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Page 1

APRIL 2020

A day in the life of

THE ARTS 1 CITY. 5 PHOTOGRAPHERS. 24 HOURS.

Henry Turner Jr.

inRegister.com

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CONTENTS

Publisher & Editor: Ashley Sexton Gordon EDITORIAL Managing Editor: Kelli Bozeman Community Writer: Riley Bienvenu Bourgeois Digital Content Editor: Mark Clements Contributing Writers: Aimee Broussard, Maggie Heyn Richardson, Scott Reis, Jeff Roedel, Kate Stevens Contributing Photographers: Joey Bordelon, Sean Gasser, TahJah Harmony, Jordan Hefler, Jenn Ocken, Jeannie Frey Rhodes, Collin Richie ADVERTISING Sales Manager: Geraldine Alfieri Senior Account Executive: Tricia Reed Account Executives: Liz Firesheets, Sadie Fury, Liz Walsh Ad Coordinator: Bridget Gaffney CORPORATE MEDIA Editor: Lisa Tramontana Content Strategist: Allyson Guay

JORDAN HEFLER

22 Features

Departments

18 Inspiring

8 Publisher’s View

Downtown’s new Heart Trail marries exploration and exercise

22 Cover Story

5 photographers document a day of culture Baton Rouge gets a new arts hub

49 Culture

16 Dish 20 Giving Back

43 Quality of Life

11 In the Know

A former LSU football player uses paintings to lift his community

46 The Creatives 52 Aimee’s Pretty Palate 55 Sommelier 57 Community

inRegister.com • April 2020

74 Archives

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ON THE COVER: Musician Henry Turner Jr. is just one of the local artists who are documented in our cover story, which starts on pg. 22. Photo by Jordan Hefler.

MARKETING Chief Marketing Officer: Elizabeth McCollister Hebert Marketing & Events Assistant: Taylor Floyd Events: Abby Hamilton Community Liaison: Jeanne McCollister McNeil ADMINISTRATION Business Manager: Lauren Ritchey Digital Manager: James Hume Business Associate: Kirsten Milano Business Associate: Tiffany Durocher Office Coordinator: Tara Lane Receptionist: Cathy Brown PRODUCTION/DESIGN Production Director: Melanie Samaha Art Director: Hoa Vu Graphic Designers: Melinda Gonzalez, Gracie Fletcher Miller, Emily Witt AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Audience Development Director: Katelyn Oglesby Audience Development Coordinator: Ivana Oubre A publication of Louisiana Business Inc. Chairman: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr. President and CEO: Julio Melara Editorial Director: Penny Font Circulation/Reprints 225-928-1700 email: circulation@businessreport.com Subscriptions/Customer Service 225-421-8181 email: subscriptions@businessreport.com Volume 31 Issue 8 ©Copyright 2020 by Louisiana Business Incorporated. All rights reserved by LBI. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. INREGISTER (USPS PE658 ISSN 2162-0474) is published monthly by Louisiana Business Inc. Business address: 9029 Jefferson Hwy., Ste 300, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Business phone: 225-924-5339. Periodicals postage is paid at Baton Rouge, La. Subscription rate is $36.00 for 12 issues and $48.00 for 24 issues. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to inRegister, 9029 Jefferson Hwy., Ste 300, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. inRegister cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material—manuscripts or photographs—with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of this information cannot be guaranteed.


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Coming Together

JEANNIE FREY RHODES

I

of times, our community events propelled us forward and often helped raise funds for the neediest in our midst. Our communities supported our individuals. So when our community engagements become limited to email, and social media, and Zoom, we find ourselves wanting. This is not how we were raised to be. We were raised to be hand shakers, and huggers, and holders on. We were raised to reach out and greet face to face and form bonds and unions in our circles. Those of us raised in the South don’t find it easy to keep away and keep still and keep silent. Even the grocery stores, with people shopping, are eerily silent. As if talking aloud mocks the situation at hand. And yet, in the silent days of social distancing, we find heroes who reach out to those most in need. The families with children at home lend a hand to local restaurants with to-go orders and gift cards. Individuals continue giving blood in the time of crisis. Healthcare workers show up every day to serve. The government softens the laws to allow those in hard times to make it through the chaos. And we attempt to continue on. Baton Rouge will prevail because our people make it possible. There will be damage—not unlike fallen timber or rotted sheetrock—but it might be more personal. Damage in the lives of sickly neighbors, or shuttered businesses, or hungry tummies. Damage that a blue tarp can’t cover. Yes, our city has suddenly sunk to its knees. But it’s not in despair. It’s in prayer. And it’s to bend down and pick up our fellow man.

inRegister.com • April 2020 8

r hands ld in you o h u o y n azine shut dow the mag our city Much of e to the re u fo d e s b g duced therin a g l ia ter c was pro o es , inRegis and larg s always A esses . k eateries in a s u re us outb ts and b n ir u e v v a e n , e ro co while yo cuisin blic. And ts local u h p y ig e b tl th n o o p e s m cati ly welco nt gratifi that warm ble to get insta ugh the ro th g a be d or walkin t n may not st assure ra re u pages, a resta e in s r. e g e th v in e n in d re o than we featu tronger ok and be s galleries e e once to rg e w t m a e h l (t il s w e e c n w that experie verytday ing for! These e orth wait w re a ) d te for gran

COLLIN RIC

HIE

ASHLEY SEXTON GORDON

have never loved Baton Rouge more. In the face of a worldwide pandemic, we have stepped up to support each other in extraordinary ways. Of course, this comes as no surprise from the hometown of the Cajun Navy. We have waded through waters after the floods, saved families and pulled river-sodden furnishings out to the curb. We have served meals to the recently homeless and lost. We’ve supplied toiletries to those who have never before lacked a private bathroom. We have sheltered in place during storms that shut down the city’s electricity and mobility. We have pulled out chainsaws and cut neighbors’ fallen trees. We have waited in long lines for gasoline and paid for those who couldn’t access their funds. We have stood strong for one another. But, until now, we have never seen the whole city shut down. Turn out its lights. Until now, we have never watched the city sink to its knees. Until now, we have never been separated from one another. A hurricane wreaks havoc, then passes. Same too, a flood. Although weather is unpredictable at best, we know how to stock up on water, and bread, and necessities. We know when to come out of hiding and assess the damage. Consider the future. Count our losses. Lend a helping hand. So it comes as no shock to find that the residents of south Louisiana don’t do social distancing well. We don’t know how not to help, how not to rebound in public, how not to fellowship with one another. We don’t know how not to go to a restaurant, or a festival, or a parade or a concert. Even in the most perilous

Beena and Jaimin Patel celebrate Holi Hai at the Hindu Vedic Society of Baton Rouge on March 7. Read more starting on page 22.


• AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

STAND OUT

IN A BLACK AND WHITE WORLD

inRegister.com • April 2020

SOMETHING REAL

4212 Bluebonnet Blvd • Baton Rouge 240 Laurel St, Ste. 202 • Downtown Baton Rouge 921 S. Range Ave • Denham Springs 42078 Veterans Ave, Ste. H • Hammond (225) 399-0001 • weilerplasticsurgery.com DR. DAUGHERTY

DR. WEILER

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inRegister.com • April 2020


IN THE KNOW

COURTESY LASM

Multiple small-scale studies of Frank Hayden’s famed downtown Baton Rouge sculpture “Head of Oliver Pollock” are part of LASM’s exhibition on the renowned local artist.

Standing Strong

G

BY KELLI BOZEMAN

gain a greater appreciation for the internationally famous artist’s distinctive style. The exhibition will feature pieces from public and private collections, including some that are being displayed in a museum setting for the first time. Fittingly, Hayden’s legacy also lives on all year long—pandemic or no pandemic— through public sculptures all around downtown as well as on local university campuses and in Baton Rouge houses of worship. What Hayden loved most, art historians say, was for his work to be accessible by all. As the artist himself once wrote, “The prospect of beauty is constant and is all that is needed to guide by hand and heart.” lasm.org

inRegister.com • April 2020

alleries are dark. Field trips are cancelled. But even as museums around the city experience coronavirusrelated closures, local art lovers look forward to a day in the not-so-distant future when new exhibitions will highlight the remarkable achievements of Capital City creators. Foremost among these is Frank Hayden, the late sculptor and Southern University professor whose bold and broad body of work will be the focus of the Louisiana Art & Science Museum’s upcoming show. Slated to be on view when the museum reopens its doors, “Frank Hayden: Lift Every Voice” is scheduled to run through September 6, allowing Baton Rougeans and visitors to

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IN THE KNOW

KUDOS

A diagnosis of congestive heart failure might seem frightening, but Civello, a cardiologist with Our Lady of the Lake, aims to help patients replace fear with practical information. Civello created a takehome toolbox packed with essentials from pill holders to fluid-limiting cups to salt-free seasonings, plus progress charts and booklets full of advice. In partnership with the Innovation Institute, the OLOL team also created an app version of the box; both are aimed at helping patients stay home and healthy.

