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ARCH ITECTU RE ANNU AL 201 4 Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering The University of Bath

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CO NTENTS Acknowledgements

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Introduction

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BSc Architecture First Year

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Second Year

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Third Year

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Fourth Year

Basil Spence

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Year 4 Report

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Primitive Studio 4.9 Studio 4.6 Studio 4.3 Studio 4.1 Studio 4.16 Studio 4.17 Studio 4.18 Studio 4.22 Studio 4.23 Studio 4.25 Studio 4.24

74 86 98 104 116 130 140 152 164 174 184

MArch Architecture Fifth Year Sixth Year

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200 Sustainable Cities

Marseille Budapest Hamburg Brighton Valletta Portsmouth Belgrade Grimsby

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Prize Winners

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Studio Leaders:

Martin Gledhill Toby Lewis Dominic Taylor Matthew Wickens Daniel Wong Alex Wright

Teaching Fellows:

Jayne Barlow Nigel Bedford Tim Burgess Scott Cahill Anne Claxton Elantha Evans Simon Gould Rob Gregory Dyfed Griffiths Rob Grover Jo Hibbert Julia Kashdan-Brown Frank Lyons Hugo Marrack Rob Mitchell Mike Tonkin Mark Watkins Mark Wray

The Department would like to thank the following practices and organisations for their contribution to Teaching on the BSc Architecture and Master of Architecture programmes in 2013-14: 00:/ 3D Create 4orm Architects AHMM Alec French Partnership Allies and Morrison Architecture Centre Bristol Architecture Centre Devon & Cornwall ARB ARUP Arup Associates Ash Sakula Architects Martin Ashley Architects The Association of Gardens Trust Atkins AVR London b:ssec Bare, Leaning & Bare Bath Preservation Trust Bath & NE Somerset Council BDP Biodiversity by Design Black Architecture Borough Market Bradford-on-Avon 27

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Bristol Society of Architects Buro Happold Burrell Foley Fischer Architects CaSA Architects Chedburn Dudley Matthew Clay Architects D’Arcy Race Partnership Design Engine Dow Jones Architects Drawing at Work e3 Consulting Engineers E&M West Consulting Engineers East West Yoga English Heritage Erect Architecture Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Ferguson Mann Architects Fold Architecture Magazine Form Design Andrew Foyle Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer Richard Frewer The Garden Museum Alan Gardner Associates Bill Gething Sustainability Tom Glendinning Photography GMA Ryder Grant Associates James Grayley Architects Grimshaw Hamilton Baillie Associates Hays HLF South West Committee Holburne Museum Hopkins Architects Houchell Studio Hyde + Hyde Architects Ibbotson Studios Ibstock Id-a-Space Donald Insall Associates Integral Engineering Design ICOMOS UK International Timber Consultancy Jarvis Jefferies Architects Kashdan-Brown Architecture & Urban Design Richard Keep Architects Keep Architecture Kendal Kingscott David Kent Architects Kilburn Nightingale Doug King Consulting Landscape Projects Levitate Architects Matthew Lloyd Architects London Metropolitan University Jonathan Logsdon Architects George Lovett Architect

LT Studio MacGregor Smith Mach Acoustics Malishev Wilson Engineers Mann Williams Marks Barfield Architects Martin Architects Andy Matthews Photography Max Fordham Philip Meadowcroft Architects Meld Architecture Metropolis Momentum Consulting Engineers Morcom Design Workshop Mount Studio Architects The National Trust Network Rail Oculus Building Consultancy Odgers Conservation Ooma Design PAD Studio Parks Agency Nicholas Pearson Partnership Penoyre & Prasad Alan Phillips Architects Pierce Architects Populous Prewitt Bizley Architects Purcell RIBA Northwest RIBA Wessex John Rodger and Associates Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners Sally Strachey Historic Conservation ScandiArch SEED SHCA Skelly and Couch Smith Maloney Architects Stonewood Design Stride Treglown Studio 8 Architects Sustain Robert Tavernor Consultancy Techniker Thoday Associates Tollbridge Studios Treework Environmental Practice Universidad Europea de Madrid University College, London University of Cambridge University of Exeter University of Hertfordshire University of Loughborough University of Newcastle University of Sheffield University of the West of England University of Westminster Vanessa Warnes Mark Wray Architects

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AC K NOW LE D GM E NTS Wrigley Associates Wyvern Heritage and Landscape

The Department would like to thank the following practices that are currently employing our students on their Placements as part of the BSc Architecture and Master of Architecture programmes in 2013-14: Aedas AECOM AC Architects AF Modinos & SA Vrahimis Allies and Morrison Archadia Paul Archer Design Archetype Group Archiects 449 ARUP Arup Associates AS.Architecture-Studio Atelier Bow-Wow Avanti Architects AVR London AWW Architects BAI Design International BBM Sustainable Design BDP Brisac Gonzalez Buckley Gray Yeoman Buro Happold Callingham Associates CaSA Architects Casson Conder Architects Chapman Taylor Childs + Sulzman Partnership David Chipperfield Architects CHQ Partnership Connections Desgin Core Architects CRAB Studio Paul Davis & Partners Benjamin Debacker Design ACB Designscape Architects DOMA Office of Architecture Chris Donoghue Architects dRMM Earle Architects EMBT Eton Design Faris and Faris Architects Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Carlos Ferrater & Partners FIT Architects Fletcher Priest Architects Forbes Massie Foster and Partners

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French Weir Affordable Homes FT Architects Garnett + Partners Godwin Austin GCP Chartered Architects Waind Gohil Architects Henry Goss Architects Grant Associates Gresford Architects Zaha Hadid Architects Simon Hands & Associates Haskoll Architectural Design Higgs Young Architects HLM Architects Horden Cherry Lee Architects Glenn Howells Architects Robert Hudson Architects Inside Out Architecture Arata Isozaki & Asociados Jeff Kahane + Associates Karaksevic Carson Architects Keep Architecture David Kent Architects Kent Design Partnerships Kievenaar Knight Architects Kengo Kuma + Associates Kumpulan Senireka Landivar Architects Lawson Rob Architects Levitate Architects Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands Little Thunder Studios LOM Architecture and Design Louis Vuitton Lytle Associates MacGregor Smith The Manser Practice Rick Mather Architects Marks Barfield Architects Maybank and Matthews Angus Meek Architects Mitchell Taylor Workshop Mitsubishi Jisho Sekkei MOAI Architects Morphogenesis Nash Partnership NVB Architects Northern Building Design One 17 Design Palmer & Turner Perring Architecture and Design Pick Everard PRC Group Architects Priestman Architects PRP Architects Purcell Mark Reeves Architects Riverfilm

John Robertson Architects Robothams Architects Tim Ronalds Architects RS Architects RSP Planet Sanei Hopkins Architects Saunders Boston Architects SHACK Architecture Smallwoord Architects Ian Springford Architects Stonewood Design Stride Treglown Stubbs Rich Architects Surface to Air Architects Techniker The Mobile Studio Tonic Architecture Tonkin Liu Architects Tooley and Foster Partnership Urban Studio VYONYX Waugh Thistleton Architects Western Building Consultants Wilkinson Eyre Architects Winsor + Leaman Architects Marek Wojciechowski Architects Woods Bagot Ian Wylie Architects ZAP Architecture

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Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios are happy to support Bath School of Architecture students and congratulate them yet again on an astonishingly creative output in their final year! We are proud of our long-standing relationship with the School of Architecture and with the University of Bath. We learn from you, we employ you, we teach you and we taught a lot of your teachers too!

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Manchester School of Art Completed 2013 by FCBS Winner of RIBA Regional Award 2014 20140615-Yearbook-HS.indd 7 17:59:05 Flyer advertisment page in UoBath publication.indd 2

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INTRO D U C TION

The publication of a year book to celebrate and record the work of our students’ has become a regular feature at Bath since the first issue in 2012. As ever such an endeavour is testament to the sheer dedication of those who collate it, those who sponsor it and of course the creative energy demonstrated in all the work exhibited within it. Sincere thanks go to all those involved on the editorial team. This year has also seen the instigation of a student magazine - Paperspace, the agenda of which is to provide a vehicle for all years to share ideas about their ‘architectural lives’ which as we know involve a combination of occasional elation, perspiration, dedication, and at times, utter despair. The 6th year projects shown are located within a variety of European and English cities. Those of the 4th year are located in Bristol for the Basil Spence project, and in Stroud for the students’ principle thesis projects. A snapshot of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year project completes this overview of our department. Architecture is perhaps a glorious passion - ‘the mistress art’, and in this sense the following pages represent an insight into every students’ intense and tempestuous relationship with their work. Their tutors and I alike, continue to be moved by both the sincerity of intent and profoundity of thought that underpins their work; I hope the reader will share that admiration. If you are in practice please employ them; if you are a parent or grandparent - it has been worth it. If you are a boyfriend/girlfriend/ sweetheart, or a good friend, insist on being taken out for dinner as ‘they owe you’ for all your support.

Martin Gledhill 4th Year Studio Leader

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BS c ARC H ITECTU RE

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F I R ST Y E A R Matthew Wickens

Year One at Bath is designed to be a foundation in which the students gather a broad range of experience by being asked to work in specific materials for each project. Additionally, this year students were given a series of technique specific workshops – model photography, freehand drawing – to augment their design studio work.

Project Two was entitled ‘Holzbau’ and the students were asked to design an exhibition stand for a wooden object of their choosing. The exhibition stand was to be built from timber but did not need to withstand the elements as it would be inside a trade hall. Therefore

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Bath has a long tradition of team working with the civil engineering students and this starts on Day One. This year that project took the form of a 6 week project to

design AND build at 1:1 a sculpture for a site on campus which depicted the notion ‘Transformation’, made pertinent by the university context. By actually working with timber, fabric and rope the students were able to take this first-hand knowledge into Project Two.

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From left: Transformation group 33. Work from Holzbau project; Issy Spence, Josh Page, Savvas Procopiou

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ease of construction, and sustainability were key concerns.

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Semester Two began with Project Three called ‘Infobox’. The brief was to design a sales pavilion for a soon to be developed housing estate. This time the material palette was a steel structure with a lightweight skin. These ‘skins’ were selected at random from Cor-Ten; Stainless Steel; Copper; Zinc; Lead; Metal Mesh; Polycarbonate & Coated Fabric.

The final, and most complex project of the year - ‘Brick House’ - was to design a 3-bed live-work house on a rectangular plot 12m x 18m around a 6m x 6m courtyard. This followed a field trip to the Ibstock brick factory at Cattybrook, near Bristol, as an appropriate way to introduce the idea of heavy-weight construction. The house was to be made from masonry and ultimately detailed and represented in a 1:20 perspective section – a tall order of Year One but ultimately well executed. Ibstock kindly sponsored prizes to the value of £500 for this project and awarded 8 students at the final crit.

From left: Infobox; Nina Manchorova, Tom Cunningham. Brick House; Ben Hair, Josh Page, Oliver Hills

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SECOND YEAR Nigel Bedford + Dominic Taylor Year two at Bath continues to develop the students’ design methodology by expanding their repertoire of design tools and analytical skills.

also encouraged to start thinking about the building in a conceptual or ideological way as long as it does not compromise function.

The students design more complex buildings and are asked to Analyse and to respond to context. A deterministic design methodology is encouraged with an emphasis on analysis of building type, programme and context and how this can ‘drive ‘the design.

Context

Building typology and ‘Programme’. ‘What does the building want to be?’’.

Programme or Partii diagrams are the standard architectural shorthand for the interrogation of both ideas about context and the design as it develops.

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Exploration and development of the building design both in its abstract ‘generic’ form as well as how it can be optimised to the given site. While the emphasis is on ‘rational deterministic approach’, the students are

Analysis of context with the emphasis on how that analysis ‘generates’ the design solution. Building form, material and detail to be seen as a sensitive and considered response to the existing buildings and landscape of the given site. Considered and appropriate responses to site forces in terms of access, aspect servicing and the like.

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From top: Nefeli Malekos; site analysis

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In the continued development of presentation skills, second year emphasises computer modelling as opposed to real modelling. By the end of second year students will be familiar with the architectural conventions of presentation and how they apply to a full range of drawing techniques Project One The design of a Visitors centre located in Underfall yard in the Bristol Docks. Underfall Yard being a good example of Victorian industrial; context.

This project was a vehicle for the study of context and catalyst for debate on what is a ‘sympathetic’ contextual response. Project Two The design of a building containing a number of Artist’s Ateliers. While also located on the docks the context was less ‘precious’. This was a larger and more complex building. All two projects were of a non-domestic scale and allowed the students study and employ non-domestic types of construction, structures and environmental design.

External Perspective

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Presentation

S ECON D Y EA R



From top: Alexander Bull; external visual, Nefeli Malekos; external visual

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TH I R D Y E A R Daniel Jang Wong Third Year explores architecture in relation to culture, society + ecology. Some key questions are posed, including: • What value systems (or pre-conceptions) do we bring, 25 as architects, into any given project? • How do we understand and interpret the cultural context of any given site + project brief? • What are our responsibilities, as architects, in the society we live and the environment we affect?

emotionally engaged with the cultural context. This year 2 projects were set in contrasting places: one quiet and rural; the other urbane and urban. Both projects set challenges about designing buildings in unfamiliar cultural and physical settings. 26 Set in a small village, the 1st project explores the influences of the human body, its movement, and the Devon landscape on architecture. This is a joint, group project with Civil Engineering students.

3rd Year Studio encourages hand drawing and working with physical models. Both these skills involve the haptic and the visceral – a belief that honing these will help create architecture that is multi-sensory, and

Some central themes used in the final designs include scale and alignment, openness and enclosure, lightness and anti-gravity, seasonality, the East Devon vernacular, and clean environmental technologies.

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34 EAST ELEVATION “The sun shines down, and its image reflects in a thousand different pots filled with water. The reflections are many, but they are each reflecting the same sun. Similarly, when we come to know who we truly are, we will see ourselves in all people.” ~ Ammachi

INITIAL CONCEPT

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MAIN STUDIO SPACE

JOURNEY

CONNECTION

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T HIR D Y EA R

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CORE & CIRCULATION

ORGANIC GROWTH Pathway

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Service Core

Studios

Accommodations

From left: Yoga Retreat project by Groups 3, 14 and 31.

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The 2nd project is set in Budapest. On our study trip, we walked, mapped and sketched the city, in order to capture the essence of the place. The Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design (MOME) hosted us for part of the time and, along with a few well-known architectural practitioners, provided us with wideranging talks about Budapest, culminating in a celebratory jazz evening.

This project introduces an increasingly complex set of needs, asking each student to choose and justify a site of their own, and to also designate an additional programme: ‘a place for that which is not yet’. The project provides a vehicle for a conceptual + critical approach, to demonstrate awareness of how the built environment is used and experienced by its users. It seeks to integrate the aesthetic, spatial, structural and environmental components that are key to engaging architecture. The key themes explored in the designs include the appropriation of the public realm, its legibility + coherence for the local people, and the reinterpretation of the Budapest courtyard typology.

The individual project looks at how a contemporary British cultural centre sits in a foreign urban morphology, steeped in its own social condition, and (at times, violent) political past.

Material Selections

In Situ Concrete Application: columns and floors

SECTION AA

A

A

Concrete is a relatively modern material compared to the surrounding buildings which are mainly masonry. It has high thermal mass and provides the required structural supports that based on a grid. Moreover the exposed concrete frame does not require additional cladding, visually it creates a honest and regular frame for the spaces.

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VOX HUMANA.

Key

FINAL EXPOSITION

External perspective of the building from the

5. 04

gardens, expression of the pavilion element of the structure and an extended public staircase intervention.

Internal perspective of the silent reading ‘breakout’ area adjacent to the main library and over looking the views to the Danube.

BRITISH CULTURAL CENTRE. BUDAPEST

1. Entrace 2. Toilets 3. Pub 4. Outside exhibition 5. Outside seating 6. Public park-like area 7. Bar 8. Kitchen 9. Staff facilities 10. Store 11. Bicyle shelter 12. Exisitng ‘open ruin’ pub

JOSEPH HAYES SPENCER southern approach, showing the split level

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FINAL EXPOSITION

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FINAL EXPOSITION

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By connecting the existing barren landscape of the residents with a new garden which forms the approach to the pavilion gallery recognises and celebrates the consraints the site presents.

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FINAL EXPOSITION

Internal perspective showing the open study box area on the mezanine floor above the garden gallery, connected to the library gardens.

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Ground Floor Level 0

T HIR D Y EA R

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From left: Budapest project by Yun Liao, Joseph Spencer, Hun Pu, Hai Jie Tan, Natalie Stas, Robin Chatwin and Trang Thien Vu. 20140612-Year Three-AR.indd 17

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There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread. Mahatma Ghandi

We may find in the long run that tinned food is a deadlier weapon than the machine-gun. George Orwell

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FO U RT H Y E A R - TH E BAS IL S P ENC E P ROJE CT Food Station From Non Place to Market Place

Each year at the beginning of their fourth year of study students work in teams of three architects and generally, two engineers in order to develop a design that integrates the two disciplines within a design proposal. This year the project was for a new market hall set alongside TempleMeads station in Bristol, in effect a food station. The brief was a deliberate challenge to the supremacy of modern supermarkets and the devaluing of food associated with them. The question posed in the brief was; is the supermarket a natural evolution of the street market, corn exchange and covered market, a parallel tradition or an abomination of modernity? Is the Market obsolete or does its resurgence offer the possibility of social and urban regeneration as well as a renewal of our attitude to food in general.

Martin Gledhill 4th Year Studio Leader

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G ROUP 1 Sophie Beagles Jade Keiderling Ishita Sachdeva + Michael Brown “Where possible, the gastronomic quarter should revitalize existing good-quality buildings and spaces that give opportunities for adaptive reuse related to food.� Susan Parham, the Gastronomic Quarter

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A series of timber pods inhabit the abandoned concrete structure on site, employing the regenerative power of food to create an area of conviviality. The market space itself is formed from a lightweight steel frame, feeding off this existing concrete structure. This new element acts as an extension of the existing grid, contrasting in materiality and atmosphere. The framework offers a dynamic market space, which is both responsive and adaptable.

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From top: External visual, long elevation, internal market visual

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GRO U P 2 Jensen Choy Lucy Edwards Rebecca Plaza + Liam Bryant Joe Bunting The Bristol Dancing Market has been designed to celebrate food in all its forms. Guided by the conceptual idea of the market as a stage for food, the design features moveable stalls that are lowered from the roof structure to create a super-flexible market space. This allows the market hall to be reconfigured as necessary to allow for a variety of uses. The idea of double-using spaces is continued throughout the rest of the scheme, with the adaptability of the market space and the combining of programs within the plan serving to create a super-flexible machine in which any number of events can take place.

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The architecture of the scheme was very much informed by the engineering necessary to achieve the desired atmosphere within the market, and the 61m spanning roof truss is the dominant feature of the design. However, the market is not a stand-alone building – rather it is a complete package, with the building integrating itself into the landscaping and the remaining site providing space for residential and commercial development. As one of the first buildings visitors would experience on arriving in Bristol, the scheme has been designed to help convey the forward thinking and sustainable ideology of the city.

From top: Internal visual, market hall

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G ROUP 3 Guy Duhig, Ben Hayes Amani Radeef + Clare Hartley Marjoram

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The brief asked us to look at what role food plays in people’s lives today. We realised that many people today lack any knowledge about how food is grown and produced. We needed this building to help people to reengage with the food process. To do this we felt that the act of buying food needed to be more social. By creating an iconic structure we could encourage people to come from far; then give them time to interact and learn from the people who grow, make and sell food.

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From top: Sectional perspective, concept sketch, market visual, green stair

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GRO U P 4 Simran Rahi Andrew Wardrope Julia Yao + Gemma Carey Josh Pemberton Hill

The market roof is a powerful typological tool for defining social space. Whilst at a rudimentary level it provides a basic environmental protection, it also establishes a plane under which a rich variety of cultural and economic transactions take place. The project aims to use the roof as an educational tool to raise awareness of the origins of food and encourage the use of new ingredients.

A tower housing a constantly changing exhibition marks the start of the route, with educational greenhouse pods and restaurant spaces inhabiting the roofscape. Smaller vertical elements pierce through the roof, signifying a means to take people down into the hustle and bustle of the market at ground level, where market stalls are integrated into the structure.

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The market acts as a key route across the site from Bristol Temple Meads station, in the west, to a proposed live-work area, in the east. The pitched roof

design responds to the rich industrial heritage of the surrounding site. Orientated north south, it provides even north lighting for the market space and south facing planting.

From top: Sectional perspective, market visual, market roof, external visual

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G ROUP 5 Romeo Chang Aaron Leung Yoyo Yao + Chun Fong Gustav Granstrom In order to understand how a food market operates, we went to London’s Borough Market to find some inspiration. We were attracted by the variety of foods, and the smell of cooked food travelled in the air. The experience is dynamic and colourful, we like the fact the it is possible for us to feel the fresh air as well as the fresh food, which resembles the experience of picking fruit from trees. We had two main drivers behind the project, which covers the micro scale to the macro scale: how it should be experienced and the detail of stalls. The first is to rediscover the primitive experience with food returning to nature and evoking the memory of fruit picking. The second driver is to explore the ambiguous nature of contemporary space, and activities within market.

