225 Magazine [December 2021]

Page 1

DECEMBER 2021 • FREE 2021'S NEW RESTAURANTS 14 TACEAUX TUESDAY 69 HOLIDAY EVENTS 74

225BATONROUGE .COM

activ ities l c a lo d n Day trip s a y m onth of 2022 for eve r

Inside ZIP LINING! HOLIDAY LIGHTS! DINOSAURS! + so much more


THANK YOU BATON ROUGE Our gift to you: FOR EVERY $100 GIFT CARD PURCHASED

YOU WILL RECEIVE

$50 FREE! NEW PATIENT SPECIALS: $100 OFF FILLER $12/UNIT WRINKLE RELAXANT

RESTRICTIONS: Specials cannot be combined. $75 Booking Fee is required to lock in special pricing for all specials. Filler specials are limited to ONE syringe

FREE CONSULTATIONS BOTOX | BODY CONTOURING | FILLERS | LIPOSUCTION HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY & MUCH MORE BATON ROUGE

8485 Bluebonnet Blvd. (225) 753-1234

Todd Howell MD, Brittany Lipoma MPAS, PA-C, & Crystal Fontenot ANP-BC

TheAntiAgingClinics.com

LAFAYETTE 5000 Ambassador Caffery Building 1, Suite 102 | (337) 484-1234


Zachary

Injuries Are Never Convenient, but Your Recovery Should Be. BROC IS NEVER FAR FROM WHERE YOU ARE! Walker South Harrells Ferry Brusly

Bluebonnet

6 OCCUPATIONAL AND PHYSICAL THERAPY LOCATIONS ACROSS GREATER BATON ROUGE! Offering the latest advancements in specialized occupational and physical therapy services through our experienced and certified team of therapists.

BLUEBONNET THERAPY

GONZALES THERAPY

8080 Bluebonnet Blvd., Suite 1000

625 S. Burnside Ave., Suite 9

BRUSLY THERAPY

ZACHARY THERAPY

400 W St. Francis St., Building A, Suite 1

6550 Main St., Suite 2300

SOUTH HARRELLS FERRY THERAPY

WALKER THERAPY

15420 South Harrells Ferry Rd., Suite A

5000 O'Donovan Blvd., Suite 514

Gonzales

For more information visit our website at BRORTHO.COM


GET cozy THIS CHRISTMAS IN A CUSTOM OUTDOOR SPACE

Call for your free consultation RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

2 2 5 . 7 5 7 . 6 1 3 8 | P E C B U I LT. c o m Locally owned and operated

MENTION 225 & RECEIVE $225 OFF


Jingle UUPP

Your burger follow us on

­


UPFRONT //

Weekend plans ARE YOU READY for 2022? Either way, we’re hoping this month’s issue of 225 will be the first step in helping you get there. One of my new year’s goals is always to try new things, and that’s what our December cover story is all about. Our team has collected ideas for 12 great weekends you’ll want to pencil into your agenda books. We’ve sorted them by month so you can plan a new adventure for every month of the year. For a chilly weekend in January, you can warm up inside a cozy brewery from our beer tour itinerary. Five new breweries have opened in the Capital Region since 2019, so we’re highlighting some of the hotspots to make for a fun and hoppy weekend. In February, we’re exploring local history through area walking tours, including the new Louisiana Civil Rights Trail. For spring break in March, we suggest you skip the airline hassles and staycation right here in Baton Rouge BY JULIO MELARA instead. We’re spotlighting some luxe hotels and unique Airbnbs in town. In April, we have some ideas for U-pick berry farms a short drive away. (Plus, did you know there’s a Louisiana farm where you can pick everything from apples and peaches to figs and persimmons throughout the year?) In May, pack the kids into the car and drive to Prehistoric Park, where they can get up-close-andpersonal with a 30-foot-long brachiosaurus and 25 other life-sized dinosaurs. As the calendar turns to June, we’re taking you to the sunflower fields— which are closer to home and more accessible than you might think. In July, we’re hitting the water with Last Wilderness Swamp Tours. If you haven’t been on a swamp tour, you have to go at least once in your life— Issue Date: Dec 2021 Ad proof #1 and Last Wilderness offers a one-of• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. a-kind ride through the Atchafalaya • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours Basin. from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. venture out on a In August,

culinary tour of Louisiana, using local chefs’ picks for the most delicious restaurants around the state. And by fall, it’s all about spooky scares and holiday light displays. Some of our ideas are right here in town, while others are worthy day-trip destinations around 45 minutes away. We hope they’re helpful in planning your best year ever. Turn to page 32 to start exploring!

Local legacy For decades, the Baton Rouge Area Foundation has been the behindthe-scenes force guiding some of the city’s most groundbreaking projects. You can thank it for its work on everything from the Red Stick Farmers Market and the Shaw Center for the Arts to the revitalization of downtown and the creation of the Water Campus. President and CEO John G. Davies was the visionary and has led the organization since 1988, during which time it has seen massive growth and donor interest. Davies will be retiring in the first quarter of next year, so 225 sat down with him to recount his journey. He shares how the organization got to where it is today, what he’s most proud of, what’s next and—perhaps most importantly—the trait he sees as Baton Rouge’s biggest strength. Turn to page 21 to read it all.

Weekly ritual Every Tuesday, the line for tacos is wrapped around the patio at Culture Reggae Club. This is Taceaux Tuesday, a gathering of local musicians, visual artists and creatives. Event coordinator Patrick Harrington curates a lineup of music to dance to, vendors to shop from, and, of course, tacos to try. Vendors like Fresh Cravings, BR Guilty Pleasures and Birriannas dish out street corn, tacos and a range of Mexican fare, while Harrington and other local DJs spin on the turntables.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Del Rio Real Estate has your home in the bag CALL FOR ALL OF YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS. BUYING • SELLING • PROFESSIONAL ADVICE 225.218.0888 • DELRIOREALESTATEBR.COM

6

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

It’s a night that’s all about connecting with up-and-coming artists and small businesses. “We have a lot of talent in Baton Rouge that hasn’t even been recognized yet,” Harrington says. “I’m trying to give those creatives a platform.” Turn to page 69 for more.

New eats We don’t need to tell you it’s been another hard year for restaurants. But that makes it more impressive how much the culinary sector has grown this year. Even in the midst of equipment and labor shortages and ingredient price increases, Baton Rouge’s restaurant scene has seen a flurry of activity. Starting on page 14, we’re recounting 10 of the biggest culinary arrivals this year. Leola’s Cafe and Coffee House brought us a clever “brunchish” menu in Mid City. Proverbial Wine Bistro taught us how to pair dinner, dessert and brunch with cocktails, beer and wine. Rêve Coffee Lab and Southern Cafe both changed our vision of what a coffee shop can be. And SoLou reminded us “there’s no place like south Louisiana.” In between it all, we’ve seen more pop-ups and food trucks than ever; restaurant expansions and location changes; and so much more. It’s been quite a year. On behalf of all of us at 225, thanks for reading our publication this year. Wishing you all a merry Christmas, happy Hanukkah and a prosperous new year! We will see you in 2022—the best is yet to come!



CONTENTS //

Features 24 How the Golden Girls

went viral during the pandemic

31 Behind the making of

Baton Rouge’s first hostel

64 Recipes for a comforting holiday breakfast at home

69 How a Taco Tuesday event became a cultural hotspot And much more … ON THE COVER

Departments 12 What’s Up 21 Our City 31 I am 225 32 Cover story 53 Style 59 Taste 69 Culture 74 Calendar

12 weekend adventures Staff photographer Collin Richie traversed the woods of East Feliciana Parish to get this shot of Magnolia Ridge Adventure Park zip line instructor Justin LaPrairie coming down the final stretch of the zip line course on the edge of the Comite River. (It’s also the longest zip line in the state at 900 feet!) The park’s exciting course is just one suggestion in our month-to-month guide to fun activities in and around Baton Rouge. Turn to page 32 for more, and use it to plan ahead for an eventful 2022.

JORDAN HEFLER

53 8

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


• AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Now that the ribbon is cut, we are officially open for eye care!

LENSES AND FR A MES • CONTACTS LENSES • COMPREHENSIVE EYE EX AMS PEDIATRIC EYE HEALTH CARE • EMERGENCY EYE EX AMS • EYE DISEASE TREATMENT DRY EYE TREATMENT • ELECTROSURGERY • MYOPIA CONTROL

Attending Doctor/Owner: Dr. Katherine Dronka, OD, ABCMO, FAAO BRINGING INNOVATED TECHNOLOGY WHILE SERVING THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND PROVIDING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF CARE TO ALL OF OUR PATIENTS!

112 South Range Ave 225-243-1950 eagleeyecarela.com • 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

9


Issue Date: DEC 2021 Ad proof #1 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

A S K T H E S TA FF

Favorite day trip destination? Publisher: Julio Melara

EDITORIAL

“St. Francisville is always such an easy escape. I love going on a hike in Tunica Hills or Clark Creek and then rewarding myself with a meal at Magnolia Cafe. Or if it’s a special night, the St. Francisville Inn has gorgeous dining rooms and a fantastic bar.” —Benjamin Leger

Editorial director: Penny Font Editor: Jennifer Tormo Managing editor: Benjamin Leger Features writer: Maggie Heyn Richardson Digital content editor: Dillon Lowe Staff photographer: Collin Richie Contributing writers: Cynthea Corfah, Olivia Deffes, Brittney Forbes, Elle Marie, Tracey Koch, Stephanie Riegel Contributing photographers: Ariana Allison, Amy Shutt

ADVERTISING

Sales director: Erin Palmintier-Pou Account executives: Manny Fajardo, André Hellickson Savoie, Jamie Hernandez, Kaitlyn Maranto, Olivia Robb Advertising coordinator: Devyn MacDonald

CORPOR ATE MEDIA

Editor: Lisa Tramontana Content strategist: Allyson Guay Multimedia strategy manager: Tim Coles Client experience coordinator, Studio E: Nicole Prunty

“Lake Rosemound in St. Francisville. I can always go for a sunset booze cruise.” —Tim Coles

MARKETING

“We’re planning to go to Abita Springs on a cool day this fall. Riding bikes on the Tammany Trace, visiting the Abita Brewery and the Abita Mystery House are on the agenda.” —Tiffany Durocher

Chief marketing officer: Elizabeth McCollister Hebert Marketing & events assistant: Taylor Falgout Events: Abby Hamilton Community liaison: Jeanne McCollister McNeil

ADMINISTR ATION

Assistant business manager: Tiffany Durocher Business associate: Kirsten Milano Office coordinator: Tara Lane Receptionist: Cathy Brown

PRODUCTION/DESIGN

Production manager: Jo Glenny Art director: Hoa Vu Graphic designers: Melinda Gonzalez, Emily Witt

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

follow us on social media for updates on holiday specials! HERRINGSTONE’S BATON ROUGE Call Haley Herrington to schedule your own personal shopping experience 7474 Corporate Blvd Ste C | 225.239.5239 | www.herringstonesboutique.com

10

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

Audience development director and digital manager: James Hume Audience development coordinator: Ivana Oubre Audience development associate: Jordan Kozar A publication of Louisiana Business Inc. Chairman: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr. Executive assistant: Tara Broussard President and CEO: Julio Melara Executive assistant: Brooke Motto

“We love going down to NOLA on a Sunday for brunch at Jack Rose. It’s the best when we can also make it over to We Bite Rare & Unusual Plants or Canopy Plant Co. Both have awesome selections of rare plants that you just can’t find in BR.” —Brooke Motto

9029 Jefferson Highway, Suite 300 Baton Rouge, LA 70809 225-214-5225  •  FAX 225-926-1329 225batonrouge.com ©Copyright 2021 by Louisiana Business Incorporated. All rights reserved by LBI. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. Business address: 9029 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Telephone (225) 214-5225. 225 Magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material—manuscripts or photographs—with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed.


F E E D B AC K / / W H AT ’ S O N L I N E / /

Comments on

What readers are saying on social media about some recent ‘225’ stories

NO VEM

Showing some love for our November cover story all about Baton Rouge’s biggest trends in food:

225 BAT

BER 202 1 • FRE E

ON ROU

HOLIDAY MEA LS 14 BR FRO M ABOVE 29 PIZZ A BYR ONZ 63 GE .CO M

“I get excited every time you guys feature food in your issue! ” —@lindsey_h311 E

I CH

IN LL

RI

“The future is food ” in Baton Rouge

COLLIN RICHIE

CO

Missy Couhig, owner of The Conundrum bookstore

On our breakdown of what makes The Village’s bread so special from the October issue:

—@wheretogeaux225

“Oh yes!!!!” —Eunice Heeren

Time to shop

About the November issue’s story on The Conundrum bookshop in St. Francisville:

—Kathie Hayden

“Love this lil gem!”

“I want this bread!”

—Cindy Peno

The bigges Baton Rou t trends inside ge and kitchen restaurants s that keeps in a world changing

“My fave!”

Yes, we’ve got our own store now. The 225 online store launched this fall. Check it out today and start repping your favorite local magazine with logoed shirts, hats, mugs, stickers and more! 225batonrouge.com/merch

—Lexi Crovetto Christian

CONNECT WITH US facebook.com/225magazine

twitter.com/225batonrouge

instagram.com/225batonrouge

pinterest.com/225batonrouge

youtube.com/225magazine

Childhood comes and goes in a blink. We’re here through the stages of your life, with the strength of the cross, the protection of the shield. The Right Card. The Right Care.

01MK7641 11/21

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

11


December

Mixologist Alan Walter has built a national reputation for his inventive drinks. Now, he’s in Baton Rouge, recently brought on by City Group Hospitality to bring new ideas to its bar programs, including Beausoleil Coastal Cuisine.

12

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

COLLIN RICHIE

Spirited away ASK BARTENDER Alan Walter if he follows certain rules when making cocktails, and he can’t respond fast enough. “No,” he says gamely. “I break them.” Over the last 15 years, the mixologist has built a national reputation for eschewing tradition and preparing drinks in a manner that’s a lot culinary and a little mad science. Sure, he’ll make you an Old Fashioned the old-fashioned way. But he’d rather serve one that incorporates, say, toasted birdseed—an inspiration that once hit while Walter was shopping for cat food. There, across from the Meow Mix, lay bags of birdseed, prompting him to think, why not? Walter’s barside flair garnered attention first at the boutique New Orleans restaurant Iris, and for the last several years at the International House Hotel’s stylish Loa Bar. Now, he’s in Baton Rouge, recently brought on by City Group Hospitality to bring new ideas to its bar program. The group operates nine restaurants in the Capital City, including the recently opened Proverbial Wine Bistro, and the casual eatery and speakeasy, Spoke ‘N’ Hub, opening next year. “(We’re) thrilled to have Alan join our team, bringing his amazing expertise,” City Group Hospitality Managing Partner Stephen Hightower says. “He has the unique talent to become a storyteller through his crafted cocktails.” This, of course, bodes well for local cocktail enthusiasts. Walter’s alchemist’s approach has led him to blend gin and scotch with delectable results, to play around with clover, Spanish moss and pine needles, and to scour Asian markets for roots, tubers, herbs and rhizomes for an unexpected ingredient to fine-tune a libation’s profile. Just one example is adding ginger-like galangal to London dry gin, sake and pineapple nectar. But pushing the envelope on cocktail assembly isn’t done willy-nilly, he says. “It’s like what Bob Dylan said, ‘To live outside the law, you must be honest,’” Walter muses. “In other words, you can break the rule, but it has to prove itself.” At Loa, Walter earned the nickname “Spirit Handler,” thanks to a four-page cocktail menu strewn with drinks built with handmade syrups and infusions, fresh ingredients and high-end intoxicants. For City Group Hospitality’s concepts, Walter says he plans to complement what’s already working and use the bar program to highlight each chef’s culinary point of view. So far, Walter has spent time at Proverbial, and recently shifted his focus to Beausoleil Coastal Cuisine, where he’ll be working to create new cocktails that dovetail with the restaurant’s seafood focus. Walter says he’s particularly excited about tapping the wares of local farmers. This year’s lower yield citrus crop due to Hurricane Ida will have him on the prowl for grapefruit and oranges, he says. He’s also excited about what else he might incorporate from the Red Stick Farmers Market, like maybe fungi from Mushroom Maggie’s Farm? For Walter, everything’s in play. “It’s funny about cocktails, because they don’t do a damn thing for anyone except give them a buzz,” Walter says. “They’re not filling your belly. They’re not giving you vitamins. So it’s like, why not have that be an area where there are little surprises?” beausoleilcoastal.com

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON


W H AT ’ S U P / /

2021 performance will deliver the same yuletide resonance it’s known for. Along with local dancers, who have been preparing for months, the ballet company’s guest artists include Francisco Estevez, former principal dancer with the Colorado Ballet; Gabi Lukasik of the Boulder Ballet; Baton Rouge native and Cirque du Soleil performer Neal Courter; and BRBT alumni Riley Richard, Marlon Grigsby and Patrick Jefferson. Buchmann says the show will also incorporate high-quality animated projections of The Nutcracker’s original sets, which Baton Rouge-based director and videographer André Chapoy created for BRBT when the show moved to the arena in 2018. And once again, the dancers will be accompanied by the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra. batonrougeballet.org

FILE PHOTO BY KRISTIN SELLE

Festival of Lights returns DOWNTOWN BATON ROUGE’S annual holiday celebration is back in person this year. The Festival of Lights includes the city’s official Christmas tree lighting, fireworks, ice skating and a real snow village. Coordinated by the Downtown Development District and the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, it all takes place Friday, Dec. 4. Expect the countdown of the lighting of the city’s 25-foot Christmas tree to begin at 6:20 p.m., followed by fireworks over the Mississippi River. Head inside the Old State Capitol for pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus in the Senate chamber (you provide the camera), then stroll across to the House chamber to take in a holiday movie. The Snow Village in Repentance Park, blanketed with 10 tons of real snow, is open to kids ages 5 to 15, and the lower level of the River Center plaza will feature a small kids’ ice skating rink for children ages 5 to 10, with plenty of space for parents to watch. Work in some Christmas shopping at the Artist Village—a T gathering of local makers—on the lawn IC R I ST of Rhorer Plaza. Food vendors will be on TD COU EN R T ES OPM Y DO W N site, too. downtownbatonrouge.org TOWN DEVEL FIND MORE HOLIDAY events on pages 50, 73 and 74.