ETC. 1

Art of Isolation

The Baton Rouge Gallery is turning lemons into lemonade with its Flat Curve Gallery program, which encourages artists old and young, experienced and inexperienced, to try their hand at any type of artistic expression in the comfort of their own homes— as is necessary due to COVID-19. From clay sculptures to abstract marker drawings, the gallery wants to not just see it all, but share it. Artists—or their parents—are invited to upload images of the works through the form on batonrougegallery.org in order to have them added to the online collection. All of these masterpieces will be available for digital viewing by anyone and everyone.

Jason Hardy

ETC. 2

Seeing STARS PIM VAN HAMMEN

The cosmos are calling, and Baton Rouge native and college freshman Alyssa Carson is answering. After being the youngest person accepted to the Advanced PoSSUM Space Academy at the age of 15, she recently partnered with German company Horizn Studios to design the first-ever luggage for space travel. With NASA projecting commercial voyages to be available in 2030, the “Horizn ONE” luggage line will feature amenities like built-in chargers, smart screens, and biometric security. “It was fun to think about what necessities someone might bring with them to space, especially because initial flights to space might only be six hours,” Carson has said. “It’s such an exciting time for the space industry because we’re getting so many people involved.”

Beth Courtney

After more than four decades at LPB, the network’s president and CEO has been named 2020 Broadcaster of the Year by the Louisiana Association of Broadcasters. Courtney first served as a government reporter before becoming one of the nation’s first female public broadcasting network presidents. She led the creation of numerous award-winning Louisiana-themed documentaries, and she helped launch and remains the co-host of LPB’s monthly Louisiana Public Square program.

C E L E B R AT I O N S

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David Graham

CAITLIN B PHOTOGRAPHY

inRegister.com • April 2020

Coming Soon

Weddings weren’t made for social distancing, it’s true. But long after this worldwide pandemic is gone, brides and grooms will continue the tradition of gathering family and friends together to celebrate their nuptials. On April 26, 2019, Michelle Morris and Grant Larson tied the knot at St. Joseph’s Cathedral. See their wedding, and many more, in our inRegister Weddings issue coming out in June.

This LSU alumnus and former New Orleans parole officer is attracting national attention for his new book, The Second Chance Club. The book weaves together the real-life stories of seven parolees trying to navigate a chaotic system, all through the lens of someone struggling to help them. Hardy is accumulating fascinating stories of another sort these days, living in New Jersey and serving as an FBI special agent.

A career in programming and a desire to help his own children prepare for a tech-based future inspired Graham, who grew up in Baton Rouge, to found the company Code Ninjas. The Houston-based firm, which teaches kids to code through a game-based curriculum that rewards achievement with martial arts-style belts, just opened its first local location on Siegen Lane.

JEANNIE FREY RHODES

Kenny Civello


Ask the EXPERT

MY FAVORITE THINGS

What causes ear infections? Middle ear infections are the result of fluid buildup behind the eardrum that becomes colonized with bacteria. The underlying problem is the eustachian tubes (ETs), which connect the ears to the back of the nose. In children, the ETs are more prone to swell shut (from cold viruses, allergens, etc) because of their size and orientation. This swelling ultimately causes a vacuum within the middle ear space that leads to fluid accumulation and pulls bacteria into the ear from the nose, creating an ear infection.

BECKY GOTTSEGEN FIGURATIVE CERAMIC SCULPTOR

GUILTY PLEASURE AND PLACE FOR LUNCH CLASS IN HIGH SCHOOL TIME OF YEAR WAY TO SPEND A SATURDAY MORNING WAY TO SPEND $20 BATON ROUGE EXPERIENCE OR ATTRACTION WAY TO GET MYSELF MOVING IN THE MORNING SONG ON MY PLAYLIST BOOK CHILDHOOD MEMORY CONCERT I EVER ATTENDED PERFUME ITEM IN MY MAKEUP BAG PLACE TO HAVE A SHOPPING SPREE OUT-OF-TOWN DESTINATION MOST TREASURED POSSESSION

IDEA OF PERFECT HAPPINESS TALENT I WISH I HAD WAY TO UNWIND MY MOTTO FOR LIFE

Art Spring

COLLIN RICHIE

Hanging out in my PJs before meeting friends for lunch A surprise for my granddaughter Love taking my granddaughter to Knock Knock and the Baton Rouge Zoo Schedule a workout Amy Winehouse’s “Back to Black”

Ear tubes sit within the eardrums and provide a passageway for airflow in-and-out of the middle ear. This prevents the vacuum effect (discussed above) from occurring, making ear infections much less likely. Additionally, ear tubes provide a channel for infections, when they do develop, to drain out of the middle ear and ear drops to get into the middle ear for treatment.

How do I know if my child needs tubes? The primary clue that ear tubes might benefit your child is frequency of ear infections. Generally, if there have been 3 ear infections within a 6 month period or 4 within a year, ear tubes may be indicated. Additionally, if your child has had non-infected fluid behind one or both eardrums for several months, ear tubes may be required to drain this fluid. Surgery itself is very quick and safe; it is the most common procedure done in the U.S. annually. Most children return to their normal routine the day after surgery.

To Kill a Mockingbird Fun Fair Park with my friends! Rolling Stones in 1978 Givenchy III, which they don’t make anymore L’Oreal lipstick that lasts all day

Baton Rouge Clinic ENT physicians: (L-R) James Krupala, MD; Kelly Clem ents, MD; Brian Petit, MD; W. Kevin Katzenmeyer Virginia Bringaze, MD; Elliot Hardy, , MD; MD

Chatta Box The beach on the Gulf or anywhere I can scuba dive! My husband Cooking Spending time with family and friends

7373 Perkins Rd

Baton Rouge, LA

Singing Working in my studio Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.

FOR QUESTIONS OR TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH ONE OF OUR ENT PHYSICIANS, PLEASE CALL (225) 246-9240. BatonRougeClinic.com

inRegister.com • April 2020

HIDDEN TALENT

How do ear tubes help with ear infections?

Dearman’s

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IN THE KNOW

Metamorphosis B BY RILEY BIENVENU BOURGEOIS

utterflies are back and better than ever. More refined than the jeweled hoops that adorned the ears of Mariah Carrey in the early 2000s, this time around, the butterfly trend is returning to its roots and adopting a more true-to-life color palette, emphasizing earth tones and soft pinks and oranges. See our picks for integrating this symbol of hope and life into homes and wardrobes.

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inRegister.com • April 2020

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1. Butterfly pendant light, $468, Anthropologie 2. Arthur Court cake knife, $25, Rickey Heroman’s 3. Rhinestone studs, $58, Dawson Street 4. Caroline Coe Butterflies, $2,000, Ann Connelly Fine Art 5. Set of 4 butterfly plates, $52, Gourmet Girls 6. Handpainted slides, $240, Head Over Heels 7. Butterfly bobby pin, $20, Rodéo Boutique 8. Set of 4 small butterfly plates, $45, Gourmet Girls 9. McClendon Designs earrings, $70, Head Over Heels 10. Vegan flowerpot candle, $40, Pollumination Eco-Chic Candles + Ceramics 11. Dodo mini charm, $210, Kiki 12. Gucci watch, $1,100, Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry

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DISH

Drago’s

BY MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON • PHOTO BY JENN OCKEN

Charbroiled Oysters and Crawfish Meatballs

M

inRegister.com • April 2020

etairie-based Drago’s has been a household name since secondgeneration restaurateur Tommy Cvitanovich engineered a signature recipe for charbroiled oysters in 1993. Grilled on the half-shell with garlic, butter and herbs and dusted with a blend of romano and parmesan cheeses, the oysters helped launch Drago’s into fame and triggered subsequent openings in New Orleans,

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Lafayette and Jackson. The Baton Rouge location opened earlier this year to enthusiastic patrons. For crawfish season, Cvitanovich and his team have rolled out specials including mouthwatering crawfish meatballs. Louisiana crawfish tails are blended with crabmeat stuffing, deep-fried, topped with marinara and finished with a drizzle of cream sauce, parmesan and parsley. It’s springtime decadence, Louisiana style.

Drago’s 4580 Constitution Avenue, Baton Rouge 256-3092 • dragosrestaurant.com Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.