Overall Experience

Perspective across river and underneath Bridge

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‘‘For ‘‘For the the millions millions of of us us w w keyboards keyboards at at work work and and may may be be more more than than en en only only sensual sensual experience experience

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From top: Aerial visual, conceptual sketch, external visual

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GRO U P 6 Victoria Boyle Ted Harding Aneura Phillips + Alex Livingston Sik Tsui Our research of Bristol showed a city that was surprisingly divided, both by wealth and ethnicity. Our project aimed to produce a market that would act as a new social hub for Bristol.

The various market squares formed helped rationalise the various different access routes coming through the site, while the market would also act as a new transport hub for a wider public transport network.

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We focused on providing a centre that could allow disparate groups to come together through sharing the different ways they cooked. To help this process the

centre would grow the herbs that gave every cuisine its unique flavour.

From top: Internal visual, upper floor plan

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G ROUP 7 Grace Anna Hay Lin Lett Thiri Samarath Syal + Cheuk Chan Nikolas Nikou Frederic Penent

B A SI L S PEN CE

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Bristol is very much a river city and in this light we wanted the river to play an integral part in our design. As we began to think about food and how it has changed over the centuries, although the way in which it is produced, sold, eaten and cooked has evolved one thing has remained constant- the way it brings people together. As Temple Meads Station has caused a division in Bristol connectivity between the East and West of the city, we saw the opportunity to use our food market as a means of connecting once again the different areas of Bristol. This idea of the food market at the heart of our design which has a connection with the surrounding areas and features of the site will also maximise footfall on our site, creating not only a route but a destination.

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From top: Internal visual, market hall visual, overall model

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GRO U P 8 Matthew Kennedy Luke Macnab Thu Ha Nguyen Phuoc + Clare Wilson

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The project aims to expand the brief to more than a food station, by proposing the model of Live-Work-Grow. By a creating a community of food merchants, city dwellers, and urban farmers, the project acts as a beacon to enable the public of Bristol and the surrounding area to reconnect to the production and the meaning of food, as well as to promote a new way of living that is closer and more connected to nature. The project responds to seasonal shifts with an adaptable stall structure, forming different configurations between winter and summer. On site food production recycling water and waste creates a full cycle of food production and food consumption.

From top: The Avenue, aerial visual, seasonality section

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G ROUP 9 Sophie Cosgrove Georgina Rathbone Rhiannon Williams + Anne Marie Ratcliffe mutual exchange policy can be seen as a pioneering pilot project which could be easily moulded and applied across the country to encourage local trade. To facilitate the exchange process we translated our concept into a physical crate. The market acts as a host for the interactive exchange, supporting the crates and forming an empty shell to house the community interaction.

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The aim of our market is to remove the divide between consumer and producer. To build a physical manifestation of the middle man to eradicate the social disconnect and virtual nature of local trade. By proposing to turn the online LETS scheme into a real trading system, we endeavour to bring the producer and consumer together under one roof. Time, goods, skills and knowledge can be exchanged and traded. Our

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From top: Ground floor plan, sectional perspective visual

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GRO U P 10 Shao Zheng John Yim Hai Wang Shan Zhong + Wan Sing Lai Sam Oldfield The project is to create a ‘Food Station’ on the eastern side of Bristol Temple Meads Train Station. The title ‘Food Station’ is derived from the nature of the building’s function in relation to food as well as its proximity to Bristol Temple Meads station.

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As a team, we want our Food Station to represent the core values of food. Food is an universal language for bringing people together and we want to transform this part of Bristol into a food hub, a food station showcasing the stages of food production, distribution, consumption and waste recycling. To do this we think it is essential to reconnect people to the source of food - Nature. We want our building to be a landmark, the essential stop/terminus for buying and sharing food.

From top: Site plan, model photo, sectional perspective

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G ROUP 1 1 Tom Gregory Benson Pang Chris Warner + Matt Soltys Ioanna Stamatki Market Hall below whilst providing shelter to the space beneath. The Food Station aims to form the final spoke to the triangle of Bristol, connecting the south-eastern part of the city to the centre. It has been designed to seamlessly integrate into and enhance further the Bristol 10-year plan. The canal-side has been reactivated in this scheme for waterside delivery of local crops using the extensive regional canal network as well for use by pedestrians along the towpath.

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The Food Station was our reinvention of the Victorian Market Hall. Our proposal, which was inspired by the ‘learning food’ movement, provided for extensive teaching gardens, displaying different crop species to the public and providing on-site food production for sale at the market. Connected into the market through finger-like projections into the food hall, the produce on sale can be viewed at the same time as the gardens. All functions are housed beneath a single roof structure, which abstractly reinterprets that of Bristol Temple Meads Station beside it, harmoniously integrating the old and the new. The roof floats above the market as a series of folds, allowing light into the

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From top: External view from the bridge, internal view from the balcony

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GRO U P 12 Adam Bufacchi James Tanner Daniel Yang + Siti Haji Julaihi Hannah Keen In response to the brief, we addressed food by exploring connectivity in public life. We propose a structure that acts as an extension to the existing train station, creating a new link to the east of Bristol. The structure integrates a market place with public kitchen facilities, allowing people to cook and eat on the go.

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| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

The level change found on the site allowed us to create a wholesale market directly beneath this, providing access for traders arriving by road, and storage for traders arriving by train.

From top: External visual, clock tower sketch, north and west elevation, section cut

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 33

33

20/06/2014 01:25


G ROUP 1 3 Reena Ardeshana Sarah Morton Akshara Pulpa + Jack Renders One of the main issues surrounding the debate around food is its status. In traditional culture, where food is valued, growth and food are intrinsically linked to the spiritual. Our initial reaction to the brief therefore was to explore the notion of the sacred, ‘that which is worthy of veneration’.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

The reconciliation of physical needs within the brief and site - where there was opportunity to connect three main physical levels -, and our conceptual thoughts led to the creation of a series of ‘green’ planes, allowing the movement flow across the site to be an integral part of the building experience. Within this landscape, a symbolic datum is carved out, creating a place for gathering. The ‘green carpet’ provokes engagement between man, community and a balanced green environment and provides shelter and light to the activities taking place in the spaces below.

34

From top: Winter visual, sectional perspective, external visual

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 34

20/06/2014 01:26


GRO U P 14 Jahan Ojaghi Hannah Pether Seb Tyler + Tadzina Stevens Dexter Wu

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

The brief defines the creation of a ‘Food Station’ typology. We believe that food has lost its sense of PLACE in contemporary culture, largely owing to the estrangement of the consumer with the PROCESS involved in its preparation and the current preoccupation with PRODUCT. This is in part a result of the fast PACE of modern life, exemplified through the flow of people through stations. We therefore aim to challenge this preconception by exposing the sense of process and ritual in the alchemical act of growing and preparing food, basing our approach largely on the observations of Claude Levi-Strauss regarding the different transformations which can be applied to the RAW: COOKED (which is achieved through cultural transformation) and ROTTEN (in which the raw undergoes natural transformation).

From top: Site plan, aerial visual, external visual

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 35

35

20/06/2014 01:26


G ROUP 1 5 Sachi Oberoi Emma Seaton Emma Thomas + Richard Bullet kitchen and teaching kitchens to give new skills to the numerous local unemployed residents. Four districts were created: supplying, teaching, producing and consuming. The kitchen became the heart of the home through in-situ sprayed conical concrete chimneys, one in each district which was supported by a locally sourced metal clad block for the supporting functional spaces.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

This project sought to reinvent the market typology creating a community hub on a derelict, brownfield site lying at the junction between the prosperous city centre and an industrial area. The area comprises a mix of Indians, Eastern Europeans, Chinese, West Indians and Middle Eastern people. Hence, the scheme brought into one space the different cultures to meet, buy, discuss, cook and eat food together. We chose to include public interest initiatives such as allotments, a large social

36

From top: Sectional perspective, market hall, sectional model

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 36

20/06/2014 01:26


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 37

20/06/2014 01:26


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 38

20/06/2014 01:26


GRO U P 16 Annie Kwan Jersey Poon XJ Wong Siyu Yao + Tendei Musekiwa Matthew Wyles

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

This project examines the idea of food as a means of bringing different cultures together, and to reinstate the social interaction that revolves around food - which we have lost with the development of supermarkets and fast food. The building serves as a normal farmer’s market that can be transformed into an event venue for food fairs, performances and exhibitions. This allows the market to attract people of different ages, cultures and interests. Bringing them to a place where food is the ‘common language’.

From top: Internal visuals, sectional perspective 39

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 39

20/06/2014 01:26


G ROUP 1 7 Dodo Lau Akshay Nagar William Zhou + Ashley Green Jason Mortimer Our Basil Spence project was to the maximum for the city though the given brief, we billeted in ideas of socialist architecture or architecture for the people, a good building we billeted did more for the city than the city did for it.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

As the clients were Bristol City Council, we not only created the required food station, but also created a green space. It is the job of the City Council to provide green spaces for the people, also the railways had historically divided the two sides of the City. We wanted to relink these sides, as good connectivity is again the priority of any public council. We tried to achieve these three things, along with an architectural strategy that most suited and attracted crowds, not just to the market, but also for the architectural appreciation. The structure is a grid shell, which forms a green canopy. Underneath lies the shops, restaurants and other elements of the Brief. These manifest CLT buildings, with a more humble architectural aesthetic. It is architecture for the public, designed with the common man in mind, something that hopes to improve the lives of ordinary citizens.

40

From top: Internal visual, external visual, frame details

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 40

20/06/2014 01:26


GRO U P 1 8 Jennifer Lee Jakub Tomaszczyk Gabriele Ziliute + Jerome Roberts Jonty Suenson Taylor

Through the use of advanced technology and communication, we are able to source and purchase exotic foods throughout the year. Local farmers, who are heavily reliant on their local network, are dealing with the loss of customers who all chose the convenience and price of large chain supermarkets. This project demanded re-examination of the true meaning behind the food we consume and create an intelligent response in a social, urban and architectural context.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

We believe that food is a very personal and intimate experience that cannot be addressed via a single, bold architectural statement. Instead, we aimed to create a very modest space coupled with honest construction and environmental detailing. As a group, our aim was to present an opportunity of an educational journey through production of food within the landscape, the acquisition of food in the market and its consumption in the dining areas overlooking the site.

From top: Section, model photos, sectional perspective

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 41

41

20/06/2014 01:26


G ROUP 1 9 Farah Ehsan Diana da Graca Joann Haddadin Marie D’Oncieu + Shaun Lombardo Alberta de Nardi Tempo Giusto, from the Italian “in its right time” is not simply about slowing people down so they can enjoy their fundamental relationship with food, it is also about accommodating the different rhythms of the everyday life, playing with the richness of the food experience; getting people more involved with what they are eating, and drawing them into spheres of impact that they tend to forget exist. Food affects our health, our well-being, our social relations and our involvement in society and is an essential aspect of our lives. Tempo Giusto seeks to remind us of that where the Slow Food Revolution can be articulated along several themes: Knowledge; Conviviality; Transparency; Independent System.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

In the journey through these themes, the scheme brought into one space the different cultures to meet, buy, discuss, cook and eat food together.

42

From top: Internal visual, market visual, sectional model

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 42

20/06/2014 01:26


GRO U P 20 Celine Chan Youseok Cho Mark Hanna + Amro Al Haddadin Simona Pavlova Half a millennium of history on the water in Bristol, and yet today there is a sense of neglect and missed opportunity. There is seldom any movement on the harbour apart from infrequent water taxis and private narrowboats. The site of the market finds itself immediately adjacent to the floating harbour and thus, a clear opportunity to give back to the water. We saw the market as an opportunity to distribute, transforming the boundaries of the site and viewing them instead as ‘arms’. People within the hustle and bustle of the city can consume fresh, local produce.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

There are two distinct levels within the architecture, whereby the busy market takes place on ground level around the water and it’s roof acts as a landscaped walkway. This move also enables the residential block to be connected with the aquaponic-driven allotments, while also relating with the platform level of the station. Beneath the landscaped walkway is a flexible open market in and around the main arrival plaza from the station.

From top: External summer visual, internal winter visual, sectional perspective

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 43

43

20/06/2014 01:27


G ROUP 2 1 Arthur Chia Ed Markland Benjamin Norrish + Andreas Kouyialis Hoi Chan

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

Modern society has been removed from the process of obtaining food from natural sources due to the supermarket. Thus, our Food Market aims to return to the medieval roots of the ‘Market Cross’ as a social and cultural hub, directed at promoting local and naturally resourced food products. The primary form of the building aims to reflect this social hub through means of a communal heart where the main market activities take place. The two flanking buildings separate the secondary spaces into both public and private amenities. The form of the roof acts as a visual connection between these entities whilst also driving the passive environmental nature of the market square beneath.

44

From top: Environmental diagram, plan, market diagram, external visual

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 44

20/06/2014 01:27


GRO U P 22 Myriam Lahalle Kevin Lo Jacob Long Abigail Murphy + Ceri Humphris Ryan Morgan

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

Our project aimed to connect Temple Quay, Temple Meads Station and St. Philips Marsh. The scheme evolved into a ‘ribbon of light’, a market route from the north of the station to the south end of the postal depot site. The permanent market is placed within a channel cut through the existing building, encouraging a symbiotic relationship between the two. The scheme extends to the north as a bridge market over the railway, with the education element and public courtyard forming the link between the two.

From top: Site plan, sectional perspective, long section

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 45

45

20/06/2014 01:27


G ROUP 2 3 Jade Appleton Nicola Blincow Lilian Tran + Philip Kingston Jones

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

Bristol Market Quay will be the start of a new food network across Bristol. The scheme connects the broken links between food and our understanding of how it is made, encouraging people to grow and sell their own food. On a larger scale it connects to the surroundings by introducing water into the site to form a market quay, plugging into the backbone of Bristol culture and the Floating Harbour. It will also provide the opportunity for people arriving in Bristol by train to take the Bristol Ferry Bus to the city centre. The ground floor is an open public realm alive with market hub, conversely the first floor is a private domain of community galleries.

46

From top: Detailed visuals, sectional perspective, view across the canal

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 46

20/06/2014 01:27


GRO U P 24 Rorie Ash Ed Procter Harper Robertson + Ze Chuan William Johnson This project is a direct challenge to the prevalent food culture of today. Food is far too often seen as fuel. It is produced, sold and consumed as a convenience item, designed not to interfere with the stream of our lives. Our market is about fostering a food community that takes greater time, and care over food and importantly that food acts as an agent to bring people together and encourage social interaction.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

The intention is that this will rejuvenate this area of Bristol with a new social and economic identity with a wide sphere of influence.

From top: Tectonic model, market sketch, long section

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 47

47

20/06/2014 01:27


G ROUP 2 5 Funmbi Adeagbo Marika Karouzou Nabillah Oyewumi + Calum Fraser Efstratios Mavrogiannis “One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” - Virginia Woolf Coming from a different cultural background the idea of hawking springs to mind as the most efficient method of tackling the mobile market. Under this principle the buyer does not travel to reach their goal of attaining goods like in the typical supermarket scenario. Alternatively the products are brought to them en route on their daily transit. You do not set out seeking the product but vendors strategically position themselves along the established path to achieve maximum sales.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

By taking this idea of sales along your journey we wished to create a point of festivity along the users’ path where they can be culturally enriched by the market.

48

From top: Model detail, external visual, market visual, external perspective

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 48

20/06/2014 01:27


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 49

20/06/2014 01:27


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 50

20/06/2014 01:28


GRO U P 26 George Pickering Liam Rawlins Reshma Upadhyaya + Max Fuller Amy Jowsey

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

Having observed the misalignment of society with food, the project aspires to reconnect people with the growing landscape and provide a model for urban food production, exchange and celebration, challenging the existing paradigm of our unsustainable food culture. It achieves this by rediscovering and rekindling a sacred connection to food.

From top: Axonometric diagram, internal visual, sectional perspective

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 51

51

20/06/2014 01:28


G ROUP 27 Oliver Choyce Charlotte Eley Otis Sloan Brittain + Harry Graham Eu¡then¡ics (noun)

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

The science that deals with the development of human well-being by improvement of living conditions

The Euthenics Exchange is a reaction to the monotony of the modern supermarket. The fracturing line of the railway is addressed with a terraced market hall that links the station to the floating harbour beyond, thus reconnecting the two halves of Bristol. Goods and people share a market rail that loops under the terraces and through Bristol Temple Meads station. This all takes place under a pneumatic, performative cloud roof that floats weightlessly over the open air market.

52

From top: Sectional perspectives, view from the bottom of the market, teaching kitchen

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 52

20/06/2014 01:28


GRO U P 28 Devant Asawla Harry Tuke Tom Joseph Ana Rita Martins + Marissa Stenning Daniel Treharne The modern ‘linear’ food system is pumped full of fossil fuels, is polluting and hugely wasteful. When thinking in terms of energy re-use and closed loop systems, one can imagine more sensible, local, less- energy intensive food systems. One in which the true value of a calorie is recognized and utilized.

The project integrates an open market, public street and productive, allotment space above a forest of Glulam trees. The trees act as the structure, the servicing and as rainwater harvesting units. This is flanked by the ‘engine’ building and the existing building converted into residences.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

This market could not only function as a useful working, productive place incorporating food production, transformation and re-use, but it can also

be an educative place inspiring and supporting social change. Re-engaging people with what they eat and where it comes from in a open, permeable, and fun place.

From top: Sectional perspective, glulam forest, market perspectives

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 53

53

20/06/2014 01:28


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 54

20/06/2014 01:28


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 55

20/06/2014 01:28


G ROUP 2 9 Lucy Galvin Nathan Gilbert Alex Russel + James Cunniffe Alex Petrou The Growing Interchange The scheme aims to reinvigorate the station’s edge, in effect providing an additional platform to house the market. The market is used as a tool to link the established areas of Bristol to the newly developing areas. And with the market as the hub, change the city’s approach to food.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

The roof structure has multiple folds, which both animates the market and provided light and ventilation to it.

56

From top: Plan in context, external visual, sectional perspective

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 56

20/06/2014 01:28


GRO U P 30 Steven Bekkers Annette Davis Harry Streuli + Jess Mill Jenny Pollard To try and combat the dislocation of shopping and the lack of social interaction around food, we want to try and enclose the whole cycle within the building; a closed system. Food will be grown on site, sold in the market and then cooked and eaten in the restaurants, bakery, and community kitchens. This is amplified by the local community contributing their own resources into the market culture and food production. The growing space and market place will gather momentum, and act as a stimulus to social contact with a focus on food.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

Food production takes up a large area when grown in a traditional manner, but space in this urban setting is limited. There are emerging techniques that drastically increase the efficiency of space used for growing food; by stacking growing areas vertically. This industrial farming could be housed within the existing seven storey Building A, with the remaining area used for community growing scenarios, specifically allotments.

From top: Teaching kitchen, roof terrace, allotment strands, sectional perspective

20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 57

57

20/06/2014 01:29


G ROUP 3 1 Colin Fowler Tom Metcalf Anna Lisbeth Shackloth + Ben Leary Antonis Michael The site is situated adjacent to Bristol Temple Meads train station; as a result the proposal creates a new platform, Platform 17, which would accommodate the planned electrification of the London to Bristol train line. The market is located on the platform, which allows local produce from Bristol and the surrounding region to be sold directly to the travelling public, as well as the local community. In addition to serving the station, the market is accessible by canal boat from the east, bus services from the south and via a number of foot bridges, creating a transport hub.

Opening Bristol Temple Meads to the east removes the barrier created by the train line which divides the city. This supports the planned redevelopment of the eastern quarter.

B A SI L S PEN CE

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

A glulam structure supports a fully glazed roof that reflects the dimensions and shape of the existing

main station building designed by Brunel. Sections of the roof extend out to the east over the surrounding landscape. These extensions create circulation and allow air to be tempered before it reaches the platform. The extensions are physically defined by buildings which provide social, residential and educational services. Building locations are defined by the associated landscape responding to the existing conditions of the site.

58

From top: Marketplace and platform visuals, long site section

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20/06/2014 01:29


20140610-Basil Spence-HS.indd 59

20/06/2014 01:29


Throughout the individual project a number of students took part in an experiment collecting data about the design process. Using Google Forms, students filled in a 30 second survey about what they were doing at that point in time, approximately 4 times a day at random times throughout the day. The following is the result.

WHAT IS YOUR USERNAME?

