Issuu on Google+

10

Gap fashion show inspires

Meadow project gets grant

ARTS

2

21

Frameline opens

The

www.ebar.com

Serving the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender communities since 1971

Shocked show canned

Vol. 43 • No. 25 • June 20-26, 2013

Chipotle seeks OK for Castro space by Matthew S. Bajko

F

by Seth Hemmelgarn

S

an Francisco Examiner publisher Todd Vogt has called off a planned June 30 concert by Michelle Shocked, the singer who had an anti-gay meltdown during a San Francisco concert in March. After many people expressed outrage over his plans, Vogt said in a Wednesday, June 19 interview that he’s “sick” over what’s happened. Shocked’s concert was to take place on the day of the San Francisco Courtesy CNN LGBT Pride parade Michelle Shocked and celebration. He said the intention had been “to shine a light” on “bigotry and hatred, and to have Ms. Shocked apologize for her comments and perform for free. It was intended to be a healing and good See page 9 >>

Chipotle wants to open a restaurant in the former Home Restaurant space in the Castro. Rick Gerharter

or the third time this year the San Francisco Planning Commission will weigh whether to allow a formula retailer to open on a prominent corner in the city’s Castro district. This time Chipotle Mexican Grill is seeking permission to open at the old Home restaurant location at the corner of Market, 14th, and Church streets. Gay former San Francisco chef Steve Ells founded the Denver-based chain in 1993 and is its chairman and co-CEO. The company will plead its case before the planning commissioners at their meeting Thursday (June 20), but it may leave disappointed. As expected, Chipotle triggered a new clause aimed at limiting the number of chain stores that can open along the Market Street corridor between Octavia Boulevard and Castro Street. According to the staff report released Friday, June 14, a Chipotle at 2100 Market Street would bring the number of formula retailers within a 300-foot radius to 36 percent. Anything at 20 percent or higher is automatically recommended for rejection by planning staff. See page 6 >>

Visual Aid Same-sex couples plan weddings to close by Matthew S. Bajko

by Seth Hemmelgarn

A

San Francisco-based nonprofit that’s been helping artists with AIDS for more than 20 years is shutting down. In an email blast last week, Visual Aid Executive Director Julie Blankenship called recommending the group’s closing “the most difficult decision” she’s made in her 11 years as head of the agency. Jane Philomen Cleland “We’re closing because after weather- Visual Aid’s Julie ing most of the re- Blankenship cession, we found we just didn’t have the resources to go on anymore, and we felt it was most responsible to close now,” Blankenship said in an interview. The board voted earlier this month to shut down and the organization, which serves people throughout the Bay Area, will close July 1. Blankenship said much of the group’s funding comes from individuals, as well as See page 16 >>

S

urrounded by 130 relatives and friends at an historic stable in the heart of California’s wine country, Laura Kutch and Jasmine Dominguez plan to exchange their wedding vows in late September. Together two and a half years, the San Leandro couple became engaged last August. Local ABC Channel 7 news anchor Cheryl Jennings will officiate, the first time she has presided over a same-sex couple’s wedding. “She offered to officiate my wedding long before Jasmine and I had gotten engaged,” said Kutch, 37, who works in the station’s public affairs department. “She has been ordained and done several heterosexual weddings but we will be her first official gay wedding.” It will take place at Rancho Wikiup, which means summer camp in Klamath Indian, a vacation lodge in Santa Rosa built in 1915 by San Francisco industrialist John Rosseter. The couple learned about it from a woman who runs a catering company that is a nonprofit and teaches under-privileged youth how to work in professional kitchens. Kutch had worked on a profile of the agency, called the Worth Our Weight Culinary Apprentice Program, for the television station and ran into the employee at an event ABC hosted in November. “She asked about our wedding plans and she told us about it. It doesn’t advertise but is open

Jonathan Ernst

Jenni Chang, left, married Lisa Dazols earlier this month at the Guerneville Lodge. Maria Caruana, center, pastor of Freedom in Christ Evangelical Church in San Francisco, officiated the ceremony.

and ready to host lots of events,” said Kutch. It fit the bill since the couple didn’t want a church wedding, neither woman is religious, and being native Californians, they wanted to

{ FIRST OF TWO SECTIONS }

WELCOME VISITORS! See the 42nd Annual San Francisco Pride edition of America’s oldest and best-read LGBT newspaper on June 27. Included in this expanded 3-section edition will be our monthly travel column, featuring Palm Springs!

marry in the Bay Area, even though same-sex marriage is legal in several other states. “The whole idea for why we want to be marSee page 17 >>


<< Community News

2 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

SF Pride retires debt

t

by Cynthia Laird

W

ith the finances of the organization that produces the San Francisco Pride parade improving over the last couple years, officials said recently that the organization has completed retiring nearly $300,000 of outstanding debt ahead of next weekend’s festivities. The nonprofit San Francisco LGBT Pride Celebration Committee said in a June 13 news release that it has “made major progress toward financial stability, retiring a three-year debt burden, while simultaneously achieving recordbreaking increases in key sponsorship contributions.” As of May 31, SF Pride completed a two-year strategic plan that allowed it to retire all its debt and repay a $65,000 loan from the Dorian Fund. That loan was made in 2011 as Pride was reeling in almost $200,000 of debt. In December 2010 a city controller’s report put the debt at $225,000. The Pride board has been working on the financial issues the past several years. Board Treasurer David Currie said in the release that SF Pride is focused on its fiscal health, as well as allocating grants to communitybased services and upcoming events such as the Dyke March, Trans March, and Pink Saturday. Pride CEO Earl Plante, who was hired last December, is overseeing his first parade and festival, set for June 29-30. He has spent much of the year rebuilding relations with corporate sponsors and the release noted that sponsorships have increased. “Sponsorship fundraising broke SF Pride’s 2012 record with a 20 percent increase in total corporate cash donations to $782,199, and $1,615,550 in secured in-kind donations – a 44 percent increase over the previously highest rate secured in 2008,” the release noted. Some grassroots activists have taken issue with Pride’s reliance on corporate sponsors. In letters and at public meetings, people have bemoaned the necessity of corporate sponsors even as the Pride parade and festival remain free events. (A $5 donation is sug-

Rick Gerharter

San Francisco’s elected officials and dignitaries cooperated but the wind did not at the annual rainbow flag raising off the Mayor’s exterior balcony Tuesday, June 18 to kick off Pride. Those waving, from left, are Supervisors Malia Cohen and Scott Wiener, Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco Pride CEO Earl Plante, Supervisor David Chiu and Chief of Protocol Charlotte Mailliard Schultz. Afterwards an invitation-only lunch was served in the Rotunda that was sponsored in part by the Bob Ross Foundation. (The foundation, named for the Bay Area Reporter’s late founding publisher, is a separate legal entity from the newspaper.)

gested for the festival.) “It’s time to consider alternatives to such an expensive celebration, and return the commemoration of the Stonewall uprising to its political grassroots,” local resident Charlie Hinton said in an email to the Bay Area Reporter. “The Pride Board has focused too much on corporate sponsors ... rather than listen to the community it supposedly represents.” Hinton also cited gay journalist Glenn Greenwald, who broke the Edward Snowden whistle-blower story. Earlier this year, Greenwald singled out several Pride sponsors in an article he posted after the Bradley Manning controversy erupted. (Manning, the WikiLeaks whistle-blower, was named a Pride grand marshal but the Pride board rescinded the honor.) Plante noted that in its mission statement, SF Pride “prides itself on inclusion and openness to all social economic backgrounds.” He said that while the gate donations are funneled back to nonprofits through Pride’s community partner program, the event remains free to the public. “We also recognize that we are

one of the few major Prides in the world that does not charge and since it costs over $4 million to produce the parade and celebration, it is essential to our bottom line that we engage corporate sponsors to pull off an event of our size and scale,” Plante said in an email to the B.A.R. Several of Pride’s sponsors issued statements of support for the event, which is one of San Francisco’s largest and brings in millions of dollars from tourists and the LGBT community. “Our participation in SF Pride is more than an annual event for us,” stated Valerie Klein, director of marketing and promotions for Clear Channel Media and Entertainment, “Our support of SF Pride and the LGBT community represents a value we implement on a day-to-day basis for our community, our listeners and viewers, and our employees.” Frances Fiorillo, senior vice president of people and in-flight service for Virgin America, another sponsor, said the company looked forward to welcoming aboard “the thousands of paradegoers from all over the nation who are kicking off their journeys in fabulous style ...”t

Gap reaches out for fashion show by Elliot Owen

O

ne thing was different about that February morning for Melissa Beckett. She woke up, remembered a dream, and without question, knew she had to make it a reality. Little did she know it would materialize into a June 13 fashion show held at the Gap Inc. headquarters in San Francisco, attended by over 200 Gap employees, and appropriately titled “Styled By Queer Eyes.” Beckett, a 37-year-old queer woman of color, has been working at Gap for 15 years, and is the senior manager for the corporation’s learning and development department. Since March, she’s also been the co-president of Gap’s San Francisco chapter of GEAR (Gay Employees, Allies and Resources), an internal employee resource group. In January, after having been on GEAR’s mailing list for five years, Beckett inquired about how to get more involved. That’s when she heard the organization needed refreshing. “My thoughts were to look at the vision and mission in the context of today,” Beckett said. “I thought about how to make GEAR more inclusive. We are LGBTQQA but

Elliot Owen

Show and Tell models, top row, from left, Julia Raffo, Kelly Lewis, Jose Lugo, Carmen Lugo, and Alice Vasquez were all smiles at a recent fashion show that featured Show and Tell owners, bottom row, from left, Alyah Baker and Nichole Payton, along with Gap GEAR co-presidents Tighe Flatley and Melissa Beckett.

within those letters we are every race, ethnicity, creed. We needed to embody that and challenge ourselves to tell more relevant stories.” A month later, she had the dream. “I dreamt we had a fashion show that was about a broader representation of the LGBTQ community,” Beckett said. “The expression of your identity shows up distinctly in fashion, and this would be a great

way to tell a different story.” She pitched the idea, recruited Gap colleague Tighe Flatley to help develop GEAR’s new plans, and with Flatley, was named co-president in March with the fashion show scheduled for June. Internal brands Gap, Old Navy, and Banana Republic signed on to participate, but Beckett wanted See page 16 >>


t

Community News>>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 3

New ethics commissioner is official Supervisor Scott Wiener swears in Brett Andrews to the San Francisco Ethics Commission Tuesday, June 18. Andrews, the gay executive director of Positive Resource Center, was a somewhat controversial pick by the Board of Supervisors, which approved him on an 8-3 vote earlier this month. Concerns included the fact that PRC seeks funds from city officials who could come before the commission. Andrews said that he does not lobby City Hall or the board “for PRC-specific funding” and would abide by the recusal policies governing ethics commissioners. Rick Gerharter

Study shows PrEP prevents HIV among IDUs by Liz Highleyman

can lead to drug resistance. It is also contraindicated for people with impaired kidney function, as tenofovir can cause kidney toxicity.

P

re-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, using daily tenofovir cuts the risk of HIV infection in half for people who inject drugs, according to findings from the Bangkok Tenofovir Study published last week in the Lancet. “This is a significant step forward for HIV prevention,” said Jonathan Mermin, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. “We now know that PrEP can work for all populations at increased risk for HIV.” Based on these findings, the CDC issued updated guidelines recommending that PrEP be “considered as one of several prevention options” for people at high risk for contracting HIV through injection drug use.

Study findings

The study, which enrolled more than 2,400 HIV-negative injection drug users in Thailand, randomly assigned participants to take oral tenofovir (Gilead Science’s Viread) or a placebo pill once daily. They also were offered risk-reduction and adherence counseling, methadone maintenance, bleach for cleaning needles, and condoms. The results are the first to show that PrEP can lower HIV risk among injection drug users, who have high rates of infection because the virus is easily transmitted via shared needles and other injection equipment. A total of 50 people became infected during an average four years of follow-up: 17 in the tenofovir group and 33 in the placebo group. HIV incidence rates were 0.35 per 100 person-years in the tenofovir group compared with 0.68 in the placebo, an overall risk reduction of 49 percent. Risk reduction rose to 70 percent among participants with detectable tenofovir in their blood, and to 74 percent among people who received directly observed drug administration and did not miss more than two consecutive days. Previous studies have shown that PrEP using tenofovir alone or tenofovir plus emtricitabine (the drugs in the Truvada combination pill) can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV transmission through sex. The iPrEx study showed that Truvada lowered the risk of HIV infection among gay and bisexual men by 44 percent overall, rising to 92 percent for those with measurable blood drug levels. The Partners PrEP and TDF2 trials likewise found that daily Truvada PrEP reduced new infections among heterosexual couples by more than 60 percent. However, disappointing results from the VOICE study of heterosexual women in Africa underscored that PrEP requires

Real-world implications

UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe

good adherence, which may be difficult to achieve. In all the studies tenofovir PrEP was generally safe and well tolerated. Nausea was more common among tenofovir compared with placebo recipients in the Bangkok study, but it usually resolved after two months. No kidney-related side effects were seen. No one who became HIV-positive showed evidence of tenofovir drug resistance. “The full potential of antiretroviral therapy in keeping people alive and well and in preventing new HIV infections is becoming apparent,” said UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibe. “The results of this study are important and if used effectively in HIV programming could have a significant impact in protecting people who inject drugs from becoming infected with HIV.”

CDC guidance

The CDC last week released revised interim clinical guidance for health care professionals who wish to prescribe PrEP for people who inject drugs, published in the June 14 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (available free online). Although the Bangkok study tested tenofovir alone, the CDC recommends once-daily Truvada as the preferred PrEP regimen for injection drug users. The combo pill contains the same tenofovir dose used in the study, and it already has Food and Drug Administration approval for PrEP. Truvada is more expensive than tenofovir alone, however. Similar to existing guidelines for preventing sexual transmission, the new guidance states that PrEP should be targeted to people at “very high risk” for HIV acquisition, should be delivered as part of a comprehensive set of prevention services, and should be accompanied by quarterly monitoring. Tenofovir or Truvada for PrEP must not be used by people who are already HIV-positive or do not know their status, as using it alone

Outcomes in the real world often do not match those in clinical trials that offer participants extensive monitoring and support. The two most widely voiced concerns about PrEP are that people will not take it consistently enough, and that it could lead to increased risk behavior when people believe they are protected. As in previous PrEP trials, socalled risk disinhibition did not appear to be a problem in the Bangkok study. Participants reported reduced risk behavior over 12 months in both the tenofovir and placebo arms, including less drug injection, needle sharing, and sex with more than one partner. In fact, less than half of participants said they injected drugs during the study and few reported sharing needles. Some HIV prevention advocates said less expensive methods like syringe exchange should not be replaced. “People who use drugs also have sex, and there is no way of distinguishing between infection acquired via sex versus drug use,” emphasized Mitchell Warren, executive director of AVAC, a global HIV prevention advocacy organization. Local advocates also were cautious. “We already have a more effective and dramatically cheaper way to prevent HIV transmission among people who inject drugs, that can also prevent hepatitis C and link people into treatment. It’s called sterile syringe access and it works very, very well,” said Laura Thomas, deputy state director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “It is always useful to have another HIV prevention tool in the toolbox, but it further highlights our failure to do what works when it comes to people who use drugs.”t


<< Open Forum

4 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

Volume 43, Number 25 June 20-26, 2013 www.ebar.com PUBLISHER Thomas E. Horn Bob Ross (Founder, 1971 – 2003) NEWS EDITOR Cynthia Laird ARTS EDITOR Roberto Friedman ASSISTANT EDITORS Matthew S. Bajko Seth Hemmelgarn Jim Provenzano CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dan Aiello • Tavo Amador • Erin Blackwell Roger Brigham • Scott Brogan Victoria A. Brownworth • Philip Campbell Heather Cassell • Chuck Colbert Richard Dodds • David Duran Raymond Flournoy • David Guarino Peter Hernandez • Liz Highleyman Brandon Judell • John F. Karr Matthew Kennedy • David Lamble Michael McDonagh • David-Elijah Nahmod Elliot Owen• Paul Parish • James Patterson Lois Pearlman • Tim Pfaff • Jim Piechota Bob Roehr • Philip Ruth • Donna Sachet Adam Sandel • Jason Serinus • Gregg Shapiro Gwendolyn Smith • Ed Walsh • Sura Wood ART DIRECTION T. Scott King ONLINE PRODUCTION Jay Cribas PHOTOGRAPHERS Danny Buskirk Jane Philomen Cleland Marc Geller Rick Gerharter Lydia Gonzales Rudy K. Lawidjaja Steven Underhill Bill Wilson ILLUSTRATORS & CARTOONISTS Paul Berge Christine Smith GENERAL MANAGER Michael M. Yamashita DISPLAY ADVERTISING Simma Baghbanbashi Colleen Small Scott Wazlowski NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Rivendell Media – 212.242.6863

LEGAL COUNSEL Paul H. Melbostad

Bay Area Reporter 395 Ninth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 415.861.5019 www.ebar.com

News Editor • news@ebar.com Arts Editor • arts@ebar.com Out & About listings • jim@ebar.com Advertising • scott@ebar.com Letters • letters@ebar.com A division of Benro Enterprises, Inc. © 2013 Published weekly. Bay Area Reporter reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement which the publisher believes is in poor taste or which advertises illegal items which might result in legal action against Bay Area Reporter. Ads will not be rejected solely on the basis of politics, philosophy, religion, race, age, or sexual orientation. Advertising rates available upon request. Our list of subscribers and advertisers is confidential and is not sold. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, and writers published herein is neither inferred nor implied. We are not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork.

Trust us, government says

T

ransparency in government is rarer today than many previously realized. Trust us, government leaders say, conveniently omitting the reality that all of our phone records, emails, and other online activity are available to the National Security Agency, with or without a search warrant. Most of the revelations by admitted whistle-blower Edward Snowden aren’t new; the Patriot Act authorized all of this snooping years ago. Nevertheless, the breadth of the surveillance is something that should concern everyone, even if it has resulted in thwarting terrorist plots, as the government asserts. Closer to home, we’re seeing an erosion of the state’s public records law that could result in some local entities opting out of sunshine provisions that were previously required. The changes would, for example, neither require government officials to respond to records requests within 10 days nor require them to assist the public in learning about which records are available. According to the Sacramento Bee, it also eliminates a requirement that governments provide a legal justification for not releasing information. (This bill does not affect state agencies, only local governments and districts. It also does not affect the 1968 public records act itself, but rather later additions to it.) The provision, called a trailer bill, was quietly inserted into one of the state budget bills, AB 76, that the California Legislature passed late Friday. There were no hearings on it. There was no debate. The tightening of public records requests was apparently done at the behest of Governor Jerry Brown in an effort to save the state hundreds of millions of dollars. That’s because when local government bodies respond to public records requests, they can send an invoice to the state for reimbursement. As it stands now, the state owes these various governing bodies some $200 million, according to state Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), who is chair of the Senate Budget Committee. In 1979 a constitutional amendment was added that said that when the state requires something of local governments, it needs to pay for what’s known as mandates. Adhering to the state public records act is a requirement, therefore, local entities have been billing the state to cover these costs. Initial articles over the weekend by the Contra Costa Times indicated the public records law could be “eviscerated” by the trailer bill. Leno de-

nied that in a phone call this week, saying nothing is intended to deny access. For example, the proposed changes suggest that local governments follow current law as a “best practice,” but also allows them the option of ignoring transparency provisions by announcing annually that they will not follow them, the Times reported. “If they decide not to provide services they must state publicly” that they will not provide the services, Leno told us. He was asked what would happen if a local body did opt out of transparency requirements. People, he said, “could sue agencies” just as they do now. “I don’t believe anything is going to change,” Leno said. We’re not so sure. There are thousands of government entities that could flaunt public records requests. We’re not talking about big cities like San Francisco, where it would be unlikely, but there are hospital districts, public utility districts, and school districts up and down the state that could, in theory, decide that it’s just too expensive or time consuming to provide John Q. Public with copies of bids, or meeting minutes, or salary databases. Another quirk in the law changes a major provision dealing with electronic records, the Times reported, “stripping a requirement that govern-

t

ments release things like databases and spreadsheets in the form they are kept, instead giving them the option of picking their own format, such as paper copies.” Leno’s colleague, state Senator Leland Yee (DSan Francisco) is greatly concerned about the changes to the public records act and called for the situation to be “quickly remedied.” “This will make it much more difficult for the public and the press to obtain information as to how local government functions,” Yee said in a statement. Running a transparent government is both expensive and inconvenient. It costs money and time to respond to public requests for information. But what we’re seeing now is an attempt to erode transparency, both in California and nationally with the NSA. It’s as though the government is trying to lock its people out. It’s a government that believes in itself, trusts itself, and believes everyone else should trust it. The problem is that it will be overzealous government workers who try to deny access to public information that, in the end, will show just how far short these changes to the public records act are. Leno mentions “best practices,” well, that’s really management-speak. The old saying that sunshine is the best disinfectant still holds true today. Governor Brown should realize that his bill would do more harm than good and veto AB 76.t

