung Cancer Screening Center. To receive the distinction, facilities must be accredited by the ACR in computed tomography in the chest module and undergo a rigorous assessment of its lung cancer screening protocol and infrastructure. Procedure requirements include followup patient care such as counseling and smoking cessation programs. Like other annual preventive screenings including mammograms, colonoscopies and prostate exams, lung cancer screenings are now approved by Medicare and some private insurance providers. If you qualify, check with your insurance provider about coverage. For those who qualify and don’t have insurance coverage, screenings are available for a $200.00 cash price. Who qualifies? 1. Between the age of 55 and 77. 2. Asymptomatic – no signs or symptoms of lung cancer 3. Tobacco smoking history of at least 30 pack years (smoking one pack per day for 30 years) 4. Current smoker or smoker who has quit in the last 15 years Other requirements LDCT lung cancer screenings require a written order from a physician or nurse practitioner following an evaluation and counseling session. Contact your medical provider for more details and to schedule an appointment. Know the FAQs What is a low- dose Lung CT? 12 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

A computerized tomography (CT) scan uses special x-ray technology without contrast or needles to get detailed images from different angles of the lungs and surrounding areas. During the test, patients lie on a table attached to the CT scanner, a large donut-shaped machine that rotates to provide highly accurate lung images. Should I get a low-dose CT scan to screen for lung cancer? Before making your decision, it’s important to see a physician or nurse practitioner to review and discuss your health history and to better understand the benefits and risks. There are some radiation risks, and you may need to have additional tests or procedures depending on your results. Only low-dose CT scans are recommended for screening, so it’s important to choose a hospital or imaging center that meets the American College of Radiology requirements such as Glenwood Imaging Services. What types of results will I receive? All screenings are interpreted by our specialized staff of board certified radiologists. After your screening, Glenwood’s Lung Scan program will send you a written notice including instructions if further studies are needed. Receiving a “suspicious” result means your scan revealed something abnormal. It could be lung cancer, or it could be something else. Additional testing may be required to get a definitive diagnosis. A “negative” result means that there were no abnormal findings on your screening. If you are high risk, your doctor will discuss when and if you should be tested again. Does my insurance cover the screening? For Medicare beneficiaries, annual LDCT preventive lung cancer screenings are fully covered for those in the high risk category. High risk qualifiers with insurance or supplemental Medicare HMOs should contact their provider to see if coverage is offered. For those at high risk who are not insured, screenings are available for a cash price of $200.00. For more information about low-dose CT scans or lung cancer screening, call Glenwood Regional Medical Center at 877-726-9355, or speak to your doctor.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Hello Happiness Welcoming Happiness Into Our Day BY BEATRICE TATEM, PH.D., LPC-S, NCC, ACS

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Y TRIP WAS JUST WHAT I needed. I awakened after a good night’s sleep by the sun shining in my face and with feelings of inner happiness.“ This was the sentiment made by a client who disclosed mixed feelings of happiness and also concern for the world. In her opinion the world seems to be out of sync and full of uncertainty, pain, fear and conflict. She admitted to questioning her own happiness amongst so much unhappiness. Why is she happy? Should she be at this time? The woman was reminded there are times when we must be intentional about what defines our lives and existence, when we must uncover our happiness and welcome it into our day.   What is happiness? What is being happy? What is your happy? Are you a happy person? Measuring happiness can be tricky. Happiness is said to be determined by innate factors and perceptions, as well as experiences. Happiness attributes to one’s life satisfaction, appreciation of life and moments of pleasure. Research in the field of positive psychology and happiness often defines a “happy person” as someone who experiences frequent positive emotions such as delight, peace, satisfaction, pleasure, interest, pride, gratitude, contentment and infrequent (although not absent) negative emotions, such as sadness, hurt, anxiety and anger. A “happy person” experiences the spectrum of emotions like anybody else; however, the manner in which they perceive negative emotions differs. The key to describing the “happy person” and defining 14 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

happiness is recognizing that possessing positive emotions does not indicate the absence of negative emotions. In essence, true happiness comes through our mindset and how we choose to live and be in the world. Regardless of where you are on the happiness spectrum, each person has his/her own way of defining happiness.   How do you define, describe or express happiness? There is the Chinese Proverb that states “Happiness never decreases by being shared.” When we are happy others are happy and yet it is at times hard to recognize our own happiness. We can learn from other people’s happiness when attempting to achieve our own. Several friends and family, colleagues and clients were asked to weigh in on how they view, measure and ultimately achieve happiness. The following are some of their thoughts: True happiness is not determined by external circumstances, but rather internal forces. Avoid waking up startled. Alarm clocks are called alarm clocks for a reason. If you have to have a snooze button set a second one in the bathroom, you have to go there anyway. Usher in happiness by letting the sun light shine in while naturally starting your day. At the end of the day have a good night’s sleep; it impacts happiness. Happiness is the art of never holding in your mind the memory of any unpleasant thing of the past. It is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony. Happiness is acceptance; let go of past regrets and focus on making the present good. Be mindful that important things are not things.  Avoid seeking

happiness from material things...relying on material things to make you happy is rarely lasting. “Happiness is like a sweet smelling perfume, you can not spray a little on yourself without getting some on others“... spread happiness. Get physical. Exercise helps to lift depression. Don’t worry, be happy. Always be in tune with how you feel. Stop wishing for happiness. Create it. Don’t put happiness off until tomorrow when you can have it today. Be grateful to the people who make you happy; they will touch your soul. Write about happiness (take it from me it invokes feelings of happiness). There are many ways to measure and define happiness; at the end of the day, you have to find yours. A part of “being happy” stems from the day-to-day choices we make, interactions we encounter and circumstances we experience. Being happy does not mean every day is perfect. Nor does it mean we are never unhappy. It means looking beyond the imperfections to experience happiness; you will find the little things that bring unexpected joy. Happiness depends on ourselves. Choose to be happy and don’t let negative situations, people, thoughts or ideas diminish your happiness. Welcome happiness into your day and make it a great one! For more information about counseling services and outreach programming contact Dr. Tatem at Wellness Initiatives, LLC. 1900 North 18 th Street, Suite 414, Monroe, La 71201, 318-410-1555 or at btatem.bt@gmail.com.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Washington Wine and Spirits To Hold Wine Dinner September 8

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N THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH, WASHINGTON Wine and Spirits will hold its inaugural wine dinner focused on the history of California winemaking presented by Wallace L. McKeel of Purveyor of Fine Wines. The dinner will feature six outstanding wines from historically relevant wineries carefully paired with appetizing cuisine from Doe’s Eat Place. Mrs. McKeel has led a handful of these courses and is very eager to bring this event to Monroe! The story begins with how grapes first arrived to California during the Spanish missions. Many unforeseen events forced them to adapt on multiple occasions. California wine felt the effects of major events such as the Prohibition, the Great Depression, and World War II. Scientific inventions of the 1960s and 1970s as well as pop culture from the 1980s and 1990s were also major influences on the California wine trade. Mrs. McKeel will lead the guests through this engaging and rich story while providing a hands-on experience through the wine and food pairing. The dinner will start with a small introduction and quickly move into the main courses. The featured wines for the event include Heitz 2012 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, Kistler Vineyard 2013 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, Merry Edwards 2014 Russian River Valley Sauvignon Blanc, Paul Hobbs 2012 Ross Station Estate Chardonnay, Seghesio 2011 Home Ranch Zinfandel and Shafer 2013 Napa Valley Merlot. The Heitz Cabernet Sauvignon was fortunate to have an almost perfect growing season and highlights rich and silky tannins. This wine is ready to enjoy now or treasure later. Kistler Vineyard Pinot Noir received a score of 94 points from renowned wine critic Robert Parker and expresses notes of wild berries, ripe plums and subtle earth tones in a medium-bodied and rich style. Merry Edwards Sauvignon Blanc received a rating of 93 points from Wine Spectator and 90 points from Wine Enthusiast. This wine boasts flavors of tropical fruits, lemon, honeysuckle and crisp, fresh acidity.

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Paul Hobbs 2012 Chardonnay, the first vintage of this cuvee, definitely stands out from the crowd with its 96 points rating from Robert Parker. This Chardonnay is full-bodied with a long-lasting finish and has notes of lemon blossom, white peach, and oak hints. Seghesio Zinfandel, awarded 92 points from Wine Enthusiast and 90 points from Robert Parker, is a great example of this varietal by expressing notes of raspberry, cherry, spicy aromas, and noticeable tannins towards the end. Shafer Merlot also received great ratings with 92 points from Vinous. With a small percentage of the blend including Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec, this wine gives you a little extra on the palate. Highlighted flavors include dark berries, vanilla, black currant and smoke with firm, rich tannins to finish. Whether you have a new-found appreciation or a longstanding love for wine, this dinner guarantees a great time for all levels of knowledge and enthusiasm. On behalf of Washington Wine and Spirits, we’d like to welcome you to the newest bottle shop in Monroe. For more information or tickets, feel free to call 318-816-5067 or stop by Washington Plaza, Suite 110. Please note, seating is limited.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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What’s Your Vision of Beauty? Haik Humble Eye Center Wants You to Imagine the Possibilities

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AIK HUMBLE EYE CENTER offers advanced cosmetic and medical aesthetic services to our practice offerings. Our services are provided in a relaxing and comfortable atmosphere utilizing the latest technology and highly qualified professionals to deliver great results. Our goal is to help you achieve healthier and younger-looking skin. We’ve focused our advanced technology on treatments for improving skin’s health and appearance, as well as cosmetic procedures for the eyes and surrounding area. Whatever your vision of beauty, Haik Humble Eye Center makes it remarkably affordable.

ResurFx LASER SKIN RESURFACING The ResurFX laser system by Lumenis is the newest and one of the best available treatments for non-ablative fractional resurfacing of the face, neck, chest and hands. Non-ablative means it does not destroy or ablate the skin cells, while fractional means the laser is delivered to the skin in tiny dots and to only a fraction of the skin. This type of laser cannot cut or produce bleeding. The surface of the skin remains intact and all the laser work is done beneath the surface of the skin. ResurFX resurfaces skin to reveal younger, more refreshed skin, improving the appearance of wrinkles, scars and age spots through a simple procedure with minimal downtime.  The optimum benefits of ResurFX are obtained with several treatments depending on the condition and desired results. WHAT CONDITIONS DOES THE ResurFX TREAT? • Age spots or sun spots • Fine lines and wrinkles 18 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

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Stretch marks or striae Hyperpigmentation or discoloration Uneven skin tone Scars from acne or surgery Lax or loose skin

HOW DOES ResurFX WORK? The advanced ResurFX technology prioritizes patient comfort just as much as effectiveness. It offers deeper dermal laser penetration and vaporizes tiny columns of tissue on the skin’s surface, stimulating the body’s natural skin cell and collagen regenerative responses. As collagen increases, the skin looks tighter, more even, and more youthful. Because of its miniscule size, the laser does not damage surrounding healthy tissue, allowing for rapid healing to only the targeted area. WHAT CAN I EXPECT DURING THE ResurFX PROCEDURE? During a ResurFX laser skin rejuvenation treatment, a topical anesthetic is applied. Due to the non-ablative nature of the laser, most patients find treatments comfortable. Treatments can take 20 minutes or more, depending on the size of the targeted area. ResurFX requires only one pass over the skin to produce effective results, reducing treatment and recovery time. WHAT CAN I EXPECT AFTER THE ResurFX PROCEDURE? After ResurFX, patients generally have recovery time with some redness and swelling after the procedure.  Patients can return to their normal activities the day after the procedure. Recovery time is short and relatively comfortable. Redness, swelling, and minor

irritation (similar to a mild sunburn) may develop, but these effects typically subside in just a few days. Sun exposure before and after treatment should be avoided – a sunscreen with SPF of 30 or higher should be worn daily in the days after the procedure. HOW MANY TREATMENTS ARE NEEDED? ResurFX is completed as a series of treatments.  Because it is a limited downtime procedure, it usually requires multiple treatments for significant and meaningful results.  Typically, at least 3-4 treatments about one month apart are necessary to obtain optimum results, although this varies by the individual and their goal. RESULTS of ResurFX The results of the ResurFX® procedure vary depending on each patient’s individual skin, but most report significant improvement to the overall quality of their skin, including: • Reduced appearance of brown spots • Reduced fine lines and wrinkles • Improved appearance of acne and surgical scars • Improved tone and texture The results of the procedure will continue to improve as side effects subside and best results are seen in 3-6 months. It is important to take certain precautions after treatment to protect the skin and help it heal properly. A sunscreen of at least 30 SPF daily is recommended. ResurFX is a true nonsurgical alternative to more invasive surgical and resurfacing procedures, as it significantly reduces the risks and recovery time associated with facelifts and other resurfacing procedures.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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The Sounds of Summer Let Audibel the Hearing Center Accomodate Your Lifestyle Needs

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VER THE PAST FEW MONTHS, we have walked you through what a hearing consultation entails, the steps of the hearing evaluation and what you can expect when you decide to purchase hearing aids. This month, we will wrap up our look at the steps of the hearing consultation by looking at what you can expect from your hearing aids. Most people don’t know what to expect from hearing aids. Misperceptions and second-hand experience with bulky, whistling, old-fashioned analog devices continue to influence the way people think about hearing aids. Hearing aids have changed dramatically from a generation ago – from outward appearance to internal technology – making them vastly more appealing and effective. At Audibel, we can help you set expectations for the performance of your new hearing aids – how they sound, feel and work. We have identified some smart steps for first time hearing aid wearers. It takes practice, and a little bit of patience, to get comfortable with hearing aids but these tips should help you speed up the process: • Wear them at home in a quiet environment for the first few days • Practice having a conversation with your spouse or a loved one • Read out loud for 10 – 15 minutes a day • Wear them only a few hours each day for the first two weeks • Take breaks when you feel tired • Do online hearing skills training exercises 20 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

Set realistic expectations. Hearing aids won’t restore your hearing to normal, but they will make listening easier and much more enjoyable again. Getting acclimated to wearing your new hearing aids is different for each person, and can sometimes take up to two to three months. But once you are acclimated, you should notice a big difference in how the world sounds. First and foremost, your ability to hear and understand others should be improved and people’s voices shouldn’t sound distorted, harsh, tinny, sharp, booming or muffled. In addition, the sound of your own voice should be “normal,” not sound like you are in a barrel. The sounds around you will resonate differently. The intensity and quality of familiar sounds should be sharp, bright and clear – not dull or irritating. In a crowded room with many people talking at once, sound should be loud but not deafening. Prior to hearing aids, you may have been talking louder than necessary and now, your hearing and communicating in quiet environments, such as home, work and the doctor’s office should be improved. You will notice a difference in social settings such as restaurants and dinner parties, as your ability to hear and understand speech will improve in these environments with background noise. Additionally, your hearing aids should help you understand speech in larger environments where there is reverberation such as lecture halls, and church and movie theaters. Lastly, loud sounds such as sirens, construction noises,

etc., should not be uncomfortable but you should hear them clearly. Once you get adjusted to your hearing aids, there are some things you can do to get even more out of them. • If you wear directional hearing aids, sit facing the wall with the restaurant noise behind you • Bring your hearing aids into Audibel for regular cleaning and maintenance • Make sure to keep fresh batteries on hand • Turn off your hearing aids or remove battery when not in use • In public places with acoustic challenges, it is best to sit in the front and center of the room, where it offers the best acoustics. We know that you will be happy and see a difference in your daily life with hearing aids from Audibel. We invite you to call today to set up an appointment for your free hearing consultation so you can see … and hear … the results for yourself! ABOUT US Audibel The Hearing Center is Northeast Louisiana’s Audibel dispenser. Cherry Phillips, “The Hearing Lady,” has been serving this area for over 27 years. We offer free hearing screenings, free second opinions, extended warranties and repairs on all makes and brands of hearing aids. You can find out more by visiting our website www.AudibelMonroe.com and you can see more and like us on Facebook.com/ AudibelMonroe.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Fishing with Kenny Where Old School and New School Meet

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am considered an “old school” fisherman. By the term “old school” I mean I don’t like modern technology. I am reluctant to try new techniques. I am leery of the modern advances to new tackle. I keep things as simple as possible, do what I do well within my comfort zone while I am on the water. Now, that being said, I will contradict myself. I have learned that not all new fishing related technology is bad. Many of today’s newer techniques are simply tweaks on things we have done for years. I believe the modern advances in fishing tackle has made the sport better and more enjoyable. By now you may be wondering “What does he mean by old school/new school?” I am going to try and give you some examples that will help you understand this a little bit better. I remember when a Lew’s Speed Stick, when paired with an Ambassadeur 5000 reel, was considered top of the line when it came to bass fishing enthusiasts. The one rod/reel setup that does it all. You could hardly tear up either of them. Recently I found just such a combo and once I picked it up, I couldn’t believe how heavy it was and realized the discomfort that would come from throwing it all day. How things have changed. Today’s rods and reels are lighter, more user friendly and even the less expensive ones are of decent quality. I am not saying they are better, but the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages. Comfort, technique-specific, sensitivity and even eye appeal are part of the rod and reel buyer’s guide. However, the mass production process tends to make things less

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article by Kenny Covington

durable leading to buyer frustration which creates battle lines over brand loyalty. The first real change, technique-wise, in bass fishing to come along was “flipping.” Angler’s had been casting for years and someone figured a way to place a lure in specific areas where basic casting wouldn’t work. It’s the same original idea, just a different tweak on the presentation no matter what modern lure you use. Once a buzzbait was introduced around the same time, it was under consideration to be banned from tournaments because it caught too many fish. Looking very much like a spinnerbait, the buzzer gave horizontal presentations a new identity. And a new way to catch giant bass. Now it seems the Whopper Plopper is the rage; I wonder where that idea came from. The Carolina rig took the fishing world by storm when the Bass Master’s Classic was won in the early 80’s with it. Called a “do nothing” technique at the time, the Carolina rig had been around for decades but was used mostly for catfishing, with the hook being placed above the sinker. Same technique, just a basic tweak. Not surprising is the younger anglers prefer using a drop shot. See what I mean by “Old school vs. new school?” I can go on and on. Nothing is really new. A shakey head was once called a jig head worm. A Yellow Magic is another version of a Pop R. All creature baits are an offspring of the first creature bait called a Lizard. A craw worm is a craw worm is a craw worm. Nothing is new. It’s just taking something old and making it new to someone else.

When it comes to fishing technology such as depthfinders, trolling motors and other accessories, there is no limit to how far these advances will go. Fishing in deep water is quickly becoming more video game-like than actual fishing. Anglers can see the fish they are trying to catch, watch the fish move and feel the actual strike the moment they see the contact on the screen. It’s amazing. The younger anglers, being more open minded to change, have adapted very quickly because of the information that is available to them. Technology has made them better anglers much quicker. Because of the accessibility of the information, what took years to learn, they can do in a matter of days or weeks or even a few hours. OLD SCHOOL LOGIC VS. NEW SCHOOL MENTALITY. At a tournament recently, as I sat and watched the weigh-in, I caught myself looking at all the people standing around and I only recognized a handful of the participants. A young man walked up to me and said, “Mr. Kenny, how did you do today?” After I responded with my answer I politely asked, “May I ask you your name because I don’t recall meeting you before.” After he told me his name he followed with, “...years ago you used to fish against my father.” As I watched this young man walk away and drive off in a modern day spaceship called today’s bass boat, it occurred to me that old school and new school had once again crossed paths. Be careful on the water, catch one for me, and I will see you next month


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Jesus the Good Shepherd Catholic School Preparing for the Year Ahead

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S THE SUMMER BEGINS TO WIND DOWN, WE ARE preparing to begin a new school year at Jesus the Good Shepherd Catholic School. Our focus as we prepare for the upcoming school year is to provide a safe, loving environment where your children can grow in Christ while obtaining an exceptional academic education. We place great emphasis on prayer, safety, self-discipline, service to others and high academic standards. Our certified and highly dedicated teachers and aides do their very best to provide each and every child with the necessary instruction to excel spiritually, intellectually and socially. In preparation for the upcoming school year we are again adding additional security features to our school to provide the very best protection for our students. In addition to a complete 33-camera interior and exterior security system outfitted with panic alert buttons throughout the school and bullet resistant glass encasing the main entryway and school office, we are currently installing security blinds and adding additional security fencing to the main school building to further protect the exterior facing classrooms. Our hope is that we will never need these additional security features, but our aim is to be prepared. We are also beginning preparation for our S.A.C.S (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools) reaccreditation process. S.A.C.S. is one of only six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. We are proud to be one of the few schools in our area to earn the accreditation of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (S.A.C.S.), which is based on five stringent categories and deliberated by a group of educational leaders and S.A.C.S officials. Another wonderful event that we will soon begin to prepare for is our annual giving program referred to as the JGS Annual Fund. Last year was the first time in 10 years that JGS initiated an annual giving fund, and it was a tremendous success raising much needed funding for our growing school. Our Iron Chef competitors last school year were such a huge part of the success of our annual fund as well as all of our JGS parents, grandparents, parishioners and friends. We are looking forward to this year’s JGS Annual 24 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

Fund drive, which will kick off in August. We humbly ask for your support and participation in our JGS Annual Fund which benefits the operation of our school greatly. JGS has many outstanding attributes to offer our parents and students including our wonderful Pre-K 3 (three or five day option) and Pre-K 4 program, 18:1 student/teacher ratio in addition to full-time aides in the classroom, certified teachers in all homerooms with 50% of teachers holding a Master’s Degree, enhancement classes including art, music, library, computer and P.E., Accelerated Reader program, religion program, daily prayer, extended day program with available after-school activities, extracurricular activities including football, cheerleading, baseball, basketball and tennis, organic gardening, as well as weekly Mass. We will also continue our Mighty Milers Program, sponsored by the New York Road Runners association, again this year. It was a huge hit last year with tremendous participation by the majority of our JGS students. The program encourages students to get out and run/walk to improve overall health and classroom performance. It also helps the students learn to set and maintain goals. When a student reaches certain milestones in the program they are rewarded with different prizes and are also recognized at the awards assemblies for their progress. As you can see we have many exciting things to offer and to look forward to at JGS in the upcoming school year. If you are interested in finding out more about our JGS family, please call the school office at (318) 325-8569 to schedule your school tour with our principal, Mrs. Lisa Patrick, or visit our website at www. jesusgoodshepherd.org. Enjoy these last few days of summer break, and we look forward to seeing you at the first day of school, Friday, August 12th.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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A. ALDEN’S MEMO

back to basics:

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MAKE-UP 101

Atlanta and Dallas based fashion sales representative for Reeves & Company, Analeise Thomas, gives us a detailed back-to-school list for updating our makeup drawers.

s summer comes to a close and school bells begin to ring, some of you will be heading to your favorite office supply outlet for your children’s much needed school supplies. You’ll buy paper, pencils, folders, glue sticks and other necessary items to help better equip your child for undeniable success in the coming year. But what about you? What do you need to better equip yourself for the coming year? I say, a makeup drawer revamp is in order. Starting the new school year off right with an updated makeup routine will help make you feel revived, fresh, confident and beautiful!

CHECKLIST Whether you prefer a subtle makeup look or a dramatic look, there are certain products that we all should have in our makeup arsenal. My mom and I recently did a makeup overhaul with Charlotte Tilbury and are LOVING her products (I’ve highlighted some of them below). Here are the key items every woman needs in her vanity: • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

PRIMER FOUNDATION EYE-SHADOW PALET TE E YELINER MASCARA BROW PENCIL CONCEALER CREAM OR POWDER BLUSH

EYE SHADOW

LUXURY PALETTE COLOR-CODED EYESHADOW PALETTE IN “UPTOWN GIRL” ($52)

BRONZER HIGHLIGHTER LIP LINER LIP STICK BE AUT Y BLENDER E YE-SHADOW BRUSH BLUSH BRUSH

HIGHLIGHT & CONTOUR

FILMSTAR BRONZE & GLOW FACE SCULPT & HIGHLIGHT ($68)

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LIPSTICK

HOT LIPS LIPSTICK IN “KIM K.W.” (NAMED AFTER KIM KARDASHIAN WEST, OF COURSE) ($32)

Every makeup product we own has a shelf life- some longer than others. It’s important to let go of the products you’ve had for an extended period of time, especially those that aren’t being used on a regular basis. This chart is a great guide that shows how long you should be keeping your makeup products.


St. Francis Medical Group Many Healthcare Needs ... One Medical Group.

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N NORTHEAST LOUISIANA, ACCESS to primary care, coordination with physicians in rural areas and focused prevention of our biggest health risks are three of our community’s greatest challenges. The St. Francis Medical Group (SFMG), which includes both primary and specialty care physicians, has allowed St. Francis Medical Center to extend care into the communities to help address these challenges. SFMG is a multi-specialty group of physicians and mid-level providers. Developed in 2003 and incorporated as an LLC in 2011, the group serves both hospitalized patients and those seeking a clinic setting. The Medical Group has grown to include 66 providers in 19 clinic locations throughout Monroe, West Monroe, Calhoun, Ruston and Sterlington. Specialties include cardiology, cardiovascular surgery, family practice, general surgery, infectious diseases, internal medicine, neurology, ophthalmology, pediatric neurology, pediatric neurosurgery, pulmonology, urology and vascular surgery. Providers focus on treating patients at the first sign of trouble, before conditions worsen and cause painful and costly complications. Assisting patients with managing chronic illnesses and preventive medicine is key to keeping people healthy long term. Providing care when it’s convenient for patients is important. Primary care clinics in Sterlington and West Monroe are now offering Saturday hours. Likewise, three primary care providers are now accepting on-line appointments: Dr. James Wootton in Monroe, Dr. Kenneth Metoyer in Calhoun, and Nurse Practitioner Teresa Wood in Sterlington.

St. Francis Cardiology Clinic David Homan, MD Michael Langiulli, MD Krista Jones, APRN, FNP-BC Lyndsay Mixon, ACNP-BC 312 Grammont St, STE 303 • Monroe 966-8850 Satellite Location: 330 E. Vaughn Ave • Ruston St. Francis Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic Mark McCoy, MD R. Keith White, MD Phillip Miller, APRN, ACNP 312 Grammont St, STE 410 • Monroe 966-6300   St. Francis General Surgery Clinic Stephenie Long, MD Kathy Smith, APRN 312 Grammont St, STE 411 • Monroe 966-6622   St. Francis General Surgery Clinic Kevin Meyer, MD Blake Bamburg, PA-C 517 Catalpa St • Monroe • 966-8343   St. Francis General Surgery and Vascular Clinic Frank Sartor, MD Trent Bratton, MSN, FNP-CC 500 Hart St • Monroe • 966-8300   St. Francis Infectious Diseases Clinic Khawar Khurshid, MD 312 Grammont St, STE 411 • Monroe 966-6670  

St. Francis Neurology Clinic Tom Gulick, MD 309 Jackson St, STE 320 • Monroe • 966-6550 St. Francis Neurology Clinic Lowery Thompson, MD Alice Fautheree, APRN, FNP-BC 414 Wood St • Monroe • 966-8880 St. Francis Ophthalmology Clinic Jo Ann Meyer, MD 517 Catalpa St • Monroe • 966-8344 St. Francis Pediatric Neurology Clinic Aristoteles Pena-Miches, MD Marcia Parker, MSN, APRN, CPNP, PMHS 500 Hall St • Monroe • 966-7337 St. Francis Pediatric Neurosurgery Clinic J. A. Bermudez, MD 301 Hall St • Monroe • 966-6565   St. Francis Primary Care Clinic Ronald C. Hubbard, MD Darshan Patel, MD James Wootton, MD Jo Lynn O’Quain, ACNPC-AG Tanasha Porter Varino, APRN, FNP-C 2600 Tower Dr, STE 309 • Monroe • 966-6575 St. Francis Primary Care Clinic—Calhoun Kenneth Metoyer, MD Dayanny Langiulli, DO 202 Hwy 80 • Calhoun • 966-8390   St. Francis Primary Care Clinic—Ruston Bobby Ensminger, MD 330 East Vaughn Ave • Ruston • 255-8271 (Continued on page 138)

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WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Life With BEES:

TRI B. HAVEN HONEY

Article By Meredith McKinnie Photos by Martin G Meyers

You can purchase Tri B. Haven honey in Monroe at Vieux Carre Market or contact Jada directly.

Tri B. Haven | 318-477-0337 tribhaven@gmail.com 30 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

Queen Bee Jada Banks harvests honey for locally-owned company, Tri B. Haven.

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ri B. Haven honey is a product created out of respect for the land, an appreciation of the bee community, and a love of local fare. Jada Banks’ fascination with bees began as a child. Her dad, Joe Banks, instilled in her a love of travel and a taste for honey. Some time in Germany in her early 20s truly broadened her scope. The fresh markets boasted local cheeses, meats, wines, flowers, and yes, honey. She fell in love with the unique flavors: lavender, rosemary, sage and even seasonal tastes. After learning more about the horrific bee conditions and declining population so essential to our environment, she wanted to help in some way. Three years ago, with the help of local beekeepers, Jada set up three hives in her backyard. Upon close inspection, she became even more fascinated with the peaceful, loving creatures, their defined structure and incessant work ethic. Noting “no comparison to God’s design,” the bees formed perfect hexagons, like little mathematicians, a “perfect demonstration of one of God’s miracles.” Their communication is incredible inside the hive. With no light, the bees dance, flapping their wings to lead other bees to the best pollen and nectar. Females reign supreme in the bee community. We’ve all heard of the Queen Bee, but the entire hive consists primarily of females, the males only serving as a means of reproduction. Alongside the Queen, nurse bees, worker bees, and stand guard bees are all female. The males serve as drones and rank low in importance inside the hive. All bees have a short lifespan and are nonstop workers. One bee will only produce 1/12 of a teaspoon of honey in its short lifetime, but as a whole, the hive will thrive. These feminist insects practice a perfect system

of symmetry and are essential to humanity. While some beekeepers spray their hives with medications, neither Jada nor the local beekeepers force the bees to do huge commercial production. They allow the bees to fend for themselves, and one can taste the difference in the honey. The bees aren’t fed sugar water, instead eating their own honey, completely natural. Tri B. Haven names its honey based on season and location of the hive. The spring honey is a blond color, lightest in flavor, texture and color with a honeysuckle taste. The summer honey is caramel-colored, a more concentrated flavor like a “warm, sunny day.” The fall honey is dark amber accompanied by a robust, richer flavor. The flowers, shrubs, trees, etc., of the different seasons make for the various colors and tastes of the honey. The all-natural treatment and respect for the bees as producers is evident. Now with 13 hives, Jada, along with her mother, Sandra Banks, and her sister-in-law, Lawanda Banks, make up the “tri” in Tri B. Haven, “no boys in the aviary,” just like the bees they so admire. The family operation extends to Jada’s two girls, Kaia and Zoe. The girls get a spoonful of honey every day as it helps with their allergies. Honey also aids in digestion and metabolism. It can be used as a sugar substitute, and the body digests honey slower so the blood glucose does not rise as quickly. Jada frequently makes protein gummies for her family, honey marshmallows, and a favorite, honey hot fudge. The family operation has come full circle. What began as time with her dad has evolved to an appreciation for the family atmosphere the bees create in the hive. Jada’s mimicked their methods in her personal life with her family indulging a common passion while doing their part to help the bee population and the environment as a whole.


WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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A Near Century of Syrup:

NORRIS SYRUP CO. Article By Meredith McKinnie Photos by Martin G Meyers

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estled in West Monroe, Steve Norris is carrying on his family’s business centered on syrup. Norris Syrup is “high quality, and no cut corners with the exception of automation.” The mill produces an “old-fashioned, thick product, the kind of stuff your grandparents would put on their table.” Primarily a manufacturer who sells to distributors and wholesalers, Norris Syrup uses mostly raw Louisiana products. But most interesting is the company’s longstanding presence in this area, one of the oldest businesses in Ouachita Parish. Steve Norris’ grandfather, Hobson Norris, opened the first Norris syrup mill in 1924 on none other than Norris Lane in West Monroe. Back in those days, the mill used wood to fire the cookers, and as a result, the mill burned in

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1929. After the second mill burned in 1939, and the third mill was split among family during the war, Hobson built the final location in 1945 on Laird Street in West Monroe, and Steve Norris still operates there today. Now using steam as opposed to wood, the mill continues to stand and serve syrup purists. Having been born into the syrup business, Steve hopes his two boys will one day take over the operation and continue the family tradition. Norris Syrup offers several varieties of flavors and even private label syrups. Norris’ Louisiana Cane Syrup derives from Louisiana sugarcane with a distinct flavor served best on biscuits, pancakes, waffles, sausage, as well. The cane syrup can and should be substituted for molasses in any recipe. Norris’ Best Louisiana Syrup is a blend of Louisiana Sugarcane Syrup and corn syrup for a milder, less-concentrated flavor than pure cane syrup. Thick and rich, the balanced flavor makes it the perfect addition to cornbread, biscuits, pancakes, and sausage as well. Substitute Norris’ Best Louisiana Syrup in place of corn syrup to enhance any pecan pie recipe. Some other selections include a pecan flavored syrup, a maple flavored waffle syrup, a sorghum flavored syrup and

moonshine syrup, which is a light colored sweet sugar syrup. The moonshine syrup got its name decades ago shortly after the last mill was built in 1945. It being wartime, products were rationed, and the family couldn’t sell sugar. Instead, they cooked the sugar into syrup, and people bought that as sweetener. They called it moonshine syrup because it was essentially bootlegged sugar. Norris Syrup is primarily distributed in the South, most popular in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Mississippi. It can also be found across the country on grocery shelves and tables in California, Florida, West Virginia, and even as far as Alaska, among others. The syrup can be bought locally at Mac’s, Brookshire’s, and Super 1 Foods. Though Steve is primarily a distributor, he promises to serve anyone who comes by the mill on Laird Street. The syrup has also graced the tables of Cotton in downtown Monroe, and the formerly beloved and also once longstanding Cascio’s on Louisville Avenue. For the craft beer enthusiasts, Norris Syrup collaborated with Great Raft Brewery in 2015 for their Provisions and Traditions beer, a classic Oktoberfest with Norris’ Louisiana Cane syrup aged on American oak. Continuing to evolve and adapt to consumer tastes has kept the Norris brand as North Louisiana’s premier syrup. With traditional, down-home tastes that syrup lovers have come to know and love, Norris continues to excel and evolve to broaden its reach beyond the South. “Shop local” is a tag we’ve all heard, and for syrup, we can’t get more local than Norris’ Syrup Company established almost a century ago right here in West Monroe.