“If WFP can describe on this Twitter thread exactly how $6 billion will solve world hunger, I will sell Tesla stock right now and do it.” —CEO of Tesla and SpaceX Elon Musk, in response to a tweet from United Nations’ World Food Programme director David Beasley that it was time for the ultra-rich to address world hunger. Another Twitter user suggested that 2% of Musk’s fortune, which skyrocketed in 2021 due to the rise in Tesla’s stock price, would total $6 billion. T Beasley later commented that IA OC ASS $6 billion wouldn’t solve world hunger, but it would prevent political instability and mass migration and would save 42 million people on the brink of starvation.

S

last-minute call to stage the show in an alternative space. For expediency’s sake, it opted for the River Center Ballroom, rather than the larger, more cumbersome arena, where it staged shows in 2018 and 2019. About 1,000 tickets will be available for each show this year, Buchmann says. BRBT has been working with the River Center to design a floor plan offering spectators the best viewing experience, while also following health and accessibility guidelines. “The visual experience is very important to us,” Buchmann says. “We’ve been working on sight lines to make sure every seat has good visibility. And we’re making sure we have social distancing, and spacing for wheelchairs.” The venue change notwithstanding, Buchmann says the

ES

IT’S BEEN TWO YEARS since spectators have experienced one of the city’s beloved holiday traditions, Baton Rouge Ballet Theatre’s original The Nutcracker—A Tale from the Bayou. Shuttered in 2020 due to COVID-19, the iconic ballet is back this month. Performances will be staged Dec. 18-19, 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. “There’s nothing like having a live audience,” says BRBT co-artistic director Molly Buchmann. “The local dancers are really strong, and we’ll have great guest artists, as well.” BRBT had looked forward to staging the show in the refreshed River Center Performing Arts Theatre, under renovation since 2018. But a shipment of the auditorium’s new seats was delayed by Hurricane Ida and thwarted the scheduled September completion. BRBT had to make a

PR

‘The Nutcracker’ pivots again

8,000

The number of fresh Christmas trees ordered this year for Louisiana Nursery’s three Baton Rouge locations. The longtime local nursery receives trees in 15 deliveries over the course of the season to ensure their freshness, says Louisiana Nursery owner-president Mitch Mayes. The most popular? Frazier Fir. It makes up about half of the trees purchased. louisiananursery.com

ED

COURTESY BATON ROUGE BALLET THEATRE

DIGITS

EXPLAINER While it might seem like there are a growing number of Teslas on the road in Louisiana, it’s not because they’re easy to buy here. Tesla sells direct to consumers—not through dealerships—and a state law signed by Gov. John Bel Edwards in 2017 bans car companies from using direct-toconsumer car sales. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

13


W H AT ’ S U P / /

GEAUX SEE ART EXPLORE THE LSU MUSEUM OF ART

W H AT ’ S N E W

Year in review 10 culinary arrivals that 2021 gifted Baton Rougeans Compiled by Jennifer Tormo

1

ARIANA ALLISON

ARIANA ALLISON

Winter

2

Spring 100 Lafayette Street Shaw Center for the Arts | 5th Floor Downtown Baton Rouge, LA • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions.| lsumoa.org @lsumoa • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Issue Date: Month Ad proof #1

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

The perfect holiday gift!

4

1. Leola’s Cafe and Coffee House 1857 Government St. Corey and Leann Ringe opened this Mid City “brunch-ish” and “lunch-ish” hangout Jan. 9. Those who frequented the former Yvette Marie’s cafe in this spot at Circa 1857 will appreciate the new space’s nostalgic mismatched chairs and original brick and wood details. But a menu loaded with items like the “Bro-Rito,” “Basic B Breakfast,” and seasonal pancake flights keep things feeling youthful and fresh. leolascafeandcoffeehouse.com

2. Rêve Coffee Lab

FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $45 | FREE LOCAL DELIVERY

225-306-8784 | MACANDETHELS .COM |

14

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

8211 Village Plaza Court, Building 4 Mixology isn’t just for cocktails. The baristas at Rêve prove it. Locals first met the Lafayette brand at its former White Star Market coffee and tea stand. But its new Village at Willow Grove location, which opened Jan. 18, has really given the shop a chance to grow. Its drinks are some of the craftiest in town, from the color-morphing “Mood Tea” to the Reese’s-inspired “Cloudy with a Chance of Peanuts” cold brew. The cafe also serves brunch daily, all in a space styled with earthy ceramic tiles and leather accents. Find it on Instagram at @revecoffeelab.btr

COLLIN RICHIE

HOMEMADE TREATS DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

HASKELL WHITTINGTON

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-

5

3. Rio Tacos & Tequila

333 Third St. The colorful Mexican-inspired restaurant by restaurateur Chad Hughes opened Jan. 15, beckoning downtown passersby with its vibrant, tile-covered front patio. Inside, the space is just as stylish, splashed with floor-to-ceiling murals by Marc Fresh and wood, brick and rattan accents. On the menu: street corn and tacos; empanadas; fajitas; quesadillas; and margaritas and palomas. Find it on Facebook

4. SoLou

7246 Perkins Road “There’s no place like south Louisiana,” declares a bright neon sign on the SoLou patio. That’s just what restaurateurs Peter Sclafani, Kiva Guidroz and Michael Boudreaux set out to showcase at SoLou. Modern Louisiana cuisine (See: the shrimp corn dogs; an alligator hot dog; and boudin quesadillas) is served against a backdrop of custom-designed wallpaper printed with Louisiana birds and magnolia blossoms. The March 15 arrival reimagined the space formerly occupied by The Rum House. eatsolou.com


Issue Date: DEC 2021 Ad proof #2 W H AT ’ S U P / /

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

More new arrivals

ARIANA ALLISON

Mobile moments The food truck scene is more fun than ever, with 2021 arrivals like Sno Juice, serving snoball creations in all-organic flavors around Baton Rouge and Denham Springs, and Abu Omar Halal, a Houston-born halal food truck dishing out shawarma, kabobs and falafel on Coursey Boulevard. City Group Hospitality launched its City Taco brand as a self-described “ghost kitchen” inside City Slice. And Brandon Thomsen and Jeff Herman are trying to make a name for Louisiana barbecue with their Oak and Smoke pop-up, seen at local breweries.

3

Holiday Shopping MADE EASY

ARIANA ALLISON

New locations Existing concepts saw plenty of growth and location shuffles, too, with City Pork opening a new location at Highland Park Marketplace, Bistro Byronz moving its Mid City location to the former White Star Market building, Royal Taste of Jamaica moving into the former Christina’s spot downtown, and Blue Store Chicken opening another location on North Boulevard near Baton Rouge Community College.

6

Pizza places 5. Southern Cofé

501 Main St. Southern Cofe is currently in the process of upgrading its original Scotlandville location, and that’s not the only big move it made this year. Owner Horatio Isadore opened his bright downtown location March 1 inside Main Street Market. The cafe serves smoothies, juices, coffee and tea, as well as healthy food like soups and sandwiches. It was a landmark move, too—as Isadore explained to 225 after the opening: “I can’t recall that a business from north Baton Rouge expanded to downtown. You always see it the other way around.” Find it on Instagram at @southerncofe

6. Bites and Boards

8201 Village Plaza Court, #1C Robyn Nicosia Parker’s popular cheese and charcuterie brand leveled up to its first brick-and-mortar shop at The Village at Willow Grove, which held a grand opening June 12. Inside, visitors can shop cheese, charcuterie, grazeto-go boxes and lots of other gourmet goodies. They can also order custom boards—or even take a cheeseboard class. bitesandboards.com

Quick-fired pizza shops are on the rise, from the bumblebee-themed The Hive on Siegen Lane to Pizza Artista inside Rouzan, where the pies are stacked with Louisiana ingredients.

Show-stopping desserts The Yard Milkshake Bar hails from Alabama, but its new local spot serves plenty of Instagrammable milkshakes themed around Baton Rouge and LSU. At the Capital City location of Crumbl Cookies, more than 120 elaborately decorated cookie flavors rotate weekly. Find all the restaurants on Facebook For more restaurant news, subscribe to 225 Daily at 225batonrouge.com/225daily.

Corporate Blvd at Jefferson • 225.925.2344 townecenteratcedarlodge.com • 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

15


Issue Date: DEC 2021 Ad proof #3 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

W H AT ’ S U P / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ARIANA ALLISON

Summer

​​SEAN GASSER

7

8

ARIANA ALLISON

Fall

9 7. Cheba Hut

WHATEVER YOUR PLAN THIS HOLIDAY SEASON... We’re here to help you feel

ahhhmazing! FIRST WAX FREE EWC REWARDS PROGRAM!

4 locations to serve you: HIGHLAND PARK TOWNE CENTER 225-228-1383 225-228-1373

16

PERKINS ROWE 225-800-3636

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

RIVER RANCH 337-446-2330

411 Ben Hur Road, Suite A The city’s newest sub shop is an ode to the munchies. At the cannabisthemed Cheba Hut, the decor and menu alike are playfully themed around marijuana culture, from the “Jamaican Red” buffalo chicken sub to the mural featuring a puffy-eyed tiger. Locals Meredith and Tommy Wiggins opened the Colorado-born restaurant Aug. 9 just south of LSU after dreaming about bringing the concept here for nearly two decades. chebahut.com/locations/batonrouge

8. Basel’s Market

5435 Highland Road Kalyn Lindsly transformed her former food truck into a charming cottage cafe near LSU. It debuted Aug. 20, dotted with antiques, greenery, a cozy fireplace and outdoor seating. Try the avocado toast for breakfast, an herb-garnished sandwich for lunch, or shop the market for groceries and gifts. Find it on Instagram at @baselsmarket

9. Proverbial Wine Bistro

9659 Antioch Road, #10 City Group Hospitality’s latest offering is all about pairings. At the Long Farm Village eatery, food boards are themed around dinner, dessert and brunch, and food is matched with complementary wines, beers and cocktails. The interior is warm and earthy, with leather chairs, green walls and a covered patio. There’s even an interactive cork wall, encouraging diners to drop a cork scribbled with their own inspirational quote. Find it on Instagram at @proverbialbistro

10. The Iron Fork Kjun Eatery & Market 7520 Perkins Road, Suite 100 This restaurant, bar and meat market opened Oct. 11, specializing in soulful lunch specials and hearty prepared meals— think comfort-food staples like red beans and rice, chicken stew and meatloaf. The Beau De Chene Shopping Center spot has housed eight different concepts in the past 11 years, but owners Tory and Jacqueline Cummings and Hershall Bergeron hope to have found the right formula for success. Find it on Facebook


Issue Date: Dec 2021 Ad1 proof #2 W H AT ’ S U P / /

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Buzz feed

Start The New Year By Taking Your Health Personally

More local news this fall

RENDERING BY COLEMAN PARTNERS / COURTESY BATON ROUGE GALLERY

Airport art

Fender + PreSonus

Mixed-use space in north BR Construction will start in early 2022 on a $10 million mixed-use development at a vacant site on Plank Road, says Build Baton Rouge CEO Chris Tyson. Expect an early child care center and affordable housing units, plus new offices for Build Baton Rouge. buildbatonrouge.org

In November, Fender Musical Instruments Corp. announced plans to acquire PreSonus Audio Electronics, a leading manufacturer of audio recording software and hardware founded by LSU alums Jim Odom and Brian Smith. Through the merger, Fender looks to develop recording tools and music production instruments. presonus.com

STOCK PHOTO

There’s a new art gallery at the Baton Rouge Metro Airport. BRG@BTR, a partnership between the airport, Baton Rouge Gallery and Visit Baton Rouge, was installed this fall to show off work from local artists. The gallery features around 70 works, which will be regularly rotated and are also available for purchase. batonrougegallery.org

Take the first step in a healthier direction by scheduling your initial consultation. Call (225) 928-0486.

FIT NESS PERSONAL TRAINING || GROUP TRAINING SPIN || YOGA || PILATES

DIGIT

New arts directories

65,000

Square footage of a proposed football training facility on a portion of the property at Burbank University, a mixed-use development in progress near LSU. In addition to sports training, the facility would include a wellness and orthopedic center, according to an application filed this fall with the Planning Commission. The commission will take up the request at its Dec. 13 meeting.

Through a platform called Culturalyst, you can now find artists and arts resources for nine regions around Louisiana. Baton Rouge’s directory is a partnership between the Louisiana Division of the Arts and the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge. It spotlights artists and cultural organizations as well as job and grant opportunities. batonrouge. culturalyst.com

TH ER APY PHYSICAL THERAPY || MASSAGE THERAPY

N UT R IT IO N NUTRITION COUNSELING

I N T EG RAT IVE H EALT H

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT Three new arrivals to watch for: Brass by Circa 1857: Gift and antiques shop by the owners of Circa 1857. “Brass,” which stands for “Baton Rouge area souvenir shop,” aims to be open by Dec. 1 on North Boulevard next to Jolie Pearl Oyster Bar. circa1857br.com

The Main Lobby: Downtown rooftop bar and lounge taking over the former Hound Dogs location at Main and Seventh streets. Developer Cornelius Quarels hopes to be serving drinks and bar food by the end of the year in the hotel loungestyle setting.

More offices: Look for future construction of a three-story office building at 861 Main St. The project is being developed by Louisiana REALTORS, with space currently available for sale and pre-lease. WHLC Architecture is designing the office, conference and balcony spaces.

NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED A goal and some serious commitment will do.

FUTUREFITNES S BR.COM | 1650 LO BD E L L AVE NUE | BATO N R O UG E , LA 70806 ST U D I O PAR K • AC R O S S F R O M TOW N E C E N T E R

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

17


W H AT ’ S U P / /

YOUR FLAVOR Do you send holiday cards?

Vanessa Green Certified life coach, Made New LLC Author, The Coaches Connect 49

Brent Granger

Purchasing manager, AdvanSix 53

Nathalie Chapman

Owner, Auntie Nat’s Soulfood & Catering, LLC Middle school math teacher 27

Yes. I really love cards, and I try to find ones that are reflective of me and the recipient.

18

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

A Christmas Story, hands down

“Jireh” by Maverick City Music

I’m usually listening to my “Christian Worship” playlist on Spotify.

Wintertime beverage you’re sipping

Favorite way to spend the weekend

Proudest accomplishment of 2021

Hot chocolate

Having a quiet day at home where I can write creatively

Becoming a best-selling author on my first try

Grilling with friends

Raising my two wonderful sons, who are 18 and 21

I prefer to text holiday greetings.

Christmas Vacation

My mom sends out our family photo card every year.

I’m torn between How the Grinch Stole Christmas with Jim Carrey or A Charlie Brown Christmas.

“Bow Bow Bow” by HD4 President

Spiced eggnog or white chocolate mocha

No

It’s a Wonderful Life

“Days Like This” by Van Morrison

Hot chai latte

Flavio Manrique

Salesman, Pride Roofing LLC 57

The best holiday movie is ...

Song most likely to be at the top of your Spotify “Wrapped” for 2021

Hot chocolate

Catering

Playing golf or being outdoors

Juggling my teaching job with running a catering business and doubling what I made last year

Helping restore Louisiana after Hurricane Ida


CampusFederal.org | 888.769.8841 | email@CampusFederal.org Branch locations available in Baton Rouge, New Orleans and Shreveport APR = Annual Percentage Rate. APR is variable. Prestige APR is determined by adding 3.50% to Wall Street Journal Prime. Rewards APR is determined by adding 6.50% to Wall Street Journal Prime. Cash Advance Fee = 2% of advance amount. 2% balance transfer fee with $60 cap per transaction. No Annual Fee. Membership and credit approval required. Promotional rate through 12/2022.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

19


INVITING ENTERTAINMENT. SUPPORTING LOCAL. PROMOTING OUR CITY. Everything we do is to make Baton Rouge a more lively place for you. From new businesses for the foodies and shopping fanatics to more robust attractions for the history buffs and even elevated experiences for the outdoorsmen, we’re in the business of making our home—and yours—special.

Let’s make the Capital City exceptional and #

20

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

together.