Coming out of the shadows by Luis Liang

I

got the letter on May 19. I had prayed this day would come since I applied months earlier to President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which permits some immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as a child by their parents, who entered the country without a visa, to apply for two-year work permits and relief from deportation. I stared at the letter from the U.S. government in awe, inspired and excited about the future it spelled out for me with one word: Approved. Never would I have guessed that not only was this the start of a whole new life for me – one free of the fear of deportation – but that it would lead to a special invitation to the White House Pride Reception on June 13, where I had the honor of meeting Obama. The president has stood beside me not only as an immigrant who was brought to this country by my mother and given a sense of hope through the DACA program, but also as a gay man with renewed faith in equality. My journey began when my mother brought my three sisters and me to the United States when I was 14 years old in hope of giving us a future and greater opportunities. We settled in with distant relatives in southern California, where we crammed 12 people into a three-bedroom house until we were able to move out on our own. I had been at the top of my class in Mexico, and I was excited when I enrolled in the local high school as a sophomore and began taking classes. I worked hard that year, honing my English and devoting myself to studying so I could excel – dreaming of becoming a community pillar, as I knew I had the commitment and determination to be. I knew I was an immigrant, but it wasn’t un-

til my senior year in high school – when my friends and I began plotting our college futures – that I learned I was, in fact, a Dreamer, an undocumented immigrant with a status that would become my biggest obstacle to achieve success. Up until that school year, my life was consumed with being the best student I could be. But I soon became focused on trying to find a scholarship and saving money so I could achieve my educational goals and give back to my community. Each week, I applied for different scholarships, hoping to find one that would recognize my determination to succeed instead of placing limitations on me because of my status. All the while, I took every job I could find – tutoring other students, working at swap meets – to build my college savings. My status continued to be a major roadblock, one that prevented me from taking a public scholarship – covering tuition, room and board – to my dream school, UC Berkeley, in 2009 because I didn’t have a Social Security number to finalize arrangements. Thankfully, with the support of private scholarships, mentors, friends, and family, I received enough aid and saved enough money to eventually enroll at UC Berkeley, where I recently graduated with a degree in business administration. Now, with a work permit and a Social Security card through DACA in my hands, I feel a sense of ease for myself. But anxiety lingers for my mother, whose status could result in her being taken away from my family at any moment, which would tear us apart. Right now, Congress is reforming our nation’s broken immigration system. The proposals would create pathways to citizenship for immigrants who were brought to this country by parents,

who entered the U.S. without a visa, including Dreamers, and will include many crucial provisions for LGBTQ immigrants. I’m hopeful for comprehensive immigration reform for my family and for countless others like us, finally putting politics aside and passing compassionate, common sense immigration reform so that nobody else has to live in the shadows. On June 13, I had the honor of being invited to be a special guest at the White House Pride Reception. When I arrived, I was ushered into the East Wing, where I was joined by celebrities, movement leaders, and other distinguished guests invited to meet the president. I had thought of so many things I wanted to say to the president, but as he approached me to introduce himself, I found myself stumped for words and caught up in the moment. “Hello, I’m Luis Liang,” I said. I never would have thought I’d have this opportunity, and I never would have if the Obama administration hadn’t committed to fixing the system that hurts people like me simply because of who we are. As fortunate as I am that I’ve been able to come out from the specter of deportation, I know there are countless people who continue to live in fear. As Congress continues to consider immigration reform, I hope they remember the abilities, the aspirations, the hope that each of us brings, and create a path forward that makes us part of the American story.t Luis Liang graduated from UC Berkeley in May 2012. He hopes to use his business education to start a nonprofit that will help students from immigrant and low-income families get a higher education.


t

Letters >>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 5

On with the parade

I was at Stonewall in New York in 1969. I owned the import store Temptations on 7th Avenue South and 10th Street, one block from Stonewall and Sheridan Square. I also lived at 171 West Fourth Street, one block the other way from Stonewall. I was there. When I arrived from the Bay Area in New York in 1967, I was 19 years old. I opened my store that year. I, a smiling, dumb country boy, learned a lot fast and it was good and bad, I was a piece of meat, okay? Everyone else was a piece of meat, too. Some guys ran around the NY Eagle in Nazi uniforms. I had words with them. Once, a club, Flamingo, hung up a large Nazi flag for the Black party; I tore it down. Some guys were angry leftists who had no answers. During Watergate, a sign hung in the window of my fancy store that said, “No Nixon fascist or their money welcome in this store.” We got calls, “We’ll get you, pinko fag.” In this case, the New York Police Department said to me, “We will come if you need it, we are not Nixon’s men.” I have not defended and fought for gay rights to defend non-gay issues in politics. We are not one, when it comes to politics we are very diverse, right wing to communist. So, as a Stonewall veteran, I say Bradley Manning’s situation is not a gay issue and as of yet, have no judgment about him. He is not my hero and, until proven to have caused deaths, he is not my enemy. Let his admirers and supporters take their issue to the general population, not the whole community, which is not in agreement on Manning. Now, in the name of Stonewall 1969, on with the parade and celebration, for what we do have in common is that we, the gay, lesbian, and transgender community, have come a long way, baby. Reverend John Schluter San Francisco

Ridiculous comparison

At my age, I’ve certainly read a lot of ridiculous comments in the Bay Area Reporter but one that appeared in last week’s front page article about the never-ending San Francisco Pride/Bradley Manning story [“SF Pride: No honor for Manning,” June 13] truly stands out: one Sue Englander of the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club compares Manning, who readily admits to leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents, to the late, great Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Seriously?

A symbol of government abuse

I believe that Bradley Manning is a symbol of our government’s abuse of power, and I wear a Bradley Manning T-shirt proudly and will wear one at Pride. But I also believe that the San Francisco Pride board, however inept as it may have been, was correct in not having Manning as a Pride grand marshal. Pride is about queer rights, and politically Pride should support marriage equality, etc., anything that has to do with our rights, but to support other issues outside of that area to me sets us up for division and painfully hurts our community. Many queer individuals have served in the armed forces, and to offend them is totally not appropriate – it is wrong. I am a Christian and a priest, and it would be wrong for me to ask Pride to support a purely Christian issue. So I support the Pride board in its stand, and I also stand with Manning as a symbol of abuse of power. Father Christian River Sims Temenos Catholic Worker San Francisco

Don’t forget about safer sex

This month marks 30 years since the debut of the Harvey Milk Gay Democratic Club’s (its name at that time) well-known safe-sex brochure “Can We Talk?” at the June 26, 1983 International Lesbian and Gay Freedom Day Parade (“Strengthen the Ties, Break the Chains”). The brochure was developed collectively by eight members of the club’s AIDS Education and Information Committee, with information from the Bay Area Physicians for Human Rights. It may be hard to believe now, but the brochure was controversial 30 years ago because it talked to gay men about gay sex and safe sex (“Avoid the direct exchange of bodily fluids during sex”) openly, directly and publicly. These words, written in a Castro-area flat in 1983, remain true today. In this time of crisis, it is essential that we re-examine our ways of sexual expression. The issue is not a moral one, but a practical one. We have fought for our freedom and intend to continue that fight, but this struggle is even more basic. We are fighting for our lives. We must not deny our sexuality, but we must be sexual in ways that will not put us in greater danger of contracting this life-threatening disease. One of the greatest expressions of gay pride is our love for ourselves and our brothers. That love can best be shown by our taking the appropriate health precautions presented in this brochure and by supporting each other through these difficult times. John Mehring 1983 AIDS Education and Information Committee member Harvey Milk Gay Democratic Club San Francisco

Wayne Friday San Francisco

Drag queen to enliven storytime compiled by Cynthia Laird

a live performance by Slow Knights, a collaboraton with Del Marquis of the Scissor Sisters. Tickets are $30 and available (cash only) at Sui Generis, 2231 Market Street. For more information, visit http://www.juanitamore.com.

J

oin Books Inc. in the Castro for a special Pride event for kids Saturday, June 22 at 11 a.m., when local drag queen Mutha will be reading some of her very favorite books for tots at America’s first drag storytime for kids. Maggie Tokuda-Hall, children’s department director for Books Inc., noted in a news release that increasingly in San Francisco’s storied Castro neighborhood, the focus is on families. So this year, to kick off Pride Week a little early, the Castro location will be hosting a storytime for children, ages 3 to 7, that parents and kids can share together. Books Inc. is the west’s oldest independent bookseller, operating since 1851, with 12 locations throughout the Bay Area. The Castro store is located at 2275 Market Street. For more information, call (415) 864-6777.

SFPD Pride Alliance benefit

The San Francisco Police Department’s Pride Alliance is hosting a fundraiser Thursday, June 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. at Slate bar, 2925 16th Street. The event will feature appetizers and surprise entertainment, along with silent and live auctions, said organizer Officer Mike Evans. All money raised from the event will be donated to the Jon Cook Scholarship Fund. Cook was an openly gay SFPD officer who was killed in the line of duty 11 years ago. Evans said that any donations are welcome. The alliance gives $5,000 for the scholarship “so every penny

Gay square dancers to gather in SF

Courtesy Books Inc.

Drag queen Mutha will be entertaining kids at Books Inc. on Saturday.

helps,” he added.

More’s Pride party coming up

Drag queen and local celebrity Juanita More’s ninth annual Pride party will take place Sunday, June 30 and this year’s beneficiary will be OutLoud Radio, a youth-driven organization that focuses on leadership development for LGBTQ young people. The fun goes from noon to midnight at Jones, 620 Jones Street in San Francisco. Entertainment includes some of the hottest DJs and performers such as Severino – Horse Meat Disco (United Kingdom), Kim Ann Foxman from New York City, and Derek Opperman and Robin Malone from San Francisco. There will also be

The 30th annual convention of the International Association of Gay Square Dance Clubs will be meeting in San Francisco right after Pride, with several events open to the general public. Under the theme, “Weave Your Heart in San Francisco,” more than 1,000 LGT square dancers and their friends will be in attendance. The convention is being hosted by the nine Bay Area gay clubs and will feature 13 internationally-known callers – gay and straight. The convention runs July 4-7 at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis Hotel, 780 Mission Street. Dancing starts each day at 9 a.m. and continues until late evening. One of the highlights of the gathering will be a mass dance-in Friday, July 5 at 5 p.m. in Union Square, where the dancers will be joined by Cheer San Francisco, the Lesbian and Gay Chorus of San Francisco, and Taiko drummers. Ed Wilson, who’s handling publicity and outreach for the convention, noted that gay square dancers usually wear jeans and T-shirts instead of the crinolines and western shirts favored by their straight counterparts, but there will be opportunities to dress up or dress down, including the “Honky Tonk Queen” contest (a country western drag pageant) and special See page 17 >>

(((((((((

www.ebar.com )))))))))


<< Politics

6 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013 CharlesSpiegel_2x2_2313

t

CHARLES SPIEGEL

Collaborative Family Attorney-Mediator Filing in June Required to have 2013 Dissolution Date. Consensual Divorce Options for: Married Couples and Domestic Partners. CharlesSpiegelLaw@gmail.com www.CharlesSpiegelLaw.com (415) 644-4555

Courtesy SF Planning Dept.

A mockup of the proposed Chipotle restaurant was included in the planning department staff report.

<<

Chipotle

From page 1

In addition to the heavy concentration of formula retailers at that location, largely due to the Safeway shopping center across the street, the staff report also concluded the area is “already well served” by three nearby, independently-owned Mexican restaurants: Casa Mexicana at 180 Church, Taqueria El Castillito at 136 Church, and Chilango at 235 Church. The planning department report also concludes that allowing Chipotle to open at such a prominent intersection “would be detrimental to the neighborhood,” as the Bay Area Reporter noted in a blog post last week. The findings did not come as a surprise, as gay planning director John Rahaim had announced in February that the department would oppose Chipotle’s application. It used similar language in recommending that the planning commission last month reject Starbucks’ application to open a coffeehouse on Market Street at the corner of Sanchez. The oversight body voted 5-1 to uphold the staff ’s recommendation and adhere to its new policy toward chain stores along that stretch of Market. The Seattle-based coffee chain could have appealed the decision to the Board of Supervisors but chose not to. Danny Cowan, a spokesman for Starbucks who works at the public relations firm Edelman, told the B.A.R. that the company “does remain committed” to opening new stores in San Francisco. Asked if Starbucks would look for a new location along upper Market Street, Cowan said he “can’t comment specifically” on potential storefronts. Instead, he said the company “will look across the city” for expansion sites. Sweet Inspiration Bakery Cafe co-owner Wendy Mogg said she was not surprised by Starbucks’ decision, as the company has previously declined to file appeals when it was turned down in other cities. “We are pleased,” said Mogg, who helped lead the opposition to Starbucks and is now hopeful the planning commission will also vote down Chipotle. Chipotle representatives have courted community support by hosting several open houses at the vacant restaurant space with free food offered. At one of its sneak peeks last fall, company spokesman Chris Arnold said that Chipotle “doesn’t operate like a chain” even though it is now in 40 states and growing its presence in California. “What makes us different than

other chains is our food culture is rooted in better ingredients and sustainably sourced,” he said. “We also emphasize and identify our best employees to be future leaders. Instead of dead-end McJobs, we are creating careers.” As for its plans for the 3,467 square foot former Home space, which has been vacant since 2011, Chipotle envisions maintaining the current interior set-up with seating along the Market Street frontage wrapping around to 14th Street. It has proposed building a new 611 square foot outdoor seating area directly adjacent to the west of the building where there is currently a partially enclosed storage area. An eight-foot high wall would screen the patio from view, while the side facing Market Street would be turned into a public art mural. The location would serve beer and margaritas indoors only and be open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. It would be the ninth Chipotle in San Francisco. Despite the B.A.R.’s repeated requests since last August to interview Ells, the company has not made him available. It has run full-page ads in the B.A.R., as well as on the paper’s website, seeking support for its application. Planning staff reported they had received letters or emails in support of Chipotle from 34 local merchants and another 48 from the public. One pro-Chipotle petition netted 1,661 signatures while another online one had 433 signatures. Both the Merchants of Upper Market and Castro and the Castro/ Upper Market Community Benefits District voted to support Chipotle. Many wrote to say that the corner has been blighted for too long and felt the fast-casual burrito chain would be a good fit for the city’s gay business district. “I support Chipotle in every way and I am shocked that planning department would rather have a corner sit empty when we could bring work to upwards of 50 people in the restaurant, and have a wonderful and charming eating establishment that actually fits right in to the Castro/Duboce community,” wrote Rachel Fleischman, a registered expressive arts therapist whose private practice office is next door. Among the opponents to Chipotle is the Duboce Triangle Neighborhood Association. Ten local merchants also sent in letters of opposition, as did three residents. Planners said they had received a petition of opposition with 255 signatures and are aware of another online petition against Chipotle with 773 signatures. “This location is a significant

gateway into the Upper Market corridor, therefore it is desirable to maintain neighborhood character and locally supported businesses,” wrote DTNA President Pat Tura, whose neighborhood group fought for passage of the new rules governing chain stores along the gayborhood’s main thoroughfare. The one formula retailer to win recent approval for a store on Market Street was CVS Pharmacy, which did not trigger the 20 percent threshold for chain stores. After it dropped plans to sell liquor, limited its hours and pledged to overhaul the facade of the long-vacant Market Noe Center, the national chain easily won unanimous approval from planning commissioners in May. The planning commission meetings begin at noon in Room 400 at City Hall.

Castro Street zoning change up for vote

The commissioners will also be voting Thursday on a proposal to change the zoning along Castro Street between Market and 19th streets, and on 18th Street between Diamond and Noe streets, so as to allow nonprofit uses in commercial spaces totaling more than 4,000 square feet. As the Political Notebook reported in early May, the code change was triggered by the San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s plan to construct a nearly 15,000 square foot gay men’s health center at 474 Castro Street. Under the current rules, the proposal would not be allowed. The planning staff is recommending that the planning commission adopt the change so that a “neighborhood-serving nonprofit” could apply for a conditional use permit in a space exceeding the stated allowable limit. The change has broad neighborhood support. It is expected to be approved and will then require adoption by the Board of Supervisors. SFAF is currently finalizing its design plans for the new health center and is expected to seek approval from the planning commission sometime in July.t Web Extra: For more queer political news, be sure to check http:// www.ebar.com Monday mornings at noon for Political Notes, the notebook’s online companion. This week’s column reported on the UC Davis Health System now asking its patients if they are LGBT. Keep abreast of the latest LGBT political news by following the Political Notebook on Twitter @ http://twitter.com/politicalnotes. Got a tip on LGBT politics? Call Matthew S. Bajko at (415) 8615019 or e-mail m.bajko@ebar. com.


t <<

From the Cover>>

Shocked show

From page 1

will gesture, and it has turned into something totally, totally different. It was never, ever my or our intention to upset people or to anger them. To the contrary, we were hoping this would help everybody move on and not only provide closure but maybe a fresh start.” Vogt added, “It has been misread and misrepresented and misreported, but it’s obvious that while our intentions were good, they definitely were misguided, so I feel terrible personally, and never, ever intended this outcome.” Vogt and Patrick Brown, chief financial officer of the San Francisco Newspaper Company, are in the process of investing a 49 percent stake in the BAR Media Inc., which will own the Bay Area Reporter. During a March 17 performance at Yoshi’s, Shocked invoked California’s same-sex marriage ban by saying, “When they stop Prop 8 and force priests at gunpoint to marry gays, it will be the downfall of civilization and Jesus will come back.” She also said, “You are going to leave here and tell people ‘Michelle Shocked said God hates faggots.’” Shocked, whose real name is Karen Michelle Johnston, later told CNN’s Piers Morgan, “I admit I made a mistake.” Vogt had sent out numerous tweets recently about Shocked’s planned performance. In some, he promoted the show. On Saturday, June 15, he tweeted, “... Yup, it’s true! We are ‘shocked’ to be presenting Michelle Shocked live in a free concert in SF on June 30!” He also defended Shocked in a Tuesday, June 18 message by saying, “We all make mistakes” and “everyone deserves a 2nd chance. But not a 3rd.” It sounds like Vogt would like a second chance, too. In Wednesday’s interview he said, “I was shocked and surprised by how upset people were,” and “I’m doing what I can to try to fix

it, and other than apologizing and acknowledging that it has focused a lot of anger and a lot of upset, I’m truly and sincerely sorry for that.” However, Vogt was anything but apologetic in an interview Tuesday, when it was already clear that many weren’t happy with his actions. Asked about his promoting Shocked, Vogt said, “That’s insulting to me that you would suggest that.” In a follow-up email Tuesday, Vogt said, “You are obviously determined to ‘spin’ this story in a preconceived fashion and with a predetermined angle. So be it. You will write it as you have already decided you are going to write it.” He added, “The stretch you have made in your claim [that he’s promoting Shocked] is thinner than a page of the B.A.R. No one, myself included, is a ‘promoter’ of Ms. Shocked. To the absolute contrary, we are the only people so far brave enough to have challenged her to come back to the Bay Area and confront her past comments and actions. In my opinion, what we have done is challenged a purported homophobic bigot to own up or apologize or atone for their actions. Regardless of what Ms. Shocked ultimately does, we have won by not letting the spread of hate simply be ignored.” In the interview Tuesday, he’d also said, “You can personally disagree with this, and you can personally think that it’s obscene or insulting,” Vogt said, but what Shocked “chooses to do June 30, at least for me, will one way or another bring an end to this.” Wednesday, while he stood by his remark that the B.A.R. was spinning the story, he said, “I’m sorry we’re meeting under these circumstances. This is not what I do. This is not who I am.” Shocked didn’t respond to a Facebook request for comment.

Concert’s origins

Vogt and Brown are sharehold-

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 9

ers in the San Francisco Newspaper Company, which owns the San Francisco Examiner, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, and SF Weekly. Vogt said Tuesday that the Shocked engagement originated about three weeks ago when an advertising representative approached him about a full-page ad from Shocked for the Examiner, Bay Guardian, and SF Weekly Pride guide. Vogt said, “I didn’t believe it” at first and thought it was “a pretty tasteless joke either by people in advertising or by someone pretending to be Michelle Shocked.” Eventually, though, he spoke with Shocked directly. She explained she wanted to buy the ad “to explain what happened at Yoshi’s” and “the subsequent fallout,” said Vogt, who said he “politely declined to accept” the advertisement. But discussion continued. Vogt said he spoke with editorial and advertising staffers from the Examiner and the two alternative weeklies. When “we thought we had something we could live with,” Shocked was told the papers would only accept her ad “if we had full editorial control” or the ability to reject it, he said. The cost for the ad was $1,000. “We also wanted her to come to San Francisco at some point” and “perform a free concert as an apology,” Vogt said, or “at a minimum” explain “where she stands and what she believes.” Wednesday, Vogt said, “She never sent any ad in,” and never sent payment. “One of the conditions we had was the full right to not accept the ad for any reason whatsoever. She made it easy on us by not even sending any copy in.” Shocked eventually proposed three dates, one of them being the Pride Sunday. “Coincidentally, that’s the day that worked for a venue in her schedule,” Vogt said. “We’re not representing this as a Pride-related event by any way, shape, or form,” he said Tuesday.