See the survey at: http://bit.ly/1pxf07b e.g. mgl21

ARE YOU WORKING?

yes

no

no. of surveys

3455 240kb of data

14_06_16 report seperate.indd 60

no. of partipants

average time between survey

63

4 6 MIN S

17 reported entire project

46 minutes 23 seconds

total time surveying

2 8HR S

assuming average survey time of 30 secs

20/06/2014 01:30


1. working 2. refueling 3. conclusion

WHERE ARE YOU?

e.g. studio

DESCRIBE WHAT YOU ARE UP TO...

designing

ARE YOU USING YOUR HANDS TO...

draw

WHAT DIGITAL TOOLS ARE YOU USING?

photoshop

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY CONSUMING?

snack

DESCRIBE IN A WORD WHAT YOU’RE EATING

tea

DESCRIBE IN A WORD WHAT YOU’RE DRINKING

toast

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT PROJECT?

number from 1-10

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNT SINCE YOUR LAST SURVEY? (MYSTERY QUESTION)?

a peanut is not a nut, it is a legume

(10 - ecstatic, 1 - suicidal)

eagle

e.g. describe your project as an animal..

what have you learnt since your last survey? MASSIVE F UN D A M EN T A L D ESI G N C H A N G E S A RE NOT A DV I SED A W EEK A N D A H A L F BEFOR E T EC TON I C 3/30/2014 4:51:36am

14_06_16 report seperate.indd 61

R E P O RT 20/06/2014 01:30


no. of days recorded

average per day

110

how do you like your eggs in the morning?

31

01/02/2014 - 22/05/2014

I P RE FE R C H I CK E N 25/04/2014 13:06:51

280 reports

most recorded day

most recorded hour

least recorded hour

5 FE B

4PM

5A M

90 reports

280 reports

2 6 02 75% of all surveys

52 9

3 reports

no. of working surveys

late night reports

between 9pm & 7am

no. of places recorded working

29

Studio, House, Critroom, Library, Hometown, Site, Lecturehall, Train, Cad labs, Bed, Workshop, Bus, Mill, Laser room, Classroom 3.11, Ferry, Print room, Friend’s house, Bill’s, Cafe, Forest, Francis DIY, Lake, Les Alpes!, Martin’s desk, Precedence visit, Royal Academy of Arts, Toilet, Trowbridge, Westbury

TIME S R E C O R D E D 12am

12pm

12am

start

14_06_16 report seperate.indd 62

march

april

may

end

20/06/2014 01:30


PL A C E S R E C O R D E D

STU DIO 2162 reports

BED

11 reports

HOUS E

T R AIN 11 reports

293 reports

L I B R A RY

S IT E 11 reports

13 reports

CR ITR OOM 45 reports

H O M E TOW N

CADLAB

11 reports

L EC T URE 11 reports

11 reports

W HE N & W HE R E 14_06_16 report seperate.indd 63

20/06/2014 01:30


average feeling

In a word describe your time at bath

5.9

B IP O L A R

out of 10

best day of the week

T H UR S 6.04/10

5/4/2014 18:32:17

worst day of the project

best day of the project

MA Y 18

MAY 22

average 4.4/10

TH

ND

average 9.0/10

H OW D O YO U F E E L A B O UT TH E P ROJ ECT?

Interim Crit 2

10

Interim Crit 1

Brief Confirmation

average happiness out of 10 against time

8

6

4

2

start

14_06_16 report seperate.indd 64

march

april

20/06/2014 01:30


00:00

mon

sun

tues

4 6

5

4

5

6

wed

fri

12:00

thurs

AVERAGE FEELI NG ACROSS THE DAY

Tectonic Crit

Final Crit

A V ER A GE F E E LIN G AC ROSS THE W E E K

april

may

Brochure Hand In

sat

3

3

end

F E E LIN G 14_06_16 report seperate.indd 65

20/06/2014 01:30


14_06_16 report seperate.indd 66

SWEET

6 1 3 1 3 1 2 5 3 2 5 3 2 1 27 3 5 4 3 2 1 4 1 1 25 4 4 13 5 2 3 1 2 1 4 1 1 1 2 5 3 2 4 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 5 2 2 2 1 12 7 2 1 5 4 5 1 1 37 1 10 1 3 1 1 15 4 1 2 8 1 4 1 8 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 4 22

S AVO URY

Bacon Bagel Baguette Bbq Beef Blood Bolognaise Bread Breakfast Brie Burger Burrito Carrot Cauliflower Cereal Cheddar Chicken Chilli Chinese Cigarette Cottage-pie Couscous Crackers Crackling Crisps Croissant Crumpets Curry Doritos Fajitas Fish Fish pie Fry-up Gnocchi Houmous Indian Jambalaya Kale Kebab Lamb Lasagne Lentils Macaroni McCoys McDonald’s Meatballs Mexican Mini-cheddars Muesli Nachos Nak’d bar Nandos Noodles Nuts Omelette Paella Paneer Pasty Peanutbutter Picnic Pizza Polenta Pork Porridge Rice Rice-cakes Risotto Roast Salad Salmon Samosa Sandwich Sausage-roll Sausages Scampi Scratchings Seeds Shepherds-pie Soup Spaghetti Steak Stew Stirfry Sunbites Sushi Thai Toast Toastie Tortellini Tuna Vegetables Wasabi-nuts Wedges Wotsits Wrap Yoghurt

22 15 1 1 30 2 1 1 3 1 11 1 6 2 6 47 18 3 2 2 1 5 4 1 1 4 2 6 3 2 6 2 1 4 1 3 1 3 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 10 1 26 1 11 20 8 1 2 1 7 3 1 12 17 1 5 2 2 1 2 1 3 10 9 1 2 2 1 9 1 1

Apple Banana Banana-bread Banofee Biscuits Blueberries Breakaway Brioche Brownie Brownies Cake Candy sticks Caramel Cheese Thins Chewing gum Chocolate Cookies Creamegg Doughnut Dunker Easter-eggs Eggs Flapjack Fredo Fries Frosties Fruitella Fudge Gingernut Haribo Hobnobs Hotcross-bun Hula-hoops Icecream Icing Jaffacake Jelly Jelly-babies Jelly-beans Kitkat Lemon posset Lollipop Lovehearts Macaroons Malteasers Maltloaf Mandarine Matchmakers Melons Mini eggs Mini Rolls Mints Moose Mrtom Muffin Munchies Orange Oreo Pancakes Pasta Pastries PB&J Pear Penguin Pie Pineapples Pomegranate Popcorn Potato Pudding Raisins Raspberries Refreshers Rennies Rock Scones Shortbread Sweetclem Sweets Toffee-crisp Tomatoes Twix Vitamins Weetos Winegums Yumyum

FO O D RE CO RD ED

20/06/2014 01:30


ARE YOU REFUELING?

FUEL TYPE

DRINK TYPE 7

2

1

3

6

8

4 9

5 1 2

surveys with food or drink surveys without food or drink

no. of foods recorded

832

31% of working surveys

3 4

snack meal

5

drink

no. of drink recorded

152 0

58% of working surveys

6 7

healthy (i.e. water) soft drink

8 9

alcoholic hot

no. of caffeinated drinks

74 8

49% of beverages recorded

ST I M ULANT D RI NKS

F UE L 14_06_16 report seperate.indd 67

20/06/2014 01:30


100

0 (%)

100

precentage of surveys

100

0

100

100

0

100 start

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

12

13

14

15

end

project timeline in weeks 14_06_16 report seperate.indd 68

20/06/2014 01:31


H A N D TO O L S

what have you learnt since your last survey?

I SHOULD MAKE MORE MODELS BY HAND 18/02/2014 20:31:48pm

none draw write modeling other

no. of hand tools recorded

1 575

57% of working reports

no. of combined hand and digital tools

14 51

53% of all working surveys

draw

W HA T A R E YO U U P TO?

other (digital)

modeling

internet

write

designing preparation researching

10%

20%

30%

40%

laser cutter

other (hand)

presenting discussion

illustrator

3d modeler

other indesign

cad photoshop

D IG I T A L TO O L S

what have you learnt since your last survey? none CAD

I ’VE REMEMBERED HOW TO USE PHOTOSHOP 7/5/2014 4:07:30am

3d modeler internet photoshop indesign illustrator laser cutter other

no. of digital tools recorded

most recorded hour

2 19 8

4P M

80% of working reports

280 reports

W HA T 14_06_16 report seperate.indd 69

20/06/2014 01:31


JUST SCRIBBLE · IF YOU JUMP A FENCE, YOU TEAR YOUR TROUSERS · I MAY HAVE BLACKHEADS · LIYUAN LIBRARY LOOKS LIKE SOLID WOOD, BUT IT’S ALL LIES AND CLEVER DETAILING · YOU DON’T GET WORK DONE WHEN SEB’S IN STUDIOS · BOXES ARE BETTER · ALL ABOUT THE BRITISH MOTORWAY SYSTEM... THANK YOU SEB · BUILDING REGULATIONS ARE MORE BORING AND COMPLICATED THAN I THOUGHT · AT THE DOCTORS AS SOON AS YOU SAY YOU DO AN ARCHITECTURE DEGREE ANYTHING WRONG WITH YOU IS STRESS RELATED · HOW A BAND SAW WORKS · I’M NOT GONNA BE ABLE TO MAKE BATH HALF AT THIS RATE · THE SUN MAKES A GOOD PROCRASTINATION REASON · DRINKING IN THE SUN ON SUNDAYS IS THE BOMB · MARTIN IS A GENIUS · SOMETIMES TWICE FINGERS JOIN TOGETHER IN THE PACKET. LIKE SIAMESE TWINS · DRY WALLS CAN GET WET · STUDIO SMELLS LIKE WOTSITS · IT’S A DOG EAT DOG WORLD · CARD BENDS WOOD · THE TWO TUNNELS CYCLE TRACK IS AMAZING · SALADS TRICK YOU · STORAGE SPACE IS GR8 · HOW TO MAKE CHEAP TREES · DON’T BOTHER · THE SPANISH HAVE LEFT · ILL · SIRTEDWINASLOWSBY · RISOTTO IS A QUESTIONABLE MEAL · PREANNE TUTORIAL HAS GIVEN ME THE JITTERS · OTIS IS RAGBOY · CLAXTON DOES IT AGAIN · YOU SHOULD BE WARY OF RENDERING AT THIS STAGE · THE SPANIARDS ARE HERE · THE CATALANS ARE HERE · TUESDAY CRITS HAVE SO MUCH WORK...PANIC · ROB GREGORY IS GOOD IN CRITS · WRITING A LIST MAKES ME FEEL GOOD AGAIN · MARTIN IS AMAZING. SORTS YOU RIGHT OUT · I CAN RUN THE BATH HALF MARATHON IN UNDER 2 HOURS · SUN MAKES YOU HAPPY · HATE FRESHERS HAVING HOLIDAYS · LOVE GROUP TUTORIALS IN STUDIO · MARTIN IS SUPER · VERY UP AND DOWN · EVEN ON BRIEMAS QUIZZES ARE TIME CONSUMING TO PLAN · DAY 21: THINGS NEED TO PICK UP A BIT · YOU CAN’T SEE A REFLECTION OF A RAINBOW · CONTOUR MODELS ARE HARD · CHEAPSIDE IS DIFFICULT TO PLAN · THE WOMAN FROM BRISTOL TEMPLE MEADS NOW WORKS AT BATH SPA · STUCK · A GOOD BIT OF SLEEP SOLVES PROBLEMS · STRONG. IN LONDRES · DON’T GET THROUGH 4 TINNIES ON THE TRAIN TO LONDON IN THE MIDDLE OF THE DAY AND EXPECT IT TO BE A LONG NIGHT· PLANNING’S CONFUSING · THE ADVANTAGE OF AN ALL NIGHTER IN STUDIO IS NO CHANCE OF FAILING LENT · BOLTON’S SCHEME LOOKS NICELY RESOLVED · HALFWAY · MAYBE ARCHES ARE COOL · I NEED TO STOP DRINKING SO MUCH · I HATE THE TEA GAME · HATE CONTOURS · TOM ESTA UN CABESSA DE POLLA · GOING BACK TO MY ROOTS BY ODYSSEY MAKES EVERYBODY HAPPY · SIXTH YEAR GOLD LEAF CONCEPT MODELS ARE BEAUTIFUL · OLI IS CLASS AT GIVING TUTORIALS · HOUMOUS AND BRIE ARE AMAZING IN BURGERS · SAINSBURYS BEEF SANDWICHES ARE BANGING · SOMETIMES SLEEP IS LITERALLY THE BEST IDEA, IT SORTS YOU RIGHT OUT · ANOTHER CLASS STUDIO 4.1 TUTORIAL · GOTTA LOVE TINNIES TUESDAYS · THE H-BOMB’S DAWG’S ONLY GOT HIS TOP JAW. DAMMMMN · FRAGILE · CHILLED. STILL GOING STRONG · OLI’S HAD A MARE AND HASN’T DESIGNED WAYNE MANOR · LASER CUTTING 20,000 LINES TAKES A WHILE · SCISSOR STAIR TIME · THERE’S NO NEED TO SAVE SO MANY TEABAGS · NICHOLAS CAGE STARS IN SOME AWFUL FILMS · BEESTING STILL GIVES HORRIBLE HANGOVERS · THE LENGTH OF THE 100 YEARS WAR · PHONE ALARMS SHOULDN’T BE ALLOWED TO BE TURNED OFF · ART BOOKS ARE HEAVY · ESTOY MUY TRISTE QUE LAS CHICAS ESPANAS ESTAN SALIENDO · RITA LOOSES EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME · VELO LOUNGE MENDIP REUNION IS ON THE CARDS · JADE “DOESN’T REALLY FANCY MEN” · STUFF ABOUT ALEXANDER BRODSKY · GORMLEY’S FEELINGS ABOUT SUBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE AND SPACE (YEAH THAT’S RIGHT, DEEP STUFF) · BLACK SHEEP IS A SHOCKING FILM · GETTING READY FOR A JOHN SMITH’S FOR FROSBY’S BIRTHDAY AT MIDNIGHT · PARADE CANNOT DISTINGUISH BETWEEN STEAK PIES AND CHICKEN PIES · HOW TO MAKE BOLTON FEEL AWKWARD SITTING OPPOSITE ME · INTERIMS CAN BE BRUTAL BUT IT GAVE OUT A LOT OF IDEAS · INTERESTING MORNING · MAR-T THE T-MAN GENERALLY GIVES CLASS ADVICE · GOING STRONG. EASY · FOSTERS FOR 3.70 AT THE NEST IS INSANE. GO FOR BEESTING-TOM GOT THE GOOD STUFF FOR 1.85. GUTTED · IT’S ACTUALLY PRETTY EASY SO FAR...NOT HARD AT ALL · YESTERDAY SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL HAPPENED. ALSO STILL GOING STRONG · BOLTON’S ESSAY IS CLASS · OLI’S CAR FAILED IT’S MOT · MASSIVE FUNDAMENTAL DESIGN CHANGES ARE NOT ADVISED A WEEK AND A HALF BEFORE TECTONIC · GUSTAV IS AMAZING · HOW TO CLEAN A TOILET · CONTOUR MODELS LOOK SICK · STUDIO 4.1 ARE CLASS AT GIVING TUTORIALS · BIG NIGE GIVES GOOD SNAPCHATS · OPEN MIC · FLOATING BUILDING COULD WORK · MALLOYS PLAYS AMAZING MUSIC · I LOVE ALL OF MY FRIENDS · CAN’T PLAN · HAPPY DAYS · BRILLIANT · THE LAKE JUST MAKES THINGS ALRIGHT · RUNNING UP WIDCOMBE HILL IS NOT EASY · BUILDING REGS IS AS DULL AS A LIAM RAWLINS ANECDOTE · HOW TO MAYBE DO QUICK VISUALS · IT’S ACTUALLY POSSIBLE TO GET 4 HOURS BEHIND SCHEDULE AFTER ONLY SEEING 6 PEOPLE · JOHN GRIFFITHS IS A DUDE · WAITING FOR A STAR TO FALL CARRY YOUR HEART INTO MY ARMS THAT’S WHERE YOU BELONG IN MY ARMS BABY YEEAAAAAHHHHH · WE MANAGED TO KEEP TINNIES TUESDAYS GOING WITH 5 MINUTES TO SPARE · PINUPS ARE EXPENSIVE · HOW IS IT 4 O CLOCK · I’VE GOT A NEW COUSIN · POWER CUTS ARE NEVER GOOD FOR THE OLD BATTERY · PURE TERROR · PARADE BURGERS ARE RUBBISH · TOM NEEDS A BETTER DATE PLAN · 0% YOGURT TASTES HORRIBLE · BUILDINGS THAT LOOK LIKE FACES ARE NOT GOOD · WHAT ARE INTERIM CRITS EVEN FOR? · FREE PIZZA AND BEER YAYAYAY · SLEEP GOOD. WORK NOT · I CAN’T SING · BEER IS GOOD · LEMONS · HOME COOKED BREAKFAST IS THE BOSS · BOO YOU BUILDING REGS · BLEURGH WHAT IDIOT THINKS SPIRAL RAMPS ARE A GOOD IDEA · MEH, ROOFS ARE COMPLICATED · SKIING IS BETTER THAN ARCHITECTURE · PRECEDENT · EXERCISE IS GOOD · BIKE = SORE LEGS · I WANT TO BE ASLEEP ALL THE TIME · FROZEN READY MEALS ARE AWFUL · HOMEMADE CURRY IS MUCH BETTER THAN FROZEN CURRY. FROZEN CURRY TASTES TERRIBLE · EVERYTHING IS A TAPERED TOWER · VECTORWORKS IS AS COMPLICATED AS GIRLS · WHISKEY FIXES THINGS · SEAN PAUL ROCKS IT · MOBY · ARE INTERIM CRITS EVEN IMPORTANT? · 12 HOURS SLEEP, HHHMMMMMM · CLEAN[ER] STUDIO = HAPPY STUDIO · IT’S OTIS’ BIRTHDAY TOMORROW · BEER IS GOOD · PLATYPUSES ARE ONLY 30CM LONG · DRUM AND BASS EQUALS FAST WORK · PINNED UP · MY HEAD IS SMALL · IT’S ONE O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING · THERE IS NOT ENOUGH COFFEE IN THE WORLD TO FUEL MY CADDING · I’M DOING EVERYTHING AT ONCE AND IT’S STUPID · ROOFS ARE A PAIN IN THE BACKSIDE · MY MUM KNEW ALISON AND PETER SMITHSON · JOHN GRIFFITHS IS POTENTIALLY THE BEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED TO THE ENTIRE WORLD · I LOVE FATHER CHRISTMAS · OH GOD, A WEEK TO GO AND I STILL HAVEN’T DESIGNED MY ROOF.. ON THE PLUS SIDE, ITS SUNNY AND I’M INSIDE · NOTHING · SUNRISE IS NICE · I’VE REMEMBERED HOW TO USE PHOTOSHOP · IN DENIAL - THERE IS NO CRIT · NEED MORE SLEEP · MAKING LISTS IS USEFUL BUT TERRIFYING · PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC · I AM SIR INDESIGN, MASTER OF ALL INDESIGN · LAST MINUTE DETAILS, ALWAYS WISE · LOL WHAT R REGULATIONZ · EVERYTHING IN THE WORLD TO DO IN EIGHT HOURS · OKUS MY CYCLE IS SO BROKEN. UGH · REMEMBERED OXBRIDGE COURTYARDS ARE CALLED QUADS/QUADRANGLES · HOW THE DOCTOR WHO THEME WAS MADE · HAPPY HOUR IS THE SAME IN FRENCH COS THEY’RE LAZY · MARTIN SEEMS TO HAVE A SUPPLY OF GIVEAWAY BOOKS · EMMAUSGLOUCESTER · TREES SUCK SOMETIMES · COFFEE DATE ON THE CARDS · PERSONAL STATEMENT (DRAFT?) WAS RIDICULOUS · MATURE CHEDDAR DOESNT GO AS WELL AS I’D HOPE IN THE OL’ CREAMY MUSHROOM SAUCE... SHOULDA BEEN BRIE · ABI DOESN’T LIKE STEVE WRIGHT COS HE’S TOO HAPPY · MARTIN HAD A BEARD IN INDIA, NICE · I HAVE ANGERED ISH, I KNOW NOT WHY · BERLIN HAS COOL ‘BORROWING SHOPS’ - SHARE ECONOMY YO · A SLICE OF BREAD HAS AS MUCH SALT AS A BAG OF PORK SCRATCHINGS · OLI’S DAD IS A COOL CAT · NEED SOME DOLLAR FOR SWEDEN · SHOULDA DONE SOME DETAILING THESE LAST WEEKS · AINT GONNA HAVE MUCH FOR THIS · GOTS CHANGE IN GAME POST CRIT · GOT HALF WAY THROUGH THE OL’ RAFFLEBOOK · SHERBET IS AS GREAT AS I REMEMBER · SOIL VENT PIPES ARE A THING AND ONE IMAGINES ANNOYING · WE PLAYIN SOME RUGGER TODAY, GOOD TIMEZ · ITALIAN HERBS AIN’T SO ITALIAN · 2007 APPLE ‘POWERBOOKS’ IS JUST A LITTLE TOO OLD TO DO ANYTHING · MAD FINDS IN TESCO THESE DAYS, INCLUDING A NICE SAILOR OUTFIT · STUDIO IS ONE BRO DOWN · TOMO IS FEELIN BETTER, HORRRAH · CYCLING DOWN AT THE VERY BREAK OF DAWN IS SWEET TING · MARIE WON THE RAFFLE, PROBABLY CHEATED · RESH MAKES YUMMY DINNER · ELEMENTARY IS A DISTRACTING SHOW. MUST NOT WATCH · STILL ON THE ELEMENTARY. HELP · I HAVE A BUILDING · ELANTHAS THE BEST · I HAVE NO MONEY · I’M SCARED OF THE DENTISTS · HOW TO COOK A SEA URCHIN · HOW TO WASTE A WHOLE DAY SLEEPING · MORRISONS BELGIUM TRIPLE CHOCOLATE CAKE’S MARBLE TOP DOESN’T STAY MARBLED WHEN YOU MICROWAVE IT · NEW YORK TAXI

