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sPACE

The Themagazine magazinefor forBath BathSpa SpaUniversity Universitystudents studentsand andstaff staff | | Summer Autumn 2016 2015

Celebrating fifty years of Hare Krishna Breaking down the barriers of a career in tech Talented student debuts at Cannes Film Festival A sustainable community HERE at Bath Spa


vice-chancellor update

W

elcome to the Summer issue of SPACE magazine – Bath Spa University’s magazine for students and staff. As the academic year comes to an end I wish to congratulate all those students who will be graduating in July. The ceremonies at Bath Abbey are the culmination of many years hard work and I look forward to conferring awards to the class of 2016.

Professor Christina Slade

SPACE magazine is published seasonally for Bath Spa University students and staff. spacemag@bathspa.ac.uk Editor

The summer term is always busy as this issue of SPACE demonstrates. As well as the ever impressive end of year exhibitions, performances and events, we welcomed the fiftieth anniversary of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness Conference to our Newton Park campus, celebrated the anniversary of the birth (and death) of Shakespeare and, perhaps most importantly, encouraged everyone to vote in the EU referendum.

Jennifer Davies

Working with the Students’ Union we held a symposium for over 400 people, featuring comedian and actor Eddie Izzard who championed the reasons for remaining in the EU and Tim Hegarty for the leave campaign. (More on page 12).

Features Jane Wakefield Alexandra Snell

To encourage more young women to enter the tech industry, we launched #ThisGirlCodes – a campaign that highlighted the experiences of inspirational women who are successfully working or studying in areas such as coding and software development. Lee Scott, Subject Leader for Creative Computing gives more thought to this in his article on page 20.

Design Rosie Maynard Contributors Catherine Robinson Lee Scott

I also attended the annual Global Academy of Liberal Arts (GALA) conference which was held at Tec de Monterrey in Mexico. I gave the keynote speech and spoke in-depth about creative entrepreneurship and the liberal arts.

Ekta Mahajan Michael Darby Front cover

Finally, I would like to welcome Kate Rigby who has been appointed Professor of Environmental Humanities and joins the University from Monash University in Australia. Environmental Humanities is an emerging area of interdisciplinary research and Professor Rigby will be responsible for shaping the Environmental Humanities research strategy at the University.

Photograph by Bethany Preston Back cover Chris Wakefield Photography Joshua Beagrie and the Bath Spa photography society Alexis Dubus Photography

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I hope you all have an enjoyable summer. The next issue of SPACE magazine will be available in the autumn, so if you have suggestions or contributions, please contact the editorial team by emailing spacemag@bathspa.ac.uk


CONTENTS

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4 ON the cover 5 10 18 20

Talented student debuts at Cannes Film Festival A sustainable community here at Bath Spa Celebrating fifty years of Hare Krishna Breaking down the barriers of a career in tech

Regulars

11 12

4 16

University News Summer in pictures

23

SPACE to Shout Tweets, photographs, and advice

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5 Minutes With‌ Bobby Anderson, Senior Lecturer in History

Features 18

SPACE to Chat Marking fifty years of the Hare Krishna movement Students Michael Darby and Ekta Mahajan write about their involvement

20

SPACE to Talk Breaking down the barriers of a career in tech Lee Scott, Subject Leader of Creative Computing

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University news

Inspiration and innovation at Bath School of Art and Design

Exciting and diverse works of art and design were on show to the public in June at the Sion Hill campus. The Bath School of Art and Design undergraduate degree show was a huge success. The extensive exhibition is a culmination of students’ three years of intense study and is a wonderful showcase of the talent, skills and creativity that each graduating student has achieved as the key foundation for their future careers.

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University news

Mathew Pike

Global Challenge winner announced Success at Cannes Film Festival Honorary graduate and film director Ken She said: “I wrote something Loach won the Palme d’Or for his film extraordinary because I never gave up. I, Daniel Blake. This is the second time That is the one thing I learned at Bath Spa he has triumphed at the Festival having that you should never give up. previously won the Palme d’Or in 2006 “When I give lectures and workshops for The Wind That to future creative Shakes the Barley. writers I always use “I wrote something Further success this bit of advice by extraordinary because I was achieved at Ira Glass - ‘For the never gave up. That is the first couple of years Cannes by former student Brittany one thing I learned at Bath you make stuff, it’s McComas who not that good. Spa that you should never just debuted her short It’s trying to be good, give up.” film Dr Sugarloaf. it has potential, but Dr Sugarloaf it’s not. But your tells the story of a shop assistant who has taste, the thing that got you into the game, her daydream transported into a vintage is still killer...you have just got to fight your movie onto a TV in her shop. Brittany, who way through.’” graduated from Bath Spa in 2009 with an MA Brittany is currently in discussions about Dr in Scriptwriting, says she wouldn’t have made Sugarloaf being distributed globally and is it to Cannes, if it had not been for the positivity hopeful for the future. she received throughout her course.