We don’t just treat cancer. We treat Anna. Your cancer treatment should be as unique as you are. Here, every patient is encircled by a team of experts from many specialties that take a collaborative approach in treating patients to ensure the best possible outcome. Hear Anna’s story and learn more about our nationally-recognized groups of specialists, state-of-the-art technologies, clinical trials and more at marybirdlake.org/conquer.

Anna Trammell, rectal cancer survivor


INSPIRING

Working with artists throughout the community, Jacobsen hopes to continue adding art installations along the trail in order to give visitors a reason to keep coming back.

Walk To Remember

BY RILEY BIENVENU BOURGEOIS PHOTO BY KRISTIN SELLE

TRAILBLAZER TAYLOR JACOBSEN BRINGS TO LIFE AN INNOVATIVE IDEA FOR PROMOTING HEART HEALTH

inRegister.com • April 2020

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aylor Jacobsen takes the phrase “follow your heart” literally. Walking along the sidewalks of downtown Baton Rouge just months ago, the LSU landscape architecture graduate and former tech company COO placed heartshaped decals in a methodical pattern, passing by art installations and local landmarks. Not easily visualized from the ground level, from an aerial view his completed 3.2-mile course creates a largerthan-life version of a heart, making up just part of his reasoning for the title of the “Heart Trail.” In 2018, Jacobsen left his job in the drone technology industry not out of a lack of passion for the field, but out of a concern for his health. Experiencing heart issues related to stress, he went back to his landscape design roots, seizing

time among the trees as a way to unwind. “I realized that my health was more important than my job,” he explains. “I changed my outlook on stress and started walking. I quickly realized the impact of the outdoors.” The benefits that Jacobsen gained from taking time out of his day to exercise were immeasurable, fueling his mission to pass the practice onto others. Establishing his own design company, Urban Canvas Studio, Jacobsen brought his vision for an art-focused downtown walking trail to the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge. Their enthusiasm for the project propelled Jacobsen forward, granting him necessary connections in order to make his dream a reality. “The big thing was how to get

others to do it as well,” Jacobsen says, noting that the trail was funded through the Baton Rouge Area Foundation as a measure of preventative medicine, especially due to Louisiana’s high rates of cardiovascular disease. “The idea is that the trail will help you re-fall in love with your city. The Heart Trail passes nine parks, 110 businesses and countless historical landmarks. It’s about reconnecting with the neighborhood you might have grown to take for granted.” The first-ever public group walk along the newly established trail took place, appropriately, on Valentine’s Day of this year. But the completion of this trail was just the beginning of a larger initiative—a pilot project for a network of future trails that could eventually spread throughout

Baton Rouge and around the state. “The trail will eventually grow and we will add more art installations in order to create a more dense trail,” Jacobsen explains. “We’re looking at a possible second trail on Plank Road, and even the idea to put up to six paths throughout the city.”
 But right now Jacobsen’s goal is simply to get people out and get them active. For him, the path is a way to not only provide people with daily exercise opportunities but also to give them a way to connect with the city and one another. “Seeing the trail now, I feel a sense of reward to have found a method that works for me, but also allows me to appreciate everything that Baton Rouge is,” he explains. “I hope the trail can help others find moments of peace.” yourhearttrail.com


SPONSORED CONTENT

WHAT’S IN STORE

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PROPRIETOR: Kathy and Steve Terry SPECIALTY: Custom furniture, retail and paint studio LOCAL SINCE: New location opening April 2020 WHAT’S IN THE STORE: Find everything you need to get creative at B Spoke 4 U. With a full line of Chalk Paint® by Annie Sloan decorative paint and finishes, they also carry Annie Sloan brushes, stencils and custom fabric for any project. Dress things up with décor transfers, molds and stamp products from Iron Orchid Designs, along with stencils, foils and finishing products from Royal Design Studio. Find unique custom painted furniture and home décor accessories, area rugs, lamps and more. The studio at B Spoke 4 U offers classes in painting and special finishing techniques for all DIY projects. They also offer private group painting parties for adults and children as well as daily special project classes and re-upholstering classes. THE DIFFERENCE: Steve and Kathy offer a multi-dimensional approach to product and design helping customers to create their own unique DIY projects. B Spoke 4U provides a fun, stress-free atmosphere using only the best products with unmatched quality. THE LATEST: At B Spoke 4U, Kathy and Steve regularly partner with the team at Annie Sloan to offer their input on the market, trends and products. Sign up for a workshop—posted on the website, for beginners to advance do-it-yourselfer with special workshops added weekly.

PHOTO BY JEANNIE FREY RHODES

11892 Ferdinand Street

225.244.9205

bspoke4u.com


GIVING BACK

Jess’ Bra Closet BY RILEY BIENVENU BOURGEOIS

inRegister.com • April 2020 20

PHOTOS COURTESY JESS

’ BRA CLOSET

T

hey say confidence comes from within, but according to Jessica Johnson, what’s on the outside matters, too. For years, she observed girls refusing to dress out for physical education. A juvenile detention officer for a number of years, when she learned the cause of their defiance, she was faced with a glaring need that was going unnoticed and unacknowledged. “These girls didn’t have the proper undergarments, so they were embarrassed to undress in front of the other girls,” explains Johnson. “I immediately saw a need that I could address.” Founding Jess’ Bra Closet in 2011, Johnson began collecting lightly used and new bras for girls and women of all ages and sizes. Extending to other needs like personal hygiene products, undergarments and even socks and undershirts for boys, Johnson and her team are working to fill an unconventional need in the community.

Boosting self-confidence in girls is one of Jessica Johnson’s primary goals. Johnson (shown at left) meets with groups to talk about topics such as hygiene, bra sizing and more.


Issue Date: April Ad 1 proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Est. in 1961

17650 Highland Road | Baton Rouge 225.755.5702 | @chattaboxboutique

Volunteers help size and distribute bras both at local events and at the Jess’ Bra Closet location, which is open by appointment.

“Talking about these needs is so important,” she explains. “You don’t know who is in need and you will be surprised who can benefit.” The Jess’ Bra Closet team fits everyone who comes to them to ensure they receive their proper size, with a strict policy to never discriminate based on the numbers and letters on the tag. In addition, the team also caters to younger clients by giving health talks and promoting body positivity. “Self-esteem is something central to our mission,” Johnson says, noting that these seminars for young girls include sizing for training bras, as well as talks about hygiene and empowerment. “The more these kids know, the more we can help them.” An annual “Back 2 School” fundraiser is one of Jess’ Bra Closet’s largest events, catering not only to what goes under clothes, but what is needed in the classroom. Backpacks, notebooks and other essentials are given away, while parents and children are invited to talk and network. In addition, Johnson and her team also partner with No Glass Slippers to collect and distribute prom dresses to Baton Rouge-area girls in need. For Johnson, the nonprofit road isn’t a straightforward path, but rather an ever-changing outlet for providing the community with what they need to not just live, but live well. “I’m always asking myself the question, ‘How can we make her feel more confident?” Johnson says. “Sometimes it really is the small things.” jessbracloset.org

inRegister.com • April 2020

“Not everyone can afford the $50 to $60 that a bra costs,” explains Johnson, noting that often those funds are allotted to other necessities like utility bills or food. “That’s something people forget, though. We just assume everyone has the same access that we do to these necessities.” Johnson, however, is working to bring some truth to those assumptions with Jess’ Bra Closet, one of the few organizations of its kind in the United States. For Johnson, the goal is simple: to restore confidence by offering necessities and creating a community that cares. “Our self-esteem is so tied to our appearance, whether we like it or not,” she says. “When we go out in public, we want people to respect us, but that’s hard when you don’t have the right support.” Johnson’s mission doesn’t stop in the local community. Since the founding of Jess’ Bra Closet, her team has extended their services to women across the country, as well as in other countries like Mexico, with nearly 18,000 bras provided locally and globally to date. According to her, the need is greater than one might imagine, and that is due to a lack of interest in the topic. Bras, underwear and personal hygiene products, while crucial, are often put on the proverbial fundraising backburner due to being deemed inappropriate for wider conversation. Johnson has observed people largely shying away from the topic, resulting in not only lesser funding and donations, but an attitude of silence that perpetuates damaging attitudes.

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COVER STORY

A day in the life of

THE ARTS 1 CITY. 5 PHOTOGRAPHERS. 24 HOURS.