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DRIVERS ARE NOT VERY LOGICAL WHEN EARNING MONEY · WORKSHOP MAN IS THE BOSS · INTERIM CRIT IS NEXT WEEK · THE FUN RAISER WAS A GREAT SUCCESS · NO · THE CHOCOLATE CAKE FROM FRESH IS REALLY YUMMY · TOOTH ACHE IS THE MOST ANOYING PAIN EVER · DEV’S AWESOME · NEWS ON THE MISSING PLANE · HOW TO PAINT EGGS · RAW EGGS DON’T SPIN · AUSRA IS CLEVER · I LOVE BRIDGET JONES · HOW TO USE PODIUM · THE TALL GUY I ALWAYS SEE AROUND IS FROM THE NETHERLANDS AND IS DOING A PHD IN FIRE IN TIMBER CONSTRUCTION · NAMING PROJECTS IS HARD · I’M SCARED · YES · NO · NO · YES · SKETCH UP IS NOT BAD · I LOVE SKETCHUP · IF LIFE GIVES YOU LEMONS, MAKE A BLOODY MARY · RESULTS · A LEGO BREAK CHEERS EVERYONE UP. · MY BUILDING IS SMALLER THAN I THOUGHT · I HAVE TWO THERMAL ENVELOPES ON THE SAME PART OF THE BUILDING · SUNSHINE IS HAPPINESS · THINK FREELY. DONT SET SITE BOUNDARY · ALWAYS FINISH EVERYTHING ON THE TO DO LIST · BE POSITIVE. · I DONT KNOW. I’M TIRED. · THE ONLY THING STANDING BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR GOAL IS THE STORY YOU KEEP TELLING YOURSELF AS TO WHY YOU CAN’T ACHIEVE IT · A FEW CHARACTERISTICS OF MY SITE · BRING COOKIES AND PEOPLE WILL BE YOUR FRIENDS · NEXT YEAR I’M TRAVELLING THE WORLD · GONE FORWARD IN MY SITE ANALYSIS · THAT STUDIO CAN GET PRETTY DRAMATIC · GOING TOWARDS AN ECO VILLAGE · SO MUCH GOSSIP ABOUT LAST NIGHT AT THE NEST · GIVE MARTIN BROWNIES AND HE WILL GIVE YOU A DEGREE · AFRICAN DANCE IS THE MOST FUN THING TO DO IN BATH · DROPPING HALF OF MY PROGRAM WILL TAKE ME PLACES · GEORGE PICKERING IS THE MASTER OF SNAPCHAT · EVERYONE’S SWEET GRANDPARENT STORIES. · STARTED TO SEE A CONCEPT EMERGE FROM MY SITE · HAD A MIDNIGHT EPIPHANY ABOUT THE PUBLIC REALM IN MY PROJECT · A HAND-MADE MODEL IS SOMETIMES QUICKER AND MORE USEFUL THAN A LASER-CUT ONE · THE ALLOTMENT IS THE KEY! · CIDER IS GOOD · MY BUILDING FINALLY MAKES SENSE. PRAISE THE LORD · JUST FOUND AN AMAZING CONCEPT · THAT LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL · CHANGED DESIGN · THAT I AM IN LOVE WITH OTIS · MY BUILDING DON’T WORK · RESOLVING BUILDINGS IS RIGHT HARD. · I NEED TO REFRAIN FROM PARTYING · MY CENTRAL MASS IS VERY UNRESOLVED... · THERE IS A SKYSCRAPER IN NEW YORK WITH NO WINDOWS. 33 THOMAS STREET · SPRINGSTEEN IS GOD · MY SITE IS WELL STEEP · THE BUS SERVICE ON SUNDAY IS RUBBISH · I SHOULD BE DOING MORE WORK · THE WORKSHOP NEEDS TO OPEN EARLIER · IT’S NOT EASY · BUTTERFLIES BE DYING · THE LASER CUTTER VIBRATES THE WALLS OF STUDIO 4.1. IT’S ANNOYING · MY HOSTEL ROOMS DON’T WORK. · THE GUYS IN THE WORKSHOP KNOW WHERE IT’S AT · I SHOULD MAKE MORE MODELS BY HAND · EARLY MORNINGS ARE PAINFUL BUT NECESSARY · MICROWAVED KORMA IS DEEPLY DISAPPOINTING · DEMARCHE - AN ESKIMO TRADITION OFFERS AN ANGRY PERSON RELEASE BY WALKING THE EMOTION OUT OF HIS OR HER SYSTEM IN A STRAIGHT LINE ACROSS THE LANDSCAPE. THE POINT AT WHICH ANGER IS CONQUERED IS MARKED WITH A STICK, BEARING WITNESS TO THE STRENGTH OR LENGTH OF THE RAGE · I NEED TO BE LESS SELF DEPRECATING. THAT’S WOT MARTIN SAID · THAT I NEED TO GET BETTER AT THE GAME. · THERE IS NEVER ENOUGH TIME · BEER CAN SOLVE ALL PROBLEMS · TRY PANCAKES WITH MAPLE SYRUP AND BACON - IT’S WELL GOOD · NEW YORK USED TO BE CALLED NEW AMSTERDAM · JUST WENT ON THE TWO TUNNELS WALK IN BATH. EERIE SOUNDS · RHLESTP · HOW TO REFINE MY CONCEPT · THE STONE OF THE VILLAGE IS THAT ON WHICH IT STANDS - THE VERNACULAR IS TIED TO THE UNDERLYING LAND · HAD A BREAKTHROUGH WITH THE TOWER ELEMENT IN MY BUILDING · CLAXTON IS RIGHT ON IT · JUST HAD A WONDERFULLY HELPFUL CRIT. JAYNE WAS ON IT · RESOLVING THE STRATEGY FOR MY HOSTEL CONSTRUCTION. · TUTORIALS AT THE END OF THE DAY FORCE YOU TO WORK HARDER IN THE MORNING · HAPPY HOUR · RED RUM IS THE ONLY HORSE TO WIN THE GRAND NATIONAL THREE TIMES · I’VE FORGOTTEN TO PLAN HALF MY BUILDING · THE WORKLOAD IS RELENTLESS · SALVIA PLATH - THE BARDO STORY. GREAT ALBUM · SHOULD HAVE BEEN DESIGNING THE SECTIONS MUCH EARLIER · HOW TO MAKE STOP MOTION ANIMATION IN PHOTOSHOP · I’VE REALLY NEGLECTED THIS AUDITORIUM SPACE · THERE’S SO MUCH STILL TO DO · PLAN PLAN PLAN PLAN PLAN · CAD CAD CAD. I LOVE CAD · MAN U SACKED THEIR MANAGER · MY HOUSEMATE HAS A COLD · SO MUCH STILL LEFT TO DESIGN · DOES SOMEONE SHAVE YOUR FACE FOR YOU IF YOU’RE IN A COMA · ELEVATIONS. ARE. A. PAIN. IN. THE · THE BUILDING IS SLOWLY FALLING APART · PURE FEAR · TIME TO PRODUCE THE GOODS #ILOVEMYLIFE · MY PROJECT HAS ACTUALLY GOT WORSE IN THE LAST COUPLE OF HOURS · SO MUCH STILL TO DO · THE WORD SCUBA STANDS FOR SELFCONTAINED UNDERWATER BREATHING APPARATUS · MILLINERY IS A HAT MAKER · BRIEMAS = BRIENOEL · ELECTRIC LADYLAND IS THE BEES KNEES · MY LECTURE IS LOST · HOW TO PRONOUNCE RENE DECARTES · THE ECOTRICITY BUILDING WAS FIRST CALLED THE IMPERIAL BUILDING...USEFUL. · THERE IS BATMANS LAIR IN STROUD · HUGO IS HUGO BOSS · I STARTED FROM THE BOTTOM NOW WE HERE · THE LOTUS EXIEGE IS FASTER THAN THE LOTUS ELISE · THE ROCK CHURCH (FINLAND) ROCKS · TARRED/UN TARRED HEMP IS USED IN THATCHING · HOW TO LOVE · YOU CAN CHANGE THE YEAR OF THE SATELLITE PHOTOS IN GOOGLE EARTH · BANANAS ARE BERRIES · HOW TO PLAY CLARINET · CHARLES DARWIN HAD A TRAIL IN HIS GARDEN TO COME UP WITH IDEAS CALLED THE ‘THINKING PATH’ · THE WORDS BUNGALOW, CUMBERBAND AND TYPHOON ORIGINATE FROM HINDI · FUNRAISER IS THE BUSINESS · PETERBOROUGH IS RUBBISH · HUGO LOVES THOSE ZUMTHOR TEXTURES · MY MOTHER IS AWESOME · PINTEREST HAS SITE ANALYSIS · POLYLINES AND OVERKILL FOR LASER FILES · I LOVE DANIEL · I’M IN YOUR HOUSE... MEH HEHEHE · TO THROW AND CATCH · TOO MUCH CHOCOLATE MAKES ME FEEL SICK · THERE ARE FEW THINGS THAT RORIE ASH LOVES MORE THAN GAVIN & STACEY · FIRST GREAT WESTERN IS RUBBISH · I CAN’T DO THIS · I’M LOST · SCORE IS LOUD · ABOUT ACCORDIA HOMES · SPLIT LEVEL SECTION WON’T WORK · I CAN’T PLAN · NOT MUCH · WE HAVE COFFEE! · I LOVE HER · ANA RITA ISN’T GONNA DRINK FOR A MONTH · IN THE 1600S PHYSICIANS TRIED TO CURE AN INSANE MAN BY REPLACING HIS BLOOD WITH A DOCILE SHEEP...IT DIDN’T WORK · ABOUT FERTILITY CLINIC · MY PLAN DOESN’T WORK · MILE END HAS A FLOATING MARKET · I’M A SUCKER FOR A PRETTY FACE · STUDIO 4.1 IS THE COOL STUDIO · I LIKE GUINNESS · BLANCA NO ES APROPRIADAO · HOW TO WASTE A DAY · FOSTERS AND ROGERS USED TO BE PARTNERS · GEORGE’S KINDNESS KNOWS NO BOUNDS · I GOT A NEW PHONE! · SNAPCHAT · GEORGE IS WEIRD · NOT MUCH · I’M BAD AT GETTING THINGS DONE · SCRATCH THE LAST THING I LEARN · JUST MAYBE IT WILL WORK OUT · SHE LOVES ME TOO · I WOULD BE WARY OF RENDERING AT THIS STAGE · THIS AIN’T ANONYMOUS, BE CAREFUL. · LET’S GET PRIMITIVE · AMERICAN 1 BED FLATS ARE HUGE · THAT MY STEP-DAD’S BIRTHDAY ISN’T WHEN I THOUGHT IT WAS · TO COMBINE RASTER AND VECTOR WHEN THE LASER CUTTER BREAKS · THAT MATT THINKS MY NAME IS JOE · CANALS ARE 1.5M DEEP · SOME SPANISH · A PLACE FOR A BOAT TO TURN IS CALLED A WINDING HOLE · NOUGHT · ABOUT SEWERAGE · THE WINDOW IS THE BEST · MARINA ENTRANCE NEEDS 12M DIAMETRE CLEAR SPACE · MARTIN IS COOL · MY SITE IS TOO BIG · ENTERING FROM ABOVE MIGHT WORK · STAINING WOOD IS COOL · THE SUBTLE CURVE OF A ROOF CAN BE A THING OF BEAUTY · BACK TO BACK TERRACES CAN WORK · THE SUN IS SHINING, THE WEATHER IS GOOD · SPIRAL/ DOG-LEG STAIRS ARE THE BOMB FOR COMPACT DESIGN · A GAME CHANGER A DAY BEFORE THE CRIT IS FUN · THOMAS HERZOG IS NOT JAQUES HERZOG · FCB HAVE NICE PEELED ROOFS · I LIKE THE ENVIRONMENT GUY · MARTIN IS AWESOME · NOT MUCH BRO · 10 DAYS UNTIL BRIE-MAS · WINSTON CHURCHILL WAS SICK ON THE FLOOR IN BATH · NOTHING YET EVERYTHING · HOW TO XREF · GEORGE LOOKS AFTER HIS SICK FRIENDS, WHAT A LEGEND · NEVER STROKE AGAINST THE GRAIN · MARTIN IS THE BEANS!

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The last thing one discovers in composing a work is what to put first. Blaise Pascal, PensĂŠes

Almost everything serious is difficult; and everything is serious Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

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FO U RTH YE AR - TH E P RIM ITIVE Participation Mystique and Architecture This year our 4th year students were asked to explore the theme of Primitive. This theme has its root in an intriguing paper, Archaic Man (1931) written by the psychologist Carl Jung. Whilst the term ‘archaic’ can be defined as meaning primal, Jung infers it can also be read as a hypothetical psychic base camp from which humankind evolves towards consciousness. In this sense he argues that primitive man lived in a state where ‘physical reality is at the same time spiritual reality’, a position that contrasts somewhat with our modern mind set which tends to favour the physical. Indeed, he wryly observes that it is difficult to say anything significant about ‘civilized man’. Arguably, as we enter an age of ecological conscience this ‘original state’ of the primitive becomes all the more relevant, as it suggests a more integrated existence for humanity, one in which architecture has a vital part to play. The work that you will see is all located in and around the town of Stroud, famed for many things including the red cloth used in army uniforms, tennis balls and its ‘green economy’. The town was deliberately chosen not with any implication of primitiveness but as an appropriate host to radical ideas and proposals derived from each student’s personal interpretation of the creative potential of The Primitive.

Martin Gledhill 4th Year Studio Leader

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Romeo Chang Annie Kwan Ying Tung Dodo Lau Aaron Leung Jersey Poon Hai Wang Xj Wong Siyu Yao Yingyu Yao John Yim

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LOV E T H E R A PY R E T R EAT Romeo Chang In this generation, people have a more casual attitude towards relationships. Love is no longer seen as having great value. Sufferings as a consequence of personal impulsiveness therefore also occur at a higher frequency.

ST U DIO 4 .9

| BS c Arc hite c t ure

The aim of this project is to provide an opportunity, not to solve the issue, but to facilitate the easing of the situation by amending fragile relationships in both married and unmarried couples, through an couples therapy retreat.

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From top: Model detail, site plan, section

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TE X TILE S CH O O L & ART M ALL Annie Kwan Although the textile culture is currently hidden in Stroud, people in Stroud are proud of their history in textile industries and want to maintain this craftsmanship in the younger generation. Therefore, the focus of the project was to regenerate, promote and celebrate the textile culture in Stroud. There are three main parts in the design: textile school, art mall and gallery. Each function of the program targets people in different age groups and tries to stitch back the textile culture with the public.

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| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

My concept is a simple stitching motion. It is not only applied to the site intent, but also the design intent. I tried to use a thread to stitch through the town and canal side, those three main parts of program, as well as people from different communities together.

From top: Construction section, internal visual, external visual, sectional perspective

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MUS I C L IB R A RY Dodo Lau The music library aims to be a place that reconnects us to music at the Stroud town centre. Letting music be the language for communication between people, the journey through the building is guided by hearing rather than vision.

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| BS c Arc hite c t ure

The scheme forms a main route through the sound playground, the indoor performance space and the music park which are the main performance areas. There are music practice corners in the library building which links both floors. Hints of sound from different spaces allow communication between different parts of the building programme. The scheme connects people at different layers and at different scales in Stroud.

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From top: Scheme parti, internal visual, external visual. auditorium section

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STRO U D ARTIST RE S ID ENCY Aaron Leung

This project is an Artist Residency for the local Stroud Artist’s community located in a protective natural environment. The traditional way of displaying art has been an enclosed environment which often isolates the art and its environment. Between the nature and manmade, the scheme aims to blur the boundary between the artist’s art and its surrounding.

The concept originated from the material itself. Spaces are created by the primitive placement of stone load bearing walls, top with a concrete slab. The design intent is very obvious from the architectural language. The design utilises the existing slope and trees and the result is an organic arrangement as if the building belongs to its place.

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| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

There are three main parts of the design, the exhibition area, the workshops, and the artist’s studios. Together with the existing residential houses for the artists on

site, the collective of buildings which aims to provide an interesting artistic community in Stroud.

From top: Site plan, sectional perspective, internal visual, external visual

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A N I M A N A T U R A : A N IMAL AD O P TIO N C ENTRE Jersey Poon

areas. Anima Natura aims to encourage people to engage and learn about animals through a series of informal spaces. The buildings form a courtyard around a public path that draws people in and brings them closer to the animals and nature surrounding it.

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| BS c Arc hite c t ure

Animals and human have always had a unique relationship with each other. This project celebrates, and seeks to remind people, of our connection with nature by blurring the boundaries between animals, humans, and nature. The scheme sits at the confluence of river, canal and viaduct: between urban and rural

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From top: Site section, internal and external visuals

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ST R O U D TEX TILE S M U S EU M AND LIBRARY Hai Wang

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| B S c A rc h ite c t ure

Stroud has a very strong history in the textiles where the origin of its settlement was rooted in Gloucestershire’s medieval wool trade. With the decline of the industry in the nineteenth century, Stroud began to lose its industrial base and its textile identity. The Stroud Textiles Museum and Library aims to act as a centre for textile celebration and to provide a venue for textiles workshops and activities. The collaboration of Museum and Library further strengthens the building purpose.

From top: Site model, internal visuals, sectional perspective

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STR OU D T E N N IS A C A D E M Y Xj Wong Stroud Tennis Academy is designed to be well equipped with facilities that aim to ‘weave’ itself into the community of Stroud. Stroud town centre is famous for its textile industry in which the cloth that covers championship tennis balls is manufactured. The level of sports participation in Stroud district is relatively low particularly among children and young people due to the topographic challenge of the Stroud town itself. There is a need to provide opportunities for development that will enable all kinds of people to come together to share the similar ‘lingua franca’ which, can be any kind of sport. Tennis nature should be ‘access to all’. Exercising is not supposed to be concealed within an opaque training ground, barely untouchable by the people outside the sports world. The volume of space aims to be visible to all, bringing the people outside.

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| BS c Arc hite c t ure

Having well-equipped facilities on the doorstep will enable members of the local community to enjoy the game throughout the autumn and winter. The improved accessibility will encourage more people from the local community to get involved in the sport.

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From top: Site plan, context visual, sectional perspective

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F RI E NDSH IP S E N IO R CO - H O U S ING Yoyo Yao

The future living style for seniors in societies all over the world is becoming more independent and having a longer lifespan.

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The project is to provide a healthy and lively community living environment in Stroud for retired individuals, who may prefer to live independently but within a similar age group of people. The scheme is

mainly inspired by the canal side walk, and the site is well connected with the Stroud town centre and train station by walking distance. The proposed buildings, its environment and the landscape aims to enhance the canal side activities in order to create more interactions between residents, nature, families, local people and visitors to Stroud.

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From top: Long section, canal view, courtward visual, sectional perspective

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STRO U D S CH O O L O F ANIM ATION John Yim

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The Stroud School of Animation is part of Stroud District Council’s development plan in revitalizing Stroud’s animation industry. As an expansion to South Gloucestershire and Stroud College, the School is a combination of a studio tower for 200 students, a museum as home to the once Stroud-based studio Animation Ltd., a cinema, and an amphitheater screening classic animations and student work. The final building design is developed under three design principles: celebration of people’s circulation by exposing structural cores, animation as the driver for programme, structure and environmental strategies, and the taking and giving of greenery to urban Stroud.

From top: Exploded Axonometric, visuals of external, internal and the tower

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Victoria Boyle Sophie Cosgrove Guy Duhig Ted Harding Aneura Philips Amani Radeef

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TH E I D E N T IT Y S C H O O L Victoria Boyle This is our truth, who we really are, what we are truly about. We are a group of creatives, harnessing our gifts in a creative realm. We all share the need for creativity under the same roof, but we are all unique from each other. In reality it is impossible to stereotype everybody into one category. We are not artists, but explorers in search of our own identity.

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My intention is to host a place for young creatives who are in search of their path in life. The school will provide opportunities for the students to partake in a number of subjects but learn through creative education and the crossing of disciplines. The school will create the space for these students to narrow down their needs and find their own identity and role in life.