First year Global Development and Sustainability student Matthew Pike has won the Bath Spa Global Change Challenge 2016. Matthew’s idea for developing more urban agriculture projects and allied healthy eating education campaigns have won him a six-week trip to Kenya this summer. He’ll be going with Balloon Ventures who run programmes in social entrepreneurship for UK students and graduates. Matthew proved to have a real passion for both social enterprise and his particular causes around education and urban agriculture. His enthusiasm and research impressed the judges and Balloon Ventures cofounder Douglas Cochrane was really pleased to pick Matthew for their summer programme which will be fully funded by Bath Spa.

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University news

Heritage students present their end of year project at No1 Royal Cresent

Celebrating Capability Brown with Bath Preservation Trust Third year Heritage students organised a family event at No.1 Royal Crescent, in partnership with Bath Preservation Trust, celebrating the work of landscape architect Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown this term. Brown is a renowned eighteenthcentury landscape architect who designed Newton Park, now home to the University. The students devised Capable Creations: Noticing Newton Park as part of their final degree project. They developed an interactive web-based map and printed leaflet which help connect students, staff, visitors and

the local community with the origins and history of Newton Park, as landscaped by Brown. Dr Kristin Doern, Heritage Course Leader, said: “I am so impressed with the hard work our Heritage students have put into their engagement with our local heritage partners, and their efforts and commitment to this project. Creating both a print and web-based interactive map, has been a huge task that required terrific teamwork and research skills, and all successfully achieved within a very tight timeframe while they were doing the rest of the final year degree work.” Visit www.capablecreations.co.uk for more information. Newton Park

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University news

Selected to host the Commonwealth Summer School Bath Spa has been selected to host the 2017 Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU) Commonwealth Summer School with the theme ‘Creating greener narratives through the environmental arts and humanities’. The event will bring together outstanding students from throughout the Commonwealth for a week of interactive workshops, keynote lectures, group project work, and field trips. The environmental humanities are an innovative area of interdisciplinary research that examines the relationship between human culture and the physical environment. Participants of the Summer School will work on the creation and depiction of environmental narratives through history, art, music, heritage, literature, and tourism. Vice-Chancellor Professor Christina Slade said: “We are delighted to be hosting the annual ACU Summer School in 2017. The relationship between the environment and the arts and humanities is a key theme of our research and teaching, so it is fitting that this will be examined by the Summer School participants.” The Summer School will take place from 6 to 12 August 2017.

After Emma, 1977/1982 by Anthony Caro Courtesy of Barford Sculptures Limited Photo: John Riddy

Artist Boss: Anthony Caro’s studio assistants Sir Anthony Caro was one of Britain’s best sculptors and played a pivotal role in the development of twentieth century sculpture. ‘Artist Boss’ is a project being led by Jenny Dunseath, Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Bath School of Art and Design and is based on her experiences working as a studio assistant for Caro. The project includes a book and three exhibitions as well as educational opportunities for students. The book includes a series of interviews with Caro’s studio assistants and critical essays that explore the role of artists’ assistants to raise questions concerning the status of production, originality, authenticity, and authorship within the tradition of twentieth-century British sculpture. From varied backgrounds, the assistants’ responses illustrate the different ways in which the evolution of sculptural language has been negotiated. Collectively they reflect and offer a range of perspectives on the frequently

contentious and widely discussed role of the artist’s assistant and modes of sculptural production. This is the first and only extended engagement with Caro – regarded as the ‘greatest sculptor of his generation’ – and his studio assistants. Three exhibitions featuring work by Anthony Caro and many of his former assistants will be open to the public: • Artist Boss: Pool 30 August to 6 October 2016 at The Cut, Halesworth, Suffolk • Anthony Cara: Artist Boss 19 November 2016 to 29 January 2017 at New Art Centre, Salisbury, Wiltshire • Artist Boss at Bath Spa University December 2016 to January 2017 at Sion Hill, Bath More information about the project including the book and exhibitions is available at www.artistboss.org.uk