I N S I D E : Golden Girls go viral / The latest local news

EXIT INTERVIEW

Big thinker John Davies talks retirement and his legacy as CEO of Baton Rouge Area Foundation B Y M AG G I E H EY N R I C H AR DS ON P HOTO S BY CO LLIN RICHIE

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

21


Issue Date: December 2021 Ad proof #1 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

OUR CITY //

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

WHAT’S ON THE OUTSIDE MATTERS 7620 Old Hammond Hwy 225.926.6892 carriagesbr.com |

*available styles brands may vary instore

THE AVERAGE RESIDENT of Baton Rouge may have no idea the Baton Rouge Area Foundation has been the force behind some of the city’s most influential quality of life projects. From the Shaw Center for the Arts to the Red Stick Farmers Market, numerous initiatives that have added culture and new experiences for Baton Rougeans have been guided by the Foundation. That most people who enjoy those projects don’t give the foundation much thought is exactly how President and CEO John G. Davies has wanted it. In May, Davies announced his forthcoming retirement from the foundation, which he has led since 1988. Davis tells 225 he’ll remain on through the first quarter of 2022, during which time his successor will be identified. A number of significant community projects can trace their DNA to the foundation, including the revitalization of downtown Baton Rouge, the creation of the Water Campus, the ability to attract highquality charter schools through New Schools for Baton Rouge and the establishment of the Bridge Center for Hope to serve those with mental illness. The preservation of the Bluebonnet Swamp, the recent restoration of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and the plan to restore the LSU and City Park lakes have all been engineered behind the scenes by the Baton Rouge Area Foundation. Since Davies took the helm, its assets have grown from $5 million to $722 million, largely through attracting local donors and piquing their personal passions. During Davies’ tenure, the foundation granted more than $550 million to local nonprofits and community projects, while also acting as a think tank for pushing big ideas and key social initiatives. While Davies is retiring, he’ll remain as chair of its subsidiary Wilbur Marvin Foundation. In that role, he’ll work with Commercial Properties Real Estate Trust to complete the buildout of the 35-acre Water Campus, a research park dedicated to advancing science on how deltaic communities can live with rising seas. What was it like when you arrived at the foundation in 1988? The foundation had no negative baggage because not many people knew about it, but those who did admired it because it had done some pretty important work. We held high ground. We were not government, or the Chamber, or the United Way, or the Arts Council. Our role was, and is, to represent and support everybody in our community. We own that space. We need to ensure that the water

22

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

rises for every single human being who is a resident of the area of the geography that we claim. No one else could say that. So we took that very seriously. Engaging donors, and encouraging them to set up funds at the foundation, has been a big part of what you’ve accomplished. What’s that been like? High-net-worth people start funds with us, and then we help them make great decisions about where they might invest those funds. We love that relationship. We have a donor give X-amount of dollars and say, “I want to give it to you unrestricted.” And we say, “No, we want it to be a donor-advised fund, because if you give us a million dollars and walk away, it’s a transaction. If you give us a million dollars in a donor-advised fund, it’s a relationship.” And we need the relationship because we want a cohort of people who really care deeply about our community, and who are willing to use not only their money but their influence to make us a better place. What’s Baton Rouge’s greatest strength? Access. This is a very open community, socially. It’s not closed. We constantly embrace new people. It’s part of our culture. It’s the personality that says “You’re welcome here.” You know, “Come


Issue Date: December 2021 Ad proof #1 OUR CITY //

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Restaurant

57 YEARS AND STILL GOING STRONG! DON’T FORGET TO ORDER YOUR HOLIDAY HAM FOR CHRISTMAS TODAY AT

FranksRestaurantLA.com

Davies stands in front of the Center for Coastal & Deltaic Solutions, home to the Water Institute of the Gulf, on the former city docks just outside of downtown. The Water Campus complex has been one of BRAF’s most significant community projects.

and share my gumbo” sort of stuff. It’s this wonderful spirit, which is to be very open and affectionate to strangers. We live rich. And we laugh a lot. There are many parts of this country where people don’t have a sense of humor. I love the sense of humor, and I love the fact that we enjoy ourselves. The foundation has used its influence to make a lot of things happen, but it still remains somewhat under the radar. How has that happened? Early on, we decided one of our operating principles was always going to be to deflect credit. Because when I came, it was obvious to me that people were always claiming credit. There were a lot of groundbreakings, and very few ribbon cuttings. We decided we’d never do a groundbreaking, we’d only do ribbon cuttings, and even those would be muted and deflected in terms of credit. Because we felt that our work would have to stand on its own, and we weren’t about to go pound our own chest. What will you be working on in retirement, as chair of the Wilbur Marvin Foundation? The main thing is to finish the Water Campus. With COVID, we don’t know exactly what that means in terms of

the need for office space, but so far, so good. There’s a lot of interest because it is not a normal office building downtown. It’s a place that’s focused on a very specific set of interests, and that is coastal, deltaic and cybersecurity, those are the three things that drive that campus. So it’s much easier than to aggregate people in one place because they share ideas and they share work and they collaborate together. I think we will be able to build it out in a reasonable amount of time, and I’d like to get it well over its tipping point. It’s developing nicely south of Water Street. In your work with the foundation, what are you most proud of? I think it’s the mentoring that we’ve done here at the foundation with our teams of young brilliant people. Many have gone on to do extraordinary things elsewhere, and the fact that they retain the connectivity and affection for us because of that is just incredibly gratifying. That reflects a deep kind of cultural value that drives me. I think that’s what we need to be about, is helping next generations find their way to increase productivity and fulfillment.

GET YOUR GIFT CARD

Holidays!

FOR THE

17425 Airline Hwy | Prairieville, LA | (225) 673-8876 8353 Airline Hwy | Baton Rouge, LA | (225) 926-5977

Editor’s note: Davies’ answers have been edited for brevity and clarity. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

23


OUR CITY //

Not so routine

LSU’s Golden Girls continue video performances that grew out of pandemic restrictions By Olivia Deffes

FROM THE TIGER Stadium seats, it may be hard to see the dazzling routines of the Golden Girls as they dance on the field. But it was even harder to see them as they were stuck in the stands during a season affected by a pandemic. LSU game days were not the same during the 2020 season. With a lower stadium capacity, smaller tailgates and the absence of Tiger Band performances, the school’s first season during the pandemic paled in comparison to the triumphant 2019 National Championship season. Blair Buras Guillaume, director of the Golden Girls, says she knew the season would look different, but she didn’t know her team would only be performing from their outpost in the student section of the stadium. Issue Date: December 2021 Ad proof #1 “We went into last year not knowing how • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. The Golden the would look,” Guillaume • AD whole WILL RUNthing AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hoursGirls perform during the 2019 season game against the University of Florida. from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Healthy Living

starts at the ROOT

Your hair tells a story about your health. Sadairea August is trained in trichology & functional nutrition to understand the power of our diet to impact hair growth. Your hair growth journey is unique, and you don’t have to go through it alone.

Happy Holidays!

20% off consultations this December

Call or visit our website to schedule your FREE 15-min consultation. 10319 OLD HAMMOND HWY. SUITE C1, BATON ROUGE, LA 70816 | 225.441.5381 | CULTIVATEDROOTSSALON.COM

24

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


OUR CITY //

Images taken from the Golden Girls’ performance videos posted to social media.

JORDAN HEFLER

says. “Everyone who auditioned knew that football season was going to be different, and it was.” Guillaume didn’t let restrictions hurt the team. She worked with the team’s captains to find ways to get creative and to showcase the Golden Girls’ talents to fans—virtually. The idea was to choreograph full routines, film them and post them on social media so everyone could see what the Golden Girls had to offer. “During a regular season, I feel like a lot of people don’t get to see what we do unless you have those really good seats,” Guillaume says. “It was a good way to get them dancing. If we hadn’t come up with this idea, they’d just be in the stands doing down cheers and school songs.” Issue Date: DEC 2021 Ad proof #2These videos helped the team stay • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. on top of24 itshours game during a season • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within

that was a little off. Guillaume saw the videos as the best way to help new team members get acclimated with being a Golden Girl and to give the seniors one last chance to experience a full season of dancing. The team has continued this new tradition in 2021 with more full-out routines, unlike the smaller performances they do on the field with the band. Guillaume says these videos are a great recruiting tool and help the Golden Girls reach a larger audience. The videoed dance routines were something Ramsi Rodriguez was grateful for as a new Golden Girl in 2020. Even when it seemed like her first season would be affected by the pandemic, Rodriguez says the team still thrived through it all. “When I made the team, I was still honored and grateful,” Rodriguez says.

“Even though our performances were different, I still embraced every second of last year because I got to be a part of such an amazing team.” Destiny Rooney and Lauren Aguillard, 2021 co-captains, were there for the highs of the 2019 season. They say the pandemic seasons have not been a total loss, but instead provided a time for the team to strengthen its skills and bonds with each other. “Without times that may seem difficult, it becomes hard to appreciate those times of greatness,” Rooney says. Aguillard adds, “Last season allowed us to take a step back from the busyness of our lives and appreciate all of the small moments we were given ... It also gave us a chance to lean on each other during such a time of uncertainty.” Find the Golden Girls on Instagram at @lsugoldengirls

from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

E S E

E V R

LIDAY PIE O H R S YO U

CAL

LT O

R

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

MON: 11AM-9PM

TUES-THURS: 11AM-10PM

ELSIESPIES.COM

FRI: 11AM-11PM

3145 GOVERNMENT ST

SAT-SUN: 10AM-11PM

225.636.515

EQ

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

25


OUR CITY // D I G I TS

EXPLAINER

17

Drawing lines

Number of potential sites for a new Mississippi River bridge to alleviate traffic congestion through Baton Rouge. The Capital Area Road and Bridge District—formed two years ago to address the issue—reviewed proposed sites along the river from Brusly to Donaldsonville in September. After a planned second round of screenings and public meetings, a shorter list of three or four sites should be made public by fall 2022. Funding would likely come from a toll, as well as state and federal dollars.

Keep an eye on the redistricting battle— and its impact on the Capital Region

—BENJAMIN LEGER

26

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

The cost insurance companies face to cover Louisiana claims for damage caused by Hurricanes Laura, Delta and Zeta, according to Insurance Commissioner Jim Donelon. Nearly 324,000 insurance claims have been filed for those storms, and the price tag doesn’t account for payments from the National Flood Insurance Program. That means the total cost of damage is likely much higher. And while those were 2020 storms, experts estimate 2021’s Hurricane Ida could cost insurers upward of $18 billion in total U.S. claims.

S AY W HAT?

“I’m excited to see the broad spectrum of funding coming to different types of infrastructure. The Capital Region is mired in traffic, and anything coming through for that is a welcome relief.”

STOCK IMAGE

LOUISIANA’S CONGRESSIONAL District 2, which includes parts of Baton Rouge, is regularly ranked by voting rights groups as among the most gerrymandered in the country—meaning its lines are drawn disproportionately to hinder the voting power of a particular demographic or party. That might change early next year when the state legislature convenes to redraw much of the state’s districts based on 2020 Census data. Population shifts around the state left many districts over- or underpopulated, creating disproportionate representation. Now, groups like the ACLU of Louisiana have launched statewide campaigns and town hall meetings encouraging residents to speak up about how those new lines should be drawn. Just looking at the awkward shape of District 2, it’s no wonder its design has attracted attention from The Washington Post to the NAACP. District 2 starts in majority Black north Baton Rouge, then narrows to no wider than the Mississippi River on its way south to include White Castle, Donaldsonville and much of New Orleans, except for the majority white enclaves of Metairie and Lakeview. Its boundaries become so thin at points that you could drive east on Government Street from downtown— which is in District 6—enter District 2 for roughly eight blocks, then be back in District 6 at Park Boulevard. The Republican-controlled state legislature convenes in February to flesh out the new maps, which will then face the pen of Democrat Gov. John Bel Edwards. It’s “going to be a tough, bloody mess,” Louis Gurvich of the state Republican Party warned in an October Associated Press article. The ACLU’s “redistricting roadshow” will end at the State Capitol Jan. 20 after visits to Lake Charles this month and the New Orleans region in early January. laaclu.org

$10.6 billion

—David Zoller, government affairs manager at the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, after Congress passed the $1 trillion infrastructure deal in early November. Capital City leaders anticipate some of that money will go toward the proposed new Mississippi River bridge, passenger rail to New Orleans, improvements at the Port of Greater Baton Rouge and infrastructure to protect against climate change.


Exceptionally simple. Louisiana’s largest pediatric network — designed for busy parents and super active kids!

PATIENT PERKS Same-day, Next-day Appointments

Extended Weekday and Weekend Hours Video Visits Until Midnight Online Scheduling

The best in pediatric care, it’s that simple.

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS: CALL (225) 374-HEAL


The Lakes at Harveston can be your new home by next holiday…

Baton Rouge’s Premier Traditional Neighborhood proudly announces The Lakes at Harveston, an architecturally-designed new home community entwined within lakes, woods, parks, and biking/hiking trails. Enjoy our master-outfitted fitness center, the designer crafted swimming pool, a luxurious community center, an outdoor cabana with grill, and our astonishing Preservation Garden. Our Sales Center is now open displaying The Lakes at Harveston site plans for your personal selection and for discussing details on home planning. We cordially invite you to visit The Lakes at Harveston, where nature is your neighbor.

Located on Bluebonnet Boulevard near Nicholson, just 10 minutes from LSU


P R O U D LY I N T R O D U C I N G

The Lakes At Harveston Homes starting at $580,000

Cathy Cusimano, Realtor

| 225-413-9801

A Wampold/Fetzer Development

Harvestonbr.com


Open Road Mode Lock doors. Adjust lights. Arm home security. Get outdoors. Protect. Monitor. Control. Call 844-347-2219 or visit cox.com/homelife

Cox Homelife is available to residential customers in select Cox service areas. A high-speed Internet connection is required. Cox Homelife Security service plan required for professional monitoring services for intrusion, smoke/fire and related system components. Applicable monthly service charges, installation, additional equipment, taxes, trip charges and other fees may apply. Subject to credit approval. Other restrictions may apply. Local ordinances may require an alarm user permit or external lock box. Cox Homelife Service provided by Cox Advanced Services: Arizona, LLC – Alarm Lic. #18141–0 & ROC Lic. #310876; Arkansas, LLC – Lic. #E 2014 0026 & #CMPY.0002278; California, LLC – Alarm Lic. #7196 & Contractor’s Lic. #992992; Connecticut, LLC – N/A; Florida, LLC – Lic. #EF20001232; Georgia, LLC – License: Bryan David Melancon #LVU406595; Idaho, LLC – Lic. #024933; Iowa, LLC – Lic. #C121646 & #AC268; Louisiana, LLC – Lic. #F 2006; Nebraska, LLC – Lic. #26512; Nevada, LLC dba Cox Homelife – Lic. #78331; Ohio, LLC – Lic. #5318–1671; Oklahoma, LLC – Lic. #2002; Rhode Island, LLC – Lic. #9314; Kansas, LLC – Topeka Lic. #109 & Wichita Lic. #2015–36492; Virginia, LLC – DCJS Lic. #11–7776 & DPOR Lic. # 2705164725 ©2021 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. MAG107433–0080


I AM 225 //

Melanie Bennett IT FEELS LIKE you’re heading back to Mom’s house as you pull up to the modest pink home at 4232 North Blvd. The streets are familiar—centrally located in Mid City, close to the LSU campus and downtown. But it’s The Hostel Baton Rouge owner Melanie Bennett, warmly greeting you with wide arms, who immediately makes you feel at ease. Bennett was born and raised in Baton Rouge, and this “Mid City cat” calls the area her stomping grounds. Prior to being a hostel owner, she worked for more than 20 years as a homemaker, stagehand, tour guide and even an Uber driver for those new to the Baton Rouge area. She loves the Red Stick, which is why she purchased this home that was destined to become the city’s first hostel. When she’d travel, she would generally stay in one, and once she discovered the former day care building, she knew it was the place. “It made it a perfect transition, I think. It was already zoned correctly and just a charming, warm little place,” Bennett says. Once visitors walk into the hostel, which had its soft opening this fall, they are welcomed into the bunk room. The custom-built bunks accommodate up to nine guests. The scent of coffee lures guests into the common room, where they can find games, a laundry unit, food and everything you need to make a sandwich. Guests who travel together are also able to stay in the private suite, which is next to Bennett’s personal room. And, in true hostel fashion, there is a shared bathroom, which includes a bathtub and eventually a shower. The walls of each space in the hostel are painted a different color, and the rooms are awash in antique furnishings and eclectic art. Bennett is determined to make this a creative space that not only welcomes out-of-towners but also brings the Baton Rouge community together. She plans to host regular events, like live music, book clubs, yoga classes and even diverse language classes—every club and get together is welcome at The Hostel. Bennett had her first guests this fall amid the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, despite ongoing renovations. She hosted Habitat for Humanity volunteers in town helping hurricane victims. She says the experience made them lifelong friends. Bennett hopes her guests feel awestruck and accommodated by the hostel, and she is excited to see what the future holds for it. Guests will soon have access to a treehouse, Southern-style rocking chairs and even a space for performing musicians. It’s a blank canvas, and Bennett is Picasso. The sky is the limit for The Hostel, she says—especially when she imagines all the visitors who can meet each other and spend time together in the space. It’s all part of Bennett’s tagline: “Bringing the world to Baton Rouge, and sharing Baton Rouge with the world.” “Ultimately,” she says, “I just envision the whole place lit up with lots of people, and it’s going to be even better.”

—BRITTNEY FORBES QUOTES HAVE BEEN EDITED FOR CLARITY AND BREVITY.

SEE THE CITY’S FIRST HOSTEL Head to 225batonrouge.com this month for 225’s photo tour of The Hostel Baton Rouge. And to book your stay, visit thehostel.la or contact Melanie Bennett at 288-6915. COLLIN RICHIE

“You can go all over the world, but if you stay in antiseptic hotels and just eat at chain restaurants, you don’t get the vibe of community. That’s what I want for The Hostel.”