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From top: Internal visual, detail sectional perspective, sectional perspective

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TH E TH IRD P LACE Sophie Cosgrove In spite of stroud’s community spirit it lacks a heart, a centre to the town. consequently, my brief was to design a lasting place for civic pride, whilst maintaining the flexibility to create a sense of community experiential ownership for stroud. to act as this ‘anchor’ of community life and facilitate broader and more creative interaction the design had to satisfy the complexity and diversity of individual needs; accommodating a spectrum of both use and user to unify people in an individualised world. I designed with consciousness towards the transient nature of society and it’s instability through time; attempting to engage with the existing economic, political and structural lexicon of place whilst exploring the capacity to nurture it’s inevitable change. The building ties two pre-existing places together with my scheme, the third place. the aim was to consolodate existing functions and a modern intervention to enhance the pre-existing qualities of both the site and Stroud as a community.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

From top: Elevation, sectional perspective, elevation, sectional visual

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STR OU D T E N N IS A C A D E M Y Guy Duhig Architecture and sport have combined over millennia to create places where we can fulfil our primal thirst for violence. It brings us together to praise the Hero’s that perform these acts of fierce passion. A place of social gathering where violence is accepted and adored. But where does this place this hero in our society? Stroud’s proud cloth making heritage has enabled it to form a partnership with Wimbledon Championship for the last century through the manufacturing of tennis ball felt. It is a prestigious honour and something Stroud should be proud of. Tennis is an internationally adored sport resulting in earnings exceeding tens of millions each year. The combination of high earning as well as the loneliness and isolation players suffer on tour has led to these heros becoming completely disconnected from the rest of society. We can try to repair this gap through education.

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A place for the creation of Hero’s where young talent can come and harness their primal desire to fight. It must prepare the Hero’s for their adventures ahead but also teach them their role in society. Making them understand they are different but are an equal part of society.

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From top: Parti diagram, model photo, sectional perspective, elevation

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TH E TH É M IS C ENTRE Ted Harding Thémis defines the wide ranging cultural expectation of what’s right. Destruction of these conventions can produce the collapse of stable character, the removal of moral constructs and the rapid reduction of those trusted in a social network. Every trauma story narrative pierces this cloak of safety. The brief is built around the three columns of health; social, mental and physical. These are particularly relevant to PTSD veterans, where physical injury is often present as well as the social and mental issues that come with the condition.

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The Thémis Centre seeks to rebuild networks of social support and a feeling of integration. It does this through formal therapy, but primarily by encouraging casual meetings between residents at different scales of group, to rebuild the sense of being a unit. It also acts as a transition zone between warzone and home, in an attempt to soften the rapid change in lifestyle, once mitigated by long journeys by ship or land.

From top: Plan detail, external visual, internal visual

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TH E ME E T IN G H O U SE Ben Hayes In keeping with the “Primitive” brief, The Quaker Meeting House in Stroud will attempt to re-link man’s rational conscience with religion and spirituality and create a centre of thinking that re-enlightens us through silence and light to our moral commitments, to compassion and to social justice. It will provide the environment where the spiritual can co-exist with the logical, where the individual can contemplate and self-reflect, but also be part of a larger society dedicated to those qualities “fundamental to a meaningful and enduring human existence” simplicity, equality, truth and integrity, justice and the ideals of an integrated community.

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The building will provide a dynamic and social facility for the Quaker community and Stroud locals alike. It will help the Quakers restore an identity within the town, while also providing a venue for community services and to stage events where people can meet. The meeting house will help mark a new active place on the city map and help to spark discourse and stimulate new investment into the town centre, instilling a new sense of confidence in Stroud’s future while also enticing visitors to embrace the Quaker ideals and foster a sustainable civic community in search of “light.”

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From top: retreat bedroom, meeting space, sectional perspective

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STR OU D F A IT H A N D D AIRY H O U S E Aneura Philips This project explores the relationship between faith, production and trade. It explores how all three elements can drive a community both socially and economically. This building aims to give back into Stroud as a whole. The client of this project will be a church led co-operative with Stroud dairy farmers.

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The faith house explores forms of ‘fresh expression’ churches, such as a cafe church and a messy church. The dairy processing factory receives milk from the 9 farms within 5 miles of Stroud and processes it on-site into pasteurised milk, cheese, yogurt, Ice Cream and Chocolate. The products are then distributed across Stroud valley and sold at the existing farmers market. The market has been extended onto the site of this building and forms the third element of my scheme; which is trade.

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From top: external visual, sectional perspective, internal visuals

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STRO U D S E M INARY Amani Radeef The return to the earliest church seems very fitting with the brief, Primitive. Syrian Orthodoxy is very much known for the exaggeration of ritual and procession within a holy place; the importance of arrival onto a place as a means of cleansing and release for the human soul before entering atmospheric and religious places of worship. Currently in Stroud, due to the location of religious meeting spaces, there seems to be a lack in any sense of arrival and often most places of worship seem to be lost amongst the urban grain of the town centre.

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The brief is to provide a seminary with an aim to nurture and cultivate both practically and spiritually. The opportunity to bring a sense of ritual and ceremony into Stroud seems very challenging in a place of unorthodoxy and nonconformity. However, somewhere as extravagant and unconventional as Stroud would be accepting of it, allowing involvement in the public aspects of the scheme. The project takes the concept of darkness, composition and topophilia as the main drivers for the scheme, evoking a great sense of mystery, richness and celebration.

From top: Sectional perspective through chapel, sectional perspective, external visual

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Amani Radeef

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Sophie Beagles Marie D’Oncieu Joann Haddadin Isheeta Sachdeva

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TH E A P P L E E X C H A N G E Sophie Beagles Throughout history and myth, the apple represented the sacred- a gift from gods, guarded and treasured. However, in the 21st century apple orchards are increasingly fading from Britain’s landscape. Since 1960, two thirds of UK orchards have been destroyed, resulting in a significant loss of ecological and genetic diversity. Of the 2,000 culinary and dessert apples, and hundreds more cider varieties once grown in this country, only a few are used today. As apple varieties disappear, lost too are the recipes, songs, stories and customs. Equally, the art of cider-making, the skills of pruning, grafting and personally planting the land, based on generations of wisdom, are all lost. In response, we must regain the richness of our apple heritage, reconnecting to the land and our thriving apple culture.

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The Apple Exchange aims to reinstate the apple, replenishing Stroud’s town in the process. This will reflect Stroud’s position as Britain’s first ‘apple town’, a title requiring both celebration and preservation. The Apple Exchange will act as a central hub to the Stroud Town Apple Project .The scheme is formed of a community cidery and orchard, collecting apples from the existing and newly proposed canalside community orchards.

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From top: External visual from pedestrian bridge, internal visual of viewing balcony, sectional perspective

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For centuries, villages have been built around a few buildings of influence, a church, a castle. The weekly visit to mass was an occupation shared by all members of a commune, regardless of age or social background. Industrialization and de-secularization have brought along a shift. Whereas community used to be defined by one’s neighbourhood, it now establishes itself on the basis of choice, shared interests, enthusiasm and outlook. A tightly knit community will encourage help among neighbours, interest in common matters and a will to act together to improve common conditions. It will also foster a sustainable consciousness for all residents. The city of Stroud developed along its river axes, creating separate burrows. Some are central and function around a community centre. Others, however, grow like limbs, without a point of focus.

Marie D’Oncieu

retirees and the disengaged young trying to get back into the professional route. Learning from the primitive concept of “initiation”, where the elderly introduced the young into adulthood, this building offers crafts, wood and cooking workshops where young and old can work, learn and share. Their interaction becomes a catalyst for the crafting of a community. The building also takes advantage of its unique location, at the limit between residences and open land, to sensitize residents to their natural environment through the creation of a walled educational garden, the introduction of communal allotments, green energy initiatives and the re-introduction of endangered plant species.

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This project chooses one of these burrows, Uplands and proposes a home for the community. The building brings together two generations who rarely interact: the

C RAFTING C O M M U N E

From top: External visual, internal visual, scheme isometric

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E C OUT U R E : C R A F T O F U S E Joann Haddadin This scheme is heavily driven by social agenda and Stroud’s deep heritage. The chosen site is therefore looking to incorporate a sense of this past as a backdrop, but to also encourage new growth, engaging with the canal. Sited on the water’s edge, this project suggests a useful re-use of a part of Stroud that was once used to power the mills around the valleys. This scheme will reunite a community with the craft of the industry and the everyday processes. Ecouture School of Stroud will use local wisdom and traditional processes of weaving that seek to preserve, amplify and increase these practices and their uptake.

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Ecouture School will begin to apply ‘craft of use’ practices that are contingent on individuals finding creative opportunities in habits, stories, techniques and ways of thinking with natural, raw materials and existing clothes. As such, the design process becomes concerned with doing things better rather than doing more things with more materials. Such work contributes to the radical sustainability agenda that critiques the central importance of the school’s principles. Searching through the ‘deep inner space’ of the wardrobe offers up potential inspiration to produce more satisfying outcomes.

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From top: Sectional perspective, interior visual, exterior visual, visual of exhibition space

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S ANC TU ARY Isheeta Sachdeva “A place of rescue, research and exhibition” Aim: To reconnect the people of Stroud to their local wildlife. The driving force of this project was to address the relationship of ‘man’ and ‘wild’ and to create awareness regarding the importance of natural balance. In the UK, various species are under threat due to human activities. Pertaining to Stroud, the locals have a strong community sense and a deep connection with their natural surroundings. Picking up on this, my aim was to use the development of The Stroud Water Navigation system to revive the biodiversity along it.

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The scheme has three aspects, Rescue, Research and Exhibition. The rescue centre aims to provide rehabilitation to all injured wildlife in and around the area of Stroud. The research centre provides the ability to be able to integrate the community into the findings of the area, whilst the Exhibition areas allow for local and other organisations to host exhibitions and lectures on biodiversity.

From top: Aerial of scheme, internal visual of cafe, external visual, collage

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Devant Asawla Oliver Choyce Tom Joseph Jade Keiderling George Pickering Liam Rawlins Otis Sloan Brittain Harry Tuke

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TH E HA L F W A Y H O U S E Devant Asawla Schizophrenia is one of the UKĂ­s most commonly misunderstood and stereotyped mental illnesses to date. Its current negative portrayal by the media, on top of its shadowed past in the time of Asylums, has disabled the illness to rid itself from connotations associated with danger. It is through an underlining affinity that lies between madness and creativity that one can overlook the intrepid past of the abandoned illness and celebrate its potential through the medium of art. With art central to the schemes core, one can integrate the public with the private through a series of carefully designed thresholds.

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The Halfway House seeks to integrate members of the public, consultants and sufferers through a layered system that enables individuals to explore, consult and dwell. These are coherently represented by a wall, frame and series of pods that composes the linear structure. It is through this concept that one can control the early symptoms of Schizophrenia that are treatable within a three year period from initially experiencing ones first schizophrenic episode. To find ones loss Self.

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From top: Exploded axonometric, aerial view, approach, south elevation

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Devant Asawla

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TH E TH INK ING P AT H Oliver Choyce “Solvitur ambulando.” - It is solved by walking. Thinkers have often remarked on the relationship between walking and thinking. Rhythmic movement of the body seems to enable heightened clarity of conscience. Darwin recognised this powerful connection between motion and mind. He constructed a circular path around his place of residence that he called his ‘Thinking Path.’ When encountering problems in his work he would stack a pile of stones at the beginning of the path, knocking a stone from the pile with the completion of successive loops. Some problems could be solved in two stones, others in four.

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The project seeks to celebrate the cognitive connection between body and mind. The walker’s refugio offers shelter to the earthly needs of walkers on the Cotswold Way. A bird sanctuary and conservation unit seek to address as yet unaccounted for declines in Starling population numbers, whilst a visitor centre and exhibition encourage public engagement bringing all users of the building together.

From top: Hostel room, hostel circulation, approach, view up hill

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TH E ST R O U DW A T E R B O ATH O U S E Tom Joseph

To do this, the historical Wallbridge Bassin will be reinstated as a mooring basin, a tapering “wedge� projecting into the water accommodates a modular system of live-work units of increasing size and a communal work house anchors the scheme back to the land. The form is a direct response to the site, the brief and function resulting in a building befitting of a canal side communal housing scheme.

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This project couples a canalboat mooring basin with a cohousing scheme. This is mutually beneficial as the more ephemeral resistants can use the communal spaces, with them bringing a dynamism that lacks in some cohousing schemes. It aims to bridge the gap between the nomadic and the sedentary.

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From top: Scheme parti, view from adjacent building, boat workshop, short section

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TH E FE RTILITY CLINIC Jade Keiderling ‘With regard to the primitive state of man, Worringer turns on its head the conventional picture of paradisal golden age... Instead, he portrays the world-view of primitive cultures as one of alienation and fear’

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The Fertility Clinic seeks to address the social complexities involved in healthcare design. With infertility rates increasing, NHS funding decreasing and a current disconnection between self and science, the clinic provides a cohesion of education, consultation, treatment and research in order to achieve a tighter integration. Within the composition of these spaces the study of spatial order and Worringer’s theory have ensured considerable thought to the psychological and functional needs of all users ultimately resulting in both a poetic and pragmatic design.

From top: Treatment orientation, aerial view, north elevation, consultation room, ward room

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Y A N TA N T E T H E R A George Pickering “Yan, tan, tethera” - traditional method of counting sheep. The project aims to reconcile the schism between Town, Nature and Industry through reaquainting Stroud with its primal domesticated animal, the Cotswold Sheep.

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In reaction to the decline in the UK woolen industry and the current international nature of the modern wool trade, the project proposes a paradigm shift, moving away from a fragmented mass- production approach towards a more localised, bespoke process. Inspired by Stroud’s rich wool heritage, the scheme combines an artisanal wool mill and tailoring guild with a sheep field situated near the town centre. Seeking to expose the entire process, from fleece to fabric, the building is designed to lead the visitor through the production process whilst constantly reminding them of the raw product. The focus of the mill is the production of Stroudwater Scarlet cloth for which, historically, the town is famous.

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From top: The drying tower, dye room, sheep field

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STRO U D BALNEARIUM Liam Rawlins The Balnearium seeks to reunite Stroud with its neglected water infrastructure. By studying Victorian bath houses, the Balnearium aims to respond to the elitist and feminine culture witnessed in many contemporary spas. It also questions the individualisation of our modern bathing and cleansing habits, seeking instead a more ritualistic, natural and sociable alternative. This requires the development of a raw architectural language of submersion.

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Alongside bathing, the building will provide Stroud with much needed industry and agriculture by manufacturing the products used in the cleansing process (soaps, oils and lotions). This is achieved by growing and drying herbs on site. This will serve to further reconnect Stroud and man with nature.

From top: Ice house, factory, public bridge, the bathouses external view

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STR OU D H E M P E RY Otis Sloan Brittain

It is ironic that in the age of materialism we have become increasingly detached from the material world. The Stroud Hempery uses industrial hemp (cannabis sativa) as a vehicle to re-evaluate this relationship.

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The building acts as a national centre for hemp in the UK. The guild, formed around a new route linking canal and town, acts as a point of contact & education. The mill honours Stroud’s cloth making heritage whilst the research facility explores new applications for the plant. Ultimately the building hopes to be a catalyst for a new industry that highlights Stroud’s progressive nature whilst reflecting its industrial past.

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From top: Sectional perspective, scheme parti, canal approach, town approach, undercroft

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R E V I V E - A C C O M M O D ATIO N AND U P CYCLING CENTRE Harry Tuke The scheme embraces the ideas of reuse and repair as key drivers in sustainability in its many senses. Stroud has been coined a ‘community in action,’ most recently captured by its strive to be a sustainable Transition Town through leading low-impact lives. The continuation of Cotsworlds crafts in upcycling, the creative use of waste, presentes itself as a basis for a community workshop enabling self-sufficiency, already seen in schemes like the Repair Cafe where communities use tools and skills to transform belongings.

In this way the project supplies additional housing for the expanding Gloucestershire Emmaus community including social spaces with varying levels of privacy, paired with workshops, studios and offices where the residents practice furniture repairs, gaining practical skills. These also act as a much-needed base for various community workshops and classes, thus integrating the residents with the wider community.

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Emmaus and other charities often focus on furniture recycling as a major source of reusable waste, while providing skills and work for the less able or

dissaffected in communities. The integration of the homeless into the Emmaus community has many parallels with the new purpose given with repair and upcycling, which link the two components of the project at a core level.

From top: External visual, internal visual, sectional perspective

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Jensen Choy Lucy Edwards Colin Fowler Matt Kennedy Luke Macnab Tom Metcalf Jahan Ojaghi Hannah Pether Rebecca Plaza Anna Shackcloth Seb Tyler

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STR OU D P E T C E N T R E Jensen Choy The complex is composed of three main components – an animal shelter, a veterinary and a pet crematorium. The main objective of the brief is to celebrate the lives of our pets, while encouraging human-animal interactions and serving the growing pet community in Stroud. As such, this design proposal and its design ambitions shape the foundations of a new typology, hoping to create a precedent for future pet complexes and the promotion of animal welfare.

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Plants and creatures were humanity’s first connection with ‘other’ lives. Most of our cultural memories, social values and archetypal identities are based on animals interacting with each other and with humans. For this reason, the appreciation of the intrinsic link between humans and animals forms the foundation for this project. In essence, the overarching endeavour of the scheme is to promote animal welfare, using architecture as the medium to bring animals and people together.

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From top: Internal visual, internal visual, sectional perspective

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STRO U D NARRATIVE CENTRE Lucy Edwards Located in the historic centre of Stroud, this project combines the traditional program of a library with additional social spaces – including a theatre, exhibition space, café, and seminar rooms – and celebrates narrative in all its forms. Inspired by my own childhood memories of reading stories with my parents and grandparents, I aimed to create a building that would facilitate the sharing of knowledge, stories and experiences through many different mediums, echoing the primitive act of passing knowledge down through the generations.

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The building design takes inspiration from the analogy of a story, with the main programmatic spaces becoming ‘events’ along the length of the linear narrative of the library. Continuing the ‘primitive’ theme, the scheme reinterprets the historic urban grain of the town in a contemporary way, reconnecting users with the history of the site and the wider context of Stroud. Further landscaping of the site provides an external extension of the internal programme of the library and theatre, as well as integrating the scheme back into the surrounding context. The structure and tectonics of the building directly express the conceptual ideas behind them, with material choices and the structural strategy being ‘refined’ vertically through the building, echoing man’s accumulation of knowledge throughout history.

From top: Sectional perspective, internal visual, external visual

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ME RG I N G B O DY A N D SO U L Colin Fowler Designed as a response to family experiences, the proposed Kidney Transplant Facility aims to reconnect the healing of both the Body and Soul of patients. Stroud is an excellent location for this type of building as it is sufficiently connected to the surrounding cities whilst providing immediate connection to nature, the act of which has been proven to aid in the recovery of both Body and Soul. The consideration of the Soul has been lost in the development of modern healthcare facilities, which focus on the treatment of the body as a machine, intentionally detached from the emotions of the person. I wanted to design a facility that overcame the practical and emotional complications of patient and donor being treated at different hospitals, as in the case of my brother and mother. In their case a scooter was required to transport the kidney across London.

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The form of the building was generated from a desire to protect the users, specifically the patients, from civilisation; whilst promoting the patients’ visual and physical interaction with nature. The patients’ rooms front onto the canal and provide expansive views of the valley. Across the courtyard from the Patient Wing, the Support and Treatment wings create the hard edge which shields the development from civilisation.

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From top: Sectional perspective, plan, site section

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SYNAP SE Matt Kennedy There is a growing trend for individualisation in the modern world, expedited by the capabilities of modern travel and communication. Where historically the individual has always associated strongly with their locale, the modern man’s location is often a matter of convenience, to be abandoned whenever fitting. Nomadism is the defining trait of such a person, who eschews traditional networks of support in favour of fluidity and perceived freedom. The result is a society in which individual living is becoming the norm, pushing people towards an existence with weakened social bonds and an inability to foster true relationships. In response to this, the proposed scheme aims to create a social hub that straddles the threshold between work and home, to afford the modern man a place to engage with others in an egalitarian setting.

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Over time libraries have come to espouse the virtues of an equal, balanced society. By providing free access to educational materials they offer an egalitarian service to everyone, helping to strengthen societal bonds that would otherwise lie neglected. The proposed library sits at the heart of Stroud, tying together the outlying villages and helping establish Stroud’s prominence in the region, where all can come and learn.

From top: Internal visual, sectional perspective, external visual

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TH E ST R O U D W A T E R R ES EARCH INSTITU TE Luke Macnab Water is one of the rudimentary elements of this planet, essential for life. However, in a contemporary society facing the imminent threat of climate change societal development has distorted the social, utilitarian and metaphysical relationship it has to its aquatic environment, undervaluing its emotive beauty and destructive power.

Due to the progressive, linear form and narrative of my project the movement, usage, cleansing and returning of water will be intertwined with each person’s experiential interaction with the building. The backbone of the project’s sustainable agenda is the processional route down to my building, uniting all the environmental considerations about the site and the function of the building into a cohesive system.