The concert was going to be free, and Vogt, who’d declined to say exactly where she’d perform, said she wasn’t going to be paid. But the news was confusing to many, who initially thought the organization putting on the Pride parade might be involved. Before Vogt called off the show, SF Pride officials sought to make it clear Tuesday that they had nothing to do with Shocked’s anticipated performance. Longtime main stage producer Audrey Joseph said, “I have no time to deal with Michelle-goddamnedShocked. Fuck her and the air she breathes.” She called Shocked “a homophobic asshole” and said the performer “has nothing to do with San Francisco Pride, and if I found out she did have anything to do with San Francisco Pride, I would walk out.” Earl Plante, CEO of the San Francisco Pride LGBT Celebration Committee, said Shocked’s reported March comments were “pretty outrageous” and her June 30 performance was “not a Pride-sanctioned or Pride-sponsored event in any sense of the word.” Others expressed dismay at Vogt’s actions. Transgender labor activist Gabriel Haaland said Tuesday he has “a lot of compassion” for Shocked, “who clearly is confused about her sexuality and has been born again” and appears to be experiencing “inner turmoil.” However, Haaland said, “I find this shock value way that it was approached diminished the credibility of any kind of offer of reconciliation” by Shocked. He said Vogt had been “wildly insensitive to how the community might respond to what appears to be a very exploitative approach to bringing in someone who so deeply offended the community.” Queer housing rights advocate Tommi Avicolli Mecca noted Vogt’s prospective part ownership of the B.A.R. and referred to his

actions as “unreal.” “I would hope that people in our community in San Francisco, that people will let it be known to him that he can’t pull this shit on us. This is San Francisco. I’m sorry, you cannot do this kind of shit to us, and if people don’t hold this man accountable, there’s something wrong with our community.” In April, the B.A.R. announced a restructuring effort in which Vogt and Brown will own 49 percent of the paper, collectively. Michael Yamashita, the paper’s general manager, will own 31 percent of the new company BAR Media Inc. and will become the paper’s publisher. The Bob Ross Foundation, which is named after the B.A.R.’s founder and currently owns the paper, will own 20 percent. The majority of the paper’s ownership will still be gay, and the paper isn’t being sold. Asked Wednesday if he had any concerns about doing business with Vogt, given what many considered to be Vogt’s insensitivity to the LGBT community, Yamashita said, “No, I don’t. He explained the situation, and he rectified it by canceling the concert. If he says it wasn’t his intention to be insensitive and he apologized, I’ll take him at his word.” Yamashita added, “We don’t have a firm deadline” for completing the restructuring deal with Vogt and Brown. “It could be weeks to a couple of months,” he said.

Bay Guardian departure

Vogt has also been the subject of controversy over the departure last week of longtime Bay Guardian Editor Tim Redmond. Vogt said Redmond “definitely offered his resignation” and he was “absolutely not” fired. Redmond told the B.A.R., “I never said, ‘I quit,’” though he said he and Vogt had “had a major disagreement” over proposed cuts and “if he had not See page 17 >>


<< Community News

10 â&#x20AC;˘ Bay Area Reporter â&#x20AC;˘ June 20-26, 2013

Kraus meadow receives grant funds by Matthew S. Bajko

t

Heights Park as one of our valued park partners.â&#x20AC;? n effort to put up signage at As the Bay Area Reporter noted a city park with a meadow in a May story, the signage will also and path named after a gay rights include biographical information leader has won a competitive grant about the late political aide and process. campaign adviser Bill Kraus. He Last week the San Francisco helped elect Harvey Milk as the Parks Alliance announced it had cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first out supervisor in 1977 awarded a $2,000 Park Action and worked for gay Supervisor Grant to the group Friends of Harry Britt, who was appointed to Corona Heights Park toward the Milkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seat following his assassinapurchase of a kiosk to be installed tion in 1978. at the hilltop open space above the Kraus was elected president gay Castro district. of the progressive Harvey Milk The volunteer group still needs LGBT Democratic Club, renamed to raise another $3,000 in order in honor of the slain gay rights to cover the full purchase price leader, and urged the Democratic and installation costs. The kiosk Party to support gay rights as a is aimed at informing park visidelegate and platform committee tors of volunteer opportunities, member at its national convenpark events, trails orienteering, tions in 1980 and 1984. and activities at the nearby RanDemocratic Congress members dall Museum, a city-funded natuPhillip and Sala Burton both emral history museum geared toward ployed Kraus as an aide followschool-age youth. ing his City Hall work. Kraus also â&#x20AC;&#x153;We selected the Corona played a key role in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early Heights kiosk project as a grant response to the AIDS epidemic, Rick Gerharter recipient because of the value we and following his own AIDS diagunderstood such a project to pronosis in 1984, he traveled to Paris Neighbors of the Bill Kraus Meadow on the west side of Corona Heights Park discuss the planned imvide to the community at large,â&#x20AC;? to take part in a trial of an experiprovements with John Mehring and Supervisor Scott Wiener, center, at an April cleanup day. stated Matthew Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Grady, the mental AIDS drug. events and gatherings through a the kind of community involveparks allianceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive direcespouse in our mission. We are After his death on January 11, shared bulletin board helps foster ment that we as an organization tor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being able to communicate proud to count Friends of Corona 1986 at the age of 38 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he had contracted meningitis shortly before Christmas in 1985 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Krausâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends sought to honor him by getting a city park facility named after him. Most weekends Kraus could be found seated on a bench in Corona Heights Park strategizing his next political move. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recreation and parks commission voted June 19, 1986 to name a segment of the park and a pathway through it after Kraus. The meadow in question is a triangular shaped patch of lawn at the park entrance on Museum Way and Roosevelt Way. The pathway begins at that intersection and leads toward a fenced-in, off-leash dog play area. Other than a plaque dedicated to Kraus on a bench in the meadow, there is no signage alerting park users to the existence of the Bill Kraus Meadow and Pathway. The long ago honor for Kraus may have remained lost to time where it not for gay schoolteacher John Mehring. An acquaintance with Kraus and early Milk club member, Mehring earlier this year learned about the decision to name the meadow and pathway after Kraus. He teamed up with the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends group as it had already applied for the grant funding, and the volunteer park stewards agreed to include information about Kraus on the kiosk. The friends group and Mehring are planning to ask the public to help cover the remaining costs. Mehring is working with current Milk club members to hold a community-based fundraiser someâ&#x20AC;˘ Dual Diagnosis time this summer to help raise the additional money needed. He is also contacting Krausâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;˘ Relapse Prevention friends and colleagues to help with the biographical information for the signage. â&#x20AC;˘ Family Program â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regarding the kiosk, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m letWilliam J. Hanna, Psy.D., William J. Hanna, Psy.D., Clinical Director LouiseLouise McCallion, Executive Director McCallion, ting people know we have to start William J. Hanna, Psy.D., Clinical Director Louise McCallion, Executive Director Clinical Director â&#x20AC;˘ Doctorate Level Executive Director William J. Hanna, Clinical Director Executive Director thinking about the visual image we believe in the Strengths Perspective, whichPsy.D., is As Executive Director of Reflections, I amLouise McCallion, I believe in the Strengths Perspective, which is As Executive Director of Reflections, I am way of perceiving people in their struggles passionate about my responsibility to ensure want of Bill and what the text will a way of perceiving people in their struggles passionate about my responsibility to ensure Therapists in the Strengths Perspective, whichPerspective, is Executive Director of Reflections, I am I believe Strengths which o rise above difficultI believe circumstances. Here,in at the best-in-class at our facility and toAscreate As service Executive Director of Reflections, I am to rise above difficult circumstances. Here, at best-in-class service at our facility and to create be (about Bill, about Billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, a way of perceiving people in their struggles passionate about my responsibility to ensure eflections, we place emphasis bolstering the highest quality experience conducive to is aonway of perceiving people inemphasis their on strugReflections, we place bolstering the highest quality experience conducive toabout the AIDS epidemic),â&#x20AC;? Mehpassionate about my responsibility to to rise above difficult circumstances. Here, at best-in-class service at our facility and to create lient self-efficacy; and mobilizing clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recovery. The team at Reflections will help your self-efficacy; and mobilizing clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recovery. The team at Reflections will help your gles to rise aboveclient difficult circumstances. â&#x20AC;˘ High Client to ring told the B.A.R. last week.t ensure service at our facility Reflections, place emphasis on own bolstering the highest quality experience conducive to wn strengths and social support we systems, clients finally conquerbest-in-class this battle. strengths and social support systems, clients finally conquer this battle. Here, atDirector Reflections, we place emphasis on Hanna, Louise McCallion, n promoting Psy.D., rehabilitation and recovery clientClinical self-efficacy; and mobilizinginclientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recovery. The team at Reflections will help your Executive Director and to create the highest quality experipromoting rehabilitation and recovery Staff Ration Contact me directly if you have any questions: bolstering client and mobilizmaintenance and sustenance. Contactthis directly if you have any questions: own strengths and social supportself-efficacy; systems, finally conquer battle. maintenance and sustenance. ence conducive toclients recovery. Themeteam at (415) 706-8906 (415) 706-8906 ing clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; own strengths & social support in promoting rehabilitation and recovery heontact Strengths Perspective, which is As Executive Director of Reflections, I am louise@livingatreflections.com me directly if you have any questions: Reflections will help your clients finally louise@livingatreflections.com Contact me directly if you have any questions: Contact me directly if you have any questions: systems, in promoting rehabilitation and and sustenance. 650) 996-4766 (800) 611-7316 eiving peoplemaintenance in their struggles passionate about â&#x20AC;˘ Laptops and (650) 996-4766 611-7316 conquer this battle. me directly my responsibility to ensure (415) Contact 706-8906 (800) recovery maintenance & sustenance. rhanna@livingatreflections.com drhanna@livingatreflections.com Online content this Contact me directly if you have any questions: louise@livingatreflections.com if you have any questions: difficult circumstances. Here, at best-in-class service at our facility and to create 800) 611-7316 Cellphones Contact me if you have any questions: (800) 611-7316 includes the Bay Area (650) 996-4766 (800) 611-7316 the highest quality experienceweek we place emphasis on bolstering conducive to Welcome drhanna@livingatreflections.com Reporterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online columns, (415) 706-8906 996-4766 icacy; and mobilizing clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recovery. The team at Reflections will help your (800) (650) 611-7316 Political Notes and Wedding louise@livingatreflections.com drhanna@livingatreflections.com s and social support systems, clients finally conquer this battle. Bell Blues; and the Out in the rehabilitation and recovery World column. www.ebar. Contact me directly if you havecom. any questions: and sustenance.

A

tXXXMJWJOHBUSFGMFDtions.com tXXXMJWJOHBUSFGMFDtions.com

tXXXMJWJOHBUSFGMFDtions.com tXXXMJWJOHBUSFGMFDtions.com

REFLECTIONS... Exclusive Fully Licensed Drug and REFLECTIONS... An Exclusive Fully Licensed Drug and REFLECTIONS... AnAn Exclusive Fully Licensed Drug and REFLECTIONS... An Exclusive Fully Licensed Drug and Residential Treatment Facility Located in Marin County Alcohol Alcohol Residential Treatment Facility Located in Marin County Alcohol Residential Treatment Facility Located Marin County Alcohol Residential Treatment Facility Located ininMarin County s$UAL$IAGNOSIS s$UAL$IAGNOSIS s$UAL$IAGNOSIS

s$UAL$IAGNOSIS s2ELAPSE0REVENTION s2ELAPSE0REVENTION s2ELAPSE0REVENTION s&AMILY0ROGRAM

s&AMILY0ROGRAM s2ELAPSE0REVENTION s&AMILY0ROGRAM

s$OCTORATE,EVEL4HERAPISTS s$OCTORATE,EVEL4HERAPISTS

s$OCTORATE,EVEL4HERAPISTS

s&AMILY0ROGRAM

s(IGH3TAFFTO#LIENT2ATIO s(IGH3TAFFTO#LIENT2ATIO

s(IGH3TAFFTO#LIENT2ATIO

On the web

s,APTOPAND#ELLPHONES7ELCOME s,APTOPAND#ELLPHONES7ELCOME s$OCTORATE,EVEL4HERAPISTS

s,APTOPAND#ELLPHONES7ELCOME

s(IGH3TAFFTO#LIENT2ATIO

1.800.611.7316 â&#x20AC;˘ www.LivingAtReflections.com s,APTOPAND#ELLPHONES7ELCOME

irectly if you have any questions: 66 ngatreflections.com

(415) 706-8906 louise@livingatreflections.com (800) 611-7316


<< Community News

12 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

t

Film recalls pivotal 1965 SF gay rights episode by Matthew S. Bajko

F

our years before New York City police battled LGBT patrons of the famous Stonewall Inn, San Francisco’s gay community had its own pivotal showdown with the city’s homophobic police department. Yet the police raid of a gay dance held on New Year’s Day 1965 at the California Hall on Polk Street has largely been forgotten to history. The incident and subsequent court

trials it spawned have been eclipsed in the public’s imagination by the June 1969 riots outside the gay bar in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village. That episode has long been mythologized as giving birth to the modern gay rights movement and spawned the annual Pride gatherings now held each June in numerous cities. Long before the Big Apple incident, there were several West Coast stands against police harassment of LGBT people and gay establishments that

had taken place. On New Year’s 1967 a police raid of Los Angeles’ gay Black Cat Tavern in the Silver Lake district led to LGBT rioting and a demonstration. The year prior, in August, transgender patrons rioted at Compton’s Cafeteria in San Francisco’s Tenderloin district due to police harassment. In recent years documentaries have brought greater public awareness and recognition to the actions taken at both the Black Cat and Compton’s. A new film premiering at Frameline, Lewd and Lascivious, aims to give the same cinematic treatment to the story of the 1965 gay dance raid. Told through the first-hand accounts of 10 participants, including several religious leaders who co-hosted the party, the documentary recalls a pivotal early moment in LGBT history. “It kind of started the LGBT civil rights movement here in San Francisco. It was the event that was sort of the catalyst,” said Jallen Rix, 49, who directed the 65-minute film. “When I heard about the story I thought it was such a great story. Why haven’t we heard this before?” An openly gay sexologist, Rix is also a professor at the Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality, where he earned a doctorate of education in sexology in 2006. After hearing

PRNewsFoto/Mark Hollenstein

A photo of ministers in 1965 featured in Lewd and Lascivious.

about the gay dance and raid, he decided to write his dissertation on it. “It always amazed me what stuff came before Stonewall,” said Rix. “As we look back on history things are whittled down. For me, I think they all have a place at the table.” In 2007 he returned his attention to the raid of the Mardi Gras-themed dance, this time setting out to film interviews with some of the key players, such as dance organizer Chuck Lewis, a Lutheran pastor, and attendee Jon Borset, who was arrested and put on

trial for dancing with a man. Several people Rix interviewed subsequently passed away, such as organizers Del Martin and Herbert Donaldson, who both died in 2008. At the time a young attorney, Donaldson was one of four people arrested for refusing to allow police into the dance. “I feel so fortunate we could get these people’s stories before they were gone,” said Rix, who splits his time between San Francisco and Palm Springs. Two other attorneys, Evander Smith and Elliot Leighton, along with activist Nancy May were arrested and put on trial with Donaldson, who later became the first out gay man appointed as a judge in California. While in jail that night, however, “I saw my career going down the drain,” Donaldson says in the film. After being released, he recalls being held by his partner, Jim Hardcastle, who tells him, “I am so proud.” Their being charged with obstructing the police attracted local and national media attention, particularly since the religious leaders who helped throw the dance to raise money for six LGBT groups held a press conference to lash out at the police. The Council on Religion and the Homosexual also sued the police department over the matter, leading to more headlines, though it settled the matter out of court. The ministers met several times with the police as they sought a permit for the dance, so the raid wasn’t entirely a surprise. “We expected the police to overreact,” the Reverend Ted Mcllvenna, who at the time worked for Glide Memorial United Methodist Church and cofounded the pro-gay religious council, admits in the film. (In 1976 Mcllvenna helped found the San Francisco-based Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality.) A jury found Borset and Konrad Osterreich guilty of lewd and lascivious behavior for dancing together, but the judge overseeing the case fined them $25 and ordered their records to be expunged after six months. The prosecution of the other four defendants on obstruction charges attracted the most attention. Their acquittal chastened the police brass – the following year they offered to assist in ensuring the second dance party was a success – and led one gay bar to advertise it would now allow same-sex dancing. The episode taught the LGBT community and its straight supporters that “we had to get together and protect each other,” May says in the film. “Our concern had to be the whole community.” Asked why it took so long to turn his taped interviews into a film, Rix said, “We had no money.” He estimated the film has cost upwards of $80,000 to produce, with most of the money coming from private donations and “my own pocket.” Rix and his co-producers on the film unearthed about two-dozen photos taken on the night of the dance, as well as incidental video and pictures. See page 16 >>


<< Automotive News

14 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

Cadillac, Range Rover compare favorably by Philip Ruth Welcome to another installment of Out Wheels. First we’ll compare a brash Yank with a comely Brit, and then we’ll look at something practical from Japan.

Cadillac vs. Range Rover

2013 Cadillac CTS AWD Premium Collection, $57,550, 21 mpg, 192-inch length. 2013 Range Rover Evoque: $55,240, 23 mpg, 172-inch length. There’s a lot of enthusiasm among automotive journalists over the Cadillac CTS SportWagon. True wagons are popular among the nostalgia-heavy automotive press, and this CTS is as close as we get these days. Its 318-horsepower power rating beats a stick in the eye. The upgraded CTSV has gotten even more raves with its supercar-like 556 hp but is a tragic

rarity at .05 percent of current-generation CTS sales. So our all-wheel drive CTS is a rare winner, yes? Yes, until a charmer like the Range Rover Evoque comes along. The Evoque is like the fellow top at a sex party who gets it done in a way that you were at first put off by but then came to admire – he or she reminds you of the finer points of engagement, where the Cadillac is the pile driver, the one who reliably makes the bottoms scream. People scream when they see it, too – or at least one driver did, when the CTS interfered with her rolling California stop at an intersection. Some people are just ornery, but her eyes were on the Caddy’s provocative grille, with its brutish array of shiny tines. The Evoque had the opposite effect: most folks I drove past, whether in tony Pacific Heights or the more working-class Mission, were placed

t

Philip Ruth

The powerful 2013 Cadillac CTS offers a handsome ride.