Norris Syrup Company 227 Laird Street | West Monroe, Louisiana 71291 318-396-8355


The Pursuit

Embracing the Future at the University of Louisiana Monroe

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T HAS BEEN SAID THAT THOSE WHO neglect their past have no future. Our past proudly represents us, and the future is ours to create. With this in mind, the University of Louisiana Monroe has planned a kickoff event for the upcoming academic year with a brand new feel. The event will for the first time in its history be organized under a new name – “The Pursuit.” ‘P’ IS FOR PURSUIT The Pursuit takes its name from the “P” in the Curtiss P(ursuit)-40 Warhawk fighter plane, best remembered as the aircraft flown by the “Flying Tigers,” or American Volunteer Group (AVG), led by General Claire Lee Chennault. The P-40 Warhawk, identified by its shark teeth nose art, was no match for enemy aircraft. But Chennault trained his pilots with innovative air combat tactics. As a result of Chennault’s determination and aviation expertise, the P-40 Warhawks’ victories in the sky were many. In fact, the volunteer pilots never lost a single battle. The legend of the Flying Tigers was born, and General Chennault became a hero in China and around the world. It was the P-40 Warhawk and the heroism of General Chennault that served as the inspiration behind the selection of the Warhawk mascot 10 years ago. The Warhawk is more than a name, however. It is a symbol of ULM’s overall vision and mission. Through its name, The Pursuit is meant to reflect ULM’s tradition and commitment to pursue excellence. In the words of General Chennault himself, “When an old, well-

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known road is blocked, a new path must be opened.” As a new event that brings us together, The Pursuit symbolizes a new path the institution has adopted, a path that marks the beginning of an academic and athletic year, a path that guides us through the year and prepares us for what’s coming, a path that orients us toward a successful and sustainable future. There is power in individuals, but the power is even greater in individuals coming together as one. The P-40 Warhawk might not have been the best aircraft of its era, but the pilots who flew them understood the necessity of coming together for their mission. United, these fighters were unbeatable. When struck by natural disasters in recent past, our community became united. We showed our true strength, potential and capabilities. We showed solidarity with our comrades. We moved fast, and we moved forward in the pursuit of our moral obligations. Now, it’s time to stand together once again and celebrate the excellence through our own mission and vision. THE PURSUIT – AUGUST 25 The Pursuit event will take place on Thursday, August 25th, at Fant-Ewing Coliseum (4099 Northeast Drive) starting at 5:30 p.m. Cocktails and dinner will be provided by Waterfront Grill, Fieldhouse, Catfish Cabin, Marsala Beverage and Southern Glazer’s Distribution. ULM is thankful for the support of the Ouachita Independent Bank, the official title sponsor for the event.

The community is cordially invited to celebrate with us as we continue to pursue excellence in the classroom, rigor on the field, and an exciting future for ULM and its supporters. Coach Matt Viator will share his plans for the 2016 football season, and Coach Keith Richard will give an update on the highly anticipated basketball season. President Nick J. Bruno will share his vision for the upcoming year, exciting changes happening around campus and some of our many accomplishments. In keeping with the P-40 Warhawk theme, the event will also include a highlight of 40 outstanding Warhawks. This list consists of top student-athletes, alumni, faculty and staff. ULM’s Sound of Today and Spirit Groups will also be in attendance. Season tickets for all sports will be sold at the event. Tickets for The Pursuit cost $50 per person, or $650 for a reserved table of eight. The proceeds from the ticket sales will go toward the athletic foundation. Seating is limited, so please buy your tickets today. This will be one of ULM’s premiere events, and you will not want to miss out! Tickets may be purchased onsite in the ULM Athletics office at 308 Warhawk Way or at https://ulmthepursuit.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact the Athletics office at 318-342-5360.


Preserve the

Harvest article by P. Allen Smith

photography by Karen E. Segrave

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s the summer winds down and we look forward to the cooler temperatures of fall, the thought of hanging up our garden tools may be enticing. But before you curl up into hibernation, there’s still a lot of work to be done! The late summer is a fruitful time in the garden. My garden is always bursting at the seams with ripe tomatoes, herbs, berries and vegetables. If you are picking them faster than you can eat them, then it’s time to look at ways to preserve your summer harvest. There are great ways to extend the life of your garden by canning, pickling, freezing and drying the fruits of your labor.

Canning

You probably remember watching your grandmother pull a can of delicious home-canned green beans out of her cupboards. The process is easy, and once you get the hang of it you’ll be canning anything you can get your hands on! There are two ways to can — either by using a pressure canner or the boiling water method. These methods produce a tight vacuum in the jars to remove oxygen, keep air out, destroy enzymes and prevent the growth of bacteria, yeasts and mold. Canning can seem like a daunting task when you are just getting started. You will need to buy some supplies (and find room in your pantry) for this project, but the benefits are an extended shelf life for your goods and a big savings at the grocery in the coming months. To get started, you’ll need Mason jars with threaded, self-sealing lids — which are available in ½ pint, pint, 1½ pint, quart and ½ gallon sizes — I prefer the wide mouth jars. Jar lifters are helpful to handle the hot jars. You’ll also need a pot that is large and deep enough to hold the jars you are using and leave room for water. Or, if you are planning to do a lot of canning, you may want to invest in a pressure canner. Low-acid foods, like vegetables should be preserved using a pressure canner. Highly-acidic foods with a pH of 4.6 or higher— including all fruits, pickled or fermented vegetables, and jams and jellies—can be prepared with either a pressure canner or the hot water method. Safety is so important when canning—one careless move can end up making people sick—so if you are new to canning only use pretested recipes, and be sure to read all of the directions in your starter kit (if you choose to buy one) before you get started. Canning is a great option for lots of fruits and vegetables. Some of my favorite things to can are tomato sauce, green beans, pickles and jams. You’ll want to choose only the best, freshest and blemish-free produce from your garden. 36 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

Here are the basic steps: 1. Clean the jars and lids with hot water and soap, rinse well. 2. Sterilize the jars and lids by submerging them for 10 minutes in boiling water. 3. Keep jars hot until you are ready to fill. You can put them in a pot of simmering water. 4. Fill jars with hot food, leaving headspace as recommended in your recipe. Headspace allows the food to expand during processing and helps create a vacuum seal. 5. Wipe down the rim of jar to clean and ensure a good seal. 6. Place the lid on and tighten the screw bands just enough to secure. Don’t over tighten. 7. Process in either a pressure cooker or hot water bath depending on your recipe. 8. Carefully remove jars from canner and cool. Listen for the lids to pop, indicating a good seal. 9. You can remove the screw bands once the jars are cool. The lids should be secure on the top of the jar. 10. Store jars in a dark pantry that stays between 50 and 70 degrees F.


Freezing

Pickling

Pickling is one of the oldest methods of preserving food. Traditional pickling happens when a fruit or vegetable is fermented and cured for about 3 weeks. There’s also a faster method known as quick pickling where pickles are not fermented, but brined several hours or overnight with vinegar and seasonings. There are tons of vegetables that are delicious pickled like cauliflower, cabbage, beans, peppers, onions and beets.

Probably the easiest way to extend the life of your summer garden is through freezing. Fruits and vegetables can last months if frozen properly. There are a few simple steps to extend their freezer life. Choose plastic freezer bags for dry foods and freezer-proof glass containers for liquids. Regular glass jars are likely to break in the freezer so look for a container that is built to withstand low temperatures. Berries can be washed and dried and dropped into a freezer bag. Most small berries, like blueberries, raspberries and blackberries, can be frozen whole. Larger fruits like strawberries and peaches should be sliced and sprinkled with a little sugar. Let the sugar stand 30 minutes to create a protective glaze, then pack the slices into freezer bags. Vegetables need to be blanched before freezing. Blanching is a simple process of dipping the veggies in hot water then soaking the in ice water to preserve the color, flavor and texture. After you’ve blanched your veggies, lay them out on a flat sheet to freeze individually first, and bag it all together afterward.

Drying

Harvest your herbs now to have a fresh-from-the-garden taste in your meals throughout the year. For sage, tarragon, thyme, bay, oregano and rosemary, bundle a small clump of herbs together with a rubber band and hang them in a dark, dry and warm room. When you notice the leaves are dry to the touch, gently remove the stems and put the leaves into labeled jars and store away from sunlight.

Here’s a delicious, basic recipe for quick-pickling: Ingredients 6 cups of vegetables harvested from the garden 3 cups apple cider vinegar 3 cups water 1/4 cup kosher or sea salt 2 tablespoons coriander seeds 2 teaspoons whole Allspice 2 teaspoons mustard seeds 2 teaspoons whole peppercorns 10 garlic cloves, peeled and thickly sliced 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Wash and slice your harvested vegetables if necessary. Leave foods like green beans and okra whole. In a large pot, bring the water, vinegar and salt to a boil. Divide the garlic and spices into 2 quart-size Mason jars. Add the veggies on top of the spices leaving about an inch at the top of the jar. Carefully pour the hot vinegar mixture into the jars, submerging the vegetables entirely, but leaving at least a half-inch of room between the liquid and lid. Cover the jars with the lids and let them cool. After an hour or two, move them to the fridge and let them sit for at least 6 hours or so. Keeps up to two weeks. WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Fitzco Marine Group Serving the Waterfront of the U.S. Since 1979

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IKE FITZPATRICK, OWNER/FOUNDER OF FITZCO, has spent all his life on and around the water. He started in business in 1979 at age 19. Having been instilled with values and principles from the beginning, he truly operates his business by the Golden Rule. Fitzpatrick has a passion for educating folks on marine construction, to help them get the best “bang for their buck.” Fitzco has recently partnered with Joe Terracina of River Marine Works on the Ouachita and Red Rivers, as well as local lakes, in Northern Louisiana to provide a level of quality unlike any other in the area. They offer unsurpassed customer service and quality for your marine construction needs. Mike’s message is that floating docks shouldn’t be unkempt looking structures with vegetation growing out of the “exposed foam” flotation. They shouldn’t have poorly painted steel framework and columns. The problem is with the original design of the docks, most of which are not repairable, as the concrete decking has been poured on top of the foam flotation with a steel frame around it. “At Fitzco, we do many things differently… for a reason,” says Fitzpatrick. “We believe that your dock should secure your boat, not the other way around. Over the years, we have developed equipment and processes specific to improving our finished product while increasing efficiency. This has led to unmatched ability and quality in the maritime construction industry in the areas of pile driving (we can even drill and install piles in bed rock), bulk heading, floating and fixed structures and underwater recovery of sunken vessels.” “With us, it’s about designing it and building it correctly… once,” says Mike. “If it’s already been built and is not performing, we will redesign it and rebuild it correctly… once. If you choose us for your next project on the water, whether it’s replacing pilings,

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installing a bulk head, building a new floating or fixed pier or an elaborate custom boat house, prepare to be impressed.” Their system features: • Encapsulated float modules that are replaceable should one become compromised (which will not allow vegetation to exist). • Galvanized steel frames with the floats attached so as to prevent any direct exposure of steel to the water. • Precast, steel reinforced concrete deck panels which can be removed to access utilities or to replace in the event one becomes compromised. • All galvanized steel components, alleviating the need to paint anything resulting in a truly “maintenance free” design. “ I’ve been designing and building floating dock structures, from small private docks to massive commercial marinas, as well as consulting for other marine contractors, for over 30 years,” states Fitzpatrick. “It’s simple,” he says, “Fitzco and River Marine Works want you to enjoy more time on the water! Contact Fitzco Marine today by calling Mike Fitzpatrick (318584-7003) or Joe Terracina (318-665-0190 or 318-614-2406). 323 Moon Lake Road, Monroe, LA 71203 P.O. Box 466, Shell Knob, MO 65747 • 417-858-BOAT (2628) 212 Flat River Road, Bossier City, LA 71112 • 318-584-7003 Fitzco Marine Construction • AirHoist Boatlift Systems Century Maritime • MariTow U.S. “Serving the waterfront of the U.S. since 1979”


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Glenwood Medical Group Quality Medical Providers You Expect. Compassionate Care You Deserve. CARDIOLOGY P.Thomas Causey, Jr., MD, FACC Dr. Causey, a fellow of the American Board of Cardiology and board certified in cardiovascular disease, specializes in clinical consultative cardiology, echocardiography, nuclear cardiology and preventive cardiology. He also serves as medical director of Glenwood’s Cardiac-Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center. PH: 318-338-3525 CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY Harry Donias, MD Dr. Donias’ services include mitral valve, tricuspid valve and aortic valve repair or replacement, on and off pump coronary artery bypass, proximal aortic and arch pathology, surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation, lung and esophageal cancer, aneurysms, peripheral revascularization and carotid stenosis, as well as minimally invasive and endovascular techniques. PH: 318-329-3475 EAR, NOSE AND THROAT Brent Metts, MD, PhD Dr. Metts, one of the few surgeons in the nation who is fellowship trained in minimally invasive and endoscopic assisted thyroid and parathyroid surgeries, provides treatment for sinus disease, thyroid disease, hearing loss, throat and voice problems, sleep apnea, tonsillitis and ear infections. He also performs minimally invasive balloon sinuplasty. PH: 318-329-8458 FAMILY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE Roland Ponarski, MD Dr. Ponarski specializes in diabetes, 40 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

hypertension and high cholesterol. In addition, he offers routine physical exams and CDL license exams. PH: 318-329-8485 FOOT AND ANKLE David Gardner, DPM Dr. Gardner specializes in bunions, hammertoes, flat foot, Achilles tendonitis, toenail fungus, ingrown toenails, heel pain, neuromas, corns, calluses, warts, deformities, geriatric conditions, diabetic foot conditions and sports injuries of the lower legs and feet. PH: 318-322-5506 GENERAL SURGERY AND WOUND CARE Russell T. Lolley, MD Dr. Lolley is the Medical Director of Glenwood’s Hyperbaric and Wound Care Center. He performs transcutaneous oxygen monitoring, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, wound debridement, specialty wound dressing and skin grafts, compression therapies, diabetic foot care as well as general surgeries. PH: 318-329-8445 INTERNAL MEDICINE Alyce Adams, MD Dr. Adams is a certified Diabetes Educator who specializes in diabetes, hypertension and preventive cardiology. She also offers EKGs, stress tests and echocardiograms. PH: 318-322-0458 NEUROLOGY Cresha Davis, MD Dr. Davis specializes in sleep, neurologic and movement disorders, epilepsy, migraines and chronic headache disorders, stroke,

dementia and neuromuscular diseases. PH: 318-807-4611 Jenny Guerre, MD Dr. Guerre is board certified in neurology and specializes in Myasthenia gravis, muscle disorders, spasticity, neuropathy, neurologic disorders, epilepsy, movement disorders, migraines and chronic headache disorders, stroke and dementia. PH: 318-807-4611 PSYCHIATRY Michael B. Wright, MD Dr. Wright specializes in psychiatric evaluation, diagnosis and treatment for adolescents and adults. His services include psychopharmacology and medication management, outpatient consultations, crisis management, acute psychiatric emergency management and referral, and consultations for psychiatric problems related to medical illness. PH: 318-329-4419 PULMONARY MEDICINE Ronald Hammett, MD Dr. Hammett specializes in critical care medicine, internal medicine and pulmonology. His services include treatment of disease and infection of the respiratory tract including cystic fibrosis, pneumonia, asthma, tuberculosis, emphysema and chest infections. PH: 318-329-8479 UROLOGY Edward Rutland, M.D. Dr. Edward Rutland is a board certified urology specialist and is one of the only CONTINUED ON PAGE 147


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BayouTrends

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Whether you are packing up for the dorm or headed to kindergarten, this month’s BayouTrends has you covered for back-toschool. Find these and more great items for the new school year at our area retailers.

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19 18 1. THE MOTHER HEN 2. IF THE CROWN FITS BOUTIQUE 3. K-SERA BOUTIQUE 4. FREE BIRDS BOUTIQUE 5. KEY MILLWORK & SUPPLY 6. PAUL MICHAEL COMPANY 7. BEEHIVE 8. CARA’S BOUTIQUE 9. HERRINGSTONE’S BOUTIQUE 10. BETTER LIVING MARKET 11. LINCOLN OUTDOOR LIVING 12. HOPKINS DERMATOLOGY 13. THE STORK’S NEST 14. K&K’S GIVING TREE 15. FABULOUS FABRIC 16. HAIK HUMBLE 17. SUE PAPERIE 18. ROUX 19. THE FASHION OF RUSTON 20. ABSOLUTELY ABIGAILS 42 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM


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FLOWERS

Probably one of the most private things in the world is an egg before it is broken. ~M.F.K. Fisher

A circa 1975 Venini Italian Murano glass “Egg” vase in grey and white takes this arrangement straight into the future. Gregory placed three fringe-y Gerbera daisies in the season’s hottest hue of blush pink with slightly darker centers as if they have exuberantly burst from the egg. Vibrant orange peppers at the base of the gerbera stems contrast with the grey of the egg. A gathering of potato onion bulbs in the shape of a small pyramid continue the theme of nurturing and protection. Allium cepa var. Aggregatum; Capsicum chinense; Gerbera hybrida

Photo by Martin Graham Meyers Arrangement by Gregory Hudgins


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FLOWERS

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Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are. ~Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

Gregory chose an elongated, oversized glass Hydria vase with applied pieces of clear, mirrored and Mercury glass which have been cut in a stylized Moroccan pattern. Sinuous, curving belles of Ireland add height while white tulips allowed to naturally curve downward create drama and movement. Chartreuse green fresh apples are tightly added to a bed of tillandsia, an air plant. Malus domestica; Molucella laevis; Tillandsia

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Photo by Martin Graham Meyers Arrangement by Gregory Hudgins


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Caples & Robinson Offer Cutting Edge Technology The DAMON System Delivers Beautiful Smiles That Last A Lifetime

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RACES AREN”T JUST “BRACES” anymore. We can recall the old days of “railroad tracks” and headgear to straighten our teeth. With the advent of THE DAMON SYSTEM, we can now straighten teeth better, quicker and much more comfortably than ever before. Let’s discuss the brace (bracket) itself first. What makes the DAMON brace so revolutionary and technologically advanced? It begins with the way the wire is held in place ... passive self ligation. Many conventional brackets require a steel ligature or rubber alastic to hold the wire in place. The DAMON bracket is a sliding system, made of surgicalgrade stainless steel (17-4) metal-injection­ molded construction which gives it exceptional strength and smoothness. It features the SpinTek sliding door which easily opens and closes ... allowing ease of changing wires and comfortably holding the wire in place with no plaque retentive alastics or sharp steel ligatures required. This gives the patient a cleaner and more comfortable brace experience with way fewer “sticks” and hygiene issues. Orthodontic treatment once centered on how “tight” the wire could be bound into the brackets (braces). “The tighter the better” was the mantra. The DAMON system has revolutionized patient comfort with passive self-ligation: which means the wire fits into the bracket slot LOOSELY, minimizing soreness after orthodontic appointments. In fact, many patients ask “Is it working? I didn’t get sore!“ But they marvel at how much their teeth have moved after only a few months of treatment. 48 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

Tooth movement is both efficient and more importantly --­comfortable. There simply is no more “tightening” of braces. Which brings us to another scientific difference between DAMON braces and conventional braces --- the wires? Years ago the orthodontist only had stainless steel wires they would bend ... and then force them into the braces as tight as possible. The result --painfully sore teeth and inability to eat for a day or two. The DAMON system uses HEAT ACTIVATED COPPER INFUSED NITINOL wires ... probably one of the biggest advances in modern orthodontics. The properties of these wires allow the orthodontist to cool the wire down which leaves the wire with string-like properties. The wire is then very easily placed into the braces without forcing/ pushing against the teeth ... meaning getting new wires is a pleasant experience. The elastomeric properties of the copper nitinol wires then SLOWLY release their forces as the wire warms up to 98.6 F --- body temperature. AND IT NEVER QUITS WORKING!!! So patients need only come in every 8-10 weeks, meaning less missing school or taking off work for orthodontic appointments. And cases finish on average 6 MONTHS FASTER than conventional braces! So we’ve got a more comfortable wire that’s easy to put in --- and it increases efficiency by 6 months! There are many more benefits to the DAMON System. This system affords a beautiful, wide smile --- without the removal of healthy teeth and/or palatal expanders to make space. DAMON patients report 50%

fewer appointments and 60% less discomfort than conventional braces. Most importantly is the result! The DAMON system gives the patient that wide, winning smile! We critique our finished cases and strive for an American Board of Orthodontics quality result every time! We deliver that perfect smile ... and go the extra mile to make sure it lasts a lifetime. In short, the DAMON system used exclusively at Caples & Robinson Orthodontics is a proven combination of passive selfligating braces; force calibrated arch wires and minimally invasive treatment protocols that work together as a low-friction, lowforce system. This adds up to faster treatment time, improved comfort, fewer extractions and freedom from headgear and expanders. Simply put --- the DAMON system delivers the cutting edge technology and beautiful smiles that last a lifetime. Dr. Caples & Dr. Robinson are both Certified Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontists. They are the only two orthodontists to carry this distinction in Northeast Louisiana. They have offices located in Monroe, West Monroe, Ruston, Bastrop and Mangham for your convenience.


Doing the Rice Thing THE KENNEDY RICE MARKET HAS GONE BEYOND THE BULK DOMESTIC BRAND TO EXPAND INTO A HEALTH-CONSCIOUS, ORGANIC PRODUCT CALLED KENCHAUX RICE. WITH THE KENNEDY WOMEN AT THE HELM, THIS PRODUCT IS EXPANDING BEYOND LOUISIANA STATE LINES. BY BRENDA TARVER

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he year was 1963. In a rural northeast Louisiana community, William Elton Kennedy with the help of his father dug his hands into a farming career at age 17. In 1969, after accumulating rice quota, Elton planted his first rice crop in the bottom land of the Boeuf River. His determination, commitment and continued success eventually became the foundation of Kennedy Rice, one of the largest rice producers in the U.S. The company has remained a family-owned business for more than 50 years. A dedication to sustainable agriculture, precision GPS leveling, fertility management and water conservation programs was instilled into each Kennedy employee and family member from the start. PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRAD ARENDER

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In 2010, the company’s future was further secured with the management addition of Elton’s youngest daughter, Meryl. With a fresh young generation at the helm, Kennedy Rice and its affiliated companies were poised to reach even greater heights. Fast forward to 2015. Meryl Kennedy Farr’s aspiration to meet customer demand and expand the Kennedy rice market from bulk domestic to health conscious organic and natural products took flight with the birth of the KenChaux® rice brand. “KenChaux is a partnership between my three sisters: Patchez Fox, Felicity Kemmerly, Chantel Dickson, and me. As a family and fully woman owned company, we understand the importance of the products you feed your family. A commitment to nature and humanity is at the core of our beliefs. We stand behind the idea that healthy CAN be better tasting, and that meals spent around the family table are NOT a thing of the past.” Today, KenChaux brand rice products are appearing on store shelves throughout Louisiana and will soon go beyond state lines. Bastrop Super Foods, Big Star, Captain Avery Seafood Market, Chauvin Grocery, Fiesta Nutrition Center, For His Temple Family Foods, Gibson Natural Grocer, Harvest Foods, Mac’s Fresh Market, Sav-U-Mor Grocery & Hardware, Vieux Carré Market and Whole Foods Market. “KenChaux started as a simple idea. Growing rice and sourcing from local and regional farmers to produce the best rice we could, was, well … part of our nature,” Meryl commented. “To us, rice is not just rice. Doing the Rice Thing – Right is part of our KenChaux rice brand heritage. We

currently have more certifications and favorable product attributes than any other organic white or brown rice on the market. “As KenChaux CEO and founder, I believe that the greatest influence on the organic trend is that it’s become synonymous with better quality. Understanding the organic/natural consumer is deeper than demographics; it’s about lifestyle and beliefs.” “Through active involvement in rice research and the innovation of the rice business, our company will remain dedicated to working with local agriculture research facilities to develop new varieties that not only perform well in the field but are also naturally organic, healthy and tasty to eat!” THEIR PAST “The KenChaux brand name commemorates my father and mentor, Elton Kennedy, and company family friend and mentor, Frank Godchaux. From the first day I started working in the family business, I’ve been privileged to be mentored by these two great men. What they have contributed to the rice industry speaks for itself. What I’ve always admired most is their tenacity, grit and hard work. It’s only fitting and out of complete respect that I named our first branded products after them.” THEIR PRESENT A circle surrounds the KenChaux logo to symbolize the company’s farm-to-table or full circle approach to doing business. “Our partnerships with conventional and organic farmers are more than just business relationships. We truly believe that they are stewards of the land. My family

KenChaux Rice Certifications

Organic Long Grain Brown Rice

Organic Long Grain White Rice

Natural Long Grain Brown Rice

Natural Long Grain White Rice


and our employees are and will remain dedicated to sustainable agriculture, precision GPS leveling, fertility management, and water conservation programs, and we only work with others who have these same ethics. We will remain committed to ensuring the highest quality of rice possible from farm to table to align with our customers’ values.” THEIR FUTURE Egrets are native to rice fields, and you can spot them nearly every day. Rice fields create a natural habitat for all types of birds and animals and serve as a resting ground for ducks, geese, and other migrating birds. “At KenChaux, we believe in a future world that is truly sustainable. A world we can feel blessed to live in…We’re truly committed to creating better food that supports a better world for all of God’s creation.” “We developed the KenChaux brand based on a lofty goal: take a little grain and make a big difference in the world. We see it as our responsibility to better the lives of our customers, employees, the communities we call home and the markets we enter in the future. If we can achieve this while bettering the environment, then that’s even better!” “A commitment to humanity and nature is at the core of our beliefs, and it’s why we can proudly say we’re Doing the Rice Thing Right!” ~ Meryl Kennedy Farr, KenChaux CEO KENCHAUX HUNGER PROJECT - GIVING BACK When Meryl began developing a Kennedy organic and natural rice brand, she spent a

lot of time with respected mentors, peers and friends to bounce ideas around. A statement that always stood out in her mind was when someone said, “I hope you find a way to give back.” It inspired her to search for a compelling way that KenChaux could do just that. Rice, one of the most widely consumed foods today, has been feeding people for over 5,000 years. Currently, 842 million people throughout the world face hunger every day. 49% of all northeast Louisiana households live below the poverty threshold and are unable to afford healthy food to feed their families. A friend told her about Feeding Children Everywhere, a social charity that coordinates Hunger Projects to mobilize volunteers to provide healthy meals to hungry children and families in local communities. After learning more, getting KenChaux involved with the charity made perfect sense.

Plans are in the works for KenChaux to host its first HUNGER PROJECT in September to celebrate National Rice Month’s 25th Anniversary. The PROJECT will be hosted locally in conjunction with the Food Bank and the United Way of Northeast Louisiana. “We will take an active role in providing the healthiest meals possible for children and families in the communities we touch, both now and in the future,” Meryl shared. “It seems natural to host our first HUNGER PROJECT here at home. Look for more details in the near future. We encourage our northeast Louisiana friends and neighbors to get involved in giving back. Together we can all make a difference.” GET CONNECTED WITH KENCHAUX TO STAY IN THE KNOW ABOUT NEW PRODUCTS, HUNGER PROJECTS, COOKING TIPS AND ALL THINGS RICE!


BAYOUBUZZWORTHY

Recently, Monroe celebrated the grand opening and ribbon cutting of its newest business in the community, IRC. InterMountain Renovation Consultants’ Grand Opening was held at 4pm on July 12th. Food and drinks were served as guests were invited to tour the new facility on Tower Dr. Mayor Jamie Mayo, Dewey Weaver - Owner, and Jared Walker – Vice President were just a few of the speakers at the grand opening and gave a short and simple address to the newest installation to InterMountain before the ribbon cutting.

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IRC GRAND OPENING

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LUNCHEON ON PLACID DR.

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MINERALS BLACK TIE

Dr. Janine Hopkins launched her much-anticipated Minerals Black Tie line during Men’s Fashion Week in NYC. Joined by staff of Hopkins Dermatology and MD Minerals along with family and friends, Dr. Hopkins featured the cosmetic and grooming line for men. The line drew attention from outlets such as the New York Times Fashion page, mashable.com and In Style. For information on the products drop by Hopkins Dermatology or visit www.mineralsblacktie.com.

On June 16th Nancy Inabnett and Kathy VanVeckhoven, of John Rea Realty, hosted a luncheon open to the public. Sandwiches, dips and drinks were served in the kitchen while friends visited in the main foyer. Kathy gave tours of the five bedroom, three story house, while Nancy entertained and greeted guests. The luncheon was held at 3801 Placid Dr. to showcase the property, just recently placed on the market.

*IF YOU HAVE HAPPENINGS THAT ARE BUZZWORTHY, PLEASE SUBMIT THEM TO CASSIE@BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

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I REMEMBER article by PAUL LIPE

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with a great deal of pleasure the joy that my first grandchild, Trey, has given me. From the first time I held him as a 10-hour-old baby, there has been a bond of affection that I do not think anything can challenge. Hours of happiness have been mine as I have watched him participate in sports, spent time vacationing with him on the beach or in the mountains, and braved the elements in the pursuit of the big 12-point buck at our hunting club near Delhi. In more recent years, he has cheered my day by calling to report to me how well his Ole Miss Rebels were doing in football, basketball, or baseball. To say that he is special to me would be a gross understatement. You who are grandparents will understand the smiles that a grandchild can produce in the heart and on the face. One such smile occurs when I remember an occasion that took place when Trey was about 2 years old. His mother, Mary Linda Moss (Doc), was a resident in radiology and was doing some weekend moonlighting in Brookhaven, MS. On the weekend in mind, she took Trey with her. My son Jonathan, and his new wife, another Mary Linda (Mel), lived in New Orleans where he was in graduate school. These newlyweds were on their way to Delhi for the weekend, and they stopped at the motel in Brookhaven where Trey and his mom were staying. Trey’s Mom 56 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

told him to give Mel a hug, adding, “She is your aunt.” Trey recoiled in fear, exclaiming, “Ants bite!” His fear is understood when you hear the rest of the story. Shortly before this weekend experience, Trey was playing in the yard while his Dad, Jimmy, was mowing the lawn. Pointing to a fire-ant bed, Jimmy cautioned his son, “Be careful, young man. Ants bite.” Remembering his Dad’s warning, Trey did not want to give Mel that chance! Trey’s problem arose as the result of his failure to see the difference between a fire ant and his uncle’s wife (Aunt Mel). Unfortunately, things, and people, are not always what they seem or what we think them to be. There have been too many times when an individual or a situation seemed harmless, and we discovered, to our dismay, that, like a fire ant, they can bite. And the bite can be painful. Or we can be fearful of something so that we shy away from it to our detriment, only to learn later that there was no danger and that the thing we feared was something from which we could have benefitted. For example, I am, by nature hesitant to try new things or to engage in untested adventures; had I yielded to this proclivity, I would have missed out on one of the most exciting and interesting trips I ever took. A number of years ago, my wife and I had the opportunity to

travel to Europe, so I cast aside my anxieties, and we set out – all alone! Had I followed my natural instincts, we never would have ventured outside my comfort zone. But contrary to those instincts, I booked our flight, purchased Eurail passes, made hotel reservations in Paris, and Linda and I were off on one of our most enjoyable excursions a person can imagine. I turned a deaf ear to those voices that were warning, “You can’t do it; it is dangerous; it will cost too much.” And we never regretted taking that trip, and I would do it again – in a minute! Have unfounded fears and lack of faith kept you imprisoned in your comfort zone? The One Who governs the whole universe encourages us, “Fear not, I am with you.” By His grace, and because of His presence with us, fears are conquered; so let us learn to trust Him. And in that trust, may we attempt greater things and, therefore realize greater joys. Don’t let fear, real or unfounded, paralyze you so that you fail to experience those blessings your Father has in store for you. When he was just a two-year old little boy, Trey was afraid that Aunt Mel might bite him. Now that he is a senior at Ole Miss…he still is a little dubious, but he will give her a hug!


Marsala Beverage Company Chafunkta Brewing Company – Proudly Brewed in Louisiana

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HAFUNKTA BREWING COMPANY IS A Mandeville, LA based Nanobrewery formed by Jamie and Josh Erickson in June of 2011. Josh is also an avid home brewer, who brewed his first batch in a good old -fashioned “Mr. Beer” in 1998. Since then, raising his 4 boys has taken priority over home brewing. In 2009 once his sons became older and could be mini-brewers themselves, Josh jumped back into the home brewing scene and became focused on creating the best and most consistent craft beers possible. Jamie’s a stay-at-home Mom whose life in recent years has been focused on raising her 4 sons. As Josh’s assistant brewer, she began to share his passion for home brewing and decided to brew her first batch of beer in May of 2010. Since then she and Josh have been brewing together side by side. Chafunkta Brewing Company was born from their shared interest and passion for brewing great craft beer. They started CBC with the hopes of doing something for a living that they both truly loved and enjoyed with great passion. They also firmly believe in increasing craft beer market awareness in Louisiana by creating and delivering great tasting beers. What’s with that crazy name you ask? Well, the word ‘Chafunkta’, aka ‘Tchefuncte’, was an early Indian settlement located in what is now the city of Mandeville, LA. There is also a river named the Tchefuncte that is located in the Mandeville area. “As a family run, Mandeville, LA based brewery, we believe that passion and personal attention is the key to providing you with a fresh, complex, full of flavor taste that you deserve as a craft beer consumer. By focusing on small batch brewing, we’re able to put our love and attention into each and every batch, giving you the quality and consistency that we demand and expect from EVERY CBC brew. Louisiana owned, Louisiana brewed, Louisiana loved, YOUR Chafunkta Brewing Company is raising the bar, one brew at a time.”

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VOO KA RAY IPA Voo Ka Ray, or “Vieux Carré” (“French Quarter”), is a malt forward yet hop-centric Imperial IPA that avoids the extra bitterness found in many other IPAs with similar hop levels by using a ‘Late Hopping’ brewing technique, which allows for the flavor and aroma of the hops to shine without overpowering your palate with extreme bitterness. OLD 504 Old 504 is a Coffee and Vanilla Infused Robust Porter that uses real Coffee and Madagascar Bourbon Vanilla beans, both imported by 2 local companies in the “new” 504, Orleans Coffee Exchange & Ronald Reginald’s Vanillas. Named after the original “old” Louisiana statewide area code, unlike many other Porters, Old 504 is a dark, yet light bodied Porter full of flavor that is enjoyable year round. KINGFISH ALE Kingfish Ale is a light colored American Cream Ale with minimal hop flavor and a hint of lingering sweetness. It’s crisp and refreshing like a lager, with the flavor and complexity of an ale. Named after Louisiana legend Huey P. Long, we proudly say, “Every Can A King!” BAYOU BLAZE An easy drinking true-to-style traditional Irish Red, this beer provides your palate not only with caramel malt & slight roast flavors, but also has little to no bitterness & and a clean dry finish. Named not only for its red color/hue, Bayou Blaze was also named in homage to Blaze Starr, an American Burlesque dancer in New Orleans, who happened to have a well known affair with Earl Long, Huey P. Long’s (The Kingfish!) brother and then Louisiana Governor!