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The Stroud Water Research Institute values and celebrates our primal relationship to each other and our natural aquatic surroundings; harnessing the potential of communal integration as a means of mutual development. Integration is achieved through; a restored metaphysical and practical symbiosis between water and people; innovative hydro-environmental research and academic excellence; a visual and communicative interaction between industry professionals and the wider public. Functionally the building comprises of research offices, laboratories (open and hydroenvironmental), incubator pavilions, a seminar room, exhibition rooms and a restaurant.

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From top: Internal visual, sectional perspective, external visual

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Luke Mcnab

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RE STO R A T IO N Tom Metcalf This project would bring together two groups of people who are masters in the trades of building restoration and those who wish to learn from them. This would not be an academic exercise; the approach to education would be through the means of craft. A skilled mason can take a piece of rough stone and already know the form within; it simply takes time to express it. This intuitive sense is sometimes born, but in most case is developed and honed through years of dedication and practice.

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The viaduct was long abandoned, having previously been used as a dye-works. It has now been reclaimed as the workshops of this new community, where the students work directly with those training them. The accommodation and social areas are linked to the river bank and surrounding woodland, with the student rooms opening directly onto the river.

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From top: Internal visuals, part sections, extermal visual

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STRO U D S P E AK E RS ’ CO RNER Jahan Ojaghi This project investigates how people react (in the most primitive sense) to the built environment around them. How can architecture enable one to feel free to express themselves in public? I have taken a semiotic approach to architecture and treated it as a language to communicate a message to the users of the building through macro to micro scale elements.

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I hope to allow the people of Stroud do what they do best and be allowed to freely express their own voice in this politically charged town.

From top: Internal visuals, sectional perspective, collage

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TH E I NST IT U T E O F E X C H ANGE Hannah Pether Given Stroud’s historic role as a market town founded upon its creative industries and trade links, the scheme plays upon the theme of creative exchange, revitalising a craft once fundamental in its establishment. Comprising a series of shared workshops and studios, rehearsal and performance spaces in addition to community cafÊ and accommodation for its residents, the Institute of Exchange promotes the exchange of goods, skills, knowledge and ideas; prioritising the skills and services that one can bring to a community above the value placed upon monetary exchange.

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Based upon the typology of the historic Corn Exchange, the Institute of Exchange seeks to redefine the notion of trade, extending its form into the landscape, blurring the boundary between inside and outside space, with its subsidiary parts defining a route to its centre and choreographing how it is approached, perceived and utilised. Its spaces communicate a hierarchy between the larger and more open spaces intended for communal use and the smaller, more enclosed alcoves for individual occupation, accommodating a variety of crafts and artistic pursuits integral to Stroud from glassblowing to poetry, tailoring their form and atmosphere to the relative stage of development of each process. Conceptualised as a new thread in Stroud’s urban fabric, it weaves together a fragmented townscape, enriching and engaging the surrounding typologies.

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From top: Plan, Sectional perspective

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ST R O U D D IST RIC T CIVIC AND M E D IA C ENTRE Rebecca Plaza

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In attempt to address the fall of public life, the growing loss of faith in our government and the rise of democracy through social media, this project aims to utilize architecture as a tool to address these very dilemmas contemporary culture face today. In developing architecture that could rejuvenate a society lost within the comforts of consumerism and convenience, the end result would be that of an architecture that enables and ennobles. Architecture’s role is not to express an extant social structure, but to function as a tool for questioning that structure and revising it. By creating a building with a focus firmly on revitalizing a local community, whilst providing a greater outreach through the design and manipulation of the ground plane and the symbolic mass, I hope to fulfill my civic duty as an Architect in creating participatory and democratic spaces where people feel able to find or freely express themselves.

From top: internal visual, external visuals

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STR OU D L IB R A RY Anna Shackcloth A library based around three types of reading: ludic reading, reading to learn and storytelling or reading aloud. Ludic, meaning “aimlessly playful”, describes reading purely for enjoyment, which allows someone to read anywhere. Reading to learn needs a space that is more secluded and quiet. Storytelling requires an environment that creates a shared experience. All of these spaces are intimate and sensory due to the nature of reading itself, where you are often said to be ”lost inside a book”. The library creates a space where one can become lost amongst the books themselves as well as protected by them in reading rooms within the bookcases.

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The towers of bookcases have balconies winding round them connecting them together with each tower containing reading rooms with different purposes. The towers are then wrapped in a metal and glass screen that creates a dappled light in the main library space and protects the readers and the books from direct sunlight. The entire library sits on a concrete plinth and the towers that touch the outside of the screen grow out of this, with a multi-tonal smooth finish and strip windows that mimic the grain created by the screen and the books themselves. The library creates individual spaces to read and spaces to share reading experiences with connections to the town centre, gardens and the entire community.

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From top: Internal visuals, street view

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STRO U D S CH O O L O F FAS H ION Seb Tyler

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Stroud has a rich heritage of textiles with woollen mills once dominating the town’s economy. Today Stroud is home to a thriving artistic community – and at the intersection of these two: fashion design. The Stroud School of Fashion is a further education college providing courses in fashion, textiles, and design for 16 to 19 year olds and at degree level. Dedicated design studio spaces form the main focus of the scheme, supported by general teaching spaces, specialist workshops, a functioning mill, library, lecture theatre, refectory, and of course, a catwalk. Located adjacent to a former woollen mill, the scheme is designed to rejuvenate the industrial legacy of the site, in addition to harnessing the power of the river running through the site to power the building. The concept for the project is based on the idea of a mask revealing instead of concealing – and how we can use fashion and clothes to reveal our inner personality to the outside world. This translated architecturally into the idea that in a design school, the students’ work becomes the façade – the building’s mask.

From top: Internal visual, sectional perspective, elevation

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Gabriele Ziliute Arthur Chia Farah Ehsan Jakub Tomaszczyk Marika Karouzou Nabillah Oyewumi Benjamin Norrish Oluwafunmbi Adeagbo

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MOTHE R A N D B A B Y C ARE CENTRE Gabriele Ziliute ‘Once we have left the waters of the womb, we have to construct a space for ourselves in the air for the rest of our time on earth - air in which we can breathe and sing freely, in which we can perform and move at will. Once we were fishes. It seems that we are destined to become birds. None of this is possible unless the air opens up freely to our movements’ - Irigaray

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Mother and Baby Care Centre – new facilities not only for giving birth, but also for early pregnancy and postnatal care, replacing the existing Stroud Maternity Hospital. To provide more time and care to welcome a new individual coming into the world. To start from scratch, looking at the primitive side of it, and to search for a deeper meaning from inside out. The design is not just intended to replace existing spaces and practices for giving birth but also to add another option. To focus on the process rather than objects themselves.

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From top: Models showing external courtyards and room layout, sectional models, birthing room perspective, external perspective and sectional perspective.

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ST R O U D CARE RE TIREM ENT VILLAG E Arthur Chia Stroud Care Retirement Village is a community day care centre with communal facilities (for the residents within the village and its surrounding area) and providing residential units defined by the level of care required for the resident. The village is a landscape-led design: communal areas and living spaces are adjoined to a garden and leads into the different parts of the village.

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The village is divided into two parts: The brick community day care building that leads the public into its shared communal spaces such as the cafe and care services and the residential fingers that is connected to the gardens that are linked through to the communal areas.

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STR OU D SC H O O L O F YO GA Farah Ehsan This proposal is an alternative to medical therapy as a treatment of self-harm; it is architecture as a preventive, with the program of a yoga school to explore how architecture may bring stability and peace to the mind and body. The site was chosen based on the ease of access and connection with the rest of the city; an urban retreat can be knitted into people’s daily lives. This courtyard scheme transitions from the public realm of the High Street, to the semi-private studio school, served by threshold courtyard spaces, and finally to the private accommodation of the yoga trainees. Opposite forces bring balance to the individual, as tension between the horizontal and vertical, the symmetrical and asymmetrical, and the solid and void are recurrent motifs.

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The juxtaposing material palette of exposed concrete and timber brings warmth to the monolithic structure, complimented by nature in courtyards and roof lights.

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From top: Plan, main studio perspective, back courtyard, dormitory, sectional model

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CO LLE CTIVE ATTIC Jakub Tomaszczyk

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How can you bring a personal attic to the public? How can you introduce its content to others in a way which does not lessen its emotional charge? The initial stimulus for this project was my family attic back in Poland in a house bought by my ancestors over a hundred years ago – an attic which was forgotten for over 70 years. Paul Ricoeur, Michel Foucault and Gabriel Marcel - three philosophers of memory whose theories allowed me a deeper and more meaningful comprehension of it. Would it be possible abstractly to coalesce the attics of the people of Stroud in one space? This is how I came up with the concept of the ‘Collective Attic’ - a place where you can go in order to remember, to share, to preserve... Storytelling and photography, sound and vision – two fields in which Stroud has enormous potential. My building functions as both a formal archive and an intimate memory celebration space. Its inverted nature – a photographic metaphor – can be seen as a negative and positive construction, and as introvert and extrovert volumes. The experience of the building is supposed to be as enigmatic as this fragmentary description...

From top: Storytelling room, entry courtyard, archive exploration wall, nature and materiality, negative - sectional perspective 20140605-Studio4.17-HS.indd 135

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YOUTH C E N T R E Marika Karouzou My final year project explores homelessness and youth unemployment in Stroud. As a result I decided to design a youth center for the age group of 16-25. The main purpose of the Youth Center is not only to offer accommodation and facilities to users, but to also offer them educational and training opportunities in order for them to eventually become independent in the community.

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The Youth Centre will provide young people, access to housing, learning, personal development, training and employment opportunities in line with their

needs and goals. It will be an integrated learning and accommodation centre offering a safe and secured environment. People staying at and also visiting the Youth Centre, will develop initiatives in: learning and skills, early intervention, mental and physical health and workforce development. They will also get confidence to work in teams, increase their communication skills and be introduced to a manufacturing setting and develop employability skills. Through the counselling and training sessions, they will build their self-esteem and independence and prepare themselves to go back to community.

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From top: Lobby, social room, aerial showing roof garden, entrance lobby, roof garden

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WO M E N’S CENTRE, STRO UD Nabillah Oyewumi the women of the community and from the refuge the power of peer support through the common activity of cooking, which transcends various cultures of what women do together. A hub is created to celebrate women in Stroud and may potentially be a prototype for helping women all around the world. With Stroud’s distinct natural qualities of vegetation and waterways encroaching into the town. The building design is adapted to relate to nature. This draws from the primitive theme, as primitive for me means relating or belonging to nature.

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With current economic and political problems in Stroud, the women are faced with the shorter end of the stick managing families and unemployment issues. For this reason, I decided to design a Women’s’ Centre right in the heart of Stroud. This centre will aim at providing empowerment through encouraging business start-up, support for women going through various forms of abuse, and childcare for the women of Stroud and neighbouring towns in Gloucestershire. The building is designed to enhance interaction and socialisation throughout it with a social communal kitchen at the heart of the scheme, which will allow

From top: Refuge room internal, social kitchen, flexibility of refuge rooms, sectional perspective

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STR OU D A RT IST ST U D IOS Benjamin Norrish

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Creative Design Studios aims at generating a viable cultural hub for Stroud’s emergent artist community, with a central focus of providing adequate exhibition galleries for the local community. The concept of my proposal will build upon the existing precedents of collaborative institutes across the country, in order to provide an affordable platform that encourages and supports new start-up businesses within the creative design sector of Stroud. Through the public nature of the architecture, this proposal aims to reinvigorate the primitive role of the craftsman as an important driver of community, reconnecting the people of Stroud with its strong artisanal roots.

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From top: Aerial view, sectional perspective, long elevation

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S EN S C H O O L O F STRO UD Oluwafunmbi Adeagbo

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The St Rose’s special school provides a sheltered environment for its students to learn and grow in. The complexity of needs and site conditions creates an element that evolves to meet the criteria. Cradled in the arms of compassion is the governing notion behind school life. As the current building becomes unsustainable, this new proposal focuses on creating a serene class base where ease of access and functionality are paramount. Light, sound and nature are used to create a therapeutic and peaceful environment where children of every age can feel safe and secure.

From top: Site plan, pool view, long elevation

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Grace-Anna Hay Jennifer Lee Kevin Lo Akshay Nagar Thu Phuoc Ed Procter Harper Robertson Lin Thiri Sean Zheng

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HOL I ST IC H E A L IN G C ENTRE Grace-Anna Hay My design aims at redefining the cancer patient experience by allowing the aesthetic and functional design of the building to complement and enhance treatments, well-being and cancer survivorship, as well as putting the patient in control of how they receive their treatment.

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The out-patient centre is a place not associated with sickness but rather healing the body as a whole and recognising that art, architecture and nature play a key role in the recovery of patients. The centre is a diagnostic and treatment day centre for the people of Stroud negating the need for them to visit the soulless cancer wards of NHS hosiptals. As was the case in ancient times, I believe that healthcare buildings should once again form part of a city’s civic urban infrastructure and culture and play a more active role in everyday life. In this way, the treatment of illnesses such as cancer can be normalised to an extent. It is my opinion that architecture can not only encourage healing but also inspire and uplift patients making their struggle with cancer that bit easier.

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From top: Internal visual, external visual, sectional perspective

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ST EINER ACAD EM Y FIVE VALLE YS Jennifer Lee This project is a response to the current “Baseline Design for Schools” and aims to explore the intrinsic social structure of a school in terms of planning and organisation. The school is separated into the corridor, the house, the community and the outdoors.

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Steiner Academy Five Valleys aspires to educate the child as a whole being, by giving equal attention to the child’s thinking, feeling and physical aspects of learning. It is a place for informal learning with generous corridors, educational gardens and classrooms where they feel a sense of belonging. Material finishes and environmental aspects aim to provide a tactile experience and increase a child’s awareness of the world around them.

From top: Aerial view, sectional perspective

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Jennifer Lee

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ST R O U D AC TIVE LIFE STYLE CENTRE Kevin Lo The concept for the project brief developed as a response to Stroud’s current lack of leisure facility and its low physical activity level among young people regarding its outdoor leisure environment. “ I have lost myself though I know where I am” Rebecca Solnit, A Field Guide to Getting Lost!

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The primary aim for the building’s function is to increase people’s attention to physical well-being and the community while living in Stroud. The Active Lifestyle Centre does not aim to replace existing facilities, but to develop people’s ability in experiencing a different kind of urban realm around the town using architecture and public spaces, thus perceiving Stroud in a new way. The building then act as the town’s community hub as well as the place for improving one’s physical and mental well-being.

From top: Exploded diagram, external visual, sectional perspective

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S PA HOT E L Akshay Nagar My individual project was a spa hotel in Stroud. I particularly studied the works of Peter Zumthor much beyond the vals spa. The project was based on the themes of the greek gods and goddesses responsible for good health. The building has two facades, the northern side facing the urban cityscape, and the southern side facing the river and the meadows. This was intended to be more permeable, while the northern more rigid. This is expressed through the materiality and the facade design.

The project links the two sides of the river, through the spa element. Inside the spa, one could have a steam bath while enjoying the river flowing underneath. This creates a public route, encouraging easy movement across the river in all Weather. The building attempts to rejuvenate people in modern day tough and stressful lives.

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Half of the ground floor is for hotel services, and the

other half being the spa facilities. The two floors above are bedrooms, inclusive of a private balcony and views to the southern river and meadows.

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From top: Site plan, south elevation

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ST R O U D ED IBLE H O U S ING P ROJECT Thu Phuoc Focusing not only on housing, Stroud Edible Housing Project aims to build a more sustainable, both socially and economically, community. Surrounding the topic of food, the project promotes a live-work community that involves training in culinary and gardening skills, as well as educational facility for children to learn more about agriculture and food security. Roof gardens, communal green house, on-site allotments, and balcony garden areas are incorporated into the design with hope to encourage a more self-sufficient and organic process of food production. Shared kitchen facilities, community cafes with teaching kitchens, learning “pods� for children within gardens, are included in the design to rebuild the relationship within the community through food.

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The project experiments with prefabricated cross-laminated timber (CLT) volumetric units for fast construction time and higher-quality buildings units. The project also follows passivehouse precedents that ensures air-tight and well insulated building envelope. Sustainable drainage system, rain water collection, thermal panels and on-site food production are strategies to make this project more self-sufficient and sustainable.

From top: External visual, aerial view

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STR OU D SC O O P Ed Procter

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This project was born from a desire to explore the way in which we find meaning in modern life. How are the important events marked? How do we engage with the bigger ideas and have a voice within our society? How can we celebrate the everyday rhythms of modern life? This manifested itself in a proposal for a new Town Hall and Registry which would provide a civic space to re-engage with these ideas. It also aimed to restore an historic route through a neglected part of the town and create a place of rest and respite on the journey to and from the town centre.

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From top: section, external visuals

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TH E STRO U D VALLEYS P O RTA L Harper Robertson One of my concerns as an Architect is environmental issues concerning the built environment. I have taken this project as an opportunity to expand my knowledge of this issue, starting with the brief - an environmental education and research hub. The project seeks to address the idea of adaptability in an environmental sense, within an architectural whole.

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Stroud Valleys Project is an environmental charity that carries out biodiversity monitoring, outdoor education, and community work in the local area. Their current lack of facilities impedes their ability to attract volunteers or funding. This project proposes a new environmental education and research facility to promote their work and their mission.

From top: Conceptual sketch, cafe view, canalside view, section

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PL AYS C H O O L Lin Lett Thiri

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The main aim of the playschool is for the children to learn through play. Providing children with well designed spaces will help to enhance their learning experiences. This playschool is not aimed just for the children but also for the adults. It is a building for both parents and children to go through this ‘parallel journey’ of learning. This building is about bringing back the modern young parents to the primitive ways of taking care of children and having these young children grow and be released into the real world taught by the most traditional method of learning such as Montessori Method.

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From top: External visuals, sectional perspective

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T H E M U S E U M O F LIVING LANDS CAPE Sean Zheng The Stroud Valleys, despite its natural beauty and distinctive topography, mean so many things to the people who live here contrasting, varied and inspiring and with a harmony of form that contributes to the quality of life and well-being of local people and visitors.

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The project respondes to the distinctive landscape of Stroud. It explores the relationship between man and nature, and how landscape can be experienced and used as an educational device. The museum displays the changes in both natural and cultural landscape of the Stroud Valleys before and after human inhabitation. The idea of strata is demonstrated by plans, sections and materiality of the building. People are guided through the building by a winding route that gently penetrates these strata which exhibits different elements of the nature.

From top: Section, internal visuals

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Rorie Ash Celine Chan Jacob Long Edward Markland Sarah Morton Abigail Murphy Akshara Pulpa Reshma Upadhyaya Rhiannon Williams

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Jahan Ojaghi

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RED BOYS S Q U ARE Rorie Ash A British family is made homeless every 15 minutes. Set in the heart of Stroud; the project aims to tackle the deep rooted problems that lead to homelessness through Supported Housing. Business units facing the new public square provide guaranteed employment whilst the flexible hall allows for interaction between residents and the people of Stroud as a whole.

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Inspired by the ancient and proven typology of the Almshouse the scheme draws upon their quality, character and longevity. Courtyards are ‘watched over’ and shared, however, each family, couple or individual have their own front door and private terrace. The ‘Red Boys’ lived in the Almshouses that once stood on this site and were so called due to the Stroud Scarlet cloth in which they were dressed.

From top: Overall axonometric, main elevation, long section, north courtyard, south courtyard

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C RE A T IV E YO U T H H U B Celine Chan The project is responds to the current social issues in Stroud, through the essential support of the youth group in the community. It provides a place for homeless young people, who require support for living, learning and working. In relation to the training facilities, artist studio/ workspace is offered as part of the programme to younger artist groups. This encourages an artistic interaction for general visitors and artists as well as emphasising the positive living working community experience in the supportive and creative environment for residences.

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The urban response to Stroud provides a new green route to regenerate and improve the relationship between the canal and the local community. Mindful of the site history, the landscape is used as part of the architectural element for public circulation and external sculpture exhibition at both Cheapside road and canal levels. The scheme also explores the public and private relationship, the sense of enclosure in the living and working environment for residences and artists is reflected in the subtle roofscape.

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From top: Exploded axonometric, canal visuals, long section

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ST R O U D SC H O O L O F ENGINE ERING C RAFT Jacob Long

Historically, Stroud has always had a strong engineering heritage driven by the needs of the cloth industry. Today, there has been a shift away from mass production towards bespoke, one-off manufacturing. Multiple companies of this type operate in the town, but there is a lack of educational facilities to pass on these skills. The Stroud School of Engineering Craft consists of a series of workshops housing trades related to single-track vehicles (the bicycle and motorcycle) with attached teaching accommodation. A site located near the town centre encourages public interaction with the building.

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A public element that contains shop, lecture theatre and café is arranged around a cour d’honner set back from the busy Cornhill link road. The individual workshops are incrementally stepped into the sloping site; the level changes separate the crafts but a visual connection through is maintained from the café. Each workshop was designed as a repeatable module with dirty working space at the lower level and clean teaching space above in a projection that breaks through the boundary wall. This difference in function was reflected in the tectonic: exposed insitu concrete for the ‘dirty’ areas and zinc clad steel frame for the ‘clean’ areas.