Less than one week before Baton Rouge businesses were closed and events were cancelled due to the coronavirus outbreak, we sent five photographers to capture art throughout the city from dawn until well past dusk. The photo essay that follows represents just a bit of the inspirational arts that took place on Saturday, March 7. We strongly believe that the arts are an essential component to the vitality of our Baton Rouge community, and we look forward to the day when we can again experience the sound of an orchestra tuning up and view an oil painter’s interpretation of our local landscape. Until then, be reminded by these pages of the blessings of an ordinary day in the world of Baton Rouge art.

inRegister.com • April 2020

Text by Kelli Bozeman and Ashley Sexton Gordon.

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6:20 a.m.

They call it golden hour: the quiet moments surrounding the sunrise when warm rays give a soft glow to all they touch. As this Saturday starts, those pale pink beams shine upon the sleek stainless steel curves of the 14-foot-tall “Sing the River” sculpture recently installed on the downtown riverfront. Commissioned by the Rotary Club of Baton Rouge in honor of the organization’s 100th anniversary, the sculpture by California artist Po Shu Wang is connected to sensors in the Mississippi River and plays musical sounds as the water rises and falls. Photo by Joey Bordelon.


inRegister.com • April 2020

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inRegister.com • April 2020 24

MAINTENANCE | CONSTRUCTION


COVER STORY

8:17 a.m.

Abe Negaran displays his Louisiana-themed artworks at the neighborhood-wide Spanish Town Spring Yard Sale, which in addition to dozens of typical home yard sales features several tables offering wares created by artistic neighborhood residents. Negaran, an LSU-trained engineer who embraces his expressive side via his business, Abe’s Drawings, uses toothpicks to create the intricate freehand designs that are the signature of his distinctive works. Photo by Collin Richie.

8:56 a.m.

inRegister.com • April 2020

Artist Marc Verret (known as Marc Fresh) does final touchups on a mural for the new restaurant Boru Ramen & Poke in Electric Depot. Verret has painted large-scale murals all over Baton Rouge for years, and he has worked with kids through the Summer Youth Employment Program by The Walls Project. Photo by TahJah Harmony.

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COVER STORY

9:16 a.m.

inRegister.com • April 2020

Lisa Sherk creates a smiling sun during StoryTime in the Garden at the LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens. This monthly event—presented by the Junior League of Baton Rouge—includes storybook readings and imagination-themed activities. StoryTime in the Garden promotes early childhood literacy for children ages 3 to 8 in the Baton Rouge area. Photo by Jordan Hefler.

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9:34 a.m.

A blue beadboard façade within Spanish Town Market makes an eye-catching gallery wall for an exhibit of paintings by members of the Baton Rouge Plein Air Painters club, while market owner Travis Campbell reviews paperwork at the table that lines the wall. The artist group spent the month of February using their brushes to capture images of the unique architecture in this neighborhood. More than a century old, Spanish Town Market serves up daily plate lunch specials alongside grocery essentials for residents who prefer to shop hyper-local. Photo by Collin Richie.


10:07 a.m.

On the first Saturday of every month, the Baton Rouge Arts Market is held in conjunction with the weekly Red Stick Farmers Market downtown. This open-air market— supported by the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge—allows local artists a chance to sell their creations directly to the public while meeting other makers. The events have become so popular that a second arts market launched in September at The Arc of Baton Rouge on Jefferson Highway. Photo by Sean Gasser.

Issue Date: April Ad proof #1

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LOCAL BUSINESS FOR 38 YEARS!

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COVER STORY

11:11 a.m.

Marion Bienvenu leads an informative and interactive theatrical performance called “The Traveling Trunk Show” at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum. The event, which is typically held every Saturday morning, was launched a decade ago as a way to expose young children to both scientific concepts and the arts. Puppets, props, songs and games keep kids engaged and moving around the stage with smiles on their faces. Photo by Sean Gasser.

11:42 a.m.

Photo by Jordan Hefler.

inRegister.com • April 2020

We can thank Instagram, YouTube and millennials (who are masters at social media) for launching the beauty industry into a whole new realm. Sure, ladies from decades gone by occasionally had their makeup done by a professional—for their wedding. But today, professional makeup artists abound and help make just about any event more glamorous. Here, makeup artist Abby Manuel gives Riley McKernan a polished look for a dinner party she is attending later this evening.

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COVER STORY

inRegister.com • April 2020

12:02 p.m.

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Artist Kimberly Meadowlark contemplates her next painting at her home studio. This abstract artist and photographer did not consider the arts a potential occupation until high school, when health issues knocked this track star off her feet. Meadowlark was forced to enroll in art classes instead. There, she thrived and now has a thriving business selling art to personal collectors as well as photographing personal moments at weddings. Photo by TahJah Harmony.


Issue Date: April Ad proof #1

12:34 p.m.

Jamaria Fisher frames a close-up of a pinecone through the camera lens on Southern University’s campus as part of The Futures Fund. This program— launched by The Walls Project—helps qualified school students focus on building careers in the arts. Through coding and photography, youth in Baton Rouge learn entrepreneurial skills and glean insight from multiple professionals and nonprofits in the area. Photo by Sean Gasser.

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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Installation day. Chad Schoonmaker, a Baton Rouge artist, hangs up his canvases at the local café Brew Ha-Ha! Schoonmaker started painting as an escape from the stress of work, and he found great pleasure in the possibilities of a blank canvas, tubes of paint and brushes. His paintings were so well received that he began commissioning work with clients all over the country and showcasing his work at local events, art shows and businesses. Photo by TahJah Harmony.

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1:22 p.m.

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COVER STORY

1:37 p.m.

inRegister.com • April 2020

It’s a colorful celebration at the Hindu Vedic Society of Baton Rouge on South Kenilworth Parkway as the organization hosts its annual Holi Hai. Aimed at marking the beginning of spring, this “festival of colors” takes place on the full moon day that falls in the Hindi month of Phalguna (February-March) and draws together people of all ages like this 7-year-old girl named Aanya to spread friendship by throwing pigmented powders on each other as vibrant music plays. Photo by Collin Richie.

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COVER STORY

2:14 p.m.

Jacob Simmons, 15, of Covington High School, performs “The Conqueror Worm” by Edgar Allen Poe in the final round of the Poetry Out Loud competition at the Capitol Park Museum. Simmons won first place in this Louisiana version of the national competition, which was developed by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation to encourage students to learn about great poetry while mastering public speaking skills. In a normal year, Simmons’ achievement would have entitled him to advance to the national finals in Washington, D.C., but the 2020 finals were cancelled due to the novel coronavirus outbreak.

inRegister.com • April 2020

Photo by Sean Gasser.

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Robert Roth Jewelers 7513 Jefferson Hwy 225.927.9444 robertrothjewelers.com


3:46 p.m.

In his home studio, artisan Damien Mitchell works with leather to create one-of-a-kind pieces from wallets to totes to skillet handle covers. Mitchell says he always had a knack for making things, and a degree from the University of Louisiana in industrial design helped to inform his streamlined aesthetic. Want a custom piece? Mitchell’s “Build a Belt” offering lets customers select their preferred width, leather and buckle colors, and size for a perfect fit. Photo by Joey Bordelon.

2:43 p.m.

Grammy-winning country musician Trisha Yearwood, center, joins the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra on the Raising Cane’s River Center stage for a final rehearsal before the Irene W. and C.B. Pennington Great Performers in Concert series performance that will take place later this evening. Issue Date: April Ad 2 proof #4of numerous resounding successes The collaboration is one for conductor Timothy right, who will retire at the • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval Muffitt, or minor revisions. end of this orchestra season after more than 20 years with • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business Photo today. by Collin Richie. BRSO. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

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COVER STORY

4:12 p.m.

inRegister.com • April 2020

Musician and festival organizer Henry Turner Jr., along with his band Flavor, hosts a CD Listening Party at the Buddy Stewart Memorial Rhythm Museum & Rock Shop on North Acadian Thruway. The Rock Shop—once a heralded retail store—is now an antique record shop with a large collection of vinyl records on display and is visited by collectors and music enthusiasts from all over the world. Photo by Jordan Hefler.

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8:14 p.m.

Comedian Jeff Foxworthy shares his latest standup routine with an audience looking for big laughs at L’Auberge Baton Rouge’s Event Center. After becoming a national sensation in 1993 with his You Might Be a Redneck... album, Foxworthy has gone on to host or star in five TV series and has sold more comedy recordings than anyone else. His Southern shtick played well alongside other famous funny guys as part of the uber-successful Blue Collar Comedy Tour, and his on-stage style has been compared to that of Mark Twain. Photo by Collin Richie.

7:49 p.m.