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

31


COLLIN RICHIE

C OV E R S T ORY

32

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


C OV E R S T ORY

weekend ADVENTURES Zip lining! Dinosaurs! Holiday lights, brewery tours and berry picking! From local hidden gems to quick day trips definitely worth the drive, here are 12 reasons to start planning your 2022 calendar now. BY O L I V I A DE F F E S , B E N JA MIN L EG ER , MAG G IE H EYN R ICH A R DSO N A ND JE NNIFER TORMO

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

33


Making East Baton Rouge a Better Place to THANK YOU for Supporting BREC for 75 Years! Join BREC to celebrate at this Free event, open to all ages! Saturday, December 18 | 6-8:30 p.m. | Independence Community Park Live Music by the Michael Foster Project + Holiday Lights + endless entertainment and activities MORE INFO: BREC.ORG/75 BREC does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, religion, veteran status or sexual orientation in its programs and activities.


C OV E R S T ORY

january

A fine brew

Resolve to explore the Capital Region’s bevy of craft beers this month ABOUT A DECADE ago, Louisiana’s claim to fame in the craft beer world seemed to begin and end with Abita Brewing Company. And while it still reigns supreme—as the 24th largest craft brewer in the country—Abita has since been joined by more than 30 others across the state. And though a statewide brewery tour might be a long-term project for the avid beer drinker, we wanted to highlight some of the hotspots around Baton Rouge that could lead to a fun and hoppy weekend.

—BENJAMIN LEGER

KRISTIN SELLE

Tin Roof Brewing Company 1624 Wyoming St. Start here to see how Baton Rouge jumped onto the scene with gusto. Tin Roof has been cranking out much-loved brews and seasonal flavors since 2010 in a warehouse off Nicholson Drive. Today, that space boasts a bustling tap room and outdoor patio as well as regular events such as live music, food truck pop-ups, family nights and weekly yoga on the lawn. tinroofbeer.com Rally Cap Brewing Company 11212 Pennywood Ave. Just off Siegen Lane, Rally Cap opened in late 2019 with a sports-centric theme and a variety of pale ales and IPAs. Naturally, there’s usually a game on in the brewery’s tap room, and weekly events like trivia nights and live music to keep things interesting. rallycapbrewing.com Gilla Brewing Company 13025 Highway 44, Gonzales Another late 2019 entry to the local brewing scene was Gilla Brewing in Gonzales. Its cozy tap room features arcades and board games as well as live music to go along with about a dozen available taps showcasing fruity sours and citrus-forward IPAs. gillabrewingco.com

TAYLOR MORAN

Cypress Coast Brewing Co. 5643 Government St. Two Baton Rouge couples went from sharing homebrewing tips to dreaming up their own brewery, which opened in Mid City in late 2020. The facility’s smaller size lends itself to their creativity and experimentation, showcasing farmhouse ales, sours and stouts. Head to the tap room for samples, regular trivia nights and local food pop-ups. cypresscoastbrewing.com

Find out more The state’s Office of Tourism created a promotional website to showcase all the breweries, distilleries and even a few vineyards across Louisiana. Go to libations.louisianatravel.com for maps and more. And for those who’d prefer liquor to beer, we’ve got a roundup of regional distilleries to tour over at 225batonrouge.com/bars-drinks.

ARIANA ALLISON

KRISTIN SELLE

Le Chien Brewing Company 101 S. Hummell St., Denham Springs The newest to the scene opened in late 2020 just across the railroad tracks from downtown Denham Springs. It quickly became a neighborhood hangout with picnic tables and outdoor games, plus a permanently stationed food truck, Pie Eyed, serving up savory and sweet hand pies and snacks. It’s a great foil for this fledgling microbrewery’s lagers, wheat beers, stouts and more. lechien.beer Istrouma Brewery 5590 Bayou Paul Road, St. Gabriel Don’t let its seemingly isolated location fool you. A visit to Istrouma can lead to a full day of beer, pizza, outdoor games, browsing the art gallery and meeting the farm animals. The brewery, which opened in October 2020, is located on a working farm with longhorns, sheep and goats, and there’s even a drive-in movie theater in the works. But if you’re here chiefly for the beer, there are plenty of ales, stouts and pilsners in the tap room or from the porch taps outside. sugarfarmsla.com/ istrouma-brewing

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

35


C OV E R S T ORY

february For the history buffs Tours and historical sites to remember our past and mark Black History Month

BATON ROUGE NATIVE John Kelton started driving for a limousine company when he moved back home from Memphis in 2012. Many of his passengers ended up being touring groups with Visit Baton Rouge and the state Office of Tourism. They were so taken by his knowledge of the city that they encouraged him to host his own tours. He took their advice, but out from behind the driver’s seat, launching Enjoy Baton Rouge Walking Tours in 2017. He leads groups of up to around 12 through downtown for two hours, highlighting historic landmarks and topics based on the groups’ suggestions. “I can cater to their interests and also their stamina,” Kelton says. “Once you know what they’re really interested in, you can really go more in depth with the tour.” And with his breadth of knowledge and research, that can include anything from the Battle of Baton Rouge to important civil rights landmarks, public art and architecture to political history. “It becomes a conversation,” Kelton says. enjoybatonrouge.com

STOCK IMAGE

REDISCOVER DOWNTOWN

The Old State Capitol’s story dates back to the late 1800s, but it also served as the backdrop to civil rights history when bus riders sat under its shady oaks waiting for volunteer transportation during the 1953 bus boycott.

INCL UDE S AN

NEW YEAR'S EVE

OPE N BA

R!

BASH FEATURING CAPITAL CITY SOUL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31 TICKETS ARE $45 | Doors Open at 10:30pm | Show starts at 11pm General Admission | Standing Room Only

PURCHASE TICKETS AT For more information, visit LBatonRouge.com • 866.261.7777 Must be 21 years of age or older to enter Event Center and Casino. Entertainment is subject to change or cancellation without notice. Tickets may be purchased at all Ticketmaster outlets, ticketmaster.com or by calling Ticketmaster. Tickets are non-transferable and non-negotiable. Subject to availability. Management reserves the right to cancel, modify or refuse this offer without notice at any time. Offer not valid for self-exclusion program enrollees in jurisdictions which Penn National Gaming, Inc. operates or who have been otherwise excluded from the participating property. ©2021 Penn National Gaming, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING 36

PROBLEM?

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

PLE ASE

CALL

800.522.4700.


C OV E R S T ORY

CIVIL RIGHTS AND BLACK HISTORY

COURTESY LOUISIANA OFFICE OF TOURISM

River Road African American Museum Louisiana Civil Rights Trail Head to this Donaldsonville cottage to explore Two of the first four sites on this historical marker African influence on Louisiana agriculture, trail are in the Capital City. The Baton Rouge cuisine, music and much more. Bus Boycott is remembered africanamericanmuseum.org with a marker at the Old State Capitol, where riders A different plantation tour waited for volunteer free • It wasn’t until Whitney Plantation transportation as part of opened in 2014 that Louisiana dea protest of the city’s bus livered a plantation tour focused system. The protests inspired on the experiences of enslaved Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. people. About 50 minutes southand the 1955 Montgomery east of Baton Rouge, it offers a bus boycott. In August, a sobering look at slavery at Whitney marker was unveiled at A. and other plantations. Self-guided Z. Young Park next to the tours are outside, so prep for the state capitol to celebrate the weather. whitneyplantation.org civil rights activist and the march he helped lead from • Laura Plantation, just five miles Bogalusa to Baton Rouge in from Whitney, began enhancing its 1967 protesting voting and discussions of slavery in 2017. Its employment discrimination. guided tours are among the most The other markers are at The Louisiana Civil Rights Trail informative along River Road. Dooky Chase’s Restaurant in marker at A.Z. Young Park lauraplantation.com New Orleans and Little Union Baptist Church in Shreveport. —BENJAMIN LEGER louisianacivilrightstrail.com

Tour some more

Scott and Susan Miles of ​​All About Baton Rouge Tours offer a variety of microbus tours, walking tours, food tours and even longer excursions that feature a boat ride through the swamps. redstickadventures.com

COLLIN RICHIE

Baton Rouge African American Museum While the loss of founder Sadie RobertsJoseph in 2019 dealt the downtown museum a serious blow, her two adult children have taken over. The many artifacts include a bus from the 1953 Baton Rouge Bus Boycott. The museum is open for small tours upon request. braamuseum.org

A historic bus used during the 1953 Baton Rouge Bus Boycott sits on the grounds of the Baton Rouge African American Museum.

MAIN CLINIC & PEDIATRICS AT PERKINS 7373 PERKINS ROAD PEDIATRICS AT INDUSTRIPLEX 12351 INDUSTRIPLEX BLVD For pediatric appointments, call (225) 246-9290 For all other appointments, call (225) 246-9240

URGENT CARE 7479 PERKINS ROAD l (225) 246-9997 You shouldn’t have to wait to feel better. Open 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

AS WE CELEBRATE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, WE WOULD LIKE TO OFFER OUR SINCERE THANKS TO OUR NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS FOR THE CONTINUED TRUST AND SUPPORT FOR 75 YEARS.

BATONROUGECLINIC.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

37


C OV E R S T ORY

march Travel size Souvenirs from Baton Rouge hotels

THERE’S SOMETHING CHARMING about hotel bath products. Miniature bottles of shampoo and scented soaps welcome you to your home away from home. They offer a chance to try a new product, and with calming fragrances like lavender or citrus, they make shampooing feel like a spa escape. Best of all, they’re complimentary. Take what’s left in the bottle home with you. It will be a tiny reminder of your trip next time you wash your hair. Here’s what we found on the bath counters at Baton Rouge hotels.

1

—JENNIFER TORMO

1. L’Auberge Casino & Hotel Essentiel Elements spa products in fresh neroli 777 L’Auberge Ave. | lbatonrouge.com

2

2. Renaissance Baton Rouge Hotel Aveda rosemary mint purifying cleansers 7000 Bluebonnet Blvd. | marriott.com 3. Watermark Baton Rouge Essentiel Elements spa products in fresh neroli 150 Third St. | watermarkbr.com 4. Hilton Baton Rouge Capitol Center Crabtree & Evelyn verbena and lavender toiletries 201 Lafayette St. | hilton.com

PACK UP Spend spring break a little closer to home at one of these unique Airbnbs

Airbnb can be a lot to sift through, especially now that Baton Rouge has more than 300 properties listed on the platform. After a little digging, here are some interesting properties we found. Note that we’ve listed the names and prices as they appeared on the app at press time.

If you’re looking for a vintage camper experience ... Adorable 1 bedroom camper Denham Springs From $81/night airbnb.com/rooms/51907740 Airstream Avalon overlooking creek St. Francisville From $98/night airbnb.com/rooms/37448028

If you’re looking for downtown vibes ... Amazing Downtown Loft in Baton Rouge - 3rd Street From $180/night airbnb.com/rooms/32290649 Historic Downtown Baton Rouge House | Parking From $194/night airbnb.com/rooms/22396532

4

3

Historic Hundred Oaks Bungalow From $154/night airbnb.com/rooms/29678891

38

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

COLLIN RICHIE

If you’re looking for a historic home ...


Juicy fruit

D

april

C OV E R S T ORY

E TIME RIV

Spring is for strawberries

2.5

How to enjoy Louisiana’s most iconic fruit

hours

MOST PICK-YOUR-OWN FRUIT farms provide the chance to fill a box or bucket with one type of fruit. Not Romero’s Fruit Orchard in New Iberia. Back in the ’80s, retired sugar cane farmer Eddie Romero had a specific vision for a U-pick farm. He planted his first fig and peach trees in 1986, adding various fruits—and varieties within those fruits—each year. Today, about 500 trees, shrubs and vines produce 20 different fresh fruits that Romero raises with very few, if any, chemicals, he says. “I’ve got a fruit jungle,” Romero jokes. The list reads like a supermarket produce section. There are blackberries, blueberries, peaches, figs, muscadines, pears, persimmons and satsumas. Romero grows apples in the fall—Anna, Dorsett and Ein Shemer varieties that perform well in Southern climates. Along with the muscadines, he grows seedless table grapes that are great for snacking. And he grows pawpaws, a tree native to North America with fruit that tastes like a cross between a banana and a pineapple, Romero says. The farm opens yearly in April, with different fruits ripening as the spring, summer and fall unfold. Blackberries, blueberries and peaches kick things off, followed by figs, pawpaws and pears. Persimmons and muscadines emerge in the fall, followed by citrus in winter. Romero keeps customers updated on which fruits are available—or have been fully picked—through social media. Romero says visitors often ask, “When is best time Issue Date: December 2021 Adtheproof #1to plant a fruit tree?” “I tellrespond themby20e-mail years ago,” • Please or fax withhe yourlaughs. approval or minor revisions. —MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

STOCK PHOTOS

Pick your own produce in New Iberia

Romero’s Fruit Orchards 5119 Freetown Road, New Iberia

Opens in April. Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. Call ahead to confirm availability. Orchard provides buckets or boxes, depending on the type of fruit. Find it on Facebook

Strawberry picking Strawberries taste even better when you’ve picked them yourself. A few U-pick farms to plug into your Google Maps app: Landry-Poche Farm in Holden; Mrs. Heather’s Farms in Albany; and Blahut Strawberry Farm in Holden. Call in advance to confirm availability and hours. Ponchatoula Strawberry Festival April 8-10, 2022 North Sixth and West Beech streets in Ponchatoula After being canceled by COVID-19 two years in a row, the annual event makes its triumphant return— celebrating its 50th year, in fact. Vendors showcase strawberries in everything from desserts to drinks against a backdrop of other festivities. Don’t miss the chance to pick up fresh strawberries from area growers. lastrawberryfestival.com

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

great skin

START THE NEW YEAR WITH

ACHIEVE YOUR SKIN CARE GOALS IN 2022 WITH

11939 Bricksome Avenue | Baton Rouge | (225) 610-0028 hello@blackandblancla.com | blackandblancla.com

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

39


• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Sweeten Your Holidays with FREE Library Resources!

WHETHER YOU’RE TRAVELING OR GATHERING WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY AT HOME, YOUR LIBRARY’S GOT SOMETHING FUN FOR YOU: Fun & Interactive Online Learning Platforms for All Ages • E-books for Reading on the Go Popular Digital Magazines • Music Downloads of Popular Artists Streaming Videos & Concerts • Recipes & Craft Tutorials • AND MORE!

All you need is your Library card! Visit www.ebrpl.com/DigitalLibrary 40

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


C OV E R S T ORY

may

IVE TIM DR E

Dino-mite!

45 minutes

Prehistoric Park offers a rare chance to walk among the dinosaurs

ON A HALF-MILE wooded trail in Henderson, rabbits dart behind bushes. Butterflies flutter through shady trees. But these aren’t the only creatures that live at Prehistoric Park. A 30-foot-long brachiosaurus looms above the trees, its green-gray neck arching toward the sky. A family of stegosauruses huddles together, a squad of herbivores seeming to protect each other from predators. Sure enough, a tyrannosaurus lurks around the trail’s final corner. It glares ominously down at passersby. Even the smaller reptiles, like the stealthy velociraptor and the friendlier parasaurolophus, dwarf the youngest visitors at this kid-friendly attraction. Kiosks in front of the dinosaurs offer educational insight, declaring that these two dinos could have reached 6- to 8-feet tall in real life. The dinosaurs are only replicas, of course. But that doesn’t matter to the tiny aspiring paleontologists who gape up at them, shrieking with both awe and terror. For many of the children who visit the park, it’s their first time seeing dinosaurs outside of a textbook or a Jurassic Park movie. And these scaly-skinned models feel about as real as it gets. “If you watch any 5-year-old that loves dinosaurs, it’s just pure excitement for them,” says Amanda Stelly-Baudoin, Prehistoric Park’s general manager. “The T. rex is always the biggest hit. My 3-year-old grandson is terrified of it.” In the fall, the trail turns haunted. Spiderwebs line the paths, and spooky ghosts and dolls hide among the plants. In December, Santa and the Grinch make appearances. Kids sip hot chocolate under holiday lights. And by May, the park is packed with day campers on field trips and families looking for summer fun. Other sections of the park offer gem mining, fossil digging, gift shopping, movie viewing and children’s activities. And there’s more to look forward to: the park has plans to expand in 2022, adding dinosaur-themed food, interactive tactile exhibits and more. The goal is to provide a full day’s worth of activities. After all, Stelly-Baudoin points out, there are plenty of alligator ranches and swamp tour attractions nearby. But where else can you see a dinosaur in the wild? prehistoric-park.com

Ruby Babineaux and Maverick Olivier, children of the Prehistoric Park team, admire its dinosaurs.