From top: External street view, exploded isometric, motorcycle workshop, cafe

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STR OU D IN D E P E N D E NT CINEM A Edward Markland “We have developed speed but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowlage has made us cynical. Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity ... We need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost” Charlie Chaplin - The Great Dictator, 1940 My proposal of an independent cinema and film library seeks to tap into Stoud’s blossoming artistic community.

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I wanted to translate the idea of the rabbit hole in ‘Alice and Wonderland’ in to a building form. To acheive this I used a section that forces you down into darkness before revealing the light atrium core of the building. The idea was to create a jarring atmospheric change that acknowledges the boundary between reality and fantasy.

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From top: Second floor plan, a glowing night facade, view down atrium, external street view

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DI S -PL A C E D R E STO R ATIO N FO R YO U NG O FFE ND ER S

The project addresses brokenness: the brokenness of young offenders who have lost respect for themselves and others and see no meaning to life, and the brokenness of a place which - deemed worthless - was torn down, leaving only ruined walls behind. The project offers accommodation of varying independence levels, horticultural training and spiritual support to the young people, helping them to rebuild a life in a holistic manner.

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Neither ignoring the past nor seeking to preserve it as it is, the project builds on the existing foundations, making them the heart of communal life. Above the ruins of the 3 cottages are built the main communal areas: chapel, refectory and library.

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Sarah Morton

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WO RKER S ’ C O - O P Abigail Murphy The scheme is a working community that provides dwellings, spaces for working and learning, and spaces for communal activity. It is intended to encourage the sharing and learning of practical skills and knowledge, and celebrate the value of these skills in a time when much of Britain’s industry has moved away from manufacture into service-based sectors.

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A secondary intention is to explore an architecture that is site- and context-responsive, and is designed with the activities of the end users in mind.

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From top: View from Cheapside, live-work exploded isometric, entrance view, site section

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TH E ARTIST’S CO M M U NITY Akshara Pulpa

The scheme is envisaged as an investment in the distinctive and celebrated arts community of Stroud, to support the vision of Stroud as an attractive environment to live and work, and to place Stroud in the national and international scene as a vibrant centre for art. The requirements of the artists for accommodation, workspace and display are fulfilled in Live-Work units that can be customised to suit individual needs. In this way, each artist has a personal, private space that is an integral part of the whole artist collective.

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The Exhibition Centre presents a platform for the local community to engage with the artists and includes flexible spaces for creative group work, classes and presentations. A series of galleries display the work of resident and visiting artists. An artist’s lounge is at the heart of the scheme and relates to both the private and public areas.

From top: An artist’s requirements, a sketch from the public square, the artists’ court, the sculpture gallery

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HI NDU T E M P L E Reshma Upadhyaya This project addresses the fundamental aspect of Hinduism; God is in everything. The focus is therefore nature, in particular the five elements. The main temple is dedicated to “Ether”. It is exposed to the atmosphere and the bamboo tubes that form the tower sing in the wind. The other aspects of the building, the function hall, yoga and education allow visitors to strive towards enlightenment in the manner that they are personally suited to.

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The only purpose built temple in the southwest, Stroud’s Hindu Temple would act as a destination of pilgrimage, as well as a core of community activity for Hindus and non-Hindus alike.

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From top: Aerial view, external perspective, internal visual, temple tower

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M O M E NTS - CARE, CRAFT, C O M M U NITY Rhiannon Williams Primitive civilizations teach us to have respect for the elders and their wisdom. We can take inspiration from the organization of Primitive communities in a series of clusters, forming smaller communities within larger communities. Responding to the Primitive, this scheme facilitates integration across generations, celebrates and captures the vibrancy and wisdom of the elderly creating an inclusive and empowering environment for both residents and the wider public. ‘Moment’ implies a qualitative measure of time but actually refers to a measure of significance. The sense of passage of time and value of each second of real time changes with age as the deathwatch inexorably ticks faster. The aim is to consciously create opportunities and spaces for moments to be enjoyed and treasured; to engineer chance meetings, allow for places of rest, spaces for thought and contemplation and areas to integrate and socialize.

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Adopting a fresh approach to the traditional Care Home, ‘Moments’ combines residential accommodation with arts, crafts and social activity spaces accessible to residents and all generations of the wider community.

From top: External visuals, part elevation, sectional perspective

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Adam Buffacchi Tom Gregory Mark Hanna Benson Pang Samarth Syal James Taner Chris Warner Daniel Yang

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A I KI S H U R E N D OJ O Adam Buffaci This project is introducing a new, well defined ‘quarter’ to the town of Stroud. This quarter consists of a Dojo training hall, its communal space, changing room; a Master Residence, three blocks of student residence, all held together by the landscape between. Together, they house an Aikido community in Stroud.

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The design aims to express the Aikido philosophies on centring, connection, and blending. In doing so, they allow the architecture and the community to become a part of, and to enrich the lives of Stroud locals, as well as promote the growth of the Dojo and Aikido as a whole.

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From top: Aerial view, external visual

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H A R O L D W H ITAK E R S C H O O L O F ANIM ATION Tom Gregory To the [Prisoners], I said, the truth would be literally nothing but the shadows of the images... And must there not be some art which will effect conversion in the easiest and quickest manner; not implanting the faculty of sight, for that exists already, but has been turned in the wrong direction, and is looking away from the truth?’ Plato, The Republic: Book VII, 360BC This project is a personal reflection upon the role of screen and imagery in our modern world. It seemed to me that we are quickly losing a direct connection to the world, and are instead engaging with it through an artificial medium of screens in their multiplicity around us. In terms of Plato’s Allegory, we are the willing Prisoners, transfixed upon the flickering shadows on the cave wall, reluctant to lift our heads to see the reality outside. The art of animation uses the power of the screen, of light and shadow, to tell a story, which can be used to tell a wider truth.

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The Harold Whitaker School of Animation is a proposal for a centre of the teaching of animation, as a vocational study in co-operation with atelier studios above and a drawing archive below. This learning centre is supplemented by public facilities, which include an auditorium and a public exhibition of Whitaker’s animation drawings.

From top: External visuals

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ROO KSM O O R H IL L Mark Hanna Situated in the very South of Stroud, ‘Rooksmoor Hill’ is a cohousing scheme released into the immediate valleys. Integral and unique to the scheme is the inclusion of a community hub on the edge of settlement, uniting the public and private spheres within the drama of the steep hillside while also holding a strong belief in the role of the extended family and the creation of a sustainable community. Key to the design is ‘the common’ and its close proximity to the solitude of each of the fourteen dwellings’ private courtyards. Entering ‘from within’, the one and two bedroom units alternate and interact to advance the mutual care and dynamism across some of Stroud’s more isolated members of society: singles, single child/parent families, retired, divorced and widowed.

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The dwellings themselves are born and divided by rammed earth party walls. ‘Rising’ from the immediate site of the hillside, the SRE walls define the punctuated elevation and provide a storage solution within the individual units and the shared house. Clad with lead, the timber frames are hung between the staggering walls of Rooksmoor Hill.

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From top: Site plan, detailed section

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BATH H O U SE Benson Pang The power of nature is what drives the cycle of life and death from the primitive to the modern man. The project is a bathhouse in Stroud that recognizes our way of life of needing privacy, desire to socialize and innate primal urge to be close with nature. Showing the need for man to live harmoniously with nature, thus the natural environment should be respected and valued.

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The idea of the building are these concrete walls, the ‘rocks’ that sit in the landscape, with the surrounding nature merging and flowing in between. Facing the road, the wall forms a bound- ary, enabling the bather to be completely detached from the city, and open to nature. The pro- ject creates a sanctuary, and aims to heal this relationship, re- connecting man back to nature through architecture, integrating the social and spiritual aspects of nature into the rejuvenation of Stroud.

From top: Sectional perspective, external visuals

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L I V I N G A M O N G ST T H E GARD E NS Samarth Syal

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Stroud’s thriving food culture - its famous farmers’ market, cafe culture, flourishing allotments and its honest appreciation of naturally grown food, was an inspiration to integrate growing with living. This community housing project explores the idea of growing food right at the doorstep and enhancing the ‘allotment shed’ into a dwelling. The aim was to create an ideal balance between the luxury of a garden as an accessible habitable space and the allotment as a spacious, efficient and communal space, which would encourage people with a common passion of growing food to socialise through this activity.

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From top: Site plan, external visual, section

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H EM P IS LAND CO LLE CTIVE James Tanner My project investigates Stroud’s Community Agriculture Projects, and explores how the growth and production of hemp could help drive economic and social regeneration. A combination of temporary accommodation and public functions ensures that as many people as possible are able to participate in this process, creating a collectively run hemp industry in Stroud.

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The site used to be the largest inland port in Britain, and is to be restored as part of a wider canal project. My building sits within a mixed use neighbourhood that terraces down to meet the water - a master plan I developed early on in response to current developer-led proposal.

From top: Canal entrance, workshop, kitchen, live-work terrace

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DYS ON C E N T R E O F D E S IGN & INNOVATIO N Chris Warner As Dieter Rams advocates, “Good design is innovative…good design makes a product understandable…good design is honest.” By way of simply thinking differently, the best designers are able to make something simpler and cleaner. As such, primitively speaking, an understanding of beauty can be debated to be the polarisation of opposites – light versus dark; archaic versus technology; though which is more important?: the expanses of darkness that frame lit areas, or the lit areas themselves? Dyson products, in their appearance and the way that they’re designed, illustrate light and dark, transparent and void. In James Dyson’s mind, form always follows function, and this ‘Dyson Centre of Design & Innovation’ provides research, innovation, testing and design amenities to allow for all Dyson design processes and management to occur ‘under the same roof’.

As a celebration of British Industry as a particular reaction against global industrialisation and to further popularise the “Made In Britain” movement, the Dyson Centre of Design & Innovation is a public exhibition of how things are made – a company with transparent and honest values.

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The design of the building seeks to relieve the tension between industry and its landscape; to echo Dyson’s company philosophy of “...engineering high performance machines and technology that maximises every watt and every gram”; and be a cross-discipline institution - a ‘new museum’.

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From top: Internal visual, model photos, the approach

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STRO U D AQ U ATIC P AR K Daniel Yang

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React to the brief of primitive, started the journey from the fundamental elements of the na- ture, thinking through the lights, the water, the wild living. This project is aiming to explore these integrated and socialised relationships between nature, architecture and people. By showing the power of water, hence bringing the celebrations to Stroud. The premier design concept is feed- ing the “Aquatic park� into the master plan and reconnecting the waterfront to the train station, which allows it to be a part of the urban routine. Meanwhile it is also embedding the programmes linked to water, learning and sporting, quiet and noisy, private and public.

From top: External visual, sectional perspective

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Jade Appleton Reena Ardeshana Nicola Blincow Youseok Cho Lucy Galvin Nathan Gilbert Alex Russell Lilian Tran

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STR OU D A RT IST C O LO NY Jade Appleton

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The colony supports fledgling artists by providing a unique opportunity for collaborative creative enterprises. By offering studio space, workshops, digital resources, exhibitions, and the potential for temporary residencies, the cooperative would be of immense value to both individuals and the emerging artistic culture in Stroud. The result would endeavour to produce an amalgamation of enabled creative minds and the cementation of Stroud’s creative identity.

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From top: Exploded structural axometric, detail section, view from the canal, long section cut

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TH E NAK ED P SYC HE Reena Ardeshana The project proposes a reinterpretation of an autism community set within Stroud. The centre provides a secure environment with 24 hour on-site care for medium to very high functioning autistic adults, to expand their social, communication and imaginative skills. The scheme provides a platform for the residents to integrate back into society, finding a balance between their inner self and outer self.

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The project title - Primitive - refers to the return of man to his natural state. Modern man has lost touch with nature through the alienation from the untouched state of mind. This can be likened to the psyche of a child, untainted by preconceptions of the world. Everything to the child is enchanting, baring the qualities of innocence and vulnerability, demanding nurture. The point at which a man discovers his natural state is the point at which he finds his inner child, his inner self. The project also seeks to evoke the idea of confrontation of opposites. The outer self can be seen as the converse to the inner self. By establishing a central community setting within Stroud, I hope to challenge the separation of the inner self from the public self.

From top: Public square, site plan, residential garden, residence section, workshop courtyard

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TH E S C A R L E T T H E A T R E Nicola Blincow The project proposes a performing arts centre to house the Cotswold Players, a local production company whose current facilities are disconnected from the town centre and lack in size. The new 400 seat theatre, and 70 seat studio theatre are equipped with full back and front of house facilities, and aim to attract visitors, as well as encourage residents to become involved in performing arts.

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The theatre’s design was inspired by Elizabethan stages which were enclosed by the audience on three sides, ensuring no seat was further than 12 metres from the stage, creating a strong actor-audience relationship. The studio theatre is designed as a flexible space aimed at experimental productions and is connected to the theatre by the spine, holding all front of house activities. Using the site’s natural topography, part of the cafe is at a lower level and opens out to the external performance area, which gradually rises through a series of terraces to high street level, engaging with the public realm and connecting the building with the existing urban fabric. The three main performance areas are clad in red metal representing ‘Stroud Scarlet’, a red fabric traditionally produced in Stroud.

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From top: High street visual, Foyer visual, sectional perspective, church visual, courtyard visual, sectional perspective

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BATH ING IN TE M ENOS Youseok Cho Stroud district had its glory days in the past with water powered mills and trade bringing wealth through the canal. However, in current days, the connection between aquatic elements of Stroud and the people has been lost. Also the district is facing difficulties to survive in the competitive tourist industry against its neighbouring areas in the Cotswold region. The proposal of a Herbal Spa could become a main source of tourism, bringing positive effect in Stroud’s economy. The project aims to be a total healing place: physical, psychological and spiritual. It contains programmes such as balneotherapy, hydrotherapy and social areas which includes herbal restaurant, cafe and a shop.

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The Greek word Temenos refers to a place for sacrificial (for God), sacred, protected or enclosed space or grove of trees which has symbolic meanings to heal, regenerate, reorganise and rebirth. Carl Jung characterises Temenos as the safe and private inner space, or a psyche container within us, where psychological encounter between consciousness and unconsciousness take place.

From top: Cold bath visual, long section, pond pool

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TH E RA P U T IK A Lucy Galvin

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This project is a proposal for a Contemporary Psychology Institute. This project was a means of investigating the social stigma in our culture around mental health. It was also an investigation of the archetype of psychology related architecture and how the architecture and psychology fit together. The aim is to encompass the three elements; Practice, Theory and Expression and with this idea the concept is to move against the stigma around mental health and try to dispel some of the discrimination and ignorance around the subject in the UK. Spreading information publicly, educating the general public and creating an interactive place to learn, experience and express all within the field of psychology.

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From top: External visual, long section, Viaduct visual

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TH E W EAVING C O LLE CTIVE Nathan Gilbert The intent of this project was to rediscover the diminishing skill of textile craft in the town of Stroud. The main reason for this skill diminishing is the lack of interaction with the skilled and unskilled population due to the seclusion of the studios and making processes.

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In this scheme the aim was to bring together the established artists and aspiring students forming a textile collective. The scheme will provide a textile design campus for the existing Stroud College alongside 12 artist studios. The combination of the artists and students in one scheme not only provides facilities for each individually but it also brings them together. By creating communal and social learning areas as well as separate individual spaces the students and artists are able to interact

From top: Facade detail, site plan, long section

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E N V E LO P IN G YO U T H Alex Russell Stroud is an aging town, with most civic buildings, such as Subscription Rooms and Cotswold Playhouse, aimed at this older generation. Addressing the current issue in Stroud, of overlooking the youth was the main aim behind this project. The current youth centre is rundown and lacking in facilities and the town has minimal facilities for this age group. Proposing a new youth centre with improved facilities is a way of bettering this situation dramatically. Stroud’s unique urban grain and making specific links to Bank Gardens informed the shape of the building. Creating a courtyard branching of from the high street.

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Creating an exiting and inviting centre was always an essential part of the project. I have tried to create a feel of community by connecting the varying programme with a unifying room, enveloping all within. The centre welcomes youth in by being permeable with the external courtyard.

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From top: Model photo, courtyard visual, bridge section

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STRO U D M ED IATH EQ UE Lilian Tran Stroud Mediatheque is made up of elements of a traditional library, digital media, crafts, and incubator space. This overlapping of different, but related, programme aims to foster new connections, and people from different walks of life may come together and learn from one another.

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The existing library is an important destination in Stroud; there are many activities going on with families, children, and elderly people. However the building is not fit to serve all its members. My proposal is to re-invent the space into a place that is better connected to its surrounding landscape, and defines a strong access link to the town centre.

From top: External visual, sectional perspective, elevation

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Emma Thomas Emma Seaton Annette Davis Harry Streuli Sachi Oberoi Simranjit Rahi Andrew Wardrope Julia Yao Charlotte Eley

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MA KI N G S P A C E FO R AU TIS M Emma Thomas Society and social convention affects individual actions: almost every action is impossible without some past action or present reaction from fellow humans. As such the basic relationship between an individual and the collective can be challenged. There are two common contradictory reactions of an individual in society: to hide away or project a social persona. Autism exemplifies an extreme reaction to society. Social interaction or a lack of understanding in this matter is typical of autistic individuals and therefore the social mask, so carefully crafted by many is stripped away. Autism provides a platform for a new community on which each individual can learn to be ‘I’.

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‘Making space for autism’ is an exploratory journey into autistic design for the 21st century. This mixed use scheme aims to foster a sense of community in a fragmented area of Stroud benefiting autistic residents and the wider community. The program is split into shared housing units, public buildings - school, healthcare centre, shop and cafe - and intermediate threshold spaces for social interaction. The resulting buildings line a new pedestrian link from Bisley Old road to Bisley Road, creating a new central public arena for life.

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From top: Aerial, Terrace houses, 1:50 sectional model, Public courtyard, Long section

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N A TUR E N U RT U R E S Emma Seaton The project proposes a complementary medical initiative located on the outskirts of the town of Stroud. I have always had an interest in alternative medical systems and this interest lead me to consider an alternative approach to modern healthcare. A complementary healing initiative is one which looks to combine ‘conventional’ medicine with ‘alternative’ medical systems and in doing so address the stigma surrounding systems such as homeopathy and hydrotherapy. I hope that this project challenges the notion of one system of medicine being the normal and works to educate and increase awareness of the incredible potential multiple systems of medicine have when allowed to work together.

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The initiative will provide a unique combination of facilities: homeopathic and hydropathic clinics for outpatients whilst also working to foster greater public understanding of homeopathy and the process behind the production of remedies. The programme combines educational facilities, an out-patient clinic, a hydrotherapy suite and two levels of medical wards. The wards were derived by studying the areas of medical care in which conventional medicine and alternative therapies can work together most effectively. Two of the most prominent areas are recovery from trauma i.e. invasive surgery and palliative care. This then helped to generate my programme in a more informed manner.

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From top: Structural glass circulation spine, A residence, West approach, East elevation

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TH E CRAFTH O U SE Annette Davis The Crafthouse invites you to Discover, Meet and Innovate. It provides a Shared Workspace environment for the most popular forms of Arts and Crafts in Stroud. These include painting and drawing, pottery works, jewellery making and photography. It also accommodates small start-up firms and provides Meeting and Events Space. Breakout spaces and circulation play a crucial role in social interaction; these spaces connect to a public cafe. The social agenda is to stimulate cross collaboration and inspiration amongst members as well as with the general public. Exhibition extends to all Workspaces and Cafe space during monthly open exhibitions.

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The Crafthouse takes inspiration from a society which is changing to become ever more intertwined in a network; that is both physical and technological. Our lifestyles, both in the realm of work and socially, have changed up to and beyond the predictions of Archigram. It will be interesting to see where it leads to next.

From top: External visual, clock tower sketch, north and west elevation, section cut

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TH E MA K IN G S P A C E Harry Streuli Maker Culture is an emerging notion of self-fabrication, which is supported by principles of the Open Source Movement. A purpose made space for such activities will arm the movements with facilities to tackle the current model of consumerism. Key architectural decisions were made through analysis of the site, particularly from the geometry defined by fissure views. Conceptual ideas for the Making Space emerged from the dissection of the brief and its requirements.

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The resulting scheme stitches the town centre and the countryside back together, through a return to a primitive idea of fabrication.

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From top: Wikipod diagram, Wikipod wall; internal and external, super studio section, super studio visual

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TH E S CH O O L O F TH O U GH TS Sachi Oberoi The intention of the ‘School of Thoughts’ was to renew the ways in which people interact by catering to their primal needs of communication and consequently eliminating materialistic values from our society. Utilizing Stroud as a test bed, I intended to reinvent the agora, the oldest, most organised premise of social interaction, as a meeting place along the everyday path’s of the citizen’s lives.