DOWNTOWN GALLERY CRAWL Mark Your Calendar For Thursday, August 4th

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ugust is hot, hot, hot—and so is the art in downtown Monroe and West Monroe! As artists and the public “crawl” among the eight unique art galleries of the Downtown Arts Alliance, we enjoy the beauty of our gorgeous river and the interesting architecture of our historic buildings. As always on the first Thursday of every even-numbered month, people of all ages will visit with happy neighbors while reveling in live music, good food and fine art. From 5 to 9 pm on August 4, all eight galleries (two in West Monroe and six in Monroe) will be open and displaying great art. Many of the artists will give artist talks, explaining the inspiration and technique underlying their creations. The event is always free--the only expense is incurred if you decide to buy some original art. A special treat at this Crawl is a limited-edition poster, based on a large collage by local artist Emily Caldwell and designed by Downtown Arts Alliance President Kelsea McCrary, which will be available at several galleries. On the West Monroe (Antique Alley) side of the river, the River Gallery features West Monroe artist Mary May. She recently won first place for her painting “Pure September” at the 2016 Louisiana Peach Festival in Ruston. Her medium of choice is watercolor, although she also works with acrylics. May studied under Nicola Vigini, along with many other artists in Texas and Louisiana, as she has been a professional artist for the last 20 years. The River Gallery, Louisiana’s oldest and largest art co-op, includes up to 30 artists of all kinds; guests are welcomed with good food and live music. Rick Sikes, curator of the Big Room Gallery on Art Alley in Monroe, presents wellknown potter Gary Ratcliff, retired ULM art professor, as the lead exhibitor, demonstrating his pottery techniques as well as finished work. He will give an artist talk at 7 pm. Other artists showing at the Big Room will be Emily Caldwell, Callie White, Alyssa Guidry

Posey, Amy Ouchley, and Stephanie Jordan. Of course, good food and drink is always available at the Big Room. ARENDER studio + gallery is proud to present Chad Schoonmaker, a Baton Rougebased artist specializing in acrylic on canvas. This bright body of work is occasionally sealed with resin and varies in size with an option for every art buyer’s space. He will give an artist talk at 7:30 pm. The Garrett House, next to the river on South Grand, is open again, newly renovated for the August Crawl, with Nicole Duet as the guest artist. Duet is an assistant professor of drawing and painting as well as the director of the gallery at Louisiana Tech’s School of Design. Curator Brooke Foy announces that Duet will give an artist talk at 6:30 pm. On DeSiard Street, the Palace Gallery is hosting a North Louisiana native who has been a working artist since she could hold a crayon. Emily Ezell embraces both oil paint and chalk pastels to indulge her love for vibrant color and dynamic mark making. The figures pictured are mostly passive, but through the use of vivid, hyper-realistic color they compel the viewer to look deeper. “Lazy Days of Summer” is the theme for the artists at Sugar Gallery on Art Alley. From Burg Ransom’s gorgeous sunsets to Melanie Douthit’s coastal-inspired creations, everyone can relate as summer winds down. Leah Reitzell’s textured Louisiana-themed paintings and Mary Thompson’s rural-inspired and travel-themed work always draw great interest. Scott Stone will be on the landing with his guitars adorned with seashells and stones he collected on the coast. Stacy Medaries will be back in the “red room,” so no one should miss out on the visual treat known as SUGAR! Rumo’s Gallery, on Antique Alley in West

Monroe, is hosting Jonathan Clayton, a photography student at Louisiana Tech. He spent time teaching English in China, and his National Geographic-style photos document his time there, with both black and white and color photography. The curator is Austin Bantel; owners of the gallery are Russell and Morgan Moore. Music, food and drink are always a part of the evening at this great place. Finally, back on Art Alley, Upstairs is pleased to exhibit a mixed bag of work in August.  Artists include Angela Genusa and Jana Giles.  Crawlers will want to see more from both of these artists who are showing for the first time. The show also includes Kay McDonald and Anna Rowan’s collaborative sculptures, made from found objects, which are certain to capture the viewers’ interest. Upstairs is co-curated by Anna Rowan and Emily Caldwell.  If you should miss the Crawl, you can make an appointment for a private showing during August or come to the closing, Saturday, August 28,  from 2-4 pm. (The air conditioning works now!) The artists of the Downtown Arts Alliance, as well as their appreciative public, sincerely thank the always-generous DAA sponsors, especially Presenting Sponsor Louisiana Pain Care, and including Bancorp South, Creed and Creed Law Firm, Fiesta Nutrition Center, Monroe-West Monroe Convention and Visitors Bureau, Northeast Louisiana Arts Council, Sir Speedy, the News-Star, KEDM Public Radio, DeltaStyle, Louisiana Division of the Arts, Restaurant Cotton, Rawls DeSigns, Cross Keys Bank, Lavalle Salomon Law Office, Warehouse Restaurant, Antique Alley Merchants’ Association, Choice Brands and Marsala Beverage.

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process of designing our LFL. We looked at several pictures and loved spotting them on road trips. I knew I wanted a rustic look with aged wood from my family’s barn and recycled tin. I also wanted it to be user friendly for children, not too tall, not a glass door but one with a clear view of the books, easy to open and shut and dividers as shelves for different size books. My dad was helping us with the dimensions and was going to have a friend build it for us, but sadly our time ran out. My sweet husband and a dear friend, Noah Reeves, took over the designing and building. They found the wood and tin along the Mississippi River bank and got to work. They completely surprised me. It is one of the dearest gifts I have ever received. Q. What drew you to create a Little Free Library for Monroe? A. The main idea behind The Little Free Library is to promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book exchanges worldwide and to build a sense of community as we share skill, creativity and wisdom across generations.

The Little Free Libraries

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grassroots movement is afoot to spread literacy one Little Free Library at a time. The concept behind these little lending libraries is simple. “Take a book. Leave a book.” Small in stature but mighty by their contents, Little Free Libraries can be found throughout the country and even in our neck of the woods. You can find two in Ruston and three in West Monroe’s Kiroli Park. Most recently a Little Free Library popped up beside the river levee on Island Drive in Monroe. BayouLife recently caught up with Dee Cagle, Grace Episcopal School’s library, a lover of books and proud erector of Monroe’s first Little Free Library. Q. How did you you learn about Little Free Libraries and why did you choose to add one in your 62 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

neighborhood? A. I learned about them from an article in the Baton Rouge social magazine In Register. I fell in love with the idea of people sharing books in a neighborhood/community. I knew we had the perfect location for a Little Free Library since we have lots of foot and bicycle traffic on our street. I also knew I wanted ours to be geared for children of all ages. It drives me crazy when my boys announce we don’t have anything good to read at our house, especially since we have books everywhere! And they usually announced the need for a book when we’re in for the night. Q. Many Little Free Libraries employ creative designs and yours is no exception. How did you decide on the style? A. My husband, Father and I were in the

Q. Any new children’s books or series of books you’d like to recommend as we head back to school? A. I love a series and love when children do, too! Here are some great new series out for children: Sophie Mouse by Poppy Green and Here’s Hank by Henry Winkler are for early chapter book readers. Heidi Heckelbeck by Debra Coven is for 2nd to 4th graders. Derek Jeter’s Hit and Miss new collection is great for upper elementary - middle school ages. The Testing Trilogy by Joelle Charbonneau is great for middle to high school students. The Who Was and the What Is collection of non-fiction/ biographies is for students of all ages. Dee’s Top 5 Must Reads for Children: (“So hard to pick just 5!”) 1. The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf 2. The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner 3. Owl Babies by Martin Waddell 4. The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson 5. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett To learn more about Little Free Libraries, where you can find one in cities near or far, and how you, too, can be part of the movement to instill a love of reading, go to littlefreelibrary.org. The website features an interactive map showing Little Free Library locations, instructions on how to become part of the non-profit’s network of book sharers and much more.


Oysters by Madison Brennan

Oysters by Walter Anderson

AFTER WALTER ANDERSON:

FLORA AND FAUNA OF THE GULF COAST Madison Brennan Exhibits at the Walter Anderson Museum of Art in Ocean Springs, MS

“After Walter Anderson: Flora and Fauna of the Gulf Coast” is the title of an upcoming exhibition at the Walter Anderson Museum of Art in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, which is set to open to the public August 11, 2016. The exhibit will contrast the work of the late Walter Anderson with new work by Monroe native Madison Brennan, who is completing a summer internship and artist residency with the museum. Madison is a senior at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi, studying Art History with a concentration in Museum Studies and Studio Art. The exhibit will be on view through the end of August.

EXHIBITION STATEMENT

Says Madison, “‘After Walter Anderson: Flora and Fauna of the Gulf Coast” is my representation of the Mississippi Gulf Coast’s state of being. Using watercolor and pen and ink, I wanted to capture the fleeting moments of the day much like Walter Anderson. Anderson’s watercolors will be placed next to mine to serve as a contrast between the past and present, cleanliness and pollution. As I worked along the beaches, I could not 64 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

Self-Portrait by Madison Brennan

help but notice the dirtiness of the water, with beer bottles and plastic bags, and the condition of the beaches littered with plastic, cigarette butts, clothing and broken glass. Anderson saw gems of hope within the flora and fauna of the Gulf Coast, creating vibrant colored works that reflected his emotional and spiritual ties to nature. My gems that I found were the multi-colored oyster shells, the breath-taking sunsets that Anderson called “the magic hour,” and blooming flowers among the trees that I became connected to. I figured that if Anderson can find hope within the coast, so can I.  My work is to ultimately bring awareness to the pollution and poor upkeep of once pristine beaches and coastal life as Walter Anderson saw and recorded through his paintings.”

ABOUT MADISON BRENNAN

At the age of 3, Madison was introduced to art by Grace Episcopal School’s resident art teacher, the late James Norton, who inspired her and all of his students. Madison was fortunate to study art with Neville High School’s Karen Medley, who refined her skills and encouraged her to study art at college. Her mother and grandmother, both advocates for the arts, were involved in local museums, where Madison nurtured her appreciation for art as she grew up. Madison’s oil painting, “Gulf on the Halfshell” was featured on the cover and as an inside illustration for “The Pot and The Palette Cookbook,” which benefitted the Louisiana Restaurant Education Foundation and The George Rodrigue Foundation for the Arts. Madison has also studied art through workshops with Meredith Pardue and Lissy Sanders Compton. She often calls herself a naturalist, loving the beauty and wonder that nature has to

Self-Portrait by Walter Anderson

offer, drawing and painting flora and fauna around her in Louisiana and Mississippi.

ABOUT THE WAMA:

A visit to the Walter Anderson Museum of Art (WAMA) is an enchanting and unique experience. The Walter Anderson Museum opened in 1991 and is dedicated to the celebration of the works of Walter Inglis Anderson (1903-1965), an American master, whose depictions of the plants, animals, and people of the Gulf Coast have placed him among the foremost of American painters of the Twentieth Century; and to his brothers, Peter Anderson (1901-1984), master potter and founder of Shearwater Pottery; and James McConnell Anderson (1907-1998), noted painter and ceramist. The watercolors, drawings, oils, block prints, ceramics and carvings by the three Anderson brothers are all represented in the museum’s permanent collection. Diverse changing exhibitions, many featuring the work of other significant artists, occur throughout the year. The museum’s sky-lit interior of warm southern yellow pine includes a main galleria and two additional galleries, which echo the natural beauty and simplicity of its setting. Adjacent to the museum is the Ocean Springs Community Center, home of Walter Anderson’s largest mural. For more information about the Walter Anderson Museum of Art, go to walterandersonmuseum.org. The museum is located in downtown Ocean Springs, Mississippi, at 510 Washington Street.


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WHAT’S IN THE FRIDGE 6

Photos by Martin G Meyers

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Blake Phillips, Chef at Restaurant Sage and newly crowned King of Louisiana Seafood, talks to Maré Brennan about his culinary influences, ultimate dinner guests and his stock of refrigerator must-haves.


So what’s the deal with expiration dates? Do you abide by or care? Most expiration dates are just suggested. We waste a lot of food in America. The FDA says the dates are a suggestion. Plus I have a really good sense of smell. I always smell test dairy and meat if I think it may be in question. What do you cook the most at home? Breakfasts on Sundays are my thing. I’ll do biscuits from scratch using cake flour, cold butter, buttermilk or cream, whatever’s on hand. I love bacon and biscuits! Breakfast, to me, is the most comforting meal. I used to eat a lot of breakfast food at night when I was younger. Eventually I got tired of that and started experimenting with cooking and used cookbooks from Paul Prud’homme and the Junior League’s Cotton Country. What made you want to be a chef? I don’t know. I like to give back to people and get an immediate reaction to my product that I put out. It’s a quick turnaround for getting feedback. You see the results of your work in real time. My mom, sister and I always cooked together, and even now we spend a lot of time in kitchen when we get together. Who are your culinary influences? Paul Prud’homme, James Beard, Anthony Bourdain are all chefs I look up to. I actually got to meet Anthony Bourdain on the way back from my Italy trip. He was checking his luggage and I went up and shook his hand. It was so cool to see him. It was the perfect ending to a great trip. I had just spent nine days in southern Italy – Positano, Sorento and Rome. I got to spend a day in Positano with a local chef in his kitchen. We cooked with produce sourced from the organic farm attached to his restaurant – fava beans, fresh cabbages, fennel and the most gigantic lemons you’ve ever seen. Ultimate dinner party guests? Thomas Keller, Anthony Bourdain and Kanye West just to stir things up.

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How has life changed for you since you’ve been crowned King of Louisiana Seafood? Well, the win has made me a lot busier in a good way at the restaurant, in my personal life and with catering events. It’s created the opportunity to sell myself more as a chef. People are more willing to venture out and try my specials. Right now I’m getting ready for the North Delta Food and Wine Festival in October and trying to recruit chefs from around the state to participate up here. I did a restaurant takeover in Austin, Texas that Sheila Snow from the Monroe/West Monroe Convention and Visitors Bureau helped coordinate and I’ll be representing Monroe/West Monroe in another upcoming restaurant takeover in Asheville, North Carolina. On August 6th I’ll be participating in the American Seafood Cook-Off in New Orleans which is sponsored by the Louisiana Restaurant Association. I’ll be representing the great state of Louisiana and competing against some of the best chefs in the country.

in the fridge 1) “I only buy natural,cage-free eggs. At the restaurant [Sage], we order fresh duck eggs and goat sourced locally from Swamp Fox Farms in Rayville.” 2) “I love using truffles in my dishes and these I smuggled back into the states from Italy.” 3) “Mirlitons are so versatile. You can make them into a slaw, bake or stuff them. At Thanksgiving I do a mirliton, cornbread and oyster dressing at the restaurant. Lately I’ve been adding crab into the mix, too.” 4) “Muscadine jelly is a staple in my refrigerator. This jar is made by a friend’s mom. Perfect on my homemade biscuits!” 5) “I love snacking on cheese: Asher Bleu Cheese from North Carolina, Drunken Goat Cheese which is made from goat’s milk cheese soaked in red wine, Brie, Fresh Mozzarella”

6) “I always have craft beer on hand. Abita Beer is brewed just outside of Hammond, LA. Abita Amber – that’s what I drink. Abita Seersucker is a great summer ale. Blueberry Wheat by Abita is a super seasonal offering. Bell’s Brewery from Comstock, Michigan has a Kalamazoo Stout - a dark beer - that I really like, too. I really like craft beers; I’m not a light beer fan.” 7) “We use Kingsland Steaks at the restaurant [Sage] because its locally-produced, grass-fed, grain finished, with no GMOs. Our fish at the restaurant is delivered whole, and we skin and process it ourselves so that it is at the peak of freshness and never frozen.” 8) “For intense flavors produced locally, raspberry and lemon extract are always available.” 9) “There is nothing better than Mitcham Farms peaches: Full, sweet, delicious peaches grown in Ruston.” WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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Getting Organized the Panache Way by Erin Sharplin Love erinlove@panachebyerin.com

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etting organized and staying organized is a learning process that never ends. Even a professional organizer can learn something new with every job. Each space can spark creativity and inspiration that can lead to new ways of arranging an ordinary item, but, with that said, there are some rules that should remain constant . As with most projects, it is best to understand the steps that will help you reach your goal. If you want to get organized the “Panache” way, follow my guidelines below: 1. Follow the Two-Year Rule I know you’ve heard the rule that you should get rid of anything that you haven’t used in a year, but my Panache rule is a twoyear rule. I believe that there are situations in which you might not have used an item during the past year, but would use it during the next. For instance, the weather in the past year might not have been cool enough for a sweater, but the upcoming weather will be. Or, maybe you didn’t entertain very much during the past year, but plan to change that this year, so all of your pretty serving platters will come in handy. 2. Get Rid of Duplicates Typically, you need only one of each item in your home. There are exceptions to that rule, so if it’s feasible for you to get rid of the duplicate, please do.

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3. Don’t Let Guilt Control You There are two ways that you might experience guilt during the organizing process – One for throwing something away instead of donating it and one that makes you keep something because of the person who gave it to you. Don’t let either of these guilty feelings get in the way of creating the perfectly-organized space that you dream of. Of course, if you are able, donating items instead of tossing them is preferable. However, if the process would just end up causing more trouble and costing time, you don’t need to feel guilty for tossing the items in the trash. On the other hand, don’t let an unloved item take up much-needed space just because your Aunt Nancy gave it to you. Instead, acknowledge the kind gesture by sharing it with someone else. 4. If an Item Isn’t Loved, Let it Go Keep only things that you love and that spark joy when you look at them. Otherwise, you won’t feel as happy and as stress-free as you would like. 5. Always Take Vertical Space into Account “TONS” of vertical space could be wasted in your home right now! Stop reading and check all of your closets and cabinets. How much unused space is there at the top of your closet? What about under your sink? If you see air, you are wasting usable space!! To extend storage, add shelf extenders, stackable baskets and bins, or more shelves to these areas.

6. Add Personal Touches to Your Organized Spaces Make every space in your home a place that makes you smile every time you open the door. You can do that by adding special pieces to each area, like rugs, pictures, greenery, and anything else that would make the space more inviting. This includes closets and pantries. 7. Make Sure Every Item Has a Home I am saving the most important steps for last. Everything in your home should have its own personal, customized spot. A pile in the floor does not constitute a personal, customized spot, by the way. Instead, every item should be easy to find and easy to replace, so try using bins, baskets, and other containers to corral like items, for instance. 8. Put Everything Back Where it Goes This final step is the step that is going to keep you organized. Once you use an item, place it back in its personal spot each and every time. It may take some getting used to, but it will pay off in the end. Remember, take a minute to save hours later!! In the end, remember that your home should be a living space and not a storage space. Getting organized will create more time and energy for you to be able to enjoy your home to the fullest.


RELATIONSHIPS

Meredith’s Musings Friday Night Supper Club: A Girl Simply Can’t Say It Enough | By Meredith McKinnie

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have a standing reservation every Friday night. It’s Friday Night Supper Club. And yes, the name is original. We meet on Friday; we have supper, and we’re an elusive club; just try breaking in. These people matter enough for me to reserve one day out of every seven just for them. And in turn, they deem me worthy of inclusion. It’s more than an honor; it’s a religion of sorts. We laugh, we gossip, we judge, we cackle, we cry, we console, we complete each other in a way many don’t understand. But you don’t have to; it’s our thing. We’re that overjoyed, loud, buoyant group in the corner, who at first annoys you, but eventually our flagrant joy sucks you in. You begin to wish you were dining at our table. In our circle exists a warmth of togetherness. These are my people, and I’m lucky to call them mine. We’re all unique, like that perfect cast of the 10-year-plus running TV show. We’re all different, but together we make more sense. We don’t fear each other. Hard truths are commonplace. Hugs are essential. This is my thank you to them. Jess is a self-assured, tiny southern firecracker, one who openly admits her faults, embraces change, and seeks improvement. She’s fearless, opinionated, and has a

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saturated southern twang that lubricates even the most cutting statements. She doesn’t just dress fashionably; she is fashionable, not just her clothes, but her life, all themed Jessica. Her store is her vision, her sweat, her soul on display. She takes profound pride in her work, her style, her perception. Just being in her circle is a Jess nod of approval, as if saying, “You will enrich my life without damaging it beyond repair. I welcome your little version of crazy into my bubble.” I’m grateful for that nod...and moreso for her. Bry has no idea how genuine and warm he is. In times of heartache, he is comfort, warmth, he feels like home. And I can almost see his scrunched up face at that statement. While he maintains a hard exterior to strangers, as if forcing people to prove themselves, to those he loves, those of us lucky enough to get in, he cares deeply, and shares our hurt and emotion. Bry’s one of those who feels with you, not for you. He’s raw in a way many of us wish we could be. Bry makes moments funny or serious, that make you laugh down deep in your gut, the genuine enjoyment radiating from the core. He has the ability to make the mundane better, life more tolerable. He’s consistent, and with age, I’ve come to value that the most in my friends. He’s always

Bryan, and he has absolutely no idea how loved and adored he is. And if you told him, he’d doubt you. He’s often the period at the end of our sentences, the closer, the common tie between us all. He is the original thread, and we are a unit because of him. Travis is what I like to call perfectly timed perfection. His appearances may have been sporadic, but his wit and humor and uplifting nature is consistent, despite the distance. He just fits in, the guy you want at the party. And if he doesn’t at first, he makes his way in. He’s a pioneer of sorts. People gravitate to him, and he is welcoming. He makes people think in a precise and affecting manner rarely seen. He does so by reaching into your soul and touching a small piece, like a hug from an unsuspecting source. He’s the hug that turns into a pick up, and then a cradle, and then he’s running with you across a field. He’s the ride at the carnival you ride again and again because you can’t get enough. I simply can’t say enough about Travis. Mo is class, sophistication, elegance, while still being down to earth, the type who can make dirt sparkle, not only timeless, but ageless as well. Should anyone hurt her, you want to physically hurt that person, that type of friend. She doesn’t need protecting, but your instincts kick in. She’s that good and kind. She’s the peak, the point of reference, the glue that keeps us all together. She puts the “Mo” in Montana, and she doesn’t even live there anymore. She can dress up a room and bring a conversation down to surface level, all with an ease of familiarity she seems to reserve for everyone. She’s open, she’s easy, in a Sunday morning kind of way. I call her my cornerstone, my conscience. She has this subtle way of giving advice without telling you what to do. She reminds me of what’s good in the world, and pure. And should you hurt her, I’ll bury you. I just can’t help myself. Jess, Bry, Travis and Mo are the other loves in my life. I have a partner. I have a biological family. These people are my chosen family, the siblings who enable me to breathe, keep me grounded. They are my therapy, my yoga, my namaste. Friday comes around again tomorrow. And for that, for them, I give thanks.


B AYOUKIDZ

PICKY EATERS Introducing Kids To New Food

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article by Cindy G. Foust

’m starting this month’s column with a huge sigh of relief. I’m happy for the opportunity to write about a topic that is near and dear to my heart ... food. This month’s BayouLife magazine is what we call our Food Issue, and I couldn’t be happier. Why? Because it’s not about fashion. Or make-up. Or weddings. Or should your toe nail polish match your fingernails. But food on the other hand, now you’re talking my language! I often say that I have no hobbies, no friends and no life (of course I have friends, some really good ones; I just never get to spend time with them), because all I do is work and chase my children. Sound familiar? However, that’s not really accurate because I do have one hobby, and that is cooking. Yes, cooking is my life in so many words. I study the art (not in Italy with an elderly Italian lady in some remote town, although, that is on my bucket list), and I’m constantly trying to figure out a way to make food taste better (well, I know butter makes everything, including kale, taste better). I actually began my culinary career around the age of 15, when the church cookbook was the only real resource you had if you wanted to “experiment” and try something new. As a result, my family was often the guinea pigs for such delicacies like “Cindy’s Stuff” (honestly, Julia Child would have had me deported to the moon if she had tried it), which included ground beef and a can of everything my mom had in the pantry. As the years passed and I found myself a poor college student with three roommates to feed, I began to really brave the culinary front and continued with constant recipe experimentation. You know, when you are a poor college student, you will eat almost anything as long as it stays within your $10 weekly food budget. Now that I am nearing the half century mark in a little less than a month, I guess you could say I have been cooking my entire life. Just like writing, it’s my passion. As a result, because it’s what they’ve watched me do all of their lives, my kids have taken an interest. I actually walked in the kitchen the other day, and my son had taken some left over steak and was warming it in a skillet with everything he could find in my refrigerator (the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree), including honey. Well, excuse me, Bobby Flay. Secretly, it did give me hope that he wouldn’t starve to death when I have to send him off to college, which is about a year from this very date. Okay, where was I? I think I was trying to build a wholesome and nutritious bridge to getting your children interested in cooking, especially those picky eaters. Okay, thanks, I found my rabbit hole. I don’t know how it was for you, but when I was growing up, my mom (or Bitsy, who cooked many a meal for me) didn’t indulge her family by making sure there was something on the table that everyone liked. (CONTINUED ON PAGE 158)


EAT AND DRINK

IN THE SPIRIT

Washington Wine and Spirits Opens Their Door To North Louisiana ARTICLE BY MARÉ BRENNAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN G MEYERS

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ocated in the cellar of Washington Plaza, directly across from Doe’s Eat Place, a revolution is at hand – a revolutionary concept in modern wine and spirits, that is. Like a boss Founding Father, Washington Wine and Spirits is leading the charge to gather unique and hard-to-find wines, whiskeys, liquors and craft beers. Co-owners Sean Hammonds, Ryan Watts and Andy Eaton recognized the need for a boutique devoted to exceptional wines and spirits and set out to create an experience like no other. The Washington Wine and Spirits team is comprised of some of Monroe’s most wellversed palates. The “Spirits Guides,” Camille Pearce, Carter Hay, Shane Brooks and Morgan Decelle with Chad Watson, Doe’s bar manager and whiskey expert consultant, have personally tested each offering and can help you make a selection based on your personal tastes and find the perfect pairing for your next dinner party. “We get passionate about pairing whiskey and wines with food. There is so much history behind the wine and whiskey process,” explains Morgan. Says Camille, who doubles duty as a bartender and waitstaff at Doe’s, “We kept finding new wines and whiskeys through Doe’s and wanted to be able to share them with customers. We love learning about wines and spirits ourselves, and we want to share that knowledge.” Shane adds, “Washington Wine and Spirits is really a whiskey and wine journey. We just want to share our passion with Monroe. What we’ve done here is hand-select all of the products so that nothing on the shelf is bad.” Explains Carter, “Everything in the shop has been tasted by at least one person on staff. Before we add anything, it must pass our taste test. If we don’t like it, it doesn’t get added.” When their wine journey began, all four would say that they loved big, bold caber-

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nets, mainly because of how well they pair with Doe’s amazing steaks, but through the journey all agree that other wines have come to the forefront. All four are loving rosés, especially in triple digit heat, and all agree that some pair exceptionally well with summer fare. Morgan adds, “Rosés are starting to take off across the country.” “When you have access to great bottles of wine the world of wine opens up. It’s not just cabernet, pinot noir, chardonnay or a red blend; there’s room for growth,” adds Carter. “We like being ahead of the game and love to teach customers about the different varietals. And there are great price points as well. “We can help you find a good bottle under $10 and we have wines that score in the mid-90s between $20 and $30/bottle,” adds Camille. Having Washington Wine and Spirits next door to Doe’s Eat Place, is a virtual extension of the restaurant’s already amazing

wine and whiskey list. If you purchase a bottle of wine that is not on Doe’s menu, you are able to take it with you to Doe’s, and you’ll pay no corkage fee for enjoying your wine. Cult wines for collectors are easy to find at Washington Wines and Spirits. A computerized, touch screen wine database makes locating the perfect wine or just exploring the shop’s vast collection of bottles a breeze. “We are lucky to be allocated some really rare bottles,” says Shane, as he demonstrates the store’s unique “virtual library” of wines, which is the first of its kind in the state. Each wine in the store has detailed information including where it was grown and bottled, a taste description, its score according to Wine Spectator and what foods it pairs well with. Custom designed wine racks line the walls of the shop filled with every bottle imaginable. For the whiskey aficionado, Washington Wines and Spirits is like mecca. (Continued on page 141)


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THE GLUTEN-FREE GLUTTON Eating My Way Through New Orleans With Celiac Disease BY CASSIE LIVINGSTON

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hen I was first diagnosed with Celiac disease, I grieved food. I wanted everything I couldn’t eat: fried chicken, pizza, anything smothered with gravy. I got trapped buying whatever processed foods I could find that had gluten-free on the label. I had quit eating at restaurants and had abandoned all hope of ever enjoying a meal again. Then, a year later, I snapped out of it and started researching options for dining out while on a restricted diet. I learned that the only way I could get through this was to ask questions...and lots of them. As with any food-related allergy, there is always a risk of cross-contamination when dining at a restaurant that serves allergen containing foods. And, you should never assume that someone who works in the food industry automatically knows what it means to have a food allergy... and definitely don’t assume anyone knows what gluten is. I’ve been offered a vegetarian menu, told that a dressing with soy sauce infused in it was gluten-free and most recently

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was told that only a few dishes had pork in it (so I should be safe from gluten if I stayed away from those offerings). My husband knows when those things happen, I more than likely am going to get up and leave. Recently, we decided we were going to have a quick getaway to New Orleans for some rest, relaxation and food. I am one of those foodies who make my reservations for lunch and dinner at least a week out. I had reviewed restaurants on my Find Me GF app and had a list of old standbys and some newbies I wanted to try. First stop on our culinary adventure was one of my favorite restaurants in New Orleans, Pêche Seafood Grill. Not only does Pêche Seafood Grill have numerous gluten-free options to choose from, their staff is highly educated regarding gf restrictions. We started our meal with Marinated Crab Claws. Although it was a small appetizer plate, it was one of my favorite dishes of our entire weekend. The crab claws were marinated in

oil and dressed with red onion, cheese and a chiffonade of fresh mint and basil. Next, I had the Grilled Lamb Skewer with Cucumber Salad. I hated to venture away from fish, but I love a good piece of lamb with tzatziki, and this lamb did not disappoint. For my main entree I ordered the Cobia with purple hull peas and tomatoes. I have ordered the fish special everytime we’ve eaten at Pêche and it has always been excellent. Our next meal found us at Top Chef favorite, Nina Compton’s relatively new restaurant, Compère Lapin. There seemed to be a theme in our culinary adventures in that the appetizer dishes in all of our meals were my favorites. I love the Chilled Curry Shrimp. The spicy curry had a great kick, but the fresh cilantro, avocado and shaved mango made it feel really light and fresh. I ordered the tostones on the side because they were not gluten-free, but my husband assured me they were also noteworthy. The biggest surprise of the meal had to be the craft cocktail we ordered. I am not a huge frozen drink fan but Trent always orders the “girliest” drink on the menu and this time I was glad he did. The Misty Slipper Sangria was one of the best drinks I have ever had. We later found out that master mixologist Abigail Gullo had just been awarded Heaven Hill’s 2016 Bartender of the Year. We know why. For dinner Saturday night, we ubered on over to Cavan in the historic Garden District. As an appetizer I ordered the Gulf Tuna Carpaccio with avocado and cucumber minus the spicy soy. I will never forget this dish and I recommend everyone who reads this, to go and eat this dish. You can thank me later. For my main dish, I ordered the seared redfish with shaved fennel and white bean salad with preserved lemon. It was absurdly satisfying but the white beans were a little much. Trent had the whole fish and I think I saw him lick the bones before we left. On Sunday, we visited one of our old favorites, Galatoire’s. My mouth waters just thinking about our food. I had Escargot covered in rich garlic butter for an appetizer, Asparagus and Hearts of Palm salad and for my entree I ordered sautéed Lemon Fish with Meuniére Amandine on top. Afterward, I drank a pot of coffee and took a long nap. Our culinary adventure ended successfully at La Petite Grocery. I ordered a salad with marinated red quinoa, olive oil poached tuna, radicchio, picked radishes, toasted pistachio and an herb aioli. And, for our last meal, I was finally offered a real dessert. No sorbet. After learning the pastry chef was gluten intolerant, I let my gluten-free glutton show and ordered the Butterscotch Pudding and Bittersweet Chocolate Cake. The trip was a total success. No gluttenings and plenty of delectable dining memories to take with us.


House of Carpets and Lighting Well Worth the Drive!

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ELLO! ALL OF US AT HOUSE OF Carpets and Lighting in Shreveport are excited to showcase our products to Northeast and North Central Louisiana, and hope you will make the short drive to see us. We promise you will not be disappointed! Remodeling your home? Building a new home? Looking to update a couple of areas in your home? House of Carpets and Lighting has what it takes to make your home look its best. We carry quality flooring, from beautiful hardwood to durable ceramic and porcelain tile, to plush carpet, and so much more! We also have a huge selection of backsplash and tumbled stone. House of Carpets and Lighting is the only Shaw Design Center in the area, and we have other top name brands as well. When it comes to lighting, House of

Carpets and Lighting combines quality and selection. We offer a wide range of lighting products that provide the perfect blend of beauty and utility. From beautiful crystal chandeliers, to decorative kitchen and bedroom lighting, to under-counter and LED lighting, you will find the perfect lights for your taste, style and budget! Whether you are looking to update your entire house, or just one room, we’ve got you covered! Let us make your home the gem of your street with the perfect exterior lighting solution to highlight the beauty of your home. From subtle lighting accents to landscape lighting and gas lanterns, House of Carpets and Lighting can help you enhance your home’s exterior to match the level of style and beauty of the interior. Accessories are the “cherry on top,” and you will find plenty of treasures at House of

Carpets and Lighting. Artwork, lamps, home accessories, mirrors, accent furniture and vanities – everything to update your beautiful home. However, what sets apart House of Carpets and Lighting is our customer service. Family-owned and operated, House of Carpets and Lighting’s staff is knowledgeable about all of our products. In addition, our design team can guide you when it comes to selecting the best look for your home. We look forward to serving you! We can’t wait for you to visit our showroom at 4344 Youree Drive. Take the Market Street exit off I-20. Market St. becomes Youree Drive, so you will be here in no time! Open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. House of Carpets and Lighting— Well Worth the Drive!

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MEET THE

TRUCKERS

The food truck scene is quickly growing across the nation and north Louisiana isn’t missing out on this growing trend. From an eclectic, gourmet meal to a casual, quick bite to eat, these food trucks are sure to provide something for everyone.

CASTER & CHICORY

Joel and Jordan Myers started selling beignets at the Downtown River Market beneath a canopy tent just shy of one year ago. Recently becoming a mobile operation, they serve the most authentic and delicious beignets in Northeast Louisiana, with traditional sauces, such as chocolate and salted caramel, to seasonal and holiday flavors. Their pastries wouldn’t be complete without their Café du Monde chicory medium roast coffee.

2 DUDES CATERING

Chris Brown and Kevin Meredith began their barbeque catering business in February of this year and quickly turned food truck in April. Their specialities include brisket soft tacos, pulled pork “sammich,” barbecue chili pie, Nacho Mama’s pizza roll and a homemade jalapeño barbecue sauce.

RHODA BROWN’S HOG WASH CABOOSE

Self-proclaimed Duke of Ribs, Rhoda Brown has been perfecting his quality barbecue for over a decade. The Hog Wash Caboose offers barbecue nachos with brisket, pork and/or sausage; sammies also made with brisket, pork or sausage; and one, two or three meat plates of chicken, pulled pork, brisket, sausage, and ribs.

WAYNE VS. WINNEBAGO #wayneabago

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Being born in the South and spending a decade in the Midwest, Mark Smith has been able to pick up on culinary flavors across the country while still staying true to his roots. He provides “gourmet-inspired dishes” which take hours to make but only seconds to serve. The menu includes gumbeaux cheese fries, beer cheese fries, catfish ceviche tacos, barbacoa nachos and shrimp and grits.