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

—JENNIFER TORMO

Prehistoric Park

26

Number of dinosaurs on display at Prehistoric Park

1135 North Barn Road, Henderson

It opened in 2014 next to its sister properties, Cajun Palms RV Resort and Cajun Fast Track, an attraction next door with go karts, arcade games, mini golf and more. Park admission ranges from $8-$12 and is free for those younger than 3.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

41


Issue Date: Month Ad2 proof #1 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-

Cupcake Junkie

C OV E R S T ORY

june

Fields of dreams Sunflower fields are a whimsical setting for your next family portrait—or a haven for connecting with nature

A PREMIER CUPCAKERY SERVING MADE-FROM-SCRATCH GOODNESS

Issue Date: DECFRESH 2021DAILY Ad proof BAKED | #1 @CupcakeJunkieBR • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • ADcupcakejunkiebr.com WILL RUN AS IS unless approval |or final revisions are received within70816 24 hours 12240 Coursey Blvd. from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

| 225.421.1995

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

give burgers

SOME PEOPLE TRACK their kids’ growth by marking their heights on a wall. Others might plant trees for them to grow up alongside. Visitors at LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens chart their lives alongside the sunflowers. Katie Guitreau, the garden’s head of events, says she sees it all the time. She thinks of the center’s landscape manager Aubrey Hymel, who has worked there since she was a student. Every summer, she’d have portraits taken in the garden. Then one year, the photos morphed into a maternity session. The next summer, she had photos taken with her newborn daughter. The summer after that, the photos pictured Hymel, her daughter—and her pregnant belly once again. “Every summer, we have repeats,” Guitreau says, visualizing the rows of stalky golden flowers that grow taller than her own three young children. Photographers and casual Instagrammers alike flock to the fields. It’s a chance to snap photos with your phone—or do the opposite and log off from screen time entirely. Surrounded by bumblebees and hundreds of flowers, it’s easy to forget this place is just a highway exit away from the racing cars on I-10. In fact, it’s easy to forget everything. “It’s a refuge in the middle of the city,” Guitreau says. She recalls when the sunflower fields began as a gamble on a batch of seeds back in 2013. She and a student worker got covered in dirt hand-planting six rows of seeds. “We said, ‘Let’s just see what they look like,’” she says. “They turned out to be mammoth flowers. That summer, we noticed a lot of people walking over and looking at them.” So they planted more. In 2014, they sowed two fields. The next year, they doubled the crop. During the best years—when rain and temperature conditions have been ideal—they’ve planted as many as eight fields. They experimented with different varieties, trying to figure out which seeds would grow taller or bloom for longer. And they asked for feedback, polling visitors on what they liked or asking local photographers about which looked best in photos. Today, people drive to Baton Rouge from places like Texas and Mississippi or Shreveport and New Orleans to experience this magical flower field. And they always come with questions, giving the garden’s horticulturists a chance to educate them. Thinking back to her first days at the gardens when she started as a student worker nearly a decade ago, it’s just what Guitreau always wanted. By creating a space to take pretty pictures, she and her team have helped the masses to regard plants and gardens as lovingly as they do. “I felt like this was the field of dreams,” Guitreau says. “Now, I tell people everything I know about sunflowers. Because if we cover the whole state in sunflowers, it would be amazing. Louisiana could be the Sunflower State.” —JENNIFER TORMO

BEST OF

AWARDS 2021 WINNER

GIVE $25 & RECEIVE $5 GIVE THEM WHAT THEY WANT - BURGERS! This Holiday Season Give & Receive Burgersmith.

Get a FREE $5 Gift Certificate with every $25 Gift Card Purchase. Get yours today at your nearest Burgersmith or on the WAITR app.

Burgersmith.com Baton Rouge • Broussard • Denham Springs • Lafayette

42

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

Family photos Local photographer Kaela Rodehorst Williams let 225 crash her photo session with LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens head of events Katie Guitreau and her family in the sunflower fields.


Issue Date: DEC 2021 Ad2 proof #4 C OV E R S T ORY

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Happy Holidays

June to October

The months you’ll be able to explore the sunflower fields during a typical year at LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens. The gardens are free, though there is a photography fee if you plan to have portraits taken by a professional photographer. 4560 Essen Lane, lsu.edu/ botanic-gardens

FROM THE

SOUTHERN AIR FAMILY!

NEW INSTALLS AS LOW AS $72 A MONTH OR 0% FINANCING FOR 72 MONTHS

GARDEN HOPPING BREC’s Botanical Gardens at Independence Community Park These specialty gardens near the Main Library at Goodwood are home to more than 400 species of roses, a butterfly garden and the recently completed Baton Rouge Sensory Garden with herbs and healing plants. brec.org

Worth the drive: Sunflower Trail & Festival Sunflower fields blossom in June and July in northwest Louisiana. Take a country-style drive through about 20 miles of fields of all sizes along Highway 3049 between Shreveport and Gilliam. Watch for the annual festival to return next June. Find it on Facebook

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

LSU Hilltop Arboretum Louisiana trees and shrubs cover 13 acres at this educational shrine to plants and landscape design, including a 3-acre Cajun prairie-inspired meadow. lsu.edu/hilltop

(225) 219-8925 | southernairbr.com |

COURTESY KAE

LA RODEHORST

WILLIAMS

Certified Technicians serving Baton Rouge and the surrounding parishes

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

43


COMING SOON

REIMAGINED new chef / new menu / new specialty drinks 7000 Bluebonnet Blvd, Baton Rouge • (225) 388-5710 • tallulahrestaurant.com

44

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


D

C OV E R S T ORY

E TIME RIV

50 minutes

july

Lose yourself Take a different kind of swamp tour

2 million

Number of wild alligators in Louisiana. (An additional 1 million alligators are raised on farms, according to the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.) Because Last Wilderness is not an “alligator tour” and doesn’t feed the gators, you’ll only see them in their natural habitats during your boat ride.

8-9 feet

Average amount of the water level’s rise and fall in the basin throughout the year. The fluctuations provide different habitats for the local flora and fauna, “making every swamp tour truly unique,” according to Last Wilderness Swamp Tours.

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

FROM KAYAKING IN the Vermilion River, to taking a gondola ride through New Orleans’ City Park, to spreading out on a sandy beach on the shores of Lake Kincaid, Louisiana’s plentiful rivers, lakes and bayous provide lots of opportunities for water-centric fun. But one standout reveals the beauty of the state’s signature swamp: a day trip into the Atchafalaya Basin with Last Wilderness Swamp Tours. The family-owned and operated company was started several years ago by Dean Wilson, a former commercial fisherman who was raised in Spain and discovered the Atchafalaya Basin while traveling through Louisiana in 1984. It didn’t take long for Wilson to fall in love with the basin’s raw, wild beauty, or to change course and move to Louisiana permanently. Wilson worked as a commercial fisherman until 2004, when, frustrated by the basin’s loss of original swampland, he formed the nonprofit Atchafalaya Basinkeeper. The organization aims to protect the swamp from further land loss caused by oil company drainage canals and other projects. He also formed the Last Wilderness Swamp Tour company to help show the Atchafalaya’s quiet, pristine beauty in a manner that is respectful to its delicate ecology. Wilson operates the business with his two adult children: Al, a fellow boat captain, and Sylvia, who handles marketing. Don’t expect a crowded airboat ride, or chicken legs tossed overboard to attract alligators. Small groups of visitors ride into the swamp in a quiet, eco-friendly boat for a two-hour tour chock-full of migratory and native birds, animals in their habitats, and stunning cypress trees draped, of course, in garlands of Spanish moss. It’s nothing to see water snakes, brightly colored tree frogs, turtles and maybe even a shy alligator, intent on swimming back to its human-free hideout. “It’s a personalized tour,” Wilson says. “It allows you to go deep into the swamps to see local wildlife and birds.” Further adding to the tour’s mystique, visitors begin by meeting up with Dean or Al at a spot called Dale’s Trading Post in the community of Bayou Sorrel, about 50 minutes from Baton Rouge. From there, they board a small boat and head down the bayou and out into the basin. As the boat picks up speed, the cool breeze provides respite from the heat. Off you go, into the wild green yonder for a bucket list-glimpse of Louisiana like you’ve never seen it.

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

Last Wilderness Swamp Tours

Tour groups meet at Dale’s Trading Post, 33115 Highway 75, Plaquemine. lastwildernesstours.com

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

45


Issue Date: December 2021 Ad2 proof #1 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

don’t forget about

your furry kids this holiday season!

C OV E R S T ORY

august

A Louisiana food tour Where do Baton Rouge chefs like to eat around the state?

WHO BETTER TO ask for a restaurant recommendation than someone in the business? When they’re traveling around Louisiana, here’s where these Baton Rouge chefs and culinary entrepreneurs like to dine. —MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

Katia Mangham

Owner of catering company and retail store Gourmet Girls “I love La Petite Grocery in New Orleans for its atmosphere, wine list and crab beignets,” Mangham says. The James Beard Award-winning eatery in Uptown New Orleans is both sophisticated and comfortable. More of Mangham’s picks: Saba | New Orleans | eatwithsaba.com Cavan | New Orleans | cavannola.com Justine | New Orleans | justinenola.com

Peter Sclafani

Chef and partner in Making Raving Fans Hospitality, which operates SoLou, Portobello’s Grill, P-Beau’s and Juban’s Sclafani likes Brasa Churrasqueria, a Brazilian steakhouse in Old Metairie, for its wood-fired Angus and Wagyu beef and mouthwatering sides like honey-glazed grilled carrots with goat cheese and chile oil drizzle and grilled corn with chile butter. brasachurrasqueria.com

ats & O u r t re ories a cce s s he make t ocking b e st st s! st u f f e r

More of Sclafani’s picks: Sno’s Seafood & Steak | Gonzales | snowsseafood.com Café Vermilionville | Lafayette | cafév.com

Cameron Jackson

Creator, Millennial Park container park “La Truffe Sauvage in Lake Charles has some of the best food and drinks in Louisiana,” Jackson says. “My favorites are their lump crab cakes and paella.” thewildtruffle.com More of Jackson’s picks: Morrow’s | New Orleans | morrowsnola.com KOK Wings & Things | Lafayette and Franklin | eatkok.com

Justin Ferguson

Executive chef/owner of BRQ Ferguson’s choice of Maypop in New Orleans will have you on a global culinary tour. Hand-pulled noodles and marrow-topped snails are just the beginning of a globally influenced menu. maypoprestaurant.com More of Ferguson’s picks: Costera | New Orleans

Jay Ducote

Radio host, culinary personality and owner of Gov’t Taco

NEW storefront location 548 S Foster Dr | Baton Rouge, LA 46

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

“Ki Mexico in Shreveport has the right blend of Louisiana passion and Mexican soul,” Ducote says. “Of course, there are tacos and salsas, but make sure you also go for hamburguesas, tortas and their special take on pho and ramen. Live music and great drinks make it a must-stop when passing through north Louisiana.” More of Ducote’s picks: Hot Tails | New Roads | hottailsrestaurant.com Lucky Palace | Bossier City | lucky-palace.com Parish | Monroe | parishrestaurant.com Restaurant Calla | Lake Charles | restaurantcalla.com


C OV E R S T ORY

45

E M

september

VE DRI TI

minut es

Magnolia Ridge Park at Barn Hill Preserve 11342 E. LA-955, Ethel magnoliaridgeadventurepark.com

900

Feet of the final zip line at Magnolia Ridge, considered the longest in the state.

Zip along

Inside Magnolia Ridge, a zip line carries riders 70 feet over the Comite River IN CASE YOU haven’t been paying attention, a veritable adventureland awaits in the woods of East Feliciana Parish. It started nine years ago with Barn Hill Preserve’s animal encounters (including swimming with otters!) on a hilly property between Ethel and Clinton. There’s a safari tour and glamping on the way, too. But if you really want to get on another level, owner Gabe Ligon added the 32-acre zip line park Magnolia Ridge in 2020. Guests are shuttled from Barn Hill to the start of the zip line course, where they complete a ground school and suit up before joining trained instructors up in the treetops. There are obstacle courses like rope bridges and shorter zip lines to get you acclimated to moving among the birds and squirrels in this peaceful hardwood forest. Eight zip lines in all end with what’s touted as the longest zip line in the state: a breathtaking final journey that zooms 70 feet above a bend in the Comite River before touching down in a grassy meadow. Zip line adventures take place rain or shine, and come October, you can book some spooky themed nighttime excursions, too. magnolia ridgeadventurepark.com

COLLIN RICHIE

—BENJAMIN LEGER

From left, instructors ​​ Justin LaPrairie and ​​April Story follow Magnolia Ridge general manager Wade Henson through the obstacle course.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

47


C OV E R S T ORY

october

Spooky season Local attractions that make south Louisiana one of the best places to celebrate fall The 13th Gate

With a reputation as one of the most frightening attractions in the country, this haunted house is not for the faint of heart. Tip: Fill up on liquid courage first with a cocktail next door at Three Roll Estate. 13thgate.com

Pop-up Pink Pumpkin Patch

On a surprise date each October, Baton Rouge General sprawls thousands of pink

pumpkins across its hospital campuses for visitors to take home—and take selfies alongside. It’s all part of the “Protect Your Pumpkins” campaign for breast cancer awareness. Find it on Instagram at @batonrougegeneral

Corn Maze at Burden The LSU Rural Life Museum, LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens and the Burden Museum & Gardens host a corn maze and other fall

WORTH THE DRIVE

Issue Date: DEC 2021 Ad2 proof #2 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

PHOTO COURTESY BATON ROUGE GENERAL

More attractions to check out around the state Mrs. Heather’s Pumpkin & Strawberry Patch: Pick or paint a pumpkin, ride a zip line, walk a corn maze and so much more in Hammond. thfarms.com Cajun Country Corn Maze: Pine Grove’s winding corn maze turns haunted after dark. cajuncountrycorn.com Grant Christmas Tree Farm: This farm is about a two-and-a-half hour drive, but its annual

festivities. Make crafts, try your hand at satsuma picking and visit the petting farms. lsu.edu/ botanic-gardens

Boo at the Zoo

During two weekends in October, guests of all ages dress up in costumes for plenty of activities and fun photo opps alongside BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo animals. It’s a wild time. brzoo.org

Pumpkin Fest has hayrides, corn mazes and pumpkins galore. grantchristmastreefarm.com Fright Trail: Wander through 20 acres of haunted woods in Scott, just west of Lafayette, with plenty of scare actors to dodge. frighttrail.com The Mortuary: Think of it as New Orleans’ version of the 13 Gate, set in a former funeral home. themortuary.net Ghost Manor: A synced display of Halloween lights and music outside a Magazine Street mansion. It’s so impressive, you’ll want to watch for a while. ghostmanor.org

Pop-up Pink Pumpkin Patch at Baton Rouge General

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Celebrate the Holidays WITH AN HONORARIUM GIFT! Purchase a $25 Paw Print through Companion Animal Alliance, and bring holiday cheer to shelter pets! Want to make your purchase even more meaningful? Dedicate your paw print to a pet or family member, or give a paw print as a gift to the animal-lover in your life! Each paw print will be displayed in the lobby of Companion Animal Alliance through January 10th.

2550 GOURRIER AVENUE, BATON ROUGE, LA • CAABR.ORG • 225-408-5360 • 48

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

—OLIVIA DEFFES


C OV E R S T ORY

november

E

IVE TIM DR

40

Retail therapy

minutes

West Feliciana Antique Mall 7143 U.S. 61, Suite A Find it on Facebook Sharpen your picking skills and discover furniture, housewares, clothing, art, books and other antique and vintage treasures waiting to be unearthed. The 4,500-square-foot space is home to nearly 30 vendors.

THE PENULTIMATE MONTH of the year signals Christmas’ quickening pace, and what better way to tackle gift-giving than to assign a weekend to shopping? But shopping is stressful, so do it in a bucolic town awash in locally owned boutiques. Head north to St. Francisville for a traffic-free day filling your backseat with the season’s bounty. —MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

Patrick’s Fine Jewelers 5452 Live Oak Centre Drive patricksjewelry.com Stunning baubles, glittering engagement rings, celebratory gems and memorable gifts adorn the cases of this friendly, familyowned St. Francisville jeweler.

61

Birds of a Feather 5943 Commerce St. Find it on Facebook Discover a curated collection of nicely priced French antiques and eclectic finds for the kitchen, bath, home and garden. A separate room holds children’s fine clothing.

Sage Hill Gifts 5622 Commerce St. @shopsagehill Focusing on home furnishings and decor, Sage Hill Gifts also includes apparel for men, women and children and a range of interesting gifts ideal for teachers, friends and family.

COLLIN RICHIE

Away Down South 11770 Ferdinand St. Find it on Facebook Restore your shopping energy with an ice cream cone at this merry local hangout, where you can also purchase classic candy, gifts produced by Louisiana makers, and items for your pets.

Restaurant 1796 RIC HIE

COLLIN RICHIE

District Mercantile 11914 Ferdinand St. districtmercantile.com St. Francisville’s historic general store is now home to District Mercantile, where visitors can find on-trend fashion, vintage toys and clever games and gifts.

The Vintage Hive 5237 Commerce St. shopthevintagehive.com A haven for farmhouse chic furnishings and gifts, The Vintage Hive is one of the few spots in Louisiana to sell Fusion Mineral Paint, an easy-to-use, full coverage, low-odor furniture paint that has fast become a DIY must.

LL IN

The Conundrum Books and Puzzles 11917 Ferdinand St. conundrumbooks.com Popular titles, bestsellers and classics grace the shelves of this village bookshop, which gives special attention to regional authors and subjects. Jigsaw junkies will swoon at the puzzle selection.

Grandmother’s Buttons 9814 Royal St. grandmothers buttons.com Dreamy antique buttons and vintage glass are recast into handmade heirloom jewelry at this longtime local retailer.