Philip Ruth

The 2013 Range Rover Evoque has soothing horizontal lines for a classy look.

in a calm state that this car rolled decorously through. Not too masculine, not too feminine, the Evoque lived

up to its name by making just about everyone take a long look. Same thing inside. The CTS test car had genuine Recaro sport seats that clamp around you like a burly spooner. The steering wheel rim was “sueded” with sinfully supple material. The dashboard’s center stack cuts sharply down to the console, and the low-slung proportions have you peering through slit-like windows. This is a car that squints and says, “Come at me, bro.” The Evoque is more demure than that. The soothing horizontal lines that define the body carry into the interior, with gauges that emerge from a long padded plank. The console is broad and flat, and your eyes naturally fall on its gentle curve up to the dash. You sit nice and high and gaze through windows that are big and stylishly wedgy. It is hard not to be in a good mood when you take the wheel. The differing characteristics between the CTS and Evoque continue into the driving experiences. Both are fun in their own ways. The Cadillac is a typical American car with its bigengine answer to more power, where the Evoque has a small four and a turbo for more juice. The Caddy gives up two miles per gallon but has more kick off the line, which helps you be a more deliberate driver in the land of stop-and-go. The Evoque felt slower but was still pretty quick – the smooth entry of the turbo’s power made pedal-stomping unnecessary, as a light press quickly brought the boost. Both cars handle with a balance of comfort and athleticism. Tip of the hat goes to the Cadillac’s suspension, as it manages the engine’s muscular energy with definitive control. Few cars inspire so much confidence: it felt like you’d have to drive this allwheel-drive CTS into an ice rink to get it crossed up. The Evoque was pleasantly agile in comparison, again in keeping with its come-hither overall feel. In the minus column: the Cadil-

lac’s interior trim needed a few more screwdriver turns to feel as tight as the Range Rover’s did. And there’s the not-so-small matter of the CTS’s extra 20 inches in length over the Evoque, which adds up to a lot of Corolla-sized parking spaces you’d have to pass up. The main issue with the Evoque was its initially confounding navigation system. I’m also not sold on the Evoque’s “full glass” panoramic roof, which does not open for ventilation and quickly becomes a backlit showcase for the schmutz the daily fog spreads on our cars. Full glass is a bit of a misnomer, as it starts just above the driver’s head – you have pretty much the same view forward that you do in the standard Evoque. It’s a feature best appreciated from the rear seat, which could be music to the ears of Realtors looking for new ways to dazzle clients. Be prepared to spend $55,000 to $60,000 to get all the goodies in each of these upscale cruisers – the Evoque’s “Prestige Premium Package” is $10K alone. Are they worth it? There are many cars that can match their abilities for much less, but the tested CTS and Evoque succeeded in feeling handsome and special. Both of them would leave that sex party with a few new numbers in their phones.t Philip Ruth is an automotive journalist and consultant at http://www.gaycarguy.com. Go to www.ebar.com for more photos of these cars, along with a review of the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport. See you next time.


t

Sports>>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 15

Talking the talk by Roger Brigham

basketball coach who has been inching up to coming out and began the process in the meeting by tweeting his experiences. He and I sat next to each other in one of the coaches’ sessions. I thought about the walls of silence around me 31 years ago when I came out, the unexplored paths yet to be walked toward an uncertain future. And I looked at the sense of excitement rapidly erasing trepidation from his face as he took in the energy and passion from the room, the encouragement and the calm, as he tapped the first

A

massive three-day gathering of LGBT human rights activists, sports groups, and individuals last week in Portland, Oregon to discuss plans to work together to end bullying and homophobia in sports was full of good intentions and good cheer. How much more it is than that will only be clear in the next few years if those best-laid plans do not go awry. The second Nike LGBT Sports Summit drew roughly 100 individuals and organizational representatives – about three times the size of last year’s inaugural event. It opened on Thursday, June 13, with a meeting of 33 presumptive members (19 men and 14 women) of the LGBT Sports Coalition, whose first task was to discuss and agree upon a working set of ground rules for how they would work together as partners. “We’re not an organization” was a commonly repeated refrain as the members discussed how to organize. The second and third days brought in grassroots stakeholders from an array of mainstream and LGBT sports groups for a series of workshops identifying barriers, goals, and specific projects to work on. Transgender mixed martial arts fighter Fallon Fox kicked off the second day of activities, and gay NBA player Jason Collins spoke on day three about his experiences since coming out. I was attending my first summit as Equality Coaching Alliance’s representative in the core coalition. Others in the core group included representatives from the StandUp Foundation; Campus Pride; Go Athletes; Athlete Ally; It Gets Better Project; ESPN; You Can Play; the Last Closet; Fearless; Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network; Federation of Gay Games; the U.S. Olympic Committee; I Am Enough; and MillerCoors. The sessions were led by organizers Cyd Zeigler of Outsports; longtime LGBT sports advocate Pat Griffin; and Helen Carroll, director of the sports project of the National Center for Lesbian Rights. The coalition structure and process document was presented by a team of members led by Sue Rankin, a professor at Penn State. The adopted 26-page document lays out the coalition’s goals of trying to end homophobia and transphobia in sports by 2016, a priority adopted last year. It sets specific benchmarks in four different levels of sports: the pros; elementary and secondary schools; colleges; and loosely termed “recreational” sports, which covers everything from youth and adult recreation programs to Olympic athletes and college intramural programs. It was agreed that new members

Courtesy Wrestlers WithOut Borders

USA Wrestling’s Akil Patterson, left front, and Athlete Ally’s Hudson Taylor, right front, joined with members of Wrestlers WithOut Boarders, including columnist Roger Brigham, right, behind Hudson, last weekend in Portland.

need to be nominated by current members (a process I suggested was unfortunately like the exclusionary practice at some private golf clubs) and would start off with a three-tiered annual membership fee based on length of existence and ranging from $25 to $100. The details of individual versus organizational memberships will be discussed by a coordinating group of eight members elected by the coalition to two-year terms. The coalition’s funds, including donations and grants, will be sponsored and overseen by the StandUp Foundation, founded by former pro rugby player Ben Cohen. Members who collaborate on a project with at least two other members can submit a proposal for funding from the coalition, to be voted on by other members of the group. Such applications are to be voted on at the annual meeting. The experience of sitting through the daylong meetings was an alien ordeal for me. I have not spent much time in the human rights professional sphere, a world of consensus building and process and discussion and vote-taking and networking. The “jaw jaw” Winston Churchill said he preferred to “war war.” Me, I “coach coach” and “compete compete;” I struggled to sit through the hours of discussion. Fortunately, I was able to unwind between sessions by spending time at dinner and on the mat with eight fellow wrestlers: seven friends from Wrestlers WithOut Borders who held a leadership retreat simultaneous to the summit to discuss revisions in the WWB mission and structure; and Athlete Ally founder Hudson Taylor, one of the coalition members. Not a lot of jaw-jaw but a hearty amount of eat-eat, laugh-laugh and drink-drink. Overall I’d give the summit a grade of B-minus. The negatives were a lot of grind-

Obituaries >> Gerald L. Walker 1924 – 2013

If queer San Franciscans are ever at a loss to thank the Catholic Church, we can indeed feel blessed for it sent us Father Gerald. Leaving the Holy Cross Benedictine Abbey in Colorado in 1967 he became Jerry and quickly came out to San Francisco in every way. A gay rights pioneer, he was our 74th registered domestic partner. He fought tirelessly for rights for his beloved artist and partner, Barry Swyers. He politely protested the pope’s visit here and wrote witty, lovely, and poignant pleas to priests, politicians, and newspapers.

He showed us how grateful a person can be. A thank-you note from Jerry’s Selectric along with his fabulous purple script under Swyers’s cover art was a real jewel in your mailbox. “Without music, life would be a mistake.” Jerry’s second home was Davies Symphony Hall where he ushered with radiant glee since 1984. He never left his dream job. But as liver cancer descended, fellow ushers, neighbors, and musicians offered 24-hour care so he could die in loving hands at home. Sharp until the end, Jerry elegantly ushered his own departure calling daily for champagne. Jerry died June 4, 2013, and eagerly joined his beloved mother, Lucille, each departing in their 89th year. In addition to Swyers, his partner of 40 years, Jerry is survived by his goddaughter Lily, and his family of dear friends.

ing hours hammering out the nits from the picks as well as one excruciating hour of personalized criticism of one of the coalition members, who handled the situation with far more grace than I would have. Hopefully that will prove to have been an aberration and members will behave with more decorum and tact in the future. And every time someone referred to the importance of not neglecting the importance of fighting for trans-inclusion by referring to the issue as “the T in LGBT,” “all of that other beautiful stuff,” or “etcetera, etcetera,” I cringed at the unintentional cubby-holing of so many friends and fellow athletes into an acronymal afterthought. The big pluses included some incredible networking as LGBT sports people in the stakeholder groups got to meet colleagues for the first time, a novel experience for many, and drew on the energies of others who have struggled and survived the same issues as themselves. I was particularly happy to meet in person a closeted

steps toward his empowerment into his iPhone. And now I sit back at home, exchanging texts and messages every few hours, wondering and waiting, hoping and praying, for come what may. The energy of the summit ebbs from my body as I wait in anticipation for the next word, the next development, the next step. It’s what a coach lives for. I don’t know what lies in the future, for this coach and me, for the coalition and me, for the coalition and all of us. But I can hardly wait. Game on.t


<< Community News

16 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

<<

Visual Aid

From page 1

small grassroots organizations and foundations. “All of our supporters have been hit very hard by the recession, and therefore so have we,” she said. “We just weren’t able to go on.” Visual Aid’s budget is $240,000. Blankenship, an artist herself, is HIV-negative and wouldn’t say whether she’s LGBT. She also wouldn’t disclose her salary. However, she said she and the other staff “have taken reductions.” Visual Aid has two taff and one temporary, part-time helper. Michael Johnstone, 57, a photographer who’s living with AIDS and has been a Visual Aid client for more than 20 years, said the agency

“helped me immensely in the ways of practical and moral support to continue making my work and to continue finding venues and ways to show the work.” He also said, “The inspiration to continue making work is good for your general health and well-being.” Visual Aid, which started in 1989, “really encouraged artist that might otherwise be very discouraged,” he said. Johnstone said the agency has been providing him financial support for materials. In October 1996, several of his photographs that were hanging at City Hall as part of an exhibit were defaced when someone stabbed them with a pointed object, probably a ballpoint pen. He said this week that whoever was responsible

was never found. Blankenship said the agency “was founded to help artists continue their work in the last weeks or months of their lives at the height of the AIDS pandemic.” Since the founding, “We’ve served and nurtured creativity in thousands of artists,” she said. About 12 years ago, Visual Aid expanded to include people with other life-threatening illnesses, such as breast cancer and hepatitis C. Most of the artists are people who are living with AIDS. Blankenship said the organization is “doing our utmost” to connect Visual Aid’s 77 clients with other resources. There aren’t many places for clients to go. “There is certainly not a single place,” Blankenship said. “We really hope we have created something that could be duplicated elsewhere, and we certainly hope to place programs with other organizations, but as you know, we’re unique, so there’s nothing just like us in the Bay Area.” Visual Aid has been helping artists “manifest their dreams through their creative work,” Blankenship said. “That’s a rare thing. It’s very precious.” Johnstone, the longtime Visual Aid client, said, “I feel that because

<<

Gap fashion

From page 2

more. If she aimed to thoroughly represent intersectional identities, she would need to source external brands and models. “It was critical to me that we had outside people playing into this space to show diversity,” she said. Beckett reached out to fellow LGBTQ community members and heard about Show and Tell, a downtown Oakland-based boutique owned by Alyah Baker and Nichole Payton, two queer women of color. When Baker, 31, and Payton, 37, read Beckett’s email inquiry about being a showcased external brand at Gap GEAR’s fashion show, they didn’t believe it. “That a large corporation thought us worthy enough to feature and support, was such an honor,” Baker said.

More to the story

But there’s more to the story than a big business recognizing a small business. In 2003, Payton was working as an associate manager at Gap’s (now closed) location at 14th and Broadway in Oakland when she remembers Baker walking through the door and asking for a job application. After Baker was hired, the two worked together for six months until Payton took a promotion at another store. “We maintained a friendship after

<<

Gay rights episode

From page 12

Footage and photos taken by a police still photographer and movie photographer of people as they entered the dance were later lost. “I searched and searched to find those,” said Rix. “But, evidently in the 1960s, the official statement they gave me was that the record-

t

of my somewhat improved health, personally I will manage. My concern is more for other artists.” He’s especially concerned for artists who are homebound or who have mobility issues “and can’t get out and about.” “I hope there’s a way they can still get some materials and supplies and some support if you are homebound,” he said. Johnstone had high praise for Blankenship, saying, “I’ve never seen anyone quite so dedicated.” In response to an emailed question about the impact of Visual Aid’s closing, board President Tim Losch said, “I think it will have a profound effect on both the lives of the artists we serve as well as the larger community. The services we provide are unique but we are making every attempt to connect our artists with other resources in the community and ensure a smooth transition. Additionally we are looking for ways to preserve the history and creative legacy of Visual Aid.” Some have said there’s been a decreased interest in helping agencies that serve people with HIV and AIDS. Blankenship said there’s “some validity” to the notion, but she added, “Surprisingly, many, many young people are interested” in Visual Aid.

“We’ve been attracting new, younger, and expanding audiences, but we just don’t have the capital” to support the change and growth needed to survive, she said. Blankenship said the agency has received “many tearful calls from artists and people in the community.” In an email to the nonprofit, Rudy Lemcke of the Queer Cultural Center said, “I’m sad to hear that Visual Aid is closing. It’s going to take a while for the community to process what this means – the loss is profound.” He continued, “You gave visual artists with HIV/AIDS a reason to get up in the morning and gave the LGBT community an organization that showed us how to reach within ourselves and embrace our strength, courage and wellness; and to transform that knowledge into something beautiful for all to see.” Visual Aid still needs about $18,000 to help pay outstanding bills, moving expenses, and other costs. Those interested in making contributions can visit http://www. visualaid.org or call Blankenship at (415) 777-8242. For more information about Johnstone’s work, visit http://www. verasphere.com.t

I left the store,” Payton said. “We’d always talked about our visions of owning our own businesses. We talked about doing it together.” By 2011, a number of culminating circumstances provided the extra impetus for Baker and Payton to incorporate as Show and Tell. Payton, who had entered the car business in 2005, had hit the glass ceiling as a queer woman of color. Baker, whose brother passed away in 2010, wanted to realign her work with family and community. “We decided on the name Show and Tell, which was inspired by the repeal of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,’” said Payton, referring to the military’s former ban on gay and lesbian service. “Our business is about showing who you are, expressing yourself as an individual.” Show and Tell highlights responsible consumerism and community equity. Their goods are made in the U.S. or by local independent designers, monetarily support charitable causes, and are sustainably produced or ethically sourced. Their first year open, Show and Tell doubled its projected sales goal, although the women declined to provide figures. The business was nominated for Oakland Indie Awards in 2012 and 2013. When Beckett approached them, Baker and Payton had already planned to create their own signature Show and Tell brand, so it seemed serendipitously perfect to debut their apparel at Gap GEAR’s fashion show.

“This is an amazing full-circle story,” Beckett said. “Alyah and Nichole met and learned their trade at the Gap, then found a voice to create something uniquely theirs. It’s not about competition or that they left the ‘fold,’ it’s a celebration of their success.” Beckett’s appreciation of Show and Tell is mutual. Both Baker and Payton emphasize the importance of Beckett’s visibility as a queer woman of color with a high-ranking job title in corporate America. “Gap’s policies are very open and accepting,” Baker said, “but it’s one thing to have it written down, another to see it in-person.” “To have Melissa in a respected position,” added Payton, “and for her to speak for her community, really says something about her.” Styled By Queer Eyes also served as a charity event for LYRIC, a San Francisco-based LGBT youth organization also known as the Lavender Youth Recreation and Information Center. Over $1,000 was raised for the nonprofit. In addition to Show and Tell, one other external brand was featured: Haute Butch, clothing that caters to masculine-identified women. Make-up for the event was done by Savannah Schmidt, Jessica Frese, and Tiffany Faircloth.t

keeping in the San Francisco police department was very unorganized. Just tons of evidence just walked out the front door and never came back in.” He is currently trying to raise $20,000 to cover post-production costs and use of archival footage. Donations are tax-deductible, as the GLBT Historical Society is serving as the film’s fiscal sponsor,

and can be made through the website http://www.cometrueproductions.com. The film screens during San Francisco’s international LGBT film festival at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, June 22 at the Victoria Theater. A Q&A with Rix and several people from the film is expected to take place after the screening. For tickets, visit http://www.frameline.org.t

Show and Tell is located at 1300 Clay Street in Oakland. For more information, visit http://www. showandtelloakland.com.


t <<

Same-Sex Marriage>>

Bay Area couples

From page 1

ried in the state of California is because it doesn’t make sense for us personally to have that certification in some other jurisdiction when this is where our lives are,” said Kutch. What they remain unsure of is if their marriage will be deemed legal under California law. Like other same-sex couples planning weddings this summer and fall, they are anxiously waiting to see if the U.S. Supreme Court will strike down the Golden State’s voterapproved ban against same-sex marriage. The nation’s highest court is expected to issue its ruling any day now in the case, known as Hollingsworth v. Perry. The court heard oral arguments in the lawsuit, brought by two California samesex couples that wish to wed, in March. Most legal observers expect that Proposition 8, the constitutional amendment defining marriage as between a man and a woman that was adopted in 2008, will be struck down. Opinion differs, however, on just how the court will reach such a conclusion, and it remains unclear just when same-sex marriages might be able to resume in California. San Francisco officials have warned that it could be at least a month, if not longer, from the day of the decision before they can once again provide marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Depending on how the U.S. Supreme Court decides the case, there could further delays should there be more litigation in the state courts over how to enact the ruling.

June wedding

One of the couples planning to be in line the first day the samesex marriages resume is Lisa Dazols and Jenni Chang. The San Franciscans met five years ago while training for the AIDS LifeCycle bicycle fundraiser and then volunteered together on the campaign against Prop 8 that year. “We have always dreamed all of our lives of finding someone special to marry,” said Dazols. “It has been hurtful to us to be denied the freedom to make that commitment to each other.” Two years ago on a beach in the Philippines Chang, 31, a business manager at eBay, proposed to Dazols, 34, an UCSF HIV/AIDS social worker. The couple had embarked on a yearlong project to document the LGBT movement around the world and is currently working with two filmmakers to turn their 120 hours of footage from 15 countries into a movie called Out and Around. “I was shocked,” recalled Dazols, for she had bought a ring and was planning to ask Chang to marry her. “She beat me to it.” Last year they settled on June 8 as their wedding date, booked the Guerneville Lodge, and invited 150 guests to the riverside ceremony. They had hoped that the Supreme Court would not take up the Prop 8 case, so it came as a bit of a shock when it did. They then held out hope that a decision would be announced prior to their ceremony. Even though that didn’t happen, it didn’t spoil their wedding day, said Dazols. “We had a very meaningful spiritual ceremony. We look forward to going to City Hall, which is such a symbol for freedom historically in this city, to make it

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 17

Ian Goldstein

Ed Graziani, left, and Tim Lorenz, with their dog Clipper, an Australian Labradoodle, plan to marry in October.

legal,” said Dazols, adding that many of the couple’s friends and family plan to also join them that day. “What can you do? We want to be there the first day it happens to share in the excitement.” Kutch and Dominguez, 34, who is a nurse, discussed if they should postpone planning their wedding until after they knew for sure how the court would rule. They determined there was no reason to wait, so last fall they settled on a date and are hoping for the best. “We would love for our marriage to be legal,” said Dominguez. “If not, then we will do registered domestic partners as a second option. For us, it doesn’t matter. We just want to celebrate with our friends and family.”

Courtesy Laura Kutch

Laura Kutch and Jasmine Dominguez are planning a September wedding in Santa Rosa.

<<

News Briefs

From page 5

tips (dances) for women, bears, and dancers wearing leather, kilts, drag, or nothing at all. Other activities that are open to the public include a pre-convention bingo benefit with the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence (July 2, 7:30 p.m., advance tickets $30 and $45 at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/335926); “trail-in” square dance

<<

Shocked show

From page 9

what I see as dismissed me on Thursday night [June 13] I probably would have wound up leaving anyway.” The Bay Guardian published a

(mainstream to advanced levels), July 4, 7 p.m., free; and contra dance, July 4m 8 p.m., free. A country and western dance will also take place Saturday, July 6 at 11 p.m. There is a $10 cost at the door.) Organizers noted that most gay clubs start beginner classes in the fall and are actively recruiting new members. Anyone who is interested is welcome to stop by and take a new look at this classic American tradition. Dancers can register for the week-

detailed account this week of Redmond’s departure. Interim Bay Guardian Editor Marke Bieschke, who identifies as queer, said the paper published the first report of Shocked’s “meltdown” at Yoshi’s and published the exclusive audio that a reader provided.t

end at www.sanfrancisco2013.org. Single-day passes can be purchased at the door.

Benefit for aging task force

The San Francisco Aging Policy Task Force is having a breakfast fundraiser next month that will include a first look at a survey the panel recently commissioned. The event takes place Tuesday, July 9 from 8 to 9:15 a.m. at Farella, Braun, and Martel, 235 Montgomery Street in

Fall nuptials planned

Architect Tim Lorenz, 49, and Eddie Graziani, 58, a legal software trainer for a major San Francisco law firm who also does architectural design and development, are in the same state of legal limbo with their wedding plans. They have invited roughly 300 people to their wedding celebration in late October at the Marine’s Memorial Club in San Francisco. They are cautiously optimistic that by the time they exchange their vows Prop 8 will be a thing of the past. And if it isn’t, the couple has no plans to postpone their marriage. “It is one thing if we were younger to say, ‘Okay, we can’t get married in the state we live in so we will wait for the next round to make it happen.’ But I will be 59 by the time we say our vows,” said Graziani. “I don’t want to wait any longer while politicians debate the merits of same-sex marriage.” Hopeful it will be both a spiritual as well as legal ceremony, the men have also devised a backup plan in the event Prop 8 remains on the books. They will either travel to Connecticut, where Graziani grew up, or to Washington state to also marry there since both allow same-sex marriage. “Where I live is not as important as the idea of being able to marry the person I love,” said Graziani. “We want to get married now. We don’t want to wait any longer.” After Graziani proposed to Lorenz shortly before Christmas last year, the men knew they wanted to have a long engagement to give themselves enough time to plan a ceremony. By choosing a fall date they figured they would also know how the court would rule in both the Prop 8 case and a second one involving the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

San Francisco The task force, created last year to advise city leaders on how to address the needs of LGBT seniors, will honor special guest Karen Fredriksen-Goldsen, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Washington who is working on the survey. (The survey results will be released later that day at a meeting of the task force, which takes place at 4 p.m. at 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 800.) All donations at the breakfast will

“Our relationship is not going to be diminished or hurt by the ruling,” said Lorenz when asked about the possibility of California’s anti-gay marriage law remaining on the books. “What it does do, it provides us additional legal hurdles for us to ensure our safety and our economic security.” His decision to propose was not influenced by the unresolved court battles, said Graziani. It was spurred by his knowing he had found his soul mate. “The relationship Tim and I developed is one that is absolutely right for the two of us and this is the next step,” said Graziani, who first met Lorenz through an online dating service that calculated their compatibility at 99 percent. “It was the exact right thing to do right then. There was no need to wait. There was no need to mince any words.” Technically, Lorenz never said, “Yes.” His response to Graziani was, “Of course.” Months prior he had asked Graziani if they were “engaged to be engaged” so the marriage proposal wasn’t a total surprise. His two daughters – Lorenz is the biological father to a 12-yearold and a 14-year-old born to two lesbians who legally wed back in 2008 – are planning to call Graziani their new dad no matter the legal status of the men’s marriage. “My kids don’t want to say this is my dad and his domestic partner,” said Lorenz. The family is hopeful there will be no need for them to register as domestic partners in the state. “It might be a possibility, but I would hate to settle for that,” said Graziani. “One way or another we should be able to get married, but I am not going to hold my breath.”t

go to support the activities of the task force. Suggested donations are $50, $100, or $250 and will be matched dollar for dollar by a generous gift from the Bob Ross Foundation. (The foundation, named for the Bay Area Reporter’s late founding publisher is a separate legal entity from the newspaper.) Donations are tax-deductible and should be made out to the task force’s fiscal sponsor, Meals on Wheels. For more information, see the Facebook page at http://tinyurl.com/mdh26x4.t

www.ebar.com


Serving the LGBT communities since 1971

18 • BAY AREA REPORTER • June 20-26, 2013

Classifieds

The

Gaylesta2x2_0610CN Gaylesta2x2_0610CN

Counseling>>

Health & Fitness>>

Legal Notices>> NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Dated 05/31/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: ST. JORGE, LLC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 3438 MISSION ST., SF, CA 94110-5437. Type of license applied for

Confidential referrals made to licensed psychotherapists who understand our community. Referrals are available to LGBTQ therapists on all insurance plans. Visit www.Gaylesta.org and click on “Find a Therapist.” Or email us at contact@gaylesta.org

41 - ON-SALE BEER & WINE - EATING PLACE JUNE 6, 13, 20, 2013 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Visit our website to view profiles of over 150 therapists.