MEET THE TRUCKERS

2 DUDES CATERING BY MEREDITH MCKINNIE PHOTOS BY MARTIN G MEYERS AND 2 DUDES CATERING

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hris Brown and Kevin Meredith combined friendship and business starting 2 Dudes Catering in February of this year. Barbeque is what they do, bringing the fun to food. Currently focusing primarily on special events and operating on weekends, 2 Dudes is heavily involved with the Downtown River Market, the Franklin Parish Chamber of Commerce, Governors Cigar & Pipe, and local nightlife. Starting as simply catering, the food truck fell in their lap and rolled for the first time in April at Governors Block Party. Chris and Kevin love the food truck, bringing their good product to great people in the community. The truck menu includes: brisket soft tacos, pulled pork “sammich,” barbecue chili pie (made with brisket meat in the chili), Nacho Mama’s pizza roll

(a deep-fried nugget of deliciousness), barbecue nachos, barbecue quesadillas, and a homemade jalapeño barbecue sauce (which is the delicious brain-child of the 3rd Dude, Ronnie Milsap). While their menu may be short, they focus on what they do well. With five hours prep and a cook time of 8-15 hours, you can taste the fun in each bite. Chris claims “barbecue is an art, but forgiving,” serving as the “chief pitmaster” alongside Kevo, the chief flavor engineer, the brains behind many of the “creative, inventive recipes.” The men insist you’ll “laugh hard and walk away full.” They also collaborate weekly on a podcast fittingly titled 2DudesRadio. It’s sports heavy, where they talk about anything men love, outside of politics or religion. And it also includes a “Beverage of the Week” segment that no one would want to miss.

318-232-2818 Info@2dudescatering.com @2dudescatering on Twitter & Instagram Facebook.com/2dudescatering www.2dudescatering.com

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MEET THE TRUCKERS

CASTER & CHICORY BY MEREDITH MCKINNIE PHOTOS BY MARTIN G MEYERS

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t’s all about the beignets at Caster & Chicory. Joel and Jordan Myers started selling beignets at the Downtown River Market in Monroe just shy of one year ago. Under a white canopy tent, they served their delicious pastries to eager consumers. In January, they started selling their popular King Cakes. Looking to expand, Jordan raised money via a funding website called Generosity to purchase a red trailer so they could take their operation mobile. Now setting up in places such as: Cross Keys Bank on Hudson Lane, Petals and Pearls Flower Shop, Downtown Monroe, and the West Monroe Farmer’s Market, the couple is broadening their scope and their menu. The couple toured New Orleans and sampled all of the great and famous beignets they had to offer. From this, they created

their recipe – the most authentic and delicious beignets in Northeast Louisiana. The recipe stands out among others that are more like a biscuit or a sopapilla, not a true southern beignet. The staple sauces for dipping are chocolate and salted caramel. Some seasonal sauces are peach, made from the fruit of Thompson’s Peach Farm in Calhoun, and blueberry from Butler Blueberry Farm in West Monroe. Soon they will offer holiday flavors like eggnog and perhaps bourbon. And while beignets are the focus, coffee is also served to enrich the experience. The coffee is a Café du Monde chicory medium roast, served both hot with steamed milk and an iced café au lait. In the winter they’ll add a mocha and hot chocolate to their menu, again both hot and iced. The Myers put the passion in pastries.

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Caster & Chicory Pop Up Food Trailer, Events, Parties Joel & Jordan Myers, Owners 208-669-0107 Monroe, Louisiana casterandchicory@gmail.com facebook.com/casterandchicory


MEET THE TRUCKERS

RHODA BROWN’S HOG WASH CABOOSE

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BY MEREDITH MCKINNIE PHOTOS BY MARTIN G MEYERS AND JOLI LIVAUDAIS

he self-proclaimed Duke of Ribs, Rhoda Brown, has been perfecting his quality barbecue for over a decade. The Memphis in May cook off named him the world champ of pulled pork twice. He converted the trailer to roadside sales five years ago and still caters events. Rhoda uses the knowledge he gained on the competition circuit. He started cooking for two other teams. Experimenting and being around good cooks is the best practice. He learned which rubs to use, the importance of time taken, wood choice, temperature variations and the influence of humidity on the outcome of the meat. The Hog Wash Caboose offers: barbecue nachos with brisket, pork and/or sausage; sammies also made with brisket, pork

or sausage; and one, two or three meat plates of chicken, pulled pork, brisket, sausage, and ribs. Rhoda enthusiasts call it the best “Q” around and claim his ribs are so tender, you can’t really pick them up. They simply melt in your mouth. The barbecue nachos tend to be the most popular item, though customers rave about all the meats, and even the potato salad. You can find Rhoda’s truck on Thursdays and Fridays 11-3 at Cross Keys Bank on Hudson Lane in Monroe. On Saturdays 11-3 and Sundays 11-2, it’s set up at Cold Desert Tattoo on Cypress Street in West Monroe. Always “100% dolphin friendly,” Rhoda Brown “appreciates his customers and strives to bring them the best product he can.” Woohoo Barbecue!

Rhoda Brown’s Hog Wash Caboose 318-801-8123 @hogwashcaboose on Facebook rhoda.brown@gmail.com

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MEET THE TRUCKERS

WAYNE VS. WINNEBAGO

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BY MEREDITH MCKINNIE PHOTOS BY MARTIN G MEYERS

he truck named itself. Owner Mark Smith, after hours of reconstructing an old motor home and a sizable accident of the truck falling on his dad Wayne (who is fine now), “embraced his inner food truck” dubbing the mobile bistro Wayne VS the Winnebago (#waynebago). Being born in the South and spending a decade in the Midwest, Mark has been able to pick up on culinary fields across the country while still staying true to his roots. Feeding soldiers coast-to-coast and providing food for disaster relief has allowed him to “experience the power of food,” which Mark claims, “sustains the body and the soul.” He invites other local chefs to come on the truck and cook together in an effort to cross-promote local businesses and continue to revive the area.

The gumbeaux cheese fries remains his most popular dish filled with fresh okra, smoked chicken, and double smoked sausage. He claims real gumbo starts at least the day before. He also serves up beer cheese fries with roasted garlic and stout cheddar. The catfish ceviche tacos are made up of Mississippi catfish strips marinated in citrus juice, onions, jalapenos, ginger and lemon grass, served with a chimichurri slaw. The barbacoa nachos with queso fresco consists of Mexican shredded beef, cumin and chipotle. The shrimp and grits blends Gulf or South American shrimp, Delta Blues grits, cheeses, bacon, corn, creole mix, thyme, etc. Mark believes in “letting the flavors speak for themselves.” Wayne VS the Winnebago provides “gourmet-inspired dishes” which take hours to make but only seconds to serve.

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WAYNE VS. WINNEBAGO 318-884-0004 facebook.com/waynevsthewinnebago @waynevsthewinnebago on Twitter & Instagram waynevswinny@gmail.com


Bayou Bend Office Park Now Leasing in Monroe

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UEST DEVELOPMENTS, LLC PRESENTS: THE Bayou Bend Office Park. Building 1 is recently completed and open for business! We gladly welcome the Law Office of Cody W. Rials and the corporate office of Blue Heron Homes, LLC to Bayou Bend Office Park Building 1. Building 1 currently has two remaining units for lease. Each unit is 1,250 sf with 4-5 offices, lounge, conference room, reception area and bathroom. Plenty of parking, mailbox, dumpster, maintained grounds and fiber optic data services. Quiet and conventionally located off HWY 165 North, behind St. Francis North, on Old Sterlington Road. The complex is minutes from CenturyLink’s headquarters and less than 5 minutes from down town Monroe. Bayou Bend Office Park has 9 buildings in the master plan and building 2 is set to begin construction in the fall of 2016. With superior quality and style built by Blue Heron Homes – Commercial Division – the space offers a professional feel that will enhance your business image. With options available for connecting suites for more square footage and build-to-suit options on future buildings, Quest can tailor to your business needs. As North Monroe and Sterlington continue to grow and more residents move into the area, businesses will soon follow. Quest has planned for this and offers this professional office park as a great option for small and growing businesses. COMING SOON: COON TRAIL DUPLEX COMMUNITY This Duplex community will be located on Old Sterlington Road next to the Azalea Estates Retirement Community. It will consist of 10 buildings with two and three bedroom units. The duplexes will be constructed with a similar style as the Bayou Bend Office Park. Construction is expected to begin in the fall of 2016 and complete in the summer of 2017. For more information or reservations please contact us. Contact James Reneau at 318-455-7826 for more information.

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Eat, Shop, Entertain Check Out Vieux Carré Market’s Gourmet Selections

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IEUX CARRÉ MARKET IS YOUR ONE-STOP-SHOP for wonderful wines, specialty food and cheeses in the Twin Cities. Summer is winding to a close and fall is upon us. Gatherings from football season to holiday parties will soon be here. Look no further than Vieux Carré Market for all your party needs. We are excited to announce the arrival of Chef John Peters. Chef Peters’ extensive professional experience in the culinary industry spans two decades, beginning in New Orleans in 1996 at Commanders Palace. Peters’ background includes a wide range of experience, accolades and accreditations. Lunch in our eatery is served Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Come experience our unique menu with options to satisfy any craving. Specialty sandwiches are our forte. We offer vegetarian options such as the Veggie on Ciabatta, and the Rice Paper Roll. What Louisiana restaurant would be complete without a poboy? Try our traditional New Orleans style or our roasted Wagyu Beef with horseradish cream, coriander and pickled red onions. Speaking of Wagyu, a house favorite is the Waygu beef burger, served on a brioche bun or wrapped in steamed collards for those on a gluten free diet. Vieux Carre’ Market proudly serves Wagyu beef in the bistro and carries it in the market. What is Wagyu beef? It is also known as American-Style Kobe beef, which is the result of cross breeding Japanese Wagyu cattle and Angus cattle. The name Kobe is reserved exclusively to describe cattle raised in the Kobe region of Japan. Wagyu cattle raised outside of Kobe must be identified as Wagyu or Kobe-style. The meat from these superior cattle is known worldwide for its naturally enhanced flavor, tenderness, and juiciness. The meat is highly sought after because of intense marbling and high percentage of healthy unsaturated fat. It is the highest quality beef in the United States. Wagyu takes beef to a whole other level. If you are in the mood for mouth-watering, flavor-enriched beef, stop by Vieux Carré Market today. We carry great selections of craft beer, wine for all occasions, gourmet cheeses, and all kinds of other delights for cooking and entertaining.

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InterMountain Renovation Consultants Hotel Renovation Company Opens New Office, Launches Brand

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NE OF THE MOST UNIQUE hotel development companies in the United States is headquartered in Monroe, LA. For nearly 35 years now, Dewey Weaver has owned and managed hotels throughout the country. He soon found himself needing to renovate those hotels every few years. After years of outsourcing the work he began to think, “Why would I continue to outsource this work when I know we can do it better and more efficiently.” In the beginning the renovations were on hotels that Weaver owned. But it didn’t take long for other hotel owners and companies to take notice. Recently the company rolled out its brand with a new name, logo, website and video taking their story to a broader audience. The company’s name is IRC (also known as InterMountain Renovation Consultants). IRC renovates name brand hotels including

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Hilton, Marriott, Hyatt, Starwood, IHG and Choice hotels, just to name a few. The company specializes in managing capital expenditures and provides turn-key, fullservice renovation solutions to the hospitality industry. According to a report by New York University School of Professional Studies, United States hotels spend more than $6 billion in hotel upgrades on an annual basis. IRC has grown over the last five years to manage part of that upgrade process. What makes IRC unique? IRC’s roots are steeped in tradition and it is the overall experience that makes the company stand out from its competitors. As soon as you step into the IRC office, you quickly realize you are surrounded by experts in the hospitality industry. King Scovell from Woodbine Development Corporation said of IRC, “They

are the epitome of the hotel industry.” In addition to the official rollout of the brand, Weaver announced the person who will lead the IRC team: Jared Walker. ”I appreciate the confidence Dewey has placed in me to serve at the head of this company. Dewey’s principles and philosophies have engrained in us the importance of treating every project as if it were our own. But, most importantly, we aim to complete our projects on budget and on time,” said Walker, Vice President of IRC. “We expect great things from the company, and I couldn’t be more proud of the team we have put together.” IRC has completed over 300 projects ranging from $50K to $5M per project. “We believe in working hard, living life to the fullest and of course, having some fun along the way,” Walker said.


Improving Medical Access One Click at a Time MyGlenwoodClinic.com

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GLENWOOD’S NEW ONLINE self-scheduling tool powered by InQuicker® is improving the way patients can see doctors and get access to the healthcare they need. Using a computer or any mobile device, browse through schedule openings and book appointments with our doctors or clinics…anywhere, anytime. Add a little convenience to your life by accessing the tool at MyGlenwoodClinic.com. The healthcare you need is just a click away.

Thomas Causey, MD, F.A.C.C. Glenwood Cardiology 102 Thomas Road, Suite 201 West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 338-3525

Alyce Adams, MD Glenwood Internal Medicine 3106 Cypress Street West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 322-0458

Ellen Gentile, NP Glenwood Family Care Clinic 3101 Cypress St., Suites 8 and 9 West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 644-2573

Billy Branch, MD Glenwood Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 9052 Hwy 165 North Sterlington, LA 71280 Phone: (318) 665-0170

Ann Gray, FNP Glenwood Stat Care 1107 Glenwood Dr. West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: 318-396-3800

David G Gardner, MD Glenwood Foot and Ankle 3101 Kilpatrick Blvd Monroe, LA 71201 Phone: (318) 322-5506

Ronald Hammett, MD Pulmonary Specialist 102 Thomas Road, Suite 104 West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 329-8485 Russell Lolley, MD General Surgery and Wound Care 102 Thomas Road, Suite 203 West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 329-8445 Brent A Metts, MD, PhD Glenwood Ear, Nose and Throat 102 Thomas Road Suite 202 West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 329-8458 Janet Morvant, NP Glenwood Medicine Clinic 501 McMillan Rd. West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: 318-388-1400 Roland Ponarski, MD Glenwood Family and Internal Medicine 102 Thomas Road Suite 104 West Monroe, LA 71291 Phone: (318) 329-8485

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Gluten Free Goodness

For His Temple Highlights Healthy Options

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OR HIS TEMPLE FAMILY FOODS LOCATED ON WOOD Street in Antique Alley is truly unique. They are a prepared meal take out restaurant, a take out lunch and breakfast spot, a grocery market, a coffee shop, a kefir smoothie bar, a bakery and so much more. Since this unique restaurant opened its doors almost a year ago, it has grown in both happy customers and healthy food options. Focused on creating 100% gluten free foods using pastured meats and organic produce from farms local to our region, the meals are all about what’s healthy, nutritious and tasty. The focus is on whole foods, seasonal vegetables and cooking from scratch. Whole chickens are stewed and hand picked for the Housemade Chicken Salad that flies off the cooler shelf. “Cream” of Mushroom Soup and Enchilada Sauce, key ingredients in various house recipes, are scratch made. Dry beans are slow cooked for hours, as well as roasts and briskets. Nothing is precooked. It’s all homemade like “Grandma used to do.” The prepared meal and daily lunch special menus change, expand and evolve regularly with southern classics like Hamburger Steak or Meatloaf with seasonal veggies and international favorites like Egg Roll in a Bowl and Cabo Verde Chicken. There are breakfast options like PB Oats, Supercharged Oatmeal and Chocolate Chia Pudding Parfait. The breakfast menu continues to expand with Key Lime Parfait being the latest addition. Organic lattes are available daily as well as Fruit smoothies using housemade dairy or nondairy kefir. The market is stocked with fresh goodies from all over the region, as well as gluten free and organic grocery items. You can purchase local, fresh, organic pastured eggs from Sapphire Farms, fresh milk delivered weekly from Flowing Hills Creamery, LLC in central Louisiana, flavored Chevre cheeses from Haute Goat Creamery, organic salsas from El Cabo Verde, Mahaffey Farms organic meats and Comfort Food gluten free mixes for pancakes, cookies and brownies, just to name a few. You can even participate in a regional CSA (Community-supported agriculture) from one of the largest organic farms in our state, Inglewood Farms. In May, For His Temple Family Foods received their Great Kitchen accreditation from Beyond Celiac, formerly known as the National Celiac Foundation. This signifies their knowledge and care in serving gluten free food. As you can see, there is a lot happening in this quiet little restaurant in Antique Alley. Stay tuned for continued exciting new developments. Keeping it fresh and real is what they’re all about!

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Improving Your Smile

Create The Smile You’ve Always Wanted BY DAVID FINLEY, D.D.S

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AFTER

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O YOU EVER TRY TO HIDE YOUR TEETH WHEN YOU are talking? Advances in cosmetic dentistry can make you proud of your smile. A dazzling smile can ignite a room. It projects strength, confidence and beauty. For decades dentists have worked on ways to treat dental problems. We can now change the way your teeth look, and the way you feel! Because your mouth is one of the focal points of your face, it plays a major role in how you perceive yourself and how others perceive you. And now, taking steps to improve your appearance is an investment in your long-term health and well-being. Here’s a glossary of what the most popular – and quick – treatments can do for your smile ... apart from making a lasting impression this holiday season! Whitening – Erases stains and discolorations for a brighter, whiter smile. It’s so popular because it’s so fast, safe and effective. Veneers – Stains and chips, or overlapping and uneven teeth, may require veneers which are extremely thin but strong porcelain shells that are layered over the surfaces of natural teeth. Veneers can be designed to improve the proportions of your smile. White Fillings – White composite, porcelain, cast glass, or resin inlays and onlays replace silver-colored fillings. Patients have options to improve their smile thanks to new materials and advances in cosmetic training. Increasing numbers of adults are improving the appearance and function of their teeth. We often correct cracked, chipped, or unevenly spaced teeth using bonding or with veneers. This patient chose porcelain veneers prior to her wedding. What’s so special about cosmetic veneers? Hand-sculpted porcelain veneers, applied to the outside surfaces of your teeth, can dramatically recontour your smile, and they’re long-lasting. Also, applying veneers doesn’t involve moving your teeth. The procedure is quick and your picture-perfect smile will look completely natural! We want your smile to radiate the health you feel. Reward yourself ... ask us about how we can help you to achieve your best smile possible: healthy, vibrant and natural! Give us a call today and get in today! Your smile can be bright and white ... just in time for back-to-school!

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Architectural Elegance 342 Lea Drive in West Monroe

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HIS ECLECTIC HOME, LOCATED ON A SMALL country road in West Monroe, is the definition of architectural elegance. Inspired by Acadian and European styles, this spacious, three bedroom, three and a half bath home is truly one-of-akind. It sits on a tailored 4.8 acre lot with a view of a private pond. The beautifully designed, fully-equipped outdoor kitchen and pool area is the perfect place to entertain guests. The landscaped yard comes not only with the spacious waterfront gazebo, but a lavish fountain and beautiful stone. An exquisite stone pathway leads from the home’s front property down to the gazebo that overlooks the pond, where one can enjoy the quiet, tranquil sounds of nature this hidden treasure has to offer. Entering the front door of the home, one will take notice of arched ceilings and wood floors that flow throughout the living area, dining room and kitchen. The kitchen is adorned with breathtaking light fixtures, a brick accent wall and a large island that is complete with sink and granite countertops. Its open floor plan, with the dining room, makes it ideal for hosting and serving guests for any occasion. Leading outside to the pool, exquisitely detailed frames line the doors in both the kitchen and living area, setting an elegant tone to each of the rooms. A large brick arch separates the kitchen from the living room, matching the brick used in the kitchen. The same brick continues throughout the house to the hearth that frames the fireplace emphasizing the vaulted ceiling in the living area. Across the ceiling, wood rafters pair well with the wrought iron candle chandelier and wide plank wood floors, creating an Old English feel to the sizable living space. This whimsical design will make one want to curl up by the fireplace with loved ones while the framed glass doors provide a perfect view to the patio. Every detail of this home complements the other and creates a seamless flow inside and out. The creative usage of brick and wood provide an artistic and historical style to the home fit for royalty. It’s a buyer’s dream come true! Priced well below market appraisal, you’ll have plenty of room to make this property your own. A home this exquisite deserves someone who can truly appreciate its beauty and how special this home really is. Call Jason Thomas, a realtor with John Rea, at 318-884-4121, or feel free to email him at jasonthomas@ johnrearealty.com, and this one-of-a-kind home could be yours.

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Thurman’s Food Factory Much More Than Dessert

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OR OVER 40 YEARS,THURMAN DICKEY HAS CREATED culinary dreams and delicious desserts and has become a staple on the catering scene in Northeast Louisiana. His shop on Stubbs Avenue in Monroe is known for the plate lunch specials Monday through Friday and for having casseroles and frozen dishes readily available to pick up for a sick friend, housewarming or just a Wednesday night supper. Thurman’s freezer is full of flavor with a variety of casseroles that include creole chicken, chicken cheese spaghetti, chicken enchiladas, king ranch chicken, chicken pot pie, lasagna, Mexican casserole, spaghetti and stuffed bell peppers. Some seafood favorites include Blend of the Bayou, Seafood Spectacular, shrimp and crawfish fettuccini, jambalaya and shrimp creole. For the vegetarian lovers, there is green bean, broccoli and rice, sweet potato, macaroni and cheese and hashbrown potato. And if that doesn’t cover it all, Thurman can make other casseroles on request. With their extensive catering menu, they can take care of your special event, from beginning to end. They offer some Louisiana staples like boudin balls, shrimp dip, meat pies, marinated crab claws, jambalaya, oysters and even a roasted pig for an added flair. It isn’t a party without a dip and there are plenty to choose from at Thurman’s – crab, spinach artichoke, cheese, grits and corn, B.L.T, blackeye pea, spinach, vidala onion and seven layered Mexican dip. For the main course, you can choose from ham, beef tenderloin, ribs, brisket, turkey, Swedish meatballs, ribs, catfish and more. They also have traditional party platters with vegetables, cheeses, fruit, meat and sandwiches. Thurman’s is not lacking in the sweets department either. They offer classic cake favorite flavors like white, chocolate and yellow, as well as specialty flavors like Italian Crème, Red Velvet, German Chocolate and Lemon Torte. If you want to sample some of the delicious dessert but don’t have a party on the books, you can always swing by the shop and pick up a sheet cake off the table that Thurman’s has readily available. Often you can find sweet flavors like Neiman Marcus, Earthquake, Fudge Factory, Heavenly Hash and more. On a daily basis, there are fresh cookies, breads and pastries like cupcakes, pralines and petit fours to choose from. If you are looking for more of a savory treat, there are always those delicious cheese straws! When you think of food, Thurman’s Food Factory should be your first stop – whether you just want to pick up lunch, a casserole for dinner, plan a small get together or have an extravagant event. There is no party too large or too small that Thurman’s can’t handle! WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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HOME IS WHERE THE art IS BAYOU ARTIST NICK BUSTAMANTE ARTICLE BY KAY STOTHART RECTOR AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN G MEYERS

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ick Bustamante is at home in North Louisiana, in the truest sense of the word. Through his connection to Ruston, his adopted hometown, he has found a sense of place that defines, in part, who he is and what he is trying to convey in his work as an artist. As Bustamante can attest, home is not always where we are born and raised. Sometimes it is where we arrive by chance, through some fortuitous circumstance. Before becoming an art professor at Louisiana Tech University, Bustamante had lived his entire life in California. He had never heard of Ruston, Louisiana and never even visited the Bayou State. “The very first time I stepped foot in Louisiana was for the interview at Tech,” laughs Bustamante, “and the second time I stepped foot in Louisiana was with my U-Haul, moving here.” Following high school, Bustamante attended Humboldt State University, graduated with a Bachelor of Art degree and went on to earn a Master of Fine Arts degree from California State University, Long Beach. He was living in Long Beach, near Los Angeles, serving as an adjunct instructor at a community college there when presented with an opportunity which would not only impact his career but shape his entire future. He accepted a position as Associate Professor in 2004 and now serves as Chair of the Studio Art Program at Louisiana Tech. One of the things he found impressive about the Louisiana Tech art program was the smaller class size, which enables an instructor to really get to know the students. “My passion, besides art, is teaching,” says Bustamante. He recognized that having a more one-on-one encounter with students would allow him to make a bigger difference in their education. While he did experience a bit of culture shock moving from a more metropolitan area and lifestyle, Bustamante says that he really fell in love with the university and the charm and slower pace of its small town setting. Unlike where he came from, he no longer spends hours stuck in traffic during his commute to and from work. “I actually have more time to paint here,” he says. Moving to a small Louisiana town was a risk that many of Bustamante’s peers criticized and warned him against. Originally, the California native thought that he would gain teaching experience at Louisiana Tech and then eventually move on. But what he

found surprised him. As it turned out, Bustamante has realized artistic opportunities in Ruston that he says he probably would not have had in Los Angeles. Several years ago, Bustamante was beginning to experiment with digital painting when he was contacted by LA Tech biology professor Dr. Jamie Newman, and bio-medical engineering professor, Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, about doing illustrations for a book chapter they were writing entitled “Engineered Stem Cell-Based Scaffolds and Patches for Heart Disorders.” Although medical illustration was something he had never done, Bustamante agreed to the project and submitted a digital painting for them to consider. They begin to collaborate and found that although the three of them came from completely different disciplines—a biologist, an engineer and an artist—they were able to work well together. “We speak totally different languages professionally,” Bustamante says, “but it was a huge success and an amazing experience. I think I ended up learning more about art than the scientists did.” Before long, they were looking for other projects and ways to get students involved. “New Frontiers in Biomedical Research,” a seminar series conducted annually by Newman and Caldorera-Moore, provided that inroad. Thanks to the generous donation of a Louisiana Tech alumni, the art department was able to purchase Wacom tablets, which are highly pressure-sensitive electronic tablets used to create digital artistic images. Art students used the tablets to design biomedical illustrations for the seminar brochure, and worked with their “client” to visualize a scientific concept. Scientists, medical professionals and attorneys introduced students to the use of medical illustrations in their various fields of work. Bustamante says that the interdisciplinary project has been a unique learning experience for him and for his students, exposing WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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them to new technology and potential career paths. Tech’s curriculum has expanded to include a digital painting class as well as a class in medical illustration. The administration is working toward an accredited program offering certification in the field of medical illustration. “Blending art with science,” Bustamante says, “is one of those things that I never in my wildest dreams expected I would be doing.” Bustamante’s career took another unexpected turn when Cynthia Steele, a community leader in Homer, Louisiana, contacted him about painting a mural on one of the town’s vacant buildings. Although much of his work is in large scale paintings, Bustamante had never done a mural. He took on the project individually, but soon realized the need for student involvement. That turned out to be a great learning opportunity for both him and the art students.

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The Homer mural was designed by local artist Judy Buckner and painted by Bustamante and students. It took the entire academic quarter, plus a portion of summer vacation, to complete. The students were dedicated and became invested in the project, continuing to drive to Homer to work on it even after they had completed the class requirement and received their grade. They all realized what their work meant to the community. Townspeople were constantly stopping by, bringing food, watching them paint and sharing in the town’s beautification effort as it progressed. That initial mural project in Homer led to murals in other communities. Two of those—one in Chatham, Louisiana, and, most recently, for the Ruston Farmer’s Market—were done as class projects. Students submitted designs for the mural, and once a design was selected, the students worked together to bring it to life in paint. They had to do things that they had never done, like building scaffolding, projecting an image onto a huge outdoor surface, and communicating and working together in ways that are not required in a solo endeavor. Bustamante says what they all gained from working together and with the community on these projects was invaluable. In addition to the class murals, Bustamante has continued to do mural work on his own. In partnership with Whitney Causey, a Louisiana Tech graduate who worked on the first project in Homer, Bustamante founded Heirloom Murals. Through this business, he has painted large-scale murals in Jonesboro, Farmerville, Ruston and downtown Monroe. He says mural painting is something that he might never have done had he not answered that call from Steele. “I always tell my students: ‘Be ready for opportunities when you see them, and take risks. Get out of your comfort zone.’” He knows from experience that his life would be completely different if he had not followed that advice. Bustamante is the first person in his family to graduate from college. Looking back, he is a little surprised that his parents allowed and encouraged him, as a first generation college student, to study art instead of a more traditional profession. Bustamante knew early on that he wanted to be an artist, but it was not until after one of his first exhibitions during


graduate school that it really became clear to him the amount of sacrifice and the level of commitment it would take to become successful. “It is one thing to say that you are interested in art or want to major in art, but to make it your profession, you have to be dedicated to it,” Bustamante advises. It is imperative for him to spend time in the studio every day, painting. “Even if you love something, it isn’t always easy to do. There are always those days that I don’t want to go into the studio and don’t want to work. But I make myself show up. I make myself keep scheduled hours to be in the studio. Otherwise, the work won’t happen.” “My work is all about creating order in chaos,” Bustamante explains. “We all do that, whether we are artists or not, trying to make sense of it all.” In his work, texture and pattern and imagery are often

stacked and intermingled in what sometimes appears to be a chaotic way. He is particularly interested in what he calls “nonlinear narratives,” which allow multiple time frames to overlap and coexist. He also has a strong interest in place, and in external and internal spaces. “When you experience a place, you have a memory of that, but that memory includes certain things that are hard to document, such as smells, or reflections. Those are the things that I want the viewer to experience when they look at my painting. So, the color is exaggerated, and there are things that are somewhat out of place or mysterious so that the viewer has to sort of fill in the blanks. My hope is that the viewer will experience not just what I see, but their own memories as well,” says Bustamante. He believes that the more personal you make a painting, the more universal it becomes. “If someone looks at my work, and leaves the gallery and thinks about it that night or a week later, then that is success,” Bustamante feels. “If that happens, I have connected with the viewer in some way.” Bustamante has now been in Louisiana almost 12 years. Since coming here, he has had a sort of fascination with his surroundings. Last year, he began working in earnest with the Louisiana landscape,

“When you experience a place, you have a memory of that, but that memory includes certain things that are hard to document, such as smells, or reflections. Those are the things that I want the viewer to experience when they look at my painting.”

with a particular interest in abandoned structures. “In this part of Louisiana,” Bustamante noticed, “nature takes over, reclaiming the land. Trees grow through houses, because that’s where water collects. Bees create a hive and kudzu grows over it. That’s not something you see in urban areas like Los Angeles.” The idea of reclaiming, rebirth, and a new beginning led him to what he calls “spinning a narrative” around these structures. “Thematically, my work has always been in relationship with my location and environment, and also reflects whatever I am going through at the time,” says Bustamante. “That is true of any artist’s work, but mine tends to manifest itself more in terms of the landscape and place.”

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s he explores the surrounding landscape, he says he finds a world much different from the urban environment of his childhood. Bustamante finds experiences such as being in a boat on the bayou without a man-made structure anywhere in sight not only awe-producing but strangely comforting. It was that feeling that led to an epiphany a few years ago, when he realized that this area is truly home to him now. Important to this transition was meetWWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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ing his wife, Louisiana native and “FInding Home” mural painted in downtown fellow artist, Hannah Bustamante. Monroe by artist Nick Bustamante She is, he says, the most important part of why North Louisiana feels like home. “I’m no longer the guy from California,” he says, “and my work reflects that.”As an example of this, he points to the mural in downtown Monroe. Bustamante says the Monroe project is the only mural that he has done to date that reflects his own voice and his own personal narrative. He was afforded much more artistic freedom with this project than with any of the others. Property owner Michael Echols and the funding agency, Downtown Monroe Renaissance Board, commissioned the mural and gave Bustamante artistic license to create from his own inspiration. Entitled “Finding Home,” it is based on one of the artist’s favorite works and explores the beauty and serenity of Louisiana’s bayou country. “Finding Home” is clearly recognizable as a Bustamante painting, very much in keeping with his more recent body of work. The bayou scene,” he says, “is a sort of magical landscape and has a fantastical element, with chandeliers coming down from the sky, reflective diamond patterns floating in and out of the space, and a gradient from daylight to night.” It depicts egrets as characters with distinct personalities, gathering bottles for a bottle tree, in a boat motoring toward home, and standing on the porch of a house that glows with light and warmth from the inside. The house is actually a replica of the home that he shares with his wife and the egret characters are stand-ins for the two of them. For Bustamante, the mural painting evokes the feeling of longing that wells up within all of us when we think of a particular place we consider home. He becomes emotional when talking about his own sense of home as a welcoming place where someone who loves you is waiting for you. “It’s a need,” he says, “that all humans have for security and a sense of belonging, and I am lucky to have found that.” Home is also a central theme and inspiration for Bustamante’s next artistic project. When he and his wife, Hannah, decided to take the next step in their lives as a family and adopt a child, they had no idea the expense it would entail. To defray the cost of the adoption, the pair has committed to creating a body of work through a collaborative effort. They have never collaborated in this particular way, artistically, by painting together. “It’s exciting to do this together, and to involve and connect other people in what we are doing,” Bustamante says. The project, which is still in the planning phase, will consist of a series of smaller oil paintings reflecting their collective style. All proceeds from the sale of their paintings will go toward adoption expenses. Because of the motivation behind it, Bustamante expects this body of work to be deeply personal in its narrative. “We want it to reflect our desire to give our child the sense of love and home that we have found.”

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P&S Surgical Hospital

Dr. Manrique Discusses His Passion for Heart Health

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LVARO MANRIQUE-GARCIA, FOLLOWED his heart when he chose to become an electrophysiologist. “I wake up every day, motivated to come to work and make a difference in a patient’s life. I spent many long nights studying and working to become better, and I made sacrifices to get to where I am today. It’s so important for young DR. MANRIQUE people to discover their passion and then pursue it.” Dr. Manrique, Monroe’s only board eligible cardiac electrophysiologist, began working at P&S Surgical Hospital one year ago in the hospital’s Cardiac and Peripheral-Vascular Laboratories. The son of two physicians, he initially wanted to become a surgeon who repaired infant hearts. He discovered cardiology—specifically electrophysiology—and instantly became intrigued by the possibilities in the field. Electrophysiology is a relatively new specialty—about 40 years old. To put it simply, an electrophysiologist is an “electrician of the heart.” This type of cardiologist focuses on heart rhythm disorders, which can produce symptoms such as palpitations, light-headedness, shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness, and in extreme cases, collapse and sudden cardiac arrest. A cardiac ablation has the ability to transform a patient’s quality of life by eradicating areas in the heart that are producing abnormal electrical impulses and causing heart arrhythmia. Dr. Manrique uses state-of-the art imaging techniques, such as intracardiac echocardiography and three dimensional cardiac mapping, to capture a clear picture of the heart’s inner workings with minimal complications. He then pinpoints where the irregular rhythm is occurring so he can cauterize—and destroy—the particular cell causing the arrhythmia. “I love electrophysiology because you can instantly determine what is wrong with a patient and permanently fix that problem through a minimally invasive procedure,” he said. “We have had several patients with heart arrhythmia, and they were limited physically. They would get very tired and very fatigued. After the cardiac ablations, their energy levels returned to normal, and they were able to do things they were not able to do before.” Anja Elias, a nurse and manager of the cardiac labs, said that Dr. Manrique’s attitude and work ethic have made a significant impact in his short time at P&S. “He truly loves what he does. It’s more than a job to him. Each patient is equally important to him, and he works diligently to ensure they receive the best of care. He possesses an extraordinary work ethic.” Dr. Manrique moved from Peru to the United States in 2004, and completed a residency, an internship and a fellowship in Louisiana. He chose to further his education in Louisiana because he made good friends during his residency and fellowship. “It’s a great place to live and raise a family.” In his free time, he enjoys being with his wife Flor Grados, a pediatrician, and playing soccer with other physicians in Monroe.