Bartenders at Soji: Modern Asian prepare for Tiki Night, a collaboration between the restaurant and Oakwash, a company owned by artist Omar Girona. It is Girona who handcrafts these one-of-a-kind tiki mugs using local materials sourced from Southern Pottery and sculpts, sands, glazes and fires each mug. Most of his works are sold out of state through partnerships with Disney. This evening, Soji launches the Tiki Night release party which includes limited editions of the mugs plus tropical cocktails. Photo by TahJah Harmony.

8:56 p.m.

Little Rock-based designer Bridgette Jones unveils her new Mis’Fits line on the runway at Oneofakind Baton Rouge Fashion Week’s Big Night, held at the Milton J. Womack Ballroom. A former model, Jones created her collection to inspire women to “stand in your true self, even if that means standing out.” The local Fashion Week was launched by Brandon D. Campbell to showcase new and emerging designers, models and artists, and a portion of proceeds benefit local charities. Photo by Joey Bordelon.

inRegister.com • April 2020 37


• AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

inRegister.com • April 2020

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COVER STORY

10:36 p.m.

Baton Rouge’s own Chase Tyler Band takes the stage at the Texas Club off Florida Boulevard. Tyler was inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2011 for his Southern rock, country and swamp pop originals. He follows in the footsteps of many popular musicians who have entertained the crowds at the Texas Club, including Hank Williams Jr., George Jones, Jerry Lee Lewis and Clint Black. Photo by Jordan Hefler.

11:59 p.m.

Photo by Joey Bordelon.

inRegister.com • April 2020

With his alter ego of DJ Snoopadelic, rapper Snoop Dogg spins records at The Basin Music Hall on Third Street during a St. Patrick’s Day pre-party hosted by Raising Cane’s founder Todd Graves. Graves was scheduled to reign as grand marshal of the Wearing of the Green Parade before the threat of coronavirus halted all public activities, but that didn’t stop Snoop from entertaining crowds until well past midnight as another Day in the Life of the Arts wound to a close.

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COVER STORY

Artistic License Sean Gasser

TahJah Harmony

Sean is a commercial and TahJah Harmony left her portrait photographer tech job as an app develwho also has a passion oper to actively pursue her for street photography. passion for storytelling as He received his bachelor’s a lifestyle photographer. from SLU and an MFA from When she isn’t behind the University of Miami. her camera (or computer Gasser’s day began with a editing!) you can find her well-attended arts market, riding her bike around town, followed by a highly enterrock climbing, or playing taining LASM show, then her violin. With a coffee cup on to a photography lesson in one hand and the latest with the Futures Fund business book in the other, students, and wrapped up Harmony loves to inspire with a very competitive other creatives to live their poetry contest. It speaks passions by speaking on the to the variety and vibrancy subject and hosting “The Issue Date: August Ad proof #1 of what Baton Rouge has Creative Health Podcast.” • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL to RUNoffer.   AS IS unless approval or final revisions

These professional photographers went behind the lens to capture a day in the life of the arts in Baton Rouge on March 7. They are true artists, indeed!

Joey Bordelon

Jordan Hefler

Collin Richie

Joey Bordelon is a Baton Rouge-based commercial and fine art photographer whose work can be found nationally in publications and advertising campaigns. Joey studied fine art film photography and business at LSU. “The variety, level and abundance of art located on any given Saturday here is incredible,” says Bordelon. “If people began to look for art-related activities, they would probably be surprised at the abundant options right within their reach.”

Jordan Hefler is a creative entrepreneur and photographer known for her love of color, music and personal expression. Her passion for content marketing, graphic design and social media has allowed her to spread beyond photography and grow into a brand of creative online workshops, merchandise and educational blogging, as well as host of the podcast “Do What You Want Radio.” She currently specializes in editorial and commercial branding photography for creative marketing campaigns, publications and the music industry.

Collin Richie’s lifelong pursuit of photography began with a school project using a disposable camera. After graduating from LSU with a B.S. in biology and an MBA specializing in marketing, he continued his love of photography and ultimately has photographed everything from chemical plants to wedding portraits. In 2016, he founded Humans of the Water, a portrait project of victims of the August flood. Richie received numerous awards and his photographs have been exhibited in multiple museum shows.

are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

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G R e at P e r f o r m e r S I n c o n c e R T The Irene W. and C. B. Pennington Foundation Great Performers in Concert series helps provide artistic excellence and presents the world’s greatest artists to Baton Rouge, enhancing our community. The Baton Rouge Symphony would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of the TRISHA YEARWOOD concert.

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Positioned on a three-sided lot bounded by St. Ferdinand and Somerulos streets and Louisiana Avenue, the structure that once served as a home for the district attorney’s office will get a modern makeover as the Cary Saurage Community Arts Center, as shown in this rendering by Ritter Maher Architects.

Taking Shape

COURTESY RITTER MAHER ARCHITECTS

QUALITY OF LIFE

BY KATE STEVENS

THE HISTORIC TRIANGLE BUILDING DOWNTOWN WILL BE TRANSFORMED INTO A NEW HUB FOR THE ARTS

I

envision all the wonderful things that will take place in the Cary Saurage Community Arts Center. “To see that come to fruition after so many years of planning is very exciting for me, and I am so looking forward to all the things that I didn’t know could happen in the building happening,” Chatelain says. The nonprofit organization— with a mission to foster the creative capacity and vibrancy of the Capital Region through advocacy, resources and education—will triple its square footage by moving from its current location at the Robert A. Bogan Fire Museum on Laurel Street to the midcentury

downtown building known as the “Triangle Building” on St. Ferdinand Street. Currently, interior demolition and abatement of the vacant building have been completed and the new center’s design, by Ritter Maher Architects, is in the final stages, says Chatelain. Construction should begin this month, she says.  In addition to the Arts Council’s administrative headquarters, the $2.5-million, 12,000-square-foot Cary Saurage Community Arts Center will house an art gallery, an artist co-op area, a recording studio, a black box theater and a rooftop terrace with an enclosed

room for meetings or workspace. The terrace, with views of the Mississippi River and Beauregard Town, will be available to the public for events. By offering much-needed artist workspace, the new arts center will retain local talent and keep the Capital City’s cultural identity strong, Chatelain says. The center’s recording studio will allow musicians, performers and those in the film industry to stay in Baton Rouge to record instead of traveling to other cities, she says. “We wanted that to be able to happen in Baton Rouge,” Chatelain says. The Cary Saurage Community

inRegister.com • April 2020

magine an artist-centric haven with innovative space anyone can use to create, inspire and share their talent with other likeminded individuals right here in the Capital City. That’s what’s arriving on the Baton Rouge arts scene in December 2020 with the grand opening of the Cary Saurage Community Arts Center. The center will serve as the new headquarters of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge and offer affordable and accessible artistcentered space. Even Renee Chatelain, CEO and president of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, can hardly

43


QUALITY OF LIFE

COURTESY RITTER MAHER ARCHITECTS

The top-to-bottom transformation will create a 1,200-squarefoot rooftop terrace, along with two interior floors featuring an art gallery, a recording studio, an artist co-op, a black box theater, and the Arts Council’s new headquarters.

Arts Center goes “beyond just kick off this month, and the Arts serving the art sector,” Chatelain Council will offer numerous says. This revitalization of the platforms to donate, Chatelain building, the former home of says. Those interested in helping the district attorney’s office and subsidize artist workspace or who empty for the past two years, want to donate can visit the Arts Issue Date: April Ad #1and Council website at artsbr.org. raises the profile of proof downtown • Please respond e-mail or fax withdraw, your approval or minor revisions. servesbyas a regional she says.  The council’s construction • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions Public fundraising is set to fundraising goal is $3 million, are received by the close of business today.

of which $2.6 million has been pledged. That amount includes a $1 million pledge from the Saurage family, who owns Community Coffee, in honor of Cary Saurage, a longtime patron of the arts for whom the building is named, Chatelain says. Chatelain says it is the

organization’s dream to raise a total of $5 million to cover additional costs and a sustainability fund that will, in part, help fund grants to artists and arts organizations using the building to create new work with significant community impact.

• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

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TRUST. RESPECT. ACCOUNTABILITY. Excellence in providing honest, independent advice and placing our clients’ needs first.

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DUSTIN S. DOWLING, AIF®

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ersonal trainer Kristen Serio is used to pushing a lot of weight around, but for more than a year now, the CrossFit apostle’s eye for detail and zeal for adventure has had her sweating over another kind of heavy lifting. “The fact is we need a challenge,” Serio says of her first steps as a maker. “It’s how we grow.” Opening a canvas tote bag, the Baton Rouge native reveals wrapped bundles of small wildflowers, weeds and other sundry flora— forgotten stems she plucked from the ground while hiking with her family around the country. Each collection is marked by location: Colorado, North Carolina, Texas.

