Page 1

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Box 1029, North Battleford, SK. S9A 3E6 (306) 445-7261 Published every Thursday and circulated to homes throughout Northwestern Saskatchewan

In the news this week

Staff Fifteen years later cryptosporidium is still haunting North Battleford city council. At Monday’s council meeting, a report was given on a recent settlement of a class action lawsuit launched in the wake of the water contamination crisis that sickened thousands of residents. The suit being reported on by City

Manager Jim Puffalt covered young people under the age of 18, referred to as “infant class.” Read more on Page 3. Battlefords MLA Herb Cox has been named chair of a new Sask. Party caucus committee that will be looking into crime in the province. Cut Knife-Turtleford MLA Larry Doke also sits on the sevenmember committee. For more turn to Page 7.

STOP IN TODAY

to keep you warm & lower your heating bills 1811 -100th St. North Battleford PHONE

306-445-2052

Giltz and Holly

The Lighthouse Serving the Battlefords has been made ready for the Christmas season. John Paul II students converged on the facility this week to decorate and spread the cheer of the season. Photo submitted


Page 2 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

VOLUME 48/2016

1291 - 101st Street North Battleford, SK S9A 2Y6

B ulletin NORT H BAT TLEFOR D CIT Y

Box 460 306-445-1700

STAY UP TO DATE on the latest CITY NEWS!

NEXT CITY COUNCIL MEETING

Monday, Dec. 12 at 8:00 p.m.

Council meetings are open to the public. Planning Committee scheduled for Dec. 19 is cancelled.

Be a Snow Angel this winter, it's the neighbourly thing to do! Thee Snow Angel Program encourages healthy, willing residents to help others when clearing snow from sidewalks - especially elderly residents or anyone with health or mobility restrictions.

HOW IT WORKS

Lend a helping hand to a resident who needs it and then tell us about it, and if you receive help from someone, nominate them as a “Snow Angel." Write or e-mail your Snow Angel story to us.(North Battleford residents only) • include the name and address of the Snow Angel • MAIL NOMINATIONS TO: City of North Battleford • P.O. Box 460, 1291 - 101st Street North Battleford, Saskatchewan S9A 2Y6

OR E-MAIL NOMINATIONS TO: dmacdonold@cityofnb.ca

The City of North Battleford will send a thank you to the Snow Angels anti enter them into monthly prize draws.

NationsWEST Field House

Mov ie

Follow us on Twitter: @citynb

Join us for a fun and relaxing evening out with your friends. Make some tasty personalized appetizers while sipping wine. Take your delicious creations home with you.

Leave your kids with us for a few hours of KID FREE time. Friday December 9th

s k c Sna

Find us on Facebook: City of North Battleford (Official)

LEISURE SERVICES

Parent Night Out Design & Create your own car for the IN DOOR DRIVE - IN MOVIE! 6:00 - 9:30 pm Kids 5 – 12 yrs Cost - $30/ kid

cityofnb.ca

Appetizers & Wine - $35 December 7th 6:30 - 9 pm

In The Don Ross Centre Kitchen One complimentary glass of wine with registration. Additional glasses by making a donation.

Healthy Option Appetizers - $35 December 15th 6:30 - 9 pm

In The Dekker Centre Kitchen (no wine)

Call 306-445-1790 or visit us for more information or to register.

For more information or to register please call the Aquatic Centre at 445-1745 Limited space available. All supplies provided.

Late fees will apply for late pick-up. Must be pre- registered to participate.

Battlefords CO-OP Aquatic Centre ★ NationsWEST Field House ★ Sport Fields

e u r Allen Sapp Gallery ★ The Chapel Gallery ★ Civic Centre & Don Ross Arena s i s Don Ross Centre ★ Walking Trails ★ 400 m Outdoor Track ★ Finlayson Le vice r e Island Trail Adventure ......and tons and tons of programs, parks & activities!!! S Check us out: www:cityofnb.ca • Book a facility: centralbooking@cityofnb.ca or (306) 445-1755

RECREATION PROGRAMS Visit the Recreation section at cityofnb.ca

THE CHAPEL GALLERY

Open until 8pm on Wednesday and Thursday Nights

Centennial Park Activity Centre The perfect place to hold a family gathering, or meeting.

Lessons Begin Jan. 7 and run for 10 weeks

with guest performer Aaron Arcand. A reception at the Chapel Gallery.

PLUS Female Only & Family Swim Lessons Find the schedule at cityofnb.ca under “Recreation”

CHEERS

Call Central Booking 306-445-1755

All Levels Available..

Call 306-445-1745, email coopaquaticcentre@cityofnb.ca, or visit us in person for more info or to register.

4th Annual Winter Sprint Classic Swim Meet Sat., Dec. 3rd & Sunday, Dec. 4th

PUBLIC SKATING

Civic Centre: 12:15 – 1:45 pm FREE Saturdays at the Civic Centre Wednesdays 1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. (Adult & preschool) Don Ross Arena Thursdays 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. & 1:30 pm-2:30 pm (Adult & preschool) FREE NOON HOUR SHINNY

will open Dec. 5

Christmas Wednesday, December 14th from 5pm-9pm. Watercolour painting demonstrations with artist Graham Flatt 6pm – 9pm

For information and availability

Registration for

Winter Swim Lessons

Indoor Playground

Free, drop in play time for tots, 5 years and under. Thursdays 10:00 am - 11:30 am Territorial Drive Alliance Church. Children must be supervised by an adult.

BATTLEFORDS CO-OP AQUATIC CENTRE

NEW

Don Ross Arena Mondays 12 – 1:00pm Bring your own sticks, skates, gloves and helmets are mandatory Thank you to For sponsoring Free Shinny Pre registration is required for all classes, to register or for more information, call or drop in to the Leisure Services Office 306-445-1790 or at the Don Ross Centre (Door #5) or NationsWEST Field House

visit our website at www.cityofnb.ca

THE AQUATIC CENTRE WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY SATURDAY Leisure Swim will resume 2:30pm on Sunday.

Spectators Welcome!

ALLEN SAPP GALLERY

Open until 8pm on Wednesday and Thursday Nights


Regional Optimist

Cryptosporidium class action settlement details outlined By John Cairns Staff Reporter

City council received details Monday about the recent settlement to ongoing litigation on the cryptosporidium outbreak of 2001. Thousands of local residents were sickened after they consumed the cryptosporidium-contaminated drinking water in North Battleford that year. What followed was a commission of inquiry into the matter as well as class action lawsuits from sickened plaintiffs. At council Monday, City Manager Jim Puffalt outlined the details of the latest settlement. He noted the impact of the outbreak was mainly on the elderly,

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 3

www.newsoptimist.ca

the young and those with compromised immune systems. But this class action settlement covers only one class of individuals — young people under the age of 18 who consumed the contaminated water. They were defined under the settlement as the “infant class.” This most recent settlement was signed in late September and conditional approval was granted in October. A copy of the settlement agreement between the plaintiffs and the City, Province and Saskatchewan Water Corporation was provided to council, along with various other documents. According to terms of the agreement, the agree-

ment settles the action and releases the defendants with respect to this particular class. A settlement fund in the amount of $3,300,000 has been set up as part of that agreement. There was provision for claimants to opt out of the agreement and a deadline of 42 days following the notice of settlement approval and certification to file those forms. All class members who do not opt out are bound by the agreement, according to the settlement terms. According to the notice of certification and settlement approval, those who wish to opt out must complete an opt-out form and mail it to the administrator, and it must be received or

Union Agreement Signed

The City of North Battleford has a new collective agreement in place with the North Battleford Fire Fighters’ Association Local No. 1756. Council voted to unanimously authorize the execution of the agreement, and it was signed by Mayor Ryan Bater, local No. 1756 president Brett Johnson and other union representatives, at the start of Monday’s council meeting. The agreement is for the period Jan. 1, 2016 to Dec. 31, 2018. At council Monday, City Manager Jim Puffalt said there were “very good negotiations with our union” and that “we were able to get through it very rapidly.” Photo by John Cairns

Scott Campbell has the

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post-marked on or before Jan. 17, 2017. Also included in the package to councillors was the letter of agreement between the Sask. Ministry of Environment, the City and the Bruneau Group, an Ottawa law firm that specializes in administering settlements. That firm will be the one administering claims applications and payments in this case. There was also a notice of a certification hearing and proposed settlement, with the approval hearing scheduled for 10 a.m. Dec. 1 in the Court of Queen’s Bench, Saskatoon. This class action had been ongoing for years. The law firm of Cuelenaere Kendall Katzman and Watson LLP had been handling the case for the plaintiffs, while Stevenson Hood Thornton Beaubier LLP (representing the City of North Battleford) and the Ministry of Justice (representing the Saskatchewan government and the Sask-

atchewan Water Corporation) acted as defendants’ counsel in the case. Puffalt told council this case had been around so long the original lawyer working on the file had retired. He had inquired with the firm to find out if there were any other claims out there. While they didn’t think

so, Puffalt said, he noted he hasn’t received a firm or complete answer to that. In updating council, Puffalt also pointed to the Report of the Commission of Inquiry into the incident, dated March 28, 2002, which he said “certainly describes very accurately what happened at that time.”

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Page 4 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Share your view! Phone: 306-445-7261 Fax: 306-445-3223 Email: newsoptimist.news@sasktel.net

Commentary

Selling Canada’s grain around the world By Cam Dahl, Murdoch MacKay and JoAnne Buth The Canadian cereals industry is united in reaching out to international customers. The 2016 Canadian Wheat New Crop Missions run for seven weeks from the beginning of November to mid-December. The sessions kicked off Nov. 10 with a seminar for Canadian millers, the largest buyer of Canadian wheat. By the time the trek is done the missions will reach customers in 17 countries in Asia, Latin America, Europe, North Africa and West Africa. Some of our competitors, like the U.S. Wheat Associates, also put on new crop seminars. But Canada is unique because we deliver the entire value chain including representation from farmers, exporters, Canadian Grain Commission (CGC), Canadian International Grains Institute (Cigi) and Cereals Canada. When customers have a question on Canadian production, we have a farmer in the room to answer. When there are questions on supply or logistics, an exporter is there to provide the right information. Cigi and CGC provide unbiased technical information on the grading factors and the technical milling, baking and pasta and noodle-making properties. This collaborative effort demonstrates the commitment of Canada’s value chain to supporting our customers and providing them with the opportunity to optimize the value and performance of Canadian wheat. The Canadian missions are about a lot more than industry representatives talking to international buyers. We are also there to listen directly to our customers’ needs and concerns. Bringing these needs and concerns back to Canada is one of the key objectives and values of

the missions. This feedback allows Canada to adjust our grading and classification systems to give buyers what they want and to focus research goals on the traits and qualities that will get the highest return from the market. The recent changes to the wheat classification system are one example of adjustments made in Canada as a result of going abroad to listen directly to the needs of our customers. Talking to our customers is important in years when everything is going well and high-quality wheat is overflowing. The conversations are even more important in years when things did not go as planned, like the 2016 growing season. Farmers know the growing season was cooler and much wetter than normal and have experienced one of the most difficult harvests on record. Customers know this too and they want to know the quality effects of the curve balls thrown by Mother Nature. The news delivered by the Canadian team is better than many customers are expecting. Over half of the Canada Western Red Spring (CWRS) crop is still in the top two grades. The Canadian team is able to assure customers that Canada has good quality to deliver. But the news is not all good and we can’t hide these facts. The cooler than normal wet summer experienced by much of the Prairies was an ideal environment for the growth of fusarium fungi. This year fusarium has had minimal effect on the milling, baking and pasta and noodle-making properties of wheat and durum. But fusarium also produces a mycotoxin called deoxynivalenol or DON, and there are strict limits on DON in most markets because of food safety concerns. Fusarium has

especially impacted the record level durum crop, which has seen downgrades because of the fungus. Because the Canadian team includes the entire value chain we are able to work with customers to help ensure they can access the Canadian quality they have come to expect while meeting their country’s grain safety regulations. The missions also allow Canadian farmers to highlight the strong management practices that allow them to consistently deliver high quality grain that is sustainably produced. For example, this year’s missions feature presentations from producers that outline the sustainability of modern Canadian agriculture. Farmers demonstrate how their practices are reducing energy consumption, sequestering carbon, reducing erosion and improving soil health. This is a good news story both here and abroad. Telling the Canadian agricultural story gives context to our customers about who we are and demonstrates our collective commitment to upholding Canada’s reputation in the global market. Canada is known for quality, sustainability, and the investment of the value chain to ensure we are producing the best product, year after year. For more information about the New Crop Missions, including the seminars presented and technical data, please visit: www.canadianwheat.ca — Cam Dahl is president of Cereals Canada, Murdoch MacKay is a commissioner with the Canadian Grain Commission and JoAnne Buth is CEO of the Canadian International Grains Institute.

Letter

Seeking ‘Shirl’ Dear Editor I recently came across about 20 letters “Shirl” wrote to Mr. N. Stiko back in the spring of 1955. They are love letters to him. I recently read that Mr. Stiko passed away in 2015. I read some letters and gathered some information as follows: • Shirl came from North Battleford or area, but was in a Bible school in Moose Jaw from April to July 1955. • She had a brother named Ray. • She was friends with Glen Engle, Doris Hilderbrand, Georgia Neale, Arleen Bowman and Martin Magnus. • She lived at 865 - 9th Ave. N.W. in Moose Jaw on May 25, 1955 (a boarding house I think). • She played an accordion. • She attended a young people’s Bible group. I have tried to contact the Stiko clan, but haven’t received a reply. These letters should be read by “Shirl’s” family, as they are a look into her life as a young school girl in love. So if you can ask around town about this lady, hopefully she is alive and well. Ryan Thomas 403-580-7321 pd624@hotmail.com A community newspaper published Thursdays by Battlefords Publishing Ltd. 892 - 104th Street, North Battleford, Saskatchewan S9A 1M9 Telephone: 306-445-7261 • Fax: 306-445-3223 E-mail: newsoptimist.news@sasktel.net Publications Mail Agreement Number 40051948

2012 SWNA

BEST OVERALL

NEWSPAPER (Circ. Class E)

Becky Doig Editor

John Cairns Reporter

Shannon Kovalsky Reporter

Alana Schweitzer Publisher

Valorie Higgs Sales Manager

Scott McMillan Advertising

Lucas Punkari Sports Reporter

Candace Mack-Horton Advertising


Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 5

Backup cameras coming to a vehicle near you “Check rear park aid.” That’s what my 2011 Ford Expedition Max’s instrument panel computer told me yesterday, after I drove over some muddy gravel. Just slightly muddy, but still, it was wet. Maybe some mud got onto a sonar sensor. Maybe the wire was loose. I’m not sure. Usually, this problem seems to solve itself. These sensors are pretty handy when driving what, I believe, is currently the largest SUV in large-scale production right now. The Max adds at least a foot to the length, allowing for a 4x8 foot sheet of OSB to be carried internally (came in handy last week). Driving such a behemoth comes with many challenges. Compared to the Geo Metro I used to drive, the Expedition is like docking an aircraft carrier without the tugboat. My wife’s F-150 is more like a supertanker, again, without the tugboat. Thankfully, both have integrated backup cameras

to assist. So, too, will your next new vehicle, no matter the size, thanks to an announcement in late October from Transport Canada. Starting in May 2018, all newly manufactured vehicles in Canada will be required to have such devices. This synchronizes Canada’s requirements with those south of the border. Cameras, cameras everywhere. I’ve had this vehicle for 2.5 years now, and I still have a tough time getting used to it and its backup camera. It’s not our first, however. My wife’s 2009 F-150 has one of the first production-model backup cameras I’ve seen in a truck. It’s very useful, especially for lining up a trailer. The superimposed centre line makes trailer hookups a snap. But the small screen integrated into the left side of the rearview mirror throws me for a loop. If I focus on the camera, my eyes go all squirrelly looking over a few inches at the main

JOIN THE CONVERSATION To comment on From the Top of the Pile or any other articles in this issue, go to www.newsoptimist.ca It’s easy. Just sign in with Facebook, Twitter, Disqus or Google.

rom

the top of

the pile By Brian Zinchuk

Saskatchewan Weekly Newspapers

Association 2012 Columnist of the Year mirror and vice versa. Similarly, on my Expedition, the much larger screen is mounted in the centre of the dash. It’s a lot easier to see, but now I get a little discombobulated, looking at the outside mirrors, centre mirror, camera, over my shoulder and back. This is where those rear sonar sensors are useful. As I’m trying to dock my aircraft carrier, the audio cues make me feel a little more comfortable that I’m not about to make something go splat. The reality is, it is best to avoid backing up as much as possible. I’m trying to teach this to No. 1 daughter, long before she actually hits the road. Through defensive driving training I’ve taken through pipeline work and the military, one thing stuck out at me – backing up is a bad idea, especially when leaving a parking spot. Circle check first, but avoid the situation entirely if possible. You can always iden-

y l k e e W ow!

DEALS

Deals of the Week!

w

tify a long-time pipeliner. Even in his off-duty time, he will back in to park. Pipeline yards are full of pickups parked with their noses out. The reason for this is, while most vehicles arrive singly, they usually leave all at once. Having up to a few hundred guys leaving the parking lot at the same time, backing up one-ton dualies is a recipe for disaster. If you back in when you parked, you can see ahead of you when you leave, thus avoiding squishing anyone or anything. Larger vehicles, i.e. one-tons, are also more maneuverable in reverse, making it easier to actually fit in a parking spot in the first place. This back-in policy has spread to other areas of the oilpatch. I am seeing back-in only signs at prob-

ably half of the oil patch business I visit now. You can identify a military-trained driver by the sound they make. Since most non-industrial vehicles lack backup alarms, they are required to honk twice before backing up. I don’t do that often, but have on occasion, to the incredulous looks all around. I guess it hasn’t caught on yet. When it comes to parking lots, I will almost always park further out, at the edge of the pack and park so my nose is facing

out, effectively “backed in.” I even park in my driveway like that on most days. Hopefully these backup cameras will save some lives, particularly of little kids who disappear behind large vehicles. It’s a great idea whose time has come. I’d like to see universal backup sonar, too. Maybe back-in policies in more places should be next on the agenda. — Brian Zinchuk is editor of Pipeline News. He can be reached at brian. zinchuk@sasktel.net.

JEANINE’S COIFFURE at Discovery Co-op Christmas Sale December 3 - 23, 2016

All Perms

$

5 Off reg. price

Colors, Highlights or Lowlights $

5 Off reg. price

(Does not apply to Wed. Senior Prices)

For all your Holiday Appoitments CALL 306-446-0722 Merry Christmas and Very Happy New Year from Jeanine & staff. We look forward to seeing you!

newsoptimist.ca

your news all the time and online

Weekend Sales Team THE BATTLEFORDS Brokerage, Independently Owned and Operated

Karen McMillan 306-441-2224

Gregg Sheppard 306-441-7242

1541 - 100th Street

Phone 306-445-5555 or 306-445-6666

Ready for your Party? We are! Hot Roast beef on a Bun

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Crescent upgrades of some windows, laminate flooring, paint, new shingles, over last two years. Revenue $20,100.00 per year. Fenced and landscaped yard, parking in rear for 4 cars. Call Wayne Hoffman soon re MLS®584215

LB

Custom Deli Meat & Cheese Trays

Great Opportunity!!!

This duplex allows the new owners to live in one side, complete with a double garage and rent the other side to help with the mortgage, or just for the revenue. Each side has three bedrooms, kitchen/dining, living room and bathroom. Complete with front and back yards. Mid Efficient furnaces in each side. Fridge and stoves, plus softener in the “A” side. There are separate titles to each side, so could be purchased by separate owners. Call Brian for more information on MLS®585370.

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Scott Moe, MLA

Rosthern/Shellbrook Constituency

Box 115, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 Toll Free: 1-855-793-3422 Fax: 306-747-3472 scottmoe.mla@sasktel.net www.scott-moe.com

306-937-2626

Randy Weekes, MLA

Biggar Constituency

Box 1413, Biggar, SK S0K 0M0 Toll Free: 1-877-948-4880 Fax: 306-948-4882 randyweekes.mla@accesscomm.ca www.randyweekes.ca

Kildeer Courts Condo!

Located next to Sobey’s & Co-op Mall as well as the Territorial walking paths, this 775 sq. ft. condo is all about convenience. Located on the South side of the 3rd floor this unit has an open concept living space with 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom and a laundry/ utility room. Control your own temperature with the in-unit furnace & air conditioner. There are 2 parking stalls available and condo fees include all exterior maintenance and water. All appliances remain! Call Tracy Voigt on MLS®586950 at 306-441-1981.

Herb Cox, MLA

The Battlefords Constituency

1991 - 100th St., North Battleford, SK S9A 0X2 Phone: 306-445-5195 Fax: 306-445-5196 herbcox@sasktel.net www.herbcox.ca

New Price

This well kept, 1 1/2, storey home is on a quiet street. Open concept Ikea-modern kitchen with island. Newer flooring in living room. Good sized bedroom on the main and two bedrooms upstairs. Renovated bathroom. Patio deck in nice back yard with parking. All appliances stay. Newer high EE furnace. Call Karen on MLS®571793 at 306-441-2224.

Larry Doke, MLA

Cut Knife/Turtleford Constituency

#6 - 116 - 1st Ave. West, Maidstone, SK P.O. Box 850, S0M 1M0 Phone: 306-893-2619 Fax: 306-893-2660 larrydoke@sasktel.net www.larrydoke.ca


Page 6 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Filtration system soon to be operational By John Cairns Staff Reporter

December promises to be an active month for City administration in their ongoing efforts to replace the water supply following the Husky oil spill into the North Saskatchewan River this summer. Despite colder conditions, the temporary water line that has been coming from the town of Battleford remains operational for the time being. But officials are looking forward to shutting off that line for the winter once the long-planned General Electric filtration system becomes fully operational later this month. The installation of the filtration equipment is the last part of a three-pronged plan to replace the water supply from the river, in addition to the Battleford water line and the four new wells built at the groundwater plant, Water Treatment Plant No. 1.

The GE filtration equipment will allow the City to access water from the North Saskatchewan River again, though not at the same rate as before the spill. The filtration is designed to stop oil “globs” from getting into the plant, with the main risk being potentially costly equipment damage. It was a big concern of City Manager Jim Puffalt, who noted that “little balls of oil” were likely to come down the river during the freeze-thaw period in the spring. That was why it was important, said Puffalt, that “we’re not taking water from the river until that system is in place.” The GE filtration equipment consists of sand pressure vessels that will be used to prevent the oil from getting into the plant. Once the filtrated water enters the plant, F.E. Holliday itself will have hydrocarbon-testing moni-

PRAIRIE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM would like to extend a warm thank you to

W. Brett Wilson & family

for the generous 2016 donation

Looking for Real Skills, Real Work and Real Wages? Prairie Employment Program 1202 - 101st Street, North Battleford, SK S9A 0Z8 Phone: (306)445-6404

tors to treat and remove any remaining hydrocarbons from the water supply. The plan was to install the equipment back in September but there had been some minor delays in obtaining the equipment, according to City officials. Also, dredging work had to take place to remove the sand buildup around the intakes in the river. City Manager Jim Puffalt confirmed that the dredging work has now been completed and GE was on the scene and working to have the filtration system installed. The timeline calls for the filtration system to be commissioned Dec. 5. Training is then to be completed in the week afterwards, with GE specialists coming to the city to provide training to city operators. Once that is completed, the GE filtration will be fully operational, but Puffalt indicated Monday that is not likely to happen until closer to Christmas.

Time Ticking Down on Pipeline Supply

In the meantime the City has been relying on their wells, as well as the Battleford water supply. The supply line is hooked up to a hydrant located next to the Battleford Town Hall and runs to the F.E. Holliday plant. The line is not built to handle winter conditions, however, and Councillor Greg Lightfoot asked administration officials whether that was a big concern. Puffalt responded it was a concern and that they were working to protect that line. “It looks to get to minus 17 next week,” said Puffalt. “So we have started the process of protecting that line, protecting the joints, particularly, more than

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anything else.” According to administration’s report, additional insulation and protection to the metal components was being added to keep the line operational during freezing temperatures. But the line won’t be operational once it freezes up. Director of Operations Stewart Schafer told reporters that the flow is keeping the Battleford line going right now, and some heat has been applied in strategic areas to maintain the valves. “But yes, we’ll have to eventually shut that line down.” Once the filtration equipment is operational, the plan was for the Battleford line to shut down. Schafer told reporters that the valve will be turned off and the line will be drained, however, they will leave it in place until next spring, when it will be turned on again to meet the usual increase in demand for water for lawns and gardens. “We still need the water even though we will have the GE filtration system going, as well as the wells,” said Schafer. The point was made at the meeting that the four new wells at Water Treatment Plant No. 1, which have been operational for a few months, were not going to provide enough water for the city on its own. Lightfoot asked how imperative it was to have the F.E. Holliday plant back up and running. It was “very imperative,” Puffalt responded. Schafer agreed, as he noted the wells were only supplying about 60 per cent of the usage. The rest was coming from the Battleford pipeline. “We’re still relying on the pipeline coming in,” said Schafer. “During the summertime, we will be

needing both the pipeline and the GE filtration system, as well as the wells, to replace the total water produced at the F.E. Holliday plant.” Before the oil spill incident, Schafer noted F.E. Holliday was running at 100 litres per second of water. Now, Schafer estimated the pipeline produced 20 litres per second,

the wells 30 litres per second, and the new filtration system would bring 40 litres per second. “Which leaves us a little under, but we figure we’ll get by with that,” said Schafer. As for the temperatures, City officials acknowledged they have been lucky that the weather has co-operated up to this point.