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Better Living Market Healthy Fare and Ware

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ALEO, SOUTH BEACH DIET, WEIGHT WATCHERS, The Zone, NutriSystem, and the list can go on. All these diets have one thing in common: they are fads. I have met very few people who can continue one of these diets for more than a year or two. Yes, they work for many people, especially in the beginning, but most will hit a plateau and stop losing weight or will not reach their original goals. Frustration follows and then they are no longer following the diet. Fad diets can be very rewarding short term but are not sustainable for most people. A more sustainable goal is to slowly clean the diet. Evaluating eating habits, determining where the most help is needed and gradually changing to make sustainable changes is how I find most people can stick with it and noticeably see a difference.  My 4-year-old son recently told me he knows why it is called Better Living Market. “Because when you shop there, you will live better.” So simple for a 4-year-old to figure out, yet applying that concept is very difficult. At Better Living Market we strive to simplify that transition. We have an array of whole and natural foods to get you started, including an organic produce section, many fermented food products, as well as all oils and fats needed for cooking, and organic spices and seasonings.  Our bodies are designed to heal and thrive only when given the proper environment. Diet plays a huge part in providing this proper environment but it can be really confusing to know where to start and what direction to take your diet. The Internet can be an excellent resource but can be very conflicting. Having someone knowledgeable who you can access and ask specific questions of is key in heading down the right path with your diet. That is where I come in. We know how confusing and frustrating it can be to change your diet. As a registered dietitian, I have worked with many people to change their eating habits and learn what foods and habits work, and don’t work, for each person individually. Visit Valerie and stay up to date on nutritional tips and much more! Better Living Market 301 North Monroe Street Ruston, La 318.254.0761 www.BetterLivingMarket.com Together, we are committed to helping you on your journey to true health and whole-body wellness.

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Linda Lavender School of Dance Bringing the Joy of Dance to Those of All Ages

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T LINDA LAVENDER SCHOOL OF DANCE,THE JOY of dance can be seen in the faces of young dancers through their jubilant smiles and excited squeals. No matter the age of the dancer, it is important to the staff at LLSD for each student to find dance to be a joyful experience. “The staff at LLSD is passionate about filling our dancers’ hearts with the love of dance. We feel so blessed to be able to share our passion with young dancers everyday,” says Linda Lou Bourland, who has been teaching dance for over 30 years. For over 50 years, the staff at LLSD has nurtured this passion and worked tirelessly to instill the love of dance in the lives of each of our students. Dance provides a life-enhancing experience and is a wonderful outlet that not only utilizes creativity and talent, but also teaches discipline. At Linda Lavender School of Dance, we are committed to providing a positive and productive learning environment, and most importantly, creating an atmosphere that provides a joyful experience. LLSD is proud to provide an environment of professional dance training for all students, from beginner to advanced, child to adult. Our classes include tumbling, ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop and pointe and start at age 3 and up. Linda Lavender School of Dance is proud to be the home of the Twin City Ballet Company. Owner and operator of one of the largest dance schools in the Ark-La-Miss, Linda Ford has been Artistic Director of Twin City Ballet Company for more than 30 years. If you have a new student interested in becoming a member of the LLSD family, registration will be held Monday, August 8th and Tuesday, August 9th, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., at both studio locations. The Monroe studio is located at 2907 DeSoto and the West Monroe studio is located at 651 Commercial Parkway. Former students will get their information by mail. For more information, give us a call at 318.361.0391 (Monroe) or 318.325.7179 (West Monroe), or check us out online at www.lindalavenderschoolofdance.com and www. facebook. com/LindaLavenderSchoolOfDance. Dance is for everyone and everyone is welcome! Our staff is ready for you!

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Copeland Electrical

Identifying Antique Chandeliers

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18th Century Oil Chandelier Converted to Electric

N ANTIQUE CRYSTAL CHANDELIER OFTEN IS SEEN as a work of art. The dazzling shine and light-reflecting qualities originally were used to enhance and distribute the soft light of the candles that once were used as the light source. As is the case with many antiques, finding a stamp or maker’s mark on a crystal chandelier can be challenging or even impossible. Correctly identifying an antique crystal chandelier depends on your recognition of certain design features and characteristics. Drip Pans, also called bobeche, are the cup-like pieces of crystal located at the base of each candle nozzle, designed to catch candle wax. Perry & Co., one of the most prestigious chandelier makers, has a distinctive feature, which is an oval-shaped depression repeated on the underside of the pan, on parts of the body and along the curved arms that extend from the body of the chandelier. F & C Osler’s chandeliers are known for their distinctive, tulip-shaped shades with brass fittings that hold the lights at the end of each arm. Baltic chandeliers may be identified by their brass drip pans. Characteristics of French-made chandeliers include shallow, pressed-glass pans with a floral shape. British chandeliers have a star-shaped drip pan with almond-shaped drops hanging from each point. A classic Baccarat drip pan features a thinly cut piece of glass with fluted edges, similar to a piecrust. Glass Color – The high lead content of a 19th-century chandelier makes the glass appear to have a gray tint. This is a good indication that the chandelier is authentic and not a modern reproduction. Baltic chandeliers, which originate from Sweden or Russia, have a characteristic blue, dish-shaped piece in the center. Bagues chandeliers commonly feature colored kite, almond or plaque-shaped drops. Other Features – Antique chandeliers were not wired for electricity. In the middle of the 19th century, gas-powered chandeliers began replacing candle chandeliers. Hollow glass or metal tubes were used to form the arms, allowing gas to reach the candle nozzles. Austrian and Italian-made chandeliers had a metal core surrounded by glass. Look for materials such as brass, bronze or copper. The drops on antique chandeliers usually were faceted on both sides as opposed to modern drops, which often feature a faceted side and a smooth side. A common feature seen on 18th-century chandeliers are daisy-shaped glass buttons. Before you begin chandelier shopping, there are a few things you should consider. The ceiling height and the dimensions of the chandelier, as well as the weight are also important factors. Most electrical boxes in current homes must be replaced to support the weight of the piece. Is the desired location accessible to power? The average lighting junction box is not designed to support most chandeliers. It is critical that the proper mounting system be in place for a safe installation. One must also take in account the availability of power to the desired location. At Copeland Electric we can meet your needs with our qualified and professional team. Call Brad Reynolds for questions about our service capabilities.    


Portico Restaurant and Bar Delicious Dishes and Tasty Toddys

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OR NEARLY A DECADE, PORTICO RESTAURANT AND Bar has been THE it spot for delicious dishes and tasty toddys, and they are adding even more to please palates in the Twin Cities. As sole proprietor of the Tower Drive location in Monroe, Stephen Walker has revamped the menu with new food and drink options, as well as some specials that are sure to keep customers happy and coming back for more. “We are excited about our upgraded 2-for-1 Burger Night, featuring our improved burgers with choice ground chuck and new fresh brioche buns,” said Walker. “Every Wednesday, you can dine in with a “burger buddy” and get the special price. We think this is a great deal for families and college students.” Speaking of college students, Portico should be every ULM student’s home away from home when they are hungry, as they accept Student Warhawk cards. And on Mondays in the Fall, Portico is the home of the ULM Coaches show. The specials continue on Thursdays when Portico celebrates Girls Night Out with bottomless house wine, $5 select cocktails and appetizers. With a creative and simplified menu, Portico has introduced some items that are exclusive to the Monroe location. Some new “big plates” that Portico has introduced include Cast Iron Filet Medallions, served with a port Dijon cream sauce, braised portabellas and asiago grits. Another new item is the Citrus Salmon, which features a pan-seared salmon, lemon vinaigrette, and fresh herb rice, topped with tzatziki marinated cucumbers and tomatoes. In addition to daily lunch specials ranging from red beans and rice on Monday to chicken and dumplings on Friday, Portico also offers some off menu items for lunch and dinner specials. “We like to be able to get creative and offer special items and dishes that might be unexpected,” explains Walker. And if you don’t have time to come to the restaurant, Portico can come to you. With options of off site catering and office lunches, they can feed your staff, friends and family on the go. After a long day at the office, Portico is your happy hour headquarters every day from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Not only are there beer, wine and craft cocktail options to wet your whistle, Portico now offers a new Nip & Nosh happy hour menu featuring small $5 portions of shrimp and crab beignets, wild mushroom flatbread, buffalo parmesan fried oysters and more. These small plates pair excellent with their new craft cocktail menu items, which feature seasonal cocktails with fresh ingredients. Some favorites include the “Bayou Nomad,” “Voodoo Doll” and “Pearadise,” just to name a few. On the weekends, Portico offers the best of both worlds with their Sunday brunch menu from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Some of the unique items like the Southern Fried Chicken and Biscuits, Louisiana Crab Cakes and Fried Green Tomatoes have become customer favorites. And no Sunday brunch is complete without a little hair of the dog, so Portico offers a build-your-own Bloody Mary bar as well as bottomless mimosas with freshly squeezed orange juice. Since its inception, Portico Restaurant and Bar has always been a local favorite and Stephen Walker invites you to come see why.

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Southern Escape

Do You Have What It Takes To Escape?

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HE ESCAPE ROOM CRAZE HAS LANDED IN Monroe, thanks to Kelle and Sydne Messer, a mother-daughter team from Monroe. Southern Escape opened at the end of June to kick off the summer with a new “something to do” in town. The Messers became fans of escape rooms after a college visit to Arkansas where Sydne will be attending the University of Arkansas in the fall. They were looking for something fun to do during their visit and found the escape room. After playing the game, they knew that Monroe needed something like this. So, that evening last October, they began researching the ins and outs of an operating an escape room. Co-owner Sydne Messer says “We have been blown away by the support and response from our community.” What is an escape room? It’s an exciting and interactive entertainment experience that will have your heart pounding and your adrenaline pumping as you race to discover hidden clues and solve cryptic puzzles to find your way out. The game will teach you to think outside the box, to use your senses and to work as a team. You will be locked in a themed room for one hour and your mission is to escape. Would you have what it takes to escape? Kelle says, “It’s a great way to unplug and get away from your smart phone or TV to

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experience face-to-face interaction with your friends, family or even co-workers.” Team Building: Any businesses looking to boost morale or build camaraderie in your team should consider booking a game at Southern Escape. This will take team building to a whole new level. Teams that can learn to work together will not only have success in the challenge but also in the workplace. Groups of more than 10 should contact Southern Escape for booking. Parties: If you are looking for a fun, new place for a party, Southern Escape could provide something out of the ordinary. The escape room brings fun to any celebration whether it’s a birthday party, bachelor or bachelorette party, graduation or anniversary, you will be sure to have a great experience. We also have a party room for an additional charge that will hold 12-15 people. Booking your experience: All bookings can be made online at southernescaperoom.com. Choose the room and time you would like to play and book directly through the website. The cost to play is $25 +tax per person. Parties of more than 10 should call or email so that we can help you get the rooms you desire.


New to Historic Downtown West Monroe The Mother Hen Children’s and Gift Boutique

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OCATED ON COTTON STREET IN ANTIQUE ALLEY, The Mother Hen is West Monroe’s newest children’s and gift boutique offering an array of unique gift options for anyone on your list. I’m Kerri Sue McBeth, mom of three, bringing you affordable options to dress your child as well as gifts for many holidays and special occasions.  We carry clothing sizes newborn to 6T and are receiving shipments daily with new fall arrivals.  From your baby’s take home outfit to your little one’s first day of school, we have got you covered.  Need an outfit for that special holiday? Come check out our selection of birthday and holiday options.  We also have mix and match bedding and plenty of accessories that help to make the arrival of a new baby a smooth transition.  We carry Angel Baby gift sets, swaddle blankets, diaper bags, Jelly Cats, Moby wraps, Little Giraffe blankets and much more.  If you need that last piece of décor to make the nursery complete, we have frames and signs perfect for any space.  We love helping expecting moms select their favorites for their personalized baby registry.

Back to School is right around the corner. We have backpacks, lunchboxes and nap mats that will have your school-goer ready for his or her first day.  If you need books to add to your home library, we are excited to carry Alpha-Kidz books which are loved by kids and parents alike. Need something to carry for the weekend? We have totes ready to be personalized for your little one’s toys, your overnight clothes or business files.  The options are endless and also make perfect gifts for anyone on your list.  We have something for Mom, Dad, Grandparents, Brides, Teachers and more.  We love to add that personalized touch and offer monogramming on-site for many items in store.  For the past five years I have monogrammed for family and friends and would love to help you create that perfect design. Check us out on Facebook and Instagram and then come see us at 115 Cotton Street, downtown West Monroe.

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Relevant and Successful Warehouse No. 1’s Iconic Status

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T TAKES A SPECIAL RESTAURANT TO REMAIN relevant and successful in a small city. But it takes a truly impressive dining establishment to reach the iconic status that the Warehouse No. 1 Restaurant has managed to achieve. It is a place where locals and visitors can repeatedly enjoy traditional favorites and try tempting new dishes under the watchful eye of a dedicated staff. With so many modern and enticing items on the extensive menu, this eatery will continue to impress diners as long as the river runs. The Warehouse No. 1 serves food that is comparable to what most would find in a larger city, and the atmosphere is surprisingly family oriented. They are known for their awardwinning steaks and fresh seafood dishes. Their vast menu also includes decadent desserts and an extensive wine selection. The building itself retains a rich history. It was restored with a “less is more” attitude, keeping as many of the original features as possible from its time storing bales of cotton that were transported by steamboat along the river.

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They are always happy to accommodate large parties and celebrations. Many locals who have grown up in our region have fond memories of special occasions celebrated at the Warehouse No. 1. Romantic dates with a sweetheart, birthdays, rehearsal dinners and prom night meals have all been etched into our thoughts. Poised on her throne on the bank of the majestic Ouachita River, the Warehouse No. 1 keeps watch over the rolling water with a quiet confidence that comes from years of knowledge and experience. Unlike many restaurants of her kind, she has stood the test of time, not for remaining unchanged, but for constantly moving, evolving and growing. Though her memory is long, her eyes remain focused on the horizon, always anticipating and delighting in the future. It is for that reason that after an impressive 36 years the celebrated icon remains Monroe royalty. She has reigned over the river for many moons, only now she is truly at the top of her game.


New Shop Finds Home in the Garden District Roux Features Unique Home Furnishings

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HEN THE HEARNE FAMILY FIRST STARTED thinking of opening a store in Monroe, they initially wanted to feature Mexican pottery and furniture. However, once they found a location in the heart of the Garden District that was too perfect to pass up, they knew they needed to adjust their sails. They decided to focus on stylish and trendy home décor, accent pieces and furniture….and Roux was born. With a background in landscaping and lawn care, it might seem like an unlikely match, but their son, Elliott, has been busy keeping customers happy since the doors opened in May of this year. “After graduating from Ouachita and NLU, I moved off but made my way back in 2000,” said Elliott. “I came back to be closer to family and this has truly become a family business. My mom and sister both help out with purchasing and designing the store.” Roux features lighting, pillows, rugs, picture frames; and furniture including tables, sofas and accent pieces. Some of their pieces are particularly unique like tortoise shells, deer and antler décor, bottles, cotton pieces, woven baskets and a variety of bottles and containers. Roux also contains an area in the back of the store that features vintage

pieces such as dishes, prints, tapestries, décor and more. “We only have a limited number of items,” said Elliott. “We want people to come in and find pieces that are unique for their home and that nobody else will have. We are also getting new things in every week so it is ever-changing.” Some of the brands that Roux carries include Uttermost, Creative Co-op, Bramble, A&B Home, Park Hill, Ivy Stone, Loloi, Best, Home Elegance, Bloomingville, Keith Shaw and Style Craft, just to name a few. They also feature several candle lines including Himalayan candles and the local favorite, Sniff Candles, benefiting the local humane society. Another local product available at Roux is out of Sterlington, LA – Rooster Ridge lamps. These unique desk and floor lamps are made from various types of wood – cypress, hickory, cedar – and each piece is one of a kind. “We are excited to be a part of the neighborhood and have some exciting things planned for the future,” said Elliott. Find Roux on Facebook and Instagram to keep up with their ever changing inventory, upcoming events and exciting plans for the future!

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Above right: CHEF HANS KORRODI is a Louisiana legend and this month’s BayouIcon. Born in Switzerland and raised on a farm, Chef Hans has traveled the world. Once working for the famed Brennan family, he now resides in Monroe, LA. Above left: Chef Hans has successfully created a line of Creole-inspired seasonings.

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This is the story about how a farm boy from Switzerland became one of the most celebrated Cajun chefs in America. And he did it in North Louisiana.

Chef Hans Korrodi

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A RT I CL E BY MAR É B R EN NAN AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY M ART IN G MEYE RS

he Chef Hans Korrodi of my youth seemed much taller than he does now. Maybe it was his mile high chef’s hat. His perfect English coated with a mesmerizing German accent, intense blue eyes and unwavering pursuit of quality, however, remain the same. Today he’s dressed as a businessman, showing us around his enormous packaging and processing facility. Wearing a hat that is more scientist and engineer than chef, Hans Korrodi has transferred his vast knowledge of the restaurant industry and the Cajun food that helped him make his name into packaged meals that consumers can simply add water to, to cook and create tasteful versions of Louisiana staples, like jambalaya and red beans and rice. Or for those more adventuresome in the kitchen, he has created special blends of spices best used for creating Creole specialties like spicy, blackened fish. You don’t get to become a legend in the restaurant world the easy way, and Chef Hans’ rise to fame began years ago as a young boy growing up in Switzerland. Little Hans Korrodi was born in Switzerland in 1943 and raised on a working farm, filled to the brim with over 200 chickens, rabbits and hogs. “My mom taught me to cook. And we raised all of our foods ourselves. We were not allowed to buy goods at a store,” says Korrodi. “I still try to emulate her cooking.” He pauses to describe how they would milk their cows every morning, allowing the rich, heavy cream to rise to the top of the pails that his mother would skim off to use for cooking. “Nothing can compare to fresh ingredients and you don’t get much fresher than that.” Wanderlust struck Korrodi at an early age. Wanting to see the world, he enlisted as a merchant marine for three years, traveling along the Rhine River, which is a main supply route through central Europe. Korrodi was able to see Holland, France, Belgium and Germany. “Being a sailor is tough,” reminisces Korrodi. “Every day you must clean the ship and the rust, so I would escape

to the ship’s galley kitchen. I liked cooking much better than cleaning rust!” Not the most lucrative career, a three-year apprenticeship paid only $20 per month, but room and board were free. The tipping point for Korrodi, which pushed him to end his time as a sailor, occurred when he decided he would go for a swim in the Rhine on a day when the weather was particularly warm. He put on his swim trunks and climbed down the ladder which scaled the side of the massive tanker. His goal upon jumping in was to clear plenty of room between himself and the massive propellers which happened to be idling at the time. As he jumped into the current, Korrodi could feel the propeller sucking him under, pulling him into its blades rotating at 100 rpms. “I could hear the whooshing noise of the propeller and just paddled like crazy and prayed to God that I would not be killed.” At that point in the river, the current near Strasbourg is very strong and the river is about half a mile wide. When Korrodi had cleared the suction of the propeller he swam toward the nearest shore, which happened to be the French side of the river. After pulling himself up onto French territory, he made his way to French customs who told the dripping wet, shoeless Swiss merchant marine with no papers that he needed to get back to the German side in order to get back onto his boat. Korrodi made it back to his boat but took the incident as a sign to pursue the culinary arts, and he left the mariner life for an apprenticeship in a large brigade style kitchen. Korrodi recalls this time of his life as very stressful and demanding. Becoming a chef in Europe demands the highest order of training and certifications for each station in a brigade kitchen. Apprentices spend time at each station, learning and mastering very specific tasks, like how to bone out a leg of veal or create a Napoleon pastry before they receive their certificate. Korrodi worked for a large hotel, Hotel St. Gotthard, in Zurich during the ski season, indulging his passion for snow skiing and working for his certificates in a luxury hotel restaurant that imported lobsters from Maine and smoked its own salmon.

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In 1967, the Swiss Centre opened in London near Piccadilly Circus. “I took a contract for a year there and it was a big experience for me,” says Korrodi. It was there the chef became a production chef, and it was there that he applied for his visa to the United States. A stint in Oslo, Norway near the Royal Palace was Korrodi’s last European stop before coming to work in 1969 for fellow Swiss restauranteur Andrea Meyer, who ran the famous Waterville Valley Resort on White Mountain in New Hampshire. Laughs Chef Hans of his time spent in the Northeast, “To this day I still love a good New England chowder.” After working in New Hampshire and Vermont for eight years, Korrodi had saved up money and wanted to made a culinary road trip to Mexico. As luck would have it, he made a stop in New Orleans and ate in the Vieux Carré. So impressed by the meal and the ambience of white tablecloths, baguettes, the unmistakable European influences and the flavors, Korrodi stayed an extra three days in the Crescent City and made another stop on his way back from Mexico. “I couldn’t believe the cuisine,” he says. “It was totally different. These were the days before Cajun and Creole cooking were well known.” The influence of this trip to New Orleans was far reaching. Inspired by the cuisine he had discovered, Chef Hans and his family made a bold move to Houston in 1976 where he took a job with Ella Brennan, owner of Commander’s Palace, when she opened Brennan’s. Brennan’s was huge operation, says Chef Hans. “We had 30 cooks on the line, 40 waitstaff, and we were so busy the valets made more money than the cooks! It was the first place to have quality cuisine in Houston. Our Eggs Benedict was a huge seller. Every day, we would make three or four gallons of Hollandaise sauce, and I had a guy who did nothing but poach eggs all day. Cruz was a one-man egg poaching factory.” Chef Hans’ eyes dance as he demonstrates how the line chef could crack eggs with both hands and fill a large pot with perfectly poached eggs, knowing exactly and instinctively when to take each egg out. “We had quality but with volume,” says Korrodi of his time as executive chef at Brennan’s, which earned a coveted #9 restaurant in the country at the time. “Brennan’s had a great menu. I had two ladies who made crepes all day. We had three different soufflés on the menu. Fresh fish from the Gulf,” says Chef Hans wistfully. “And the turtle soup!”

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t that time Ella Brennan hired Chef Paul Prud’homme as her corporate chef at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Prud’homme was one of the first “Cajun” chefs to achieve stardom. Korrodi and Prudhomme became friends and often would challenge each other in creating unique dishes. “Ella once raved about my turtle soup and made Paul fly out to taste it, saying that my version was better than theirs in New Orleans,” states Chef Hans. “It’s incredible still today to remember what we did in Houston.” Working the split shift at Brennan’s in Houston meant that Chef Hans spent hard time behind the wheel of a car stuck in Houston’s wall to wall traffic. The pace and pressures associated with a top ten in the country restaurant added to a growing list for Chef Hans to make the move to Louisiana. For example, a typical Jazz Brunch at Brennan’s would see 600 or more people come through the restaurant. So when the West Monroe Convention Center was searching for a chef for their grand opening of their 13,000 square foot space in 1979, Chef Hans boarded a plane for a place he would soon come to love. Said Chef Hans, “As I looked out my plane window when we were landing, all I could see were

trees and bayous. I was like, ‘Where is the town?’ I took a pay cut, but the trade off was tremendous.” One of the defining moments of his career at the West Monroe Convention Center stemmed from a hobby he had been practicing and perfecting that involved a block of ice, a Stihl chainsaw and an artist’s eye for design. “We were doing a wedding, and I created an ice sculpture of swans. When the mother-of-the-bride saw it at the reception she burst into tears. I said, ‘You don’t like it?’ and she said, ‘Of course, I love it, but I didn’t ask for an ice sculpture.” In typical Chef Hans style, the ice sculpture was his gift for the couple’s wedding. “It was a huge hit,” he exclaims. Blocks of ice back then were only $20, making for an economical way to add major design points to parties. If north Louisiana didn’t know who he was before then, Chef Hans got their attention real quick. For his high profile weddings and community events, Chef Hans mastered the art of the show, whether it was creating flavorful crepes in front of our eyes, a savory bananas foster or a beautiful baked Alaska. Who else could make a sexy dessert out of three gallons of ice cream atop slices of pound cake smothered in meringue and set it on fire? Chef Hans’ next act after serving two years at the West Monroe Convention Center was to open an eponymous restaurant on North 3rd Street in Monroe, in a space that had been a restaurant named Charlie’s. Chef Hans’ restaurant reputation quickly grew. He was importing over 70 pounds of fresh whole fish every week. “I would have them brought in whole, because I wanted to look the fish in their eye,” he said. The Chef Hans menu included memorable dishes like alligator bisque, beautifully prepared veal, crepes and seafood and won a loyal following that kept the restaurant filled to capacity. In 1986, Chef Hans received the coveted Louisiana Restauranteur of the Year Award from the Louisiana Restaurant Association, in a state known for fabulous restaurants, mainly south of Alexandria. The chef’s celebrity cache was at an all-time high when a businessman with a chain of Baskin Robbins ice cream stores in Japan offered to create a chain of Chef Hans’ cajun restaurants. While in Tokyo, Korrodi served the delegation his signature dishes, including his famous turtle soup, gumbo, crepes Fitzgerald and Crawfish in Heaven, the pairing of crawfish in a cream sauce with cheese and green onion atop a bed of vermicelli, or angel hair pasta. In Chef Hans’ showman fashion, he also prepared for them a Café Brûlot, or flaming coffee, using an orange peel, cloves, cinnamon sticks and brandy that is drizzled down the orange peal and set alight. “When I did the coffee, they went nuts,” explained Chef. “And when I had asked for brandy, they brought me a very expensive, very old Napoleon brandy.” In addition, Chef Hans traveled to Europe to spread the gospel of cajun cooking and to train chefs there on techniques to create the perfect gumbo. Chef Hans has also cooked for several Presidents of the United States, including Presidents Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan (“I cooked for him when he was running for President and he was campaigning in New England at the time, I served him veal Marsala with fettucini.”), and Bill Clinton (“I did a 600 lb. razorback sculpture out of red tinted ice for a centerpiece as well as food for over 8,000 people at one of the inauguration balls.”) One of Chef Hans favorite customers was actor and comedian Bob Hope, who dined with the chef at Brennan’s in Houston. Says Chef Hans, “Bob Hope liked the 16 oz. sirloin with blackened seasoning. He told his driver to bring him back the next day, because it was the best steak he had ever had. That was one of the most joyous days of my career.”

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Around the mid 1980s at the zenith of the cajun food craze, Chef Hans’ friend Paul Prud’homme had launched a successful line of spices inspired by his cajun roots, and Chef Hans, too, had been experimenting as a hobby with combinations of spices that he used on his blackened fish. Dr. Paul Dunn, with Northeast Louisiana University’s College of Business, now ULM, had opened an incubation center for new businesses and offered Chef Hans space and marketing advice for starting his own line of seasonings. The incubation center had an FDA-approved kitchen on site and soon the chef and his employees were hand-bagging spices for his proprietary blend of blackened seasonings. At an annual Boat Show, Chef Hans realized he had a great product when he couldn’t keep up with demand, selling out of all the spices he had on hand. Quick to credit the success of any restaurant as a 50/50 partnership between the chef and the front of the house, Chef Hans closed his restaurant when his restaurant manager succumbed to cancer, and he began concentrating on his spice business, which boasts two employees who have been with Chef Hans for over 36 years. Both started with him at the Convention Center in West Monroe and made each move with the maestro. Long since outgrowing the Incubation Center offices in Swartz, Chef Hans Gourmet Foods is located in the Riverside Cultural District of Downtown Monroe and is housed in a paprika-hued building, which bears the chef’s likeness and logo painted on the north side. “This is a famous old building that was a Buick dealership during the 1930s and 40s on one side and a giant skating rink on the other,” says Chef Hans. Today, instead of Buicks, the machines inside the cavernous space are state of the art and can process 2,000 pounds of rice in mere minutes and blend over 2,000 pounds of spices in a giant blender. Today, Chef Hans’ jambalaya and the company’s other easy-to-cook packaged meals are available in most grocery stores for consumers and are served to our service men and women in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as to hungry workers on rigs throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Chef Hans is equal parts spice mixologist, engineer, scientist and marketing manager. “We will always stick to using real spices, nothing synthetic will go in our products. Over the years I have learned that Peru supplies the best paprika and New Mexico has great chiles. Our blackened seasoning is one of the best on the market today because we develop the flavor with more spices and less salt,” says Chef Hans. Successful local restaurants, including Taco Bandido and Cormier’s, use specially blended spices custom blended by Chef Hans Gourmet Foods. Just as the chef likes to wow us with his impeccable flavor profiles and spices that make us seem like we know what we’re doing in the kitchen, Chef Hans, too, likes to be wowed. His ultimate meal would be Osso Buco, a crosscut veal shank braised to fall-off-the-bone perfection, topped with a gremolata and paired with a rich polenta. Adds Chef Hans, the secret to a gremolata is to add caraway seeds to the chopped herb condiment of lemon zest, parsley and garlic. “Osso Buco has such big flavor and the gremolata enhances that.” Possibly because I miss the showman who masterfully helmed the Squire Creek kitchen when James Davison asked him to create a world class dining experience for the country club, I dare to ask the chef if he would ever make a foray back into the kitchen. Says Chef Hans, “If I did a competition again, what’s missing is to make a good veal again. Veal is just not handled correctly anymore. And if I were to cater again, it would have to be in Washington D.C.” Today, Chef Hans lives with his wife and business partner, Chris, on a secluded five acres of Cheniere Lake in West Monroe. Just like his childhood home in Switzerland, he raises chickens and tends a huge organic vegetable garden. His children are a source of pride for him as well. One of his sons is a wine distributor in Austin, Texas and attended sommelier school in San Antonio, and all of them share a love cooking for friends and family. “I came to the United States to be a part of this free country and Louisiana has provided me with so much opportunity,” says Chef Hans, reflecting on his legendary life and career. 110 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM


Unique Dining Experience Meet Friends Where Friends Meet – at Trio’s Restaurant

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RIO’S RESTAURANT IS A LOCAL FAVORITE LOCATED at 2219 Forsythe Avenue in Monroe. They offer a fine dining experience with top-of-the-line cuisine, gourmet specials and top-notch service. Their menu combines Mediterranean cuisine with American favorites. Owner Jenifer Johnson Walker is a local who comes from a strong Greek heritage. When she first opened Trio’s, she knew she wanted the food to have a distinct Mediterranean influence. Trio’s Restaurant has stood the test of time by reinventing and adapting while keeping the tried-and-true staples of their establishment. The menu at Trio’s is packed with Greek favorites such as hummus, flat bread, Greek salads, gyros, their famous crabmeat moussaka and more. They have a long list of salads that give variety to those making healthy choices. In addition to their Mediterranean selections, they offer sandwiches, burgers, pizzas, pasta and many other favorites. Their specialties include delicious gumbo, crawfish etouffee and fish tacos that are out of this world. Looking for a great brunch spot? Trio’s offers a bottomless champagne brunch with great dishes every Saturday and Sunday from 11- 3. Follow them on facebook to see their daily specials and options that you won’t find on the menu. Trio’s has a full-service bar with a wide selection of fine wines and hand-crafted cocktails to give you or your group a great selection. They offer regular happy hour during the week and are a great place to stop and have drinks on the weekend. The sleek, modern décor makes for a great place for a night out. So whether you are in the mood for a night out, want somewhere to catch the game, need an intimate spot for a date night or want to hang out with a few friends, Trio’s is the place to be. Follow them on Facebook for constantly changing deals and specials. Come on over and meet friends, where friends meet! 2219 Forsythe Ave in Monroe 318-387-3577. Open Monday through Saturday, 11-10 and Sunday Brunch from 11- 3

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Ouachita Christian School Looking Foward to a Spirit-Filled School Year

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S WE BEGIN OUR 42ND YEAR AT OUACHITA Christian School, we are thankful for our 850 students, their families and the 2,600+ alumni in our area and around the world. This year’s theme, Same Spirit, comes from Romans 8:11; “The same spirit that raised Jesus from the grave is living in us.” It is our vision that our students embody spirit-filled lives and take Jesus into their world. Our students attend prestigious universities across the nation, serve in mission fields locally and abroad and are found in every profession. 99% of our students attend college and garner several million dollars in scholarships each year. Our faculty is fully certified and 35% hold advanced degrees in their fields. OCS has the unique blessing in our area of having eight former principals teaching in our classrooms currently. In 2015-16, our students gave back over 8,000 hours into our community in service hours. We field competitive athletic teams at many levels in the LHSAA. Seven seniors off last year’s baseball squad signed collegiate athletic scholarships this spring. Several OCS alumni have played and are playing, in the NFL and the MLB. We were commended by the Advanced-Ed team and the

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National Christian School Association this spring with full national accreditation. If you are searching for a Christian worldview education with academic rigor, experienced staff and exemplary extracurricular athletics and activities, please call us at (318) 325-6000 to schedule a tour. UPCOMING OCS EVENTS: August 19th – First day of school (K-12); HS Half Day August 22nd – First day of Pre-K; HS Orientation August 24th – Magazine Day Kickoff September 5th – LABOR DAY (no school) September 11th – NHS Induction September 28th – See You at the Pole October 7-11th – FALL BREAK (no school) October 21st – Spiritual Emphasis Day 7-12 October 28th – Homecoming


Introducing the Think Tank at Tower Place Everything You Need to Run a Successful Business

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HE THINK TANK IS WHERE SMALL BUSINESS owners, entrepreneurs, sales reps, independent contractors, remote workers, innovators, creators and small teams will have an affordable and convenient work space. Just bring your laptop or tablet, pick an open seat or area and get to work. Located in the heart of Monroe’s Business and Financial District, the Think Tank is conveniently located at 1500 N. 19th Street on the first floor of the iconic Tower Place building. Our amenities include video conferencing, wireless video connections, audio conferencing, wireless screen projection and collaborative or private work environments. We offer a large meeting and/or training room that can accommodate over 50 people with video conferencing and a smaller, more intimate conference room that can accommodate 10 to 15 people. Services include scanning, wireless printing, copying and faxing, as well as high speed wireless internet. Everything you need to run a successful business. Our goal is to provide comfortable, productive, aesthetically inspiring, and affordable work space for our clients. Our

collaborative work area contains six work or meeting “zones” to suit your needs with private desks, semi private desks or open comfortable seating for 3-5 people for team collaboration. We offer flexible solutions to your office and work needs. Our fees are affordable and flexible and we are offering low introductory rates. Reserve workspace by the day or month. The conference room and large meeting/training rooms are also available by the hour or day. We also have private office space on a daily or monthly rate. This location is also very convenient to some of Monroe’s favorite restaurants and coffee shops such as Portico, Newk’s, Pie Works, CC’s Coffee House, Sage, The Fat Pelican, Vieux Carre, and many others. Come by and see YOUR new work space or contact John P. Mitchell at 318-388-2492 or john@holyfield-inc.com for more information, or set an appointment for a tour of the facilities. Take a virtual tour of the Think Tank at www.towerplacemonroe.com.