Dated 05/30/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: S HANNA INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 531 HAIGHT ST., SF, CA 94117. Type of license applied for

Movers>>

41 - ON-SALE BEER & WINE - EATING PLACE JUNE 6, 13, 20, 2013 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Dated 05/24/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: JOIN INDUSTRIES INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 968 VALENCIA ST., SF, CA 94110-2322. Type of license applied for

Vacation Rental>> SUMMER IN THE SIERRAS! 2+ bdrm cabin, upper Hwy108, close to Sonoma Pass/Yosemite! $150-$165 daily rates. For more info: 209-586-7774 or mtnguys2@att.net

41 - ON-SALE BEER & WINE - EATING PLACE JUNE 6, 13, 20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035136200

E25-25

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE VISUAL, 1677 BUSH ST. #4, SF, CA 94109. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Jeff Mark Munar. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/28/13.

ebar.com Household Services>>

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035133700

Hauling >> Hauling 24/7 441-1054 Lg. Truck

E22-E31

Legal Services>>

BAYB AAY AR REPORTERFax to:Fax to: REA EPORTER REA Fast excellent, overall clean, apt or home $55. 15 yrs exp. JR Street S.F.415-205-0397 CA

395 Ninth 395 Ninth Street S.F. CA

Fax from: Fax from:

E24-E25

PHONE 415.861.5019 FAX 861-8144 PHONE 415.861.5019 FAX 861-8144 CA Lic. 731605

Landscaping Design & Construction Decks, Fences, Patio, Irrigation & Electrical

(415) 412-8906 JimLinkLandscapes.com Young Asian male house cleaner, mid thirties, looking to clean houses. 6 years experience 30$ per hour please contact bluestraycattoo@yahoo.com thanks

E25-E32

Quality housecleaner kitchen and baths. Polish, wash, and iron call Jose 415-225-4963

E25-28

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A- 035142100

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A- 035150500 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOAPS HAIR SALON, 323 IVY ST., SF, CA 94102. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Barbara McLean. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 09/01/12. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/04/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035102400 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SALON D, 660 MARKET ST. #204, SF, CA 94104. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Diane H. Oertwig. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/13/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/13/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035134100 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE RINCON GROUP, 425 1ST ST. #2702, SF, CA 94105. This business is conducted by a corporation, and is signed Tarslin Real Estate (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/28/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/28/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035147100 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA IRON WORKS, 1405 EGBERT AVE, SF, CA 94124. This business is conducted by a married couple, and is signed Alfonso Ramirez & Marisela Ramirez. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/03/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/03/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035152400 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SABAI TEA, 1557 8TH AVE., SF, CA 94122. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed Sabai Tea LLC (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/04/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035143600

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GLAZE TERIYAKI, 1946 FILLMORE ST., SF, CA 94115. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed Seatown Fillmore LLC (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 04/25/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/31/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013

E23-E24

MACINTOSH HELP

All the news that’s fit to post.

R ick 415 .821 . 1 792

E24-36

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FILLMORE FLORIST; FILLMORE FLOWERS; 1880 FILLMORE ST., SF, CA 94115. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Faramarz Tabar. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 07/21/01. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/30/13.

In the matter of the application of: ELLIOT GEORGE SZKUP, for change of name having been filed in Superior Court, and it appearing from said application that petitioner ELLIOT GEORGE SZKUP, is requesting that the name ELLIOT GEORGE SZKUP, be changed to ELLIOT ARIEL RYAN. Now therefore, it is hereby ordered, that all persons interested in said matter do appear before this Court in Dept. 514 on the 1st of August 2013 at 9:00am of said day to show cause why the application for change of name should not be granted.

Housecleaning since 1979. Many original clients. All supplies. HEPA Vac. Richard 415-255-0389

Tech Support>>

www.computerhelpsf.com Recorded information at 415-820-3251

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE A-035141000

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PAT CHAN PHOTOGRAPHY, 660 4TH ST. #353, SF, CA 94107. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Pacharin Pisansatherawonge. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 01/01/02. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/30/13.

Cleaning Professional 25 Years Exp (415) 794-4411 * Roger Miller

E23-E26

* home or office * 22 years exp * sfmacman.com

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LUXE SOJOURNS, 771 14TH AVE., SF, CA 94118. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Susan K. Lukrich. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/28/13.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO FILE CNC13-549545

ebar.com

To place yo Classifie ur d ad, Call 415-8615019.


t

Read more online at www.ebar.com

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay area reporter • 19

Legal Notices>> ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN SUPERIOR COURT OF CAlIFORNIA, COUNTy OF SAN FRANCISCO FIlE CNC13-549554

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN SUPERIOR COURT OF CAlIFORNIA, COUNTy OF SAN FRANCISCO FIlE CNC13-549578

In the matter of the application of: CATHERINE ALEXANDRA MALLICK, for change of name having been filed in Superior Court, and it appearing from said application that petitioner CATHERINE ALEXANDRA MALLICK, is requesting that the name CATHERINE ALEXANDRA MALLICK, be changed to ALEXANDRA MALLICK WILLIAMS. Now therefore, it is hereby ordered, that all persons interested in said matter do appear before this Court in Dept. 514, Rm. 514 on the 13th of Aug 2013 at 9:00am of said day to show cause why the application for change of name should not be granted.

In the matter of the application of: ERICA LYNN ATCHLEY, for change of name having been filed in Superior Court, and it appearing from said application that petitioner ERICA LYNN ATCHLEY, is requesting that the name ERICA LYNN ATCHLEY, be changed to E LAI ATCHLEY. Now therefore, it is hereby ordered, that all persons interested in said matter do appear before this Court in Dept. 514 on the 5th of Sept 2013 at 9:00am of said day to show cause why the application for change of name should not be granted.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035139900 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 2130, 2130 FILLMORE ST., SF, CA 94115. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed Oska Mill Valley LLC (DE). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/30/13.

JUNE 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035113700 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: R P M COMPLETE AUTOCARE INC., 160 RUSS ST., SF, CA 94103. This business is conducted by a corporation, and is signed R P M Complete Autocare Inc. (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 09/16/08. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/16/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035113000 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RINEY, 2001 THE EMBARCADERO, SF, CA 94133. This business is conducted by a corporation, and is signed Publicis Inc. (DE). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 03/15/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/16/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035124100 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MILANO PIZZERIA 1330 9TH AVE., SF, CA 94122. This business is conducted by a corporation, and is signed BM Holdings Inc. (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on N/A. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/22/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035129100 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KD COMMERCIAL SERVICES 925 GEARY ST. #506, SF, CA 94109. This business is conducted by a corporation, and is signed Widjaja Winata Corporation (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on N/A. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/24/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035113100 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARC USA SAN FRANCISCO, 30 HOTALING PLACE, SF, CA 94111. This business is conducted by a corporation, and is signed Leo Burnett Company Inc. (DE). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 02/01/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/16/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035120700 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ENTERPRISE SELLING GROUP, 788 CAROLINA ST., SF, CA 94107. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Michael Andrew Holland. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/20/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/20/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035123400

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION TO SEll AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGES Dated 06/10/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: FUTURE BEVERAGE INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 101 SPEAR ST. #A04, SF, CA 94105-1557. Type of license applied for

21 – OFF-SAlE GENERAl JUNE 13, 20, 27, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION TO SEll AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGES Dated 06/03/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: CENTRAL KITCHEN LLC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 1550 BRYANT ST., SF, CA 94103-4832. Type of license applied for

41 - ON-SAlE BEER & WINE - EATING PlACE JUNE 13, 20, 27, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION TO SEll AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGES Dated 06/07/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: STCC INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 3910 GEARY BLVD., SF, CA 94118-3219. Type of license applied for

48 - ON-SAlE GENERAl PUBlIC PREMISES JUNE 13, 20, 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035104200 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CITY DWELLER, 1440 DE SOLO DR., PACIFICA, CA 94044. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed David Brian Gohn. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 04/25/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/14/13.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035161000 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAVEN; OSCAR AND STELLA; OSCAR & STELLA, 215 FREMONT ST. #1 SF, CA 94105. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Michelle Renee Stehle. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/07/13.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035108700 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MN REMODELING SERVICES, 2793 16TH ST., SF, CA 94102. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Milton Navarrete. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/15/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/15/13.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035166600 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CASTRO SMOG STATION, 376 CASTRO ST., SF, CA 94114. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Yinkit Tse. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/11/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/11/13.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035143000

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOBLEY BLOOMFIELD, 208 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. #110 SF, CA 94107. This business is conducted by a married couple, and is signed Jennifer Mobley & Frank W. Bloomfield Jr. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/22/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/22/13.

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WALKERSHAW CLOTHING, 1400 CASTRO ST., SF, CA 94114. This business is conducted by a general partnership, and is signed Connie Walker & Ira Jesse Shaw. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/31/13.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035131200

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035155200

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035111900

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035170700

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035170500

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHESTNUT PARTNER GROUP, LLC, 2265 31ST AVE., SF, CA 94116. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed Chestnut Partner Group LLC (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 01/01/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/16/13.

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WEST PORTAL SHOE SERVICE, 79 WEST PORTAL AVE., SF, CA 94127-1303. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed EDGAR IPINA LUGO. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/12/13.

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUSHI SHOH, 406 DEWEY BLVD., SF, CA 941161425. This business is conducted by a corporation and is signed UPPERLAND, INCORPORATED (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/12/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035181800

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035189400

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: K & CO PROMOTIONAL AND EVENT MARKETING, 664 FOURTH ST. #326, SF, CA 94107. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed KAREN TRAN. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/14/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/14/13.

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: R & T MARKETING SOLUTIONS, 3327 24TH ST., SF, CA 94110. This business is conducted by a general partnership, and is signed TERIZA ARGUELLES ANICETE & CAMERON T. ANICETE. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 11/20/06. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/19/13.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035165800 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLE MISSION HILL SALON, 491 POTRERO AVE., SF, CA 94110. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed Code of Ten Percent LLC (DE). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/10/13.

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION FOR CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGE lICENSE Dated 06/17/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: 1300 BATTERY, INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 1300 BATTERY ST., SF, CA 94111-1104. Type of license applied for

47 - ON-SAlE GENERAl EATING PlACE JUNE 20, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION FOR CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGE lICENSE Dated 05/29/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: UPPERLAND INCORPORATED. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 406 DEWEY BLVD., SF, CA 94116-1425. Type of license applied for

41 - ON-SAlE BEER & WINE - EATING PlACE JUNE 20, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION FOR CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGE lICENSE Dated 06/13/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: AVATAR FOODS INTERNATIONAL INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 1805 GEARY BLVD, 2ND & 3RD FLRS, SF, CA 94115-3519. Type of license applied for

47 - ON-SAlE GENERAl EATING PlACE JUNE 20, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION FOR CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGE lICENSE Dated 05/28/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: JULIO ERNESTO MORAN, MARIA JUANA MORAN. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 5080 MISSION ST., SF, CA 94112-3426. Type of license applied for

41 - ON-SAlE BEER & WINE - EATING PlACE JUNE 20, 2013 NOTICE OF APPlICATION TO SEll AlCOHOlIC BEvERAGES Dated 06/12/13 To Whom It May Concern: The name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are: SCHMEER AND SCHMALTZ, LLC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control at 33 New Montgomery St. #1230, SF, CA 94105 to sell alcoholic beverages at 126 SUTTER ST., SF, CA 94104-4001. Type of license applied for

41 - ON-SAlE BEER & WINE - EATING PlACE JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME IN SUPERIOR COURT OF CAlIFORNIA, COUNTy OF SAN FRANCISCO FIlE CNC13-549577 In the matter of the application of: RAN DHIR SINGH, for change of name having been filed in Superior Court, and it appearing from said application that petitioner RAN DHIR SINGH, is requesting that the name RAN DHIR SINGH, be changed to RANDHIR SINGH. Now therefore, it is hereby ordered, that all persons interested in said matter do appear before this Court in Dept. 514 on the 15th of Aug 2013 at 9:00am of said day to show cause why the application for change of name should not be granted.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035184300

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035181700 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DR. DOOLITTLE’S PET CARE, 725 34TH AVE., SF, CA 94121. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed ELEANOR A. HAYES. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 08/30/98. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/14/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035132100 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAM’S SIGNING SERVICES; ELITE SIGNING SERVICES; 101 LEESE ST., SF, CA 94110. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed IBTISAM N. MUNIAR. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/24/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/24/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035178500 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FRANCES CONSULTING, 28 2ND ST. #300, SF, CA 94105. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed ANITA JACKSON. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/01/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/13/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035188300 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REBECCA FOX METAL SCULPTURE, 144 PARNASSUS AVE. #20, SF, CA 94117. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed REBECCA FOX. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/13/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/18/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035188200 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FOX CHANDELIER CLEANING, 1355 FAIRFAX AVE. #B2, SF, CA 94124. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed REBECCA FOX. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/13/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/18/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035173900 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEATONE CONSULTING, 515 JOHN MUIR DR. #A412, SF, CA 94132. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed RICHARD A. WILSON. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/03/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/13/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035179800 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RAIJIN RESTAURANT, 531 HAIGHT ST., SF, CA 94117. This business is conducted by a corporation and is signed S HANNA INC. (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/14/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/14/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035158400 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LANDEROS BROTHERS HANDYMAN SERVICES, 1370 REVERE AVE., SF, CA 94124. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed EMMANUEL LANDEROS. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/01/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/06/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FIlE A-034668900

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALINA SEPEDA ACUPUNCTURE, 183 FRANKLIN ST. #3, SF, CA 94102. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed Bianca Alina Sepeda. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 05/24/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 05/24/13.

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOTEL MARK TWAIN, 345 TAYLOR ST., SF, CA 94102. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed JBEAR Associates LLC (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 01/01/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/05/13.

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLACK HOUSE PROJECT, 501 OCTAVIA ST. #1, SF, CA 94102. This business is conducted by an individual, and is signed RICARDO REYES. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/17/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/17/13.

The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name known as: WEST PORTAL SHOE SERVICE, 79 WEST PORTAL AVE., SF, CA 94127-1303. This business was conducted by an individual and signed by GEORGE BARTSIOKAS. The fictitious name was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 10/22/12.

MAy 30, JUNE 6, 13, 20 2013

JUNE 13, 20, 27, JUly 04, 2013

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035188700 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SF SHOTCRETE, 318 WEST PORTAL AVE., SF, CA 94127. This business is conducted by a corporation and is signed BRADY CONSTRUCTION INC. (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on 06/01/13. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/18/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FIlE A-035181500 The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GREEN VIKING CONSULTING, 51 DOUGLASS ST., SF, CA 94114. This business is conducted by a limited liability company, and is signed GREEN VIKING CONSULTING LLC (CA). The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the above listed fictitious business name or names on NA. The statement was filed with the City and County of San Francisco, CA on 06/14/13.

JUNE 20, 27, JUly 4, 11, 2013

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT DISTRICT NOTICE TO PROPOSERS GENERAL INFORMATION The SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT DISTRICT, 300 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, California, is advertising for proposals on or about June 12, 2013for RFP 6M3230 Plaza Cleaning Services at various BART stations, walkways and/or covered parking in the West Bay locations, East Bay North locations and the East Bay South locations, with proposals due by 2:00 P.M. local time, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. DESCRIPTION OF WORK TO BE PERFORMED The District is soliciting the services of one or more firms (“CONTRACTOR(s)”) to provide Plaza Cleaning Services. The District presently intends to enter into no more than three, three-year Agreement(s) with a unilateral option to extend the Agreement(s) up to two additional one year periods. It is anticipated that the total amount awarded under this RFP shall not exceed Two Million, Three Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars ($2,350,000.00); however, there is no guaranteed minimum level of compensation as more particularly described in the RFP No. 6M3230.This is the maximum amount to be awarded regardless of the number of awards. A pre-Proposal meeting will be held on Wednesday, June 26, 2013at 10:00A.M.at 300 Lakeside Drive, LKS 17, Conference Room, 1715, Oakland, CA 94612. Prospective Proposers and subconsultants are urged to make every effort to attend this only-scheduled pre-Proposal meeting. Proposals must be received by 2:00 P.M.,local time, Tuesday, July 16, 2013 at the address listed in the RFP. Submission of a proposal shall constitute a firm offer to the District for One Hundred and Eighty (180) calendar days from date of proposal submission. WHERE TO OBTAIN OR SEE RFP DOCUMENTS (Available on or after June 12, 2013) Copies of the RFP may be obtained: A PDF version of the RFP will be sent to all firms on the Interested Parties List at time of advertisement; or, (1) By E-mail request to the District’s Contract Administrator, Gloria Abdullah-Lewis, at gabdull@bart.gov. (2) By arranging pickup at the above address. Call the District’s Contract Administrator at (510) 464-6547 prior to pickup of the RFP. (3) By attending the Pre-Proposal Meeting and obtaining the RFP at the meeting. Dated at Oakland, California this 12th day of June 2013. s/ Jacqueline R. Edwards for Kenneth A. Duron, District Secretary San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District 6/20/13 • CNS-2498120# BAY AREA REPORTER


Reynolds wrap

29

Fabulous events

Youth pass

26

Out &About

28

O&A

25

The

www.ebar.com/arts

Vol. 43 • No. 25 • June 20-26, 2013

Celebrating Harvey Milk by David-Elijah Nahmod

T

I Am Harvey Milk composer Andrew Lippa.

he San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus will perform composer Andrew Lippa’s I Am Harvey Milk on June 26, 27, and 28, at the Nourse Auditorium in San Francisco. Lippa and Broadway star Laura Benanti will join the chorus onstage to help tell the story of Harvey Milk’s life through song. Each night’s performance will begin at 8 p.m. Chorus conductor/ artistic director Dr. Timothy Seelig describes the show as part theater piece, part choral performance. “It’s a staged theater piece with video projection,” Seelig informed the B.A.R. “It’s been in the works for three years. When we asked Andrew to compose it, he was thrilled. His husband worked on Gus Van Sant’s Milk movie, and he’s a Tony-nominated Broadway composer.” The show will commemorate the 35th anniversary of Harvey Milk’s assassination at City Hall. Milk is now a community legend as the first openly gay man in U.S. history to hold an elective public office. “Today we’re horrified when someone is bullied for being gay,” said Seelig. “But Harvey was murdered for being gay. His death was a seminal turning point for us, like Stonewall.” Seelig reminds us that the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus was born out of the ashes of Milk’s death. That very night, an impromptu memorial service on the steps of City Hall led to a musical performance. The participants became the first members of the chorus. “As LGBT people, we have a lot of heroes in See page 22 >>

Courtesy SFGMC

Scene from director LeeSong Hee-il’s White Night.