News-Optimist.ca Last week’s News-Optimist online poll:

Last week Husky Energy released its final report on its investigation into the July 21 pipeline rupture that spilled oil into the North Saskatchewan River. The report cites ground movement as the cause of the break. What do you think? • Pipeline construction should be subject to more stringent environmental standards. 13% • Existing pipelines must be more closely monitored. 37% • Husky Energy still hasn’t satisfactorily explained why it took so long to discover the break. 32% • No more pipelines should be built. 18%

This week’s News-Optimist online poll:

More than a year after moving operations to a temporary location, Canada Post has announced the old post office building on 22nd Street is for sale. Officials say no decision on a new location will be made until the building is sold. What do you think? • Canada Post should have dealt with problems in the historic building and resumed operations there. • Canada Post should sell the building for $1 to a developer willing to restore it to active use and move back in. • Canada Post should not wait until the old building sells. They should begin working on a new downtown location immediately.

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Regional Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 7

www.newsoptimist.ca

Challis recognized for Battlefords River Valley board work

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• 98.7 acres, 6 miles south of Spiritwood along the #378 highway • Currently used / operated for Gravel crushing • 48X40 Shop with electric heat and drive through over head doors • Water well, old house and barn with metal roof • Generators are negotiable

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Donna Challis accepts a piece of art work from Mayor Ryan Bater of North Battleford and Mayor Ames Leslie of Battleford. Photo by John Cairns

I think what we did in the River Valley as a committee and as a community is amazing. It’s one of our finest assets and there’s so much more yet that can be done. - Donna Challis

Brett Payne

Owner/ REALTOR®

Marlene Kotchorek

Staff Reporter

A special presentation was made at Monday’s city council meeting in North Battleford to Donna Challis for her work with the Battlefords River Valley Board, responsible for the trails and for maintenance of the river valley between North Battleford and Battl-

eford, including Finlayson Island. Challis was chair of the Battlefords River Valley Board for more than a decade until 2015, and was credited with being a driving force with the organization, according to North Battleford Mayor Ryan Bater. Both Bater and Mayor Ames Leslie of Battleford

were at city hall Monday to present a work of art by local artist Bill Humenny to Challis in recognition of her work. “I think what we did in the River Valley as a committee and as a community is amazing,” said Challis in accepting the honour. “It’s one of our finest assets and there’s so much more yet that can be done.”

Herb Cox chairs caucus committee on crime Staff Battlefords MLA Herb Cox has been appointed chair of a newly formed committee of MLAs that will focus on reducing crime rates in Saskatchewan. Premier Brad Wall announced formation of the committee Tuesday and it includes Saskatoon Fairview MLA Jennifer Campeau (vice-chair), Estevan MLA Lori Carr, Canora-Pelly MLA Terry Dennis, Regina Coronation Park MLA Mark Docherty, Cut Knife-Turtleford MLA Larry Doke and Cypress Hills MLA Doug Steele. “One of the main concerns I hear as I travel around Saskatchewan is crime,” Wall said. “I have asked this new committee to focus on causes and make recommendations on what the

province and our partners, like municipalities and police forces, can do to reduce crime.” According to a Saskatchewan Party Caucus press release, the committee will consult with municipalities, police agencies and other organizations to determine what the major issues are and what can be done to better address each. Some particular areas of concern are rising property crime rates in rural areas, police presence in rural areas and

an increase in guns, gang activity and highly addictive and dangerous drugs such as fentanyl in urban centres, the release adds. The committee will make recommendations to the minister of Justice, cabinet and government caucus. “Saskatchewan must be a safe place where people feel protected from crime,” Wall said. “I look forward to receiving and acting on the committee’s recommendations.”

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By John Cairns

• 2,000 + sq. ft. newly renovated home • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms • Additional renos include new windows and doors, main bathroom on 2nd level • Custom built fireplace in the family room • Single detached garage, Double attached garage • Great family home, Westside location

• 732 sq. ft. home • 2 beds, 1 bath • Newer cupboards and countertop in the kitchen • Siding and metal roof 3 years old • Close to convenience store and car wash

$73,900

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Wally Lorenz

Owner/ REALTOR®

160 acres with 150 acres cultivated rented out for $6,000.00 per year, balance is mainly yard, a comfortable 2 bedroom home on a basement plus a back and front porch. High efficiency propane furnace, a summer guest house. Hip roof barn, chicken barn, 55x80 steel Quonset. 30x40 insulated heated work shop, 20x26 wood working shop insulated. A 2096 case FWA tractor w/ front end loader truck, agent has full list available.

$459,600

MLS®568342

1122 104TH STREET

Kayla Petersen

Owner/Associate Broker

• Spacious character home • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms • Some renovations done • New fenced & Landscaping, large lot • Brand new 24x24 double garage, garage is insulated • Close to schools and downtown, Motivated sellers

$199,900

MLS®587822

2426 Buhler Ave. North Battleford

Al White

Associate Broker/ REALTOR®

OPEN HOUSE EVERY THURSDAY FROM 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. $206,359 - $379,665 • No Taxes/condo fees till January 1, 2017 • Units from 812 to 1808 sq. ft. • All 2 bedroom Units • Grade Level Heated Parking • Quiet Residential Area • Immediate Occupancy MLS®564630

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Price ranges $256,900 - $359,900 Sunday, Dec. 4th from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. 6 months of no condo fees 1,034 sq. ft. to 1,404 sq. ft. Indoor ground level parking Building is registered with National Home Warranty

MLS®584568 MLS® 584573 1491- 94TH STREET Sunday, December 4th From 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

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Page 8 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Book Review: Fault Lines: Life and Landscape in Saskatchewan’s Oil Economy By Brian Zinchuk It’s not often you find a publication (besides Pipeline News) focusing specifically on the Saskatchewan oil patch, but this October saw the release of a book that looked deep into our sector and exposed much of its flaws. Back in 2014, University of Regina associate professor of geography Dr. Emily Eaton and photographer Valerie Zink set out on a summer tour of Saskatchewan’s oil producing regions, talking to people impacted by the petroleum industry. At that time, the pair spoke with Pipeline News in Estevan about their project. On Oct. 18, 2016, their book, Fault Lines: Life and Landscape in Saskatchewan’s Oil Economy, was released. Published by the University of Manitoba Press, the 108-page book was sent to Pipeline News for review

prior to launch. Much of it is composed of highcontrast black and white pictures. It starts out with a helpful map outlining not only the oil pools of the province, but also the rural municipalities they visited in each of the oil-producing regions. And this map might be the first time you will find the boundaries of Saskatchewan’s various numbered treaties with First Nations overlaid with oil pools.

Dark Images

In a preface, photographer Zink writes, “As wood-crib grain elevators are torn down, pumpjacks are taking their place as the new fixture of the prairie landscape. Amid the ravages of rural decline, promises of prosperity during the recent oil boom breathed new life into old constructs of the Last Best West, spurring a wave of migration and minting millionaires

in towns with skyrocketing rents and overstressed infrastructure. From the Seacan Motel on the outskirts of Estevan to seismic testing sites on Thunderchild First Nation’s Sundance grounds, this series of 77 images captured during the height of the boom considers the ways in which the oil economy is remaking the spatial and cultural landscape of rural Saskatchewan. More than a lament for pastoral plains, these images testify to a moment of transition and urge viewers to consider the complex consequences of rural communities’ engagement with the oil economy.” While there are some smiles in Zink’s photos, through high-contrast editing and purposeful dark exposure in many cases, most present a feeling of melancholy bleakness. Of particular note: several busi-

$200 Gift Card

1292 100 Street North Battleford (306)446-2112

nesses portrayed, including Estevan’s Derrick Motor Hotel, Baba’s Bistro and Ron’s the Work Wear Store (Estevan Location), have closed since the pair did their tour in 2014, when oil was still US$100 per barrel. ATCO Estevan Lodge had

closed just before the tour.

The Essays

Although rarely directly attributed to their sources, the text is based on more than 70 interviews throughout the province for 2011 to 2015. The interviews included oil workers,

regulators, environmental consultants, landowning farmers and ranchers, community pasture staff, indigenous land defenders, municipal politicians, temporary foreign workers and social service providers. Eaton’s essays cover five chapters: The Past, Present and Future of Oil in Saskatchewan; Hosting the Oil Industry; Working the Oil industry; Servicing the Boom; and Resisting the Oil Industry. In Hosting the Oil Industry, she describes the distinction and separation of surface versus mineral rights, explaining, “The perception that landowners are getting rich from hosting infrastructure is largely false: by the definition of the act, they are being compensated for the last agricultural use of their lands … For families trying to resist farm consolidation and corporatization, oil

Regional Optimist

Book focuses on the most of the negatives of the oil industry lease income, though meant only to compensate for last agricultural use, can be the difference between selling the farm and staying on the land.” She adds, “Unlike surface rights owners, private mineral rights owners are compensated handsomely through annual payments of oil royalties that provide them with substantial ongoing income that more than accounts for the nuisance of surface leases. Thus, in any given landowning community, a complicated landscape of oil interests structures farmer’s and rancher’s relationships to the industry.” Therein Eaton sets up one of the numerous conflicts suggested in the book: the dichotomy between the surface rights owners, who get most of the hassle, and mineral rights owners, who get most of the money. (This applies in the 25 per cent of the oil producing regions where mineral rights

Holiday Gift

are free hold and not held by the Crown.) The book pulls no punches referring to the uglier side of the business, from the effects of vented and leaking hydrogen sulphide on those living nearby, to careless field operators who leave gates open, allowing cattle out, to animals being killed by pumpjacks. Saline produced water spills are highlighted. Eaton writes, “In fact, in many ways the oil industry is more accurately in the business of waste management, given that they must properly dispose of the water that accounts for 75 to 95 per cent of each barrel extracted. The sheer volume of ‘produced water’ that companies must dispose of at their own cost means the potential for spills is significant.” She added, “While spilled oil will biodegrade over time, salt is a persistent contaminant.” Through several exam-

ples throughout the book, Eaton frequently refers to people’s self-censorship of criticizing the industry, as either they, their family or neighbours are often dependent on it for some or all of their income. In Working the Oil Industry, Eaton focuses on the male-dominated, contract-based feast and famine nature of the business, one that takes a hard toll on families. Eaton highlights the difficulties of living in an oil-fueled boomtown in Servicing the Boom. From overpriced, short-supply housing, to temporary foreign workers who toil in fast food restaurants for just above minimum wage, she discusses the strains put on communities when times are booming. It’s in her Resisting the Oil Industry chapter where Eaton’s true feelings are hinted at, as she highlights protests at Thunderchild First Nation and an area

Contest Rules:

ENTER ! TO WIN

ENTER AS OFTEN AS YOU WISH!

GIVEAWAYS

All entries must be dropped off at one of the participating businesses on or before December 12, 2016 at 5:00 pm. The LUCKY WINNERS will be drawn from entries on December 13, 2016. Please fill in the entry form. Photocopies will be accepted. Prizes must be accepted as awarded and have NO cash value. One winner from each participating business will be awarded. Some restrictions may apply. Contest is open to everyone except News-Optimist employees and their immediate families.

Celebrat ing 61 Years! Selected Shirts

61

$

00

• Blu by Polifroni • Columbia • Oakley • Modango

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north of La Loche. It is worth noting Eaton has made something of a second profession as a frequent protester for various causes. While not at all mentioned in its pages, during the time this book came together, she has been involved with protests on a broad number of topics. Her favourite causes include numerous aboriginal issues; pro-Palestinian (she visited Palestine recently); boycott, divest and sanctions against Israel; pro-renewable energy; anti-pipelines; and that is not an exhaustive list. Her Facebook page is populated with frequent postings about her presence at numerous protests. She is occasionally one of the organizers. We reported she was the speaker at a February 2015 Saskatoon meeting that hoped to drum up support for banning fracking in Saskatchewan. In her conclusion, Eaton touches on the down-

turn that has gripped the industry over the last two years. Due to the publication timetable, there was substantial lag between much of the book’s writing and final printing, thus, the downturn’s tremendous impacts are all but missing from this book. She writes, “The recent downturn, although certainly painful for oil-producing regions, also opens up opportunities to articulate a different future. The burden is on all of us to bring to life alternatives that can break the cycle of boom and bust and that are more environmentally and socially just.” It is important to note Pipeline News was consulted several times with regards to the research for this book, where we largely spoke of the positives of the industry. This included that aforementioned meeting with Eaton and Zink in Estevan during their 2014 tour. Despite this, CBC was quoted three times in

the footnotes section, and Pipeline News was not footnoted once. Yet, in a Facebook post on July 27 regarding the Husky oil spill, she wrote, “Pipeline News is a very pro-industry rag, but it’s always got the most complete coverage of SK’s oil industry. Here is the most detailed coverage I’ve seen of the spill - Including the size of the pipe - 16 inches, the source of the oil - Husky’s Paradise Hill site (north of the river) and details about the incident report.” Eaton’s writing and Zink’s photos lay out the Saskatchewan oil industry, warts and all. The first few pages focus on the benefits of the oil industry, and occasionally, begrudgingly, benefits pop up throughout the remainder of the pages. The rest of the book focuses primarily on the warts. If you work in the Saskatchewan oil patch, buy this book. But you aren’t going to like it.

HOLIDAY GIFT GIVEAWAYS

ENTRY FORM

Please drop off your entry form at any of the participating businesses.

Name: __________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________ Email: ___________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________________________

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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 9

www.newsoptimist.ca

2501 - 99th Street, North Battleford

218 - 22nd St. West, Battleford, SK

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Page 8 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Book Review: Fault Lines: Life and Landscape in Saskatchewan’s Oil Economy By Brian Zinchuk It’s not often you find a publication (besides Pipeline News) focusing specifically on the Saskatchewan oil patch, but this October saw the release of a book that looked deep into our sector and exposed much of its flaws. Back in 2014, University of Regina associate professor of geography Dr. Emily Eaton and photographer Valerie Zink set out on a summer tour of Saskatchewan’s oil producing regions, talking to people impacted by the petroleum industry. At that time, the pair spoke with Pipeline News in Estevan about their project. On Oct. 18, 2016, their book, Fault Lines: Life and Landscape in Saskatchewan’s Oil Economy, was released. Published by the University of Manitoba Press, the 108-page book was sent to Pipeline News for review

prior to launch. Much of it is composed of highcontrast black and white pictures. It starts out with a helpful map outlining not only the oil pools of the province, but also the rural municipalities they visited in each of the oil-producing regions. And this map might be the first time you will find the boundaries of Saskatchewan’s various numbered treaties with First Nations overlaid with oil pools.

Dark Images

In a preface, photographer Zink writes, “As wood-crib grain elevators are torn down, pumpjacks are taking their place as the new fixture of the prairie landscape. Amid the ravages of rural decline, promises of prosperity during the recent oil boom breathed new life into old constructs of the Last Best West, spurring a wave of migration and minting millionaires

in towns with skyrocketing rents and overstressed infrastructure. From the Seacan Motel on the outskirts of Estevan to seismic testing sites on Thunderchild First Nation’s Sundance grounds, this series of 77 images captured during the height of the boom considers the ways in which the oil economy is remaking the spatial and cultural landscape of rural Saskatchewan. More than a lament for pastoral plains, these images testify to a moment of transition and urge viewers to consider the complex consequences of rural communities’ engagement with the oil economy.” While there are some smiles in Zink’s photos, through high-contrast editing and purposeful dark exposure in many cases, most present a feeling of melancholy bleakness. Of particular note: several busi-

$200 Gift Card

1292 100 Street North Battleford (306)446-2112

nesses portrayed, including Estevan’s Derrick Motor Hotel, Baba’s Bistro and Ron’s the Work Wear Store (Estevan Location), have closed since the pair did their tour in 2014, when oil was still US$100 per barrel. ATCO Estevan Lodge had

closed just before the tour.

The Essays

Although rarely directly attributed to their sources, the text is based on more than 70 interviews throughout the province for 2011 to 2015. The interviews included oil workers,

regulators, environmental consultants, landowning farmers and ranchers, community pasture staff, indigenous land defenders, municipal politicians, temporary foreign workers and social service providers. Eaton’s essays cover five chapters: The Past, Present and Future of Oil in Saskatchewan; Hosting the Oil Industry; Working the Oil industry; Servicing the Boom; and Resisting the Oil Industry. In Hosting the Oil Industry, she describes the distinction and separation of surface versus mineral rights, explaining, “The perception that landowners are getting rich from hosting infrastructure is largely false: by the definition of the act, they are being compensated for the last agricultural use of their lands … For families trying to resist farm consolidation and corporatization, oil

Regional Optimist

Book focuses on the most of the negatives of the oil industry lease income, though meant only to compensate for last agricultural use, can be the difference between selling the farm and staying on the land.” She adds, “Unlike surface rights owners, private mineral rights owners are compensated handsomely through annual payments of oil royalties that provide them with substantial ongoing income that more than accounts for the nuisance of surface leases. Thus, in any given landowning community, a complicated landscape of oil interests structures farmer’s and rancher’s relationships to the industry.” Therein Eaton sets up one of the numerous conflicts suggested in the book: the dichotomy between the surface rights owners, who get most of the hassle, and mineral rights owners, who get most of the money. (This applies in the 25 per cent of the oil producing regions where mineral rights

Holiday Gift

are free hold and not held by the Crown.) The book pulls no punches referring to the uglier side of the business, from the effects of vented and leaking hydrogen sulphide on those living nearby, to careless field operators who leave gates open, allowing cattle out, to animals being killed by pumpjacks. Saline produced water spills are highlighted. Eaton writes, “In fact, in many ways the oil industry is more accurately in the business of waste management, given that they must properly dispose of the water that accounts for 75 to 95 per cent of each barrel extracted. The sheer volume of ‘produced water’ that companies must dispose of at their own cost means the potential for spills is significant.” She added, “While spilled oil will biodegrade over time, salt is a persistent contaminant.” Through several exam-

ples throughout the book, Eaton frequently refers to people’s self-censorship of criticizing the industry, as either they, their family or neighbours are often dependent on it for some or all of their income. In Working the Oil Industry, Eaton focuses on the male-dominated, contract-based feast and famine nature of the business, one that takes a hard toll on families. Eaton highlights the difficulties of living in an oil-fueled boomtown in Servicing the Boom. From overpriced, short-supply housing, to temporary foreign workers who toil in fast food restaurants for just above minimum wage, she discusses the strains put on communities when times are booming. It’s in her Resisting the Oil Industry chapter where Eaton’s true feelings are hinted at, as she highlights protests at Thunderchild First Nation and an area

Contest Rules:

ENTER ! TO WIN

ENTER AS OFTEN AS YOU WISH!

GIVEAWAYS

All entries must be dropped off at one of the participating businesses on or before December 12, 2016 at 5:00 pm. The LUCKY WINNERS will be drawn from entries on December 13, 2016. Please fill in the entry form. Photocopies will be accepted. Prizes must be accepted as awarded and have NO cash value. One winner from each participating business will be awarded. Some restrictions may apply. Contest is open to everyone except News-Optimist employees and their immediate families.

Celebrat ing 61 Years! Selected Shirts

61

$

00

• Blu by Polifroni • Columbia • Oakley • Modango

1281 - 100th St. 306-446-4300

We are your repair specialists! • iPhone • Smart Phone • Tablet “Quality Service”

Water Damage? We Can Fix It!

LOANER PHONES available for ALL Carriers

north of La Loche. It is worth noting Eaton has made something of a second profession as a frequent protester for various causes. While not at all mentioned in its pages, during the time this book came together, she has been involved with protests on a broad number of topics. Her favourite causes include numerous aboriginal issues; pro-Palestinian (she visited Palestine recently); boycott, divest and sanctions against Israel; pro-renewable energy; anti-pipelines; and that is not an exhaustive list. Her Facebook page is populated with frequent postings about her presence at numerous protests. She is occasionally one of the organizers. We reported she was the speaker at a February 2015 Saskatoon meeting that hoped to drum up support for banning fracking in Saskatchewan. In her conclusion, Eaton touches on the down-

turn that has gripped the industry over the last two years. Due to the publication timetable, there was substantial lag between much of the book’s writing and final printing, thus, the downturn’s tremendous impacts are all but missing from this book. She writes, “The recent downturn, although certainly painful for oil-producing regions, also opens up opportunities to articulate a different future. The burden is on all of us to bring to life alternatives that can break the cycle of boom and bust and that are more environmentally and socially just.” It is important to note Pipeline News was consulted several times with regards to the research for this book, where we largely spoke of the positives of the industry. This included that aforementioned meeting with Eaton and Zink in Estevan during their 2014 tour. Despite this, CBC was quoted three times in

the footnotes section, and Pipeline News was not footnoted once. Yet, in a Facebook post on July 27 regarding the Husky oil spill, she wrote, “Pipeline News is a very pro-industry rag, but it’s always got the most complete coverage of SK’s oil industry. Here is the most detailed coverage I’ve seen of the spill - Including the size of the pipe - 16 inches, the source of the oil - Husky’s Paradise Hill site (north of the river) and details about the incident report.” Eaton’s writing and Zink’s photos lay out the Saskatchewan oil industry, warts and all. The first few pages focus on the benefits of the oil industry, and occasionally, begrudgingly, benefits pop up throughout the remainder of the pages. The rest of the book focuses primarily on the warts. If you work in the Saskatchewan oil patch, buy this book. But you aren’t going to like it.

HOLIDAY GIFT GIVEAWAYS

ENTRY FORM

Please drop off your entry form at any of the participating businesses.

Name: __________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________ Email: ___________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________________________

Your Home for the Holidays From Stockings & Ornaments to Garland & Décor.

PH. 306-445-3300

We’ve Got you Covered!

Toll Free 1-877-223-SAVE (7283)

*TAXES & DUTIES EXTRA

Dealer Licence #911462

www.bridgesgm.com

Downtown North Battleford|306-445-4111

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 9

www.newsoptimist.ca

2501 - 99th Street, North Battleford

218 - 22nd St. West, Battleford, SK

306-937-2642

Offer good until 12/31/2016. Hours: 7:30 am - 5:30 pm Mon. - Fri.; 7:30 am - 3:30 pm Sat.

Looking for a UNIQUE

Christmas Gift?

For the cook in the family Saskatoon’s Famous...

Solar Gardens Oils & Balsamic Vinegars Fresh! Flavourful! Fragrant!

WE ARE MORE THAN A FURNITURE STORE

Highway 4 North • North Battleford

306-445-2232 Located in

Meet the Artist

Strait Line Auto Sales Bringing country value into the city North Battleford, Saskatchewan

www.straitlineauto.com 2602 - 99th Street • 306.445.5885

Jody Miller Showing on

December 10th 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

ARTrageous

Custom Art Finishing & Gallery

Jody Miller Artwork starting at $40.00

Jocelyn Schmunk

Suite 2 2062 - 100th St., North Battleford

306-445-1488


Page 10 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

www.newsoptimist.ca

Regional Optimist

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Join us as we usher in the Christmas season at the 2016 Festival of Trees being held at the beautiful Dekker Centre for the Performing Arts from Friday, December 2nd to Thursday, December 8th. The seasonally decorated items including trees, wreaths, and swags will be artfully arranged in wonderful vignettes for you to view and they will be available for silent auction throughout the seven day event. We look forward to seeing you at the 2016 Festival of Trees as we celebrate the Christmas season with family and friends and support healthcare in our community ...