COLLIN RICHIE

Small-town shopping in St. Francisville

CO

DINNER + DRINKS

After a long day of shopping, settle in for a much-deserved dinner at one of the charming restaurants around town. The Saint Restaurant & Bar at the St. Francisville Inn and Restaurant 1796 at The Myrtles Plantation are newer and stylish. You also can’t go wrong at the home-y, romantic Magnolia Cafe or with the huge, hearty menu at The Francis Southern Table and Bar.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

49


C OV E R S T ORY

december Silver bells

2.25 miles

Louisiana holiday displays and events worth the drive

Bonfires on the Levee

20

Dec. 24

Length of the driveable trail at this year’s Celebration in the Oaks

In this Louisiana Christmas Eve tradition, log pyramids as large as 20 feet are lit on fire along the Mississippi River levee between Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Though the origin of this local Height in feet of some tradition is unclear, those who build the fires say the illuminated of the Christmas Eve trail lights the way for Santa, or his Cajun persona Papa Noel, bonfires along the so that he can guide his reindeer and sleigh full of toys to the Mississippi River children in the area. The bonfires make for a holiday display that is just as stunning as the state’s more traditional light shows. Families and friends build towering pyramids for the event, and some even get creative with their logs and make complex designs like small homes and boats to light ablaze. These bonfires can be seen all along the levee, but you’ll see the most in areas close to Gramercy, Lutcher and Paulina. The best way to see these burning displays is by driving or walking along the levee—joining the families mingling and socializing along the river.

Abita Brew Pub Abita Springs

COURTESY NEW ORLEANS CITY PARK

The Abita Brew Pub is known, of course, for its craft beers. But it is also a hidden gem when it comes to holiday light displays. The whole restaurant is covered in sheets of colorful lights. The brew pub has put on a variety of small shows that can be viewed by restaurantgoers or those driving through the small town. There is even a sign displaying a radio station visitors can tune in to that features music synced up to the flashing lights. Though Abita Springs is a small town, this display makes it a great place to pass through for the holidays. abitabrewpub.com

Natchitoches Christmas Festival Nov. 20-Jan. 6

Natchitoches’ Christmas lights are some of the best in the state. The Natchitoches Christmas Festival features more than 100 lighted sets and over 300,000 individual twinkling bulbs. The display is along the Cane River and illuminates the surface of the water. It’s no wonder the decorations have won countless awards. Visit on a Saturday, and you’ll also be rewarded with a fireworks show. Check the festival’s schedule for a lineup of parades, music and other festivities. natchitocheschristmas.com

Celebration in the Oaks

Nov. 25-Jan. 2. (Closed on Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve) New Orleans Celebration in the Oaks is a classic New Orleans holiday tradition. Though it’s usually a walking tour of the lights in City Park, this year’s Celebration in the Oaks will be a driving tour, featuring millions of lights that make up large displays themed around the season. The whole trail takes around 40 minutes to drive through. Tickets start at $40 for a vehicle of eight. There is also an option to bike the trail for $5 on Mondays. Tickets sell out quickly, so be sure to book yours in advance. neworleanscitypark.com/celebration-in-the-oaks

Christmas in Roseland Nov. 26-Dec. 23 Shreveport

Holidays in BR

STOCK PHOTO

There’s plenty to do closer to home, too. Turn to page 74 for our December calendar of events, and subscribe to our 225 Daily newsletter for seasonal holiday coverage. 225batonrouge.com/225daily

50

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

The American Rose Center undergoes a festive transformation the day after Thanksgiving, morphing into a winter wonderland that is a much shorter drive than going to the North Pole. Christmas in Roseland features dozens of displays made of thousands of bright little lights, plus visits with Santa and other family-friendly entertainment and fun. Tickets start at $5 per person. rose.org/christmas-in-roseland

—OLIVIA DEFFES

Float your boat Last month, Louisiana showed off its first-ever float in the 95th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The float celebrated all the reasons it’s great to travel around the state, featuring jazz musicians, iconic New Orleans-style homes and Mardi Gras beads, all on the back of a 60-foot-long alligator.


SPONSORED CONTENT

THE LOWDOWN

SPONSORED BY:

GLASSES MAY NOT BE ENOUGH:

HOW YOUR CHILD’S VISION COULD BE HURTING THEIR SCHOOL PERFORMANCE

T

he most common cause of visual impairment in children between 5 and 15 years of age is myopia, and it increases the risk of eye diseases as they age. If left uncorrected, myopia can have a significant impact on school performance. Once children are old enough to start reading, prevalence in myopia tends to increase dramatically. Often called “short-sighted’’ or “nearsightedness”, a person with myopia can see clearly up close—when reading a book or looking at a phone—but words and objects look fuzzy on a blackboard, on television or when driving. There have been a multitude of studies showing the impact on quality of life in patients of all ages. Severely myopic children who have visual symptoms like tired eyes and headaches often tend to have lower self-esteem. Adolescents with myopia also tend to experience a higher level of anxiety. Dr. Reshma Amin is a local expert. A Baton Rouge native and graduate from Baton Rouge Magnet High School, Dr. Amin received her BS in Microbiology from LSU, then received her doctorate in Optometry from the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago, IL. Dr. Amin returned home and has been serving the Baton Rouge community and proudly opened her own private practice called TRIO Eyecare in 2019. “Spending more time doing close work such as reading, playing computer games, drawing or using smart phones and tablets has been linked to

development of myopia,” Dr. Amin says. “These days, even toddlers use electronic handheld devices, resulting in an increase in exposure to close work at a younger age leading to more myopic children.” In younger children, myopia can progress at an alarming rate because their eyes are growing faster, leading to higher levels of myopia, stronger glasses and more eye health risks: • Retinal Detachments when the light sensitive ‘film’ lining the back of the eye pulls away from its base, causing distorted vision or blindness depending on its location • Glaucoma, causing increased pressure in the eye which damages peripheral vision • Cataracts: a cloudy window in the middle of the eye, like looking through a foggy windscreen • Myopic maculopathy (MM), also known as myopic macular degeneration, is the most serious, irreversible, vision-threatening complication and the leading cause of bilateral visual impairment and blindness. Smart phones are great, but too much screen time can increase the risk of eye damage and diseases in adulthood. Harmful blue light emitted from tablets and phones can damage long-term eye health and affect sleep. While there are no set guidelines yet on how much to limit a child’s overall time spent on screens, Dr. Amin recommends screen time outside of school work be limited to one hour daily and should be avoided close to bedtime.

GLASSES ARE ONLY PART OF THE SOLUTION.

DR. AMIN GIVES A FEW WAYS TO SLOW MYOPIC PROGRESSION:

1 2

3 4

GET OUTSIDE. The odds of developing myopia is reduced by 2% per additional hour of time spent outdoors per week. “Outdoor sports and playing at least 90 minutes a day can reduce the risk of myopia, and looking at your tablet or phone when you’re outside doesn’t count!” Yearly or bi-yearly visits to the eye doctor can help catch early signs of myopia before it fully develops and can help slow its onset and progression. Children should not spend more than one hour a day—in addition to school time—on close work such as reading, homework or screen-time. When using a computer, ensure it is properly positioned and avoid eye strain by applying the 20-20-20 rule: look 20 feet away for 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Blue Blocking glasses are preferred at all times while looking at any screen.


We expanded our hospital wings to give

them wings to soar.

At Children’s Hospital New Orleans, our transformed hospital was designed with kids at the center - with 50 percent more space, 40 pediatric specialties, and more than 600 pediatric providers. Today, as the Gulf South’s largest children’s hospital, there are so many big reasons to choose Children’s Hospital New Orleans. But we like to focus on the little ones. We’ve built extraordinary, because they are.

Explore our campus at chnola.org

52

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


The fairest of all Style for December’s cool nights and bright lights THIS MUST BE the place, we thought. The Greater Baton Rouge State Fair this fall seemed the right setting to photograph our December style shoot. It felt like a seamless tie-in to a magazine edition that’s all about looking ahead to weekend fun in 2022. Plus, the breezy weather and neon lights are practically a primer for the season of twinkle lights and gift giving. We grabbed some fun, colorful jackets— festive, but just light enough for the in-between weather this time of year—and off to the bright lights we went. Even as you wait in the long line of cars along Airline Highway, you can hear the music, laughter and shrieks of joy in the distance. At

the top of the Ferris wheel, spectators can get 100 feet above the crowd, taking in all the sights and sounds of the 40-something other rides below. The cool fall air is thick with the scents of barbecue, jambalaya and funnel cakes. “We have the largest midway in south Louisiana,” says Cliff Barton, the Greater Baton Rouge State Fair’s CEO and board chairman. “Rides, games—there’s truly something for people of all ages.” About 100,000 visitors walk through the fair’s gates every October and November. Run by volunteers, its proceeds are donated to an array of organizations and causes around the region, ranging from Line 4 Line to the Regional Burn

Center at Baton Rouge General. As of 2021, Barton says the fair has donated more than $4.2 million since its first donation back in 1987. “We have people who came when they were children, now bringing their kids and grandkids,” he says. Barton, who started as a volunteer himself back in the ’70s, now brings his own grandkids to the fair, beaming as he watches them film TikTok videos on their phones. And as soon as the last customer walks through the gate, he’s already thinking about next year. The fair returns Oct. 27 to Nov. 6, 2022. “Come out and make a memory that will last a lifetime,“ he says, “It’s what we do.” gbrsf.com

—JENNIFER TORMO

Styling: Elle Marie // Photography: Jordan Hefler Hair: Cekeisha W illiams // Makeup: Katrina Liza // Model: Shika Crayton Shot on location at the Greater Baton Rouge State Fair 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

53


STYLE //

Sequined trophy jacket, $245 Colorblocked wooden purse, $56 Chess earrings by local designer Tiggy & Teddy, $26 From Time Warp Berry Splash of Color two-piece set, $58 From London’s Fashion Boutique Boots, model’s own

54

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


The perfect gift for THE SEASON. Available only at Three Roll Estate Distillery D O W N T O W N B AT O N R O U G E 7 6 0 S t. P h i l i p S t R E E T threeroll.com Thurs–Sat (Noon-9PM) Sunday (Noon-6PM)

Spend the holidays with your Baton Rouge Symphony Holiday Brass at St. Joseph's Cathedral December 2 at 7:30 PM

Holiday Brass at Houmas House December 5 at 4:30 PM

Holiday Brass at Whimsical Alley December 4 at 7:30 PM

Holiday Brass at Hemingbough December 10 at 7:30 PM

Home for the Holidays at Istrouma December 12 at 7:30

For tickets: BRSO.org or 225-383-0500 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

55


STYLE //

56

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


STYLE //

American Bazi denim distressed jacket, $56 Good Time USA “Fancy Free” top, $58 Yellow tulle ruffled feather maxi skirt, $129 From London’s Fashion Boutique Acrylic and gold heart earrings, $18 Sherbet bamboo handbag, $28 From Time Warp Necklace, stylist’s own

SHOP SIMILAR STYLES London’s Fashion Boutique 670 O’Neal Lane shoplondonsboutique.com Time Warp Boutique 3001 Government St. timewarpboutique.com

Issue Date: December 2021 Ad proof #1 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Celebrations are essential! HOLIDAY DESSERTS FROM SCRATCH ORDER ONLINE FOR YOUR HOLIDAY CELEBRATION 3753 PERKINS ROAD, SUITE D | BATON ROUGE, LA 70808 | 225-456-5002 | COUNTERSPACEBR.COM |

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

57


58

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com


I N S I D E : Christmas breakfast recipes

Elevated yet casual

COLLIN RICHIE

Digging into the Louisiana-Italian dishes at Portobello’s Grill

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

59


ADVERTISEMENT

Meet

Nicholas LeBlanc, MD A former collegiate and semi-professional soccer player, Nicholas (Nick) LeBlanc, MD, earned his bachelor’s degree in exercise physiology from Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. He then attended Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. “I’ve always had an appreciation for the human body and its impressive capabilities, from athletic endeavors to the disease state and everything in between,” Dr. LeBlanc says. “Early on, I knew I wanted to devote myself to learning about it and using that knowledge to help people.” When he befriended a general surgeon in medical school, Dr. LeBlanc knew where he would help people. In the operating room.

A Doctor on a Mission

To finish his studies, Dr. LeBlanc completed a residency in general surgery at Virginia Tech-Carilion Clinic in Roanoke, Virginia. This was followed by Fellowship training in thoracic (chest) surgery at the University of Manitoba Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, Canada. Since joining Our Lady of the Lake Physician Group, Dr. LeBlanc has felt he’s where he belongs. According to him, the thoracic surgery department is a family. “Our advanced care providers all share the same goal,” Dr. LeBlanc says. “We work together to provide patient-centered care and the best possible results.” To reach this goal, Dr. LeBlanc and his colleagues make use of advanced surgical techniques, including robotic assistance. While many thoracic surgeries once required large incisions and long hospital stays, robot-assisted surgeries changed that. With the help of surgical robots, Dr. LeBlanc can perform many procedures with small incisions. This leads to less pain, reduced time spent in the hospital and faster recovery.

Why Thoracic?

Recently, thoracic surgery has made tremendous advances. For Dr. LeBlanc, these advances have led him to have a particular interest in esophageal surgery. Just a few years ago, precancerous lesions and early-stage cancers were removed from the esophagus by performing a major operation and resulted in lengthy hospitalization. Today, the procedure can be done through a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope. The surgeon guides the tube down the throat to the site of the mass. The surgeon then removes the suspicious or cancerous

area leaving no external incisions or visible scars. Should a patient require esophagectomy (removal of the esophagus), the robot is put to use. Again, a minimal invasion with a quick recovery. For Dr. LeBlanc, this is a reason to celebrate. It’s also part of what draws him to thoracic surgery.

Thankful to Be Home

On top of surgical robots, being with Our Lady of the Lake Physician Group has another appeal. For Dr. LeBlanc, Louisiana is home. Originally from Lafayette, he’s grateful to work near his family and friends, where he can enjoy his Cajun roots and bask in the community’s resolve and joie de vivre! Over the years, Dr. LeBlanc has competed in several triathlons and other endurance races. Now that he’s back in Louisiana, he plans to compete in as many local races as possible. His goal? Finish an Ironman-distance triathlon in less than 10 hours. (That’s 2.4 miles swimming, 112 miles biking and 26.2 miles running.) Between training sessions, Dr. LeBlanc can be found hanging out with family, all of whom live in Louisiana. An avid traveler, his favorite trip was to Botswana in southern Africa. He made the trip to visit a college roommate. Together, they went to Rustenburg, South Africa and attended the 2010 FIFA World Cup as the US Men’s team (and another of Dr. LeBlanc’s college roommates) took on Ghana. What other passions does Dr. LeBlanc have? Animals. He currently has an Australian shepherd named Chloe and a calico cat, Ophelia. And when he found an abandoned squirrel, he rescued her, raised her and named her Petunia. “If I wasn’t practicing human medicine, I would want to be a veterinarian,” Dr. LeBlanc says. “In fact, whenever I retire from surgery, I plan to volunteer in a veterinary clinic.” But don’t worry. That’s not happening any time soon. Surrounded by family and friends in the community he loves, Dr. LeBlanc looks forward to serving his neighbors for years to come. Learn more about our surgeons and the Our Lady of the Lake Robotic Surgery Institute at ololrmc.com/robotics


TA ST E / /

R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

Portobello’s Grill BY D.J. BE AUTICI A PHOTOS B Y COLLI N R IC H IE Our food critic’s name may be false, but the credentials are not. This gastronome has studied the history, cultivation, preparation, science and technology of food for more than 30 years.

MY IN-LAWS AND their friends adore Portobello’s Grill and have been raving about it for many years. Given the Jones Creek location’s close proximity to my ’hood, I thought it high time I give it a shot. While this location, at the corner of Jones Creek and George O’Neal roads, is a little more rustic-chic than its Bocage Village sister restaurant, much of the menu features the same elevated-yetcasual Louisiana-Italian fare. We started with a cheesecake. Not dessert, but crawfish. I’m a big fan of a savory interpretation, and this appetizer was gorgeous in presentation. Resting in a pool of a light reddish Creole tomato dressing, the cheesecake slice was topped with artful drizzles of aioli. We found it overly salty and rich, though the tartness of the tomato sauce helped slightly quell the intensity. I hoped for more lemon in the aioli, which was needed to tie the whole dish together. We all agreed that it was extra salty and too fatty. I wrongly expected the entrees to be straight-up red sauce Italian fare, but was pleasantly surprised to see an abundance of seafood options. Calling my name was Fish Katherine, consisting of sautéed redfish topped with jumbo lump crab meat, Creole meunière, hollandaise and a side of asparagus. The meunière had a delightful tanginess that complemented the pan-crisped fish and luxurious crab. Caramelized roasted asparagus presented a beautiful version to contrast the usual restaurant offerings of steamed asparagus spears. A smear of mild hollandaise added to rather than detracted from the crisp vegetable. Another surprise was the plate of Half Roasted Duck. The golden-skinned roasted duck leg was topped with a sweet-sour sauce that enhanced the flavor of the tender and earthy fowl. It was an exciting alternative to beef or chicken, and one I enthusiastically recommend. I couldn’t resist trying Wild Mushroom Bread Pudding from the menu of side items, so I substituted that for the polenta included with the duck. Our server had

portobellos.net 7622 Old Hammond Highway 15440 George O’Neal Road Sunday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

THE BASICS: Kiva Guidroz founded the original Portobello’s in 1996. It celebrated its 25th anniversary in October, now with a location at the Bocage Village Shopping Center and another near Jones Creek Road. Chef Peter Sclafani became co-owner in 2020, helping update the restaurants’ menus and overall look—aiming at what they say is a “modern neighborhood steakhouse” vibe. WHAT’S A MUST: Start the meal with a slice of savory Crawfish Cheesecake before going in on entrees that marry southern Louisiana classics with Italian cuisine, such as the Creole Shrimp & Crab Alfredo. The Fish Katherine tops Gulf redfish with lump crabmeat and a Creole meunière. At the Jones Creek location, Miss Grace’s Five Cheese Lasagna offers classic Italian comfort food.