World of gay cinema

Courtesy Frameline

by David Lamble

T

he 37th San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival puts a special emphasis on bold documentaries this year, while continuing to showcase a wide array of LGBT features and shorts. (June 2030 at the Castro, Roxie and Victoria Theatres in SF, with select encores at the Elmwood in Berkeley) White Night In 2006, director LeeSong Hee-il was hailed for shooting the first Korean gay feature No Regret, which climaxed at two freshly dug graves. In his latest, a young man, Won-gyu (Won Tae-hee), returns briefly to Korea as a German airline steward. His exile was prompted by a violent homophobic incident, which continues to haunt him. Won-gyu initiates a one-night-stand with

a sexy motorbike courier, Tae-jun (Lee YiKyung). The chemistry between the pair is electric – there are hints of an online tryst – but the bike boy bristles at his slightly older companion’s refusal to commit to more than a hotel quickie. In-between bouts of hot sex, the men argue about the possibilities for a dignified life in South Korea, where homosexuality is still thought of as shameful. The bike boy rejects money for sticking around until his companion’s plane leaves at dawn. The steward complains that the attack left him exposed and friendless. A sudden eruption of violence is especially shocking because we have been lulled into thinking that the boys are playing in a nocSee page 24 >>

Morris’ ‘Rite’ a minor masterpiece by Paul Parish

T

he world premiere of Mark Morris’ version of le Sacre du Printemps bearing the title Spring Spring Spring was a very big deal. Critics and dance-history scholars came from far and wide, as far away as London, and must have made up a large percentage of the audience, since the usual Berkeley dance venues were closed for retrofitting and the small Hertz Hall had to be pressed into service. Hertz is not a theater, it is “an acoustic concert hall primarily used by the Department of Music,” which fortunately does have a stage. It had to be specially rigged for dance, since though

Mark Morris Dance Group in Morris’ Spring Spring Spring at Ojai North.

it has fabulous acoustics has no sprung dance floor, and no grid for hanging lights. But the audience was very lucky – it was a wonderful event, the dance looked fabulous in there. Tickets were like those at the Kleiner Salzburger Festspielhaus: though they were very expensive, they could not be had. All of the audience were cognoscenti; the premiere must be understood as a coterie event. Spring Spring Spring begins in the dark. A synthesized version of Stravinsky’s famous bassoon melody fills the space: it is clearly the onslaught of a dawn chorus of birdsong, which

Peg Skorpinski

See page 30 >>

{ SECOND OF TWO SECTIONS }

Follow America’s oldest and best-read LGBT newspaper and the undisputed newspaper of record for the San Francisco Bay Area LGBT community at

/LGBTsf


<< Out There

22 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

Queer Andy by Roberto Friedman

I

s it surprising that the most influential American artist of the second half of the 20th century, legendary pop artist Andy Warhol, was gay? Non, not at all, when you stop to think about how gays find the links between high art and popular culture, and move back and forth between them. Just like Warhol did. But as well-known as are Andy’s contributions to Pop Art (Campbell’s Soup, anyone?), cinema (Joe Dallesandro in Flesh) and celebrity culture

(Studio 54, the 1980s portraits), his essentially gay sensibility often gets glossed over in the annals of arthistory. For all the cottage industry of Warhol scholarship, there’s not much consideration of his work and legacy in the context of queer studies. One big exception is the book Pop Out: Queer Warhol, edited by Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley and José Esteban Munoz, and published by Duke University Press in 1996. Essays by such noted queer scholars as Thomas Waugh and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick consider topics like Warhol’s “queer

childhood” and his “shyness,” and show how these traits are reflected in his work. We’re ruminating about the immortal Andy because global artauction powerhouse Christie’s is currently offering an online-only auction of original works by Warhol, For Members Only: Eyes on the Guise, through Thurs., June 27. The sale features over 200 photographs, prints and drawings that promise insights into Warhol’s intimate world. To us, the world looks like Big Gay Andy’s. The images illustrating this column are among those going on the cyber-auction block. Follow www.christies.com/warhol for access to the auction. “Andy Warhol was queer in more ways than one,” write the Pop Out editors in their introduction. “To begin with, he was a fabulous queen, a fan of prurience and pornography, and a great admirer of the male body. This queerness was ‘known,’ in one way or another, by the gay audiences who enjoyed his films, the police who censored them, the gallery owners who excluded his sketches of male nudes from exhibits, the artists who were made uncomfortable by his swishiness, not to mention the drag queens, hustlers, speed freaks, fag hags, and others who populated the Factory.” In his own book POPism, Warhol wrote, “During this period [1969], I took thousands of Polaroids of genitals. Whenever somebody came up to the Factory, no matter how straight-looking he was, I’d ask him

t

that in it “there is only absence. The bicycle and the Jeep are riderless. It is Warhol’s most melancholic painting in the depressing sense, registering a failure to mourn, an inability to appropriate some form of publicity that might comfort him.” This work isn’t part of the auction, but plenty of male pulchritude is.

U.S./China relations

© The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Self-Portrait in Drag (1981), unique Polaroid print by Andy Warhol, is Lot 23 at auction (estimate: $10,000-$15,000).

to take his pants off so I could photograph his cock and balls. It was surprising who’d let me and who wouldn’t.” Warhol left only one work dealing with AIDS (he died in 1987), and it appears unfinished. At any rate, it was never exhibited during his lifetime. AIDS/Jeep/Bicycle (c. 1985) is reproduced in Pop Out, along with essayist Jonathan Flatley’s analysis

Last Sunday night we watched a live stream of artists Laurie Anderson and Ai Weiwei performing Greetings to the Motherland, a collaboration described as a “hip-hop dialogue,” via Skype, performed live for the Luminato Festival in Toronto. “My idea was that he would do a rant about China, and I would do one about the United States, and we’ll trade lines,” Anderson told The New York Times. During the performance, Ai referred to his detention by the Chinese government for 81 days, and rapped, “Say something about China. Let’s talk about China.” Anderson replied, “Ah, America! Someplace they found on their way to China.” She also gave a shout-out: “Before we go on, I’d like to mention a couple of names. Julian Assange, and Bradley Manning, and Ed Snowden. Let’s hear it for the whistle-blowers! Yeah!” She welcomed her audience on the Internet. “Who knows how it became the new Dragnet? Your silence will be considered your consent.”t

© The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Querelle (1982), two unique Polaroid prints by Andy Warhol, is Lot 125 at auction (estimate: $5,000$7,000) during the online event For Members Only: Eyes on the Guise.

<<

Harvey Milk

From page 21

our lives,” said Seelig. “We have a few who stood out and did great things, even though they were ordinary people. They had the courage to do extraordinary things. Harvey Milk was a normal guy, just like most of us. He looked around and decided he could make a difference. He stepped out of his comfort zone and stood up for what he believed. He gave those of us who followed him the courage to do the same.”

The show will tell the story of Harvey’s life, from his boyhood until his death. “Every audience member should be able to walk out and say, ‘I am part of Harvey Milk.’ “It’s definitely a theater piece,” said Seelig. “It’s very theatrical. Lippa is extraordinary. When it ends, the audience will be elated beyond their expectations.”t Tickets: $25-$65. Info can be found at the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus website, www.sfgmc.org. Directions to the Nourse Auditorium: www.cityarts.net.

Courtesy SFGMC

San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus conductor/artistic director Dr. Timothy Seelig will lead the performance at Nourse Auditorium.


t

Music >>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 23

Seeing the light of Così by Jason Victor Serinus

A

re you in need of a joy fix? By all means, head to the War Memorial Opera House, where San Francisco Opera’s production of Mozart and Da Ponte’s great comic opera Così fan tutte is in the middle of its run. There you will encounter a near-ideal cast and superb chorus, conducted with supreme grace and wit by Music Director Nicola Luisotti, having a ball as they and the members of SFO’s sterling orchestra glide through this pastel-perfect revival of John Cox’s 2004 production. Although Luisotti’s ultra-smooth hand encourages playing and singing so lovely that, in the ensembles toward the end of Act I, the effect borders on the soporific, his attention to detail extends down to the raised pit and choice of period instruments to accompany recitative. Luisotti mandates theorbo and guitar (played by Michael Leopold) for the florid, baroque-style ornamentation of female leads Fiordiligi and Dorabella, harpsichord (from resident conductor Giuseppe Finzi) for 18th-century-style characters Despina and Don Alfonso, and fortepiano (Luisotti) for the more forward-looking Guglielmo and Ferrando. You may not notice such subtlety, especially in the large house, but you will take note of the

aptness of his tempos and the delight of his improvisations. Taking the cast in order of appearance, the fine-voiced bass Marco Vinco, whose Don Alfonso here becomes a croupier in a Mediterranean resort on the eve of WWI, immediately colors expectations with his devilish wit, vibrant characterization, and winning physicality. One of several characters benefitting from Jose Maria Condemi’s kinetic direction, his performance is a joy from start to finish. Tenor Francesco Demuro, as hapless lover Ferrando, may not be as

Cory Weaver/San Francisco Opera

Marco Vinco (Don Alfonso) and Susannah Biller (Despina) in San Francisco Opera’s production of Mozart and Da Ponte’s Così fan tutte.

Books >>

Rebel yell

by Jim Piechota

Rapture Practice by Aaron Hartzler; Little, Brown, $17.99; e-book $9.99 aron Hartzler grew up expecting the worst to happen. His family, stern evangelical Christians, held neighborhood Good News Bible Club meetings in their Kansas City living room and predicted that the “Master of the Universe” could descend upon them at any minute. After yelling “Blastoff!” they would all be unceremoniously swept up to heaven forever. It’s an unconventional childhood hilariously described in Rapture Practice, a memoir that should put Hartzler, a gay writer and actor, on the literary radar. He writes of being the oldest of four children, and a good son at that – carefully adhering to the rules stringently applied by his parents that he is to avoid movies, popular songs (“the music of rebellion”), television, and the dreaded sweetened breakfast cereal. This is not to say that his folks were tyrannical; when he asks if there will ever be a time when he might enjoy the forbidden fruit they’ve shrinkwrapped from him, they respond, “One day you’ll be all grown up, and you’ll have to decide what is right for you.” All of this taboo mumbo-jumbo is as right as rain until the author turns 16, a time when hormones begin

A

to simmer, hair sprouts in curious places, youthful eyes see things for what they really are, and, well, there’s this tingling which, according to his father, can only mean one thing: “Satan will begin to shoot his fiery darts of sexual temptation your way.” Hartzler ignores these pious warnings and leaps headfirst into the land of free-abandon by way of sneaking into movies his parents would never approve of, listening to the radio, allowing his sexual attraction to flow freely, and having a drink or 20. This, of course, spells disaster at Christian central (home and school), but the author has other plans for himself and

mobile as either Vinco or his partner in backfiring misogyny, bassbaritone Philippe Sly, but he sings wonderfully. In the best of all possible Mozartian worlds, his beautiful, clear tone would be even more honeyed. Nonetheless, when in his heaven-sent aria “Un’aura amorosa” (“An amorous breath”) he tapers to sweet, soft voice as he moves closer to the audience as if whispering the most fragile of love’s intimacies, only a curmudgeon could complain. Sly seems tailor-made for Guglielmo. Putting his handsome, youthful physicality at the service of an exceptionally rich midrange, his vocally seductive powers are reminiscent of Nathan Gunn’s. To sing with so much beauty, and move with such ease, are major accomplishments for a still-growing singer who is but 24. Soprano Ellie Dehn, now in her early 30s, fulfills her promise, giving the finest of her three Mozart performances to date with SFO. The extreme smoothness of her beautiful voice, which betrays no hard edge, and the grace of her bearing seem ideal for Robert Perdziola’s production designs and period-inspired costumes. In her two memorable arias, she may lack the strong low notes for an ideal “Come scoglio” (“Like a rock”), and sing a marginally too slow cabaletta in in “Per pieta” (“Have pity”), but her vocalhis future, including a new attraction to other boys, which he is more than willing to investigate. Embracing oneself at such a young age is something a great many gays and lesbians must do; it’s a delicate flower that can take minutes or years to fully bloom. Hartzler exposes the roots of his childhood with great honesty, and though he incorporates the details with a heaping helping of

Cory Weaver/San Francisco Opera

Christel Lötzsch (Dorabella) and Philippe Sly (Guglielmo) in San Francisco Opera’s production of Mozart and Da Ponte’s Così fan tutte.

ism is immaculate. The smoothness with which Dehn voices her line in the God-given first act trio “Soave si il vento” (“May the wind be gentle”) honors its sublime essence as only one other Mozartian of recent memory, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, could in the first part of her career. In her U.S. operatic debut, mezzo-soprano Christel Lötzsch looked so fabulous in both full dress and undergarments, and blended so well with Dehn, that it was possible to overlook the occasional shrillness that intruded higher in her range. Additional compensation came in the form of well-placed top notes and a welcome ease onstage. This leads to soprano Susannah

Biller’s delightful Despina. Replacing an indisposed Heidi Stober, who was originally scheduled to sing most of the run, Biller infuses every character who comes her way with such physical freshness that it is tempting to overlook that the role’s tessitura, which ideally suited mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade in 2004, resides below the sweetest part of her range. When Biller and Vinco go at it together, the joy of their partnership promises that the world will be a better place. Even if the world takes its sweetass time to get there, you will certainly be in a better place for attending this Così. It’s a joy from first note to last.t

humor, readers will recognize that the ride was never an easy one for him. Currently sharing his life with boyfriend Nathan, dividing his time between Los Angeles and Palm Springs, Hartzler is one of the fortunate men who have lived through a childhood governed by the rigidity of staunch religious edicts to come away from it with a true sense of himself and an ability to love whomever he chooses.

At the memoir’s conclusion, he also extends that love (and a great amount of respect) to his parents, reflecting, “Whether we ever agree or not, we will always stand up to defend the things we believe, our truths – even if those truths are hard, even when those beliefs create more questions than answers. This is the man Dad raised me to be.” Amen, sister.t


<< Film

24 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

<<

Frameline

From page 21

turnal ghost town, a sleeping city. Is there a future for homo love in a land still at war on so many levels? (Castro, 6/20; Victoria, 6/28) Concussion As Abby (Robin Weigert), a wealthy lesbian housewife, rides home with her wife and kids in the family bus, she’s just been struck in the head at her son’s Little League game. The blow becomes a catalyst for a series of huge life changes. Writer/director Stacy Passon explained what drove her to finish her first feature script in six weeks in a Sundance web chat. “She tells her wife, ‘I’ve had it, I’m going back to work.’ Her version of that is to actively source sex. We need to show her at her most vulnerable, when she was filled with rage and jealousy, because some people can have it all, and she couldn’t. If you’ve been sexually abandoned in your life and your marriage, how do you find intimacy again?” (Castro, 6/20) C.O.G. In director Kyle Patrick Alvarez’s funny adaptation of a David Sedaris essay, a book-smart white boy hatches a plan to spend a summer picking apples alongside a young lady he imagines to be his girlfriend. Samuel makes his first mistake when the girl stands him up on the ride to Oregon. Sedaris fans will relish the opening mon-

tage as Samuel is assaulted by a full array of Greyhound bus denizens, from the trash-talking, pregnant black woman to the tattooed Jesus freak just out of prison. Freshly out gay actor Jonathan Groff is adept at channeling a prideful sissy-boy on the verge of hilarious pratfalls with two middle-aged Mr. Wrongs: a dildocollecting apple-plant supervisor, and a Bible-thumping vet, an Oscar-worthy turn from openly gay actor Denis O’Hare. Alvarez nails the novelist’s eye lurking under the Sedaris wit. “The story took confusion about homosexuality and mixed it with a religious confusion. It was funny, kind of dirty, and felt really cinematic.” (Castro, 6/22) Pit Stop As he did with his Dallas-based first feature Ciao, Malaysian-born Yen Tan has made the Hill Country towns around Austin (Bastrop, Dripping Springs, Lockhart) feel like the center of a universe where queer love can flower but it’s never easy-going. This is not Red State America but a sophisticated exurbia where a first date might play out at a Frenchlanguage movie, even if the date is too pooped to read subtitles. Hunky, divorced construction contractor Gabe (Bill Heck) and forklift operator Ernesto (Marcus DeAnda), just losing his young male lover, bump into each other way short of cute. Do they have

Scene from director Stacy Passon’s Concussion: How do you find intimacy again?

t

Courtesy Frameline

Courtesy Frameline

Scene from director Kyle Patrick Alvarez’s C.O.G.: a prideful sissy-boy is on the verge of pratfalls.

a future? With deliberate pacing and character insights, Tan seems settled in to watch the Lone Star state turn ever-so-slightly purple. (Castro, 6/21; Elmwood, 6/27) Interior. Leather Bar. In 1979, director William Friedkin sought an exotic backdrop for his script about a serial killer stalking gay men in New York. Tapping his mob contacts, Friedkin got permission to scout the legendary Mineshaft leather bar, accompa-

nied by a retired NYC police detective. “Wally escorted us to an area where we had to strip down to our jockstraps, shoes and socks. Uncle Mort had a .38 strapped to his right ankle. Everyone was in a jockstrap, some with leather boots and vests, executioner masks or leather jackets. Men of all races, colors, and social status mingled as equals.” Even critics of Cruising have cited its vivid record of gay nightlife in the decade before AIDS. In 2012, James Franco and Travis Mathews corralled a gaggle of actors of various persuasions to recreate sex scenes believed cut from Cruising. Following a graphic four minutes of this new footage, Franco raps with Val, the young straight actor he’s cast to play Al Pacino’s undercover cop. “What about leaving something to the imagination?” “It’s not porn for titillation. We’re telling a story.” “What story are we telling?” “About a guy who’s uncomfortable and goes undercover. Friedkin was going to a dark, evil place.” Preceded by In Their Room: London, the 2009 episode of Mathews chatting bedside with gay men as they do their out-onthe-town rituals. (Castro, 6/23) Valentine Road Marta Cunningham follows the story behind the 2008 classroom shooting death of California queer teen Larry King by classmate Brandon McInerney. “Brandon was 14 years old when he committed the crime, he was looking at 53 years to life without chance of parole, and I thought, ‘That’s not right, either.’ It’s not right to kill somebody in the middle of English class, but is it right for him to be tried as an adult?” (Castro, 6/26) But I’m a Cheerleader In her 1999 feature debut, Jamie Babbit attempted to turn camp on its head and produce a message comedy using a veteran of John Waters’ early “exercises in poor taste,” Mink Stole; a 70s cult actor, Bud Cort (Harold and Maude); and a wigless RuPaul Charles. Under its candy-colored surface, Cheerleader is an angry comedy. Preceded by the 1999 short Sleeping Beauties, as part of the Frameline Award tribute to Babbit. (Castro, 6/21) Gore Vidal: The United States of Amnesia In 1948, 23-year-

old Gore Vidal’s notorious gay novel The City and the Pillar becomes both a bestseller and the cause for his expulsion from the literary pantheon by the homophobic New York Times. This setback pushes Vidal off to Hollywood, where he follows William Faulkner’s advice and writes for money. Unable to merely be a paid hack, Vidal laces his BenHur script with a queer subplot. Director Nicholas Wrathall provides an incisive, witty montage of Vidal debunking the myths of Pax American. JFK: “One of the most charming men I’ve ever known, one of the most intelligent, and one of the most disastrous presidents we’ve ever had.” Vidal, as the queer intellectual scold, inspires revealing vitriol from bully-boys William F. Buckley and Norman Mailer. (Castro, 6/26) Paul Bowles: The Cage Door is Always Open Director Daniel Young details how Bowles’ novel The Sheltering Sky afforded him a comfortable life in Morocco while inspiring the Beats. Vidal has a sublime cameo, stroking a cat. (Castro, 6/24) I Am Gay and Muslim Chris Belloni explores the tiny, precarious space available to gay Muslim Moroccans. (Roxie, 6/21) In the Name of “Father, how did you get to a shithole like this?” As the ruggedly handsome Father Adam (Andrzej Chyra) is asked this leading question by a parishioner, we grasp the soul-crushing realities confronting religious men who have taken vows of celibacy they can’t possibly keep. Running a kind of Boys Town for hard cases, Father Adam must decide what he wants from attractive reform-school lads. Director Malgowska Szumowska delivers a fresh take on the Catholic Church pedophile scandal. (Castro, 6/25) Valencia This ambitious, homegrown Bay Area feature benefits and suffers from its 18-segment/ multiple casts-and-director format. Ultimately we forgive its artsy sins due to its pure punk heart. (Castro, 6/21; Elmwood, 6/27) Camp Beaverton: Meet the Beavers Ana Grillo & Beth Nelsen do a Burning Man version of The Fear of Flying, as women on every spot of the LBT continuum find See page 25 >>


t

Books >>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 25

Staying afloat by Tavo Amador

D

ebbie Reynolds (b. 1932) has had one of the longest, most fascinating careers in show business. The 1948 Miss Burbank signed a contract with Warner Bros., made her barely noticeable debut that year, quickly moved to MGM, and over the strenuous objections of Gene Kelly, became his leading lady in the unforgettable Singin’ in the Rain (1952). She starred in a series of popular, forgettable musicals, often displaying a flair for comedy, did well in a drama opposite Bette Davis, The Catered Affair (1956), then was part of one of the great classic Hollywood scandals when her husband, singer Eddie Fisher, left her for the recently widowed Elizabeth Taylor in 1959. (Carrie Fisher is her daughter.) She was a Top 10 box office draw in 1959 and 1960, had a best-selling record, and scored as The Unsinkable Molly Brown (1964). After her screen career faded, she triumphed on Broadway as Irene (1974), developed a successful nightclub act, essayed memorable supporting roles in movies (Mother, 1996; In and Out, 1997), found a new generation of admirers on television as Debra Messing’s hilarious mother in the long-running series Will and Grace, and most recently portrayed Liberace’s mother in Behind the Candelabra. Her lively new memoir Unsinkable, written with Dorian Hannaway (Morrow, $28.99), is often laugh-out-loud funny, and offers candid reflections on the people she has known. She’s brutally honest about how her second and third husbands cheated her of millions of dollars, how she desperately sought to house her spectacular collection of classic Hollywood costumes and memorabilia in a museum, and how, battling bankruptcy, she auctioned them for fantastic sums, giving her the financial security she had earned and lost. With typical wit she writes, “Hell, my first husband left me for Elizabeth Taylor. At least that made sense.” (She and Taylor reconciled and, many years later, appeared together in Carrie Fisher’s 2001 television movie These Old Broads, which satirized the scandal. In her will, Taylor

left Reynolds a suite of sapphire and diamond jewelry.) Second husband Harry Karl came from a wealthy family. She was unaware that he gambled and brought hookers, supposedly manicurists, into their home. By the time she learned what was going on, he had gone through all his money and hers. Third husband Richard Hamlett claimed to be a real estate tycoon. Before their marriage, Reynolds, who jokes about being considered frigid, tells a hilarious story about visiting a professional prostitute to get some pointers. She was shown sex toys that she didn’t know existed and was unsure how to employ. Using her money, she bought a hotel and casino in Nevada, where she hoped to house her memorabilia and appear as a performer. She let Hamlett manage the details, to her regret. His incompetence and greed forced her into bankruptcy. He also had a long-term mistress. The divorce was messy and expensive, but she ultimately recovered both financially and emotionally. She writes sympathetically and proudly of daughter Carrie’s battles with depression, successes in films (Star Wars) and as an author, including the funny, autobiographical Postcards from the Edge, filmed in 1990 with Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine brilliant as daughter and mother. She’s equally proud of son Todd Fisher, who did his best to salvage her hotel/casino investment. Her anecdotes about co-stars and directors are vivid. Director Richard Brooks, for example, humiliated her during filming of The Catered Affair, at one point slapping her. Stagehands avenged her by “accidentally” letting a piece of equipment roll over his foot, breaking it. She and Bob Fosse danced together in 1953’s Give a Girl a Break. The film was directed by Stanley Donen, who, Reynolds writes, “was smitten” with Fosse to the point of cutting her out of their scenes together. She complained, and the scenes were re-shot, but Fosse was

furious. “During rehearsals, Bobby, who was so in love with his own well-endowed self, would come up behind me and press his ‘gift’ into my backside to tease me. It was obvious he wasn’t wearing a dance belt; I could feel everything he wanted to share.” Determined to stop it, she presented him with an “extra-large” jockstrap. He got the message. She adored Tony Randall, and while filming The Mating Game (1959), went to see him in his dressing room. He was naked. “I was momentarily taken aback by the size of Tony’s equipment.” Nonetheless, she denies being obsessed with penises. (Eddie Fisher was also reportedly very well-endowed.) She says it’s a Hollywood preoccupation. “In my day, Milton Berle was said to be the biggest. When challenged in a contest, Milton supposedly would take out just enough to win. Personally, I didn’t care how large it was. ‘Big Miltie’ was still attached to ‘Uncle Miltie.’” Several years ago, Reynolds made a memorable appearance at the Castro Theatre under the auspices of Marc Huestis. “I’ve never been in a theatre where so many men loved me. You may not want me, but you love me,” she cooed to the enthusiastic, largely gay male audience. Her resiliency is astonishing. She loves performing, and if she has her way, many years from now she will die after shooting her final movie scenes or after taking her last bow on stage as audiences cheer.t

Courtesy Frameline

Scene from directors James Franco and Travis Mathews’ Interior. Leather Bar.