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Subway and Mama DeLuca’s Independently Owned and Operated

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HE SUBWAY AND MAMA DELUCA’S PIZZA LOCATION AT the corner of Lamy Lane and Armand (formerly Flowerama building) has only been in operation since December of 2015, but has made a big impact with local customers craving both delicious food and great customer service. Owners Connie and Steve McGee were familiar with the Subway operations beforehand, as they operated a convenience store on Louisville Avenue that housed the well known sandwich shop. In that time, they had become a staple in the community, extending significant discounts for law enforcement and emergency response personnel, supporting local youth athletics and providing food for those in need. When their lease was up on that location, they were determined to move forward and rebuild their team by purchasing a new location and constructed a new “stand-alone” Subway location. Connie has now rehired most of her former staff, as well as added several new faces to the team. A new addition to the Subway product is the Mama DeLuca’s Pizza, a co-brand of Subway, located inside the location. This franchise began in 2008 and currently has 58 stores, with 13 more in production. The chain has evolved from a full-fledged pizza concept with a conveyer oven and dough mixer to what it is today – a small space that specializes in fresh, made-to-order pizza that bakes in two minutes or less. In addition to pizza, Mama DeLuca’s also serves mouth-watering calzones, delicious garlic parmesan breadsticks, soft pretzel sticks, 100% white meat boneless wings and kid’s meals. “It is a unique concept because you are able to pick out fresh ingredients and have your pizza made right in front of you,” said Connie McGee. “It only takes about six minutes, from start to finish.” Pizzas come in 9,” 12” and 14” options, and can be custom made or you can pick one from the menu. For meat lovers, there is the Butcher’s Best featuring pepperoni, Italian sausage, ham, bacon and beef. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there’s something for vegetarians – The Garden Run, with green peppers, onions, mushrooms, black olives and tomatoes. One of their specialties is the Chicken Bacon Ranch topped with ranch sauce and mozzarella cheese over the chicken and bacon. And since they are open for breakfast, you can enjoy Mama DeLuca’s in the morning with their Southwestern Omelet Pizza, loaded with eggs, ham, red onions, mushrooms, green peppers, Monterrey cheddar and mozzarella cheese, made with a zesty chipotle sauce. Other favorites include Hawaiian, Supreme, BBQ Chicken, Buffalo Chicken and Bacon Double Cheeseburger. The McGees, along with their son, Adam, have truly made Subway and Mama DeLuca’s a family business. They are very hands-on and work there on a daily basis. Stop in today to check out their fresh ingredients, convenient location and friendly customer service!

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Bird of a Different Feather Free Birds Boutique

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CHOOL’S BACK! AND FREE BIRDS BOUTIQUE IS HERE TO help make you feel better about it. A new wardrobe is the perfect pick-me-up and confidence booster for heading back to school. Hold your head high as you walk into that classroom and know that this is your year to shine as you find your style and what works for you. Whether you’re looking for grunge or chic we’ve got you covered. Boho, modern, bold and vintage fashion is what our boutique is all about. Your wardrobe is one of the first things people notice about you and should be an expression of your personality and who you are. Spread your wings, find your style and fly with it. Uniforms ... are for the birds! But if you must wear them this year, we can help. We’ve stocked up on loads of locally made jewelry. Necklaces, bracelets and headbands can make a great statement piece for even the simplest of outfits. You will rule the roost with some new kicks or a cool sweater over your polo. In an environment where everyone is made to look the same, stand out and enhance who you are. For school hours or after school extra curricular activities, here are some trends we are loving at Free Birds Boutique: • Jean Dresses • Sneakers • Chokers • Bralettes • Distressed Band Tees • Tee Shirt Dresses Come visit our comfy little nook on the corner in Antique Alley and you’ll see that we love what we do. Or you can visit our website, shopfreebirdsboutique.com! We are adding new stuff daily, so check back often. Follow us on Instagram and FaceBook for updates of new arrivals. And when in doubt, you know you can always just wing it with Free Birds Boutique!

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Golsons Gas, Grills, Logs and Lights

Your Outdoor Kitchen Questions Answered by the Experts What would be the best grill or outdoor heating solution for my patio? Nothing enlightens better than asking an expert, and more so when you have a sea of options that all look great, and a good sum of money at stake. This is because you usually don’t just want the best grill or the best outdoor kitchen accessory; you want to know which is the most suitable grill for your home among the best grills on the market. Six hours of reading about gas grill features like temperature control, high heat, smoking, burners, and all such factors to consider, will never be a match for 40 years in the patio and hearth industry. If you could ask a 40-year expert for free, would you? This is what Golsons Gas, Grills, Logs & Lights encourages its store visitors to do.

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Ask and keep asking until they’re sure of their choice. What’s the best grill for your patio? According to Golsons’ staff, the answer is quite easy if you can define for them the following: • Your needs • Your wants • Your budget Then, they’ll help you define your options among brands like AOG, DCS, RCS, Fire Magic, Saber, and Holland, the industry’s finest manufacturers. Golsons has a proficient knowledge of each single item they sell. Billy Golson founded Golsons’ local store in 1975, selling and servicing gas appliances in the West Monroe, Louisiana region, which it still

does today. Golsons is now a certified dealer and reseller of a wide selection of best-in-class outdoor kitchen components from grills, refrigerators, gas and wood burning fire places, and heating and cooling systems, to kitchen accessories. According to its founder, “Complete customer care defines best the company’s operating philosophy.” You also hear the same from its customers, “They are very knowledgeable about their products. We are building an outdoor kitchen and they have made everything very easy for us!” You can visit Golsons’ local store at West Monroe, open Monday to Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. They also have an online store that ships to any part of the U.S., golsonsonline.com.


Facial Fillers Have They Gone Too Far?

BY TIMOTHY J. MICKEL, MD, CERTIFIED, AMERICAN BOARD OF PLASTIC SURGERY

“Give a small boy a hammer, and he will find that everything he encounters needs pounding.” Abraham Kaplan, American Philosopher

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HE OTHER NIGHT I DREAMED I was from a planet where everyone had disproportionately full lips and round, ping-pong ball fullness in their cheeks. Then I woke up and realized it wasn’t a dream. Overuse of facial fillers – relying on them to do more than they were intended to do – not only is rampant in this “anything goes” era of aesthetic medicine, but it creates an unnecessarily alien appearance that you can spot from across the room, or the airport terminal or the aisle in the sanctuary. The most commonly used fillers are composed of natural substances found in the body – either hyaluronic acid (Restylane, Juvéderm, Belotero) or hydroxyapetite (Radiesse). They are used to fill wrinkles, creases or areas of volume deficiency. They

do not take away extra skin. Injectable fillers add volume, and in properly selected patients have been a significant advance in the treatment of facial aging. However, as patients approach 50 years of age, some of these issues are best addressed by surgical intervention with periodic injection of small amounts of filler over the subsequent years to maintain the surgical correction. Older patients, especially those over 60 are always better served by having a facelift, a browlift or eyelid surgery. If you go to a non-plastic surgeon with typical changes of the aging face they generally don’t say, “Mrs. Jones, the best treatment for you is a facelift, a browlift or a blepharoplasty, but if you are not ready for surgery, we can give you a little bit of improvement with fillers. The results are not as good as surgery so the decision to have fillers instead of surgery is an aesthetic compromise.” The ethical practice of aesthetic medicine demands this kind of honest exchange as

part of the patient education process. And while it probably occurs sometimes, I see two or three patients a month who were told that fillers would solve their aging issues. They are unhappy because they spent a lot of money on fillers over the years with minimal improvement, only to face the prospect of spending a lot more on surgery to finally give them the result they wanted in the first place. If all you have is a hammer, everything is a nail. A board-certified plastic surgeon has more than just a hammer in his toolbox. He provides the full spectrum of aesthetic services, from fillers and botox, to peels and laser treatments to cosmetic facial surgery. He has taken the face apart and put it back together again, and he has intimate knowledge of facial anatomy and the progressive effects of the aging process on the skin, fat and muscle of the face. He understands that fillers are just one of many tools, and he won’t try to make them do more than they were meant to do. If you are considering facial fillers, or any type of aesthetic facial rejuvenation, call Mickel Plastic Surgery at (318) 388-2050 for an honest opinion on which procedure is right for you.

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At the Front of the Line of Monroe’s Elite Waterfront Grill Remains a Local Favorite

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OMING UP ON ITS 20-YEAR ANNIVERSARY,THIS local restaurant is one of Monroe, Louisiana’s favorite places to dine. With a casual setting on Bayou DeSiard and a menu featuring the highest quality steaks and assortment of savory seafood dishes, it’s not hard to see why Waterfront Grill has lasted so long. The Weems family has mastered the grill and has created a special niche that customers, whether they be a local resident or passerby, find delectable. Don, Sam and Brad have perfected the menu with items that can appeal to any clientele, all without the use of a frier. One of the most popular dishes of on the menu is the Catfish DeSiard, which was once featured in Southern Living Magazine. This dish consists of baked catfish topped with seasoned bread crumbs, green onions, Parmesan cheese, mushrooms and shrimp and is truly a mouthwatering combination of flavor and texture. Although, the rising star of this restaurant would have to be the grilled pork chops. These frenched, center cut pork chops are made from a premium selection of meat and are char-grilled, flawlessly harnessing the flavors of the seasoning and the natural

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juices. It comes with two 8oz. pork chops, totaling one pound of meat, and is paired with a side dish and toasted french bread. A side cup of their amazing gumbo puts this entree above the rest. Pork chops may not be your first choice when dining out but saying that you would be missing out if you didn’t try these would be an understatement. Waterfront Grill has evolved over the years, and will continue to evolve, to ensure that this family restaurant remains a local favorite. Providing gluten-free options, Waterfront strives to accommodate each and every one of their customers. Every aspect of the restaurant is infused with a sense of community and hometown pride. The walls are adorned with ULM memorabilia, large windows on the back wall provide views of the patio overlooking the bayou, and the cuisine itself is a statement of Louisiana. You can find them next to ULM’s campus at 5201 DeSiard St., open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday-Saturday or simply call-in your order at 318.345.0064.


Principal Webber’s Reception Sept. 1st

Proceeds From Event For Tuition Assistance at St. Frederick

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T. FREDERICK ALUMNI, FAMILY AND FRIENDS WILL sponsor the 2016 Principal’s Reception to honor Dr. Bob Webber at the bayou home of Angie and Bernard Sager on September 1, 2016, from 6:00 - 8:00 pm. Principal Webber will highlight St. Frederick’s academic, sports and other extracurricular achievements. He will recognize the St. Frederick Board of Directors (School Board) for the professional manner in which they have supported teachers and students in raising the bar and attaining higher goals. Assistant Principal Blair David will give an update on teacher training, STREAM (Science, Technology, Religion, Engineering, Arts and Math) curriculum development and the science and technology building project that also includes an art facility. St. Frederick had an outstanding achievement year last year and is pleased that all full-time teachers will be returning this fall. Wendell Manning, President of the St. Frederick Board of Directors, will introduce board members as well as the officers of the PTO, Warriors Club, Alumni, Family & Friends and the Warrior Foundation.

Athletic Director and Head Coach Jeff Tannehill will introduce the coaches and give a football preview of the 2016 season. Hall of Fame Coach Ray Gambino will present the Nancy Fritsche Award to the 2016 recipient for his or her many years of service to St. Frederick High School. The Principal’s Reception is the AF&F’s primary membership drive event. Ticket(s) to the event are included in membership levels at Warrior Knight level and above. For membership or ticket information go to stfrederickhigh.org and click on Alumni or contact AF&F President Peggy Sullivan at peggy.sullivan.k2tb@ statefarm.com or Vice President Dino Taylor at dino@cartown.biz Membership fees and event contribution proceeds go to tuition assistance. Last year AF&F gave $17,000 for tuition assistance and scholarships. Additionally, AF&F sponsors Warrior sports, the PTO Mardi Gras, Warriors Wear It Well and other events. For 2016 St. Frederick enrollment information contact Admissions Director Shere May at 323.9636.

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Solving Hunger Together CHANGING OUR COMMUNITY FOR THE FUTURE OF OUR CHILDREN

THE FOOD BANK OF NORTHEAST LOUISIANA

ARTICLE BY LARONE RICHARDSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN G MEYERS AND COURTESY OF THE FOOD BANK OF NELA

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o most of us, the word “hunger” is an abstract term. Sure, we know its meaning, we utter the words “I’m hungry” daily, but we don’t live in actual fear of it, in uneasy, worried dread of it. The shocking truth, however, is that over 72,000 people in northeast Louisiana – many of them helpless children and the elderly – struggle with hunger. The Food Bank of Northeast Louisiana (FBNELA) is leading the charge against hunger in our area and is eager to share how each of us can play a role in winning that fight. Located on Central Avenue in Monroe, the Food Bank of NELA is the massive hub of a giant hunger relief wheel with 60 philanthropic spokes. Arriving at FBNELA headquarters, I’m impressed by how immaculate

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its huge warehouse is, how organized its vast storage areas are and by the sheer volume and varieties of food it holds. The logistics involved with such an operation are mind-boggling, especially considering that the Food Bank employs only 11 full-time employees. One might expect to encounter rushed, frantic chaos, especially considering over 4.2 million pounds of food passed through the Food Bank’s doors last year! Yet my interview with External Communications Officer Sarah Hoffman and Development Officer Ashley White reveals the secret of the organization’s success - a close-knit, supportive family of co-workers passionate about what they do and full of positive, creative, contagious energy.


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“Many of our elderly are forced to choose between paying for food, their utilities or their medicine each month.” “We never know exactly what may happen on any given day,” says Sarah. “That’s one of the reasons this job is so exciting, so rewarding.” As an agency, their job is to procure, sort, inventory, store and distribute food to 60 hunger relief partner agencies in a 12-parish area. But you can sense their goal entails so much more. “We partner with churches, schools, soup kitchens, food pantries and shelters, and we also help individuals,” explains Ashley. “We learn a life lesson every time someone walks through those doors, whether it’s a volunteer or someone in need.” In addition to its partner Agency Program, the FBNELA operates two programs focused on children. The BackPack for Kids and Kid’s Cabinet programs are geared to ensure a readily accessible source of nutritious, easy-to-prepare foods to low-income students even when school is not in session. Former Miss Louisiana Hope Anderson is a registered dietician and licensed nutritionist. Founder and owner of Monroe’s innovative, nutrition-based Health With Hope enterprise, Anderson is an enthusiastic proponent of The Food Bank of NELA and its mission. “When a family is plagued by food insecurity, the implications reach much further than the table,” she explains. “Children who have limited food access aren’t able to receive key nutrients they require to grow and develop. In fact, intermittent hunger in children is associated with increased developmental risk.” According to Hope, a child’s nutrition status during early stages of life largely impacts his or her health status later in life. “It’s of utmost importance to provide kids with proper nutrition from early on,” she continues. “Addressing the hunger epidemic by making wholesome foods available to those facing food insecurity is paramount to ensuring bright futures for our children. I can’t emphasize enough the importance of our Food Bank and what it accomplishes.” Additionally, FBNELA operates a Senior Program aimed at helping low-income north Louisiana residents stretch their food budgets by providing a supplemental box of groceries each month. Launched in March 1999, this program serves more than 1,430 low-income seniors over the age of 60. “Many of our elderly are forced to choose between paying for food, their utilities or their medicine each month,” says Sarah. “They are so grateful for what we’re able to provide.” Because of generous donors and volunteers, FBNELA was able to distribute 17,220 boxes in 2015, and is working hard to surpass that number this year.

DONATE YOUR TIME

Last year, nearly 8,000 volunteer hours were donated to the FBNELA. As with any non-profit, volunteers are crucial to the Food Bank’s successful operation and are constantly needed to help with sorting and packing food, office/clerical work or assisting with events. Sometimes people volunteer as a group, such as a family or a business. A teacher will bring in a class, or a church group or civic club will devote their time. Lots of times, though, it’s just an individual who has the time and desire to help out. “We absolutely love our volunteers,” affirms Sarah. 122 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

“There’s no way we could do what we do without them.” To learn more about volunteering, call the volunteer coordinator at (318)322-3567, visit www.foodbanknela.org, or go to the Food Bank of NELA’s Facebook page.

ORGANIZE A FOOD DRIVE

Another major way to help support the Food Bank is to organize a food drive at your school, church, workplace or civic club. And it’s easier than you think. Simply fill out the registration form included in the Food & Fund Drives Kit, accessed on www.foodbanknela.org, and you’re on your way. Helpful hints and suggestions for a successful drive are also included on the site.

GROCERY RESCUE AND FARMERS’ SURPLUS

According to the USDA, 70 billion pounds of surplus food is lost in America each year at the consumer, retail and food service levels. “Sadly, much of this wasted food is perfectly edible,” says Ashley, “a result of over-planting, minor damage, a date code or an expired marketing campaign.” Working with the FBNELA, however, area manufacturers, farmers and retail stores can donate their surplus food, reducing warehousing, inventory and dumping costs and the amount of food that ends up rotting in landfills. “Thanks to generous food growers and retail partners in our area like Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club, we’re able to rescue over 900,000 pounds of food a year,” Ashley continues. That rescued food equals more than 755,000 meals! FBNELA has worked hard to streamline the food donation process and make it a win-win for all involved. They can meet with managers and department heads to help work out all the details, even coordinating a pick-up schedule based on the store’s volume. Food donors enjoy tax benefits from charitable contributions and are also protected from liability issues under the Good Samaritan Food Donation Act. Most importantly, excess inventory is put to good use right here in our home communities.

CALLING ALL GREEN THUMBS

You don’t have to own a farm or a grocery store to donate fresh produce to FBNELA. Aware of the “growing” number of people who love to garden in our area, a donation program has been devised specifically with green thumbs in mind. The Grow a Row program enables avid gardeners to share their backyard bounty…simply dedicate an extra row of produce to donate to the Food Bank! “Many of the people we serve, especially the elderly, don’t have easy access to fresh produce,” Ashley says. “They get super excited when it’s included in their food box.”

$1 GIFT EQUALS FIVE MEALS

As important as donated food is, there is another vital ingredient in FBNELA’s recipe for success – monetary donations. “The food that is donated to the Food Bank is what enables us to fill orders from partnering agencies every day,” relates Sarah,


“and that’s so important. But what people need to realize, too, is that we have ways to stretch a donated dollar to equal five meals!” “That’s right,” agrees Ashley. “Someone can donate a can of green beans that costs $1.29, and that’s wonderful; it’s the lifeblood of our day-to-day operations. And when someone donates an actual dollar, with our nonprofit purchasing ability and resources, we can transform that $1 donation into multiple meals!” You can send a donation to the FBNELA by mail or visit www.foodbanknela.org to make a secure online donation.

SAVE THE DATES

On Saturday, August 6, from 8 – 10 AM, enjoy a “Short Stack for a Tall Cause,” a Flapjack Fundraiser hosted by Applebee’s Restaurant in Pecanland Mall, Monroe. Dine in for all-you-can-eat pancakes and a drink, or choose take-out (not AYCE). Tickets are just $5, and can be purchased at the Food Bank or by calling (318) 322-3567. On Thursday, August 11, from 7 – 9 PM, join in the fun at Painting With a Twist Studio, 1818 Tower Drive, Monroe. Participants will “Paint with a Purpose” under the instruction of a professional artist, returning home with their very own “Crawfish on Newspaper” creation. Complimentary wine and beer, provided by Marsala Beverage, as well as snacks will be served. (Can you say, “Girls Night Out?”) Tickets are $40 per person. Call 318-538-1357 to reserve your


groups’ seats now, as seating is limited. Next month is National Hunger Action Month, and FBNELA has numerous fun-filled and worthwhile fundraising events listed at the end of this feature. Looking even further into the future, the Food Bank is excited to announce its Empty Bowls, a Serving of Art, Music and Food fundraiser, will be held Saturday, January 28, 2017, from 11 AM to 2 PM. Just when the social scene is settling down after the Christmas holidays, this event promises to be the perfect antidote for mid-winter doldrums, while supporting a most worthy cause. Attendees will enjoy signature dishes from areas chefs, live music and a silent auction. With a $30 ticket, choose and take home a beautiful bowl, handcrafted by a local artist, as a reminder of all the empty bowls in our area. Additional tickets that do not include a commemorative bowl are available for $15. Area artists are encouraged to contact the FBNELA now to participate in creating bowls to donate. Sponsorship information is also available for area businesses and community groups to partner in Empty Bowls sponsorship. Yet another way for businesses and individuals to help is to donate items, trips or services for the silent auction. “Absolutely 100% of all proceeds from ‘Empty Bowls’ will be devoted to fighting hunger in northeast Louisiana,” affirms Sarah. “The people in our area have always been so eager to give of their time, talents and money to help others less fortunate. Working together, we can make a huge difference in the lives of our communities’ most vulnerable.”

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Saturday, August 6, 8 -10 AM, Applebee’s, Pecanland Mall, Monroe. – Flapjack Fundraiser – Enjoy a Short Stack for a Tall Cause - Dine in for all-you-can-eat pancakes and a drink; or take out (not AYCE). $5 per ticket. Purchase tickets at the Food Bank, 4600 Central Avenue, Monroe, or call (318) 322-3567. Thursday, August 11, 7 – 9 PM, at Painting With a Twist Studio, 1818 Tower Drive, Monroe. Painting with a Purpose – Join in the fun of painting your own personal masterpiece, a crawfish on newspaper, under the instruction of a professional instructor. $40 per person. Complimentary wine, beer and snacks. Call 318-538-1357 to reserve your seat now, as seating is limited. September 1 – 30 – FBNELA partners with Centric Federal Credit Union for “Coins for a Cause” during National Hunger Action Month. Drop off your change at any Centric FCU. Remember, $1 = 5 meals when donated to FBNELA. FBNELA also teams with the West Monroe/West Ouachita Chamber for a Food Drive during the September Brown Bag Concert Series.

Thursday, September 8 - Turn Orange for Hunger Action Day. Wear orange to show your support for hunger-relief efforts.   Thursday, September 22, 6 – 8 PM, at The Food Bank, 4600 Central Ave., Monroe - “Rock ‘n’ Box” Volunteer Foodbox Packing Event. Help pack food boxes with like-minded volunteers while enjoying great live music by the Josh Madden Band! Saturday, January 28, 2017, 11 AM – 2 PM, Monroe, Venue TBA - Empty Bowls, A Serving of Art, Music and Food, benefitting the Food Bank of Northeast Louisiana – The perfect antidote for winter doldrums, while supporting a most worthy cause. Enjoy signature dishes from areas chefs, live music and a silent auction. With a $30 ticket, take home a beautiful bowl handcrafted by a local artist. Additional tickets available for $15 that do not include a commemorative bowl. Area artists encouraged to create bowls to donate. Sponsorship information available now for area businesses and community groups. Seeking donated items, trips, or services for the silent auction. All proceeds devoted to fighting hunger in our area. Call (318) 322-3567 for more information.


Keep Your Chin Up

Achieve A Youthful Look With KYBELLA®

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HAT CAUSES A DOUBLE CHIN? THERE ARE three primary reasons: genetics, slack facial muscles and caloric intake. Dietary changes can definitely help with this area of fat. Exercising the muscle we call the platysma may also help in getting rid of a double chin. You may also just be predisposed to having a double chin. Our genes decide the shape of our face and the areas of fat deposits. You can also change your personal style to decrease the appearance of the double chin. One way is through makeup. Creative contouring can camouflage the area. Wearing a scarf around your neck can also hide it. The surgical answer is mentoplasty or lumpectomy. This solution works well as long as you are willing to keep weight off to avoid a double chin comeback. The best solution is the first and only FDA- approved KYBELLA® treatment. KYBELLA® is a deoxycholic acid injection that is used in adults to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe fat below the chin (submental fat). Deoxycholic acid is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that aids in the breakdown and absorption of dietary fat. When injected into the

DR. KENNETH SANDERS

fat beneath your chin, KYBELLA® causes the destruction of fat cells. Once destroyed, those cells cannot store or accumulate fat. After a consultation to determine if KYBELLA® is right for you, I will customize your treatment regimen, including how many treatments you need, based on your desired chin profile. Many patients experience visible results in 2 to 4 treatment sessions. Once you have achieved the desired aesthetic results, you’re done. That fat will not come back. It’s a relatively painless procedure with superior results. The most common side effects are swelling, bruising, pain, numbness, redness and areas of hardness around the treatment area. KYBELLA® can cause serious side effects, including trouble swallowing and nerve injury in the jaw that can cause an uneven smile or facial muscle weakness. Even more reason to put your trust in a physician trained in performing this treatment.

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New Facility, New Location, New Name

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S WE ENTER OUR 39TH YEAR OF BUSINESS, WE HAVE some amazing and exciting new things happening at Debbie’s School of Dance. In order to offer young people the best training possible, we are expanding our curriculum to reach beyond Dance to include Drama, Music, Theater, and Tumbling. The Performing Arts are so vital not only to our growing community, but in providing a well rounded education for our children. We are becoming DBK Dance & Performing Arts! The name change has been something I have wanted to do for quite a while. We have always been a “Dance Family” from the special love and devotion we give to our students to the entire business being run by family members! My daughters, Brittany and Kelsey, have been so involved in every aspect of this business since they were very small. Brittany has been my very own personal assistant since she was about eight years old. She was my little organizer- from the office, to helping with costume orders, scheduling, and recital plans. A strong competitive dancer with a special ability to work with children, she began teaching the little ones while attending college. Now, with a Marketing degree and a natural creative talent, she is the core of the business side. Kelsey began choreographing at the age of five! It was very obvious at an early age that she was an extremely talented dancer. Years of winning major competitions, titles and scholarships landed her a Professional career. She brings so much experience in every aspect of the Entertainment Industry to our studio. Incorporating my daughters’ initials with my own truly speaks “who” we are! There are so many activities for young people to choose from these days. We see parents struggling to shuttle their little ones from one activity to another. We wanted to broaden our curriculum to enable them to have more options in one location. Our Theater class was so successful last year that we are expanding to offer more age groups. Mrs. Vickie Freeman, head of Drama at West Monroe High School and assistant Choir director, will again be teaching this super fun class. Also, so many dancers want to work on tumbling skills to help with cheer or to enhance their dancing. We are super excited to have Mr. Tommy Perkins join us for Tumbling. An instructor for Totally Tumbling and cheer coach for OCS, we feel blessed to have him work with our dancers! He is a bundle of energy that is definitely contagious! Check out our entire staff and their bios on our website. I am blessed to have an amazing staff that has literally grown up in the studio. I am a firm believer that children learn what they live. A child who is trained in Dance and the Arts learns to have self discipline, respect for others, and strong work ethics. Creativity and self expression are strong learning tools that enhance a child’s education. The Arts teach children to see and hear the beauty of movement and music. These are things that touch our very souls! I can’t even begin to imagine a world without music and dance. Classical training in the Arts should be a top priority for every young person to ensure we never lose these precious gifts!!! Every day our young people are saturated with issues that are so difficult to comprehend. Our mission is to help each student accomplish their goals in a loving family environment. A dancer’s body is the instrument that makes the music come to life! We look forward for many generations to “Dance From The Heart And Give God the Glory!” Mrs. Debbie 126 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM


Tasty Tex-Mex

Iron Cactus Celebrates Six Years in Business

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N 2010, BRAD AND LEAH PARKER HAD A CONCEPT that combined Tex-Mex food with a fresh, flavorful spin! So the Iron Cactus was born and has become a local staple, known for their family friendly atmosphere that people of all ages can enjoy. Brad pretty much grew up in the restaurant industry and found his love for the industry early on. He started out as a busboy at Ernesto’s Mexican Restaurant in the Garden District of Monroe and went on to be a waiter there for 15 years. Being there for so long gave him a great reputation with the customers, who are now frequent regulars of the Iron Cactus. One set of customers – The Dannas – became good friends with Brad, after being his customers for many years. When the Dannas gave him the opportunity to open his own place, he jumped on it. Six years later, they have established this quant small town eat place in Calhoun that brings in customers from around the area. From Ruston to Rayville, Sterlington to Columbia, their clientele stretches far! If you ask anyone who frequents the Iron Cactus what their favorite dish is, answers would vary! Some of the more popular items include fajitas, hamburgers, Mexican cornbread, pulled pork and the fried avocado…just to name a few! No matter what their favorite dish is, everyone loves the famous margaritas from Iron Cactus! Soon, they will be expanding to accommodate a full bar with seating, added tables and more waiting space. There will also be a few new menu items that will surely become customer favorites as soon as they hit the tables. Not only does Iron Cactus serve delicious food, they also are very involved in the community and give back as much as they can. They partner with the West Monroe/West Ouachita Chamber of Commerce on several events, as well as host fundraisers throughout the year for various organizations and groups. Iron Cactus has become a staple at the Monroe Junior League Spring Market, serving up Market-ritas for the past four years. They also participate in a favorite, festive event - Holidays in Cedartown sponsored by Cedar Creek School in Ruston. Brad and Leah are very passionate about helping out the community whenever they can. The Parkers thank all their customers for the support these past six years in helping the restaurant become a staple in the region. With much anticipation of the new expansion, Iron Cactus looks forward to seeing familiar faces as well as new customers in the coming months!

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On the Corner of a Perfect Setting in Egret Landing... 401 Fox Den Trail

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ESTLED IN ONE OF MONROE’S MOST PRESTIGIOUS AND attractive residential developments known as Egret Landing, you will find this unique custom built home by Donna and Rusty Laborde located on the corner of Egret Landing and Fox Den Trail. This one and a half story home of 3049 hsf, 4 bedrooms, 3 and a half baths, showcases a rustic, yet stately, exterior design trimmed out with cedar shakes, stained glass front door entry, 2 front porch areas, double-chimneys with copper stacks and fenced courtyard area. Being on the corner, this home presents itself with an open feel and extends an invitation for gatherings of family and friends. As soon as you enter this home, you will quickly begin to notice the quality of workmanship and all the eye-catching details from the beautiful wide-plank wood floors to 26-foot wood ceilings flanked with restored vintage beams, and upper stained glass windows designed to complement the stained-glass front door. The kitchen is centered with a granite-topped custom-designed island with cabinets, drawers and built-in microwave. Custom built knotty alder stained cabinetry with granite counters, glass subway tile back splash and top of the line DCS stainless steel appliances include a 4-burner griddle gas stove and double-drawer dishwasher. The dining area visible from both the kitchen and living areas, lights up beautifully with a chandelier hanging from a 26-foot wood ceiling and the natural light

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that radiates through the upper and lower windows. Step from the kitchen to the outdoor living area that adds an entire other room for relaxing and entertaining. This outdoor kitchen boasts a gas grill, stainless steel sink, mini-fridge, granite countertops, cabinets, and stone fireplace that can be wood-burning or gas logs and includes mantel and wiring for TV mount. Through the living area you enter the master suite with 14-foot ceiling that has a set of French doors to the outside and attached to master bath with a double vanity that displays custom hand-made sink vessels, large soaker tub and tiled double shower with frameless shower door, and oil-rubbed bronze fixtures. From the master bath is a large walk-in closet that connects to a laundry area for convenience. Separate from the master suite, you have two bedrooms downstairs with bath, and an upstairs bedroom with office / computer area, bath, walk-in closet and a gorgeous view of the wildlife refuge. Off the second-floor bedroom is a bonus area that can be finished out for a media room, game room, etc. With this home favorably located on the corner, a two-car garage is located in the rear and provides extra space for parking and privacy. You can make this home your home today! Call Lane Laborde at 318.512.5651 (or) email labordelane@gmail.com for your private showing.


Stationery Shop Introduces Local Artist Sue Paperie partners with Buffy Walker

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UE PAPERIE IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THEIR partnership with local artist Buffy Walker. Most people in the Ruston area are familiar with Buffy, as she has been teaching art for some time. She is known for custom t-shirts, paintings and designs. Her unique canvases feature angels, ducks, crowns and the local favorite – Ruston peaches. Not only will they add a vibrant pop to any room, many of her designs have connections to the community such as Cedar Creek, LA Tech and the Ruston area. These pieces are now available exclusively at Sue Paperie and there are plans to expand from canvas to a line of personalized products and items. While they are excited to feature local artwork, that isn’t all you can find at Sue Paperie. Now that August is here, Sue Paperie is the place to go for all things back to school. One of the most important back to school basics – planners! The specialty stationery store has a variety of planners for a variety of tastes and personalities. “Our Emily Ley line of Simplified Planners are particularly popular,” said Rachel Davison, owner. After the birth of her son, Brady, Emily Ley searched high and low for a planner with heart, not just bells and whistles and extras that left her even more overwhelmed. She craved a simple, beautiful place to start fresh each and every day. And so, the Simplified Planner was born. Each page features four simple, purposeful spaces: Schedule, To Do, Notes

and Dinner - everything busy, intentional women need - and nothing more. You can also find planners from Lilly Pulitzer and Kate Spade, for a unique, stylish feel. The Karen Adams Calendars have become very popular and refills will be available in the shop soon. The refills come packaged with a satin ribbon and consist of 6” square pages of heavy smooth natural white card stock with delightfully hand drawn illustrations by the designer, with each month enhanced with touches of hand-applied glitter. Sue Paperie is the place to find all things Jon Hart. This Texas-based company has been producing high quality custom and personalized bags, totes, and various travel goods and accessories for the past 35 years. Now through August 31, Sue Paperie is hosting their annual Back to School sale on the personalized products. Some of the items featured in the sale include totes, backpacks, computer cases, coolers, pouches, satchels, travel kits and wristlets, just to name a few. They have added new colors in their most popular materials of coated canvas and leather. No matter who or where you are in life or your particular lifestyle, Jon Hart Designs has a product appropriate for you. In addition to helping you stay organized, Sue Paperie has chic school supplies. From Kate Spade pens, erasers, pencils, to Lilly Pulitzer notebooks and planners, you will be the envy of everyone on campus.

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SLICE OF HEAVEN Looking for the Best Pizza in town. BayouLife asked our favorite restauranteurs to cook their tastiest piece of pie. So, the next time you’re craving a mouth-watering sliece of heaven, look to these local eateries. PHOTOGRAPH BY MARTIN G MEYERS.

1) MAMA DELUCA’S

Stop in Mama DeLuca’s and try the “Butcher’s Best.” This delicious pizza comes with pepperoni, Italian sausage, ham, bacon and beef with olives and bell peppers.

2) PORTICO RESTAURANT & BAR

If you love a pizza covered in delicious toppings, you’ll crave this “All the Way” pizza from Portico Restaurant & Bar. Loaded with pepperoni, sausage, red onions, bell peppers, mushrooms, tomatoes, and mozzarella, Asiago and Feta Cheeses, this pizza has something for everyone.

3) GENUSA’S RESTAURANT TRATTORIA & WINE CELLAR

There is no doubt that the experts at Genusa’s can whip up a mouth-watering pizza. If you want a fresh pizza teeming with flavor, try the “Pizzetta.” This pie is free-formed with fresh mozzarella, basil and tomatoes.

4) TRIO’S

Trio’s doesn’t just have the best gyros in town, they also serve one of our favorite pizza, too. “The Trio’s Pizza” is made with sausage, hamburger, pepperoni, spinach, black olives, mushrooms, jalapeños, onions, bell peppers, tomatoes, garlic and all cheeses including feta.

5) VIEUX CARRÉ MARKET

You can’t go wrong with anything on the menu at Vieux Carré Market, including this savory pizza. The “Special Pizza” features red sauce, provolone, mozzarella, Italian sausage, andouille sausage, bacon, sautéed mushrooms, roasted red bell pepper, sliced shallots and jalapeño slices.

6) NEWK’S EATERY 2

The spice is right with Newk’s Eatery’s “Spicy Shrimp Pizza.” This delectable pizza is made with broiled plump shrimp, red and yellow bell peppers, ripe Roma tomatoes, house-shredded mozzarella, grated Parmesan and crushed red pepper flakes over a crust brushed with chili oil and garnished with fresh cilantro.