Miss Grace’s Five Cheese Lasagna is a special item at the Jones Creek location, stuffing mozzarella, provolone, pecorino romano, ricotta, parmigiana and ground beef between fresh pasta sheets.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

61


TA ST E / /

described this side dish as “dangerous.” Soft and luscious with a caramelized cheesy topping, the pudding was indeed dangerously sinful. Not wanting to miss an Italian staple, we tried Miss Grace’s Five Cheese Lasagna, which is featured only at the Jones Creek location. Beef, red sauce and, of course, five Italian cheeses—including ricotta—were layered between pasta sheets. It was a pretty classic representation, especially when what you crave is old-school lasagna. And this version fulfilled that yearning. For dessert, we went with the most interesting of the bunch: Ricotta Cheesecake, though all choices were house-made and sounded droolworthy. It was ultra creamy and smooth as silk, with a delightful tang not often found in restaurant cheesecakes. It made me wish more restaurant cheesecakes were like this. With two locations, most residents can easily get their Louisiana-Italian fill seven days a week, plus a brunch offered Saturdays and Sundays. For me, I’ll stick conveniently close to home with the southeast spot. But if you’re near Bocage, this stalwart location will definitely feed your needs. Either way, mangia!

Fish Katherine features sautéed redfish topped with jumbo lump crab meat, Creole meunière and creamy hollandaise.

Don’t miss the smooth-as-silk and housemade Ricotta Cheesecake.

i m s s b i r a u ck o T IN GREATER BATON ROUGE! 2022

CULTURE FESTIVALS

62

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

FOOD OUTDOORS

The Official Visitors Guide is your resource for getting in front of travelers and staycationers looking for local experiences.

MUSIC

& More

Scan to reserve your space or contact Judith LaDousa at 225-937-2175


SPONSORED CONTENT

THE LOWDOWN

4 WAYS TO EASE SEASONAL DEPRESSION AND ENJOY THE HOLIDAYS

W

hen the trees outside are barren and the plants and flowers are dying, it can be difficult to feel like yourself and keep a positive attitude. If you were sick with the flu and your home treatments weren’t working, you’d probably go see a doctor, right? Well, the same applies to depression (or any other mental health condition for that matter). Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or seasonal depression is a very real problem. SAD is thought to be from changes in brain chemicals triggered by less light and more darkness, an issue that affects roughly two in 10 people. While it affects people differently, some of the more common symptoms are: losing interest in activities you normally enjoy, low energy, no motivation, sleeping too much or too little, changes in appetite, feeling agitated or moody, difficulty concentrating, a lingering feeling of hopelessness, and in the worst cases, thoughts of death or suicide. CareSouth is a private, nonprofit Health Center that provides a comprehensive range of medical, dental and behavioral health services to the Capital Region. With comprehensive mental health services for children ages 5 to adults, its dedicated team of Behavioral Health professionals help patients through safe and effective evidence-based treatment, interventions and practices. CareSouth also offers screening, intervention and treatment referrals for adults who are at risk of substance use disorders. Patients can access services in person at a CareSouth clinic or via Telehealth sessions. Some of the common conditions treated at CareSouth are: depression, anxiety, unstable mood (i.e. bipolar disorder), psychosis (i.e. schizophrenia), anger management, grief counseling, suicidal or homicidal thoughts, nicotine dependence, alcohol or drug use, trauma-related problems (i.e. PTSD), and challenging behaviors in children (.i.e. ADHD, ODD). CareSouth’s experienced team provides a broad range of behavioral health, medical, and dental services at its main location in Baton Rouge. Services are also accessible at satellite clinics in Donaldsonville, Plaquemine, and Zachary. If you know someone who struggles with SAD, do your best to be supportive, and if they need treatment for mental health or substance use issues, please call 225.650.2000 to schedule an appointment with a social worker.

SPONSORED BY:

TIPS TO EASE SEASONAL DEPRESSION

1

KNOW WHAT TO LOOK FOR. Learning to spot the signs of common conditions like anxiety and depression can help identify problems and appropriate treatment before the situation worsens. If you or someone you know is experiencing any of the symptoms below, call 225.650.2000 to schedule an appointment with a social worker. ANXIETY: Difficulty sitting still, easily irritated, difficulty concentrating or focusing, excessive worry with an inability to control it, difficulty relaxing, feelings of dread. DEPRESSION: Changes in appetite or sleep patterns, decreased interest or pleasure in things formerly enjoyed, difficulty concentrating, decreased motivation, energy or interest in activities, crying spells, feelings of helplessness, worthlessness or hopelessness, suicidal or homicidal thoughts.

2 3

4

GET MORE LIGHT. Getting your body up and moving can work wonders on your mood. When you’re experiencing depression, it can be extremely difficult to make it to the gym, or even get out of bed. If your usual form of exercise includes walking or running outdoors, then the cold months of winter may keep you from exercising at all. Try something different—yoga, a dance party, barre workouts, or bodyweight exercises like push-ups, squats, lunges, etc.

ADJUST YOUR DIET. We’re talking omega-3 fatty acids and other mood-boosting foods. Some diet choices may have subtle effects on depression and mood. Focus on choosing natural—not processed—foods like vegetables, beans, whole grains, unsaturated oils, nuts, and fish, as well as minimally processed versions like nut butters, canned beans, and frozen unsweetened berries. DHA and EPA are two omega-3 fatty acids found almost exclusively in fish, and recent research suggests that increasing your intake of those two fatty acids can improve symptoms associated with depression. Not enough is known yet to use them to treat depression exclusively, but the positive effects that EPA and DHA may have on brain health and mood is enough reason to include fish in your diet once or twice a week.

FIND SUPPORT WHEN YOU NEED IT. A counselor can help reframe negative thought patterns and teach useful coping methods when the depression gets really bad. They also serve as an outlet to vent to about anything and everything that’s on your mind with no judgment. Best of all, they adjust the therapy method based on what does and doesn’t work for you.


TA ST E / /

DINING IN

Cozy holiday breakfast A casual menu to start off a busy day of festivities—that comes together with ease, too B Y T R ACE Y KO C H A N D STE P HA N I E R I E G E L P H OTOS B Y AMY S H U T T

64

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

A FAVORITE MEMORY for any parent is waking up early on Christmas morning, sitting in pajamas and watching the kids open their presents. Now that our kids are no longer little, the routine of being awakened at dawn to see what Santa brought has changed a bit. We still enjoy sitting around the tree in our pajamas, sipping coffee and opening presents, but the focus has shifted away from the presents and more to Christmas morning breakfast. This has really become our favorite part of the holiday. The hustle and bustle of the shopping season is over, and we can sit back and relax with our loved ones and enjoy time together. The menu we prepared this month is a hearty breakfast that can be made ahead of time and will satisfy every member of the family. Enjoy!


TA ST E / /

Sausage and Cheddar Frittata with Crispy Potato Topper Breakfast casseroles are always a crowd pleaser and a great do-ahead breakfast item. This version is really more of a frittata with a layer of crispy tater tots on top. We like filling our frittata with breakfast sausage, sharp cheddar cheese and tomatoes, plus green chilies to give it a little kick. But it can really be filled with any kind of meat, cheese and vegetables your family likes. The base can be prepared ahead of time and then topped with store-bought frozen tater tots right before you bake it.

WE CAN HELP YOUR BUSINESS REACH THE AFFLUENT & ACTIVE 225 READER!

Servings: 6 1 tablespoon melted butter 1 pound bulk breakfast sausage ¼ cups chopped onions 1 small can Ro-Tel tomatoes 8 large eggs ½ cup half and half or whole milk ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ¼ cup chopped green onion tops 2 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese 16 ounces frozen tater tots

1. Brush a 10- to 12-inch round quiche

pan or a 9-by-13-inch casserole dish with the melted butter. Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

2. In a large, nonstick skillet, brown the

sausage and chopped onion together until the sausage is cooked completely and the onions are soft. Drain the tomatoes and add them to the sausage. Stir, turn off the heat and set the skillet aside.

On the menu • Sausage and Cheddar Frittata with Crispy Potato Topper • New Orleans-style Milk Punch • Homemade Belgian Waffles with Ginger Maple Butter

3. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the eggs and milk together and season with salt and pepper.

4. Add the sausage mixture, chopped green onions and cheese into the beaten eggs and pour everything into the buttered casserole dish. Layer the top with the tater tots and cover with foil.

To request more information, email erinp@225batonrouge.com or scan here

5. Place into the 350-degree oven and

• Fresh Pineapple and Cranberry Compote (find this recipe at 225batonrouge.com/recipes)

bake for 20 minutes. Remove the foil and continue baking for another 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the oven when the eggs are just set in the middle, the cheese is melted, and the tater tots are golden.

Recipes by Tracey Koch

6. Allow the casserole to sit for 5 minutes before serving.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

65


BUSINESS

REPORT

LEADERSHIP A C A D E M Y

LEARN | CONNECT | GROW All rising professionals, entrepreneurs, executives, and small business owners are invited to join us in taking their leadership up a notch. Business Report’s Executive Leadership Academy is a transformative program that will take your career and your organization to new levels of success.

APPLY TODAY

FOR

SPRING 2022

BRLeadershipAcademy.com

Business Report’s Leadership Academy is an asset to leadership, networking, and development no matter what industry you are in.”

The program was thought provoking, informative, challenging, and just what I needed as I continue to grow my career.”

The Business Report’s Leadership Academy was the best leadership class that I have attended...”

CHRISSY DUPUY,

ORLANDO PALMER,

Director of Events/Community Partnerships at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center

GREG ROCKENBAUGH,

CEO of Parker’s Pharmacy

66

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

Chief Financial Officer, Himmel’s Architectural Door & Hardware


TA ST E / /

New Orleans-style Milk Punch Dec. 25 is a doubly special day in our family because it also happens to be our mother’s birthday. One of her favorite ways to celebrate is to make a milk punch on Christmas Day. It’s a quintessential beverage to serve at brunch in New Orleans, which is perhaps why our mother is a fan. It is similar to eggnog but not as heavy and much easier to make. We thought milk punch would be the perfect complement to this Christmas breakfast menu.

Servings: 1 2 ounces bourbon 1 sugar cube or ½ teaspoon superfine sugar 4 ounces whole milk ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract Dash fresh grated nutmeg

1. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice. 2. Pour in the bourbon, sugar, milk and vanilla. Shake vigorously until well chilled.

3. Strain into a highball glass and sprinkle with a dash of fresh nutmeg.

Homemade Belgian Waffles with Ginger Maple Butter Waffles are a classic breakfast item, and we enjoy making them at home using a waffle iron. There are several good waffles mixes on the market you can buy. But in just a couple of steps, homemade waffles are a cinch to make and are unbelievably delicious. This is an easy recipe made from everyday ingredients that can be prepped ahead of time and then blended together right before dropping the mixture into the waffle iron. This recipe works well with any kind of waffle iron, and the ginger maple butter makes these easy waffles the perfect, sweet Christmas morning breakfast treat.

Servings: Yields 6 waffles 1¾ cups flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons sugar 2 eggs 2 cups 2% milk 1 ⁄3 cup vegetable oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1. Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar in a large mixing bowl and set aside.

2. Separate the eggs into two bowls.

Beat the egg yolks, milk, vegetable oil and vanilla together. Add the wet ingredients into the dry and mix until well blended.

3. Heat the waffle iron. While the waffle iron heats, use an electric mixer to beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form. 4. Gently fold the beaten egg whites into the waffle batter. Carefully pour the batter into the heated waffle iron according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Once golden brown, remove and serve the waffles hot with the ginger maple butter and maple syrup. FOR THE GINGER MAPLE BUTTER

Servings: Yields 6 ounces 1 stick softened butter 2 tablespoons candied ginger, finely chopped ½ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ cup pure maple syrup

1. In a small mixing bowl, cream together the softened butter, candied ginger, ground ginger and ground cinnamon.

2. Add in the maple syrup and stir until well blended.

3. Keep the ginger maple butter at room temperature to make it easier to spread on the hot waffles.

4. Store the leftover butter in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Reheat the leftover butter in the microwave for a couple of seconds to help it soften up. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

67


This Month [ D E C E M B E R ]

@ BREC ZOOLIGHTS

BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo

Nov. 26-Dec. 30 Closed Christmas Eve + Christmas Day 5:30-8 p.m. | Grounds close at 9 p.m.

OPEN HOUSE JUNIOR SINGLES ROUND ROBIN TOURNAMENT

City-Brooks Community Park Tennis Center Dec. 3 | 4-8 p.m.

REINDEER RIDE

SENSORY SANTA

North Sherwood Forest Community Park

WINTER BREAK HOLIDAY CAMPS D ec. 20-31

brec.org/holidaycamp

Dec. 10 | 6-8 p.m.

TRAIL DAYZ

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER

Dec. 11 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Dec. 14 | 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Comite River Park

LET IT SNEAUX

Perkins Road Community Park Dec. 11 | 1-5 p.m.

Highland Road Park Observatory

SUNSHINE SOCIAL: HOLIDAY BALL

Womack Park Dec. 17 | 6-9 p.m.

LET IT SNEAUX MOVIE IN THE PARK

Lovett Road Park Dec. 17 | 6-9 p.m.

Farr Park Equestrian Center and RV Campground

SOLAR VIEWING

Dec. 3 | 6-8 p.m.

Dec. 11 | noon-2 p.m.

DOG DAY AT THE SWAMP

LET IT SNEAUX MOVIE IN THE PARK

E-SPORTS TOURNAMENT – NBA 2K22

Dec. 18

Ben Burge Park: Dec. 3 | 6-9 p.m.

EXPEDITION PADDLE

Bogue Chitto River Dec. 5 | 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Highland Road Park Observatory

Red Oaks Park

Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center

Dec. 11 | noon

BREC’S 75TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION

TEEN POP UP & UNPLUG

Dec. 18 | 6-8:30 p.m.

Perkins Road Community Park

Independence Community Park

Dec. 11 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

BREC.ORg/thismonth BREC does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, religion, veteran status or sexual orientation in its programs and activities.


CULTURE I N S I D E : Arts and entertainment events around town

Taco ’bout a vibe

Patrick Harrington hosts weekly one-of-a-kind events with music and plenty of tacos in downtown Baton Rouge B Y CY N THE A CO R FA H / / P H OTOS B Y CO LLIN RICHIE

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

69


Issue Date: Feb 2021 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

C U LT U R E / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

HIGHEST QUALITY WITH COMPETITIVE PRICING! At Ducote’s Restaurant & Bar Equipment, we specialize in supplying the foodservice industry with a broad selection of the top-quality equipment and supplies you need to successfully run your operations and efficiently serve your customers.

4433 Florida Blvd • 225-344-4240 ducotesrestaurantsupply.com OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

#38003 #AM-50-BAJ

USE PROMO CODE “225” AND RECEIVE 15% OFF YOUR ENTIRE STAY (VALID AT BURBANK LOCATION ONLY)

6 locations region wide • Online booking available

WWW.DEPENDABLESTORAGE.COM 70

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

TACEAUX TUESDAYS MAKE Tuesday feel like the new Friday in Baton Rouge. Every week, locals gather at Culture Reggae Club on Oklahoma Street for tacos, music and shopping in a casual atmosphere. The party happens outside at the downtown venue’s patio and backyard. The evening event is a house party-style hub for musicians, visual artists, creatives and hipsters. At Taceaux Tuesday, hosted by event coordinator Patrick Harrington, attendees can watch local DJs spin the latest hip-hop, rap, trap, dance and afrobeats; shop vintage and designer clothing from local vendors; socialize, drink, and eat tacos, street corn and other Mexican fare.

“There’s nothing out here like it,” Harrington says. The 32-year-old Baton Rouge native started the event in 2019, combining his love for tacos and music with his desire to offer a unique event to the city. He launched the event at Brickyard South Bar + Patio on South Boulevard before moving it a few blocks to Culture Reggae Club. Every Tuesday is a different experience. If Harrington isn’t behind the turntables himself, he brings in Louisiana DJs to perform, such as DJ K-Strikes, DJ Kelly Green, Legatronprime, DJ FTK, Mikey Offline, DJ Jess, Nick Fury and DJ LoveYourself. Some nights the music is slow, chill and hypnotic. Other nights, it’s


C U LT U R E / /

“We have a lot of talent in Baton Rouge that hasn’t even been recognized yet. I’m trying to give those creatives a platform and space to shine.” —Patrick Harrington, organizer of Taceaux Tuesdays at Culture Reggae Club

C E L E B R AT E T H E

HOLIDAYS

AT M A N S H I P T H E AT R E

BRIAN SHAW’S COOL WINTER NIGHTS, HOT JAZZ DEC 8&9 | 7:30 PM

CRYSTAL GAYLE’S H O L I DAY S H O W DEC 11 | 7:30 PM Find out more

Follow Taceaux Tuesday on Instagram for news on upcoming events, @taceauxtuesday.

upbeat with heavy trap bass to get the attendees moving and grooving. The music is not the only thing that makes people do a happy dance. Doors open at 9 p.m., and by 10 p.m., the line for the taco stand is usually wrapped around the patio. Harrington alternates between local food vendors like Fresh Cravings, BR Guilty Pleasures and Birriannas. The vendors typically serve birria tacos and assorted Mexican-inspired dishes like street corn, Spanish rice, beans, burritos and even birria ramen. The food has gained a large fan base. Some attendees come solely to eat. If you don’t arrive early, though, the fan favorites may sell out. In addition to food, attendees

can also shop small businesses like vintage clothing pop-up shops and T-shirts by Baton Rouge designers. Before Taceaux Tuesday, Harrington hosted The Bandeaux, a monthly live music and arts event at Spanish Moon, and the bimonthly Chicks N’ Waffles at Culture Reggae Club, where people could listen to music and munch on some fried favorites. He plans to bring both events back this fall. “We have a lot of talent in Baton Rouge that hasn’t even been recognized yet,” Harrington says. “I’m trying to give those creatives a platform and space to shine. It’s only going to get bigger and better from here.”