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University news

First Researcher Development Week a resounding success The first Researcher Development Week took place earlier this year drawing in researchers of all career stages from across the University. A host of different events took place covering topics such as the ethics of social media, research bidding and open access. The Early Stage Researcher Conference was well attended and talks and workshops were also well received. Following its success the event will now

be held on an annual basis, providing an opportunity for researchers and students from across the University to come together and build their skills, while enhancing the presence of the research community at Bath Spa. Those interested in next year’s event please follow @BathSpaResearch on Twitter.

Chloe’s winning design

Design a bag competition winner will feature at careers fair After launching a design a bag competition for Bath Spa students, the Enterprise and Employability team are pleased to announce the winner is third year Publishing and Creative Writing student Chloe Pritchard. Her design called ‘Never Out of Reach’ will be featured on recycled cotton tote bags that will be handed out at the Careers and Opportunities Fair on Tuesday 25 October.

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Runner up, Emma Harris, Msc Principles of Applied Neuropsychology will have her design called InSPAration featured in the brochure which will be handed out at the fair. Vanessa Doust, Business Liason Manager, said: “The entries to the competition were extremely high quality, and made judging a difficult task indeed.”

Jessica Milton, centre of second row, with her group in China

Enriching experience in China Third year Philosophy and Ethics student Jessica Milton recently visited China as part of an educational programme called The Woodenfish Project. The project, run by Taiwanese Buddhist nun Venerable Yifa, brings together students from all over the world who are eager to share opinions, experiences and cultures. The programme focuses on deep personal exploration, collaborative scholarship and dialogue, and cultural peace training. Since 2002, Woodenfish has provided innovative experiential education and scholastic engagement with the Chinese Buddhist world. Jessica said: “Venerable Yifa’s words ‘If you like it, it is a blessing, if you don’t, it is cultivation’ were hard to leave behind. They will stay with me for life. “I am a student, so I must study diligently and I must apply myself wholeheartedly to any endeavour I choose to pursue. It is the combination of diligence and compassion that I am most grateful for. “This experience showed me, among many things, that whatever I am doing, I must do it to the best of my ability.” Religion, Philosophy and Ethics students have been taking part in the programme since 2010. To find out more contact Mahinda Deegalle, Reader in Study of Religions, Philosophies and Ethics on m.deegalle@bathspa.ac.uk


University news

Signing the Memorandum of Understanding

Bath Spa sign international agreement in the Indian Himalayas Bath Spa and Himachal Pradesh University in India have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to underpin a four year collaborative relationship. Since 2012 the universities have been working closely together on a variety of teaching and research in both India and the UK. The collaboration has explored a wide range of environmental and societal challenges in modern day India including • the complexities of environmental hazards and disasters driven by changing climates and societal shifts, • the impacts of mountain hydroelectric power generation on a rapidly developing India, and • the role of digital media and societal heritage to help achieve sustainable futures.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Christina A partnership network has also been Slade and Professor A.N.D. Bajpai, Viceestablished with other universities in Chancellor at Himachal Pradesh. India and Canada, which seeks to better The agreement paves the way for understand and influence these challenges. more student study abroad programmes, The Memorandum of Understanding faculty visits, and joint research and was signed at a ceremonial event entrepreneurial attended by Dr activity. Esther Edwards, “The agreement paves Professor Bajpai, Senior Lecturer the way for more Vice-Chancellor at in Geographical student study abroad Himachal Pradesh Information Systems and Dr programmes, faculty visits, University, said: “This was a red Richard Johnson, and joint research and letter day in the Reader in Physical entrepreneurial activity.” history of the Geography, along university and it will with 23 Bath Spa help both universities to move forward students in Shimla, an Indian Himalayan in the field of educational services and mountain city last April. international activities.” It was formally signed by Bath Spa’s