<<

Frameline

From page 24

a safe space for fun. Would Erica Jong applaud the Beavers’ Strapon-a-thon? (Roxie, 6/23) Alaska is a Drag “As the late Bruce Lee used to say, ‘Fear not the man who’s practiced 10,000 kicks, fear the man who’s practiced one kick 10,000

times.’” Shaz Bennett’s African American cannery worker is trapped between dreams of disco balls and a fist in the face. The novel premise and incendiary screen chemistry between Martin L. Washington Jr. and his white-boy “savior” Spencer Broschard suggest a feature in embryo. (Fun in Boy Shorts, Castro, 6/22, 30; Fire We Make, Victoria, 6/23)t

On the web This week, find Tim Pfaff ’s music review, “Another Norma casualty,” and Victoria A. Brownworth’s Lavender Tube column, “Summertime sizzles on the tube,” online at www. ebar.com.


<< Out&About

26 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

Queer & present by Jim Provenzano

W

e’re here, we’re queer, we’re buying tickets! The avalanche of LGBTQI-etc. films, shows, panels, readings, exhibits and artistic presentations continues. With no space for any more chatter, let’s get to it, with plenty more listings in our expanded online version.

Faetopia, Fri 21

Thu 20

Valencia Events @ Various Venues

99% Gay Comedy Festival @ Esta Noche

Series of panels and events related to the themes and artists of the film adaptation of lesbian author Michelle Tea’s San Francisco-set novel Valencia. June 20: What Were the Queer ‘90s?, speakers include participating group filmmakers in conversation with author Tea. Free/$5. 7pm. GLBT History Museum, 4127 18th St. www.glbthistory.org June 22: film screening after-party with a live set by queercore band The Need at the Elbo Room. $15, 9pm, 647 Valencia St. June 24: panel discussion with more of the filmmakers, GLBT History Museum. June 25: other works by the various filmmakers are screened; $10, 7pm, Viracocha, 998 Valencia St. www.radarproductions.org

Comedy Bodega celebrates Pride month with a new weekly series of stand-up acts. This week: Justin Lucas, Karinda Dobbins, Ronn Vigh, Faith Choyce,Yuri Kagan, Marga Gomez and Jose Castillo.8pm9:30pm. 3079 16th St. at Mission. www.comedybodega.com

Alysia Abbott @ SF Public Library Author of Fairyland: A Memoir of my Father reads and discusses her life with a gay dad in 1970s-80s San Francisco. 6:30pm. Hormel Center, 3rd floor, 100 Larkin St. www.sfpl.org

Barbara Cook @ Feinstein’s at the Nikko

Krispy Kritters in the Scarlett Night @ Exit Theatre

The Broadway veteran performs classic pop and show standards. $90-$115 ($30 drink/ menu credit). 8pm. Nightly thru June 23 (Sat & Sun 7pm, also Sat 10:30). Hotel Nikko, 222 Mason St. 394-1111. www.hotelnikkosf.com

Cutting Ball Theater’s production of Andrew Saito’s poetic Beat-like family saga, full of eccentric characters. $10-$50. Thu 7:30. Fri & Sat 8pm. Sat 2pm, Sun 5pm. Extended thru June 23. Exit on Taylor, 277 Taylor St. 525-1205. www.cuttingball.com

Drunk Enough to Say I Love You? @ The Costume Shop

Tinsel Tarts in a Hot Coma @ The Hypnodrome

Politics and sex go together in Theatre Rhinoceros’ production of Caryl Churchill’s provocative play about gay men obsessed and in love. Also, two short one-acts, Seven Jewish Children (by Churchill) and Seven Palestinian Children (by Deborah S. Margolin). $15-$30. Wed-Sat 8pm. Sun 3pm. Extended thru June 23. 1117 Market St. (800) 838-3006. www.therhino.org

Thrillpeddlers performs Scrumbly Koldewyn and Pam Tent’s new, full-length restored version of The Cockettes’ 1971 wacky drag musical comedy on the 42nd anniversary of the original production. $30-$35. Thu-Sat 8pm. Extended thru July 27. 575 10th St. at Bryant. (800) 838-3006. www.thrillpeddlers.com

Frameline 37 @ Castro Theatre Opening night of the LGBT International Film festival; screening of Stacie Passon’s Concussion. 429 Castro St. Daily screenings at several theatres. Fest thru June 30; closing night party at Temple. www.frameline.org

The Gospel of Mary Magdelene @ War Memorial Opera House Sasha Cooke and Nathan Gunn star in San Francisco Opera’s world premiere production of Mark Adamo’s new opera about Jesus’ close companion, and his alleged only female disciple. $22-$340. Seven performances thru July 7. English w/ English supertitles. 301 Van Ness Ave. 864-3330. www.SFOpera.com

Mark Abramson @ Books Inc The author of the popular San Franciscoset gay ‘Beach Reading’ series reads from and discusses the seventh book in his series, Love Rules. 7:30pm. 2275 Market St. 864-6777. www.booksinc.net

War on Whistleblowers @ Berkeley Unitarian Hall Documentary about four whistle-blowers of government corruption or cimes, and how they were maligned, attacked, and jailed, mostly under the Obama administration. $5-$10. 7pm. 1924 Cedar St. at Bonita, Berkeley. (510) 275-4272. www. waronwhistleblowers.com www.bfuu.org

Fri 21 Abigail’s Party @ SF Playhouse Mike Leigh’s biting comedy pokes fun at straight suburban Brits in the ‘70s disco era, where a cocktail party goes overboard. $30-$100. Tue-Thu 7pm. Fri & Sat 8pm. Also Sat 3pm. Thru July 6. 450 Post St. 2nd. floor of Kensington Park Hotel. 677-9596. www.sfplayhouse.org

Valencia and related events. Thu 20

410 [GONE] @ Thick House Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s fantastical drama about a pair of siblings’ trip to a fairy-ruled underworld. $10-$35. Wed-Sat 8pm. Thru June 29. 1695 18th st. at Arkansas. 7469238. www.crowdedfire.org

Amara Tabor-Smith @ Mission Locations The dancer-choreographer performs He Moved Swiftly But Gently Down the Not Too Crowded Street: Ed Mock and Other True Tales in a City That Once Was..., a site-specific multiple-location dance tribute to gay dancer-teacher-choreographer Ed Mock, who died of AIDS. Free, and viewers can watch any or all of the works in Mission cafes and theatres. June 21, 22 & 23, from 3:30-8:30pm. www.dancersgroup.org

Beach Blanket Babylon @ Club Fugazi Musical comedy revue, now in its 35th year, with an ever-changing lineup of political and pop culture icons, all in gigantic wigs. Reg: $25-$130. Wed, Thu, Fri at 8pm. Sat 6:30, 9:30pm. Sun 2pm, 5pm. (Beer/wine served; cash only). 678 Beach Blanket Babylon Blvd (Green St.). 4214222. www.beachblanketbabylon.com

By & By @ Ashby Stage, Berkeley Shotgun Players’ production of Lauren Gunderson’s scifi thriller drama about an eccentric professor of cloning who puts his skills to use after a family tragedy. $20-$30. Wed & Thu7pm. Fri & Sat 8pm. Sun 5pm. Thru June 23. 1901 Ashby Ave., Berkeley. (510) 841-6500. www.shotgunplayers.org

Cosi Fan Tutte @ War Memorial Opera House San Francisco Opera’s production of Mozart’s farcical drama, reset in a 1900s Mediterranean resort; in Italian with English subtitles. $22-$340. June 18, 8pm. June 21 8pm. June 26 7:30pm. June 29, 8pm. July 1, 7:30pm. 301 Van Ness Ave. 864-3330. www.sfopera.com

Darling @ CCM Theatre American Conservatory Theatre’s student production of a new jazz-age-themed musical by Brett Ryback and Ryan Scott Oliver, a take on the Peter Pan tale, about a desperate 1929 couple who become involved in crime and the speakeasy underworld of booze and drugs. $20. Fri & Sat 7:30pm. Sun 2pm. Thru June 29. Theater at the Children’s Creativity Museum, 221 4th St. 749-2228. www.act-sf.org

Dear Elizabeth @ Berkeley Repertory Sarah Ruhl and Les Waters’ new play based on the letters between 20th-century poets Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell. $29-$72. Tue, Thu-Sat 8pm. Wed & Sun 7pm. Sat & Sun 2pm. Thru July 7. Roda Theatre, 2015 Addison St., Berkeley. (510) 647-2949. www.BerkeleyRep.org

The Divine Sister @ New Conservatory Theatre Charles Busch’s musical comedy parody of every Hollywood nun movie gets a local production, with drag-music stars Joe Wicht (Trauma Flintstone), J. Conrad Frank (Katya Smirnoff-Skky), David Bicha ( Christmas With the Crawfords) and other talents. $25-$45. Wed-Sat 8pm Sun 2pm. Thru June 29. 25 Van Ness Ave., lower level. 861-8972. www.nctcsf.org

Ethnic Dance Festival @ Various Venues Third weekend of the large annual monthlong festival of local and international dance companies. Free/$18-$58. Sat & Sun at Lam Research Theater, YBCA700 Howard St. Thru June 30. www.sfethnicdancefestival.org

Faetopia @ Former Tower Records The vacant storefront gets another fey-boy makeover, with a wealth of queer performances, live music, sex playshops, visual art and dayglo spectacle. Thru June 28. 2286 Market St. www.faetopia.com

Kylie @ Yoshi’s, Oakland Japanese vocal pop star performs with her band. $17. 10pm. 510 Embarcadero West. (510) 238-9200. www.yoshis.com

Love, Humiliation & Karaoke @ The Garage Enzo Lombard’s solo show about finding and losing gay love in embarrassing ways. $15. 8pm. Also June 22. 715 Bryant St. at 5th. www.enzolombard.com

MOTHA @ YBCA The pop-up Museum of Transgender Hirstory and Art’s opening party (6pm9pm) is followed by an artist salon with Chris Vargas, June 22, 5pm; a trans-in-film screening and panel discussion with Patricia Maloney June 23, 4pm. 401 Mission St. www.ybca.org/motha

Pansy @ New Conservatory Theatre Evan Johnson’s solo play about a gay teen who discovers the archive of a 1990s San Francisco club kid, and is transported back in time. (Special post-show discussions with SF 90s icons June 21, 22, 28.) $25$45. Fri & Sat 8pm. Thru June 29. 25 Van Ness Ave, lower level. 861-8972. www.nctcsf.org

Sat 22 AXIS Dance Fitness Fair @ Ed Roberts Campus Day-long workshop, dance, yoga, tai chi classes and a performance for disabled and able-bodied people; no experience needed. 10am-3pm 3075 Adline St., Berkeley. (510) 847-0842. www.axisdance.org www.getfitfair.eventbrite.com

Chris Mann @ Yoshi’s Pop singer and competitor on The Voice performs music from his two CDs. $33-$51. 8pm. 1330 Fillmore St. 655-5600. www.yoshis.com

Dark Play, or Stories For Boys @ Exit Theatre Do It Live’s production of Carlos Murillo’s romantic thriller with unusual twists. $15. Fri & Sat 8pm. Thru July 13. 156 Eddy St. at Mason. www.doitliveproductions.com

Drag Queen Storytime @ Books Inc. Muthachucka leads the new Kid Pride event, with a campy reading of her favorite stories; for ages 3-7. 11am. 2275 Market St. 864-6777. www.booksinc.net

East Bay AIDS Walk @ Lake Merritt, Oakland 6th annual fundraiser walk-athon for East Bay AIDS/HIV charities. 10am. Lake Merritt www.EastBayAIDSWalk.org

Fiction @ Modern Eden Gallery Opening reception for a group invitational exhibit of fascinating portraits of fictional characters. 6pm-10pm. Reg. hours Tue Sat 10am-6pm. Thru July 13. 403 Francisco St. 956-3303. www.ModernEden.com

t

Rachel Yamagata, Sanders Bohlke @ Great American Music Hall Folksy singer-guitarist (Yamagata) and the haunting vocalist with a dark rock edge (Bohlke) perform live. $23. (dinner sold out). 9pm. 859 O’Farrell St. 885-0750. www.slimspresents.com

SF Hiking Club @ Black Mountain Join GLBT hikers for a 9-mile hike starting at Black Mountain that crosses Los Trancos, Monte Bello, and Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserves. Carpool meets 9:00 at Safeway sign, Market & Dolores. 7409888. www.sfhiking.com

Sylvia @ Fort Mason A.R. Gurney’s family comedy, with a dog played by a human, gets a local run in a few different venues; produced by Independent Cabaret Productions. $20-$45. Thu-Sat 8pm. Sun 7pm. Thru June 30. Bldg C, Room 3900, 3rd floor. Buchanan at Bay streets. 272-7992. www.cabaretsf.wordpress.com

This Is How It Goes @ Aurora Theatre, Berkeley Aurora Theatre Company’s production of Neil LaBute’s edgy comic drama about race, love, and emotional manipulation. $35-$50. Wed-Sat 8pm. Sun 2pm & 7pm. 2081 Addison St., Berkeley. (510) 8434822. www.auroratheatre.org

Tomboy @ SF Public Library Screening of Celine Sciamma’s film about a young girl who passes as a boy. Free. 2pm. Eureka Valley branch, 16th St. at Pond. www.sfpl.org

Topsy Turvy @ Brava Theatre Queer circus show with aerialists, jugglers, comics and clowns. $12-$20. 2pm & 8pm. 2789 24th St. at York. www.brava.org topsyturvyqueercircus.tumblr.com

Sun 23 Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg @ Contemp. Jewish Museum

Subtitled The Evolution of Family Affirming Children’s Literature, exhibit curator Randall Tarpey-Schwed shares his unique collection of children’s books that portray gay or lesbian parents. Thru Aug. 1. Hormel Center, 3rd floor, 100 Larkin St. 557-4400. www.sfpl.org

Enjoy the new exhibit of vintage prints taken by the gay Beat poet of his friends Jack Kerouac and others. Special performance event June 23: Snapshot Poetics Now: Queer Encounters with Allen Ginsberg, readings by Jewelle Gomez, Richard Meyer, Tirza Latimer, Justin Chin, Jaime Cortez, and DL Alvarez. 2pm-5pm. Free (members)-$12. Thu-Tue 11am-5pm (Thu 1pm-8pm) 736 Mission St. 655-7800. www.thecjm.org

George Gershwin Alone @ Berkeley Repertory Theatre

BGLT Pride Arts @ SF Public Library

From Heather’s Mommies to Tango’s Daddies @ SF Public Library

Hershey Felder’s solo show and stage biography tells the composer’s life story and plays classic songs in this acclaimed theatrical tribute. $29-$77. Tue, Thu-Sat 8pm. Wed & Sun7pm. Sat & Sun 2pm. Extended thru July 7. Thrust Stage, 2025 Addison St. (510) 647-2917. www.BerkeleyRep.org

Hedwig and the Angry Inch @ Boxcar Theatre The hit local production of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s popular transgender rock operetta features multiple actor-singers performing the lead, including Katya Smirnoff-Skyy, Jason Brock, Arturo Galster and Trixxie Carr. $25-$40. Wed-Sat 8pm. Also Sat 5pm. Extended with open-ended run. 505 Natoma St. 9672227. www.boxcartheatre.org

An afternoon of LGBT Black artists sharing books, films, poems, stories and community. 2pm. Main Library, lower level Latino/ Hispanic Meeting Room. 100 Larkin St. 557-4400. www.sfpl.org

Disco Daddy @ SF Eagle DJ Bus Station John’s Pride-centric T-dance, with a deliciously retro post-Stonewall mix of groovy tunes. $5. 7pm-12am. 398 12th St. at Harrison. www.sfeagle.com

Into the Woods @ Eureka Theatre Ray of Light Theatre’s new production of the whimsical dramatic fairy tale-gonewrong musical by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine. $15-$36. Wed-Sat 8pm. Sun 2pm. Thru June 29. 215 Jackson St. at Battery. 788-7469. rayoflighttheatre.com

Lesbian/Gay Chorus of San Francisco @ SF Conservatory of Music Ripped From the Headlines: Music Celebrating LGBT Stories is the theme of the chorus’ 35th annual concert, with the San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band, countertenor William Sauerland, the Oakland East Bay Gay Men’s Chorus’ OnQ, SF Gay Men’s Chorus ensemble Vocal Minority, and the MCC church choir. $20-$30. 6pm & 9pm. 50 Oak St. www.annualprideconcert.com

Nightmare on Elm Street 2 @ Castro Theatre Peaches Christ presents a special screening of one of the gayest horror movies ever made, including the movie, a costume contest, and a Q&A with star Mark Patton. 429 Castro st. www.peacheschrist.com

Karinda Dobbins at Hella Gay Comedy, Sun 23

Hella Gay Comedy @ Club OMG The SF Gay Pride Comedy Show, hosted by Yuri Kagan, features Ariel Smith, Carrie Avritt, Rich Hutchison, Kevin Shaller, Karinda Dobbins, Sharon Birzer, Zack Pedersen, Morgan, Rachel Gill and Tammy Powers. $10. 21+. 8pm. 43 6th St. at Market. 3719705. www.charlieballard.com


t

Out&About >>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 27

San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus’ I Am Harvey Milk, Wed 26

Pride Gospel Brunch @ St. Aiden’s Episcopal Church Concert, silent auction, and brunch (catered, and with mimosas!) at the LGBT-friendly church, with members of the Ducal Court, and host Bebe Sweetbriar. Big church hats encouraged. $35-$50. 12pm3pm. 101 Gold Mine Drive. 285-9540. www.SaintAiden.org

Wine Tours @ Sonoma Wineries Fundraiser for Sonoma’s Food For Thought welcomes up to 30 guests on a four-winery tour, with lots of wine, a limo bus, lounge on wheels, and scenic winery tours. $125. 10am-4pm. 6550 Railroad Ave., Forestville. (707) 226-3333. www.fftfoodbank.org

Sunday’s a Drag @ Starlight Room Donna Sachet hosts the weekly fabulous brunch and drag show. $45. 11am, show at noon; 1:30pm, show at 2:30pm. 450 Powell St. in Union Square. 395-8595. www.harrydenton.com

Mon 24 California Native Plant Bloom @ SF Botanical Gardens

Funny Tuesdays @ Harvey’s Ronn Vigh hosts the weekly LGBT and gayfriendly comedy night. One drink or menu item minimum. 9pm. 500 Castro St. at 18th. 431-HARV. www.harveyssf.com

Steve Tyrell @ Feinstein’s at the Nikko Ace singer and music producer performs original and classic pop hits. $70-$95 ($30 drink/menu credit). 8pm. Thru June 29 (Sat 7pm & 10:30). Hotel Nikko, 222 Mason St. 394-1111. www.hotelnikkosf.com Exhibit of arresting black and white street portraits by the photographer are exhibited at the design firms’ offices. Thru June 29. 2 Harrison St., #400. 433-3700. travisjensenphoto.com www.gensler.com

Veronica Klaus @ Martuni’s The local chanteuse’s new weekly concerts, thru June, feature new and classic music. $15. 7pm. 4 Valencia St. www.facebook.com/veronica.klaus

Wed 26 Butterflies & Blooms @ Conservatory of Flowers

Seasonal flowering of hundreds of species of native wildflowers in a century-old grove of towering Coast Redwoods. Free$15. Daily. Golden Gate Park. 6612-1316. www.SFBotanicalGarden.org

Monday Musicals @ The Edge

Dita Von Teese’ Burlesque @ The Fillmore

The renovated bar now shows fun musicals each week, with Broadway touring performers occasionally stopping by to sing, too. 7pm-2am. 2 for 1 cocktail, 5pmclosing. 18th St. at Collingwood. www.edgesf.com

The saucy celeb hosts a night of ribald vaudeville and variety acts. $40. 18+. 8pm. Also June 27, 28, 29. 1805 Geary Blvd. www.TheFillmore.com

Sing-along night with talented locals, and charming accompanist Joe Wicht (aka Trauma Flintstone). 9pm-1:30am. 4 Valencia St. at Market.