“This is like a diary,” she says, clutching the bundles like tactile memories of her travels. Armed with a homemade woodblock press—Serio grew up learning woodworking from her father in his workshop—she flattens and dries the flowers and uses a resin mold technique to create art pieces, coasters, even jewelry. When her sister was married last year, Serio took her bridal bouquet, pressed the flowers and laid them onto a wooden serving piece she covered in resin. Friends, family members and followers on Instagram who saw it soon began contacting her for custom orders. Next, Serio called the Audubon Butterfly Garden & Insectarium


Issue Date: April Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

KRISTEN SERIO HOMETOWN: Baton Rouge AGE: 26 ARTISTRY: Flower press artist, painter, fitness specialist ONLINE: @arte_di_kristen on Instagram

to carefully handling the brittle textures of butterfly wings, Serio’s creativity is filled with tense moments of trial and error. But that’s how she likes it—both for her art and for her day job in fitness. “Fitness is a form of creativity for me, thankfully,” she says. “Every body is different, so improving each body takes a creative, unique approach.” For artists, Serio gives the same advice she does to someone she’s whipping into shape in the gym. “You can’t wait for inspiration, and you’ll never find the perfect moment—you just have to get up and get moving,” Serio says. “It’s all about the start.”

225.926.6892 7620 OLD HAMMOND HWY.

inRegister.com • April 2020

and asked them what they do with their dead butterflies. “That was an awkward conversation at first,” Serio says with a laugh. Eventually she found the one person responsible for butterfly removal, and they worked out a deal. Now translucent and vividly hued wings of some of the rarest species in Louisiana are centerpieces for the artist’s pendant necklaces and earrings. To relax, Serio paints acrylic landscapes. Her favorite depicts the feeling of standing tall after a climb and looking down on a thick fog covering the valleys below like a blanket. From gauging the precise temperatures of the resin pour

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inRegister.com • April 2020


CU LT U RE

EDDY PEREZ, LSU

Brandon Surtain’s art gives a voice to his community, but that is only one way he is working to lift them up. Poised to earn his master’s degree in sustainable real estate development this year, his goal is to help in tangible ways.

Hometown Hero B

BY RILEY BIENVENU BOURGEOIS

ARTIST BRANDON SURTAIN’S WORK GOES BEYOND THE CANVAS

COURTESY BRANDON SURTAIN

inRegister.com • April 2020

“I didn’t have much guidSurtain’s earliest encounters randon Surtain’s life From afternoons playing basance for selecting a major,” says with art revolved around cartoons, is split in two. There’s ketball in the street to summer Surtain, who is the first college with Dragon Ball Z characters as before Hurricane Katrina days spent in an inflatable pool graduate in his immediate family. his first muses. For many years, and after. filled by a garden hose, looking “A high school friend of mine his art remained a hobby rather The former defensive end for back has drawn Surtain to not just said that we could make a lot of than a primary interest. That is, LSU’s football team was just search for the profound in the money, so I just did it. But after until a stint as a petroleum engi11 when his family made their mundane, but to share his explormy first semester, I wasn’t doing neering major at LSU showed him exodus from New Orleans just one atory process through artistic well. That’s when I talked to my the light. day before the devastating storm expression. mom and she told me to made landfall. The 12-hour follow my heart.” journey out of the city was And his heart led him just the beginning, though. to LSU’s School of Art. In A permanent move to between practices, workBaton Rouge would follow, outs and time on the Death forever separating him Valley field, Surtain could from his childhood in the be found in the studio 9th Ward. painting vivid depictions of “The further I am from days past. His senior exhithat event, the more I bition, titled “Free Lunch” start to think about the in a nod to the free and teachers, friends, places, reduced lunch program, activities—all of that was served as a sort of autobisevered,” he explains. ography, a chronicle of his “Over the years, I’ve youth in New Orleans. started to reflect on how “I didn’t grow up in the those moments shake and Surtain’s works, especially those from his senior LSU show “Free Lunch,” give stylized depictions of his cherished memories. This one is titled “Game of 21.” best neighborhood,” he inspire me.”

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explains. “I have a painting of Comiskey Park and it’s one of my favorites. We played there growing up, and the park actually ended up being really influential. It kept us off the streets. I owe a lot to that time.” In the days following the exhibition, a newspaper article took Surtain’s career to the next level. While the paintings, which maintained some of the hallmarks of traditional New Orleans art, were received well by all, a special interest had been taken by Tulane’s dean of architecture, Ken Schwartz. “He got in contact with me through the writer and we talked for like 20 to 25 minutes,” recalls Surtain. “I didn’t really see my paintings as architectural at In an ode to his favorite childhood park, Surtain painted this piece, titled “Comiskey #2.” the time but two days later, he called and said I had a spot in the architecture master’s program if I I want people to have the ability development, he says it all ties wanted it. I thought, ‘Sure, I’ll try to choose where they want to live. back to his art and his early it.’ Two days later, I was back in But I also want to show people influences. New Orleans at orientation.” that if I was able to make some “I’m discovering ways to merge Surtain’s “why not” attitude sort of change, they can too.” all my practices,” he says, noting has propelled him into a path he Surtain’s ongoing art project that he wants to make a difference might otherwise have missed. is yet another love letter to his in the lives of people growing up Currently pursuing master’s hometown, albeit in the rather like he once did. “I want to make Issue Date: proof #1 degreesApril in bothAd architecture unconventional form of trash an attempt at providing affordable • Please respond by e-mail or faxreal with estate your approval or minor revisions. and sustainable cans. Reimagined in bright housing and housing alternatives. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

COURTESY BRANDON SURTAIN

CU LT U RE hues—indicative of the overall energy of New Orleans—Surtain says the series was born out of none other than trash itself. “I was cleaning out my art studio and I found these wooden panels a professor had given me years before,” he explains, noting that a first portrait of cans had come as a prior feature piece titled “Family Portrait.” “I jokingly decided I would paint 150 trash cans. They are so much a part of the New Orleans visual landscape, but they exist without recognition.” As the paintings have added up and he has gained recognition, with some of his work being shown at the renowned Arthur Roger Gallery, Surtain says his favorite part has been seeing others connect with his images. “I always try to paint from a place that is authentic to me, whether it is a playground, a trash can or a portrait,” he says. “But I feel like I gain more from hearing other people’s interpretations of my paintings. For me, people relating to things like the trash cans are what make me feel successful.” brandonjuansurtain.com

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APPLIANCES THAT DO THE

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A IMEE’ S PRE T T Y PA L ATE

Don’t Be Jelly

AIMEE BROUSSARD AIMEE BROUSSARD is a Southern food blogger and award-winning cookbook author. Seen on QVC, Rachael Ray and more, she is a selfproclaimed accidental entrepreneur with a penchant for porches and sweet hospitality. Find her online at aimeebroussard.com.

A LITTLE-KNOWN fact about me: In high school, I held the state title for my mayhaw jelly. Random, I know. I was vice president of our 4-H club, and while I did not show cows or sheep as most people assume when they hear the words 4-H, my record books (do they still call them that?) were submitted from the Leadership categories. One summer, likely because there was no one else, I was selected to compete at Short Course hosted by LSU. I was assigned jelly making under the Horticulture Use category. In full disclosure, I must credit our county agents with finetuning and teaching me how to make my award-winning jelly, but after two years of competing, I took home top honors. The fruit processing plant in the small town that I grew up even made gold foil labels for my jelly jars adorned with “Aimee’s Best” to commemorate my accomplishment. If you’ve never had mayhaw jelly, you are missing out. As its name would suggest, mayhaws are available from mid-April through early May. They are a small, round reddish fruit and make the most delicious jelly, although the juice can also be used for syrups and wine. Last year, I sought out to relive those

MAYHAW JELLY

jelly “glory days,” as my husband calls them, and make some jelly. I stumbled upon a lady by the name of Evelyn Davis in Denham Springs selling the mayhaw fruit. Turns out, Mrs. Davis sits on the Louisiana Mayhaw Association board as its current vice president and is—get this—the current winner of the association’s jelly cooking contest. She invited me into her “canning kitchen” to chat about all things mayhaw jelly, and while she did not share her recipe, she did mention she increases the juice ratio to ensure the beautiful red coloring of her jelly. She believes that’s what earned her first place. As spring approaches and in honor of the mayhaws ripening, I’m sharing how to make jelly this month. If mayhaws are not your thing, spring also brings us strawberry season, so try your hand at the Strawberry Lemonade Marmalade. Once you’ve recovered from that, it’s time for blueberry picking season. We go blueberry picking almost every year, and there’s an entire section on my blog for all things blueberry recipe related: biscuits, scones, French toast and of course, jelly. Happy jelly making, friends! Oh yes you can can.