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2ND – 5:00 PM What an excellent way to end the work week by attending the opening night, “Let’s Get Lit!” Enjoy a beverage with complimentary appetizers while listening to live music. Visit with friends while sitting comfortably in the beautifully decorated foyer of the Dekker Centre. Watch in awe as the “big” tree gets lit up!! You will be the first to view all the decorated trees, wreaths and accent pieces. It is the opening night of Festival of Trees and a great way to spend some down time with your friends and family. We look forward to seeing you. Tickets are $15/adult. Children under 15 years are free of charge.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3RD – 5:00 PM

Reception starts at 5:00 pm – Advance tickets only To get into the spirit of Kentucky we will be featuring one of Saskatchewan’s finest bluegrass/alt-country bands “Grain Report.” Come and enjoy an evening of bluegrass music and observe the big hats and bow ties some of the guests will be sporting. Sip on your mint julep while you visit with friends and wander through the foyer in a Christmas wonderland. Dinner will be full service. Live auctions will take place. Tickets are $100/person

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4TH – 9:00 AM-3:00 PM 9:00 am-12:00 noon: Enjoy a pancake breakfast with ice cream and sprinkle toppings (first 500). 9:15 am-10:15 am: Face painting by your child’s favourite artist, Danica Lorer. 10:15 am-11:15 am: “Stories and Songs for a Sparkling Season” by your child’s favourite entertainer, Danica Lorer. 9:30 am-1:30 pm: Pictures with Santa Claus. Admission is $2.00/person. Silver collection for the Pictures with Santa.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8TH – 3:30 PM-6:30 PM

Enjoy a traditional High Tea complete with a “proper” High Tea menu complete with petit fours and cucumber finger sandwiches. Enjoy live entertainment while sitting in the Christmas ambiance of the beautifully decorated Dekker Centre foyer. Advance tickets only. Tickets are $25/person.

PUBLIC VIEWING Monday, December 5th : 9:00 am-5:00 pm Tuesday, December 6th: 9:00 am-5:00 pm Admission is a silver collection For more information call BUH Foundation office at 306-446-6652


Regional Optimist

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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 11

Community safety co-ordinator’s report

SAGE struggles with aboriginal engagement By John Cairns Staff Reporter

Here are some highlights from the November monitoring report to council by Community Safety Co-ordinator Herb Sutton on Monday night. The next meeting of SAGE is Dec. 7 and they will focus on work plan development for 2017. Four groups have been identified for engagement in the coming year and they are youth, business, seniors/elders/adults and urban and rural aboriginal people. Sutton noted it was in regards to that last group that they “struggled with the most” in engagement. He said the SAGE group has put forward a proposal to Public Safety Canada to develop processes and tools and building capacities to have those kinds of conversations. “We have to find ways

smaller scale than trying to do something with the entire city.” He said creating formal neighbourhoods would help with that. Sutton also reported on efforts at the Hub table and Hub steering committee and he noted one of the efforts has been to find ways to involve communitybased organizations in the work of the Hub. They have invited organizations to come to the Hub table and make presentations on what they are Herb Sutton gave his November monitoring report doing. Monday night, his first one to the newly-elected The idea, Sutton excouncil. Photo by John Cairns plained, is that when Hub table members make conto move ahead in a positive tiative and Sutton noted nections to individuals and way,” said Sutton. preliminary discussions families to services, “they Sutton also reported on have already started. He can take the appropriate Crime Prevention Through noted SAGE has strongly community-based organiEnvironmental Design ef- supported the creation of zation materials with them forts, in particular on work formal neighbourhoods as and make that available to with respect to creation of a way to help with the en- the families as well.” As well, much closer formal neighbourhoods. gagement required with the work is happening with The CPTED Review public. Committee is partnering Sutton noted “engage- Building Partnerships to with SAGE on that ini- ment works better on a Reduce Crime, and the Hub has been getting more referrals from a number of agencies including the RCMP. Sutton called it a “strong tangible sign of a emergency crews battled Smoke from the fire and very effective table” when an elevator fire. fire suppression efforts ne- agencies were coming and Turtleford RCMP say cessitated the blocking of participating and bringing firefighters from Turtl- the highway, but the high- elevated risks forward. Sutton also had some eford, St. Walburg and way was open again at 5 Mervin were called to the a.m. Wednesday. At that encouraging news to report blaze at an elevator in Tur- time fire crews were still on the activities of The Lighthouse Serving the tleford at about 10:50 p.m. on the scene.

Elevator fire closes highway Staff Travellers on Highway 26 in the Turtleford area encountered a detour for several hours late Tuesday and into the early morning hours of Wednesday as

Battlefords. Sutton had spoken to the new manager in place there and reported that effective Nov. 28, the Lighthouse will now be open 24 hours, including daytime hours. That schedule was expected to continue until the end the March. Breakfast and lunch will be open to the community, though dinners would be restricted to

those who will be at the Lighthouse for that night. Sutton also said the organization is looking for volunteers and encouraged those interested to contact The Lighthouse if they wanted to help. Sutton still noted in his written report that more work was needed to find sustainable, long-term funding models for the emergency shelter.

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Page 12 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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North Stars trio aim to make Canada West roster By Lucas Punkari Sports Reporter

Of the 12 teams in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League, the Battlefords North Stars are the only one that haven’t had a player take part in the World Junior A Challenge since it started in 2006. Levi Kleiboer, Cody Spagrud and Layne Young are eager to make that a thing of the past. All three players will be travelling to Leduc, Alta. on Sunday to try and make the final roster for Canada

West at this year’s tournament, which will take place in Bonnyville, Alta. from Dec. 11-17. “That would mean a lot for us to be able to do that,” Spagrud said. “To represent the Battlefords region and our team at a big event like that would be a tremendous opportunity.” All three players are in their second seasons with the North Stars. Young, who attended last year’s Canada West camp with teammates Reed Delainey and Connor

Sych, leads the North Stars in scoring this season with 35 points in 27 games. The 19-year-old forward from Frenchman Butte is currently fifth in league scoring. “I don’t think it will be as overwhelming of an experience for me as it was last year,” Young said. “It’s a much faster pace than what we’re used to here, but I know to expect that this time around. “I would say that I’m a more physical player this year. Being a stronger player has helped me to

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outmuscle guys when I’m battling for pucks.” Kleiboer, an 18-year-old from Martensville, leads all North Stars defencemen in points this year with 21 points in 29 games. “I’m really looking forward to the camp,” Kleiboer said. “It’ll be a great opportunity to compete against players that are committed to the college level and seeing just what it takes to be right there with them. “I’m much more confi-

dent out on the ice than I was a year ago, especially when I’m battling against bigger guys in the corners.” Spagrud, who is from Gull Lake and is also 18 years of age, has 10 points in 29 games. “Coming back here for a second year has really helped me to feel more at ease this season,” Spagrud said. “You have a better idea of what to expect when you’re familiar with what you’re facing on a regular basis, especially

when it comes to working out in the summer and knowing what you have to do in order to get stronger. “When it comes to the camp, having Layne around will be great for Levi and I. He knows what it will be like and that will only make us better as the week goes on.” The training camp, which will feature a total of 60 players, will begin Monday with the final roster expected to be announced Thursday.

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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 13

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The Medstead Mustangs senior boys’ volleyball team gave a thumbs-up after they won the SHSAA 2A boys’ provincial championship on their home court Saturday. Photo courtesy of Greg Knot

By Lucas Punkari Sports Reporter

It was a special weekend for the Medstead Mustangs senior boys’ volleyball team. Not only were they the host team for this year’s SHSAA 2A tournament, but they also captured their fourth provincial championship in school history. The Mustangs captured a banner for the first time since 2013 with a two-set win (25-22 and 25-19) over the Island Lake Warriors. “It was pretty amazing,” Mustangs head coach Greg Knot said. “We entered the tournament as the fourth seed, and we were just hoping to make it to the semifinal. “We had been to a number of finals, but we hadn’t won a tournament all year. We had to beat Fox Valley in our last round-robin game to get into the playoffs, but after that the boys played the best volleyball that they had played all year.” Due to a number of injuries throughout the course of the season, the Mustangs weren’t able to use their full roster of 16 players until the provincial tournament. “Our six Grade 12 players have been playing together for the last six years, so finally getting that chemistry back in

the squad was huge,” Knot said. “Our ball movement was probably what stood out the most with that group during the weekend. We’re not the type of team that can outblock or outhit our opponents, so we worked a lot on keeping the other teams off balance with how we moved the ball around.” The Mustangs toughest match of the weekend came in the quarter-final Saturday, as they defeated the Hepburn Hawks in a three-set thriller. “They were the team that scared me the most,” Knot said. “A year ago we had beaten them four straight times in the regular season, but then they got the win over us in the provincial semifinal. “They have an incredible setter, which made things pretty tough. It was pretty much a flip of a coin between both teams, but we were able to take control at the very end.” That victory was followed up by a semifinal triumph over Ecole Mathieu of Kincaid, which set the stage for the championship contest with Island Lake. The team also had to deal with elements out of their control, as a power outage caused havoc with the round-robin schedule Friday. “When the power went

out at around 10:30 a.m., we just assumed that it would only last for a few minutes,” Knot said. “When it started to last longer and longer, we realized we had to do something. “The power didn’t come back on until a little after 3 p.m., so we couldn’t have any games at the gyms in Medstead or Glaslyn. Luckily, the schools in Spiritwood and Turtleford helped us out, and we were very appreciative of that. The amount of work everyone put in to get everything back on track was impressive.” The Turtleford Titans also took part in the 2A provincials, but missed out on the playoffs. Elsewhere, the Cut Knife Condors won the bronze medal at the 1A tournament in Broadview as they defeated the H. Hardcastle Royals of Edam in three sets. The Royals were looking for a second straight provincial championship. The Maidstone Huskies also had a chance to make it on the podium at the 3A tournament in Osler, but came up short in the bronze medal game to host Valley Christian Academy Lions. Wilkie’s McLurg Broncos made it to the quarterfinals but were eliminated from the competition by Ecole St-Isidore of Bellevue.

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Page 14 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

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JPII and Unity senior girls’ basketball teams begin season By Lucas Punkari Sports Reporter

As it is for every school in the province, the goal for the John Paul II Crusaders and Unity Warriors basketball teams is to make it to the Hoopla provincial championships in March. However, both programs are also keeping an eye towards the future as they each have a number of young players taking to the court this winter. “It’ll be a bit of a learning year for us,” Crusaders head coach Bruce Yockey said. “We have seven Grade 10s

on the roster so it’s very important for us to get them a lot of court time, especially against many of the top teams in the 4A category.” “We’d like to make our way back into the 3A Hoopla mix but we have a very young team with many Grade 10 and 11 players,” Warriors head coach Matthew Poirier added. “We’ve lost a lot of players due to graduation, so it’ll take some time to get everyone to gel together. In the years to come though, I think we’ll have a very exciting team in Unity.”

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Sarah Morrison of the John Paul II Crusaders looked for a teammate to pass the ball to while she was guarded by Cyane Sperle of the Unity Warriors during a third-place game at John Paul II’s senior girls’ basketball tournament Saturday. Photo by Lucas Punkari

The two sides squared off in the third place game at a season-opening tournament at John Paul II Collegiate in North Battleford Saturday, with the Warriors coming away with a 54-30 victory. “The goal this weekend was to have fun, but to also improve our skills,” Poirier said. “I felt like we did a really good job of that. “There’s some work we have to do, especially with

our passing as we had some struggles with that against John Paul II, but it was still a pretty good weekend for our first time together as a group.” It was a busy weekend for the Crusaders, as they ended up playing in both sides of the tournament draw with only seven teams competing in the event. Prior to taking on the Warriors, they won the

fifth-place game by a score of 45-30 over the Meadow Lake Carpenter Spartans. “The girls’ were dead tired at the end of the day, but they agreed that it was better for them to be getting through all of the early-season conditioning in games rather than running drills in practice,” Yockey said. “I was really happy with how the weekend went and there were a lot more posi-

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tives that we can take out of the tournament than negatives. We were very good around the outside of the basket, but our ball movement is something that we can get better at.” The Melfort Comets went on to win the tournament over the Warman Wolverines. The Crusaders next tournament will be in two weeks, when they’ll travel to Balfour Collegiate in Regina. Meanwhile, the Warriors will return to action this weekend for a tournament in Caronport. The provincial Hoopla championships will be held in Regina from March 23-25.

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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 15

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Edam Three Stars assistant captain Mitch Wall powered his way by Levin Floen of the Meota Combines at the North Battleford Civic Centre Saturday night. Photo by Lucas Punkari

By Lucas Punkari Sports Reporter

After being swept aside in three games by the Shellbrook Silvertips in last year’s Saskatchewan Prairie Hockey League final, the Edam Three Stars are determined to come away with the league championship. Following a 5-4 win over the Meota Combines at the North Battleford Civic Centre Saturday night, the Three Stars are 3-0 for the season and in a three-way tie for first place in the SPHL standings with the Silvertips and the Battleford Beaver Blues. “Usually we have a slow start to the season, so this is a bit of a different feeling for us,” Three Stars forward Mitch Wall said. “Everyone’s getting into shape and getting used to playing with each other once again, but we’ve been able to click right away

here.” Unlike their first two wins of the season, which saw the Three Stars dominate their opponents by a combined score of 20-3, Saturday’s contest was a much tighter affair. “I felt like we were a little bit nervous at the start and we couldn’t really break out of our own end,” Wall said. “We started to settle down after the first period, and we started to play our game by keeping things simple. “It was more of a defensive style game, and it was a good one to be a part of. Both teams were playing really well, which is what we were expecting.” Wall, who has the most points in the league with 15, led the Three Stars on offence Saturday with two goals while Keegan Bourelle and Damon Schaefer both had two assists. A pair of new faces

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connected on the gamewinning goal for the Three Stars in the third period, as Owen LaClare made a great pass to Kade Mosimann, who fired the puck through traffic and past Combines goaltender Mike Silvester. “Owen and Kade both played at a high level last year,” Wall said. “Owen was with the Estevan Bruins in the SJHL and Kade was playing midget in Prince Albert. “We have a couple of experienced lines up front, but Owen and Kade both add an extra dynamic to our team. Owen has one of the best shots around, and I think he’ll really hit his stride for us soon.” Tristan Deronoski and Geordy Gabruck also scored for the Three Stars on Saturday. Brody Tatchell and Michael Pylypow had a goal and an assist each for the Combines in the loss.

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The Three Stars will look to continue their winning ways Friday night, when they’ll travel to Shellbrook to face the Silvertips, who also have a 3-0 record. “I think it’ll be a similar type of game to the one we had with the Combines,” Wall said. “We need to play smart in our end and not have as many turnovers, as I think that’ll be the key to having any success against them.” The Beaver Blues, who have a 3-1 record, moved into a tie for first place with the Silvertips and Three Stars following a 6-5 road win against the Cut Knife Colts Tuesday. Brent Salzl led the way for the Beaver Blues with a goal and three assists, while Riley Albert and Justin Waskewitch both had five point nights for the Colts. The Beaver Blues will host Hafford Friday.

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Nov. 26 was the National Holodomor Memorial Day commemorating the 83rd anniversary of the famine genocide in Ukraine. Thirteen per cent of all Saskatchewan residents can trace all or part of their ancestry back to Ukraine, so the memorial is dear to many peoples’ hearts. John Paul II Collegiate teacher Chris Fullerton included Holodomor observance into his curriculum in his art class. Students in Fullerton’s art class each completed a project in honour of Holodomor remembrance. Photos submitted


Page 18 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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Regional Optimist

It’s business as usual

Same familiar faces. Same location. Same great service. To our loyal and valued customers, We’re pleased to announce that we’re now part of Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers. This was not a decision we made lightly, but it was made in the best interests of our family and the continued success of the business. Joining Ritchie Bros. allows us to continue building strong connections closer to home, while offering our customers new and enhanced services. But, it’s business as usual at Kramer Auctions, and we’re confident that with our combined experience and expertise, farmers – whether sellers or buyers – are the winners! Rest assured that our auctions will continue to be handled with honesty & integrity. You can look forward to seeing the same familiar faces offering the same great service you have grown to trust. Sincerely, The Kramer Family

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Art from ARC

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 19

Santa

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Colouring Table 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Children’s Entertainment ARC Creative Studios Gallery features affordable art for the festive season. Enjoy current works from 13 local artists ready for the Christmas bow. ARC will be hosting a reception where guests can meet the artists Wed., Dec. 7 from 4 to 7 p.m. Pottery by Joanne Rivers-Wang, Brenda Lamb

By K. Smith It’s cold, drab and dreary outside, but vibrant and enjoyable inside. A few enthusiastic Battlefords Art Club members met Tuesday to paint and engage in art activities. Lorraine and other members were at the workshop, Artist Block with Alejandro Romero. The workshop was held on the weekend with Alejandro as a facilitator to help painters get over that “bump in the road” we all experience. Watch this space for further information regarding the art club party, Dec. 13. The time is still to be announced. Take time to enjoy life!

12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m.

The Ernestine Haptin Show (Music and entertainment)

Santa is Coming 1:00 p.m.

Photos with Santa By Warne Photography 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.

REMEMBER TO BOOK ALL YOUR CHRISTMAS PARTIES & EVENTS WITH US...

All Children & parents are encourage to wear their PJs and children can bring a teddy

Size doesn’t matter!

Stop by our lunch counter for daily meal specials Open from 11:00 am - 5:00 pm 1642 - 100th St., North Battleford, 306-445-4042 Cell: 306-480-7840

306.445.3414

www.FrontierCentreSK.ca


Page 20 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

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Time for Tea

Life

Zion Lutheran Church in North Battleford and United Church in Battleford both had a Christmas tea and bake sale on Saturday afternoon. Folks at both churches enjoyed the holiday atmosphere with Christmas trees and lights. There were homemade buns and jams and knitted items for perusal — perfect for treating yourself or others this season. Photos by Shannon Kovalsky

as I know it

By Colleen Crawford

Worldwide Candle Lighting “Light a candle for all children who have died, that their light may always shine”

This non-denominational ceremony commemorates and honours children, siblings and grandchildren of all ages who have died from any cause and transcends all ethnic, cultural, religious and political boundaries. All family members and friends are welcome.

Sunday, December 11, 2016

Happily ever after They were the “Fred and Ginger” of the dance studio. Maybe not. Were Fred and Ginger a couple off the dance floor? Did a romance ignite when they started dancing together? Maybe they were Cinderella and Prince Charming. She once told me her story, before and after she met her husband. She had a child-like sense of joy about her when she spoke of her life and he was such a very big part of her story. They were both single and had never been married. He was 60 when they met and fell in love.

From someone who feels like the romance ship has sailed in, out and through their life at the age of 55, I look to my favourite dance couple and marvel at the proven fact you are never too old to fall in love and start a life together. Last night, she spoke of him and them with a sense of naiveté and wonder. She talked of how they met. She told us of the ways he listened and gently guided her through her life’s journey. She called him “Sweetie.” I have never known one, without the other. In my eyes, they have been

Money Problems?

a couple “forever.” But they weren’t. In actuality, they were newlyweds when I first met them. Funny I didn’t realize that at the time. They simply seemed meant for each other. Destiny and dancing brought these two young souls together and two lives merged into one life together. They are two of the kindest, most caring, giving and fun-loving people I know. I aspired to be part of a couple that emulated the love and joy they had found together. Their wedding vows saw them through “in sickness and in health.” The last time I spoke to him, his health was declining and when I asked

7:00 p.m.

Catholic Family Services of the Battlefords Inc.

101, 1272 101st Street, North Battleford

Followed by snacks, refreshments and fellowship. If you plan to attend, you are invited to bring a picture of your loved one to display on the memory table. Sponsored by: Catholic Family Services, W. Brett Wilson and Family and the Territorial Alliance Church

Marla Adams, CPA, CA, CIRP Licensed Insolvency Trustee

Start Fresh. We can help. FREE consultation 1-855-220-1705 www.debtsolutions.deloitte.ca Appointments available in North Battleford 400, 122 - 1st Ave. South, Saskatoon, SK . S7K 7E5

NORTH BATTLEFORD 306-446-7177 or 306-480-9876 Dates: Nov. 25 & 26, 2016 Dec. 2 & 3, 2016 Dec. 9 & 10, 2016 Dec. 16 & 17, 2016 December 31, 2016 Hours 9:00 pm - 2:00 am

how he was, his only concern was for his wife. They had moved out of their house and into a seniors’ condominium and he was so pleased his wife was surrounded by a caring community and out of their high maintenance home. She was happy and that, to me, sounded like his greatest joy. He passed away last week. Last night, his brave and courageous wife got up and spoke about him and her and them in front of a room full of family, friends and community. She looked so strong and her love for him superseded all else as she told us their love story. Her voice was young and her words were full of life as she remembered the impact he had made on her life. I thought that kind of love only happened in fairy tales. I am grateful to know this couple that fell in love on the dance floor and forged a partnership which carried them through their lives together. And they will live happily ever after, within her heart and all of those who were privileged to know this real life couple who walked straight out of a fairy tale and into our lives.


Regional Optimist

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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 21

A few of my favourite garden tools By Erl Svendsen

Like most people, I get a lot of junk email. I’ll admit some of it is my own fault as I voluntarily subscribe to certain sites. One of them is a cooking magazine. About once a month, they send out an email with a themed “curated” collection of kitchen tools, for example for the baker or the barbecuer. That got me thinking of the tools I regularly use a gardener. A couple of groundrules, first, I’m a strong believer in “tools for life.” They must be sturdy, solid (no hollow metal tubes for handles if I can help it) and non-rusting, stainless steel if possible. Second, they have to be comfortable to use and actually be good at what they’re supposed to do. Here a short list of some of my favourites. Heavy duty, one-piece cast aluminum trowels. I have two – a 4” wide one for digging substantial holes quickly (great for planting large transplants in the spring) – and a long narrow one for digging narrow deep holes, excellent for getting out dandelion roots from the lawn without leaving large cra-

arden Chat ters or planting bulbs individually. The handles have bright orange rough rubber grips for visibility and comfort. Hori hori knife. A friend of mine couldn’t shut up about hers so I had to give it a try. Now it’s my constant gardening companion. It looks like a cross between an ordinary trowel and a kabar military knife – shiny, stainless steel, slightly curved, pointed 7” long blade with a sharpened smooth edge on one side and a sharp serrated edge on the other. For an added bonus, it has a six-inch ruler embossed down the middle of the blade. Great for digging up and dividing perennials. Japanese hand-hoe. The basic design is an offset, four-inch wide half-moon head attached to a short handle. The business end is sharp and is useful for simply separating weeds from their root system as you pull it along the soil surface. It has pointy ends that are good at getting in close

SaskBooks Book Pick

homecoming

Written by Zondra M. Roy Published by Jackpine Press Review by Shelley A. Leedahl $30 ISBN 978-1-92703520-7 Sometimes the lines between genres blur. As I began reading Zondra M. Roy’s chapbook, homecoming , I thought, “looks like poetry, feels like a first-person essay.” This isn’t poetry filled with similes, metaphors, alliteration and finely-crafted images, this is a straightup story (with line breaks) that shouts. “This is how it’s been, I’ve made mistakes, and I’m grateful for the people and activities (like performing hip hop) that have helped me along the way.” The Dené Cree/Métis writer left home at 13 and she doesn’t hold back on her life’s gritty details as she writes of bouncing between various homes in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick (“for a few months”) and British Columbia. Actually, the word home is a misnomer here — no warm connotations of homemade bread and a family sitting around a fireplace exist when one’s stays include a juvenile detention centre in Saskatoon (jail) and that hardest of beds – the street. Roy begins her story with family history: “ My parents were born into a society that was built to

facilitate their failures … they were native people in the northern prairies.” Strong language and a strong voice, legitimized by the vernacular — “It wasn’t until I moved to Saskatoon that I seen Native MCs” — and, ironically, by the lack of memory. “I tried to get through grade eight\but I don’t think I got through grade eight.” After she “got jacked” on the street, she moved in with her 17-year-old sister, a single mother doing all she could to rise up from

C

heck It Out!