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University news

PV solar panels on the roof of Commons

Committed to sustainability Bath Spa’s Newton Park, Sion Hill and Corsham Court campuses are outstandingly beautiful and historically significant. We take our responsibilities to protect this environment very seriously, and we feel strongly that universities have an important role in achieving sustainability and reducing climate change. We have an environmental policy that gives a commitment to continuous environmental improvement, and staff and students share this commitment. Since 2010, we have been rollingout a carbon reduction and energy efficiency programme, which has delivered substantial cost, energy and carbon savings for Bath Spa. Our buildings now use 26 per cent less energy per m2 than they did in 2010 and, prior to bringing 560 more students to live on Newton Park, we reduced carbon emissions by 30 per cent per person. This was great progress but there is more to do. Over the last couple of years, we have worked with Schneider UK to develop

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a project that will deliver our remaining carbon-reduction plans, via an Energy Performance Contract (EPC). The EPC model is a form of contracting where the energy, water and operational efficiency systems are upgraded and paid for through the guaranteed energy savings that the project will deliver. It is a partnership, where both parties have a long-term interest in the project’s success. Bath Spa’s EPC commenced in March 2016 and work will be completed in September 2016. Works will take place across our three main campuses, Newton Park, Sion Hill, and Corsham Court. These works are expected to save over 1.1 million kWh in energy every year, which equates to around 850 tonnes of CO2. This is equivalent to the carbon emissions from heating and powering around 140 medium-sized homes or driving four million kilometres in an average-sized car We have a long journey ahead but we’ve made a great start.

Delivering on our ten year goal to reduce annual carbon emissions by 2,000 tonnes, the University will see seven energy conservation measures being implemented. 1. Biomass district heating and energy centre expansion 2. Building management system upgrade 3. Lighting upgrades 4. Cooling and ventilation works and removal of R22 Gas units 5. Date centre cold-isle containment 6. Mechanical services insulation 7. Boiler works


University news

Cutting a ribbon to mark the opening

Stunning student accommodation unveiled Bath Spa’s new student accommodation was unveiled in June. Located on the street where one of Jane Austen’s homes used to stand - at Number 3 Green Park Buildings East, from 1804-5, the regeneration of this historic location has revitalised this area of the city centre. The site of derelict offices and a former care home, and before that a victim of several WWII bombing attacks, had been boarded up for a number of years, blighting a prominent route into the city centre overlooking Green Park and the River Avon. Since being given the go-ahead by planners at Bath and North East Somerset Council in 2014 the building has been transformed and is now an impressive feature in the Bath skyline. Green Park House has been developed

by Berkeley Homes using classic Bath Stone, and built using Georgian architecture which is sympathetic to its surroundings and a nod to its history. The proportions of the buildings, set in threebay sections, with parapets and chimney details reflect a typical Georgian building found in Bath city centre. The accommodation will provide an additional 461 bed spaces for the University to house new and continuing students. Professor Christina Slade, ViceChancellor said: “I am delighted to declare Bath Spa University’s Green Park House open. The University is proud to be leading the regeneration of this area of Bath prior to works starting on the neighbouring Bath Quays development.”

Green Park House

A living room in the Green Park House accommodation

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University news

The importance of universities and place On Wednesday 6 April, Matthew Taylor of the Royal Society of Arts visited the University’s Newton Park campus and gave a talk about ‘Universities and Place’. He spoke about the possibilities and challenges for universities when positioning themselves in their local region alongside their position in national league tables and international research rankings. In particular, Matthew talked about his theory of ‘social coordination’ and highlighted how universities had shifted over time from being highly solidaristic, but insular communities into more individualistic structures, beholden to markets, focused on innovation and enterprise, and driven by customer satisfaction, as well as into authoritarian models driven by targets, rankings, and management cultures. In the face of these individualistic and authoritarian models of motivating and organising universities we had lost much of our solidarity, much of our community. He then positioned ‘place’ as a way to regain that sense of a common cause.

Students’ Union host EU symposium with Eddie Izzard Earlier this year the Students’ Union launched a campaign encouraging students to vote in the EU Referendum. To help students make a decision on which way to vote they hosted a symposium featuring two speakers who put forward their arguments for and against staying in the EU. Stand-up comedian, actor, and writer Eddie Izzard attended the event and gave his views to remain in the EU and songwriter, music publisher and local

businessman Tim Hegarty put forward views to leave. Each speaker gave a short speech before taking questions from the audience of over 450 people – mainly young people including Bath Spa University students.