12TH ANNUAL

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS SINGER SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND DEC 28 | 7:30 PM

M A N S H I P T H E AT R E . O R G • 2 2 5 - 3 4 4 - 0 3 3 4 Supported in part by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a Federal agency. This program is made possible in part by a grant from the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, funded by the East Baton Rouge

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

71


C U LT U R E / / Some of Lin’s sculptural work on display

ART

Altered by time CANDICE LIN’S WORK is constructed from materials that tell a story. It’s a story of the history of indentured Chinese labor, and it uses items like tobacco, sugarcane and even clay sourced from places in the Caribbean where Asian laborers were brought in the 19th century to work on farms and plantations. The Los Angeles artist has some recent works on view at the LSU Museum of Art as part of an exhibition and installation exploring this mostly forgotten history—even commenting on LSU football’s problematic use of the term “Chinese bandits” in one piece. She’s also been working with LSU School of Art students to create a ceramic sculpture that will take a central role in one of her pieces on display, “La Charada China.” In the installation, a liquid derived from tobacco, tea, sugar and poppy slowly drips onto the white porcelain sculpture the students help create. Because the sculpture hasn’t been fired to strengthen its shape, it will erode over time under the dripping liquid. While Lin is a visiting artist at LSU and the museum, she’s also a participant in Prospect.5 in New Orleans, presenting new works there that explore the history of indentured Chinese labor in Louisiana. Her exhibition at the LSU Museum of Art, “The Agnotology of Tigers,” will continue through March 2022. And as part of the Free First Sunday event Dec. 5, the museum will host a ceramics demo with artist Denise Greenwood Loveless. lsumoa.org

—BENJAMIN LEGER

PHOTOS BY CHARLES CHAMPAGNE / COURTESY LSUMOA

Visiting artist’s work at LSU Museum of Art grapples with history

Candice Lin speaks about her work during a reception at the LSU Museum of Art.

REFRESH. RESTORE. REPEAT. JUST CALL THE MAIDS. ®

LIMITED-TIME OFFER

$50 OFF GOOD TOWARDS THE PURCHASE OF YOUR FIRST CLEAN

No cash value. New customers only. Cannot be combined with other offers. Offer Code: AD50 Limited Time Offer.

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Call today to schedule your first clean.

72

225-755-8383 | MAIDS.com

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

|

22-STEP CLEANING PROCESS

|

PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED TEAM OF EXPERTS


C U LT U R E / /

ARTS BEST BETS ALL MONTH If you want to fully immerse yourself in the Bayou State, head to the Louisiana Art & Science Museum for its “Our Louisiana” exhibition, on display until Jan. 14. The exhibition features work from Louisiana-born or based artists, including Lin Emery, Hunt Slonem, Margaret Jones and others. lasm.org ALL MONTH There are six opportunities to see the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra perform holiday-themed shows this month. It starts with Holiday Brass, performing at St. Joseph’s Cathedral Dec. 2; Whimsical Alley in Zachary Dec. 4; Houmas House Dec. 5; Hemingbough Guest House Dec. 10; and the Denham Springs downtown train depot Dec. 11. Round out the holiday revelry with the full orchestra and chorus in Home for the Holidays at Istrouma Baptist Church Dec. 12. brso.org ALL MONTH Remember the days when you’d play with your dollhouse after school? Until Jan. 15, you can check out the Louisiana Art & Science Museum’s permanent collection of those adorable little homes and other collectible miniatures in “Playing House.” You can even check out how minis went into the making of films like Godzilla and Star Wars. lasm.org UNTIL DEC. 16 Together Baton Rouge presents “Toward A Larger Freedom,” a new exhibit at the Arts Thank You Print Ads LBI_CR.pdf 1 10/29/21

Council of Greater Baton Rouge’s Cary Saurage Community Arts Center. The exhibit showcases local and state leaders who have inspired change. Visitors can listen to oral narratives by the leaders and see portraits taken by Lily Brooks, assistant professor of photography at Southeastern Louisiana University. artsbr.org

UNTIL DEC. 29 Baton Rouge Gallery showcases the works of four of its artist members: mixed-media artist John Alleyne, glass sculptor Paulo Dufour, wildlife painter Mary Lee Eggart and mixed-media artist Nonney Oddlokken. The exhibition will be celebrated in the First Wednesday reception on Dec. 1 and with an ARTiculate Artist Talk Dec. 12. batonrougegallery.org DEC. 5 The Baton Rouge Concert Band marks the season with a free Christmas concert at St. Joseph’s Cathedral downtown, featuring holiday favorites from The Nutcracker Suite to Polar Express. brcb.org DEC. 10-19 Theatre Baton Rouge continues its holiday tradition with a production of the Charles Dickens classic A Christmas Carol. The production takes its cues from a new adaptation by John Mortimer. theatrebr.org DEC. 18 Come one, come all to the “Legends of Christmas” presented by Circus Louisiana at the Manship Theatre. This 12-act circus show will tell the tale of how Krampus takes two children to the night-goblin town, and how they escape to Christmastown. manshiptheatre.org 3:52 PM

MUSIC BEST BETS DEC. 3 Relive the ’70s with Grand Funk Railroad, live at L’Auberge Casino & Hotel. The hard-rock band will have you feeling “Some Kind of Wonderful” by the end of the night. lbatonrouge.com DEC. 8-9 In the 10th annual Cool Winter Nights and Hot Jazz, the Manship Theatre will welcome the sounds of Brian Shaw, Greg Daigle, Bill Grimes and others in this 15-piece jazz ensemble performance of new arrangements and holiday favorites. manshiptheatre.org DEC. 10 Monica, a Grammy Award-winning multi-platinum artist with more than 25 million albums sold, and Keke Wyatt, a chart-topping R&B singer, will bring the house down with their powerful vocals at “Laughter & Ladies Night Out” at the Raising Cane’s River Center. raisingcanesrivercenter. com DEC. 17 The Texas Club hosts singers Easton Corbin with Chris Bandi, bringing their traditional country flair to the Capital City. thetexasclub.com DEC. 23 Clay Parker and Jodi James take the stage at La Divina Italian Cafe to perform and celebrate their newest album, The Lonesomest Sound That Can Sound. ladivinaitaliancafe.com DEC. 28 Louisiana native songwriters—many of whom work on the Nashville recording scene—return to Baton Rouge for the 12th annual Home for the Holidays showcase at the Manship Theatre. manshiptheatre.org

C

Thank You

M

Y

CM

for making this year’s Mediathon a success!

MY

CY

CMY

K

Sponsored By:

Benefiting:

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

73


CALENDAR //

December

Where play aro to Baton R und o this monuge th C ompiled b Brittney Fo y rbes

STOCK PHOTO

all month

FILE PHOTO

LIGHT UP More than 50 illuminated animals and holiday displays will line a mile-long trail during this year’s ZooLights display at BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo. Glowing, animated sculptures of animals, snowmen and more will be presented by Children’s Hospital New Orleans until Dec. 30. brzoo.org

17-31

ICE ICE BABY Ice skating on the bayou isn’t something you see every day. Louisiana may not get a lot of ice, but that’s where the Raising Cane’s River Center comes in. Bring your family out to downtown Baton Rouge from Dec. 17 to Jan. 3 for a day of skating around the rink and the chance to feel like you’re in a winter wonderland. raisingcanesrivercenter.com

ON THE ROAD NEW ORLEANS

NOW TO JAN. 2 (closed Dec. 24 and 31): Celebration in the Oaks, neworleanscitypark.com

74

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

504

DEC. 11: Pink Sweat$: Pink Moon Tour, republicnola.com DEC. 17-22 + DEC. 25-30: NOLA ChristmasFest, nolachristmasfest.com


CALENDAR //

COURTESY BATON ROUGE BALLET THEATRE

ALSO THIS MONTH

18 + 19

ALL MONTH As you source supplies for holiday dinners, consider supporting local farmers at the Red Stick Farmers Market, packed with meats, veggies and freshly baked goodies. Shop for gifts at the Baton Rouge Arts Market, which will set up at the downtown market for the first three Saturdays of the month. Find the schedule at breada.org. NOW TO DEC. 21 Head to the Mall of Louisiana for photos with Santa. And on Dec. 5 and 12, Autism Speaks hosts its Sensory-Friendly Santa Experience, when photo purchases support the organization. malloflouisiana.com DEC. 7, 14 + 21 Settle down with a good book at the West Baton Rouge Library for its all-ages storytime series. Register your child at wbrpl.com.

JETÉ INTO THIS BALLET CLASSIC Bring your pointe shoes and your holiday spirit to the Raising Cane’s River Center Ballroom, because the Baton Rouge Ballet Theatre is taking you on a journey with The Nutcracker—A Tale from the Bayou. The company will be joined by the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra for a magical evening—and a triumphant return after the pandemic canceled the show last year. batonrougeballet.org

GET YOUR DAILY DOSE OF 225 Good news. Good vibes. Everyday!

185k

article pageviews per month

5k+

225 app downloads

24k+

225 Daily subscribers

106k+

225 social media followers

DEC. 7 Does your teen want to take their gaming to a new level? Head to the North Sherwood Forest Community Park for a gaming tournament, where they can show their skills on Madden NFL, Super Smash Bros, Rocket League and others. brec.org

FILE PHOTO

DEC. 11 Mid-City Artisans is showcasing young artists, musicians and chefs at the Kids Makers Market Winter. Come out to the Square 46 shop to support young makers. mid-cityartisans.com

31

HAPPY NEW YEAR Ring in the new year at a signature Capital City celebration. At L’Auberge Hotel & Casino Baton Rouge, dance the night away with an open bar at the Event Center. If downtown and fireworks are more your style, head to Red Stick Revelry for live music and laser light shows at Rhorer Plaza followed by fireworks over the river. redstickrevelry.com and lbatonrouge.com

LAFAYETTE

DEC. 3: Ginuwine at Heymann Center, heymanncenter.com

DEC. 11 Celebrate the season with family fun at Perkins Road Community Park’s Let it Sneaux event. Snap photos with Santa, play in the “sneaux,” make gingerbread houses and more. brec.org DEC. 18-19 Revel in magical holiday song and dance as Cangelosi Dance Project presents its Holiday Nutcracker at Dunham Theatre. cangelosidanceproject.com DEC. 20-23 At the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge’s “Arts Round the World” winter-break camp, campers can explore visual arts, dance and music. artsbr.org

Scan here to subscribe or download the app.

SPONSORED BY

337 DEC. 11-12: The Nutcracker at Heymann Center, heymanncenter.com

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

75


YOU KNOW OUR WORK AND OUR COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE. NOW LET US DO THE SAME FOR YOU.

A NEW CUSTOM CONTENT STUDIO IN BATON ROUGE

Video & broadcast production

Brand & identity development

public relations + press releases

Digital marketing

Content strategy

social media management

webcast planning + management

Application & web development

Learn more at StudioE.us or contact Judith LaDousa at judith@sudioe.us


Issue Date: December 2021 Ad proof #3 WRITE ON //

Built for you this magazine had given me. I thought I’LL ADMIT I had a motive for about what the 9-year-old me would featuring Prehistoric Park in this think if she knew writing about stuff month’s cover story: I really just like dinosaur parks was the kind of wanted to see it for myself. thing I’d get to do as an adult. The dinosaur park in Henderson Because I think I can speak for our is part of our collection of weekend team when I say we all discovered activities to try in 2022. Its 26 dinosaur some new gems as we trekked across models seem to stare down at the trail town—and beyond—for our cover story. of native plants and trees below. The And after nearly two years of the life-like creatures dwarf not just the pandemic, I think we children who visit, but appreciate more than the grownups, too. The ever all of the events and property also offers fossil attractions our region digging and gem mining has to offer. Zip line attractions. parks, swamp tours and I first discovered it garden trails connect when a friend posted us more deeply to this pictures of her young son special place we live in. visiting with its 30-foot “I think that’s brachiosaurus. Even what COVID gave us: though it is a 45-minute self-awareness that we drive from Baton Rouge, needed nature,” Katie I knew we had to find a By Jennifer Tormo Guitreau, head of events way to feature it in 225 at at LSU AgCenter Botanic some point. It seemed like Gardens, told me when I interviewed such a fun family-friendly attraction. her for our feature on its sunflower Plus, I was sure the giant dinosaurs gardens. “I’ve seen more families out would look amazing in photos. here in this past year than, I think, the I was not disappointed. The park’s rest of the 11 years since I’ve worked staff let us “borrow” their children for here. Parents are seeing that their chilour photo shoot. It’s hard to say what dren thrive when they step away from the elementary schoolers were more their screens. People get emotionally excited by: having their pictures taken healthier when they’re out here.” by a magazine, or seeing the mamOver her decade at the garden, moth-sized dinosaurs. Even though Guitreau says she’s made it her their parents work for Prehistoric Park mission to increase awareness of this and they’ve seen these creatures many magical wonderland of woodlands, times before, they still shrieked with wetlands and flowers. She wants every glee and terror at the site of the T. rex. resident to know this place is free and It was as if it was the first time they open to the public. were seeing it all over again. Today, guests are lured in by social After I’d interviewed the park’s media posts of the golden sunflower manager, I took some time to walk fields or the swaying corn stalks. the park by myself, taking notes and “But when people come out to have snapping iPhone photos. photos taken or for events, I tell them: It brought me straight back to third Please do not let this be the only time grade, when my own favorite weekend you’re here. Please come back. Bring a adventure was visiting an outdoor picnic lunch, or just sit in the garden exhibit of dinosaur models at my local for a while and smell the roses,” science museum. Thanks to Jurassic Guitreau says. Park, The Land Before Time and a She can speak firsthand to how the great first-grade teacher who taught botanic gardens have given her own me all about the Mesozoic Era, I was children so much. obsessed with dinosaurs. Just like the “We don’t have a family farm, and kids at Prehistoric Park, every time I we don’t have family land … but we do visited my hometown museum, I felt have this place. It’s one of the places like I was discovering those mysterious in the Capital Region where you have creatures for the first time. access to plants and dirt and insects As I studied Prehistoric Park’s longand birds,” she says. necked camarasaurus, it was clear that After all, she tells me, this whole fascination never wore off. Driving space was made for our community. It home, I felt grateful for another was built for you. adventure that writing for and editing

REACH JENNIFER TORMO AT JENNIFER@225BATONROUGE.COM.

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Dyslexia is NOT my Disability, it’s my

Superpower!

At The Brighton School, we prepare and empower students with dyslexia and other language-based learning differences to succeed.

Grades 1-12 12108 Parkmeadow Ave • Baton Rouge, LA

Baton Rouge’s leader in the

• Issue thebrightonschool.org Date: October 2021 Ad prooffield #1 of educating students

225.291.2124

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. with dyslexia. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless approval or final revisions are received within 24 hours from receipt of this proof. A shorter timeframe will apply for tight deadlines. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

LMP 5430

225-925-8710

|

WWW.ROTOBR.COM

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] December 2021

77


FRAMED //

In every issue of 225, you’ll find a free print on this page. FRAMED celebrates life and art in Baton Rouge, each one highlighting a local photographer, place or graphic designer. Cut it out to hang in your cubicle, or frame it for your home gallery wall. Show us where you hang them by tagging them on social media with #225prints.

78

[225] December 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

PHOTO BY JACKIE HAXTHAUSEN / leekayphotography.com GET FEATURED We love spotlighting local photographers, artists and designers for this page! Shoot us an email at editor@225batonrouge.com to chat about being featured.


MAYBE IT’S TIME FOR SOME

COLOR OF YOUR OWN?

WAREHOUSE

WAREHOUSE

INDUSTRIAL-STYLE SALON STUDIOS Pre-Leasing Now

OPPORTUNITY. INDEPENDENCE. CONTROL. DESTINY. It’s all yours. Make the space your own. You’ve earned it! STUDIOS, Co.

STUDIOS, Co.

WAREHOUSE STUDIOS, Co.

WAREHOUSE

EMAIL FOR LEASE INFORMATION: info@warehousestudiosco.com | 4485 FLOYNELL DR | BATON ROUGE |

STUDIOS, Co.


“My goal is to provide procedures or treatments in the least disruptive way.” Kevin P. McCarthy, MD

At the Spine Center, big improvements in your life can start smaller than you think. That’s why Dr. Kevin McCarthy is such an enthusiastic advocate for minimally invasive spine surgery. By staying on the leading edge of technological advancements, he helps patients benefit from faster procedures with smaller incisions, quicker recovery times and reduced post-operative pain. He performs a range of advanced surgeries, including endoscopic procedures and robotic spine surgery. Dr. McCarthy graduated with high honors from Michigan State University and earned his medical degree from Wayne State University where he graduated in the top 20% of his class. He received the Sherman Award and Irene Thibodeaux Award for best orthopedic resident at Tulane Medical Center. Get in touch with us to learn more about how our doctors deliver world-class spine care.

BATON ROUGE • PRAIRIEVILLE • WALKER Web: SpineCenterBR.com Phone: 833-SPINEBR

LOUISIANA’S LEADER IN MINIMALLY INVASIVE SPINE SURGERY