Lakeland Library www.lakeland.lib.sk.ca

Colin from Lakeland headquarters recommends The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World by Abigail Tucker. This is an amusing and highly entertaining book examining the historical, cultural and scientific background of cats and their relationship to mankind. It is a must read for anyone who wants to understand the modern feline.

to dig out small weeds without damaging your vegetables or ornamentals. This is my absolute favourite gardening tool! Rabbiting spade. The shovelhead is narrower and longer (five to six inches wide by up to 12 inches long) than your usual spade. This is great tool for digging up and transplanting perennials and small shrubs. It is also good for digging deep narrow trenches (hence, it’s other common name – trenching spade) if you’re installing an irrigation line or a short, shallow drainage trench. Axe file. This is invaluable for keeping shovels, hoes (including the handhoe) and, of course, axes sharp. A sharp tool make for quick and easy work – a real back saver. Wide landscape rake. I bought my three-foot wide rake when I was redoing my lawn several years ago. It is super for spreading out low mounds of soil and makes quick work of leveling larger areas. I now use it every spring to level out my community garden plot. Good quality hand pruner. My pruner of choice is the Swiss-made an abusive relationship, including “trying to push a 4x4 stroller across the\ street in the snow.” The sheer honesty in this writing is impressive. “I never hurt anyone\until I did” Roy writes. On the streets “It was easier to give up,\to be a statistic,\to align with society’s desire for me.” Imagine a teenaged girl trying to straighten out her life. She returns to school on Saskatoon’s west side and gets a job at a sandwich shop. “I remember chopping tomatoes,\And the guy next to

A Japanese hand hoe. Photo by Erl Svendsen

Felco No. 2 pruner. The blade is easy to keep sharp and can be replaced if damaged. There are lefthanded versions as well as long-handled and ergonomic ones. The handles are solid cast-aluminum for durability and covered with bright red plastic for visibility. Obviously designed to cut branches cleanly without crushing, I

also use mine to trim back grasses and other perennials in the fall. Leather gloves. No cloth or rubber gloves for me. My leather gloves are comfortable and long wearing. They protect my hands from drying soil and peat moss as well as the errant sharp blades of my pruners on the occasions when I’m not paying close enough at-

tention. — This column is provided courtesy of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (www.saskperennial.ca; hortscene@yahoo.com; www.facebook. com/saskperennial). Check out our Bulletin Board or Calendar for upcoming garden information sessions, workshops, tours and other events.

me was weighing cocaine.” This is not usually the stuff of poetry. Again, the honesty — and the humility — to write about dyeing hair “with a red bingo dabber” and “learning to count with burnt streetlights on \15th Avenue East in Prince Albert” is admirable. This is a poetry of stealing clothes from apartment dryers and off clotheslines, of Christmas in jail, of being stabbed and finding the hospital queue too long, so she “put a Kleenex on it, and taped it together.”

Eventually the writer found hip hop culture, and began seeking knowledge and setting both broad goals, ie: “ At the very least I wanted to work with people” and some specific ones : “get to know Saskatchewan,\get to know Canada, different places around the world\get to know my community. ” The long poem\memoir spreads across most of this chapbook, but it concludes with four poems I can clearly hear delivered in a hip-hop beat. Does the speaker ever

truly find home? Eventually, yes. “Home becomes where [her] heart is safe.”

Marshall’s Funeral Home hosts 21st annual

Candlelight Memorial Service Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016 3:00 pm CST at Marshall’s Funeral Home Chapel St. Walburg, SK

We would like to invite you, your family, and friends to an Inter-denominational Christmas Memorial Service on Sunday, December 4, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. CST at Marshall’s Funeral Home Chapel in St. Walburg, SK. This is an opportunity to share memories and healing with others who have suffered a loss. Please feel free to invite family and friends.

The purpose for this special service is to recognize that during the holiday season a renewed sense of personal grief may accompany those people who have lost someone they love. The holidays are a time of family togetherness and sharing but can also bring feelings of sadness, loss, and emptiness. By hosting this special service we hope to let people know we still care and that grief is different for each person. Love does not end with death and we hope that this Candlelight Memorial Service will give people an opportunity to express their love for those they have lost through death.


Page 22 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

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The legendary John Grieve Oliver: builder, ferryman and entrepreneur Part One of Three

iebert on Heritage Richard W. Hiebert, Ph.D

President, Battlefords Heritage Society

Miss Cora Hind of the Winnipeg Free Press visited Battleford in September of 1907 and wrote of her experiences with the Battleford steam ferry: “You leave that nightmare of new towns, North Battleford, and with much jingling of harness and cracking of whips are rushed down to the ferry. The hills on the North are steep and you are swept around curves and ever

downward at breakneck speed. At the ferry new surprises await you. On drives the first load, horses are unhitched and backed into corners, rigs packed together with poles over the edge – fourteen horses and rigs have been bestowed, when down comes a prairie schooner with three horses attached and drives on last of all, I have not heard such profane language, but up goes the

Provost Livestock Exchange

The Livestock Market Serving Eastern Alberta and Western Saskatchewan

2016 UPCOMING FALL SALES:

Friday, December 2 Regular & Presort Sale @ 9 AM

Wednesday, December 7 Bred Sale @ Noon Murphy Ranch - 200 Black & Red Limo Cross Cows. Complete Dispersal. Bred to Limo Bulls June 28 to Aug. 22. Lazy HE Ranch - 65 home raised Heifers. Bred to Red Angus June 19 for 60 days. Clifford Land & Cattle - 40 home raised Heifers bred to Black Angus June 14 to Aug. 9. Bar 07, Grant & Denise and Jay Hager - 50 home raised Heifers bred to Red Angus from June 16 to July 20. H Bar M, Pat McKinnon - 70 home raised Heifers bred to Y Coulee Red Angus bulls June 15 for 60 days. Neil Scammell - 40 Red & RBF Heifers bred to Black Angus June 1. Ben Meier - 53 Black & BBF Heifers bred to Black Angus June 15th.

gang plank and we are off downstream … Oh, Battleford ferry experience is an experience to remember.” Indeed, a woman crossing the mighty North Saskatchewan by ferry in the company of half-domesticated farm animals and men whose language left something to be desired, must have been a harrowing adventure. This essay has several purposes. First it is about one of Battleford’s great founders and citizens of more than a century past. It’s about his exploits with respect to his community and nation building. But it’s also about this great man’s personal life, and his family life. And, of course, this essay is about transportation on the great river highways in the area before bridges, trains and automobiles. The Battlefords old bridge was opened in 1909. The Canadian Pacific Railway arrived in North Battleford in 1905. Before that, John Oliver’s steam ferry, the first of its kind, plied the waters of the North Saskatchewan in 1900. Before that, primitive ferries, scows and rafts of various kinds crossed the river.

And, the great rivers were critical to the operations of the Hudson’s Bay Company and North West Company fur empires. The pelts of beaver especially, muskrat, fox and other cold climate animals sustained both the English and French colonies and the fledgling nation of Kanata with its tag on provinces. None of this would have been possible in the absence of the great river highways, of which the mighty North Saskatchewan was one — the eternal river with its shifting sand bars and unpredictable currents — coursing its way through the Battlefords on its way to Hudson’s Bay hundreds of miles to the northeast. The traders, Courier de Bois, and of course the First Nation trappers, the middlemen, moved their furs to the trading posts strategically located on the Great River and Hudson’s Bay. The fur trade could not have existed without the river highways, nor could it have existed without the First Nations. The Europeans courted the favour of the indigenous people until

Friday, December 9 Regular & Presort Sale @ 9 AM Wednesday, December 14 Bred Sale @ Noon Allan & Marilyn Johnson - Complete dispersal of 300 Cows including 25 BLK 2nd calvers, 20 Red/BLK 3rd calvers, 60 Red/BLK 4th calvers, 195 RWF/Red/BLK mature cows. Bred to Red/ BLK Simmental & Black Angus Bulls June 24. Pleasantview Farms - 95 Fancy Tan & TWF Charolais cross Heifers bred to low BW Red Angus June 18 to Aug. 10. X Anchor Bar - 60 RWF & Red Simmental cross heifers bred Red Angus June 20. Brien Mouly - 90 Red & RBF Heifers and 25 Black & BBF Heifers bred to Davidson Red Angus Bulls June 21 to Sept. 1 Steven Ramsay - 30 second & third calvers to start calving April 1st. Friday, December 16 Last Regular & Presort Sale of 2016 @ 9 AM

Wednesday, December 21 - Last Bred Sale of 2016 @ noon. More information available on these, and other upcoming sales on our website

www.plecattle.com

Live Auctioneer & Live Nationwide internet sales to get the best exposure for your cattle! Direct Livestock Marketing Sales held every Thursday

Provost Livestock Exchange 780-753-2369 Jerry Hewson • 306-753-7788 Dean Lawes • 780-753-0803 Darcy Lakevold • 780-753-8669 Casey Lawes • 780-753-1466 Wayne Black • 403-575-0200

Call for Information on The SERENADERS Dance Band

(picture courtesy City of North Battleford Historic Archives) Likely a North Battleford swing band from the 1940s or ‘50s. Need to know the names of the band members in question, where they resided, the kind of venues they played (in which communities surrounding the Battlefords). Will appreciate any and all information, and any pictures.Would like to know where they went to school, where they worked, if any are deceased (when, where), and where they are now living. Perhaps you know someone else who would know about one or more of these band members. Contacts: telephone numbers, street addresses, email addresses, etc. will be appreciated. Please phone me at 1-306-445-5985, email centurysound@sasktel.net or text 1-306-441-5810 or write to Richard W. Hiebert, 8916 Gregory Drive, North Battleford, SK S9A 2W7

iebert on Heritage Richard W. Hiebert, Ph.D

President, Battlefords Heritage Society

Rock ‘N Roll featuring the Talk-A-Bouts

from North Battleford, Sask. DANCE For Bookings, contact Daryl Schueller at 445-3414 during week days

Call for Information on The TALKAOUTS Dance Band

The Battlefords first rock n’ roll band (1960-1962) Need to know the names of the band members in question, where they resided, the kind of venues they played (in which communities surrounding the Battlefords) Will appreciate any and all information, and any pictures. Would like to know where they went to school, where they worked, about their family members and social connections, if any are deceased (when and where), and where they are now living. Perhaps you know someone else who would know about one or more of these band members. Contacts: telephone numbers, street addresses, email addresses, etc. will be appreciated. Please phone me at 1-306-445-5985, email centurysound@sasktel.net or text 1-306-441-5810 or write to Richard W. Hiebert, 8916 Gregory Drive, North Battleford, SK S9A 2W7

John Grieve Oliver (circa 1886) was a big and ruggedly handsome man.

the fur trade fell apart in the mid-18th century. Then they sought to remove their former partners in business, the First Nations people, from mainstream society through the treaties and forcing them onto reserves. It’s a sordid story and deserves a proper response (a long researched article; I assure you, I will write it.) For now, this essay puts the Anglo Saxon conquest of Western Canada in the late 19th century into perspective. It tells what really happened to the indigenous people, the Plains Cree and Saulteaux, and the Mixed Bloods (Métis), of this area. At the outset, I must thank Battleford resident, Don Light, for the story on an extraordinary former citizen, John Grieve Oliver, who lived and worked in Battleford, and in the surrounding area, more than a century ago. Despite the fact he is getting on a bit (in his early 80s now), Don, the son of the late Fred Light (North West Mounted Police staff sergeant and founder of the Fred Light Museum) is one of the more engaging and informed historians I’ve met. I’m always happy to talk to him because of his near encyclopedic knowledge on Battleford’s early history, and particularly as it concerns the foundations of the town of Battleford, which were laid in the late 19th century. John Grieve Oliver was born on Nov. 21, 1846 to the honourable Adam Oliver, (a prominent and skilled politician in Prime

Minister Alexander Mackenzie’s government) and Dolly Oliver at Dorchester Township, Ont. Adam Oliver had a profound influence on young John, instilling in him the virtues of education and hard work – an Anglican work ethic. John was expected to excel in everything he did. And indeed he did – far beyond his father’s expectations. John Oliver grew up to be more than six feet tall (when the average height of men a hundred years past was about five feet, eight inches). It would be fair to describe John Oliver as a “big and strong man” (which indeed is how reports in the Saskatchewan Herald, Battleford’s first newspaper, characterized him on more than one occasion) with extraordinary energy. He was also extremely smart – brilliant even, particularly in engineering, drafting and construction and business. His father also instructed him in the arts of leadership and administration. John Oliver learned early how to act as foreman — as a crew boss — to lead and supervise working men. He became an extraordinary leader. To top it off, he was strikingly handsome with rugged facial features, a thick head of hair and full beard. All of this would serve him well when he moved West to the edge of the Canadian frontier – to the future area of the Battlefords and the seat of the territorial government. Continued on Page 23


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Hiebert on Heritage

vive the white man’s efficient technology. And the Plains Indians could only their way across the great survive by surrendering to Continued from Page 22 Long before the Eu- expanses of water, plains the white man’s wishes. By 1880, there were ropeans arrived, and the and forest, how to clothe North West Company, the themselves with the skins only a few hundred buffalo left. The Plains Cree, the Saulteaux and the Blackfoot faced imminent starvation. They were forced to take treaty and moved to reserves by the North West Mounted Police whose orders came from Prime Minister John A. Macdonald. Chief Big Bear was the last hold out. After losing John Oliver’s steam-powered ferry on the North Saskatchewan the last fight of the 1885 North River circa 1900. West Rebellion great land explorers like of deer and buffalo, how to (Riel Rebellion) to the legHenry Kelsey and David tame and ride horses, how endary Sam Steel at Loon Thompson, who claimed to hunt and gather food, Lake, he was tried and convast tracts of land for the and how to heal with medi- victed and incarcerated in the Stony Mountain PeniLa Verendryes, who ex- cines. tended west the empire of The indigenous peoples tentiary in Manitoba. After New France, and Alexan- were here first – the stew- his release, he had no opder Mackenzie, who was ards and protectors of the tion but to sign Treaty Six knighted by King George land. Here they had lived and relocate his scattered III of England for his ex- for hundreds of years, hunt- people to a reserve. The reserves were genploits and for reaching the ed the buffalo which supPacific Ocean, had crossed plied all of their physical erally of marginal, unprothe inland seas and made needs, made war with the ductive land. Red Pheastheir way across the Great Blackfoot along the Fight- ant, Mosquito and Grizzly Plains by canoe, horseback ing River (Battle River) Bear’s Head south of Battleford, and Sweetgrass, Little Pine and Poundmaker to the West are all good examples of this. Thunderchild reserve was originally located near Delmas, about 20 miles west of Battleford along the

John Oliver’s final resting place is located in the Battleford Cemetery. He died in December 1920.

and foot, the indigenous people lived here. They were the rightful owners of these magnificent plains, rivers and forests. Indeed, for hundreds of years before, any white man gazed on the great valley and the mighty river, named by the aboriginal people, Kitchekatchewan (fast flowing water), the Plains Cree traversed the great river highway, later renamed the North Saskachewan River by the Anglo Saxons who ultimately came to take the land. It was the aboriginal people who had taught the white man how to survive in a harsh and unrelenting environment – how to find

and prayed to Manitou, the Great Spirit. By 1860, the fur trade, which had driven the quest for new lands and beaver pelts that had sustained the fledging Canadian nation for at least 200 years, was dying (no longer sustained by European men’s fickle tastes in felt hats). And tragically, the great herds of buffalo (by one account, a herd 25 long and 10 miles wide West of Battleford in 1840 – millions of the great beasts that moved like thunder across the plains) were being exterminated by white men on horseback with lever-action Winchester repeating rifles. The buffalo could not sur-

North Saskatchewan River on its south side. It was an exception. It was very fertile. White settlers wanted the land so the government moved Chief Pise-Awasis (Thunderchild) and his people to a hilly, stony area a few miles east of Turtleford. Now a proud people who had hunted the buffalo with such courage and immense skill, and who were hunters and gatherers, were to learn farming on unproductive land. By some accounts, the buffalo were deliberately slaughtered – exterminated – in order to bring the First Nations to their knees – to starvation. Then it would be easy to persuade them to sign the treaties, and to force them on to reserves. Once on a reserve, on one could leave the reserve without permission from the Indian agent (this policy was in force until 1958). And First Nations people were disenfranchised. They could not vote in any federal or provincial election, not even veterans who had fought in Canada’s wars could vote until 1961. I digress, but I do it purposefully. Some things should be said when an opportunity presents itself. Finally, the terrible legacy of the government sponsored church-run residential schools, which were designed to break First Nations children’s spirit and rob them of their language, customs, traditions and culture, wreaked havoc in the reserve communities. prime minister and minister of Indian Affairs, he is most responsible. He is quoted as saying that the

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 23

first purpose of the residential schools (which he created) is to take the Indian out of the child. The infamous Indian Act (still in existence) was John A. Macdonald’s creation. He also oversaw the execution of Louis Riel in 1885. But John A. Macdonald wasn’t the only prime minister to hold these views. A Liberal successor, Sir Wilfred Laurier, was his

equal in this regard. By 1870, the Plains Cree economy, the great herds of bison, was gone, and the pale horse of starvation stalked the land. Prime Minister Macdonald’s National Policy dictated that the west must be prepared for settlement by largely Anglo Saxon Protestants, from Upper Canada (Ontario) first. Continued on Page 24

Advertisements for Oliver Drug Company and Battleford Flour Mill that appeared in the Saskatchewan Herald. The flour mill ad was published Jan. 6 1916 and the drug company ad Dec. 15, 1921.


Page 24 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

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Fundata

Sharing year-end mutual fund tax secrets By Evelyn Jacks Mutual funds are common investments but can often cause some tax confusion, particularly because investors don’t understand the nature of their real returns from these investments, after fees and taxes. Here’s a summary of what to watch for and where to get help. Here’s the Year-End Tax Secret In some cases, there are unintended results that can push investors into a higher tax bracket than expected at the end of a tax year. That could mean making quarterly tax-installment remittances, and often making additional interest payments for under-remitting. This is because mutual

fund companies are required to distribute all interest, dividends, other income and net capital gains to their unit holders at least once every year at their fiscal year end. With the exception of any return of capital, these distributions are taxable. Mutual fund trusts have a fiscal year end of Dec. 31. Income for the full year will be distributed at the end of the calendar year. This is true, even if you invested late in the year. Therefore, investors may wish to hold off making an investment in a mutual fund until the New Year. Mutual fund corporations, on the other hand, may choose a fiscal year other than the calendar year end. This means income distributions could

occur at any time in the year. Best to invest shortly after the distributions are made to avoid the tax. In addition, the cost of the units tends to decrease when the dispositions are made. In addition, it’s noteworthy that rarely is this income received in cash. Rather, the income is used

Public consultations in NW Dec. 14 and 15 Staff Last week #TransformSK announced dates and locations for public meetings across the province. The consultations into what the Sask. Party government calls transformational change is coming to the Northwest Dec. 14 and 15. Original information from #TransformSK has since been updated twice, but the News-Optimist is confident the following information is the oganization’s final word. The public is invited to a meeting in North Battleford Dec. 14 hosted at the Western Development Museum and Lloydminster on Dec. 15 at the Microtel Inn & Suites in Lloydminster. Both meetings will run from 7 to 9 p.m.

to buy more units in the fund and those reinvested amounts are added to the Adjusted Cost Base. This makes the reporting of sales or deemed dispositions of mutual funds a more difficult undertaking at tax time, because you will need to have kept track of your ACB along the way. Most mutual fund

companies can help you with this, however, it’s a good idea to track this on a spreadsheet yourself to ensure that your ultimate reporting of capital gains or losses on disposition is correct. New Tax Rules for Inter-Class Switches Don’t forget, switches between classes in a mutual fund become taxable after Dec. 31, 2016. It is likely a good idea to review risk tolerance and investment objectives against this change in tax reporting rules, which will speed up the taxes that would otherwise be deferred until disposition. Consider whether rebalancing the investment portfolio before year end can better manage outcomes. Year-end tax planning

involves a solid review of asset allocation strategies as well as net and taxable income levels to ensure investment decisions in a non-registered account achieve the right results. This includes a review of marginal tax rates and potential clawbacks of tax credits or Old Age Security payments. Consult a qualified tax practitioner for advice on your specific situation. — Courtesy Fundata Canada Inc. © 2016. Evelyn Jacks is president of Knowledge Bureau. This article originally appeared in the Knowledge Bureau Report. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved. For more Fundata columns visit www.newsoptimist.ca

Hiebert on Heritage

Public registration is required for attendance. Visit www.transformsk.ca/ have-your-say to register. According to a government press release, #TransformSK is the largest panindustry consultation in Saskatchewan’s history, “mandated to develop the collective vision and action plan necessary to shape the next generation of provincial economic and social prosperity.” The release states the initiative will culminate in a final set of recommendations to be tabled with the premier, and will focus on: transforming government; transforming infrastructure; transforming the economy; and transforming education. The public meetings will be held in 15 communities between now and Dec. 15.

Check out The Battlefords RCMP Daily Report on our website at

www.newsoptimist.ca

John Oliver’s family: Julia, Jay Adam, Jane Agnes, Annie Belle, (seated) Alice Grieve and Arthur King.

Continued from Page 23 Settlers then came from Great Britain and the United States. Later, during the last decade of the 19th century and the

Battlefords Boys & Girls CLUB

December Announcements

• On December 14th, Eagle Hill 4-H Club will be attending the Club and engaging in programming with our children and youth. Come and join them for some fun!

first two of the 20th century, waves of immigrants from Ukraine (Ukrainians and Mennonites), France, Russia and the Slavic countries, and other countries, arrived in Western Canada seeking escape from poverty and political

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and religious persecution. But the American whiskey traders were still a force, and the land was lawless and dangerous. So, Macdonald created the North West Mounted Police, a magnificent idea really. The national police force marched West with a mandate to enforce the laws of the English Queen and the Dominion of Canada. Almost all recruits were stalwart Anglo Saxons (English, Scottish, Irish) from Upper Canada (Ontario) and whose forbearers had emigrated from the United Kingdom a few generations previous. Every man was prepared in a military college (ie. Kingston Military Academy). All were excellent soldiers and horsemen, young (in their 20s) and physically and mentally robust. They were actually soldiers – mounted soldiers. The indigenous warriors and buffalo hunters were mounted also and were magnificent horsemen. This was one important reason why the Plains Cree and the North West Mounted Police came to respect each other.


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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 25

Leko’s Conservation Corner

Issues surronding land access for hunters By Lindsey Leko

With the fall hunting season underway, it’s time to discuss land access issues and the variety of lands available to hunt on in Saskatchewan. Most of the land in southern Saskatchewan is private land with a great deal of Crown land in Northern Saskatchewan. In today’s column, I plan to discuss some of the land access issues that you may run into. In addition I will address some of the rules surrounding hunting on some of the public land. I get lots of questions as to how to properly post your land, and I promise that I will get to that in the next column. I can’t stress enough the importance of asking permission to hunt on private land, because failure to do so will result in more land being posted. I find that most landowners just want to know who is out there on their land and I see this as common courtesy.

Private Land

This is one area where I constantly have landowners and hunters calling me about the legislation. As most people understand hunting on posted land is unlawful, but what if the land is not posted? The law is somewhat confusing, but just because the land is not posted does not give a hunter consent or right to access private land. It is not a violation of the Wildlife Act or the Trespass to Property Act to hunt on private land without permission if the land has not been posted. However, hunters do not have the explicit right to access private land, as landowners do have the ability to sue any person under common law for trespass. As a hunter, you are not in violation of the province’s wildlife or trespass laws if you enter private land without permission. But common courtesy by asking for permission will go a long way between landowner and hunter relationships and will allow access to land to be hunted in the future. The ethical thing to do is to ask permission from the landowners prior to going onto private land. If the landowner comes out and asks you to leave, then you must do so immediately. In terms of landowners, I can appreciate that some of you have huge tracks of land and it may be labour intensive to post. However, if you wish to limit access to your land in a manner that is enforceable, then posting remains the simplest option. In Wildlife Management Zones 15 to 18 and 30 to 34, no person hunting big game is allowed to drive off roads (or road allowances with trails) without written permission from the landowner, except to retrieve legally

of times it is hunting on foot only.

Community Pastures

killed big game animals using the most direct route. In the Regina/Moose Jaw and Saskatoon Wildlife Management Zones, no person hunting big game is allowed to drive off roads (or road allowances with trails) except to retrieve legally killed big game animals using the most direct route. If a landowner has posted his land then it is an offence to hunt on that land contrary to the posted instructions. A hunter can be responsible for damage to crops, swaths or freshly seeded fields while hunting in Saskatchewan. Hunting on posted land or hunting contrary to posted instructions carries a fine of $380 and a one-year hunting licence suspension.

Wildlife Development Fund Lands

These parcels have been purchased with a portion of hunting licence revenue and are open to all hunting. All hunting must be on foot only. A new regulation in 2016 prohibits all vehicle use including recreational ATV and snowmobile use on these lands in order to minimize the damage to this valuable habitat. Limited vehicle use will be allowed under permit such as required by agriculture lessees. Most importantly this vehicle prohibition does not apply to hunters who are retrieving lawfully taken big game animals. Hunters are reminded to use the shortest and least impacting route to access their animal.