Eddie Izzard

EU discussions at Komedia

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#EURef

Tim Hegarty


Careers & Opportunities Fair 2016 Tuesday 25 October 11am - 3pm Walled garden, newton park

facebook.com/BSUCareersFair careers@bathspa.ac.uk / 01225 875525


University news

Teacher training in nurseries

Institute for Education celebrates Ofsted results for early years programme The new early years teacher training programme at Bath Spa has been rated ‘good’ by Ofsted inspectors. The Bath Spa Institute for Education’s Early Years Initial Teacher Training (EYITT) course, which is in its second year, is a specialist programme designed for those already working or seeking to work with babies and children aged from birth to five years old. The programme was created by the Government in response to research which demonstrates that the quality of early education and childcare provision is higher when practice is led by specially trained graduate teachers. Bath Spa’s programme offers an opportunity to understand how children develop and learn, and to build on skills and experience to contribute to improving outcomes for young children. The Ofsted report praised Bath Spa’s Institute for Education. It said the syllabus “blends theory, up-to-date research and practice very well” and the course overall “is producing early years teachers who are highly motivated and passionate about

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ensuring children get the best possible start.” Dr Kate Reynolds, Dean of Bath Spa University’s Institute for Education, said: “Our early years programme is only in its second year, so to be rated ‘good’ by Ofsted is a proud achievement for us and we delighted with the outcome of the inspection. This result is thanks to our University staff, students and our partner settings. “This rating is a reflection of the hard work and dedication of our University staff who promote excellence and expertise in education research and professional practice. I want to thank the nurseries and schools that work with us to produce great teachers that we know make a real difference to young children in our region and beyond. “Our talented Bath Spa early years teachers make a positive contribution to children’s learning and progress. Our trainees recognise their professional responsibilities, as well as the impact they will have on the lives of all the young children they teach.”

3 Minute Thesis competition The 3 Minute Thesis competition was open to PhD students in which they had 180 seconds and one PowerPoint slide to present their thesis, when on average, presenting their thesis would take nearly nine hours. Ten students took part in the competition, with Barbara Harrington, PhD Creative Writing, winning the competition overall. She will now represent Bath Spa in the semi-finals which will take place in July. Sean Cameron, Research and Graduate Affairs Officer, said: “Any PhD is a labour of love. Each individual thesis has often had hundreds of hours spent on it, reaching astronomically high word counts in the process. Following the presentations, each of the judges remarked how difficult the process of grading those who took park was, reflecting the abilities of all those who took part.”


University news

Plastic Vanitas

Students making ice cream with liquid nitrogen

Psychology and Human Nutrition courses accredited Psychology and Human Nutrition have Tracey Lewarne, Human Nutrition recently been accredited by the British Course Leader said: “Human Nutrition is Psychological Society and Association for a specialised course designed specifically Nutrition respectively. to give students thorough and up-to-date Human Nutrition graduates will be knowledge in this ever growing area. It’s a eligible for Associate Nutritionist status, stimulating programme that will challenge which will entitle them to use the letters views, and provides students with the skills ANutr (Associate Nutritionist) after their needed for employment in both the private name. Accreditation and public sector.” “Accreditation is a is a rigorous process Dr Rebecca with many core skills rigorous process with many McGuire-Snieckus, to cover within the Leader in core skills to cover within Subject courses modules. Psychology, said: the courses modules.” The accreditation “I am absolutely shows graduates delighted. This was can prove underpinning specific knowledge very much a team effort with input from in evidence-based nutrition in the industry. students, administrative support staff, Psychology graduates will have met senior management and of course all the requirements for the Graduate Basis members of the Psychology team.” for Chartered Membership of The British Human Nutrition students are all Psychological Society. This means that eligible for accreditation, as long as they graduates will have the required skills to pass their degree, whereas Psychology enter Stage 2 and Doctoral programmes students must pass with a minimum 2:2 as part of the route of becoming a overall to be automatically accredited. Chartered Psychologist.

Still-life photographic exhibition launches in Corsham A touring exhibition of new work by artist and Bath Spa University Professor and Research Fellow Mariele Neudecker visited Corsham Court this term. The exhibition, called ‘Plastic Vanitas’, began in May and runs until Saturday 30 July 2016. It is at the Basement Gallery at Corsham Court. ‘Plastic Vanitas’ is a series of photographic works developed as a result of a residency at the Museum of Design in Plastics (MoDiP) and the Arts University Bournemouth (AUB). Mariele has developed her version of the Vanitas genre to symbolize the modern-day questions of impact, consumerism, waste and sustainability. The exhibition is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 12:00pm until 5:00pm by appointment only. To book please call the Bath School of Art and Design.