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A Trattoria with Sicilian Soul Food Genusa’s Restaurant

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OR 50 YEARS GENUSA’S ITALIAN Restaurant has been serving the Monroe area a blend of Italian and Sicilian favorites. The restaurant was founded on being a small, comfortable, family restaurant and that still holds true to this day. Genusa’s is now pleased to announce that the third generation, their first grandchild, Ashley Genusa, has joined the team. That’s Ashley with a capital “A,” as bold and brave as the characteristics she embodies. Between caring for her three rambunctious canine children and managing the wait staff, bookkeeping and payroll for Genusa’s, Ashley’s capable hands are definitely full! Genusa’s is ecstatic to keep family tradition and values alive with this newest addition. With this cornerstone under their belt, the Genusa family will continue as usual: pounding garlic, dicing onions, making meatballs and memories, and serving their

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fabulous customers with love. A few years ago, a guest chef from Florence, Italy arrived at Genusa’s to find an eager staff ready to absorb and learn some traditional cooking methods. As they began to help her prep for the chef’s dinner, the chef soon realized that Genusa’s culinary style more closely resembled the Sicilian style instead of traditional Italian. Since then, Genusa’s has happily identified their cuisine as “Sicilian Soul Food.” “We love our heritage, our tomatoes, garlic, onions, and our garlic bread! This will never change at Genusa’s!” Cherry and Francis Genusa started this trattoria and wine cellar 49 years ago and as the business grew, so did the family. They could not be happier to have three talented Genusa women to carry on the family business for them. Ann is a master of all trades, often working in the kitchen and on the service floor, when she is not running

the Coffee Bean. Rachel fine tunes each and every plate that comes out of the kitchen and regularly flexes her innate culinary skills by constructing truly amazing foodwine pairings. Ashley works to constantly improve service and to bring the guests the most pleasurable dining experience they can offer. She is now learning from Pop & GG as Ann and Rachel have before her. Maybe one day this quaint favorite of Monroe’s natives will add another generation to the restaurant business but until then, they will continue on together, doing what they do best – cooking with love and a healthy dose of laughter. Genusa’s is Now Serving Family Feasts “To Go” Stop by and pick-up a Family Feast menu at 815 Park Ave. in Monroe, or feel free to call in an order at 318.387.3083.


Medi Weightloss: The One That Works Lose Up to 10 lbs Your First Week

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T MEDI WEIGHTLOSS,THE PHYSICIANS AND nutrition counselors offer a more realistic approach to weightloss. Instead of promoting diet, they encourage a lifestyle change that helps their patients achieve long term success. The plan is designed to help patients learn how to eat in the real world, real food for real success. By focusing on everyday situations such as grocery shopping, restaurant dining and family events, patients learn how to live while losing the weight, maintain weight loss and stay healthy. Medi Weightloss incorporates once-a-week nutrition counseling for accountability; they also provide healthy recipes and exercise counseling, all while catering to each patient’s personal needs. Beverly Burnley, who works at Woodlawn Elementary and lost 36.5 pounds, says “My favorite thing of all is the education, meeting with a nurse every week; I just love the whole Medi Weightloss experience! It taught me how to eat healthy and still eat stuff I like, just in a healthier way.” The Medi Weightloss program starts with a medical evaluation where the patient will see a physician to have a plan designed around his/her specific needs. The plan will be designed to help set the body into weight loss, which will help burn fat faster. Most Medi Weightloss patients say they have tried all other

plans and none compare to the success they are able to achieve on Medi Weightloss. Some patients have previously had weight loss surgery, but unfortunately gained the weight back, so they end up joining Medi Weightloss afterward. Learning how to eat and adapt their lifestyles is the most important part of the patients’ success. While individual results vary, patients are hitting their overall goal weight (the goal they never thought they could) and getting off of prescription medications like cholesterol, diabetes and blood pressure. Before joining Medi Weightloss, some patients said they were having trouble bending over, putting on their own socks, picking up items on the floor, sitting on the floor to play with their children/grandchildren, getting in and out of vehicles, or even walking outside to get their mail. Within just a few weeks, these patients have seen a huge difference in their everyday lives. Patients are going on cruises and beach trips, yet still losing pounds and inches at their next weigh-in. Medi Weightloss is owned locally by respected physicians: Dr. Mark Dollar, Dr. Byron Henry and Dr. Michael McCormick. Your assessment is free when you call (318) 807-7448. Open Monday through Friday, Medi Weightloss is located at 1900 North 7th Street in the West Monroe Family Clinic of Family Doctors of NELA.

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Simply Lou

Maters! Nothing Beats the Vicksburg Tomato Sandwich article and illustration by Lou Davenport

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think we can all agree that it’s hot. Real hot! Summers in Louisiana “ain’t for sissies.” When I lived in Vicksburg, MS, I used to say it was the hottest place in the world. I’ve changed my mind, it’s definitely hotter here! It’s that time of year that I stop trying to water plants. It doesn’t help. The air temperature just burns them up. So, I have gone into my annual “only the strong survive” routine. I’m always surprised at what plants actually make it! And, thankfully, many do. You gotta be a tough plant here in North Louisiana. But, that’s enough griping about the weather! Just turn that thermostat down and stay inside. Dear Yard, I’ll see you in the fall! P.S. Make that late Fall. The one thing that does help make our summers here somewhat tolerable are those real, homegrown tomatoes. I could eat mater sammiches everyday, three or four times a day! When I was about five years old, I discovered how good they were and ate so many, I broke out in a rash. Just give me some fresh tomatoes, mayonnaise and white bread and turn me loose! They are so good that songwriter Guy Clark wrote a song about them...

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“Homegrown Tomatoes, Homegrown Tomatoes, What’d life be like without Homegrown Tomatoes. Only 2 things that money can’t buy and that’s true love and Homegrown Tomatoes!” The song goes on to proclaim, “plant ‘em in spring, eat em in the summer, all winter without ‘ems a culinary bummer!” No truer words! Those things at the grocery store taste about as good as cardboard. Does this make me a tomato snob? I guess I am, so I enjoy as many of those precious red jewels as I can! Living in Vicksburg, I learned that tomato sandwiches are a true art form and if you live there, you need to make ‘em right or just don’t show up at a gathering IF you were assigned to make them! There are RULES! As the story goes, a young lady had moved to Vicksburg and was asked to a ladies’ tea. (They LOVE teas in Vicksburg) This poor girl was assigned to bring the highly esteemed Vicksburg Tomato Sandwich. Nobody bothered to give her the special recipe. I guess they just assumed everyone knew how to make the proper tomato sandwich. The girl showed up with her sandwiches on unsliced bread with the crusts on and used store bought mayonnaise. AND the greatest faux pas of all....she did not peel her tomatoes! Ah,

the shame! She was ostracized for two years. They take their Vicksburg Tomato Sandwiches seriously. I learned how to make them and I must say, they are delicious. They are just too damn little. I could eat an entire stacked up tray of them. It’s hard to keep bein’ a lady when those things are served! So, I am going to share with you all THE recipe! You might end up living in Vicksburg (which I do really still love) and I sure wouldn’t want anybody being ostracized! (Now, that I don’t live there, I slap some good ol Hellman’s or Duke’s mayonnaise on a whole slice of white bread, pile on the tomatoes and give it a little salt and pepper and top it with another slice of white bread, crusts intact! I use enough mayonnaise to make it get all “drippy” like a good hamburger should be! You know the ones. They drip down your wrists and you have to use a lot of napkins!) THE OFFICIAL VICKSBURG TOMATO SANDWICH RECIPE: First of all, you have to get ripe, smallish size tomatoes (so the slice of tomato won’t hang out the side of the sandwich!) Boil some water, then dip the tomatoes in for just a few seconds. Those skins will slip right off!


Then you slice them fairly thin, but not too thin. You want to really taste that tomato! Lay them out on paper towels to drain some while you cut out the bread. Day old white bread is mandatory. Trim off all the crusts. Then, you use a small round cookie cutter or a small jelly jar to cut sweet little circles of bread. Supposedly, day old break cuts better. TRUE Vicksburg Tomato Sandwiches use homemade mayonnaise. I’m not that much of a purist. Just start slathering on the Hellman’s or Dukes. (I believe MORE is MORE for this step) Put it on both sides! That way, the tops don’t fall off! Now, if you do want to go all out and be extra fancy, there’s a lot of recipes for homemade mayonnaise! I’m just not that fancy. And the proper pronunciation of mayonnaise is....”MAN AISE!” The very truest artists of the Vicksburg Tomato Sandwich grate a little onion on the tomato before they top it with the bread. (I never take the time for that and besides, onions make me cry). And always add a little salt and pepper. After you assemble all your pretty sandwiches, dust the tops with a little bit of paprika. You are done and safe from being ostracized if you ever get asked to make these for tea in Vicksburg!

One more tip. If you are going to have to wait and take them to your occasion, you need to put layers of them in some Tupperware and between each layer of sandwiches, a damp, NOT WET paper towel! Put in the refrigerator until you are ready to go. Oh, and put the top on that Tupperware! You sure don’t want to show up with DRY Vicksburg Tomato Sandwiches! When I was growing up, my mother and grandmother would put up (can) fresh tomatoes. From those jars, my Mama would make the best soup! Sometimes they would even put all kinds of fresh vegetables in a huge pot and cook it, then put it in the freezer. Mama called it her soup mix. Vegetable soup on a cold day with homemade cornbread! My grandmother made a tomato relish, and I have yet to find one that can compare. It was so good, I’d sneak the jar out of the refrigerator and eat it with a spoon! Just a little bit of her relish on some fresh black eyed peas and you were off to nirvana! (I had no idea what nirvana was back then, but I do now and I also like using that word to describe how good that combination was!) And, I sure can’t not mention Fried Green Tomatoes! Oh my, oh my! They are so good they have reached appetizer status in a lot of fancy restaurants! Finally, they get the respect they deserve! I’ve been eating those

since I was a baby! I may have “slapped my Mama” they were so good. It’s probably the only thing I can really fry well. I’ve never mastered that art. They are best fried in an old black skillet! Back to those mater sammiches. Bacon and lettuce on your tomato sandwich is a good choice! Those two ingredients can almost make one of those cardboard tomatoes taste...well, okay! Bacon with anything is good. And if you are going to cook up some of the fine fresh vegetables we have right now, you have to save that bacon grease! Everything tastes better cooked in that! One of my favorite writers, Rick Bragg, said “Bacon grease runs through my veins.” He’s from the South. WE know what he means. You know we do! But, I bet I could eat more Vicksburg Tomato Sandwiches than him! Stay cool ya’ll! See you next month when I am going to tell ya’ll about “Ridin’ with the Duke.” Stories from the road with my Daddy.

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After School Pit Stop

Magic Grill West Monroe and Magic Grill Chicken

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T IS BACK TO SCHOOL TIME, which means everyone will soon be getting back in their routines of homework, after school practices, rehearsals and more, which will send everyone into a frenzy…a feeding frenzy! That is why Magic Grill West Monroe and Magic Chicken are the place to feed your family! Both locations offer a happy hour, with specials in the afternoon. With options from po-boys, burgers, hot dogs, chicken strips and fish, there is certainly something for everyone. They even provide pencils for the kids to get their homework done before it’s time to rush off to football, dance or cheer practice. The Magic Grill Chicken location offers Mr. Ray’s famous fried chicken and gravy! “One thing I was striving for was to also become known for a magical bread product to serve along with the delicious chicken and popping gravy!” said Jada Ali,

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owner. Well, she has succeeded because they have become home of the magical rolls! They are similar to a school cafeteria roll and are near perfect when paired with the fried chicken and gravy! The delicious rolls are also used for the chicken salad sliders. Head cook Candace has nearly perfected the homemade chicken salad and it has become a customer favorite! If the kiddos bring home a great grade, you can reward them by letting them pick up some candy by the pound from the wall of candy inside J-Mart Too. Before or after the game, Magic Grill West Monroe and Magic Grill Chicken are the perfect pit stop. Being a pit stop for people for local flavor and the tradition of po-boys and gravy is something that Mr. Ray Pierce started over 50 years ago. At the Magic Chicken location inside J-Mart Too, they have started a new after-school tradition. Every Monday through

Friday, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., they offer a special after school snack menu with $1 fries and drinks, and mozzarella sticks, 10 piece nugget and fried pickles for $2.49 each. Another tradition they know will become a favorite is their $5 plate lunch, available at Magic Chicken inside J-Mart Too. The lunches are offered Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., and customers can choose from a breast, side and roll, leg/thigh, side and roll or sliders and a side. What a great way to grab a delicious, balanced lunch on the go! Magic Grill West Monroe is located on Arkansas Road and Magic Chicken is right down the hill. Both are conveniently located and owners Faisal and Jada Ali look forward to seeing familiar faces and new customers during the busy back-to-school season!


NELA Dental – Bridging the Gaps

Dental Implants: Bringing Confidence and Stability Back to Your Smile Trust Our Experience and Expertise At NELA Dental we take pride in the education and experience of our dentists and staff. Dr. Vance Costello is highly trained in performing dental implant procedures. He has completed the American Academy of Implant Dentistry’s Comprehensive MaxiCourse and is an Associate Fellow of the AAID. Also, Dr. Costello is an instructor with Advanced Implant Educators (AIE) and Implant Know-How. What Exactly Is A Dental Implant? A dental implant is an artificial tooth root that is placed into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or a bridge. A proper dental implant coupled with a replacement tooth or bridge will look, feel and function like a natural tooth. While functionality and appearance are two big reasons patients

seek out dental implants, they may also be looking to prevent future problems like deterioration of the jaw bone and shifting of surrounding teeth. It’s Not All About Looks For those with missing or decaying teeth, implants can improve your smile not only cosmetically but structurally as well. No more passing up on the beef nachos! Implants provide a stable and durable base for restoration so you can start to enjoy all of your favorite foods again. Even denture wearers find that their dentures can be held in place with dental implants for added comfort and stability. I’m Embarrassed by My Missing Teeth At NELA Dental, our dentists are sensitive to the problems experienced by patients with missing teeth. We understand

that there are a variety of reasons why patients have missing teeth. Our goals are to protect your oral health, restore your beautiful smile and enhance your self confidence. Is A Dental Implant Right For Me? Everyone’s dental needs and financial situations are different, and we are committed to finding ways for each patient to get the care they need. Affordable financing is available. Call one of our three convenient locations in Farmerville, Monroe and Oak Grove to schedule your free consultation. Don’t let anything stand in your way of a great smile any longer, contact NELA Dental and get started today on that smile you’ve always wanted!

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St. Francis Medical Group Continued From Page 28

St. Francis Primary Care Clinic— Smith Medical Office Richard D. Smith, Jr., MD 3510 Magnolia Cove, STE 120 • Monroe 966-8700 St. Francis Primary Care Clinic— Sterlington Darshan Patel, MD Gwendolyn Proctor, MD Teresa Wood, APRN-BC, FNP 8950 Hwy 165 N., STE 2 • Sterlington 966-8800   St. Francis Primary Care Clinic— West Monroe Clyde E. Elliott, MD Gwendolyn Proctor, MD Nandini Sunkireddy, MD Brian Moore, APRN-FNP Susan Seanor, RN, FNP-C

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200 Professional Dr • West Monroe 966-6535 or 966-6350 St. Francis Pulmonary Clinic Antti Maran, MD William Matthews, MD Debra Barker, MSN, FNP-BC 411 Calypso St. Monroe • 966-6500 Dr. Maran and Debra Barker Satellite Location: 2104 Loop Rd, STE F • Winnsboro St. Francis Urology Clinic John Califano, MD Nayana Shrestha, APRN, FNP-C 312 Grammont St, STE 404 • Monroe 966-8400   The Hospitalist Program at St. Francis Medical Center is composed of 22 SFMG physicians and two nurse practitioners who

devote their time exclusively to patients within the hospital. Primary care physicians refer patients to the Hospitalist Program during a hospital stay. Coordination between primary care physicians and hospitalists reduces unnecessary admissions, readmissions, and emergency room visits. Also, keeping the primary care physician informed along the way is critical in making sure the patient gets the right care the first time. In life, most people find themselves needing to locate a new provider of healthcare services. It is reassuring to know that the SFMG can provide an easy transition and trustworthy option. With the tradition and resources of St. Francis Medical Center behind the Medical Group, you can be sure that your health will be treated with respect, attention and compassion. For more information please call (318) 966-SFMG (7364) or visit www. stfranmedgroup.com.


Local Home Boutique Opens New Location Louisiana Purchases

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OUISIANA PURCHASES - A BOUTIQUE OF THE south located in Northeast Louisiana that boasts far more than material goods within its walls. Louisiana Purchases is not just a store. It is a place where friendships are made, gifts are purchased to show gratitude, hearts are impacted, and every item is handpicked with meaning and care. A year ago this month, this legacy of a store was passed down to its new owner, Emily Lane. Having experience in home construction, interior design and real estate, Emily is passionate about everything home. With excitement and hard work, it is with great joy that they welcome you to their new location to find all of your gift and furniture needs. The store is located at 1306 North 18th Street, Suite A, in Monroe Louisiana. From wedding gifts to couches to hostess gifts and even gifts for men – they have it all. As the employees would say, Louisiana Purchases is the lagniappe for the home and garden. Did we mention the local artists and exclusive lines? How about custom orders? Emily’s focus and desired store culture is to create a place that is truly unique. A memorable experience.

What makes this store so different is the mixture of antiques and contemporary furniture. Emily and staff attend nationwide furniture and gift marts but they especially take pride in their one-of-a-kind finds. From small town backroads in Louisiana to artists who create their crafts in the backyard sheds of their homes, nothing beats finding a piece of history, a small piece of art with a big story, or maybe just the quirkiness of the different styles throughout the years. Regardless, Emily lives her days striving to make a difference, share a moment, help a friend, freshen a home with what she calls “a little fluff,” and, all in all give, the Monroe community a place to visit where walking in the doors puts a smile on your face, comfort in your heart, excitement in your eyes and a shopping experience that is truly fun. Aside from helping make a house a home with furniture, lighting, etc., picking gifts and wrapping is one of the staff’s most favorite tasks. Visit them Monday through Saturday at their new location. It is sure to impress.

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Cancer Survivors Celebration On Thursday, June 16th, the annual “Cancer Survivors Celebration” was held at the West Monroe Convention Center. The event, sponsored by the Louisiana Cancer Foundation, the Northeast Louisiana Cancer Institute and the Cancer Foundation League, had over 150 people in attendance. Each table had beautiful decorations and arrangements created by ladies of the Monroe Garden Club, music was performed by Kent and Laura Arrington and the guest speaker was Kimberly Peters. Attendees enjoyed a great meal, door prizes and most importantly, fellowship with other cancer survivors.

On the BayouScene

1 Janis Curtis and George Curtis 2V  irginia Sumrall, Virginia Carter, Clarence and Betty Schmittzehe and Louise LaDart 3D  onna Payne, Jan McDonald, James Adams and Ginger Huckaby 4 Dillie Vernon, Odell Jackson and Chris Jackson 5 L ydia May, Lydia Beach, James Adams and Kimberly Peters 6 Alise Oliver, Donna Nolan and Lexie McGuffee

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IN THE SPIRIT

Washington Wine and Spirits Opens Continued From Page 74 “We have some real unicorns in our inventory of whiskeys,” says Shane, pointing to the “Holy Grail” of whiskeys, McAllan M. This particular bottle, perched high on a shelving unit made by local artist Joshua Mitchell of reclaimed wood, is one of only 300 bottles released in the United States. Adds Carter, “We are only one bottle away from having the entire McAllan line of whiskeys. And that one bottle is actually on its way.” The shop carries over 300 labels of alcohol including some surprisingly inexpensive bottles of 30-year-old whiskey, according to Morgan. The liquor collection has outpaced their shelf space, so if you don’t see what you are looking for, just ask; it may be in the back. Washington Wine and Spirits is hosting its first Wine Dinner on September 8. The dinner will feature Wallace McKeel, who will speak on the History of California Wines. McKeel is extremely knowledgable about California wines. Seating is limited. The evening will provide a great meal with California

wine pairings plus a great program. In addition, the shop will have regular demonstrations and complimentary tastings of wine, spirits and craft beers. Morgan adds, “We have a pretty gnarly selection of craft beer. We have hard-to-find Old World and American craft beers on the shelf.” Says Shane, “We tend to favor the Belgian style beers.”

Camille points out the bottles of Argus, traditional English-style cider kin bottled in Texas. “It’s made from apple pomace and tastes like champagne.” In addition to wines and spirits, the boutique offers bitters, cordials and necessities for creating yummy craft cocktails. In the future, the shop will offer Doe’s steaks for sale so that you can grab steaks for grilling and a bottle of wine, creating your own Doe’s experience at home. Closer to the holidays, Chad Watson, Doe’s bar manager, will do craft cocktail demonstrations, giving you ideas for your holiday parties. Washington Wine and Spirits offers over 300 spirits including whiskey, vodka and gin and over 300 bottles of wine. This hidden gem of a boutique is open Monday-Saturday from 10a.m. until. For more information and to see upcoming events, make sure to add Washington Wine and Spirits on Facebook.

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BAYOU OUTDOORS

ROOKIE OF THE YEAR Local Angler Brett Preuett Sets the Bar High

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article by Dan Chason

f you look up the lists of legends of fishing in North Louisiana, some will bring up old names from the River’s Ford Bass Circuit while some will tout the successes of a Greg Hackney, Dana Walker, Ross Cagle, Allen Butler or Jim Dillard. That list is growing and it is growing due to a young gun who was birthed into the world of fishing via the various College fishing organizations. I know this first hand as I first met this young man, Brett Preuett, at ULM. He and a friend approached Chief Larry Ellerman and me and asked us to serve as sponsors/advisors for the first ULM fishing team. The Chief and I readily accepted and I will admit, there wasn’t a lot of pushing to be done. Brett Preuett came to ULM from Tioga High School with high hopes of playing college baseball. Having been chosen an All-State third baseman, this was a reasonable dream. However, in his senior year in high school, a freak accident cost him the sight in one eye. The first time I met him, I immediately liked Brett. A very respectful and focused young man who absolutely was enthralled by bass fishing. Brett admits he was a novice. Not knowing how to read a depth finder or structure, he was limited to fishing exposed cover and cypress trees. That was about it. Brett was like a sponge. He read everything he could get his hands on and was a constant fixture in my office, gleaning what fishing knowledge I could share. He teamed up with some talented ULM anglers and being a good student, soon became a top gun on our fishing team. Brett soon became the partner to draw. I think he spent more time reading Bassmaster’s Magazine than he did his school books, but luckily

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he was able to balance both and maintained high grades both on the water and in his studies at ULM. Not only did he do well in school, he was well respected by his peers and instructors. This hard work paid off in the second year of the team, where ULM ranked #2 in the nation in college fishing. That was not good enough for Brett as he and the team learned from costly mistakes. The third year, ULM was the number one college fishing team in America. The same year Brett and his partner, Paul Clark, won the FLW Championship on Beaver Lake. Brett did so well in the Carhartt Bassmaster College Series, that he qualified for the 2015 Bassmaster’s Classic presented by GoPro, as he had won the Carhartt Bassmaster College Series Classic Bracket. Quite an accomplishment in a short period of time. Not long after the Classic, he again fished with the big boys in Bassmaster and pulled off three Top 12 finishes helping him to qualify for the Bassmaster Elite Series. In January 2016, Brett and partner, Tyler Craig, dominated the field at Toledo Bend by winning the USA Fishing Trails Division #1 Championship with 5 fish weighing 25.88. Not bad for a guy who didn’t know how to fish anything but shallow water. He continued with a good showing, finishing 27th on Lake Texoma in June. This is only his rookie year and he is still finishing well ahead of noted veterans. With all of his fishing accolades, Brett still managed to get his MBA from ULM. It is not all fun and games on the fishing circuit, but Brett finds time to spend with his fiancée, Sarah Purvis, and his loving and supportive family. But Brett will tell you quick that the biggest change in his life came recently when he became a Christian and was baptized.


“I am now more focused, more involved in my personal relationships and zoned in on what God has in store for me than what I have in store for me.” Quite a statement and a lesson for all of us, whether we fish or not. To put Brett’s accomplishments in perspective, you need to understand that just to reach the Elite Series is a life-long goal of many anglers. The Elite Series is not a tournament series where you can just put up entry fees and fish. You must qualify through performance, THEN pay upwards of $40,000 just in entry fees. That performance goes like this: There are Open tournaments in various regions. You must finish in the top 5 overall after three tournaments to qualify. Only the top five anglers gain access to the Elites each year from each division. An average field in an open tournament is 200 anglers. Consistency is the key and is rewarded. Remember, the top anglers in the world who fish FLW or the Elite series also fish the Opens which makes the achievement of making the top 5 over three events a monumental task. Brett was fortunate to garner some key sponsors who stepped up to help him on his way. One of the local sponsors is the JPS companies. Brett proudly drives a JPS Ford and pulls a wrapped Nitro boat with a 225 Mercury. Remaining true to his origins and alma mater, the boat promotes his University with a giant ULM Warhawk displayed on a national scale. “Without my sponsors like the U.S. Polo Association, JPS, Creme Lures and Mudhole Tackle, there is no way I could do this.” Traveling to waters as far as the Great Lakes and the Potomac River, Brett has flown our flag on the national stage and is highly regarded as an up and coming professional angler. With the demands of travel, high expenses and the wear and tear on an angler both mentally and physically, Brett maintains his composure through his faith, family and his tenacity. Getting up most mornings by 4 a.m. and fishing until the sun sets may sound like fun. But over time, it can be a grind and the fun becomes a job. This job, however, came to Brett in a different way. He had a great team of anglers

at ULM, and competing on the college level gave him a quick lesson in strategy and methods to catch bass in every type of water you can imagine. “It’s unreal how much lakes differ in each state. Smallmouth fishing is so different but when you find them, it can be unbelievable as they love to stack up by the droves,” says Brett. This showed to be true on Lake Erie where Brett landed 39 pounds of smallmouth bass in two days, finishing in the top 20 in the tournament. He went to the tidal waters in the James River for his first time, and again, finished in the top 20. He missed DOUBLE qualifying ... that means twice in two different divisions by a mere ONE fish. He still finished in the top 10 overall. Not bad for a Louisiana boy who’s accustomed to cypress trees. Brett continues his quest this year as he competes in his rookie year. He has a waiver for 2017 meaning he is qualified to fish next year regardless of his performance in 2016. I would wager that 2017 will be a stellar year as this young gun gears up to represent all things good about the young anglers of today. If there is a fantasy pick available for 2017 on the Elite Series, my money is on Brett.

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Dr. Alvaro Manrique Hosts President’s Academy

ULM President’s Academy Students Are Heart Electricians at P&S Surgical Hospital

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n July at P&S Surgical Hospital, visiting high school students learned how to map the human heart, treat heart arrhythmia, and even understand the importance of following their own hearts.   Alvaro Manrique Garcia, M.D., a board certified cardiac electrophysiologist who specializes in the electrical system of the heart, encouraged the visiting high school students to “follow their hearts” when choosing a medical profession. “Choose this profession because you love it, because you want to make people feel better. It’s so important to follow your heart when deciding what to do with your life.” The 10 junior and senior high school students from Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi visited P&S Surgical Hospital’s Cardiac and Peripheral-Vascular

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Laboratories as part of the University of Louisiana at Monroe President’s Academy, a preparatory program for high-ability junior and senior high school students. The young scholars—all of whom are interested in pursuing a medical profession—imagined their futures today when they performed simulated cardiac ablations on chicken breast tissue. A cardiac ablation, which is performed on adult patients of all ages, can transform a patient’s quality of life by eradicating areas in the heart that are producing abnormal electrical impulses and causing heart arrhythmia. The students utilized three dimensional cardiac mapping, just as an electrophysiologist would do to capture a clear picture of the heart’s inner workings. The students also learned to locate where the irregular rhythm occurred and cauterize

the particular cell causing the arrhythmia. One such student was Kyla Mccall of Oak Grove High School in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Today’s hands-on experience, combined with Manrique’s words, solidified her future career choices, she said. “When I was six years old, I found out that I had a heart murmur, so I’ve been in and out of cardiology offices. Dr. Manrique talked to us today about his specialty, and he really made me fall in love with it,” she said. “I didn’t know what field to go into, but I think he just convinced me to study cardiology.”  To put it simply, an electrophysiologist is an “electrician of the heart.” This type of cardiologist focuses on heart rhythm disorders, which can produce symptoms such as palpitations, light-headedness, shortness of breath, fatigue, dizziness,


Kyla McCall of Oak Grove High School performs a simulated cardiac ablation.

and in extreme cases, collapse and sudden cardiac arrest. Manrique, the son of two physicians, knew he wanted to be an electrophysiologist when he realized how the specialty could transform lives. He moved from Peru to the United States in 2004, and began working at P&S a year ago. “I love electrophysiology because you can instantly determine what is wrong with a patient and permanently fix that problem through a minimally invasive procedure,” he said. “We have had several patients with heart arrhythmia, and they were limited physically. They would get very tired and very fatigued. After the ablations, their energy levels returned to normal, and they were able to do things they were not able to do before.” P&S Surgical Hospital CEO Linda S. Holyfield said she appreciated the chance to host the PA students. Holyfield, a ULM nursing graduate, has been inviting ULM interns to work at P&S for many years. “Hands on education” is so important, she said. “We welcome the opportunity to educate high school students about potential careers in healthcare. Electrophysiology is a great example of the innovation they can anticipate in

their own professions. It’s so important to encourage our children to imagine the possibilities.” President’s Academy Students at P&S Surgical Hospital Jenny Bond, Cabot High School, Austin, AR James Butler, Corinth High School, Corinth, MS Kristen Clement, Patrick F. Taylor Science and Technology Academy, Terrytown, LA Lauren Ducote, Mandeville High School, Mandeville, LA River Gordon, Northwest Rankin High School, Brandon, MS Evan Hebert, Kaplan High School, Kaplan, LA Laine Keel, George County High School, Lucedale, MS Kyla Mccall, Oak Grove High School, Hattiesburg, MS Emma Orman, Magnolia Heights School, Olive Branch, MS Lauryn Smith, Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science, Meridian, MS P&S Surgical Hospital is a joint venture among physician specialists and St. Francis Medical Center.

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Chefs for a Cause

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On July 12, Family Promise of Ouachita held its annual fundraiser, Chefs for a Cause. 4 local chefs donated their time and resources to help with this event. Chef Pat Nolan of Pat Nolan catering, Blake Phillips of Restaurant Sage and Chris McKnight of The Fat Pelican prepared a southern cuisine that consisted of baked chicken, rice pilaf, fresh summer squash and locally grown field peas. Chocolate parfaits, pecan pie bars and ooey gooey bars were prepared by Tummy Yummy Creations. Trent Dion Soto, a local artist and film producer was the keynote speaker. It was a great night of food and fellowship while getting to hear Trent’s inspirational journey. All the funds that were raised went to Family Promise of Ouachita for the continued operation of their day center.

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On the BayouScene 1 2 3 4 5

Barney and Lauretta Tucker Shawn Keyser, Lisa McGehee and Darrel Janes L oura and Guy Barr Ben and Emily Thompson, Allison Earl and Vickie Jacola M  arilyn Hudson, Bruce Walker, Sandy DeCelle and Delora Walker 6 Zeke and Courtney Wetzell and John Bruscato 7M  ichael Monk, Dorothy Lawson and Blake Phillips 8 Claude, Alana and Naima Davis 9 Jeramiah Beck, Laruese Rollins, Big Al Cherry, Sheryl Steen and Kanada DeBurr 10 R  onnie Scott, Ken and Stella Gibson 11 C  J and Callie Prewitt 12 M  elissa Williams, Marleika Williams and Carissa Odubela 13 Janet Haedicke, Jordan Haedicke and Steve Haedicke 14 A  shley Morris, Dusty Teer, Gloria Teer and Makenzie McClain 15 C  hris McKnight, Chip Nolan, Jordan Edwards and Ethan Terral 16 Cherry and Larry Phillips

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Glenwood Medical Group Quality Medical Providers You Expect. Compassion Care You Deserve. (Continued From Page 40)

robotically trained urologists in Northeast Louisiana. His services include the evaluation and treatment of bladder, kidney and prostate cancer, kidney stones, male and female urinary incontinence, enlarged prostate, vasectomy and erectile dysfunction. PH: 318-329-8517 PRIMARY CARE CLINICS GLENWOOD FAMILY CARE CLINIC Rita Zuber, NP Ellen Gentile, NP Pediatric, adult and geriatric care including minor illness and emergencies, sports physicals, vaccinations, specialist referrals, medication management and DOT/CDL physicals. PH: 318-644-2573 GLENWOOD INTERNAL MEDICINE AND PEDIATRICS Billy G. Branch, MD Internal medicine, pediatrics, KidMed vaccinations, chronic disease management and diagnosis along with family minor illness and emergency care. PH: 318-665-0170 GLENWOOD MEDICINE CLINIC Christene Wooden, ANP Chronic disease management, diabetes and minor illness as well as medical testing for CDL license exams, diabetic nail care, in-house labs and EKG. PH: 318-388-1400 GLENWOOD STAT CARE Daniel Trejo, MD Lynne Talley, NP Ann Gray, FNP Kim Kornegay, NP Pediatric, adult and geriatric care for minor illness and emergency including in-office labs, X-rays and EKGs. Primary care includes chronic disease and medication management, physicals and wellness exams, Kidmed vaccinations and skin condition treatment. Open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Walk-ins welcome. PH: 318-396-3800 Glenwood Medical Group administrative offices are located at 503 McMillan Road, in Glenwood Regional Medical Center, West Monroe. For more information, call (318) 329-4200 or visit www.glenwoodmedicalgroup.com.

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Ruston Peach Festival 2016 The 66th annual Peach Festival took place June 24-25th this year, and it was one for the books. Festival-goers enjoyed everything from arts and crafts to a parade and a rodeo. Kids’ activities were onsite as well as an antique car show, sporting tournaments, and even a dinosaur exhibit. Live music was provided by the Chee-Weez and Dylan Scott among others. Along with music, activities included an Art Exhibit, Peach hunt, BMX and Skateboard Show, Baby photo contest, arts and crafts show and tons of vendors to shop from! The Louisiana Peach Festival celebrates peachy goodness and highlights the explosive popularity of Ruston peaches, which have been a staple of life in Lincoln Parish since the late 1930s. For more information, visit louisianapeachfestival.org.