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Make it more than just a memory!

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ORDER A PLAQUE OR PAGE REPRINT TODAY. inRegister.com/store


INGREDIENTS

3 lbs. fully ripe mayhaws 1 (1.75-oz.) box Sure-Jell pectin 5 cups granulated sugar 4 (8-oz.) half-pint glass preserving jars with lids and bands Prepare boiling water canner. Heat jars in simmering water until ready to use. DON’T BOIL. Wash lids and set them aside. Remove stems and blossom ends from mayhaws; place in large saucepan. Add water. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Gently crush cooked mayhaws. Place several layers of damp cheesecloth in a fine mesh strainer over a large bowl. Pour prepared fruit into cheesecloth. Tie cheesecloth closed; hang and let drip into bowl until dripping stops. Press gently. Measure exactly 4 cups prepared juice into 6- or 8-qt. saucepot. Gradually stir in pectin. Over high heat, stirring constantly, bring mixture to a full rolling boil that can’t be stirred down. Add all of the sugar and stir to dissolve. Return to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim foam. Ladle jam into hot jars, leaving about ¼ inch headspace. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar and apply band until it is fingertip tight. Place jars on elevated rack in canner/stockpot. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process for 5 minutes. Remove jars and place upright to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, they are not sealed and require additional processing or placement in refrigerator. Makes 4-6 (8-oz.) jars.

BLUEBERRY JAM INGREDIENTS

6½ cups fresh blueberries, washed and chopped (about 5 pints whole blueberries) 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 1 (1.75-oz.) box Sure-Jell pectin 5 cups granulated sugar 7 (8-oz.) half-pint glass preserving jars with lids and bands In a large saucepan, combine blueberries and ½ cup water. Add lemon juice and pectin to blueberries. Over high heat, stirring constantly, bring mixture to a rolling boil. Add sugar to fruit mixture. Return to a rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute. Remove from heat and skim off any foam. Ladle jam into hot jars, leaving about ¼ inch headspace. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar and apply band until it is fingertip tight. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process for 5 minutes. Remove jars and place upright to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, they are not sealed and require additional processing or placement in refrigerator. Makes about 7 (8-oz.) jars.

inRegister.com • April 2020 53


A IMEE’ S PRE T T Y PA L ATE

STRAWBERRY LEMONADE MARMALADE INGREDIENTS

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¼ cup thinly sliced lemon peel (about 2 large) 4 cups crushed strawberries (about 4 lb.) 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 6 Tbsp. pectin 6 cups granulated sugar 7 (8-oz.) half-pint glass preserving jars with lids and bands

Prepare boiling water canner. Heat jars in simmering water until ready to use. DON’T BOIL. Wash lids and set them aside. Combine lemon peel with water to cover in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and boil for 5 minutes. Drain and discard liquid and return peel to pan. Add strawberries and lemon juice. Mix. Gradually stir in pectin. Over high heat, stirring constantly, bring mixture to a full rolling boil that can’t be stirred down. Add all of the sugar and stir to dissolve. Return to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim foam. Ladle jam into hot jars, leaving about ¼ inch headspace. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar and apply band until it is fingertip tight. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process for 5 minutes. Remove jars and place upright to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. If lids spring back, they are not sealed and require additional processing or placement in refrigerator. Tip: Use lime peel and lime juice in place of lemon for a strawberry lime marmalade. Makes about 7 (8-oz.) jars.

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* FROM THE STONE QUARRY * TO OUR STONE YARD * TO YOUR HOME * BATON ROUGE: 7150 Pecue Lane • 225-753-5870 NEW ORLEANS: 720 S. Galvez St. • 504-837-1511 Hours: M-F 8am-4:30pm • Saturday 9am-12:30pm • WWW.TUSCANSTONEIMPORTS.COM


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SOMMELIER

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Red Schooner

R

ed Schooner captures the best of two worlds. It’s produced using Mendoza malbec grapes, hand harvested from high altitude vineyards in Argentina’s Andes Mountains. These grapes are then shipped ultra-chilled to California where Caymus crafts them into Red Schooner, numbering the bottles according to their voyage instead of their vintage. But the oceangoing freighter that transports these grapes from Argentina to the U.S. is not likely a red schooner. Nor was the French boat that traversed the Atlantic in the 1800s introducing malbec to Argentina, now the No. 1 malbec wine region in the world. Red Schooner Malbec Voyage 6 is rich, ripe and filled with concentrated flavors of black fruits overlain by soft tannins ending with a smooth chocolate finish. This malbec is an easy-drinking expression of the Caymus house style— dense, dark and delicious. Red Schooner is available at Zorba’s Greek Bistro, where it pairs perfectly with the rack of lamb. Or pick up a bottle for $50 at Alexander’s Highland Market, but decant this dreamer well before dinner.

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COMMUNITY

Krewe of Tucumcari The Krewe of Tucumcari hosted its Tableau Ball on February 15 at the Raising Canes River Center. 1. Ron Bays, Emma Ramsey, Brandon Broussard, John Allen, Jack Dixon, Sloane Allen, Brooklynn Broussard, Jason Jobes, Riley Richard, Eric Barksdale & Maggi Barksdale 2. Brandon Broussard, Kaylynn Broussard, Noah English, Isabelle English, James Landry, Molly Landry, Jerry Piper & Piper Melton 3. Michael Hale & John Sanchez 4. Joey & Tammy Culmone with Angele Ourso 5. Cameron Fahrig, Nicole Rinaudo, Amanda Ourso & Nicholas Ieyoub 6. Peggy Betz & Shirley Allen 7. Ashton Crittenden, Averi Lambert & Serena Alaniz 8. Juliana Doub & Vickie Langwell 9. Derek Knijn, Lauren Baxter, Alexandra Adams & Vincent Lai 10. Shila Daswai, Kathryn Moore & Cynthia Fierro Harvey 11. Alicia Quebedeaux with Amy & Louis Prejean 12. Madison Brown & Amelia Quebedeaux PHOTOS 1 & 2 BY ASHFORD HALLEY STUDIOS

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COMMUNITY

Krewe of Romany

The Krewe of Romany hosted its annual Mardi Gras ball February 8 at the Raising Cane’s River Center. Valerie Elizabeth Williams, Cheyanne Taylor Sutton, Mary-Hannah Kathryn Varnado, Scott Varnado, Brandi Sharp AlJariri, Danielle Renee Cavalier, Madeline Elise Watson & Clarissa Keegan Haik (back row); Keegan Joseph Moore, Matthew Parks McGucken, Robert Murry, Yousef Henry Muhammad Aljariri, Ruby Cecilia Boyd, Adelaide Mary Fabre, Amelia Jane Meng, Faye Malyn Buco & Ella Kyoko Brown PHOTO BY LAYNE PHOTOGRAPHY

It’s time you took

ANOTHER LOOK inRegister.com • April 2020

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Krewe of Lyonnesse

The Krewe of Lyonnesse hosted its annual Mardi Gras ball on February 8 at the Marriott Hotel. 1. Andre & Melanie Uzee with Eddie Tessmer 2. Elizabeth McKnight, Ashley Lalande, Melissa Lalande & Judy Pellerin 3. Angela Hammett, Molly Kimble & Miranda Papizan 4. Ann Mallory Kimble & Benjamin Papizan 5. Travis & Kim Uzee 6. Catrina Kennedy, Kris Washington & Yolunda Taylor

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39 Years of Service in Baton Rouge

landscape lighting specialist Mary T. & Hugh Wiley one fixture

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Landscaping and LED down lighting installed we maintain your lighting no matter who installed it

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Artistry of Light

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COMMUNITY

Krewe of Cypress

The Krewe of Cypress hosted its annual Mardi Gras ball February 8 at the Carl F. Grant Civic Center.

Baton Rouge Garden Club

The Baton Rouge Garden Club partnered with The Brighton School for a Flower Show fundraiser February 8-9 at the Garden Center at Independence Park.

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2 1. Jeanette Gatzman 2. Della Sinclair 3. Reese Robinson & Sharon Harley

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225.663.6845 | Stone-br.com | 1575 Lobdell Avenue & 11840 Airline Highway

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COMMUNITY

Empower 225 Empower 225 hosted its annual gala on February 13 at the Crowne Plaza.