Ducks Unlimited/Pheasants Forever

These are parcels of land set aside for wildlife, but hunting is allowed. In most cases there are signs indicating hunting instructions, but the vast majority

There are three types of community pastures in the province (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada pastures, Saskatchewan provincial pastures and patron operated pastures). However, they all have similar hunting rules. Community pastures in the southern zones (1 to 47) are open for hunting on Nov. 1, with pastures in the north areas opening Nov.15 ( 48 to 50, 52, 53, 55 and 68N) with the exception of WMZ 54 which opens on Nov. 10. Pasture managers may allow hunting earlier in the year, but with permission only. Hunters are asked to watch for closed portions of pastures, as livestock may still be present. Vehicles are restricted to roads and trails only, unless you are retrieving legally taken big game animals. Remember that because it is November and there is sometimes no snow, the fire hazard is high and open fires should be avoided.

Military Bases

There are two military bases in the province: Canadian Forces Base Dundurn and the Primrose Air Weapons Range. Both of these areas are closed to hunting.

First Nation Reserves

These are off limits to non-First Nations persons, unless you have permission granted by the chief, or the band council.

you are travelling through a road corridor game preserve, all firearms must be encased and inside the vehicle. Licenced hunters may carry an unloaded firearm (on foot or encased on an ATV) from a vehicle to the edge of the game preserve by the most direct route possible. I have received a couple of questions from readers for me to answer. Here are a few: Q: I am unable to walk due to a hip surgery. Is there a chance I can get a permit to carry a firearm on an ATV in the Weyburn area? No, there is no regulatory authority that would allow you to carry a firearm on an ATV in southern Saskatchewan (WMZ 1 to 47). If the applicant has mobility issues where crutches, a cane or a walker is needed to assist them, then a permit to operate a highway vehicle off roads and trails for the purpose of hunting may be issued. All-day ATV use is allowed in forest and forest fringe wildlife management zones. This applies to zones 48 to 50, 53 and 55 to 76. In these areas an encased and unloaded firearm may be carried on an ATV. Q: I am unable to walk due to a knee replacement. Can I get a permit to shoot from a vehicle? For the conditions that you have outlined, the an-

swer would be no. A permit may be issued to someone who is confined to a wheelchair due to paraplegia, hemiplegia, single amputee (above the knee) or a double amputee or similar disability. If the applicant has mobility issues where crutches, a cane or a walker is needed to assist them, then a permit to operate a vehicle off roads and trails for the purpose of hunting may be issued. In zones where written permission is required to drive off of roads and road allowances with trails, a permit is not normally issued, as driving is allowed as long as written permission is obtained. Q: Can I set up baits on private land? To set up baits on private land, you must have permission from the landowner. The type and quantity of bait used on private land is up to the discretion of the landowner. However, the ministry strongly recommends that if salt or salt products are used that they be placed in a leak and spill proof container. The use of bait on Crown Land (provincial forest, provincial parks, recreations sites and unoccupied Crown Lands) is more closely regulated including restrictions on the type and amounts, required containers, signage and timelines. These restrictions are clear-

Parks

All regional parks and recreation sites are off limits to hunting, unless otherwise stated in the Hunters’ and Trappers’ Guide seasons listing. If travelling through the core area of the park (including all posted no hunting areas), all firearms must be unloaded and encased.

Road Corridor Game Preserves

Hunting is not allowed within 400 metres from the centre of the road to the edge of the preserve. Road Corridor Game Preserves are in place in select areas within the provincial forest and there are signs marking their locations. If

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ly listed in the 2016 Hunters’ and Trappers’ guide. Hunters should also know that baiting is not allowed on Fish and Wildlife Development Fund Lands in Saskatchewan. Q: I heard somewhere that a landowner does not have to have a licence to hunt upland birds. Can you confirm this? I always thought that I would avoid this question, but the truth is that an owner or occupant of any land may, within the limits of that land, hunt upland birds during an open upland season without a licence or habitat certificate. Please remember, folks, that if you see a violation, or if you know of some illegal hunting activity to please contact a local officer. We have a limited number of officers who simply cannot be everywhere at once. This is why we need your help. If this is not possible, call the Turn In Poachers line at 1 800-667-7561. All calls are anonymous, and officers look into every call. Callers may be eligible for a reward as well if their information results in prosecution. Until next time, keep your rod tip up. — Ministry of Environment conservation officer Lindsey Leko has spent more than 25 years as a conservation officer in Saskatchewan. If you have questions, please contact lindsey.leko@gov.sk.ca.


Page 26 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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Where’s the line? Does it matter? S. Yvonne Prusak

Municipal Planner

When it comes to lake development one of the most stressful parts for ratepayers is determining exactly where to place their building within their lot. You’re making a big investment to build that cabin, garage or gazebo, or landscape your property to create that perfect piece of paradise that you will enjoy for generations. Do you know that you’ve built within your property boundaries? What happens if you don’t? The fact of the matter is, if you don’t get a Saskatchewan land surveyor (SLS) to lay out your building, you don’t know exactly where your building will be lying, or if the structure will be within your property boundaries. I’ve had cases where ratepayers found three of the four pins, or all four pins, and they still

built too close to property lines. We all know that hiring a SLS isn’t cheap, and you feel as though they were only there for half an hour because that’s the only time you saw them around your lot. Each job typically takes at minimum half a day as SLS’s verify the correct pins. Nonetheless, spending the money on the SLS means that you have peace of mind that the building is in the right place – before you build. I can guarantee the cost of hiring an SLS to lay out your cabin or garage is going to be cheaper than the cost to move that building if it’s found to be too close to the property line. Depending on your municipality, some require that an SLS lays out the building and then comes back to do a Real Property Surveyor’s Report (RPSR) afterwards. Other municipalities require the RPSR after time of foundation

to verify the building is in the right place before you build your structure, others require it after construction is all finished and some don’t require an RPSR at all. For those municipalities that do require an RPSR, if the RPSR verifies your building is too close to the property lines, then council is bound to upholding their zoning bylaw and they will be forced to begin enforcement on your

structure. According to section 79 of the Planning and Development Act of 2007, council is bound to uphold their zoning bylaw. Enforcement typically includes the landowner moving the building, altering the building so it abides by the setbacks, or removing the building entirely. In every case I’ve seen, the municipality has reluctantly proceeded with enforcement, but unfor-

tunately, they are legislatively required to. Unfortunately, out at the lakes, there have been many times my municipalities proceeded to the local Development Appeals Board (DAB) and the Saskatchewan Municipal Board (SMB) because someone has built too close to the property line. The DAB and SMB are quasi-judicial boards that review these cases to evaluate the facts and stories of the parties involved to determine whether the person needs to move the building or not. They evaluate the cases on three items, does the infraction: (i) grant to the applicant a special privilege inconsistent with the restrictions on the neighbouring properties in the same zoning district; (ii) amount to a relaxation so as to defeat the intent of the zoning bylaw; and (iii) injuriously affect the neighbouring properties.

This board will decide to uphold the municipality’s enforcement, or to side with the landowner that the infraction is minor and shouldn’t affect any surrounding landowners. It’s a tough decision for the board, and enforcement is stressful for all parties involved. What is interesting is that after each of these setback violation appeals, every landowner has stated they should have just spent the money on the SLS to get the building laid out beforehand, because the money it would have cost for the SLS is minor compared to the time and stress involved in the appeal. — S. Yvonne Prusak, BASc, MA, MCIP, RPP, is a Municipal Planner with municipalities and communities in Northwest Saskatchewan. She specializes in land use planning and development.

Fundata

Getting that credit card debt under control By Robyn K. Thompson

A recent report by credit agency TransUnion paints a scary picture. According to the study, of over 26 million Canadians carrying some sort of variable-rate consumer debt, some 718,000 would not have enough cash to continue making debt payments if interest rates rose one quarter of one percentage point. And Statistics Canada’s latest survey of household debt showed the debt service ratio at 14.15 per cent, its highest point in seven years. Debt is emerging as a looming problem, and for many people, revolving credit card debt is the biggest problem of

all. Here are some ways to cope with that little rectangle of plastic. First, try to get a handle on where your money is going. Create a statement of income and expenses to determine what you have coming in compared with what’s going out. Very often, those credit card payments become a major part of the expenses column. If you find you’re “living on credit cards,” you have a two-part problem — spending habits and debt accumulation. You can create a budget to get your spending under control. The credit card debt problem is not insurmountable either. Here are a few tips. Stop. First of all, stop

LIFE-CHANGING DEBT SOLUTIONS

using your credit cards. Or, if necessary, use only one with the lowest possible interest rate. Lock the others away in some inconvenient or inaccessible place – say, a bank safe deposit box. Minimum payment. Pay the minimum monthly payment on each card. Add an additional amount beyond the minimum to at least one card with the highest interest rate. Zero-interest transfer. Consider transferring a high card balance to one of the zero-interest trans-

fer promotions that appear in your mailbox from time to time. You could get breathing room of as much as six months with no interest. Any payments you make would go directly against your principal amount. But if you go this route, be sure to check terms and conditions after the interest-free period expires. You don’t want to trade one debt problem for another – possibly bigger – one. Bear in mind that applying for a new credit card will affect your credit score. Switch rates for a fee. You may be eligible for an upgrade to a premium card from your credit card company. You’ll pay an annual fee, but the interest rate charged on these cards may be less than half that charged on no-fee cards. The annual fee (typically $99 to $150 per year) should be offset

by savings on the monthly compounded interest payments if you have a large balance. Line of credit. If you have a personal line of credit that you haven’t maxed out, consider using it to pay down some or all of your credit card balance. Interest rates are considerably lower on lines of credit, so you’d be reducing the overall interest rate hit. But be sure to make those payments. If it’s a secured home-equity line of credit, the bank can seize your home if you fail to make payments. An unsecured line of credit is in effect a callable loan and the bank can demand payment in full at any time, especially if you start missing minimum payments. Use personal lines of credit sparingly and with great discipline. Consolidate. Ask your friendly neighborhood bank loan officer for a personal loan at a

lower interest rate to pay off other higher-interest credit-card loans. Your bank can work out a payment schedule to fit your budget. But you’ll have to cut up or lock away all but one (preferably low-interest) credit card until that personal loan is paid off. Using the tactics I’ve outlined here, you can get a good start on fixing your credit card crunch. It takes persistence and fiscal discipline, but it can be done. — Courtesy Fundata Canada Inc. © 2016. Robyn Thompson, CFP, CIM, FCSI, is president of Castlemark Wealth Management. This article is not intended as personalized advice. Securities mentioned are not guaranteed and carry risk of loss. No promise of performance is made or implied. For more columns from Fundata visit www. newsoptimist.ca

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Practise Makes Perfect

The Wilkie fire department held a practice day at Scott Nov. 19. An abandoned house was used for training most of the day, starting with how to lay out the hoses upon arrival, to using a smoke machine to conduct practise searches, to live burn training and finally to containing the fire on site as the house slowly burned to the ground. Photos by Helena Long

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Page 28 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 29

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Clear skies to enjoy the supermoon By Dorothy M. Mills

able to see the last full moon on Nov. 15. They called it a supermoon as it was at its closest position to the Earth in a good number of years. It will be a few more years before it takes place again. It was very bright and lit up the whole sky. White-tail deered season is open now in the local area. With not much snow, the backroads will still be open for the hunters to travel on. They will have to hunt with care as most of the farmers’ cattle and horses are still in the fields and pastures. Good luck to all the hunters as there are a lot of deer out there. Just remember to take along your hunting tag with you. If you happen to bag a deer you do need the tag. Our weather seems to be stuck halfway through fall and into the beginning of the winter season. With it not being all that cold, ice on ponds, dugouts and rivers is not really a safe thickness. Christmas sure seems to be coming on us a little earlier every year or are we all just getting that much older? The TV, radio and all the stores are full of Christmas things and hap-

penings. Christmas celebrations should be spaced out so that those of us who like the simple things might enjoy more completely. Too often holiday becomes too rushed, too full of events, too frantic for complete enjoyment. Friends come and hurry off. Children feverishly unwrap their gifts. The cook tries to juggle her social and domestic duties. For this reason my Christmas offerings are of homely, simple fare sent to cooks in all kitchens of our family with sincere wish for peace on Earth and good will to people everywhere. If you are serving a Christmas feast you may well fall into bed exhausted on Christmas night unless you plan a little ahead. By now all the Christmas baking should be done and tucked away in the freezer. It can be done leisurely weeks or months before the great occasion and relieve the stress of the last-minute, frantic efforts. There are always good reasons why some households get caught in a whirlwind of the last preparations. This is dedicated to those who want to get out of the kitchen on Christmas Day to visit with friends. To laugh and be happy and to tumble into bed without a feeling of being cheated out of a special day. Take care and good luck to you all.

are warning Saskatchewan residents to properly research door-to-door salespeople and out-of-province companies offering discounted heating equipment. “With winter on its way, upgrading to high-efficiency heating equipment can go a long way to saving money and increasing comfort, however it really is a buyer beware market when making this type of purchase,” said Carolyn Bagnell, executive director for MCAS. If the salesperson for the

company claims to be associated with another business or government agency, contact the organization directly to verify a relationship does exist. “Don’t be afraid to ask a lot of questions, thoroughly review financing contracts before you sign and shop around by gathering quotes from other contractors, such as your local SaskEnergy Network Member,” added Bagnell. A contractor should be able to provide a valid business license for Saskatchewan and the local mu-

Correspondent

Belated birthday greetings go out to Olive Beierle (Boucher) of Saskatoon on her 90th birthday in October. Olive was born and raised in the Baljennie area. Olive and her husband Lawrence Beierle lived in North Battleford and moved a few times as her husband was a railroad worker and his work took them here and there. Later they settled back in the Battlefords where her husband passed away. Olive sold her house and moved to a senior home in Saskatoon close to her daughter. Another daughter lives in B.C. The family put on a little celebration for her. A 60th wedding anniversary greeting goes out to Robert and Irene Greer on Nov. 22. They were married in the United Church in North Battleford 60 years ago and they lived in Baljennie. They moved to Saskatoon and Edmonton, Alta. where there was work. Later they moved back to Baljennie to farm and raise a family of two girls and five boys. They remain on the farm. Irene has been a school bus driver for the local children for a good number of years. Robert has been the councillor for the R.M. of Glenside Division 5. With clear skies everyone in the Battlefords was

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Beware of high pressure heating equipment sales Submitted

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Students participate in door-decorating contest By MCS Staff The calendar shows December has arrived and Christmas is only a few short weeks away. The month of December always passes quickly since it is a busy time at Maymont Central School. Elementary classes have started preparations for the annual Christmas concert. The theme for this year’s concert is “An Old-Fashioned Christmas Concert. “ This means classes will not be working together to produce on big play, but will be following the older, traditional program where there are songs, choral speaking, skits, drills and a group opening and closing number. This was the concert format in many of the original one-room schools. Of course, with technology, there will be some modern elements to

the concert as well. The SCC is sponsoring a Christmas door-decorating contest for the classrooms. The doors are to be completed by Dec. 15 so they can be viewed the evening of the Christmas concert. The chess and craft clubs have started Tuesdays and Thursdays for elementary classes. Their first craft was an advent calendar on a Santa face. The Scholastic Book Fair raised more than $1,600. Since this amount was received, the school received $800 worth of new books for the library. The junior girls’ vol-

leyball team had their team windup Nov. 25. The girls and their coaches, accompanied by a few parents and siblings, had a nice supper in Saskatoon. One of the team’s captains, Brooke Ferris, gave a heartfelt speech thanking the coaches and parents for their help and support. Following the supper, the team watched the University of Saskatchewan volleyball teams play against the teams from Brandon, Man. It was a great display of volleyball, but unfortunately, the U of S teams fell short. Congratulations to Cassidy Serhienko, Grade 12, on being selected as a semifinalist by the Loran Scholars Foundation. Cassidy will attend regional interviews as part of the selection process for the Loran Awards, which is

Canada’s largest and mostcomprehensive undergraduate scholarship program. The Loran Scholars Foundation received 4,438 applications from schools across the country and only the top 10 per cent of candidates were selected as semifinalists. It was based on character, service and leadership potential. After the regional interviews, only 84 students from across Canada were invited to interview at the national level and Cassidy is one of the 84. She will find out this week if she will be one of the 32 finalists. Several students participated in the Borden Dance Recital held on Saturday, November 26. The final day of classes, before the Christmas break will be Wednesday, Dec. 21.

According to a press release, the company is expanding its grain receiving system to include a second platform scale with a capacity of approximately 400 tonnes per hour.

The project is expected to increase the speed at which the company can receive deliveries from its farmer customers by as much as 25 per cent through greater efficiency

and flexibility. The project is scheduled to be completed in the early spring of 2017 at a budgeted cost of $867,000. Management expects to finance the expansion using existing capital, the release states. “The board of directors is very pleased to be upgrading the delivery system,” says NWT’s president Brad Sperle. “We strive to be an industry leader in everything we do as a business. This expansion will allow us to better serve our farmercustomers by improving unloading speeds.”

aymont Central School News

NWT begins driveway upgrade Staff UNITY — North West Terminal Ltd. has started construction on an upgrade to the company’s grainreceiving capacity at its Unity.

Hey Kids! Get into the Christmas spirit and send your letters to Santa!

Letters will be featured in our Christmas edition on

December 22th, 2016.

Don’t forget to include your name and age on your letters. All letters must be received by December 13th to be printed.

TUESDAY’S BEST

ONLINE

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Student of the Week Landen Gallon — Grade 7; favourite subject - gym; favourite food pizza; favourite app - Clash Royale; last book read - Spirit Bear; favourite sport/free time activity - basketball. Photo submitted

New residents welcomed By Margaret MacEachern Correspondent

MAIDSTONE — Ruth Enright enjoyed the weekend with a number of her family — daughter and son-in-law Karin and Brian Spray of Wadena, granddaughters Anita Spray and Allana Weinhandl of Edmonton, Alta. Jean Stewart spent a day in Lloydminster doing some shopping. Colleen Koski hosted Riley and Chantal Koski in for Sunday supper. It was a belated birthday supper for Chantal. We welcome newcomers to the apartments, Peter Gusbrecht in No. 6, Bill Morrant in No. 30 and

ine Island

Apartments

Marlene Pike in No. 22. We hope you will all enjoy your new home. Tuesday coffee at the suites was enjoyed with show and tell and bingo. The Christmas lights are starting to show up around town. As usual Communities in Bloom members are doing a terrific job. They have put Christmas trees in front of the Legion and lights in Memory Lane. Thank you ladies. A sKiff of snow but still a great winter so far.

Drainage process streamlined Staff Amendments to The Water Security Agency Act have been introduced that will change how agricultural drainage complaints are handled in Saskatchewan. According to a press release the legislation will support new regulations announced in September 2015. The new process is focused on ensuring drainage projects can be permitted when they have downstream landowner permission to drain and are draining into an adequate outlet. The Agricultural Water Management Strategy

provides producers and municipalities with the parameters to control and organize drainage projects in their area through the usage of Conservation and Development Area Authorities or watershed associations. Under the proposed process, if WSA receives a request for assistance they will first confirm the presence of a drainage project, then recommend the owner obtain a permit or close the works. WSA will work with producers to permit drainage works through the usage of gates and gated culverts, which help to provide organized and controlled drainage.

Drop off, mail or email your letters to:

Box 1029 892 - 104th Street, North Battleford, SK S9A 3E6 battlefords.publishing @sasktel.net

Remember to winterize your vehicles and get your winter tires before the snow flies!

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Regional Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 31

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Firefighters called to tackle NWT grain dryer fire By Sherri Solomko Correspondent

‘Tis the season to be jolly! December brings out the best in kindness and caring, so let’s do our part in maintaining that momentum all month and beyond. It is one of the most enjoyable aspects of the Christmas season. Because next week will be too late, wishing an early birthday greeting to our favourite bus driver, Larry. There was a fire Nov. 19 at the NWT in a grain dryer. Thirteen volunteer firefighters spent the better part of five hours extinguishing the fire. In a harvest that came complete with plenty of wet grain, it is hoped this piece of equipment is operational again soon. Thursday is the annual Winter Wonderland festivities in Unity. Downtown activities include late night shopping at most of the downtown businesses. Delta Co-op hosts the St. Peter’s School bake sale as well as demonstrations and draws. The Lions Club is selling live Christmas trees. Our Drug Store is offering cookie decorating for the kids. Prairie Branches is hosting a bake sale and free hot chocolate. Sunrise Wellness Spa is hosting face painting, The Balloon Man, free foot massages and hot chocolate. Unity Baptist Church is hosting a family gingerbread house workshop. Even the Unity Library is offering some surprises. And don’t forget the sleigh rides, hot dogs and hot chocolate at the Unity Credit Union, with donations accepted for Secret Santa. Saturday is Santa Day at 2nd Avenue Cinema, sponsored by the Unity Chamber of Commerce. Secret Life of Pets will be shown with show times at 10:30

nity News a.m. and 2 p.m. with treat bags and a Santa visit to follow each movie. Sunday, the annual Christmas Service of Remembrance will take place at St. Peter’s Church, sponsored by the Unity Ministerial Association. This service of peaceful music, and speakers is dedicated to soothe the mourning soul. The service begins at 2 p.m. with a prelude of carols while the actual service takes place at 2:30 p.m. Unity Public School School Community Council is planning a Christmas dinner for all staff and students for Tuesday, Dec. 13. The now complete basketball court, thanks to the fundraising efforts of students and generous donations from community members, is an active spot on the playground. The choir is practising a couple days every week to prepare for the upcoming Carol Festival on Sunday, Dec. 18. At UCHS basketball season is in full court press. SADD will be hosting taco salad sales and the SCC is planning a dance affiliated with the senior boys’ basketball tournament. ACTIVATE is promoting 12 compliments of Christmas on social media as well as through their front foyer tree. Drama performances are next week. Instead of having a Walk of Silence as in previous years, students are selling candles for $20 each. The candles are a symbol used to promote awareness of women and children who are silenced every day worldwide. This fundraiser runs until

s d r o f Battlaene society hum the

46 306-4

-2700

Dec. 6 with a goal of raising $10,000 to help build a school in Kenya, a Free the Children initiative. The candles are individually boxed with a tag created by the Free the Children Club explaining the symbolism in relation to the We Are Silent Campaign. If interested please contact caprice.sherwood@lskysd. ca or contact the office. The town’s recreation director position remains vacant after Cora Fischer left for another opportunity. Thank you to those who have filled in admirably keeping residents up to date on the arena schedules. And hockey fans, even without a senior hockey team, you are in for some fast-paced hockey action with the bantams, Midget A team and Midget AA teams. The Midget AA team has only two losses and Jaxon Georget the third leading scorer in the league. The annual scoring night for the Unity Wildlife Federation is Dec. 10 starting at 5 p.m. A $5 ticket at the door includes lunch and refreshments. The wildlife awards and supper will take place Feb. 4. The next Anglican Church “mall in the hall” will be Dec. 8 with additional dates coming up in the new year. Call Val Middleton at 306-2284536 to book a table. Christmas can be a stressful time for families who are already financially strapped. This is where the community’s Secret Santa campaign can help out. Collection bins are set up at Delta Co-op, Unity AG Foods and the Red Apple. You can donate new, unwrapped toys or clothing items. Contact Sharon Riou at 306-228-4264 or Bea Stephenson at 306228-2494 if you want to submit a name of a family or individual that could use

All our animals want for Christmas is a home. Help raise funds for their care and adoption by participating in our

Pet Photo Fundraiser!

Pet Photos with Santa

With the Battlefords Humane Society

Join us at the Co-op Mall

Saturday, December 3 1:00 - 5:00 p.m.

All proceeds go to care of the animals.

Call 306-446-2700

for more information

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1000

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Carolyn Kopp recently hosted an open house of her newly expanded business Special Events Rentals. Kopp’s business began in her basement four years ago and has moved and expanded four times since then. It is now located in the former KC Rescue building. During the nine-hour open house, many visitors came to see what this business has to offer while enjoying snacks and refreshments. The Kopps have done extensive exterior upgrades to the building to enhance the appearance of their new location. Photo by Sherri Solomko

a hand this Christmas or if you need further details on the program. Coffee row folks are loving the sights and sounds of Christmas. They enjoy reviewing the many

activities that are coming up or have happened. They are anxious to share their “remember Christmas when” stories. The smiles and laughter echo throughout the venues that

host these groups and are surely contagious to those who experience it. So you see we keep busy in Unity with activities and wisdom from our friends on coffee row. Until next time …

Scott Campbell Dodge Invites everyone to our...