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On the BayouScene 1 Matti and Charli Grillot 2 Greer and Shunda Young 3 Jack and Loraine Taylor 4 Jordan Raborn and Brittany Gilbert 5 F rancie Aulds, Rachel Davison and Cameron Adams 6 Lora Lee and Wayne Yelverton 7 Monica Hill and Susie Mathis 8 Connie Thompson Cline and Faye Barnes 9 S ierra Ortiz, Christy Norris and Kimberly Frey 10 Rob Phillips, Julie and Caylan Dowden, Brittany Drewry 11 K  elly Forest and Emma Melville 12 Ian Blaylock and Brittany Reeves 13 Andrew Book and Mashall Smith 14 C  hastity Livingston and Anette Straughter 15 Brad and Emily Wiggers 16 D  eidra Adair, Debbie Newcomer Foley, Fitz and Olivia Adair

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Art Exhibition Winners The North Central Louisiana Arts Council Announces 28th Annual Peach Art Exhibit Winners The North Central Louisiana Arts Council is proud to present the winners of the 28th Annual Peach Art Exhibit! For the Youth Ages 6 & Under category, sponsored by 109 Trenton Gift Shoppe: 1st Place Storm by Lakelynn Honaker, 2nd Place A Happy Summer by Kate Sanders, 3rd Place Cutie Kitty by Ashleigh Harrison, with Honorable Mentions going to Flowers in a Vase by Avery Dixon and Sitting Peach by Conly Jackson. For the Youth Ages 7 to 10 category, sponsored by Durrett Law & Title: 1st Place Papaw’s Pasture by Braden Pye, 2nd Place Rainbow Starry Night by Collin Rozelle, 3rd Place Cat and Mouse by Mia St. John, with Honorable Mentions going to The Peach Life by Emmie Parks and Lucy by Avery Madden. For the Youth Ages 11 to 14 category, sponsored by Beta Sigma Phi: 1st Place Abstract Face by Gwendolyn Beasley, 2nd Place The City by Aimee Turner, 3rd Place Harry Potter by Elizabeth Beasley, with Honorable Mentions going to Channel Cat by Shane Rowe and Self Portrait by Emma Thorn.

For the Youth Ages 15 to 18 category, sponsored by Nancy & John Wallace: 1st Place Eye of the Beholder by Destiny McGrew, 2nd Place Fruits of Labor by Autumn Downen, 3rd Place Dreamscape by Leah Price, with Honorable Mentions going to Fuzzy Thoughts by Leah Prescott and Snowy Sunset by Autumn Downen. And for the Youth Best of Show, sponsored by Origin Bank: Snow Leopard by Alex Davis. For the Adult 3-Dimensional Arts category, sponsored by Bank of Ruston: 1st Place Reflections of the Peach by Katherine Fields, 2nd Place Ridge by Alice Morgan, 3rd Place Painted Desert by Meredith Piper, with Honorable Mentions going to Oyster Platter by Peggy Cruse and Entanglement by Chris Seaman. For the Adult Photography category, sponsored by First National Bank: 1st Place Farmer by Jonathan Clayton, 2nd Place She Danced by Keith C. Matthews, 3rd Place Splish Splash by Kevin Cuccia, with Honorable Mentions going to Chou Bao by Jonathan Clayton

and Peach on a Beach by Matthew Vincent. For the Adult Opaque Painting category, sponsored by The Peach 99.3: 1st Place I Danced on the Earth by DeLena Ashworth, 2nd Place Calypso by Almira Bradford, 3rd Place Goodwill by Julie Crews, with Honorable Mentions going to Puppy Love by Teddi McGehee and Orange Madness by Kathy Alger. For the Adult Transparent Painting category, sponsored by Ponchatoulas: 1st Place Pure September by Mary May, 2nd Place Early Morning at Parish Press, Ruston by Dianne Douglas, 3rd Place Swimming Angels by Mary Ann Nagan, with Honorable Mentions going to Moon Night by Chunlan Yi and Chilling Out by Dianne Douglas. For the Adult Drawing category, sponsored by Fine Line Supply Co.: 1st Place Wilton by S.C. Hartt, 2nd Place A Little Cow in the Water by Erik Rodriguez, 3rd Place Zia, Zentangle Inspired Art by Marlen Waters, with Honorable Mentions going to Waiting by Debra Heard and Mandala 27 by Rachel Sims. And for the Adult Best of Show, sponsored by Gallery 203 & Frame of Mind: Austin by Molly Butler. Congratulations to all the wonderful artists on display. The show will be in the Ruston Civic Center until July 11. Artists should remember to pick up their artwork on Thursday, July 12 between 9am-12pm when the show is over.

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ARCHITECTURAL REDUX HOME OF AIMEE AND CHAD HILL PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN G MEYERS ARTICLE BY MARÉ BRENNAN


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hen Aimee and Chad Hill became only the second owners of the King Stubb’s designed home for community leaders Frances and Grayson Guthrie in 1937 and built for a whopping $4,400, to say that a lot was on the line was an understatement. Sited directly across the street from Monroe’s Triangle Park, which is ground zero for the annual 4th of July Children’s Parade, the Hills were respectful of their home’s role in 20th century Monroe and of its architectural pedigree. Says Aimee, “We wanted our home to look as close to the original house as possible, but we also had to be mindful of the special needs of our son, Hudson.” A major redux began in earnest after the couple acquired the home in 2012. Chad, an electrical engineer and owner of HCH, Inc., says, “Aimee and I sat down, and we drew out what we envisioned for this home, what we thought it could be.” From those sketched plans, Larry James finessed a set of working plans to help the family realize their renovation dreams. To create an open concept living and kitchen area, a wall that split the center of where the kitchen is now was completely removed. A garage and new wing for the couple’s teenage daughter, Chandler, increased the footprint of the home. A screened porch was also added that transitions from the main living area to the pool and open air cabana and outdoor kitchen. The master bedroom was completely renovated, removing an existing bath and creating an en suite. For the renovations, Brian Allen’s BRACO was sourced as the contractor for interior spaces, while Thomas Woods contracted the exterior renovations and additions. Landscaper Al Hayward executed the landscape installations based on plans developed by local landscape architect Patrick Trisler. Says Chad of the project, “Everything was gutted down to the studs, exposing old knob and tube electrical which was replaced and providing the opportunity to fully insulate the home.” Hudson’s room was acoustically wrapped as well to provide an extra layer of soothing quiet. David Shively with ShiveCo was brought in to create three separate zones of air conditioning to make each unit last longer and efficiently cool each zone of the home. Existing oak floors were salvaged, and Dupuy Flooring was able to match the old oak planks with new, staining them a dark shade of walnut, to create a unified open concept space between the living room and kitchen. Margaret Moses worked with Aimee and Chad to design their interior spaces, helping choose paint colors as well as fixtures. In the home’s foyer, a set of nesting consoles of reclaimed wood is positioned beneath a large canvas painted by Moses. A set of built-in cabinets in the living room features glass doors with X-shaped decorative mullions custom designed by Aimee and built by Rucker Cabinets. The shelves are filled with objets d’art, books and even framed sketches of trees rendered by one of the sons of the original owner who is now an architect.

The living room is filled with comfortable seating, including leather club chairs in blue with nailhead trim. A plantation desk of Chad’s since his early college days was given a new lease on life by Aimee, who painted the desk with Amy Sloane’s charcoal grey chalk paint. “It’s super easy to paint with, and I didn’t have to sand or prep!” says Aimee. A tip the pros know is that pocket doors are a life and space saver. In order to keep an unrestricted view of Hudson and allow the Hills to limit access, pocket doors leading into the dining room are horizontally split in two. The top panel can remain open while the bottom panel acts as a barrier. In addition, pocket doors save valuable floor and wall space, since there is no swing to account for. “When we first bought the home there was a wall which separated the now open-concept kitchen and living room right down the middle of the kitchen,” says Chad. The kitchen features a six-burner Wolf range and hood, as well as a Sub-Zero refrigerator, freezer and wine cooler. For convenience, the couple added a pot filler above the range. A trio of vintage schoolhouse pendants which illuminate the island were a find from Rosemary Beach. Chinese wishbone counter height seating allows kids and adults to gather at the island. A large undermounted sink and easy to care for white quartz with grey veining countertops put the fun in functional in Aimee’s kitchen. “I cook often, and I cook messy,” she laughs.

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ust beyond the living room, a screened-in porch beckons visitors to stretch their legs and head out doors. The X detailing is carried forward into the mullions on the screen porch as well. Wood floors are painted a modern grey and topped with a bold, graphic rug and generous wicker club chairs. Vintage string lights with Edison-style bulbs hang artfully above head. There is no need to wait for a holiday to enjoy festive lights! Night time is definitely the right time. Adding a touch of green to the space, two large fiddlehead ferns are placed on either side of the doorway. In the master bedroom, a large Margaret Moses painting is positioned over a camel back sofa. Mongolian curly lamb pillows in a soft grey hue lend soft texture. Two small square canvasses by Claire Crawford are hung above a chest of drawers. Drapery in the master bedroom was sourced at Fabulous Fabrics. The linen upholstered headboard creates a backdrop for casually chic bed linens in hues of grey, white, khaki and soft blue. The en suite master bathroom features a floor of octagon white tiles with a patterned grey square inset into the mix. An oversized, glass steam shower with white subway tiles is punctuated with a horizontal banding of Carrara marble subway tile. A luxurious oval soaking tub puts relaxation as a top priority and adds to the spa-like feel. Modern sconces with frosted glass cylinders are placed on the mirrors, reflecting soft light back into the space. Custom cabinetry built by Rucker Cabinets is topped with Carrara marble.


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he backyard addition and pool were designed by Patrick Trisler and includes an outdoor kitchen and open air pavilion, placed on axis with the inviting pool. A large cypress header beam with rivet detailing adds a touch of earthiness to the white washed, brick columned space. Jalousie shutters hide an air conditioning unit on one side and pool equipment on the other. An outdoor fireplace provides warmth on cool evenings spent watching sporting events or movies on the flatscreen television. Minimalist shelves of cypress add symmetry to the space on either side of the fireplace and above built-in cabinets topped with bluestone countertops. Chad, who happens to be super handy, built the cocktail table from leftover cypress planks and industrial pipe. “We live out in the backyard,” says Aimee. “The fireplace

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is great in the winter, and the pool is perfect in the summer. Since we finished the outdoor space, this is where we entertain.” Aimee got the idea for the astroturf rug in the outdoor pavilion during a trip to California and wanted to incorporate the look in her own project. All weather wicker sofas are dressed in a myriad of navy and white patterned pillows. Aimee recalls, “When we were talking to Patrick about what I wanted this backyard to look like, I showed him photos of spaces I liked, but most of all I wanted functionality and simple clean lines. Like our pool. I love how simple it is and squared off, nothing complicated. I really wanted a ‘cocktail pool.’ And cool and natural color combinations are what I was going for.” Ewing Aquatic from Shreveport installed the pool, which features a self-cleaning option making pool cleanup a breeze. Jets pop


up and make water flow to the drains. Days spent vacuuming pools are over! The pool doubles as a water feature with three copper fountainheads, which spout arcs of water into the pool. To help alleviate drainage issues, the pool is raised slightly higher than the backyard surrounding it. Concrete coping around the pool and stepping stones which lead from the screen porch to the poolside are created from a uniquely treated, white concrete with a rock salt finish, which stays cool to the feet when the weather is hot. The pool features a unique built-in bench seat, and LED lights add to the pool’s ambience. Palisades zoysia in a vibrant hue of green grows lushly in the gaps between the pools coping and the oversized poured concrete stepping stones. According to the homeowner, an old fashioned push mower is the best solution to cutting the grass between the concrete steps. Pat Trisler adds, “A layer of clipped boxwood with arborvitae fern delineate the gardens. Raised beds are filled with Fielder’s white azalea, and star magnolia are underplanted with dwarf gardenia and machofern.” The shady south side of the Hill’s home is where Henry’s dog run is located, cooled by a multitude of dogwoods and mature trees. On the side, viburnum shows off its big puffy flowers for a springtime show and provides clippings for casual floral arrangements throughout the season. According to Chad, his proudest moment from the renovation encompassed finding a treasure trove of old bricks buried in the backyard, digging them all up and then using them to construct the front entry stairs, sidewalk, columns and patio. The renovation of the Hill’s quaint King Stubbs is nothing short of spectacular in its scope to modernize the interiors and fit them to the family’s unique needs while respecting the history and heritage of the home as well as Stubbs’ mastery of proportion and scale.

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BayouKidz

Picky Eaters: Introducing Your Kids to New Foods Continued From page 72 She cooked it ... you ate it. It may not have been my favorite, but we scarfed it down like it was. As we have raised our children, Scott and I have subscribed to the same sort of philosophy, we cooked it, and they ate it (well, not always, but most of the time.) My late son, Samuel, at just two years old, loved coleslaw and would “gnaw” the meat off a rib right down to the bone. But I have to be perfectly honest, I’m not sure we did this consciously; I think it has always been more of “we did what we were taught.” In my line of work, I get to interact with parents and teachers and grandparents very frequently. During that interaction, I often hear about issues that young children face and one of the most common problems we discuss is picky eaters. As I try to qualify in every column, I am no expert, but I am a mom. And being a mom does qualify me to at least offer up a few ideas on how to get your child to overcome their, shall we say, food phobias. I did a little reading on the matter, and there are literally thousands of articles written on this very subject. Of course, a few ideas jumped at me, because I found them

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to be more realistic, than say, blending spinach into their strawberry banana smoothie. I actually think having your children help make the grocery list is a great place to start. Take this opportunity to let them put what they like on the list and then have them write different foods that perhaps they don’t like. Explain to them the nutritional value of each and even talk to them about how you prepare the dish. Next, let them go grocery shopping with you (no eye rolls or heavy sighs please.) This can actually be fun, if you let your children help you find the items on your list and cross them off as you go. It will even help avoid a phone call, like I got a few days ago when I sent my son to the grocery for me (oh, the benefits of a teenaged driver) and he called to find out where the Cool-Whip was (I have failed him as a parent). And then a suggestion that I’m totally on board with, let them help you with food preparation. Now, I’m not saying you need to buy your six-year old a set of Wusthof knives, but, hey, teach them to tear the lettuce for the salad, squeeze the lemons or peel the hard boiled eggs. It won’t be long before they will be asking to bake a cake or even

stir frying some chicken they saw on a video on YouTube. Finally, start introducing new foods to your child or children every week. One article I read suggested you do it every meal, and I say, they need to get in touch with picky eater reality. But once a week, introduce this new food alongside one of their favorites. As Dr. Rosales has always said, “Pick your battles,” and if they don’t like it, or they resist, just revisit the same food another time or prepare it a different way. With all the culinary resources at our fingertips, especially on the Internet, there are literally thousands of ways to get your child interested in and motivated to try new foods. Anyone who has shared a meal I have prepared will tell you, my mantra is, “It’s all about presentation.” Remember that as you prepare their plate and make it look as appetizing as possible. Shoot, I reckon (as Bitsy used to say), you could let them help you with presentation, by doing something as simple as using a cookie cutter to make their sandwiches. It takes a little work, and I’m not guaranteeing your children will be eating roasted Brussels sprouts within a week, but there is absolutely no reason they shouldn’t be moving in a direction that will help them overcome their aversion to foods that taste delicious and are good for them. Bon Appetit, readers ... the holidays are coming, and that’s a wonderful time and platform to get in the kitchen!


It’s Fig Season Fig Cake Recipe and History of the Fig by Evelyn O’Neal

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igs grow on the Ficus tree (Ficus carica) a member of the mulberry family. They have an opening, called the “ostiole” or “eye”, which is not connected to the tree, but helps the fruits development by increasing its communication with the environment. Figs range dramatically in color and texture depending upon the variety. They may be dried by exposure to sunlight or artificial process, creating a sweet and nutritious dried fruit that can be enjoyed throughout the year. They may also be frozen. Figs can trace their history back to the earliest times with mentions in the Bible and other ancient writings. They are thought to have been first cultivated in Egypt. They were introduced to the Western Hemisphere by the

a time. Stir in buttermilk. Add figs, pecans and vanilla. Mix well Pour in greased and floured tube pan. Bake 325 degrees for 1 hour.

Sauce:

Spaniards in the early 16th century. Today, California is one of the largest producers of figs. We have an abundance here in our area for our own personal use. Everyone knows someone with a fig tree. They ripen from June to September. On the Food Rating System, figs rate “good” with nutrients of fiber, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, manganese and pantothenic acid.

MY FAVORITE RECIPE: FIG CAKE

2 c plain flour 1 c oil 1 tsp salt, soda, cinnamon (each ) 3 eggs 1 1/2 c sugar 1 c buttermilk 1 c chopped pecans 1 1/2 c cooked figs (mashed) 1 tsp vanilla Sift dry ingredients, add oil, beat well. Add eggs, beat one at

1 c sugar 1/2 c pecan halves toasted 1 stick butter 1 tsp corn syrup 1/2 c buttermilk 1/2 tsp soda 1 Tbl vanilla Mix and boil 3 minutes. Pierce cake with toothpick and pour sauce over cake while hot. (Special thanks to Mrs Evelyn for baking this beautiful fig cake and submitting her recipe.)

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Pretty in pink is the only way to describe this flashy, fitted blazer. Paired with a floral romper and chunky sandal, this outfit is the perfect balance of color. Ellie has plenty of pink accessories to choose from, a blush tote to a bright clutch, extra pink earrings, sandals and haute hair accessories.

ERS PHO TOG RAP HY MAR TIN G. MEY D HAIR & MAK E-UP MEK A REL IFOR MOD EL ELL IE JAC KSO N


Ellie is festival ready in this 70’s style outfit featuring bell bottom inspired jeans paired with an ivory tank and floral kimono. The sunglasses, platform wedges, layered with a choker necklace complete her hippie chic look.


This off the shoulder pink dress will have any date falling in love. The strappy, black, chunky heels add some va-voom to her look. The matching jet-beaded necklace and bracelet finish off the outfit for a romantic evening.


This red formal gown is a show stopper. With red beaded details, a sweetheart illusion neckline and a full tulle bottom, Ellie is ready for the red carpet. She is accessorized with crystal bracelets and red crystal drop earrings.


Ellie will be the star of the slumber party in her comfy PJ set paired with her perfectly pink, fuzzy slippers. Throw in her printed duffle bag, stuffed bunny and eye mask, she has everything she needs for a fun night with her girls.


This Free People cutout midi dress gives Ellie a city chic look and is topped with a suede wide brim structured hat. Earrings and necklace from Kendra Scott give her an extra sparkle. The grey suede lace up chunky heel is perfect for strolling the city sidewalks.


Workouts will be fun and fashionable with these bright and bold tuxedo leggings. Paired with the high neck sports bra or loose fitting tank and funky headbands, Ellie is ready to break a sweat in style.


This LBD is the chic choice for Ruston’s Fashion Week. The necklace adds a pop of color, and the bracelet completes the look. A girl has to have options, and Ellie has plenty between her clutch and tote bag and luxe suede sandals or snake embossed flat sneakers.


Ellie is funky fresh and fun in this street style look. The striped top features a turtleneck and haltered body. Paired with white flowy shorts and minimalist platform sneakers, this outfit rocks!


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Miss Louisiana 2016 Dillard’s, along with the Miss Louisiana Organization, hosted a Fashion Show on Thursday, June 23 at Pecanland Mall. All 32 contestants made an appearance on the runway, along with their Fleur de Lis princesses. Later that day, the contestants joined local kids at a Community Service and Wellness Event, held at the Boys’ and Girl’s Club, which was sponsored by Vantage Health Plan. On Saturday, June 25, The Miss Louisiana Organization held the 53rd annual Miss Louisiana pageant in Monroe at the Jack Howard Theater. This year’s show featured Miss Louisiana 2015 April Nelson, as well as the Miss Louisiana band, Miss Louisiana’s Outstanding Teen 2016, Sarah McCallum, former Miss Louisianas Hope Anderson (2011) Blair Abene McCurdy (2008), Kelsi Crain (2010) and Jaden Leach (2013), as well as the 32 contestants and over 60 Fleur De Lis princesses. Emcees for the pageant were Ed Walsh and Melissa Clark Whitworth, Miss Louisiana 2003. Corporate sponsors for the Miss Louisiana pageant include The City of Monroe, MonroeWest Monroe Convention and Visitors Bureau, the University of Louisiana at Monroe, Propane Dealers of Louisiana, Vantage Health Plan, JPS Executive Transportation, JPS Ford in Arcadia, the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco Free Living, Louisiana Tech University, Big Whit 77 Foundation, TownePlace Suites by Marriott and Laundry by Shelli Segal. On the final night of the pageant, Miss Louisiana Watermelon Festival, Justine Ker of Choudrant, was crowned Miss Louisiana 2016.

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Samantha Vaughn, Macey Colvin and Taylor Walker Anna Blake and Baylea Huffman D  eidra Adair and Debbie Foley B  randy Parker, Avery Parker, Sue and Woodie Williams and Talmadge Parker 5 S ara Frances and Jennifer McLin, Nicole Tannehill and Teresa Scurria 6 Crystal Ware Bolton, Stephen and Stormy Jeselink 7 Gaundhi Hays and Michele Od 8 Sharon Turrentine and Valerie Brosset Corcorhan 9M  aggie Jones, Nirali Patel, Laura Jennings and Alexis Porter 10 Lola Black, Beverly Bowling and Tab Eppinette 11 Deanna and Jay McCallum 12 Allison and Taryn Davidson 13 Julie Emory and Lissy Compton 14 Lauren Vizza and Michele Odom 15 Rhonda McCartt and April Nelson 16 Mary Sue Jacka and Lamar Mullican 170 AUGUST 2016 | WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM

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15 Courtney Crain and Jessica Crain 16 C  arli Noland, Candee Anderson, Julianne Tippen, Carol Morton and Cameron Adams 17 Anne Marie Snow and Shelia Snow 18 Renee and Don Humble 19 L eslie Bryan and Betty Feazel 20 B  rooklyn Lord, Abby Lord, Brintley Kitchingham, Genevieve Wetzel, Cherie Donias, Randa Kitchingham, Jennifer Lord, Courtney Wetzel and Saige Doty 21 Evie West, Nicole West, Ava West and Makayla Roberts 22 Sarah Katherine McCallum and Joe Price 23 Missy and Paul Amy 24 Skylar Doss and Carrie Doss

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8th Annual KEDM Beer Tasting It was a perfect night for the perfect brew June 14, as the Friends of KEDM partnered with Marsala Beverage to host the 8th Annual KEDM Beer Tasting. Proceeds of the event benefit KEDM programming. People’s Choice Champion pitmaster Rhoda Brown served up barbecue while Josh Madden provided tunes for the crowd. Patrons sampled a host of featured brews, including old standbys like Stella Artois and Shock Top and up and coming new beers by New Belgium, Tin Roof, and Lazy Magnolia. The event was held this year at the Marsala Event Pavilion on Stone Avenue, in Monroe.

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On the BayouScene 1 Wanda Davis and Walee Shakur 2 E.J. Ratcliff and Lindsay Abshier 3 Russell and Julie Kicey 4D  enise Duplechin, Nannette White, Lyndsey Miller and Therese Filhiol 5 E mily Duchesne, Dusti Douglas and Zach Duchesne 6 Babette Adcock and Lila Strode 7 Veronica Duchesne with Brad and Elise Brian 8 Anne Fisher and Jay D’Auteuil 9 T abby Soignier, James Truxillo, Cassie Wade 10 Carol and Olivia Barker 11 Marie Clark and Amy Keifenheim 12 Brett and Loretta Lemoine 13 Susan Brooks and Mike Broussard 14 Veronica Duchesne with Brad and Elise Brian 15 Jeff Fritzer and Scott Eberts 16 A  lissa Russell and Brittany Ramsay 17 Brandy and Jimmie Drummer

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Roux & Brew All hail the king! On June 24th, Restaurant Sage hosted Roux and Brew, a celebration of the tastes of Louisiana.  Blake Phillips, the newly crowned 2016 King of Louisiana Seafood, cooked up a royal seafood boil, which was paired with a cask of Shotgun Double IPA from Abita Brewing Company.  Guests were treated to crab, crawfish, gulf shrimp, and all the fixings, served in a pirogue.  The citrusy, hoppy IPA was the perfect complement to the spicy seafood mélange.  After the meal, everyone danced the night away to the groovy sounds of Papa Docs, with a special appearance by Mark Smith on the washboard.  Brady King and Jay Yates both made presentations to congratulate Chef Blake on his crowning achievement.

On the BayouScene 1 Nichole Amman and Frank Elkins 2 Chasity Davis-Harris, Yakima Smith and Tasha Johnson 3 The Papa Docs, Band 4 Larry Collum, Delia Simpson, Julie LeBell, Mary Simpson and James E. Simpson and Katie Smith 5W  es and Tonya Burns, Jamie Nelson, Christy and Mitch Bratton 6 James E. Simpson and Julie LeBell 7 Kathryn Coker and Kelly Eshelman 8 Michelle Byrd and Van Edwards 9 Jim and Amy Norris, Caroline Youngblood and Gretchen Dean 10 Caroline and Alan Brockman 11 Cissy Ellis and Lynda Gavioli 12 Charlotte and Kent Breard 13 Delia Simpson and Kurt McEnery 14 Jeremy and Renee Kent 15 C  arrick and Nancy Inabnett 16 C  herry Phillips and Blake Phillips

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Downtown Summer Art Fest

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Downtown Summer Art Fest was held on the historic Antique Alley, June 18. The event was a one-day celebration of the arts in the streets of Downtown West Monroe. The area between Antique Alley and the river was filled with artists’ booths, live bands, and performers. Guests enjoyed visiting with the artists whose work was featured. The festival featured free children’s crafts, activities and delicious food. 6

On the BayouScene 1 Samuel Hogue and Bess Wise 2 Matt and Megan Wilkins 3 Lish’a Reed and Laceyw Cormier 4 Marshall and Victoria Smith and Ashlee Bell 5 I antha Thomas, Michele Bowie and Janie Mercer 6 Krystal Bacle, Madison Smith and Andrea Smith 7 Samantha Clark, Lynn Clark and Arely Castillo 8 L isa Lirette, Indie Pickard, Magen and Ryan (baby) Pickard 9 E lle and Jill Young, Jaylen Towers and Lewis Young 10 Bryan Blanco, Ryan Gonzales and Cody Connally 11 Laura Maggio and Bonnie Ferguson 12 Clarissa Peacock and Gavin Peacock 13 Riley Williams, Staci Williams and Nikki Cardwell 14 B  rittany and Justin Streetman 15 Kirsta Hays, Crystal Lowe and Debbie Bourg 16 Alison Pennington and Lauren Blalock

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Calendar of Events For a full list of event happenings in Northeast Louisiana, see our website at www.bayoulifemag.com August 1-3 Rhea Lana’s Back to School SALE Time: Times Vary Spend a day shopping for great deals on HIGH QUALITY & BOUTIQUE children’s clothes, toys, baby equipment/accessories, maternity clothes, and much more at this back to school sale. Visit monroe.rhealana.com for sale schedule and more information. Venue: Monroe Civic Center Address: 401 Lea Joyner Memorial Expressway, Monroe Phone: 318-329-2225 Web: www.monroe.rhealana.com/ August 4 Downtown Gallery Crawl Time: 5:00pm-9:00pm Presented by the Downtown Arts Alliance, 11 art galleries in downtown Monroe and West Monroe are open all evening for the public to enjoy great art, food, drink and music. Original art is for sale, tax free. Admission is free. Venue: Downtown Monroe and West Monroe Address: DeSiard St. and Trenton St. Monroe and West Monroe Admission Cost: free Phone: 318-503-5125 First Thursday Downtown Time: 5:00pm- 7:00 pm On the first Thursday of every month join Antique Alley for extended shopping hours. Enjoy sips, nibbles and store specials during extended shopping hours. Venue: Antique Alley Address: 100-400 blocks of Trenton Street, West Monroe Admission Cost: Free Web: www.antiquealleyshops.org August 5-7 Big Creek Trade Days Time: Friday & Saturday 9:00am6:00pm, Sunday 10:00am-4:00pm Shop a mix of unique gifts, antiques, hand-made items and more treasures from a huge variety of vendors! Venue: Big Creek Trade Address: 327 California Plant Rd,

Dubach Admission Cost: $5 Parking Web: www.bigcreektradedays.com August 6 Flapjack Fundraiser for the Food Bank Time: 8:00am-10:00am Join the Food Bank of Northeast Louisiana at Applebee’s for a “Flapjack Fundraiser!” Enjoy all you can eat pancakes, as well as juice, milk, soft drink or coffee, all to raise funds for the Food Bank of Northeast Louisiana! Tickets are just $5, and must be purchased in advance at the Food Bank - 4600 Central Avenue, Monroe LA 71203, or by calling us at (318) 322-3567. Ticket delivery available for batches of 5 or more to the Monroe/West Monroe area. Venue: Applebee’s Address: 4911 Pecanland Mall Dr, Monroe Admission Cost: $5 Phone: (318) 398-7319 Zoobilation 2016 Time: 10:00am-5:00pm Don’t miss the return of this exciting event with a fun run & 5k, music, food, vendors and fun for all ages. Proceeds benefit the Louisiana Purchase Zoological Society. Venue: Louisiana Purchase Zoo Address: 1405 Bernstein Park Road, Monroe Admission Cost: $7 for 2 and up Phone: 318-329-2400 Web: www.monroezoo.org My Mini Masur Drop In Activity Time: 2:00pm-5:00pm Bring your kids and let the creativity flow at the Masur Museum as they create an art project. This event is free of charge and children will leave with a unique art project. Venue: Masur Museum of Art Address: 1400 South Grand, Monroe Admission Cost: Free Phone: 318-329-2237 Web: www.masurmuseum.org August 6, 7, 12, 13, 14 “Oliver” Time: ( Performance times vary)

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In this award-winning adaptation of the Broadway musical based on the Charles Dickens novel, 9-year old orphan Oliver Twist falls in with a group of street-urchin pickpockets led by the Artful Dodger and mastermind by the criminal Fagin. When Oliver’s intended mark, Mr. Brownlow, takes pity on the lad and offers him a home, Fagin’s henchman Bill Sikes plots to kidnap the boy to keep him from talking. Venue: Strauss Theatre Center Address: 1300 Lamy Lane, Monroe Admission Cost: $26.25 Adult, $10.50 Student Phone: 318-323-6681 Web: www.strausstheatrecenter.com

com/e/ulm-wesley-foundation-sportsmans-auction-tickets-25722132591

Saturday, August 6 Praise Fest in the Park presented by My Sistah’s Keeper Ministry at the Old Lida Benton playground on Lee Avenue in Monroe Waterslides, food, gospel karaoke, praise singers and dancers, Bible trivia, basketball tourney, school supplies and backpacks will be given out to children. To help sponsor this event or donate school supplies, please call Georgie Freeman at 318.512.6505.

August 13 Driven Desires Car, Truck, and Bike Show Time: 10:00am-4:00pm Come see extraordinary local show cars, trucks and bikes at this one-of-a-kind happening in Monroe-West Monroe. Venue: Monroe Civic Center Address: 401 Lea Joyner Memorial Expressway, Monroe Admission Cost: $5, Kids 5 and under are FREE! Phone: 318-329-2225 Web: http://monroela.us/docs/community-affairs-calendar.pdf

August 11 ULM Wesley Foundation Sportsman’s Auction Time: 6:00pm Join the ULM Wesley Foundation’s annual Sportsman’s Auction, presented by Premier Air. This year’s event will feature ULM Head Football Coach Matt Viator plus a jambalaya dinner and live and silent auctions. You don’t want to miss this opportunity to hear from Coach Viator and bid on some great items! Tickets are $40 each and can be purchased online at ulmwesley. eventbrite.com Venue: Lea Joyner Memorial United Methodist Church Address: 4390 Old Sterlington Rd, Monroe Admission Cost: $40 Phone: 318-343-0073 Web: https://www.eventbrite.

August 13-September 24 Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America Come view this Museum on Main Street exhibit that captures the stories of underdog heroics, largerthan-life legends, fierce rivalries and gut-wrenching defeats in American sports. The exhibit will be held at the Lincoln Parish Library. Venue: Lincoln Parish Library Address: 910 North Trenton St. Ruston, LA 71270 Phone: 318-251-5030

Landry Vineyards presents: Mike McKenzie Band Time: 4:30pm-8:00pm Landry Vineyards winery outdoor concert featuring Mike McKenzie Band! A mix of Country, Rock and Funk music will have you, family and friends dancing all night. Make sure you pack your lawn chair, blanket and picnic dinner and enjoy the outdoor show! Venue: Landry’s Vineyard Address: 5699 New Natchitoches Road , West Monroe Admission Cost: Adults: $10; Ages 13-18: $5; Children 12 & under: Free Phone: 318-557-9051 Web: www.landryvineyards.com 2016 Battle of the Badges Time: 6:00pm-10:30pm


Catch all the boxing action as the Policemen take on the Firemen in this non-stop action event. This year features Captain Clay Higgins fighting for TEAM BLUE! All proceeds will benefit selected charities. Venue: ULM Fant-Ewing Coliseum Address: 4099 Northeast Dr, Monroe Admission Cost: $10-$25 Email: info@battleofthebadgesmonroe.com Phone: 318-381-1812 Web: www.battleofthebadgesmonroe.com/ August 20 16th Annual Bayou Black Open Rodeo Time: 7:00pm Come out to the Bayou Black Open Rodeo and satisfy your inner cowboy with events like Bareback Bronc Riding, Bull Riding,Calf Roping, Cowgirl’s Barrel Racing, Saddle Bronc Riding, Steer Wrestling and Team Roping. Venue: Monroe Civic Center Address: 401 Lea Joyner Memorial Expressway, Monroe Phone: 318-329-2225 Web: http://monroela.us/docs/community-affairs-calendar.pdf August 27 Ouachita Valley Dog Training Club Obedience Trials Time: 7:00am-7:00pm Obedience trials are scheduled for Saturday and Sunday at the Monroe Civic Center Conference Hall. Venue: Monroe Civic Center Address: 401 Lea Joyner Memorial Expressway, Monroe Phone: (318) 329-2225 Web: www.ovdtc.org/index.htm

Mater! Venue: ULM Warhawk Field Address: Warhawk Way, Monroe Admission Cost: $10 Phone: (318) 966-7355 Web: www.ulmwarhawks.com Red Grape Stomp Fest with Lisa Spann & Company Time: 4:30-8:00pm Landry Vineyards winery outdoor concert featuring Lisa Spann & Company! A mix of classic rock and dance music will have you, family & friends dancing all night. Make sure you pack your lawn chair, blanket and picnic dinner and enjoy the outdoor show. Venue: Landry’s Vineyard Address: 5699 New Natchitoches Road , West Monroe Admission Cost: Per Person: $5-$10; Children 12 & under: Free Phone: 318-557-9051 Web: www.landryvineyards.com August 28 Ouachita Valley Dog Training Club Obedience Trials Time: 7:00am-7:00pm Obedience trials are scheduled for Saturday and Sunday at the Monroe Civic Center Conference Hall. Venue: Monroe Civic Center Address: 401 Lea Joyner Memorial Expressway, Monroe Phone: (318) 329-2225 Web: www.ovdtc.org/index.htm

Visit www.monroe-westmonroe. org for information about events in Ouachita Parish and visit www.rustonlincoln.com for events in Lincoln Parish.

Eddie G. Robinson Classic Time: 11:00am-7:00pm Share a full day of family-friendly activities, including a tour of the Eddie G. Robinson Museum, games and more at the Kids Fun Zone, and cheering on your favorite high school football teams! Venue: Grambling State University Address: 126 Jones St., Grambling Phone: 318-274-2210 Bayou Jamb 2016 Time: 1:00pm Bayou Jamb is a football jamboree featuring eight local high school football teams. Four games are played beginning at 1 p.m. Come and cheer on your High School Alma WWW.BAYOULIFEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2016

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BayouLife Magazine August 2016  
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