1. Jaidon Stanley, Dante Kelley, Vantrell Louis, Mark Stevenson, Ahmad Bass & Brandon Hoyt 2. Dana Chakravarti & Kiara Roberson 3. Maggie & Walter Fahr 4. Vashti Nettles, Monisha Pack, Kyra Luckett & Krisya Recinos 5. Karen & Melvin Hardnett with Francis & Sherrie Kinamore 6. Shannon Rasbury & Caleb Domingue

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MAKING MEMORIES!

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DAVID RICHARDSON B U I L D E R S

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JESSICA BRENNER PHOTOGRAPHY

inRegister.com • April 2020 64

COMING JUNE 2020 For special advertising opportunities, contact Geraldine Alfieri at geraldine@inregister.com or 225.421.8117


COMMUNITY

Baton Rouge General

Baton Rouge General hosted its FatherDaughter Sweetheart Dance February 3 at the Raising Cane’s River Center. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Edmund Caswell with daughter Elise Michael Murphy with daughter Jolie Jarrod Baker with daughter June Eric Newman with daughter Cora Charles Becnel with daughter Elise Harris Zeringue with daughters Caroline and Catherine 7. James Maddi with daughter Lucy

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The 2020 Fur Ball Committee

Celtic Media Center | Baton Rouge FurBallBR.org | Tickets on sale now.

Companion Animal Alliance THANK YOU TO OUR 2020 SPONSORS : CHERIE & ROB ARKLEY| BORGHARDT LAW FIRM | KRISTINA, JOHN, & CREIGHTON MIREMONT THE AESTHETIC MEDICINE & ANTI-AGING CLINICS OF LOUISIANA | INREGISTER & 225 ST. ROMAIN FAMILY DENTISTRY | VERA OLDS | THE DUNNE FAMILY | STAR SERVICES | AUGUST EVENTS | CELTIC MEDIA CENTER | LEE MICHAELS FINE JEWELRY AMERIPRISE/GULF SOUTH WEALTH ADVISORS | ANIMAL HEALTH CLINIC | BREAZEALE, SACHSE & WILSON, LLP | BUQUET & LEBLANC | CAMP BOW WOW CATHY COATES AND BRIAN HALES | FRUGÉ ORTHODONTICS | GHERE PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY | HERMAN MILLER | WORKPLACE RESOURCE JEANNIE FREY RHODES | JONES WALKER | MURPHY LAW FIRM | PETZ PLAZA | THOMPSON WOOSLEY CATTELINO GROUP AT MORGAN STANLEY

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MAY 16

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COMMUNITY

Krewe of Orion

The Krewe of Orion hosted its Mardi Gras ball on February 15 at the Raising Cane’s River Center. 1. Cathy Rosenfeld, Aliena Hanks & Dana Cassidy 2. Alex Keller & Courtney Gatlin 3. Abigail & Bill Mitchell 4. Kellen & Jennifer Riley with Whitney Johnson 5. Marissa Lockhart, Jennifer Spencer & Kelli Partin

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6. Kara Roth & Mimi Trahan 7. Rick & Julie Beringer 8. Bryce Lobell, Linc LeBlanc & Darrin Cagnolatti 9. Elise Delahoussaye, Allie Blestel & Heather Williams

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GIVING YOU

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225.753.3001 • 504.885.3188 • 985.871.0810 louisianacustomclosets.com Call for Free Estimates Experienced Designers & Installers Don Wise, Owner

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COMMUNITY

Jump Start Your Heart

Jump Start Your Heart hosted its Valentine Gala February 8 at the Renaissance Hotel. 7. Aaron Leonard & Ardean Leonard 8. Chandra Jackson & Kendra Allen 9. Moses Kelley & Beatrice Powell 10. Roberto Cortes & Vielka Valdez 11. Steven Kelley, Sharon Weston Broome & Danielle Kelley

1. Steven & Danielle Kelley with Lea Montgomery 2. Agnes Andrews & Georgia Brown 3. Kim Benjamin & Mandolia Jean-Batiste 4. Shirley Fleming & Keytha Thompson 5. Lisa Derry, Dana Franklin-Holden & Horace Derry 6. Crystal Patterson, Jade Newell & Eric Patterson

the queen bee

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WE ARE

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Junior League of Baton Rouge

Women as catalysts for lasting community change. 9

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Learn more about the League's history and impact at

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inRegister.com • April 2020

The Junior League of Baton Rouge is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.

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COMMUNITY

Karnival Krewe de Louisiane

Karnival Krewe de Louisiane hosted its annual Mardi Gras ball February 7 at the Raising Cane’s River Center. 1. Yolunda Taylor, Peter Sclafani, Rose Hudson & John D’Angelo 2. Breelyn Nicole Kilpatrick, Karsen Elise Sala, Amelia Celeste Buffone, Madison Rebecca Bauder, Hayley Christiana Gregoire, Brennan Elizabeth Cascio, Lauren Ashley Doerr, Camille Victoria Nyboer & Caroline Peyton Colby (back row); Lindy Adele Hataway, Sydnie Katherine Larkins, Christine Grace Myer, Ella Renee Clark & Whitney Anne Dodd 3. Collis Temple III, Susie Furr, Mollie Montelaro, Scott Taylor, Gabrielle Rettig Kees & Anthony Pope 4. Brandon Hollie, Cristy Heck, Stephanie Anderson & Brandon Becnel PHOTOS BY EYE WANDER PHOTOGRAPHY

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THE HEALTH & WELLNESS ISSUE!

The June issue of 225 will cover our readers’ many healthy interests,

inRegister.com • April 2020

including FITNESS, NUTRITION and OVERALL WELLNESS.

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To advertise or get more information, contact Erin Pou at erinp@225batonrouge.com

DEADLINE APRIL 29TH


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COMMUNITY

Capital Area United Way

Capital Area United Way hosted the Brotherhood Sisterhood Awards Breakfast on February 14 at the Main Library at Goodwood. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Gerri Hobdy, Myra Richardson & Bobby Thompson Robin McCullough-Bade, George Bell & Donna Saurage JoAnn & Charles Fryling with Carolyn Stutts Michelle Hardy & Caroline Cook Darrell Moses, Jose Torres & Jahi Mackey Winifred Reilly & Heather Sewell Day Ernesto Johnson, Chandra Stacie, Dawn Lockwood, Terri Mearidy & Iesha Thomas 8. Abel Thompson with Bobby & MiJa Thompson

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• AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received by the close of business today. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Present:

SATURDAY, May 9, 3-7PM on the lawn

at L’auberge casino baton rouge entertainment provided by

marc broussard FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFO:

wineontheriverbr.com

Sample

WINES Media Partners:

Includes Sampling Of Wines + Commemorative Tasting Glass

EVENT BENEFITING:

$100 VIP TICKET Full Bar, Food, and Lounge Area

Official Sponsor:

inRegister.com • April 2020

over 250

$50 TICKET

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inRegister.com • April 2020

ARCHIVES

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‘I

Step by Step

tell people I was born in a trunk in Oklahoma City and then we left,” Jeffie Jean Bolton told inRegister’s then-editor Chris Russo Love for a cover story in the magazine’s July 1990 issue. Bolton went on to explain that with her father in the traveling carnival business, performing was in her blood. Called “one of the city’s grand dames of dance,” Bolton had launched her eponymous local dance studio in the early

1940s and was still going strong, with her daughter Jerisse Grantham and 5-year-old granddaughter Blair Bolton by her side. Though the larger-thanlife studio founder passed away in 1994, Grantham still carries on her legacy even now—nearly 80 years after the studio opened—for a new generation of young dancers. “I love teaching—Jerisse does too,” Bolton told the magazine. “We love the kids. You’ve got to love the kids.”


THE ETHAN ALLEN DIFFERENCE AWARD-WINNING COMPLIMENTARY DESIGN SERVICE SAVE UP TO 25% IN STORES AND ONLINE * LIMITED TIME 24-MONTH SPECIAL FINANCING†

LOC ALLY OWNED & OPER ATED AUTHORIZED E THAN ALLEN RE TAILER BATON ROUGE 1030 0 PERK INS ROAD 225.926.4650 Discounts are taken off our regular prices. Prior reductions may have been taken. Exclusions apply. Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com for details. † Restrictions apply. Limited time only. Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com/platinum for details. ©2020 Ethan Allen Global, Inc.

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Profile for Baton Rouge Business Report

inRegister | Baton Rouge, Louisiana | April 2020  

inRegister is a monthly lifestyle magazine that covers the people, places and organizations that make the Capital Region an extraordinary pl...

inRegister | Baton Rouge, Louisiana | April 2020  

inRegister is a monthly lifestyle magazine that covers the people, places and organizations that make the Capital Region an extraordinary pl...