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Summer IN PICTURES

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1 & 4 Forest of Imagination: The pop-up contemporary arts event with a conservation theme was in Bath for the third year running. Bath Spa University is a key event collaborator. 2 Forest of Imagination: Colourful butterfly sculpture wows visitors at Bath Abbey. The swarm of giant paper butterflies was created by Anthony Head, Senior Lecturer in Interactive Art and Design. 3 Students delighted to be receiving Bath Spa University’s Certificate in Global Citizenship designed to recognise the global perspective of undergraduate studies and to open opportunities for students in the global employment market. 5 Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare being performed by alumni Peter and Sarah at Newton Park as part of the BBC Shakespeare Festival.

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6 Talented Bath School of Art and Design students showcased their art and design works at the annual Undergraduate Degree Show in Sion Hill. 7 David Gunstone, Domestic Services, directs and shoots amateur horror movies. Here, Isabel Offler and Andrew J Fletcher star in Some Kind of Witch. More details at vampiredawnmovie.com

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summer IN PICTURES

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sPACE TO

“ Chat ” Marking fifty years of the Hare Krishna Movement Bath Spa hosted a conference to mark the fiftieth anniversary of Catherine Robinson, Senior Lecturer in Religions, the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (or ISKCON), Philosophies and Ethics at Bath Spa, said: “From controversial better known as the Hare Krishna Movement. Sometimes seen beginnings in the West where it attracted allegations of being as a new religious movement, it was established in America in a cult, the Hare Krishna Movement has established itself as a 1966 and centres on worship of the Hindu God Krishna as ‘the vital part of the contemporary religious scene with activities as Supreme Personality of Godhead’. diverse as feeding homeless people, ecological farming and The conference, organised by the Religions, Philosophies workshops for schools alongside various forms of public witness and Ethics team at the University, offered and outreach. delegates the opportunity to hear how the “The Hare Krishna Movement “By examining its origins and Hare Krishna movement has changed in has established itself as a development, as well as offering some the course of its first half century. insights into the life of the movement, the vital part of the contemporary conference will be a forum for reflection The keynote lecture was given by Kim religious scene” Knott, Professor of Politics, Philosophy on New Religious Movements and also and Religion from Lancaster University, global Hinduism.” and focussed on the movement’s achievements and challenges Working in collaboration with the University’s teaching staff, in a British setting. One of the movement’s leading gurus, Bhakti technical team and events department, students from Film Caru Swami, was also in attendance. and Television, Creative Media Practice, Music, Education and During the conference there was an opportunity to experience Religious Studies were instrumental in bringing this conference to the arti ceremony where worship is offered, as well as a chance to life enabling them to learn about other cultures and beliefs while learn Indian dance and join in chanting the Mahamantra. advancing their organisational and team-working skills.

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Michael Darby, second year ReligioNs, Philosophies and Ethics Picture the scene. You walk past the large conference room on the ground floor of Commons at Newton Park and you see approximately fifteen people in saffron and white robes jumping around, and chanting words you can’t quite grasp. And hang on a minute, there are more ordinary people joining in. What on earth has happened to Bath Spa? I have just finished my second year in Religions, Philosophies and Ethics and have become increasingly interested in Eastern traditions, and so this was a perfect opportunity for me to experience such a tradition first hand. ISKCON, the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, are celebrating their fiftieth anniversary and the religious movement is going from strength to strength. Such a success is certainly a call for celebration, and that’s truly what this conference was! I have been involved in the development of this event for most of this year as part of my Special Project module. I worked on the

communication of the event and the development of materials that would be placed within the conference pack, which each guest was gifted. With such a broad audience the conference truly catered for all, and as a student with a specific interest in this movement I learned a great deal about the movement’s past and present from our guest speakers Professor Kim Knott, Dr Dermot Killingly and Rasmandala Das, and the podcast Q&A session that took place in conjunction with the Religious Studies Project and INFORM, two influential organisations in the Study of Religions. Music and drama were also a highly entertaining part of the event. ISKCON’s Mahamantra, a devotional mantra sang to honour and to evoke their deity Krishna, was a particular highlight resonating throughout the Commons building twice during the day by the movement’s orchestral and festival teams. I very much enjoyed being involved in and attending the conference, and I can’t wait for an opportunity to do it all over again.