Give & Take Coffee Break to help fill our

“New Wishing Well”

at Battlefords Union Hospital Wednesday, December 7

11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. • We will be serving complimentary refreshments & cookies • All donations gratefully accepted • BUH staff will be on hand to give charitable receipts if needed. You could be a lucky winner of a Free “Cooking Up A Cure with Pink Warrior” Give-aways Cookbook


Page 32 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

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Christmas decorations brighten the landscape

These five hard-working ladies held a craft and bake sale in their room in Meota Community Complex on Nov. 26. They were pleased with the results and will likely have another one next year. They had a great display of needlework — table runners with matching place mats, many bags, quilts, aprons, tea cozies, potato bags, chat mats and so on, all with a Christmas theme. There was a steady turnout of patrons to admire their work, and maybe make a purchase. All items were handmade by these five ladies. The winner of the door prize, a table runner with four matching place mats was Carol Fisher of North Battleford and the winner of the quilt raffle was Kathy Fitch of Meota. In the photo are Valerie Coke, Linda MacDonald, Irene Caslor, Vi Cardinal and Mavis Hummeny. Photos by Lorna Pearson

By Lorna Pearson Correspondent

The town workman and a couple of his helpers hung the Christmas street lights last week. The holiday lighting makes the village brighter after dark, which comes pretty early these days. November is almost a memory like every other

eota News month, as every season seems to go by faster. Maybe the winter will scurry by just as fast, without the low temperatures and winds and snow.

The Meota Hobby Band entertained in Harwood Manor on the afternoon of Nov. 23 to a full house. This was comprised of residents and some visitors who all enjoyed the live music, after so much hum drum stuff on the television. The Sons of Norway gathered at Towers 2 on Nov. 25 with four tables in

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play at Norwegian whist. Top score was earned by Carol Huys. Second high was Ken Tucker, followed by Bev McCrimmon and then Eric Callbeck. It was a nice afternoon with lots of visiting. It was good to have Ken back with the group again. The crafters at Livelong held their show and sale last weekend and had a hall full of their works. There was every kind of needlework, canning, knitting and crocheting. The sale was an impressive display of the talents in that area. Contract bridge was played in Meota on Nov. 21 with Robert Iverson taking high and followed by Maureen Campbell. Nov. 22 players met here again and played duplicate bridge with high score by Glen and Julie Moore. Second high were Eric Callbeck and Maureen Campbell and third high were Mary Greenwald and Joyce Luckey. Nov. 24 the group met in North Battleford with first won by Lucille and Bernard Gregoire. Second high were Mary Phelps and Gerry Craig and third high were Donna and Cletus Scherman. The adult co-ed game of pickleball is being played at the Meota Community Complex on Wednesday afternoons from 1:303:00 p.m. Drop in fee is $2. Wear indoor running shoes. This started up on Oct. 19. Call Lexie for information at 306-8924349. Stop in and watch and see if it’s something you could enjoy doing for exercise and socialization. This is the first I have heard about it, so I do wish people would let me know of new things so we could spread the word. The Meota Curling Club is looking for people to start up their winter program. There is Tuesday and Thursday night league curling for $180 a year. This program runs from November to March. It is a great exercise and social activity. Contact Amy Ray at 306-480-7731. New this year is Friday afternoon drop-in curling. Call Pat Becotte for information at 306-441-5446. The Louisianna Hay-

ride show at the Dekker Center on Nov. 25 was enjoyed by a full house crowd who applauded them enthusiastically. Their rendition of past popular western singers was outstanding. Andrea Anderson has a voice that is hard to beat. Anderson sang songs made famous by Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn and many others, including Coal Miner’s Daughter and Crazy, as well as some Christmas carols. MC Lori Risling was easy to listen to as she gave the history of the songs and the performers. Gil Risling was good on guitar and vocals and William Brookfield kept the action going on his versatile keyboard as well as guitar and vocals. He made that instrument sound like a whole band. Mike Melnichuk played stand-up bass, guitar and sang so well. A local boy from the Battlefords, Troy Wakelin, has joined their group and did a fine job of his songs, too. The Rislings are from Scott, and are well known by many local people. This was a rare occasion of the music not drowning out the singers and, of course, the acoustics are good in the

Dekker Center. People left with smiles on their faces after having enjoyed the whole program. Santa Claus Day in Meota is set for Saturday, starting out with a pancake breakfast from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be hayrides from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be cookie decorating and crafts for the children and a chance to talk to Santa and have their picture taken with the jolly old fellow. I expect he’ll have some treats for them, too. Glaslyn is celebrating on Dec. 4 with their annual Christmas party, their 80th anniversary. Worship is at 4 p.m. followed by a potluck supper and evening activities. Several folks from Meota took part in the grand chorus of Christmas songs, by about 100 voices, at the Dekker Center on Sunday, performing at 2:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. They were sold-out performances and well received by appreciative audiences. Dec. 5 the Turtleford women are holding their Christmas party with supper at 6:30 p.m. Continued on Page 33

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Regional Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 33

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New minister to serve Glenbush, Rabbit Lake and Mayfair By Elaine Woloshyn Correspondent

Celeste Wright is the new Mennonite minister who has recently relocated to Rabbit Lake from Ontario. She will serve the three churches in Glenbush, Rabbit Lake and Mayfair. Celeste is replacing Don Unger who has been busy in his retirement years as of a couple years ago. In Mayfair the plan is to have the Sunday church service at Teresa and Martin Toew’s residence. Rabbit Lake’s population has just increased, as Wright will be residing there. The Mayfair winter craft sale this past Saturday brought many people into the hall. Santa made a visit to give treats to the children and there were many raffles with individuals taking home a little more. If you are able to spare a few hours please call Alice Grigor at 306-246-4212 to work a bingo at Gamex in North Battleford. The next two dates are Thursday, Dec. 8 and Tuesday, Dec. 20. Mass schedule for All Saints Roman Catholic Church is changed to 9 a.m. for the months of December and January. Leanne and Stephen Cherwinski always love

ayfair News going to Calgary, Alta. to see their daughter Carla (Kelly) Soucy and family. This occasion was grandson Camden’s confirmation at St. Patrick’s Church. Jena, their daughter and her four children travelled with Stephen as Leanne had flown there a few days earlier. A week later Carla’s oldest grandson had a hockey tournament in Kindersley. So, like most grandparents do, the Cherwinkis joined them for two days in Kindersley to watch Jaycee play hockey. Unfortunately his team lost in the A finals. Madeleine Huard has turned 80 years old, so her three children, Clark, Eric and Shannon and families, hosted an invitational come and go tea Nov 13 at her farm. In her younger years Madeleine played women’s fastball and was an excellent player. Although the crowd was not as many as what was anticipated, Julian and Shirley Goyan enjoyed the best wishes given to them Nov. 12 at their 50th wedding anniversary celebration. Most farmers in the

area were putting in endless hours trying to bring in the harvest during the above-normal temperatures at the time. In fact the Goyan’s son Curtis finished around 3 p.m. on this special day and he did get a chance to mingle with the guests. Neighbours and friends were invited for the afternoon and Goyan family, including their siblings and three children, Curtis, Michelle and Rachel, and other family members gathered for a catered supper and an evening of visiting. Some travelled from Vancouver Island, Alberta and Manitoba. Shirley’s brother Stanford came from B.C. and Julian’s brother Myron, from Alberta and his sisters, from Manitoba. This was a wonderful day for everyone who came. Congratulations to the Goyans on this achievement and to Madeleine on her birthday. Rick Taylor enjoyed his visit at his son Robert’s place in Memramcook, N.B. This town is on the Chocolate River and not too far from Moncton. Robert has been residing there for nearly 20 years. Loreili Powers and her sister from Edmonton vacationed in Jamaica recently. Our son Greg will return shortly from his two-and-half-week

Shirley and Julian Goyan from Whitkow on their 50th wedding anniversary. Photo submitted by Elaine Woloshyn

getaway in Vietnam and Thailand. Many people are away long distances this time of the year as it is not

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in Lloydminster. Dorothy Ray of Killdeer Apartments celebrated her 90th birthday Nov. 27 with her family and friends at a come and go tea, hosted by her children. Dorothy lived in the Prince district all her married life but moved into Killdeer several years ago where she keeps well and happy. Her only sister, Muriel (George) Nachtegaele, was able to attend. Most of her family was also able to join her, so it was a nice afternoon with lunch and birthday cake. A huge poinsettia plant was one of the gifts from some of her

children and she received a variety of “90” cards. The bridge players of Meota and North Battleford gathered in the city Saturday and had a full day of card playing, the results of which I will try to get for next week’s report. It’s nice to see the Christmas lights going up around the city and our village. They look so bright and cheerful. Heavy fog settled over the countryside Sunday evening making it dangerous for folks in a hurry. There were many driving home after taking part in the carol singing at the Dekker Centre.

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TVs, jewelry stolen Staff Two televisions and jewelry were taken from a residence southwest of Lone Rock in the RM of Wilton between 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20. Maidstone/Lloydminster rural RCMP are looking for a small, black, four-door car, possibly an older Chevrolet that witnesses saw in the area

of the residence that was broken into around the time of the theft. The television sets have 32-inch and 43-inch screens. A brown jewelry box containing jewelry was also taken. RCMP are seeking any information that may help solve this crime. Anyone with information is urged to please contact the Maidstone RCMP or Crime Stoppers.

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90th birthday celebrated Continued from Page 32 The United/Anglican Church services change their time in Meota to 11:30 a.m. for three months, starting Dec. 4. Beth Wynne from Taber, Alta. spent four days with her mother, Lorna Pearson, in Meota last week. It is always nice to have family around to do things together. She took me to the Louisiana Hayride and other entertainment and taught me a few things on my iPad as she is currently taking a course in Taber. She also visited her nieces, Shari and Lori Pearson and their families,

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Page 34 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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OBITUARIES FOULDS: In Loving Memory of Clayton Franklin Foulds, born November 29, 1921 at Brainard, AB, passed away November 13, 2016 in Saskatoon, SK. Survived by his children: Milton (Donna), Glaslyn, SK, Dale (Karen), Vermilion, AB, Lloyd (Irene), Meota, SK, Rita Sloan, Livelong, SK and Vivian (Matt) Burgess, Glaslyn, SK; son-in-law, Ed Goll, Glaslyn, SK; 18 grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren; brother, John; sisters: Milda, Belva and Thelma; brother-inlaw, Victor; nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by his wife, Olive; his parents, Jim and Maude; son, Cameron Foulds; daughter Ferne Goll; son-in-law, Neil Sloan; siblings: Marguerite, Carl, Rilla, Melvin, Kenny, Doreen, Eddy, Leonard; brothers-in-law: Lawrence, Allen, Joe, Ted, Ed; sister-in-law, Antoinette. Celebration Of Clayton’s life was held on Saturday, November 19, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. from the Livelong Community Hall, Livelong, Saskatchewan with Minister Rev. Dan Gies. Music Ministry: Pianist - Judy Gies; Hymn Selections: “Amazing Grace”, “How Great Thou Art” & “In The Garden.” Shared Memories were given by Melanie & Gary Burgess. Honour Guard by Royal Canadian Legion, Br. 192. HonouraryPallbearers were Family and Friends. Active Pallbearers were Alan Goll, Jody Foulds, Gary Burgess, Cory Fonda, Colin Foulds and Kyle Wells. Memorial Donations are requested to Edam Enriched Manor or to the Donors Choice. Interment was at the Livelong Cemetery, Livelong, SK. Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. ___________________________________________________ CODRON: In Loving Memory of Audrey Marguerite Codron, born April 21, 1923 at North Hampton, England, passed away October 27, 2016 in North Battleford, SK. Left to cherish Audrey’s memory are her loving family and friends: brother Roy Vowles/Nona Carpenter; nephew Walter Geering/Bea and their family: Cherie /Brad - Bianca, Walter Jr., Elaine Geering and her family Kim/Curtis - Justin, Morgan and Austin, Sheldon/ Amy - Kayla, Tiffany/Dwaine Hope, Sydney and Jorrie, Blair/Michelle, Rhonda/Jodi - Johnny and Mandy, Jason/Lanette - Justin, Jasmyn, Cassandra, Shaena, Samara and Breanna and many great-great-grand nieces and nephews; long-time friends Liz Carstensen and Elsie Pernala. She was predeceased by her parents William & Clara Vowles; sister Eileen and brother-in-law George Geering; nephew George Geering; good friend Lena Stewart. Funeral Celebration Of Life was held on Saturday, November 19, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. from “The Garden Chapel” - Battlefords Funeral Service, North Battleford, Saskatchewan with Mrs. Joyce Salie officiating. Scripture Reading: Ecclesiastes 3: 1-8. Eulogist was Cherie Geering Curry. Music Ministry: Pianist - Lisa Hornung; Soloist - Jaki Esquirol: “Just A Closer Walk With Thee”, “Amazing Grace” & “One Day At A Time”; “In The Garden” by Soloist, Robert MacKay. Honourary Pallbearers were Everyone who knew, cared and shared in Audrey’s Life. Memorial Donations are requested to River Heights Lodge, 2001 – 99th St., North Battleford, SK S9A 0S3 or to the Royal Canadian Legion Br. 70, 1352 – 100th St., North Battleford, SK S9A 0V8. Interment was at City Cemetery, North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. Card of Thanks The family of Audrey Codron would like to thank Dr. Lipsett for many years of conscientious dedication. The nurses and staff for the compassionate and loving care they gave Aunt Audrey for eight years while at River Heights Lodge. Joyce Salie officiant at the Funeral Celebration of Life, Music Ministry, Pianist Lisa Hornung & Soloists Jaki Esquirol and Robert MacKay. Eulogist and power point presenter Cherie Geering. The staff at the City Cemetery & Robert MacKay and all the staff at Battlefords Funeral Service. The family of Audrey Codron would also like to thank all friends and family for their many acts of kindness. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her. __________________________________________________

HEIDEL: It is with great sadness that we, the family announce the passing of Jason Terry Heidel. He was born June 1, 1978 and passed away November 12, 2016, at the age of 38. Jason is lovingly remembered by his wife Maria, devoted father Larry, brother and best friend Jody (Lacy), special nephews, Kayle and Korben, numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. He was predeceased by his dear mother Lorraine, grandparents, John & Helen Heidel and Anton & Pauline Marchewka, numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. Service Of Thanksgiving for Jason was held on Thursday, November 17, 2016 from Third Avenue United Church, North Battleford, SK. Jason loved life and although he suffered he always stayed positive and had a smile on his face. He left us with many, many fond memories. He was a wonderful man. He will be missed by all who knew him. Interment took place at Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, North Battleford, SK. Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. ___________________________________________________ AYRE: Doris “Jean” Ayre passed away at Lady Minto Health Care Centre, Edam, Saskatchewan on Saturday, November 12, 2016, at the age of 96 years. Jean is survived by: her four children, Myrna (Len) Aschenbrenner, Bev (Bill) Meikle, Carol (Bob) Alexander, Elaine (Dave) Romanell; her grandchildren: Barb (Brad) Villeneauve; Kevin (Vanity) Aschenbrenner; Shane (Jen) Meikle; Shana (Kelly) Ellis; Kim (Rob) Goodall; Craig (Marie) Alexander; Jim (Sharon) Windo; Darcy (Curtis) Bonsan; and Pam (Gavin) Vermette; her great grandchildren: Jenna and Jadon Villeneauve; Jarett, Cheyenne and Chase Aschenbrenner; Tyler and Carlie Meikle; Abby, Paige, Aiden and Maddy Ellis; Lindon and Hunter Goodall; Nate and Cam Alexander; Brett, Kylie, and Coltan Windo; Brooke and Lee Bonsan; and Owen, Carter and Kenna Vermette. The Funeral Service for Jean was conducted from the Edam Community Centre, Edam, Saskatchewan on Thursday, November 17, 2016 at 2:00 PM with Reverend Cannon Don Skinner officiating. The eulogy was given by Shane Meikle with Carlie Meikle presenting a special reading entitled “What is a Mother?” Soloists was Lawrie Ward, accompanied by Sharon Brydges, and Abby Ellis performed “Safe in the Arms of Jesus” and “Grandma.” The hymns were “Jesus Loves Me” and “There’ll Be Peace in the Valley” accompanied by Bill and Bev Meikle. Scripture readings were given by Elaine Romanell and the reading “Footprints in the Sand” was presented by Lindon Goodall. The Recessional was special music of “How Great Thou Art”. The active pallbearers were all the grandchildren and the honorary pallbearers were all the great grandchildren. The internment was held in the Edam Municipal Cemetery, Edam, Saskatchewan. The reception was held in the Edam Community Centre. Donations in memory of Jean may be made to Edam Trinity United/Anglican Church, Lady Minto Hospital Resident Fund or the Edam Municipal Cemetery Fund. The family wishes to express their gratitude to the many friends who shared warm expressions of sympathy, remembrances, supplied food, generous memorial donations and numerous acts of kindness. Special thanks to grandson Shane Meikle for delivering the eulogy, daughter Elaine Romanell for the scripture presentation and the great granddaughter Carlie Meikle and great grandson Lindon Goodall for special readings. The compassionate professionalism of officiant Rev. Donald Skinner and the McCaw family was greatly appreciated. The presentation of music by nephew Lawrie Ward, neice Sharon Brydges, great granddaughter Abby Ellis, Bill and Bev Meikle and the large community choir added greatly to the service of remembrance. Family appreciated the generousity of the Hanson family for the use of their family home. Thanks also to the Edam AUCW for the delicious lunch at the reception. ___________________________________________________

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WOOD: Josephine Wood (Zubiak), born April 27, 1918, passed away November 22, 2016 at Villa Pascal with her family at her bedside. Josephine was born on a farm located near Goodeve, SK, living there for 5 years then moving to Hawkeye and then to Glaslyn where she met her husband Seth Wood. They farmed there together for 28 years, raising three children and making memories that we will cherish forever, then moving to North Battleford to enjoy their retirement years together. Josephine was predeceased by her husband, Seth Wood; sisters: Mary Deason, Annie Czuy and Helen Zubiak. Josephine will be greatly missed by her children John Wood (Shirley): Tim Wood (Lisa) – Connor; Tammy Leatherdale – Lauren & Jacob; Cindy Wood (Richard Farrell) – Justin & Braeden; Joan Booy (Jerry): Murray Booy (Iracema) – Nicolas; Corinna Booy-Nolin (Patrick) – Liam; Darcy Booy (Angela) – Breanna, Shelby & Ashlyn; Harvey Wood (Joanne): Chad Wood (Bobbee-Jo) – Breydan (Shayla) – Brantt; Jennifer Gabruch (Trevor) – Rylan, Kleysen & Daysen; brother: Harry Zubiak (Hilda) and many family relatives. Funeral Service was held at ‘The Garden Chapel’ – Battlefords Funeral Service November 26, 2016. Memorial Donations are requested to Villa Pascal, 1301-113th Street, North Battleford, SK S9A 3K1. Interment was at Woodlawn Memorial Gardens. Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. Card of Thanks The family of Josephine Wood would like to thank the nurses and staff of Villa Pascal for their compassionate and loving care that was given to Mom “You are the Best”. Thank-you to Rev. Janice Trost officiant at the Funeral Service, organist and friend Joan Harrison, soloists Robert MacKay and Joan Harrison. Thank-you to Bob at Battlefords Funeral Service for always being just a phone call away. ___________________________________________________ ALLEN: We Celebrate the Life of Robert (“Bob”) John Allen, born July 25, 1950 at Regina, SK., passed away November 14, 2016 in North Battleford, SK. Bob has blessed the lives and leaves behind to fondly remember: His loving partner, Brad Bourdages, his children: Ryan Allen (Marie Madelin) and Kari Allen (Michael Tozzo); his grandchildren: Antoine Allen, Louise Allen, and Constance Allen; his sisters: Marlene Hames, Annette Kipp (Wayne Kipp); his brothers: Terry Allen (Leslie Allen), Don Allen (Aroom Allen); his brother-in-law & sister-in-law: Dennis & Sharon Hiebert; his sister-in-law, Wanda Bourdages; his mother-in-law, Ethel Bourdages and his many, many nieces and nephews. Bob was predeceased by his father, Albert Allen, his mother, Marie Wasko, his step-father, Michael Wasko and his father in-law Victor Bourdages. Celebration Of Life was held on Friday, November 18, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. from the Sloan Auditorium - Br. 70, Royal Canadian Legion, North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Master Of Ceremonies was Merle Lacert. Music: Blue Rodeo - “Lost Together”; Leonard Cohen - “Hallelujah” & “Tower of Song”; Kelly Bourdages - “Call and Answer.” Pallbearers were Ryan Allen, Michael Kipp, Tanner Jackson, Kari Allen, Mike Weinmeyer and Greg Vangool. Readings were by Pam Watt – “Desiderata”; Ryan Allen – “Dear Dad” and Leeane Young – “A Message From Brad Bourdages.” Honourary Pallbearers were Everyone who knew, cared and shared in Bob’s life. Memorial Donations are requested to The Canadian Mental Health Association, 1011103 St., North Battleford, SK S9A 1K3 or to The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Saskatchewan, 1738 Quebec Avenue, Unit 26, Saskatoon, SK S7K 1V9. Interment was at Garden of Devotion - Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, North Battleford, Saskatchewan (Beside his mother Marie & step-father Michael Wasko) Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. ___________________________________________________


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The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 35

OBITUARIES HONCH: In Loving Memory of James Cecil Honch, born March 30, 1955 at Biggar, SK., passed away, November 5, 2016 in North Battleford, SK. He will be lovingly remembered by his mother Ann; brothers: Rodney & Grace Honch of Battleford, SK., David & Diane Honch of St. Paul, AB.; nephews and nieces: Lee (Sally) Honch of Calgary, AB., Neil Honch of Biggar, SK., Carmen Sallstrom (Anthony Mailloux) of Edmonton, AB., Ashley Honch of Edmonton, AB.; seven great-nieces and great-nephews: Tyler Honch, Kylie Honch, Alayna, Devon & Aurora Sallstrom, Tristen Honch & Noah Honch & extended family. Predeceased by his father, Henry Honch (April 15, 2016); brother, Richard Honch and great-niece, Brandi Honch. Service Of Celebration And Thanksgiving was held on Monday, November 21, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. from ‘The Garden Chapel’ - Battlefords Funeral Service, North Battleford, Sk with Pastor Conrad Hunchak officiating. Family Shared Memories were given by Pastor Conrad Hunchak. Music Ministry: Glenn Goodman – Organist; Alma Frazen – Soloist - “Love Lifted Me”; Robert MacKay – Soloist - “What A Friend We Have In Jesus”; Hymn Selections: “Leaning On The Everlasting Arms” & “Stand Up, Stand Up For Jesus.” Memorial Donations are requested to Canadian Mental Health Association, Battlefords Branch: 1011103rd Street, North Battleford, SK S9A 1K3. Interment will take place at Crane Creek Cemetery – CandoDistrict, SK (at a later date) Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. Card of Thanks In loving memory to our son James Honch. He was always so faithful. Coming every Saturday we would go to Dairy Queen or McDonalds for soft ice cream. We would sit, talk and eat our ice cream and visit. He loved to talk about Jesus. He wanted to learn so much about him. Knowing about God changed his life. He was devoted to learn more about God. He became so gentle, kind and forgiving man. It was so good to see him so happy. It was a blessing to be with him. All he wanted was to be loved. We will miss him so terribly not seeing him. He was left avoid in our hearts for always forever. He is at peace and will be with God, forever taken cared of, loved and peaceful. We would like to thank the staff and Doctors from Mental Health, for the good care he received. We are forever grateful to Pastor Conrad Hunchak for the beautiful message he shared with all of us. Our hearts were greatly touched. Thank you our hearts are filled with prayers for him also with praise. He loves people and it shows in the message and compassion. We thank Glenn Goodman for the music and the people that sang. Alma Frazer, Bob McKay and Conrad helped also. Thank you, Bob McKay and staff for all the arrangements. They always do so well. Thank you Ladies for the lovely lunch they served. We are truly grateful. The beautiful people that never let us down even coming in bad weather. Thank you for the support. We will always remember. Thank you all kind people for cards and condolences. We are grateful. Love from The Honch Family ___________________________________________________