Xavier Castellanos @ 456 Montgomery Gay artist’s exhibit of colorful landscape, on exhibit by appointment. Thru June 30. 456 Montgomery St. www.xavierart.com

Tue 25 The Biggest Quake @ Magnet Second annual series of readings and performance artists, activists and educators about the history of the AIDS epidemic in San Francisco; hosted by Kirk Read. 8pm, 4122 18th St. Also June 27, 8:30pm at Subterranean Art House, 2179 Bancroft Way, Berkeley. www.facebook.com/ events/135293953342574/

Tom Orr @ The Garage Cowboys & Angels: The George Michael Songbook is performed by the local comic singer-actor ( Dirty Little Showtunes), accompanied by The Tom Shaw Trio. $25. 8pm. Also July 2 & 3 at 7pm & 9:30pm. 715 Bryant St. 518-1517. www.715bryant.org

Folsom Street Events presents a Pride dance event and electro music show with Slow Knights (Derek Gruen of Scissor Sisters) and Bright Light Bright Light (Rod Thomas). $25. 21+. 9pm-2:30am. 161 Erie St. www.eventbrite.com/ event/6419184955

Travis Jensen @ Genlser

Popular exhibit transforms the floral gallery into a fluttering garden with 20 species of butterflies and moths. Special bee-themed lectures and events June 22. 10am-4pm. Free-$7. Tue-Sun 10am-4:30pm. Thru Oct. 20. 100 JFK Drive, Golden Gate Park. 8312090. www.conservatoryofflowers.org

Piano Bar 101 @ Martuni’s

Bright Light, Slow Knights @ Public Works

Migrating Archives @ GLBT History Museum Migrating Archives: LGBT Delegates From Collections Around the World features historical items from nearly a dozen countries and archives, each showcasing an archive of prominent LGBT persons. $5. Reg hours Mon & Wed-Sat 11am-7pm. Sun 12pm-5pm. 4127 18th St. www.glbthistorymuseum.org

Miss & Mr. Safe Latino @ Marines’ Memorial Theatre Annual pageant and show promoting health and wellness in the Latino LGBT community. $10. 7pm. 609 Sutter St. 6179722. www.cityboxoffice.com

SF Gay Men’s Chorus @ Nourse Auditorium I Am Harvey Milk, a special oratorio and choral concert celebrating the life of the gay SF politican and gay rights icon, with works composed and performed by Andrew Lippa, plus Laura Benanti and special guests. $25-$65. 8pm. Also June 27 & 28. 201 Hayes St. 392-4400. www.sfgmc.org www.iamharveymilk.com

Thu 27 Gay in a Day @ Temple Sinai, Oakland Screening of short films about Israeli LGBTs. Free. 7pm. Webster St. at 28th., Oakland. (510) 318-6453. www.awiderbridge.org

Slow Knights’ Derek Gruen, Thu 27

99% Gay Comedy Festival @ Esta Noche Comedy Bodega celebrates Pride month with a new weekly series of stand-up acts. This week: Natasha Muse, Portland’s “Lez Stand Up” Comedy Troupe, and Marga Gomez. 8pm-9:30pm. 3079 16th St. at Mission. www.comedybodega.com

Academy of Friends Pre-Pride Party @ Harlot The nonprofit that annually throws its fab Oscar party hosts a pre-Pride reception sponsored by Clear Channel. $30. 5:30pm8:30pm. 46 Minna St. 995-9890. www.AcademyofFriends.org

Love: A Deeper Pride @ Abada Capoeira Arts Center Dance and show fundraiser for the arts studio, with Tara Wrist, Timothy Aviance, Miss Beth, DJs Gehno and the Go Bang guys, and performances by The A, Deeva, Abada Caoeira and others. Donations. 10pm-2am. 3321 22nd St. www.theadance.com

Pepperspray @ SF Eagle The wild drag rock cover band performs, with Nectar on the Dewly and She-L-O (ELO cover band) and $5-$10. 9:30pm. 398 12th st. www.sf-eagle.com

Swallow Your Pride @ Starlight Room Enjoy cocktails, appetizers and a fab view as this year’s grand marshalls are honored at a fundraiser for the Richmond/Ermet AIDS Foundation; hosts Cassandra Cass, Donna Sachet, Patrick Gallineaux, Michael Pagan; performers Leanne Borghesi, Brian Kent and Kippy Marks. $15-$60. 8pm-12am. 450 Powell St. www.HelpIsOnTheWay.org

Tubesteak Connection @ Aunt Charlie’s Lounge Enjoy retro disco and R&B tunes and a fun diverse crowd, each Thursday; DJ Bus Station John plays records. $4. 10pm-2am. 133 Turk St. at Taylor. www.auntcharlieslounge.com

To submit event listings, email jim@ebar.com.

Read more on www.ebar.com


<< Society

28 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

Anticipating Pride

t

by Donna Sachet

T

he Commonwealth Club continued its InForum series with a sold-out night at the Castro Theatre with Dan Savage, interviewed by Daniel Handler aka Lemony Snicket. The VIP reception upstairs was bubbling with anticipation, where guests included James Holloway & Greg Bjornstad, Todd Ferrell, Carol Queen, and Will Whitaker. Handler conducted an excellent interview, allowing Savage to demonstrate his well-known blunt opinions and caustic wit, as well as some startling moments of true wisdom. Book-signing afterwards was a flurry of idol worship and celebrity ogling. Upcoming InForum events focus on the Internet, personal wealth, and popular but controversial speakers. Pride started earlier than ever with a kick-off party in the Spanish Suite of the Clift Hotel last Wednesday, where cocktails flew, attending Grand Marshals of the Pride Parade were announced, and guests compared busy calendars of upcoming events. We chatted with Mario Diaz, Alec Hughes, John Marez, Ashley Love, Adam Sandel, Doug Waggoner, Sister Roma, James Patterson, Gary Virginia, Marion Abdullah, Zoe Dunning, Duane Cramer, and many others. After a period of dark financial days, SF Pride leadership happily announced that it is back in the black with all outstanding loans paid off. After a bit of well-deserved back-patting and the surprise announcement of additional main stage entertainer Lil’ Kim, airline tickets on SF Pride sponsor Virgin Air were awarded to two raffle winners, one going to Ken Katen, and the other to Grand Marshal nominee Nikolas Lemos, who promises to take us along. When people ask sometimes why we appear at a San Francisco but not necessarily gay event, we reply, “We answer our own phone, and say yes more often than no.” Such was the case when the San Francisco Marathon called requesting assistance with emceeing duties, specifically for their Fabulous 5K Marathon, partially benefiting the LGBT Community Center. So there we were at 7 a.m. at Embarcadero and Mission on Sunday, cheering on the enthusiastic athletes, among whom were city Supervisor Scott Wiener, Center Executive Director Rebecca Rolfe, Director of Development Roberto Ordenana, runner Michael Medena, and Jordana, who gave a beautiful rendition of our National Anthem. Over two hours after the start of the marathon, the finalists from thousands of runners crossed the finish line, and we were privileged to present ribbons to several exhausted participants. Over the course of seven successful years of Sunday’s a Drag at the Starlight Room atop the Sir Francis Drake Hotel, you can imagine that we’ve seen a variety of well-known people in our audiences. A couple of Sundays ago, we received a surprise visit from Frank Marino, the internationally recognized female impersonator whose shows have delighted audiences in Las Vegas for 28 years. His gracious compliments filled the cast, technical crew, and producer Michael Pagan with pride. As your personal guide to all things Pride-related, please allow us to highlight some fabulous imminent events. The San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus celebrates 35 years of singing with Harvey Milk 2013, Wed.-Fri., June 26-28, at 8 p.m. at Nourse Theatre in Civic Center. Included are the world premiere of

Courtesy Donna Sachet

Las Vegas female impersonator Frank Marino poses with Holotta Tymes at Sunday’s a Drag at the Starlight Room atop the Sir Francis Drake Hotel a couple of Sundays ago.

Andrew Lippa’s I am Harvey Milk, the debut of I Am the Legacy, soloist Laura Benanti, and over 300 dedicated choral singers. Thursday night will have many of us traipsing all over the city trying to keep up with a night full of Pride parties. We start at Westfield Centre Dome for GLAAD’s Pride Party at 5:30 p.m., then SF Pride’s Media party, W Hotel, 7 p.m., followed by Swallow Your Pride, Starlight Room, Sir Francis Drake Hotel, 8 p.m. Friday, the 10th annual Trans March leaves Dolores Park at 6 p.m., and Saturday, the Dyke March leaves Dolores Park at 4 p.m. Earlier on Saturday, head up to the top of Twin Peaks to help assemble the Pink Triangle, which is christened at 10:30 a.m. and visible only for the next 48 hours. The 15th annual Pride Brunch, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Hotel

Whitcomb, is one of the rare opportunities to hear prepared remarks from each of the SF Pride Parade Grand Marshals, while raising money for Positive Resource Center. And that night, indulge in Pink Saturday in the Castro, followed by dance parties all over. Sunday’s Parade down Market Street and Festival in Civic Center are bound to exceed past records in attendance, creativity, and enthusiasm. If you are in the Parade, give us a wave as you come by the Clear Channel anchor booth, where we’ll be co-anchoring the live coverage with Michelle Meow and Sebastian Kuntz. With a packed schedule on the Main Stage and 23 Community Stages throughout Civic Center, a newly formatted VIP Party in the Rotunda of City Hall, and nearly 1 million people gathered from all over the world, this is not a day to stay home. Take mass transit, stay hydrated, and have the best Pride Weekend ever!t

Steven Underhill

Model Allan Gamboa-Amador crashes the Golden Gate Business Association business expo, but in a good way.


t

Karrnal >>

June 20-26, 2013 • Bay Area Reporter • 29

Young & restless by John F. Karr

E

ager for some fresh, new faces, and wondering if I’d find the stars of tomorrow among them, I watched a new Buckshot feature, Off the Hook. It’s a nice movie, and thoroughly professional with directing, videography and editing by Max Phillips. In two hours, it presents six scenes that feature a couple established performers working out some tasty young newbies. The slightly implausible scenario finds Hunter Page and Lucas Knight trapped in their office cubicles, and bored. So they watch streaming porn. In the workplace. On a company computer. Can you get away with that? I certainly couldn’t. Oh well, they seem to be the only two employees in the company. And one of them carefully explains that the filter is so easy to get past.  First, Knight fantasizes himself into becoming Angel Rock’s fuckbuddy. Rock needs no introduction, and is seen at his most attractively appealing: muscular body, full pecs, smattering of fur; he’s a good-natured, sturdy pumper. Young Mr. Knight, who has previously filmed three scenes, is all peaches and cream, with a thick and decidedly adult wang. They’re very cosmetic; all they lack between them is connection. Do they look at each other once? Hunter Page has been seen at a handful of websites, but this is only his second movie. I’m eager for more. He’s a sweet and sweetly devilish young man, with dark hair, a smooth and lithe body, and quite a spike of cock. He imagines himself making it with plain-faced Connor Patricks, who’s only been in two previous scenes. Patricks has one of those cocks so broad at the base it’s scary. Not to Page, though, who gulps it all right down. And Patricks delights in swallowing every inch of the long Page prong. The cocksucking’s so swell that I was truly disappointed there was no 69. Why is double skull-buggery so infrequently filmed? If there isn’t much excitement to their fuck, these guys do look at each other, all through their flip-fuck. Patricks’ perfectly hairless asshole – it’s surrounded by skin smooth as glass – gets nicely split. Of course, his wide wang spreads Page’s slightly furred crack even wider. Page just grunts and breathes deep. Marc Dylan, the second of the movie’s established stars, is featured fucking Scott Hunter, who has been little-seen in American movies, but is the veteran of a halfdozen British-made movies. He’s uncut, a little older, a little furry – a nice foil to Dylan’s still boyish muscle-stud. Hunter goes in for some deep rimming – wouldn’t you wanna stick your face between the polished boulders of Dylan’s butt? It makes Hunter cum. Doug Acres is a rising star, with a half-dozen features to his credit. The blond kid’s quite a cutie, with a dewyfresh cock. He and Bobby Hart make lotsa eye contact, watching and gauging their effect on each other as Bobby creams Doug’s tight, pink hole. Acre’s white body contrasts nicely with Hart’s lightly toasted brown, especially when the camera neatly observes sphincter

Colt Studio Group

Winning Hunter Page stars in Buckshot’s Off the Hook.

Colt Studio Group

Lucas Knight, a young new star, in Buckshot’s Off the Hook.

squeezing cock. Office mates Knight and Page inevitably find themselves appraising each other’s cocks. My vote goes to Page’s length over Knight’s girth. You know how some performers just take to the camera? Page’s cock does that. Got some charisma of its own, and Knight’s gulping it makes for some hardhitting moments before Knight shoots pellets clear across the gap between them. The final computer-viewed cock-up departs from the movie’s Buckshot-brand youth into the territory of parent company Colt.

JR Bronson and Hugo Alexander are men. The more built Bronson – granite body, fine fur, steely dick – is a power bottom star of many films, while Alexander’s curious filmography of four scenes for four companies has been spread over four years. He’s a handsomely faced brunet, with a meaty and malleable uncut cock. The wrap-up? Mr. Bronson is always worth a visit, and it was nice to make the acquaintance of some new lads. Doug Acre’s bound to be popular, and I’m sure we won’t have to hunt much for forthcoming visits with the extended cock and pleasing persona of cute Hunter Page.t

www.ebar.com


Serving the LGBT communities since 1971

30 • Bay Area Reporter • June 20-26, 2013

t

EXCLUSIVE BAY AREA LGBT MEDIA SPONSORS

Peg Skorpinski

Mark Morris Dance Group dances in Morris’ Spring Spring Spring at Ojai North.

<<

ebar.com

Mark Morris

From page 21

becomes cacophonous. Then the pianist turns on his light, the bassfiddle and drummer join in, and they attack the syncopated violent accents of the “Adoration of the Earth.” Female dancers dressed like Arcadian shepherds (in the style remoded by Napoleon, now known as “Empire”) enter rapidly. Squads of them fill the stage like schools of fish at a coral reef, each group doing its own folkloric moves and minding

its own cohesion, whereupon a line of boys bare-chested and sporting sherbet-colored jeans slice through them in quick-step. Casting their legs out in front of them like birds, they dash through the melee and disappear offstage into the far wings. This sets the tone for the whole ballet. Stravinsky’s score in 1913 was the bridge between the pan-Slavic, folklore-drenched stage of his Ballets Russes roots and the Modernism that, after the onset of World War I, he would come to embrace. Morris’ dance is learned modernism, not the pan-Slavic, fin-de-siècle tragedy that Stravinsky envisioned. That vision is maybe best realized by Disney’s  Fantasia, with dinosaurs battling it out in the la Brea tar pits . It will doubtless repay study to find the formulae that yielded Morris’ geometric complexities. The counterpoint of trajectories gave much interest at first sight. But in the long run, Morris’ decision to abandon the libretto’s dramatic structure releases each episode into a flattened thing. As in a tribal Bactrian carpet, many repeating, contrasting panels belong together with deep structural integrity, but absorb the attention only when less demanding stimuli fade away. The ballet is best seen as the capstone of a larger festival experience, designed for “music tourists” such as go to the Edinburgh, Salzburg, or Bayreuth Festivals. At this, I think it succeeded brilliantly. The Berkeley  Ojai North  shows were a NorCal outpost of the Ojai Music Festival in Ventura, the whole of which was directed by Mr. Morris, who is such a musical choreographer that many have come to think of him now as essentially a musician. Mor 

ris curated Ojai as an homage to the west coast maverick composers Lou Harrison (Seattle and Santa Cruz), Henry Cowell (born in Palo Alto), and John Cage (Seattle and New York). Stravinsky, who though Russian fled the Soviets and settled in Los Angeles, may be considered an honorary senior member of the tribe, much as Marcel Duchamps is an honorary founding member of the New York School of painting. Starting Wednesday afternoon and running through the weekend, there were concerts from mid-afternoon til late at night. The dance concert under review should be considered a Gesammtkunstwerk, with outstanding musical components. I think of it as a triple bill, including Morris’ wonderful dancesettings of Cowell’s string quartets Mosaic and United,  and the fabulous music composed by Morris’ former music director Ethan Iverson for the jazz trio The Bad Plus, for the great silent movie Salome (Nazimova, 1923), which screened at 10 p.m. for free. The movie Salome included the virgin sacrifice, which is crucial to Stravinsky’s conception of The Rite of Spring, but which Morris, though he alludes to it throughout his ballet, does not include as an event in his choreography. Salome therefore contains a tragic climactic structure, culminating in the moment when the palace guards converge on Salome and stab her with their spears, in rhythmic convulsions which Iverson accompanied by throwing his entire body at the piano, attacking it with his elbows spread, and thus creating “sound clusters” covering three octaves. They sounded like bombs going off.t


Read more online at www.ebar.com

Personals

June 20-26, 2013 • BAY AREA REPORTER • 31

The

Massage>>

Model/Escorts>>

Excellent nude massage Dolores park. SF pix & details on ebar.com ad. 415-706-9740

E21-E28

Nude full body sensual hot oil deep massage $50/hr Gary 407-9226 out only

E24-E25

“Dr. BLISS” is IN! I love touching men and it shows! Massage is my art form. 415.706.6549 http://bodymagicsf.blogspot.com

E25-25

Aggressive Top, handsome, masculine, hung huge 6”, 46, buzz haircut, blue eyes, cln shaven, German/Irish. Out visits

Erotic Relaxing Full Body Massage by hairy Irish/Portuguese guy. (510) 912-8812 late nights ok.

Malek: White top, 9” cut curved downwards. Outcalls only. 650-533-0064. $150/hr.

coremassage4men.com malepelvicfloor.com Jeff Gibson 415-626-7095

Miguel, gentle & passionate lover at your service & needs. 415-312-0604. Good kisser, uncut, all your fantasies.

E25-25

E25-25

E20-E25

SEXY ASIAN $60 JIM 269-5707

E23-E23

Edgy Escort for Extreme Clients

HOT*CKSKR*24HRS

E22-E25

ebar.com Personals

Call Steve 707-694-7975

Out * 860-5468*$150/hr* Attractive Caucasian 415-320-1040 Skot2trot.com

E25-27

Blk masculine and handsome. Very discreet, hung, also friendly and clean. In/out Cedric 510-776-5945 All types welcome.

E24-E27

Confident 9x7.5 $150 top Clean cut Handsome Sexy Austin 415-735-4548

E23-E29

BE SAFE! • USE CONDOMS • EVERY TIME! E52

E25-25

ebar.com “Falling out of love is chiefly a matter of forgetting how charming someone is.” —Iris Murdoch The

ebar.com Personals People>>

Classified Order Form

Deadline: NOON on MONDAY. Payment must accompany ad. If you have a question, call 415.861.5019. Display advertising rates available upon request. Ads will appear in print and online. Indicate Type Style Here

XBOLD and BOLD stop here

RATES for Newspaper and website: First line, Regular 10.00 All subsequent lines 5.00 BOLD double price X-BOLD triple price

PAYMENT:

Cash

Personal Check

Contact Information Name Address Number of Issues

Mail with payment to: Bay Area Reporter 395 Ninth Street SF, CA 94103 OR FAX TO: 415.861.8144 OR E-MAIL: simma@ebar.com

Credit Card Payment Name Card Number Expiration Date Signature Money Order

City Classification

Visa

MasterCard

AmEx

Telephone State Amt. Enclosed

Zip

New FREE Gay Dating Website SameSexConnections.com

E23-E28

ebar.com



June 20, 2013 Edition of the Bay Area Reporter