Ekta Mahajan, second year Creative Media Practice I had the privilege of working on this event which coincided with my module titled ‘Commissioning and Working in the Media’. When I was approached to assist in the day’s celebrations I immediately realised the opportunity it offered. My role as a Production Coordinator meant I acted as a catalyst between the events team and my production team. In the lead up to the conference we worked tirelessly. Pre-production involved technical demonstrations, meetings with the events team and sourcing props and gifts. It was a pleasure to be given an opportunity to collaborate with other students, staff, and visiting guests in realising our vision for the conference. The technical team were integral in providing additional support before and after the event. Conducting interviews in the TV studio and taking photographs with the involvement of students from different courses further enhanced our promotion of the event. The conference had many elements which included inspiring lectures, panel discussions, praying ceremonies, and theatre

and dance pieces. By the end of the day we were all on our feet feeling enriched and inspired by the whole experience. My fondest memory of the day was when His Grace Vraja Bihari Das recounted being nervous before arriving. This feeling dissipated when he saw 20 students dressed in orange Kurta’s on his arrival. He beamed with pride when I presented him with a gift known as a ‘shawl’ which my father sourced from India. In addition to my knowledge of Hare Krishna, as the day unfolded for me it was a great opportunity to showcase my faith in the power of collaboration in work and spiritual practice. The day’s proceedings drew to a close with students getting to their feet and ended with a lively chant praising Hare Krishna in our collective movements, a proud moment for me as a Bath Spa student. A quote that summed up the day for me was said by Mahatmu Prabhu: “Where you are looking to go and the direction you are moving in is more important than where you are presently standing.”

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“ Talk ” Breaking down the barriers of a career in tech Article by Lee Scott, Subject Leader of Creative Computing

It’s no secret that in the UK we have a if the gap isn’t closed soon it will threaten digital skills gap. The BBC reported at the economic growth, productivity and social end of 2015 that over 12 million people, mobility. and a million small businesses in the UK, However I’m pleased to say that do not have the skills to prosper in the progress is now being made. Both digital era. This is a significant issue and Government and businesses are the result of a long ignored problem which getting behind the drive to train the next has been rearing its head since the 1950’s. generation and current workforce, in order Technology continues to thrive. to shrink the current skills gap. We’ve seen With all types of the introduction “We’ve joined the businesses and of campaigns like organisations now conversation and recently ‘Make it Digital’ heavily reliant on by the BBC, as launched our campaign digital technology well as the set-up #ThisGirlCodes to encourage of charities like in order to function, it’s now more young women to enter Doteveryone more important to champion a career in tech.” than ever that technology. we have a strong workforce of digitally Fortunately people have recognised savvy individuals to meet the needs of how crucial it is to teach computing the economy. Many influential figures at Key Stage 2 and 3. With the right have spoken out on this topic; with the approach, children could enter higher government’s former digital advisor education divorced from the stigma of Baroness Martha Lane Fox warning that gender stereotypes in computing, and

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This Girl Codes


Businesses are heavily The next generation

reliant on digital technology

free from the worry that strong maths close a gender gap, to challenge mind-sets skills are a necessity to succeed in this in education, in the workplace and industry, area. We’re now seeing coding taught at as well as how women see themselves in primary school level; often using devices the creative computing space. We think it’s like the Makey Makey and Raspberry Pi vital that we dissolve the misrepresentation to encourage imaginative thinking. This that technology is a career for men, both in is a small, but important step that I hope the workplace, and the media. will help supply the digital economy with Although the UK has taken big steps individuals who wield both programming forward in tackling this issue in recent skills and creative flair. Finally, the years, there is still more that can be done. internet has provided the perfect platform If we’re really ready to see an impact and for tech bloggers, make a difference academics, social “We will only achieve this in society we need media gurus and to focus our efforts by breaking barriers and on encouraging experts within the crushing stigmas.” industry to hammer more people to home the message choose technology that technology is here to stay. based degrees and qualifications. We will We’ve joined the conversation only achieve this by breaking barriers and and recently launched our campaign crushing stigmas. #ThisGirlCodes to encourage more young Our reliance on technology is only women to enter a career in tech. Because going to grow and like coding, various aside from the digital skills gap, those aspects will become daunting and working in the sector are facing a huge inaccessible to those who haven’t had gender divide, with women only holding 26 the sufficient teaching or training. It’s so percent of all tech jobs. important that we’re not left out of the We’re encouraging everyone in the conversation and that we take action to computing industry to share the great work rectify the gender divide. women are doing in this field by using Teachers and lecturers at every level #ThisGirlCodes so they can inspire the should get on board and help ensure next generation of coders, animators and the UK’s children and students are as game makers. To us, it seems a no-brainer equipped as they can be. Let’s close the that more young women should be looking digital skills gap, celebrate technology and at careers in computing. We’re looking to inspire the next generation.