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MEENA: In Loving Memory of Treva Leona Meena, born November 15, 1940 at Saskatoon, SK, passed away November 5, 2016 in North Battleford, SK. Lovingly remembered by her husband of 55 years, Harold; children and their families: Gwen (Darcy) Wood & family: Krista, Ashley (Wes) Dust-Grayson & Brielle and Kelsey; Carla (Darren) Wilkie & family: Kyla (Trevor), Alyssa and Jenica; Kurt (Tracey) Meena & family: Jared & Addison; sisters: Bernice Sharp & Inez Harris; in-laws: Laurienne Meena, Muriel Miller, Ken Meena, Eileen (Vernon) Curry, Barb (Don) Tatchell and their families; nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by her parents Frank & Cora ‘Cosy’ Miller; sisters: Eileen (+Ewald) Draeger and one at birth; brother Lelend Miller; brothers-in-law, Doug Sharp & Melvin Harris; in-laws: Everett & Gladys Meena, Ron Meena, Glen Meena & Shirley Meena. Treva Leona Meena, born November 15th 1940, was the fourth daughter of Cora and Frank Miller. Growing up she was an active and busy girl who played on the Fielding girls softball team for several years and also participated in the church choir and the CGIT. She loved riding horses and playing pranks on people. After finishing her school years in Fielding, she worked at the telephone office in town, where she admitted just a few years ago, that she had snuck a few phone calls to Harold because of the high price for long distance calls at home. Then shortly after, she married him, the love of her life, on July 1, 1961. They welcome three children into the family, Gwen, Carla and Kurt. It was no easy job for her to keep up with them and their activities in addition to preparing meals for the field, milking cows, delivering calves and any other farm work Harold needed help with. However, she made it look easy, because her family was her entire focus in life, and she was there to support them in any way possible. Harold and Treva, along with their family, enjoyed many wonderful family vacations together over the years, as well as camping trips. Treva really enjoyed these trips as she finally did not have to do the cooking. We cannot even begin to guess the amount of roasts cooked and potatoes peeled to take to the field for meals over the year. There was never a dull moment for Treva. As soon as her children left home and were married grandchildren began to arrive, and she sure loved to spoil each and every one of them. As Treva’s grandchild you always knew that if you wanted something, you always go to grandma first because she would always give you whatever you wanted. It was also a tradition that she took each granddaughter to get her ears pierced as soon as they turned five, (even though her own daughters had to wait until they were twelve, which there were only a few bitter feelings about). It was easy to tell from the beginning that she was her family’s biggest fan no matter what they got into, whether it be figure skating, dance, volleyball, softball, hockey, you name it and she was ready to support, cheer, and question any ref with a “bad call”. After every single game it was expected that you would receive a call from her so she could learn all the details. Her grandkids were the best way to brighten her day, it is safe to say that the effect was reciprocated. She actively kept track of the family’s daily events through writings in her diary. It did solve a lot of arguments over the years, as when there was a disagreement on the date of anything, it could always be looked up. It did not matter what age you got to, Treva still worried about you. If you were headed out on a long drive you could always count on a phone call around the time she figured you would arrive to make sure you made it safely. It might only be two in the afternoon and she would start suggesting that you stay overnight as the roads might get bad or it might be too dark for you to leave. Her yard was her pride and joy. From her trees to her vegetable gardens to her flower beds, she was always eager to show off any new additions. When she moved to town she also became a lover of solar lights and she would be sure to shut the lights out so you could get a better view of them in the dark. She was very proud. Another important part of Treva’s life, since she was a girl, was the curling rink. She curled for more than 50 years and even at the age of 75 she was one of the most competitive woman out there. Her passion on the ice was equally matched by her passion for her favorite team, the Saskatchewan Roughriders. She always had the schedule printed out in the living room and never failed to catch the game. Her competitive edge always showed through when they played as she was often frustrated when Durant could not make a “simple” throw. She was a wonderful wife, mom, grandma, aunt, neighbor and friend who never failed to show her kind and caring ways to all those around her. She was a hardworking and loving woman who could effortlessly put a smile on anyone’s face and her impact on each and every one of our lives is clear here today as we celebrate her life. She has changed us all for the better and she is someone who will always be loved and missed dearly. But it is easy to say she will never be forgotten. Service Of Thanksgiving For Treva’s Life was held on Saturday, November 12, 2016 at 2:00 p.m., from the Western Development Museum, North Battleford, Saskatchewan with Rev. Fred J. Tinio officiating. Family shared memories and a video. Music: “Too Old To Die Young”, Grandma’s song - “The Love You Had.” Poem “So God Made a Farm Wife” read by Tracey Meena. Honourary Pallbearers were All who shared Mom’s life. Urn Bearers were Jared, Grayson, Addison & Brielle. Memorial Donations are requested to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Private Interment was at the Ruddell Cemetery, Ruddell, SK. Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. ___________________________________________________

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WOYTIUK: In Loving Memory of Nellie Anne Woytiuk , born February 2, 1935 at Redfield, SK, passed away November 16, 2016 in North Battleford, SK. Left to cherish her memory: her loving children: Dale (Diane), Cochin, SK; Linda, North Battleford, SK; Brian (Randie), Unity, SK; Glen (Val), North Battleford, SK; 5 Grandchildren: Michael (Erinn) Woytiuk, Lloydminster, SK; Melanie (Michael) McKay, Calgary, AB; Tonielle (Jerrod) Madarash, Saskatoon, SK; Andrew (Erin) Woytiuk, North Battleford, SK; Bryce Woytiuk, Unity, SK; 5 GreatGrandchildren: Karsyn Woytiuk; Ellie McKay; Jaxon and Kohen Madarash; Quinn Woytiuk; Step-Grandchildren: Shayna and her family; Travis and his family; Emily; & Kay-Lynne; siblings: Wanda Bahrey, Stella Kostiuk, Shirley Hujdic, Walter (Ann) Kzyzyk, Sandy Jones; numerous nieces, nephews, uncles, aunts and their families. Nellie was predeceased by her parents, Walter and Alexandra Kzyzyk & by her husband, Morris Woytiuk (March 3, 2016). Celebration Of Life was held on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 at 1:00 p.m., from Territorial Drive Alliance Church, North Battleford, SK., with Pastor Earl Millar officiating. Scripture Reading was by Linda Woytiuk & Sandra Usselman. Eulogy was given by Tonielle Madarash. Music Ministry: Karen Millar – Prelude; Diane Woytiuk – Soloist - “Hallelujah”& “The Rose”; Robert MacKay – Soloist - “Amazing Grace” - Glenn Goodman – Accompanist. Urn Bearers were Melanie McKay & Tonielle Madarash. Memorial Donations are requested to Battlefords Union Hospital Foundation Inc., Box 1358, North Battleford, SK S9A 3L8. Private Family Interment was at the Cremation Section - City Cemetery, North Battleford, SK. Arrangements were entrusted to Battlefords Funeral Service. ___________________________________________________

IN MEMORIAM

Thank you for your donations in memory of Al Gotto....................................North Battleford Walter Nelson ..........................North Battleford Charlotte Lahti ...................................Battleford David W. Shury Dean Williams..........................North Battleford Gary Boskill .............................North Battleford Laura Prescesky .............................. Saskatoon W.E. Kotchorek ........................North Battleford Germaine (Geri) Nachtegaele .North Battleford Rebecca (Bep) Wyatt ..............North Battleford Peter Fylyma ...........................North Battleford Vernon Thompson ...................North Battleford Ronald C. Kelly ........................North Battleford Bernie Adams ..........................North Battleford Nellie Woytiuk ..........................North Battleford Jason T. Heidel ........................North Battleford

Given with Love to enhance patient care

Battlefords Union Hospital Foundation 306-446-6652 Charitable #13936 3626 RR0001

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Andrea Hutchison DECEMBER 1 Dec. 1, 1988 - June 15, 2005

We both have had major changes in our lives. Sam was supposed to join you but Papa Bear joined you instead. So I made the selfish decision to keep Sam here one more year. Hope that you enjoy your birthday with Dad and Tiggie and all of the other pets that have crossed over. Did manage to plant a garden but it didn’t do well because I planted too soon after roto-tilling. The yard is different; had some trees cut down so now have a space to honor Dad. Had a new roof put on so the house looks different. Sam is still a bed hog and he misses you and Dad. Happy Birthday, wish you the best, still love you, and miss you, until we meet again.

Love Mom, Sam & Tiggie 2

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Page 36 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

FUNERAL SERVICES

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Dec. 26, 1929 - Dec. 3, 2013 Her thoughts were all so full of us She never could forget. And so, we think, that where she is She must be watching yet.

Twenty years have passed Since you were called away The world may change from year to year And friends from day to day But never will the one we loved From memory pass away — Ever remembered by Harry, Ken, Karen, Zachary & Larke

“THANK YOU LOVE” John and “My Lucky Seven” IN MEMORY JOHN & FAMILIES

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Winter 2017 Session Registration Wednesday, December 14 - 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. at the gymnastics club

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NOTICES / NOMINATIONS

VILLAGE OF EDAM

Public Notice: Official Community Plan and Zoning Bylaw Adoption Public Notice is hereby given that the Council for the Village of Edam intends to consider the adoption of a bylaw under section 35 The Planning and Development Act (PDA), 2007 to adopt a new Official Community Plan (OCP) and adopt a new Zoning Bylaw under section 46 of PDA, 2007. INTENT: The OCP provides a municipal vision of municipal futures and includes local landuse policies to assist decision makers in achieving this vision. It establishes balanced growth and associated servicing considerations within the region. The OCP will be adopted by Council, and all future land use decisions shall be consistent with the document. However, the OCP is a changing document, and amendments may be made in response to changing conditions in the municipality. The second proposed bylaw known as the Zoning Bylaw will establish the regulations for future growth and development within the municipal boundaries of the Village. Included are specific zoning designations to which specific permitted and discretionary uses are assigned. AFFECTED LAND: The affected land is legally described as all lands located within the jurisdiction of the Village of Edam.

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FOR SALE

REBUILT APPLIANCES Washers/Dryers Refrigerators & Freezers Ranges & Dishwashers 90 DAY GUARANTEE Battlefords Refrigeration & Appliance 11152 - 8th Avenue North Battleford, SK

(306) 445-9770 HORSES & TACK

Will buy all classes of horses. 306329-4382.

HEALTH SERVICES Do you have a DISABILITY? Physical or mental. We can help you get up to $40,000 back from the Canadian Government. FOR DETAILS check out our website: disabilitygroupcanada.com or CALL us today Toll-Free 1-888875-4787.

REASON: The reason for the adoption of the Official Community Plan is to: • Ensure that the Village of Edam remains a safe and sustainable community in the future. • Promote diverse and affordable housing options for various demographics within the municipality to maintain a high quality of life for all residents. It is important that local communities attract and retain permanent residents and families. • Regional collaboration allows for the preservation of environmentally, culturally sensitive areas, local water resources, and development opportunities for collaborative and complementary infrastructure and land uses. The retention of local amenities ensures the high quality of life and promotes recreational and tourism opportunities. • Encourage and facilitate economic diversification to establish a stable local economy built off agriculture and value-added agribusiness, oil and gas, consumer and tourism opportunities. • The identification of specific areas within the region for particular land-use development ensures appropriate compatibility between different types of development. These designations are regulated through the municipal Zoning Bylaw that reflect a particular character and community-inspired values, which preserve and enhance local identity. The reason for the adoption of the Zoning Bylaw is to control the use of land for providing for the amenity of the area within the Village’s jurisdiction and for the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the municipality. The Zoning Bylaw includes the following zoning districts that provide standards for development within specific areas within the municipality: • R1 – Residential District: which is intended to provide for low- to medium-density residential development surrounded by agricultural lands and other compatible developments. • MH – Mobile Home District: which is to provide for specific areas within the community for mobile homes and other related and compatible developments. • C1 – Commercial Core District: which is intended to provide for general commercial development, and other compatible developments. • C2 – Highway Commercial District: which is intended to provide for highway commercial and light industrial development and other compatible developments. • M – Industrial District: which is intended for industrial and other types of compatible developments. • UH – Urban Holdings District: which is intended for lands held for subdivision prior to rezoning to accommodate specific forms of development. PUBLIC INSPECTION: Any person may inspect the bylaw at the Village office between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. as well as between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. Turesday to Friday, excluding any statutory holidays. Copies will be available to the public, or by emailing the Village at edamvill@sasktel.net. Additional information and maps can be found on the Village website at www.villageofedam.ca. PUBLIC HEARING: The Public Hearing shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 5th, 2017 at the Village Office at 1000 Main Street, Edam, SK, S0M 0V0. Issued by the Village of Edam this 18th day of November, 2016. Pamela Dallyn Administrator


Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

In the Estate of TERRANCE ANTHONY MADISON, late of rural area of Battleford, Saskatchewan, deceased. ALL CLAIMS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE, duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before the 16th day of December, 2016. Estate of Terrance Anthony Madison c/o Robertson Stromberg LLP 600, 105-21st St. E., Saskatoon, SK S7K 0B3 Solicitors for the Estate

HOUSES FOR SALE North Battleford Triplex with garage - $229,900. 8% cap rate. 3 suites - $1000, $875, $650/month single net. $30,300 Potential Gross Income. Call 306-937-5073

MOBILE/MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE

HOME OWNERS

we are now selling NEW MODULAR HOMES starting at $94,900.00 Choose your size, choose your interior, choose your layout, and choose your exterior! We have many samples we can show you to help you pick what is exactly right for you!

HOUSES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT

Please call (306) 445-8778

in North Battleford

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL

(306) 445-8778 (306) 441-3418

to find out how we can help you get into one of these beautiful new homes.

306-445-7261 CLASSIFIEDS SELL IT FASTER

TOWN OF BATTLEFORD PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN Notice is hereby given under the Tax Enforcement Act that unless the arrears and costs appearing opposite the land described in the following list are fully paid before the 31st day of January, 2017, a tax lien will be registered against the land. Note: A sum for costs required by subsection 4(3) of The Tax Enforcement Act is included in the amount shown against each parcel. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY

495001700 20 495005550 6 505011500 21 505013900 1 505023700 7 505025850 39 40 505026600 25 505031500 6 505034450 6 505036400 1 505046350 B 505046400 B 505046550 B 505046850 C 505046950 C 505047000 C 505047450 C 505048400 A 505048600 B 505049500 A 505049650 A 505049700 A 505049950 A 505052000 B 515001350 27 515001550 24 515001800 41 545007450 26 515007650 22 515010050 18 515010950 20 515012500 22 515016600 1 515018650 40 515018700 41 515020400 12 515023550 10 515029640 19 515053050 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 515112850 15 515112900 14 515118950 9 515121000 15

2 6 12 10 2 21 21 21 21 21 30 49 49 49 49 49 49 49 50 50 51 51 51 51 52 9 9 9 50 50 56 48 57 38 38 38 39 41 71 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 92 92 62 49

PLAN

TITLE NO.

101603629, Ext. 0 80-B-16594, Ext. 0 99-B-14191, Ext. 0 99-B-14191, Ext. 0 99-B-14191, Ext. 0 B1125 B1125 B1125, Ext. 0 63-B-04943, Ext. 1 70-B-02306, Ext. 0 72-B-04421 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 81-B-08899 99-B-17350, Ext. 0 99-B-17350, Ext. 0 99-B-17350, Ext. 0 02-B-07505, Ext. 0 02-B-07505, Ext. 0 02-B-07505, Ext. 0 02-B-07505, Ext. 0 00-B-12367, Ext. 0 76-B-09791, Ext. 0 77-B-03318, Ext. 0 77-B-03318, Ext. 0 00-B-03214, Ext. 0 76-B-09791, Ext. 0 101928641, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 E5923, Ext. 0 02-B-07508, Ext. 0 02-B-07508, Ext. 0 02-B-07508, Ext. 0 81-B-09523, Ext. 0

144171626 145293059 144868012 145466523 139733208 140920310 140920343 129884912 144665859 148356782 131883329

TOTAL COST ADVERARREARS TISING

TOTAL ARREARS & COSTS

6,426.31 4,876.92 4,345.95 3,198.07 5,007.88 3,295.45

8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60

6,434.91 4,885.52 4,354.55 3,206.67 5,016.48 3,304.05

2,354.61 3,134.68 1,938.48 5,714.55 1,905.31 2,022.18 1,969.30 1,261.73 1,997.12 837.88 1,946.74 5,201.59 1,326.00 2,050.03 2,905.87 1,887.25 1,839.92 2,316.96 6,208.32 5,063.71 3,145.23 2,435.36 2,825.94 5,345.24 5,250.11 2,459.74 4,334.59 2,627.97 2,927.63 3,363.61 2,128.27 4,821.59 6,644.21

8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60 8.60

2,363.21 3,143.28 1,947.08 5,723.15 1,913.91 2,030.78 1,977.90 1,270.33 2,005.72 846.48 1,955.34 5,210.19 1,334.60 2.058.63 2,914.47 1,848.52 1,848.52 2,325.56 6,216.92 5,072.31 3,153.83 2,443.96 2,834.54 5,353.84 5,258.71 2,468.34 4,343.19 2,636.57 2,936.57 3,372.21 2,136.87 4,830.19 6,652.81

138411840 137890132 147271484 110900720 131859142 110901462 137648144 145255406 145277286 143056661 143093347 110947732 139477247 146520020 139695788 139695799 139695801 139695812 139695823 139695834 139695845 139695878 139695889 139695890 145756390 718.54 8.60 727.14 145757389 2,897.60 8.60 2,906.20 135403286 2,745.41 8.60 2,754.01 133974906 6,072.23 8.60 6,080.83

Dated this 23rd day of November, 2016

NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS!

Fall Clearance Inventory Reduction SALE ON NOW! 1520 sq ft $111,900.00 1216 sq ft $91,900.00 1088 sq ft $87,900.00 Stock Homes Ready for Delivery Now! Custom Orders Welcome Single wide, Multi Sections Lake House, Motel Units We sell & service homes across Western Canada, On Site Consultation.

YellowHead Modular Home Sales 306-496-7538 306-849-0002 HWY #16 West of Yorkton www.affordablehomesales.ca Weekend calls Personalized Service

SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES North - 10 1/4’s North East - 14 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 57 1/4’s West - 50 1/4’s Central - 219 1/4’s South - 100 1/4’s South East - 46 1/4’s South West - 65 1/4’s PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

THURSDAY’S BEST

ONLINE

www.newsoptimist.ca NOTICES / NOMINATIONS

TAX ENFORCEMENT LIST

Steven Piermantier, B.Comm. Finance Officer

COMING EVENTS

FARMLAND WANTED

BEST CANADIAN BUILT HOME BEST PRICE!

NOTICES / NOMINATIONS

ASSESSMENT LOT BLK NUMBER

LAND FOR SALE

MOBILE/MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 37

VILLAGE OF MERVIN

Public Notice of Discretionary Use Subdivision Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to section 55 of the Planning and Development Act, 2007 that the Village of Mervin has received an application for a discretionary use parcel subdivision. The application includes the creation of one (1) parcel for the intended use of RTM residential development within Block 10, Plan No. 60B09867, represented by Lot 1, Block 10, as shown in “Schedule A”. This is currently permitted as a discretionary use in the R1 – Residential District – Section 6.0, subsection (6.3)(6.3.0.1)(5) of Bylaw 11715 known as the Zoning Bylaw.

Schedule A

Visit our website

www.newsoptimist.ca for more community events

Community Events Calendar ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

Please call our 24 hour helpline at 306-446-6166 for support or information.

Tuesdays

Battlefords Humane Society Chase the Ace Diamond in the Ruff Lottery. Tickets $5 each or 3 for $10. Weekly winner gets 20% of that week’s sales plus CHANCE TO WIN 30% progressive jackpot! Tickets must be purchased weekly to WIN! Don’t miss a draw - weekly subscriptions available. All proceeds to Shelter-Us Building Fund. Draws every Tuesday morning, 9:00 a.m., Lakeland Vet Clinic. Call The Shelter for more details 306-937-MEOW (6369). Lottery licence LR15-0091.

Tuesdays, November 29 & December 6, 13 & 20

Heart to Heart is a Heart and Stroke Foundation program, working in partnership with Prairie North Health Region to offer cardiac patient and their partners the answers to their questions about heart health. Through this program, patients learn about coping with health problems, making healthy eating choices, the role of exercise in heart health and how to manage stress from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. To find out more or to register, call Kellie at 306-446-6424 or email kellie. heidel@pnrha.ca. Please leave a daytime phone number if leaving a message.

Thursday, December 1

Benefit for Standing Rock at the Sloan Auditorium, North Battleford Legion, 1352 - 100th Street starting at 6:30 p.m. The people at Standing Rock who are opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline are attempting to prevent contamination of their river like what happened here in the North Saskatchewan River in July are holding a fund raising event with speakers, music, poetry and prayer. Chili and bannock will be served. Everyone welcome.

Friday, December 2

Borden Care Home Auxiliary Tea & program at the Care Home from 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. by donation.

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, December 2, 3 & 4

A Walk Through Bethlehem 2016 provides a rare and unique opportunity for the people of the Battlefords to step back in time and experience Jesus birthplace at the Battlefords Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 1611 - 93rd Street. Friday from 6:00 - 9:00 p.m. Saturday from 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. Sunday 12 noon - 4:00 p.m.

Saturday, December 3

Historic Battleford Lions Christmas Bazaar from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm at the Alex Dillabough Centre, Battleford. Gifts Galore! Concession Available

Saturday, December 3

The 31st Annual Big Buck Nite Competition at Sonningdale Hall from 6:00 p.m. - 12 midnight. Chile and buns all evening.

Saturday, December 3

Christmas Trade Show and Craft Show from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 9 Battleford, Main Street, Battleford. Everyone welcome. Free admission.

Saturday, December 3

Borden Farmers Market and Home Businesses Christmas Sale at the Borden Community Centre from 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Lunch by Grad 2017 & SCC. Call Lorraine at 306-997-2159 for info.

Sunday, December 4

North Battleford City Kinsemen Band “The Joy of Christmas Concert” at 7:00 p.m. at The Dekker Centre for the Performing Arts.

Sunday, December 4

Christmas Celebration Banquet at the Territorial Drive Alliance Church. Punch at 5:00 p.m., supper 5:30 p.m. Music to follow. Tickets available at church office or 306-445-5188 until Nov. 27th.

Council will consider this application at the regular scheduled Council meeting on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 7:00 PM in the Village office. If you wish to comment on these proposals, please do so in writing prior to Thursday, December 8, 2016 to the Village of Mervin, Box 35, Mervin, SK, S0M 1Y0. For additional information please contact the Village office at (306) 845-2784. Lora Hundt Administrator Nov 14, 2016 COMING EVENTS

Christmas TRADE SHOW and CRAFT SALE December 3, 2016 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Royal Canadian Legion Branch 9 Battleford Main Street, Battleford Crafts, Scentsy, Tupperware and sooo much more!!! Coffee, tea, burgers, soup, chili, hot dogs, baking

GIFT BASKET DRAW EVERYONE WELCOME FREE ADMISSION

Sunday, December 4

Borden Lions Festival of Music at the Borden Community Centre at 7:00 p.m. Santa will be there and beverages and cookies served after the festival.

Sunday & Monday, December 4 & 5

NBCHS students will be canvassing the City of North Battleford for food donations from 6:30 - 8:30 pm on both days. All donations of non-perishable food items will go to the Battlefords and District Food and Resource Centre.

Wednesday, December 7

Ladies Night Out at St. Paul’s Anglican Church - roast pork, scalloped potatoes, hot vegetables, salad and dessert. Fellowship and entertainment. Supper at 6:00 p.m. Presold tickets only, 100 available. Phone Rosemarie at 306445-4645, Evelyn 306-445-3249, Joyce 306-445-0587 or the Church Office at 306-445-4155 for tickets. Collection will be taken for the Empty Stocking Fund.

Saturday, December 10

Topline Dance Club - Gold Tones from 8:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m. at 1351-100th Street, Legion Hall, downstairs. Lunch served, minimum age 19, dress casual. Contact Sharon 306-446-0446, Leela 306-445-7240 or Jean 306-445-8815.

Saturday, December 10

Radisson Royal Purple Tea & Bake Sale at the Radisson Hall at 2:00 p.m. Santa arrives in town at 2:00 p.m. to give out candy bags from Radisson Firemen.

Tuesday, December 13

Seniors Fun Day at St. Joseph Hall 1942-98th Street, North Battleford. Bingo at 2:00 p.m. Coffee 3:00 p.m. Entertainment 3:00 p.m. by Meota Hobbey Band. 4:00 p.m. Hot Christmas Supper. All seniors welcome.

Wednesday, December 14

Borden Senior’s Club Christmas Bingo at the Borden Community Centre Club Room at 7:00 p.m. This section, which will appear weekly in Tuesday's News-Optimist and Thursday’s Regional Optimist, is provided free-of-charge to non-profit organizations. To list the Community Calendar please call News-Optimist at 306-445-7261 or fax the information to 306-445-3223. Please provide complete information including event, time, date and location. Although we will do our utmost to make sure your event appears in this section, News-Optimist does not guarantee all submissions will appear. Deadline for submissions is 5:00 p.m. Thursday prior for Tuesday's & Thursday’s publication.


Page 38 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

LAND FOR SALE

SASK FARMS & RANCHES WILKIE: 319 ac. - 250 cult. ac.,Sfenced OLD pasture, assess. 77,550/qtr.

WILKIE: 1433 ac. D assess. 1242 cult. ac, SOL 89,930/qtr.

FOR ALL OF YOUR BUYING OR SELLING NEEDS Contact Darren Sander (306) 441-6777 With 108 New Sales So Far in 2016!

LANE REALTY Saskatchewan's Farm & Ranch Specialists™

WITH OVER 30 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS

PHONE:

(306) 569-3380 EMAIL:

lanerealtycorp@sasktel.net www.lanerealty.com ACREAGE FOR SALE south of Blaine Lake on Hwy #12. 77 Acre hobby acreage features a 6 year old 2,151 sq ft custom built 2 storey home. Heated garage, pole shed, corrals, outdoor riding arena, cross-fenced pastures. View this great property @ w w w. e d b o b i a s h t e a m . c o m MLS® 589188 Value priced at $419,900. Call Ed 306-222-7770 with RE/MAX Saskatoon.

DOMESTIC CARS

PETS

PAWLUS ADOPT A PET Saskatchewan

Motor Licence Issuer

INSURANCE SERVICES LTD. 1292 - 102nd Street, North Battleford

306-445-8059 “serving ALL your insurAnCe & motor LiCenCe needs”

AUTO MISCELLANEOUS Wrecking over 250 units... cars and trucks. Lots of trucks... Dodge... GMC... Ford... Imports... 1/2 ton to 3 tons... We ship anywhere... Call or text 306-821-0260. Lloydminster.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Amelia is one of our special kittens and has found her way into everyone’s heart that has met her. She was mauled by a dog at a young age and although it has caused some minor handicaps for her, it hasn’t slowed her down. She will need a home where she will not be chased or picked on by other animals and where she will be strictly an indoor cat. If you are interested in meeting this special girl come down to the shelter !! Hey guys my name is Baxter and I was found wandering around town searching for a home and family and a second chance at love. I am a really sweet kind gentle giant that just loves to be around people and see them smile and laugh. I am pretty laid back and am quite happy and content to just lay down and nap as long as I am in the same area or room as you. If your thinking about a new furr baby to your home and family then come on down to the shelter today. PLEASE SPAY OR NEUTER YOUR PETS! Check out all our Shelter animals in need of homes at: www.battlefordsanimalshelter.com

306-445-7261 your CLASSIFIED line

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! Indemand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

• Fridge, stove, washer, dryer • Some are air conditioned Rental rate: $650 to $1,200 per month Complete application: 1441 - 100th Street Or Phone 306-445-8571 or 306-441-0950

SERVICES FOR HIRE A-1 Service, Snow removal, Interior Painting, Renovations, Shingling, Build Fences, Decks, Metal Fascia Soffit, etc. Phone 306-4458439. Rob’s Snow Clearing. Walks and driveways. Book early. Phone 306445-2736, 306-441-5677

NutraSun Foods Ltd of Regina wants to buy your Organic Hard Red Spring and Conventional Hard White Wheat. Please contact Abe Ens at 306-751-2440.

Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Chief Administrative Officer: This position is a full-time position starting immediately. Applicants for this position should have their Standard Urban Certificate in Local Government Administration or have accounting and administrative skills learned from previous work experience and are willing to take the Local Government Administration course (can be taken by correspondence). Personal Asset Skills for this position are: ability to work independently and manage time, detail oriented, leadership qualities, planning and accounting skills. Experience in Word/ Excel and accounting packages are required assets. Interested candidates are invited to submit a detailed resumé with references and salary expectations in confidence to the address listed below. Education transcripts, diplomas and/or certificates plus current criminal record check will be required. Resort Village of Aquadeo Bo 501 Cochin, SK S0M 0L0 Email to: aquadeoadmin@gmail.com Fax to: 1-306-386-2544

Growth Without Limits, Learning For All

Winter Road Haul 2017 Class 1 Drivers needed for deliveries in MB & NW Ont. (800) 665-4302 ext. 251 or e-mail: orderdesk@penneroil.ca

Now accepting applications for the following positions:

Teacher - Kindergarten • Norman Carter School - Wilkie Student Services Teacher • St. Vital Catholic School, Battleford Closing noon, Tuesday, December 6, 2016 Student Transportation Driver • Medstead Area - driver to transport student to and from school daily using personal vehicle, call for more details Open until successful candidate is found - apply ASAP

STEEL BUILDINGS/GRANARIES STEEL BUILDING SALE ...”REALLY BIG SALE IS BACK EXTRA WINTER DISCOUNT ON NOW!” 20X19 $5,145 25X27 $5,997 28x27 $6,773 30X31 $8,110 35X33 $11,376 40X43 $13,978. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036 www.pioneersteel.ca

Details and link to online applications can be found on our website at www.lskysd.ca LEGAL / PUBLIC NOTICES

Rural Municipality of Mervin No. 499

PUBLIC NOTICE OF DISCRETIONARY USE SUBDIVISION

All applications must be submitted online. We are looking for Bus Drivers for our rural locations! If you live near Cut Knife, Hafford, Spiritwood or Wilkie, we would love to talk to you. Training opportunities are available. Please call our office at 306-937-7972 for more information.

Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to section 55 of The Planning and Development Act, 2007 that the RM of Mervin No. 499 has received an application for a discretionary use parcel subdivision. The application includes the creation of one (1) parcel for the intended use of single-parcel country residential development within the NW 1/4 Section 13-51-21-W3M, represented by Parcel D, as shown in “Schedule A”. This is currently permitted as a discretionary use in the Agricultural District - Schedule A, section (B)(f) of Bylaw 94-4 known as the Zoning Bylaw.

Schedule A

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

Employment Opportunities The Resort Village of Aquadeo is currently seeking a motivated individual for the position of:

Living Sky School Division No. 202

FEED & SEED NORTH EAST PRAIRIE GRAIN INC. Currently Buying: Soybeans, Feed Barley, Wheat and Oats. OFFERING: Competitive Prices, On Farm Pickup & Prompt Payment! CALL: 1-306-873-3551, WEBSITE: neprairiegrain.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

We thank all those that apply but only those applicants selected for an interview will be notified.

HOUSES FOR RENT

1&2 Bedroom Suites

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Reporter Correspondents required for all rural areas

• All District First Nations • Cando • Cochin • Cut Knife • Glaslyn • Hafford • Lashburn • Livelong Council will consider this application at the regular scheduled Council meeting on Tuesday, January 10th, 2017 at 11:00 am in the RM of Mervin office. If you wish to comment on this proposal, please do so in writing prior to Friday, January 6th, 2017 to the RM of Mervin No. 499, Box 130, Turtleford, SK, S0M 2Y0. For additional information please visit www.rmofmervin.com or contact the Municipal Planner at (306) 845-7333 or at planner.rm499@rmofmervin.com S. Yvonne Prusak, BASc, MA, MCIP, RPP Municipal Planner November 14, 2016

• Mervin • North of the Gully • • • • •

(Maidstone)

Maidstone Paradise Hill Medstead St. Walburg Turtleford

NOTE: These are freelance opportunities, not salaried positions. Ideally, reporter correspondents should reside within the communities listed above.

For more information contact:

Becky Doig (Editor)

email: newsoptimist.news@sasktel.net or toll free 1-866-549-9979


Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Manager of Pasture Operations

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 39

Kids’ Fun Page

Meeting Lake Grazing Association Inc. of Mayfair, SK is now accepting tenders for a contract pasture manager for the 2017 grazing season. Please email: meetinglakegainc@gmail.com for a tender package. Closing date Dec. 15, 2016

Battleford Home Hardware Building Centre is currently seeking a

Full-Time

Yard and Delivery Person Must have a valid driver’s license. Lumber/hardware knowledge preferred. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50lbs. No phone calls please. Email resumé to Brett5427@sasktel.net or drop off resumé at 218 - 22nd St. W. Battleford, SK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY District #30 Agriculture Development & Diversification Board is looking for a

PEST CONTROL OFFICER

A valid driver’s license and dependable vehicle are job requirements. Successful applicant must be willing to take necessary training to become a licensed PCO. Job is seasonal part-time. Applicant must work with low supervision. Apply to: District #30 A.D.D. Board P.O. Box 82 Unity, SK S0K 4L0

Deadline to apply: December 10, 2016 For more information please call 306-843-8513

Word Search

JOB OPPORTUNITY JANITOR/ MAINTENANCE B.T.C. Human Services Corp. requires an energetic, motivated and career-minded Janitor/Maintenance who will be responsible for keeping building in clean and orderly condition, and will perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities, notifying management of need of repairs, and clearing snow or debris from parking lot. Qualified applicants should contact B.T.C. Human Services Corp. at: 691-109th Street, North Battleford, Sask. Or mail your resumé with 2 professional references to: P.O.Box 1426 North Battleford, Sask. S9A 3M1 or email: btchsc@sasktel.net Deadline for applications is December 9, 2016 We all thank all applications and wish to advise that only those individuals that have been selected for an interview will be contacted.

Advent Alleluia Angel Baby Birth Brandy Bread Camel Candy Cards Carol Cedar Chestnut

Child Chimney Christ Comet Crib Dancer Dasher Divine Dolls Donner Ebenezer Scrooge Eggnog Elves Excited Fairies Family Fir Flock Gift Gold Gravy Green Ham Happy Holy I Saw Three Ships Icicle Immanuel Inn Ivy Joy Lights Lord Magi Manger Mary Mass

Merry Myrrh New Year Noel Pie Pine Port Prancer Punch Red Reindeer Ribbon Roast Sales Sauce Season Sing Sled Sleigh Snowman St. Nick Stable Star Surprise Toast Toys Vixen We Three Kings Of Orient Are Worship Xmas Yule


Page 40 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Across E NO. 757 1. Grassland plain in South America 6. Monetary unit of Ghana 10. Big wine holder 13. Basket material 14. Coffee break snack 15. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 16. Marrying again 18. Brouhaha 19. Cardinal 20. A chip, maybe 21. Air 22. Short opening act 26. French navigator Jacques 28. Farmer’s place, in song 29. Unfair treatment of old people 30. Rich 34. Morgue, for one

35. Passionate 11. “Home ___” 37. Free from, with “of” 12. Eiffel ___ 33.Aretha 10.Zilch 38. Strong and deep in 14. Void 11.Snow tone 17. Milescoaster per hour, e.g. Franklin hit 41. Bear 21. Knight 19.Cut one’sfight 36.Snare 43. Artificial Intelli- 23.molars Backboard attach37.Bar gences ment 39.Trait carriers 21.Spiders’ 44. Early pirates 24. Bank 46. Making something 25.structures “Is that ___?” 41.Turn over required 26. “The Alienist” au-quickly 22.Angel’s 50. Mysterious: Var. thor 42.Camp 51. Battering wind 27.headgear Chill helper, e.g. 23.Like 52. Castle part 30. All some ___ 43.Foal 55. Victorian, for one 31.cheese Citrus drink like 45.Prayer 56. To consider lemonade 25.Song concluder 59. Kipling’s “Gunga 32. Little dent 28.Commits ___” 33. “What are the ___?” 49.Brewery 60. A Christian adhering 35.perjury Saturated substancesbeverage to an Eastern rite 36. A badge of honor or 29.Skilled 50.Prosecute 61. Alternative to a con- authority 30.Army eatery vertible 39. Comply with 51.Wish 62. “Comprende?” 40. Discouraging words 63. Back 41. Schuss, e.g. 64. Clarification lead-in 42. Passed urine (child Copyright © 2015, Penny Press saying) Down 28.Take it find SS 1. Base of a crocus stem 44. Hotel employee 45. Any thing on the ____ 2. Fishing, dge’s 55.Dogs and perhaps ncern 31.Made holy 3. Copies catsof other‚Äôs 46. Demands 47. Like “The X-Files” behavior gnal assent 32.Clan 56.Fountain 48. Construction site 4. Small____ change s 34.Turf sight TO PUZZLE NO. 757 5. “Catch-22” pilot ANSWER aft animals 35.Stags and 6. Cousin adult 57.Young 49. Golden Horde memof a raccoon ber bucks ot temper 7. Bring about 53. Flight data, briefly By Lorraine Olinyk 38.Foot parts 8. Directly oderately DOWN 54. Confined, with “up” Correspondent alive!” (contracld 1. Shy 39.Polite chap 9. “___ 56. Blackguard tion)2. Woodsman’s The Borden Dance cade unit 40.Winding 57. “___ moment” 10. Computer woe Club held their Christmas curves implement ort-term job 58. Chi follower recital program in the Bor-

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the side walls. The instructors this year are Miss Cassidy and Miss Kenzie, with 45 dancers taking part. Many of the dances were done to the music they will be using when they enter dance competitions in the spring. The 10 students taking Acro demonstrated what they have been learning from Miss Cassidy in the way of acrobatics. In ballet one, 11 dancers with the help of Julia Siebert danced to Let It Go. Ballet two had five girls dancing to Butterflies of the Nut Cracker and the five senior ballet students chose Titanium as their music. Tap 1 had 11 dancers demonstrating their skill

orden Radisson to Jingle Bell Rock, Tap 2 had five dancers using the song When Will I See You Again and Tap 3, with six girls, danced to Bom Bom. The three girls and Miss Cassidy in senior tap chose Stand By Me. The Tiny Tots, in their pyjamas and carrying gifts, showed what they had learned with the song Christmas Morning. Hip hop junior, with five dancers, Rocked the Disco and hip hop seniors, with eight dancers, showed off their hard- earned skills with Temperature. Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree had 11 boys and girls in jazz one dancing. Jazz two, with six girls dancing, used the song Better When I’m Dancing. Jazz three had seven girls and one boy dancing to Dear Future Husband and the seven girls in senior jazz danced to Acapella. After the performance many thanks were extended to parents, the teach-

ers, helpers, silent auction donors, cleanup crew and others. The 50/50 draw of $266.50 went to someone from out of town and many people took home silent auction baskets. Radisson held their Christmas Craft Day on Nov. 26 in Radisson Hall with the playground committee arranging the sale and also selling lunch. The main hall upstairs had tables all around the outside and two long rows down the middle, so you needn’t have gone home empty handed if you were looking for that special gift, crafts, baking, jewelry, cosmetics, perogies or whatever. The last four days I have been busy with my computer, watching our grandson Duncan Sutherland playing volleyball with the College of the Rockies Avalanche team. Duncan is in his second year at the college in Cranbrook, taking kinesiology, and is renting a house with two other boys from the team. Thursday and Friday they played at Columbia Bible College, winning in three sets the first night and 3-1 on Friday. Continued on Page 41


Regional Optimist

The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 41

www.newsoptimist.ca

Tiny Tots in their pyjamas Christmas morning with helpers Julia and Sydney.

The Tap 1 dancers wearing their reindeer antlers danced to Jingle Bell Rock. Photos by Lorraine Olinyk

Supper for 70 years and older held Sunday By Dorothy Schwartz Correspondent

Jazz 1 group Rockin’ Round the Christmas Tree with helpers Katelyn and Sydney.

The ACRO class showed off their acrobatic skills at a recital Nov. 26 in Borden.

Activities coming up

Continued from Page 40 Then on Saturday and Sunday they played the University of Fraser Valley, losing the first night 1-3 and winning on Sunday 3-1. They now have time off from playing to study for exams and don’t resume until Jan. 6 and 7 when they host Vancouver Island University and Camouson on Jan.13 and 14. Upcoming at Borden this coming week is the se-

niors’ potluck supper Nov. 30, Care Home Christmas tea Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. with entertainment, a baby shower for Lincoln Boucher (Erica Wensley) on the evening of Dec. 2 in the seniors’ room at 7 p.m. and the Borden Christmas sale with 16 farmers’ market tables and 12 other vendors Dec. 3 with grad 2017/SCC providing lunch from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Borden Community Centre.

Caring, Sharing, Remembering

A COMMUNITY CANDLELIGHT SERVICE Christmas is usually a joyous time full of memories. The bereaved often feel this season makes their loss more painful. You, your family and friends are invited to join others in the community to renew your spirit and honour your loved ones.

Dec. 4 in the community centre is the Borden Lions Carol Festival and Santa will be dropping in along. There will be cookies and hot chocolate served.

MAIDSTONE — Cribbage was played at the Maidstone Drop In Centre Nov. 7. High score was by Jean Hartman and low was Denise Newton. Bingo was played Nov. 9 with Joan Smith and Margaret MacEachern during the calling. The loonie pot was won by Bev Stewart. Lunch was provided by Dorothy Harmel. A number of seniors attended the craft show Nov. 6 at the Legion Hall from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. sponsored by the hospital auxiliary. There was a nice variety of items for sale and it was well attended. There were no card games Nov. 14 as some of the card players were under the weather with a flu and

rop in Centre cold that is going around. Bingo was played Nov. 16 with Joan Smith and Bev Stewart doing the calling. Bev also won the loonie pot. Lunch was provided by Verla Mitchell and Irene Kerr.  Kaiser was played Nov. 21 with winners being Margaret MacEachern and Dorothy Schwartz. Lunch was provided by Joan Stewart. Bingo was played Nov. 23 with Joan Smith and Margaret MacEachern doing the calling. The loonie pot was won but left to grow to next week. Lunch was provided by Cheryl

McCaskill. Don’t miss the Golden Age Supper to be held Sunday, Dec. 4 at Maidstone Legion Hall from 5 to 7 p.m. This free event is sponsored by the Maidstone High School Leadership Group for anyone 70 or older. See you there!

NORTH BATTLEFORD 306-446-7177 or 306-480-9876 Dates: Nov. 25 & 26, 2016 Dec. 2 & 3, 2016 Dec. 9 & 10, 2016 Dec. 16 & 17, 2016 December 31, 2016 Hours 9:00 pm - 2:00 am

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Page 42 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

Out trash talking professional wrestlers Ed, my old neighbour from Saskatchewan, and I had a chat about the American election. Ed phoned me two days after election day. He was proud of himself as he had predicted last New Year’s Eve that Donald Trump would win in the November election in the United States. My old neighbour did admit that it was a long campaign of trash talk between the candidates. “Professional wrestlers are good at trash talk towards an opponent, but Donald and Hilary put them to shame,” Ed observed. I found out Ed is already lining up his predictions for 2017. He promised me he would

send me a copy of his prophecy at New Years so I can be prepared for the coming year. I told him I still haven’t got my mind around the new president. I don’t want to hear any more of Ed’s forecasting. I would rather not know what will happen until after the fact. Ed is certain border walls will be built, but I refuse to deal with that thought right now. The actual definition of “trash talk” is disparaging, insulting, taunting, or boastful speech intended to demoralize, intimidate or humiliate someone, especially an opponent in an athletic contest. It sure is easy to hear such talk just about

eighbourly Advice According to Ed

By Raymond Maher www.accordingtoed.com

revraymaher@accesscomm.ca

anywhere, but particularly in election campaigns at all levels of government. No one is immune to being the victim of trash talk. Sadly, we all bear too much false testimony about folks we do not like and don’t think twice about hurting someone’s reputation. When Jesus was crucified with two other

criminals, one of them hurled insults at Jesus as they all hung on their crosses. He taunted Jesus, “Aren’t you the Christ? Save yourself and us! When Jesus was crucified the people stood watching, and the rulers sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Christ of God,

the Chosen One.” The soldiers also came up and mocked him. There was one exception to all the trash talk leveled at Jesus. One of the men crucified with Jesus insulted him, but the other spoke well of Jesus. He said, “We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.” Trash talk does not change the truth it just clouds it for those who aren’t concerned with the whole truth. When we indulge in trash talk, it says more about us than the person we hurl it at. Trash talk means we are willing to betray and hurt the reputation of another.

We could defend, speak well of, and explain the person or their actions in the most positive way instead of talking trash about him or her. Lack of love and willingness to slander are often at the core of what we say about others. Free speech is not our right to make false accusations about others. Jesus was and is the truth of God’s love towards sinful trash talking humans. On the cross he showed the love that always protects, always trusts, always hopes, and perseveres. He was willing to sacrifice himself on the cross that we would have His good reputation before God the Father.


The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016 - Page 43

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30

Leonard Braithwaite (1923–2012) WWII veteran, politician and rights activist A life dedicated to serving the Canadian people Leonard Braithwaite was the first black Canadian elected to a provincial legislature. He ran against NDP and Conservative party candidates to win a Member of Provincial (MPP) seat for the Liberal party. His maiden speech in 1964 to the Ontario Legislature addressed the Separate Schools Act, which permitted racial segregation in the Ontario school system. Several weeks later, the province’s premier amended the Act. This human rights victory was the first of many championed by Braithwaite during his political career. Leonard Braithwaite was born in Toronto in 1923 to a Bajan (Barbadian) father and Jamaican mother. He grew up in the Kensington Market district during the Depression, and in 1943—after several unsuccessful enlistment attempts stemming from racial prejudice—left to serve overseas with the Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War. He functioned as both an engine mechanic and a safety equipment worker with the No. 6 Bomber Group in Yorkshire, England. After the war, Braithwaite returned to Ontario’s capital where he obtained a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Toronto. He continued his studies at the Harvard School of Business and there acquired his MBA. The final tier of his education involved a return to Toronto where he achieved a law degree from Osgoode Hall Law School of York University. In 1958, he opened a law practice just outside Toronto, in the suburb of Etobicoke. In 1960, Braithwaite commenced his political career as school trustee for Ward 4 in Etobicoke. A couple of years later he was elected as alderman for Ward 4. He became increasingly popular in the riding and ultimately was approached by the Liberals to run as an MPP. He won in the 1963, 1967 and 1971 elections, but ultimately lost his seat in 1975. During his more than 10 years in parliament, he raised his voice for racial and women’s rights. One of the causes he championed was affording women the right to work as legislative pages in parliament—a position formerly reserved exclusively for men. After his years in the Ontario Legislature, Braithwaite returned to municipal politics. He also returned to his law practice, where he worked until his death in 2012 at the age of 88. Shortly after his passing, the City of Toronto renamed an Etobicoke park in honour of the riding’s pioneering representative. His determination and strong sense of justice sparked profound change in Ontario’s legal framework, most notably by, in his words, “getting rid of the old race law.”

Where are we from? THE 52 LARGEST GROUPS IN CANADA’S MULTICULTURAL MOSAIC

CANADA’S BELGIAN COMMUNITY According to the Canada 2011 Census, 176,615 Canadians claim Belgian ancestry. This population has made significant positive impacts on Canadian culture, affecting numerous sectors and industries. Some Belgian-Canadians of note include: painter Henri Leopold Masson; Olympic diver Emilie-Joane Heymans; philanthropist and businessman Michael DeGroote and musician Chad VanGaalen. In the mid 19th century, Belgians were given preferred immigrant status in Canada. The Canadian governing body was actively pursuing agriculturally inclined individuals to help settle the western provinces and in many cases, suitable candidates—such as Belgians—were given safe passage and free farmland. Several Belgian communities therefore sprung up in Manitoba, with St. Boniface and St. Alphonse being among the earliest. Substantial waves of immigration also occurred close to the beginning of the 20th century—thanks to a direct steamship link from Antwerp and a need for dairy farmers— and after the First World War in response to a need from Ontario tobacco companies. A final large influx of Belgians started to arrive after the Second World War and kept coming until 1990. This final group gravitated to urban centres and were more educated than preceding migrants. About two-thirds among this group landed in Quebec.

Quiz TEST YOUR CANADIAN KNOWLEDGE

Question 1: Name the Canadian creator of the Scott Pilgrim series, on which the 2010 film Scott Pilgrim vs. the World starring Michael Cera, Anna Kendrick and Jason Schwartzman is based. Question 2: Which province celebrates the statutory holiday Louis Riel Day on the third Monday of February? Question 3: What is the name of the next Canadian astronaut set to travel to the International Space Station for a six-month mission in November 2018? Question 4: In which city are the Canadian Forces Snowbirds—Canada’s aerial acrobatics team—based?

ART, LITERATURE AND ENTERTAINMENT

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY

SPORTS AND LEISURE

ANSWERS

CANADA: NATURAL SOURCE OF PRIDE SINCE 1867

Bryan Lee O’Malley Manitoba David Saint-Jacques Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

Canadian treasures

WEEKS TO GO

1: 2: 3: 4:

Regional Optimist

infO Canada THE STORIES BEHIND OUR SYMBOLS

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES BIRD: Gyrfalcon In 1990, the gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) became the avian emblem of the Northwest Territories. This largest member of the falcon family winters in the north and primarily inhabits tundra and mountainous areas. Its diet consists mainly of ptarmigan but also includes squirrel, arctic hare and seabirds. The gyrfalcon is quick, strong and has few natural enemies.

THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY


Page 44 - The Battlefords, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Regional Optimist

www.newsoptimist.ca

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