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5 Minutes With ...

Bobby Anderson Roberta Anderson, known to everyone as Bobby, is a Senior Lecturer in History. She is retiring this year after being a member of the Bath Spa community for 27 years. She is a much loved member of staff and will be missed by all. We wish her the best of luck in her retirement!

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What do you love about Bath Spa University? I have been at Bath since I was an undergraduate in 1989 and have always been attracted by the beautiful Capability Brown landscape. I remember many lectures which passed in a haze as I was watching the sheep and herons in the field behind the Newton building! Even on a grey day there is something new in the landscape to see. I love working with some very special colleagues and seeing my old students suddenly appearing as staff members.

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Where is your favourite spot on campus? The Italian Garden, it is so peaceful, and of course, the Archive.

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And finally, complete this sentence. Not many people know this about me but… … I was a dancer on Ready Steady Go! in the 1960s and featured in a BBC Going to Work programme when I first left school and began working at Marconi Marine in Chelmsford as a punch card operator. Both are on YouTube, but I’m not saying where!

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If you went on Mastermind, what would your specialist subject be? James VI & I, the first king of Great Britain. There’s not much I don’t know about him.

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SUMMER 2016

Tell me something you’re passionate about at the moment? My new project on a group of English Benedictine nuns founded in Flanders in 1597 by Lady Mary Percy. They were expelled by the French Revolutionary forces in 1797 and returned to England, staying first in Winchester and moving to larger premises in East Bergholt, Suffolk before a last move to Haslemere in Surrey where they stayed until suppressed [closed] in 1976. I have the whole archive from beginning to end, so have lots to do in my forthcoming retirement.

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! SHOUT ! sPACE TO Have your say – We’re looking for letters, feedback, and general social media musings, so please send in what you like about Bath Spa and the city of Bath via spacemag@bathspa.ac.uk

Twitter @eddieizzard See you at @KomediaBath for the @BathSpaUni event at 2pm. SU reps will be outside the venue to help people get registered! #standupforeurope @GenaGoldfield Tuned into the @BathSpaUni live stream of #EUref @KomediaBath @bathspasu #OfficeLife ‫@‏‬BathSpaSSS Bath Spa Nightline is now up and running! @BathSpaUni @bathspasu ‫@‏‬OllyFest Great music from @BathSpaUni at Parade Gardens until 3 as part of #BathMusicFest #partyinthecity

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Where on earth? Who can guess where on our campus this lovely photograph was taken? Find the answer in the Autumn issue of SPACE. Answer Spring Edition: Photograph taken of sculpture in the gardens of Sion Hill

see how Student Support can help you Bath Spa aims to remove barriers and create an inclusive environment for all students. Find out more about how Student Support can help you by visiting the University website. 1. Disability and Dyslexia From special exam conditions to Disabled Students Allowance, we will support you with any disability. All consultations are treated as personal and sensitive data in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. 2. Emotional and Mental Health support We provide professional advice and guidance on a range of issues including bullying, bereavement and sexual assault. We offer Mind Your Head sessions, counselling, and much more to help to make Bath Spa a safe space and environment for you to study. 3. Peer Mentor scheme Second and third year students are trained to provide first years with informal support on areas such as coping with a new environment, module choices, essays and revision. 4. Medical Service We hold surgeries at Newton Park during term time and at Fairfield Park Health Centre all year round. Details on how to register are available on the Hub, or pop into Student Support at Sophia, Newton Park. 5. Care Leavers Bath Spa achieved a Buttle Trust Quality Mark demonstrating the University’s commitment to supporting care leavers in Higher Education. We offer bursaries of up to £1k a year to care leavers. Visit Student Support to find out more.

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SUMMER 2016

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New student accommodation in the centre of Bath – Green Park House

SPACE - Summer 2016  
SPACE - Summer 2016