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Through the three stages of thinking: The gathering, processing and disseminating of information, the scheme proposes the creation of spaces to cater for people to research, present and test their ideas as an individual and with other citizens, as a collective. Consisting of a library and thinking pods, a debate chamber, and a publishing unit, the School of Philosophy was proposed as a means to invoke thoughts within people and spark a conversation to revolutionize the way we perceive life.

From top: Plan, Debate chamber, Exterior approach, Long section

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BR I C K B Y B R IC K Simranjit Rahi

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Residential accommodation and therapy spaces are provided for within the sanctuary of a walled garden. The retained trees influence the proposed scheme heavily and are a focal point for some of the courtyards, which provide spaces for private reflection and communal interaction. The foyer was envisaged as a gallery space where those in rehab can exhibit their artwork for viewing and purchase by the public, to highlight the creative talents of those in rehab and provide a platform for interaction between the two parties, with the aim of breaking down preconceptions the public may have and aiding reintegration into society.

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From top: Internal passageway, Cross section, Long section

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T H E O U TD O O R YO U TH P ROJECT Andy Wardrope An Outdoor Activity Centre for an existing charity in Stroud called the Door Youth Project who work with 11-25 year olds with a variety of needs. The proposal combines their existing programme, including mentoring, residential and workshops, with outdoor pursuit facilities that are shared with the public. The Bike Workshop, for example, is a place where practical skills are gained but also engages with the public through bike hire and repairs. Located at the crossroads of various transport routes, as well as at the boundary between town and landscape, the proposal links the current unresolved strands. The scheme is a gateway into the surrounding landscape as well as a place of interaction between the public and the young people.

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Through design materiality and level changes, the scheme balances the privacy required for the vulnerable young people whilst maintaining an open and engaging frontage to the busy canal route that crosses through the site.

From top: 1:200 model, North sectional perspective, East sectional perspective

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STR OU D SE N SC H O O L Julia Yao The project looks to design a new school for young adults of Stroud with a variety of special educational needs. The school acts as an addition to the existing St. Rose’s School which is currently secluded from the rest of Stroud. The chosen site is therefore situated at the junction between the town centre and the residential quarters; making it both easily accessible to students and visible to the public. The main aim of the project is to ease the transition between nurturing school life and working life and at the same time abolishing social stigmas surrounding SEN schools. The inclusion of a cafe/ bakery and growing gardens where students grow their own wheat and make bread, encourages both independence, creativity and social interaction with the public.

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The ultimate goal of the school is to act as a platform for future employment opportunities and creating a positive image for the students. The performance hall on the public side of the scheme is a celebration of the student community where they can share their talents to the people of Stroud.

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From top: Aerial, Site plan, Cafe, Gardens, Long Section

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TH E P ASS ING P LACE Charlotte Eley Passing away. Passing on life. This project explores the pairing of a euthanasia retreat with the facilities for organ and tissue recovery; providing life to others following the death of an individual. This new building typology seeks to address society’s shifting attitude towards death and the invaluable potential of organ transplantation following euthanasia.

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The euthanasia retreat is located in the depths of woodland, anchored to the cliff face to provide views out towards the canopy. Forming a cross, the clinical element sits perpendicular to the accommodation, extending back towards the road. A crossroads is formed, the social heart of the building. Detached from the form lie the arrival and departure thresholds. The entrance; a place of decision. The departure; a place of release; the axis mundi. The journey binds the elements together, a threshold between passing away and passing on life.

From top: Building diagrams. The passing place, Bridge, Chapel, Long section

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ARCHITECTURE PLANNING DESIGN tp bennett is a dynamic, award winning architecture, design and planning practice located in the vibrant heart of Bankside, London, a stone’s throw from Borough Market’s foodie heaven, across the Thames from the City of London and in the shadow of Tate Modern. We have a simple design philosophy – we believe that one solution rarely fits all; therefore our architecture is not defined by a pre-determined house style. Rather, our approach embraces diversity, allows individual expression and ensures that design solutions are environmentally responsive and appropriate to context, brief, culture and climate. The simple resolution of light, space and materials are the core values of our approach. And, as a practice we stand or fall by the quality of our people. We value our team, our clients and our architecture equally and our experience over 90 years has taught us that high quality projects require happy, motivated and inspired people. tp bennett are currently recruiting from the UK’s best schools of architecture for Part I and Part II graduate positions. Please visit our website at www.tpbennett.com

Office building in Stewartby, Bedford

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FORMER BATH UNIVERSITY GRADUATES & CURRENT BATH UNIVERSITY STUDENTS COMMENT ON THEIR TIME AT TP BENNETT: tp bennett provided a supportive environment which enabled me to put my academic study in to practice. Everyone was friendly, approachable & I was given varied & exciting work opportunities.

I joined tp bennett as a Year Out Student, where I had a great time! The experience I was given was the perfect preparation for my Part 2 at The University of Bath. Chris Ansell (November 2010 – January 2012, from June 2013 onwards & during various term breaks in between!)

Toni Riddiford (September 2012 – January 2013)

Here at tp bennett I am challenged to push my capabilities further every day. The projects I am working on require my significant involvement on so many levels including the direct interaction with consultants; this has hugely improved my confidence as a young designer. Laya Burgan (July 2013 – present)

If this year’s graduates are anything like me, they will be looking for a practice at the top end of national & international architecture that offers them the support & confidence to develop as an architect as well as a person. tp bennett has some of the friendliest, most welcoming people I could have hoped to work with, but they are also people you can look up to & who will always drive you to be better. I am constantly in the thick of something both challenging & exciting. Currently I am working on seven hospitals in Ghana, whilst also tackling a school & a mixed use development in London. I’m learning about masterplannning, competition bids, regeneration projects & I even had a stint with the interiors department. Hannah Cordell (January 2013 – present)

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M Arc h ARCH ITECTU RE

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F I F TH Y E A R Toby Lewis The aims of the studio have been

To develop designs that address wider issues of urban design and landscape as well as detail considerations of material and technique as part of an integrated architectural approach.

For this the students have undertaken several one week exercises during the earlier part of the semester, the first based on campus and the rest on the project site of Sydney Gardens, Bath: a ‘live’ threshold installation a manifesto on ‘beauty’ in image and text an observation exercise

• • • •

F IF T H Y EA R

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

• • •

a landscape design exercise incorporating an inhabited wall a concept development exercise for a poetry and craft library a series of precedent studies of landscape, building, concrete and timber a concrete detail with a fabric formed concrete workshop or a timber detail with a visit to Hooke Park a landscape design exercise in Sydney Gardens a week in Madrid working with Universidad Europea de Madrid on urban design for a site in Delicias an environment workshop.

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From top: concrete detail; Nadi Grudinina, Sydney Gardens sketch; Emily Jones, Model; Holly Gare

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To encourage each student to explore and develop their own design processes through a series of structured exercises, run in parallel with the studio design projects, including: • • • •

Seeing comes before words… [but] the way we see things is affected by what we know or what we believe. Yet this seeing which comes before words, and can never be quite covered by them, is not a question of mechanically reacting to stimuli. We only see what we look at. To look is a matter of choice.

F IF T H Y EA R

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

• • •

a group collaboration; designing and building a series of book reports on current approaches to architecture a workshop on ‘asking, looking, playing and making’ a ‘muff on a huff puff’ game of architectural picture consequences a group project of urban design an encouragement to design with models a Rhino and Grasshopper CAD modelling

workshop an encouragement to be confident presenting sketches or unfinished work. These combined have required the students to work very quickly and productively, to change gear from what some of them have been used to, to ‘jump in and splash around’ as Dennis Lasdun put it.

From top: Sydney Gardens sketch; Sophie Yoell, Threshold installation, Model details,; Anna Praulitis, Sketch perspective; Jack Stephenson 20140613-Year Five-HS.indd 201

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SIX TH YE AR - S U STAINABLE C ITIES During the first part of the final year of the Master of Architecture programme students carry out urban design projects in groups, in a European city of their own choosing. In 2013-14 the cities studied were; Marseille, Budapest, Hamburg, Brighton, Portsmouth, Belgrade and Grimsby. Each team carries out desk top studies before undertaking their site visit, during which they carry out further research and analysis of their chosen locale within the city. The students then return to Bath where they explore transformative urban design proposals for their locale, based on the principles of low carbon urbanism. The final part of the first semester is dedicated to individual work during which students prepare a design brief for a building within their locale. The second half of the year is spent entirely on the students individual design projects. Studio work is supported by architectural tutors and specialist consultants whose aim is to help students develop and resolve the final project of their academic education. The project provides the opportunity for every student to employ the full range of knowledge and expertise they have gained in the course of their architectural education. Each student is encouraged to pursue their own agenda for the project and to use the opportunity it provides as a spring board into their professional lives. Alexander Wright 6th Year Studio Leader

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MA RS E IL L E Tommy Stoney Samuel Clarke Jason Turner Oliver Justice Our masterplan was an attempt to draw the disaffected youth, the unemployed and the criminal out of their subculture and reintegrate them into an educated, working society; in an environment that is open, green and connected to the waters of the Mediterranean. To achieve this the locale was designed to be an educator, employer and liberator; a space of apprenticeship, industry and leisure. In doing so boosting the future success of the existing port. Our proposal extends a green park through to meet the waters of the Mediterranean, enhancing local ecology and providing a catalyst for future change. This green spine will provide relief in an otherwise dense urban context. The proposed park (Parc Nord) will host a range of diverse leisure and recreational facilities. The proposal acknowledges the difficulties in providing adequate access to the Mediterranean on a coastline defined by port and commercial activity, therefore we allow the Mediterranean to draw inland to meet the Northern Communities, reinvigorating their historic relationship with the ocean. All programme displaced as a result of the Parc Nord masterplan is to be re-accommodated within the increased density provided at the edge condition. The dense edges creates an intensity within the park, providing a generosity to the green space. Transport networks are crucial to the success and growth of the area. Within the masterplan we proposed a relocated metro stop, an expanded tram network, an integration of the existing commuter train network, a new marina for trade and tourism to relieve the overcrowded Vieux Port, and finally a ferry terminal for the growing flow of people around the Mediterranean.

More info at: www.atelier6point1.com

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L’ É C O L E D ’ A RT Tommy Stoney

MA R SEIL L E

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

Located in the north of Marseille, the College of Art combines a school and museum of modern art. It aims to draw the disaffected youth, the unemployed and the criminal out of their subcultures and reintegrate them into an educated, working society. On their way to the galleries, visiting public will explore the hive of activity within the main atrium and witness the imagination that is contributing to the exhibition they are about to visit.

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From top: External visual, gallery entrance and main atrium

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TRAD ING P LAC E[S] FE RRY TE RM INAL Samuel Clarke

MA R SEIL L E

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

Marseille is a land of immigration and refuge. The growing numbers of visitors from the North Mediterranean coast and North Africa has prompted the construction of a new ferry terminal, for both passengers and trade, which permeates the port sea wall and liberates the northern coast.The terminal extends the public realm from the park to the sea, celebrates the merging flows of departures and arrivals, and explores the relationship between served and servant spaces.

From top: Concourse view toward the horizon, Model showing the Southern facade of the ferry terminal, Gangway to ferries. 20140613_Year 6 MArch.indd 209

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É C OL E D E M A R SE IL L E Jason Turner

Since the demise of the port and all associated industry, the mono-cultural labour force of North Marseille have been without employment. The youth consequently fail to understand the value of traditional education and are typically destined to become another unemployment statistic.

MA R SEIL L E

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

A new vocational college will focus on providing the local labour force with suitable skills to achieve employment within the developing area affected by the internationally renowned Euroméditerranée masterplan.

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From top: Considered Public Realm, Pixelation versus Ornamentation, École de Marseille Short Section

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LA BIBLIOTH EQ UE D U NO RD Oliver Justice

The library as a traditional symbol of free access to information is the perfect model for developing a public space that removes the barrier between the streets of disaffected youths and buildings that liberate individuals and communities of north Marseille.

MA R SEIL L E

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

La Bibliothèque du Nord must be public in every sense, and not intimidate or exclude, it must be as social as the market place and as comfortable as the park provided by Parc Nord while still remaining an urban retreat and quiet space for introspection.

From top: External visual, Internal mezzanine walkway, Long section cut

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BUDAP E ST : R EG E NE R -VI I I MA STE R P L AN Eleanor Garrard Elizabeth O’Neill Located in close proximity to the city centre, Josefvaros, Budapest’s 8th district, is an area prone to high levels of poverty and unemployment, and whose population are deemed segregated from the rest of the city’s inhabitants. As a result of financial neglect and historical conflict the continuing spiral of decline has had significant impact on the urban grain. The specific area chosen for the masterplan demonstrates a unique urban condition of vast vacant ‘grunds’ and semidemolished courtyard blocks, set in contrast to the rest of the city’s dense urban fabric. In response to this urban decline, the masterplan scheme proposes a productive landscape as a means of initiating a localised economy and utilising these void spaces. The configuration of an ‘urban village’ sees the development of an improved housing scheme, renovation and re-use of existing structures, proposed educational buildings, and a centralised market. These are located along a sequence of public squares and farmed landscapes of varying scales. Embedded within the masterplan is the scheme’s key urban gesture; the proposed ‘Regener-Viii’ route is a pedestrian and cycle route spanning the length of the regenerating productive landscape. This route extends north and south between the commuter hub of Keleti railway station and university and commercial institutions along the Danube waterfront, enabling a reconnection with the wider context of Budapest.

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A G RI C U LT U R A L IN N OV-VIII I NSTI TU T E Eleanor Garrard The Agricultural Innov-VIII Institute will play a integrated role within the Regener-VIII masterplan by creating a public interface which informs the public about the crop research happening within District VIII and provide specialist research environments to support the productive landscape.

B U DA PEST

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

The scheme explores the interaction between the public and science to break down elitist barriers, and make research accessible. The Growhouse Tower and Experimentarium Food Hall increase peoples awareness of the vital role of food in our future whilst unique laboratory and Experimentarium support spaces provide innovative research and working environments to aid the development of the Institutes work.

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From top: Solar responsive elevation, the working landscape, laboratory, experimentarium hall long section

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BU D AP E ST INSTITU TE O F C U LINARY ARTS Elizabeth O’Neill The design for the Culinary Institute sees the reclamation of the courtyard that once existed on site. The semi-demolished existing building is retained as the academic hub of the Institute, preserving the character of the old and providing a counterpoint to the new building. The contemporary insertion sits in stark contrast as an element designed to emphasize transparency and fluidity of space, exposing the building’s interior workings and culinary processes to passersby and animating the internal streetscape of the courtyard once more.

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

Previously an urban wasteland of derelict courtyard blocks and vast vacant plots, the proposed Institute of Culinary Arts and Regener-Viii masterplan provide a source of physical and economic regeneration for this run-down area of Budapest’s District VIII.

B U DA PEST

N

EXISTING

BUILDING

-

PROPOSED

REAR

ELEVATION

From top: Restaurant interior, section of new-build west elevation, final model, renovated rear elevation of existing building. 20140613_Year 6 MArch.indd 215

S C A L E

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JOZS E F V A R OS WO ODWO R K SC H O O L Ruth Harness

B U DA PEST

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

The Jรณzsefvรกros Woodwork School provides alternative vocational training in District VIII, Budapest, an area of low employment and education. Carpentry is a traditional craft of the district and one which teaches artistic skills as well as technical, giving the opportunity for pupils to learn in both practical as well as theoretical environments. The school design is driven towards celebrating and expressing these skills through its structure and fabric, whilst remaining part of the city architecture. An interpretation of the traditional Budapest courtyard house, the school is centred around an atrium; a social hub for all ages to commune and interact.

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From top: Detail Model of Exposed Structure and External Wall, Perspective Section through Central Atrium

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FE STIVAL H Q & CO M M U NITY ARTS TRU ST Caoimhe Hughes

In Budapest much of the current building stock is badly degraded, whilst it may be easier to demolish and build new, it erases the city character.

B U DA PEST

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The project aims to work within the current context, healing and stitching together the fabric of the city, juxtaposing the new and old to create a more vibrant urban landscape. The new proposal externalizes the usual pedestrian movement, bringing it through the middle of the city block. Allowing free access through the existing and newly created courtyards, which are planned around the functions of Dance, Music, Arts & Crafts; a community of diverse artistic activities involving the local community and developing arts in the area to produce a new city festival. Providing a variety of spatial experiences where passers by walking through the site can interact with the activity of the scheme.

From top: External visual from south, project iso, ground floor plan

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HA MBU R G

[ ST. P A U L I ]

Eleanor McIntyre Timothy Cambridge Ross Cornish Richard Farrelly The overriding strategy for the city of Hamburg as a whole is to return to its historic situation as an independent city state. The major elements involved are connection with the green network, increasing local agriculture, city densification and restoration of maritime heritage. St. Pauli is a rundown district which through the masterplan proposal becomes a catalyst for change in the functionality of the city centre, situated between the historic docks and central business district. The masterplan becomes a sustainable flood defence against rising sea levels, while using the existing geometry to promote a north-south direction which reconnects the district with its founding waterways. Responding to the surrounding context three distinct areas are formed: docklands and industry to the west, central community spaces, and more formal spaces and transport hubs connecting to the city centre towards the east. A series of public spaces with a range of different characteristics transform the derelict waterfront into an attractive and functional public realm. Responding to Hamburg’s range of native and visitor generated culture, social integration and cohesion are promoted with new community and cultural education spaces.

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HE RI TA G E L IB R A RY Eleanor McIntyre The Heritage Library responds to the city on both a local and civic level. It becomes an anchor in the district’s recently developed waterfront, acting as a cultural repository and museum for the city. The multiple and varied city identities, both past and present, are re-invited as a vital part of everyday experiences.

HA MB U RG

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

The scheme is realised as an intensification and extension of city journeys in terms of its arrangement, materiality and spatial typologies. Two polar elements, an archival tower and waterfront reading room, are unified by a social core which acts as a living room to the city. Light is crafted to guide the journey in connection with the city context.

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From top: sequence of experiences in relation to context, overall 1:500 model, 1:200 sectional model (grounding and celebration)

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INSTITU TE O F M ARITIME AND CLIM ATE LAW Timothy Cambridge

HA MB U RG

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

It is considered that climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humankind, with the need to change living patterns and socioeconomic forces. To this end, this project re-imagines the International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea, a body based in Hamburg with key interests in maritime law, climate change and global trade, to become a directing, policyshaping body, that steers debate and action on climate change.

From top: Model Photo- Tribunal as waterfront object, Perspective Section showing Circulation between Tribunal Volumes 20140613_Year 6 MArch.indd 221

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ALEVI MADRASA Ross Cornish

HA MB U RG

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

The Alevi are an Islamic cultural and religious group struggling for social recognition. The Madrasa aims to increase the social integration of Alevis and Germans in Hamburg by promoting both cultures equally. Increasing awareness and understanding through mutual education improves social cohesion, a core objective of the IBA, Hamburg city government and St Pauli Masterplan. Another function of the Madrasa is to recognise and promote the Alevi people. This is a national and international challenge that must be taken up by the diaspora due to ongoing persecution in Turkey.

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From top: External visual, courtyard visual

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WO RK ING M ARITIME M U S EUM Richard Farrelly

HA MB U RG

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

Situated in the heart of Germany’s maritime activity, this project builds upon the success of Hamburg as a global port with the creation of a Working Maritime Museum and dry docks. These dry docks service both active craft (tugs and trawlers) and historical timber vessels, which then become live exhibition pieces. The scheme’s focus is the creation of a district hub, encompassing strengthened community links within the sites historical context in a way that the Hamburg’s global port can no longer facilitate.

From top: Scheme overview, View into traditional graving dry dock from public datum, Inside the Maritime Museum

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BR I G H TO N Alex Cumner Sarah Keetch Toni Riddiford Georgie Smith The East Brighton Regeneration Project is intended to act as a catalyst for economic investment and housing development in a forgotten, isolated part of the city. Our overall strategy for the site focussed on improving access and providing key functions to generate a critical mass of activity and create a vibrant new cultural destination for visitors and residents alike. The regeneration of the marina is at the core of the masterplan with a large scale civic space surrounded by a series of landmark buildings including an Art Gallery, Convention Centre, Aquatic Centre and Harbourmaster’s Tower, acting as a draw to the scheme and a grand finale to a rejuvenated seafront promenade. A terrace landscape connects the upper cliff top to the new public plaza, inhabited by kiosks and other small units, giving access into the Conference Centre at multiple levels and encouraging activity to spill out. At the lower level, a series of tidal pool offers visitors a chance to engage with the sea and its natural ecology by bathing or exploring the rock pools in a sheltered environment.

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BR I G H TO N A Q U A T IC S C E N TR E Alexander Cumner

After investigation East Brighton became the focus of our masterplan due to its disconnected communities and isolating topography. An aquatics centre became the obvious choice of intervention to create an opportunity to create a daily point in Brighton residents lives in which they interact with the sea and its waters.

B RIG HTON

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

The Aquatics centre, with its 50 metre and other pools, diving facilities and training focus on sporting excellence will give a home to three currently dislocated swimming clubs.

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From top: 50m Competition Pool & 25m Diving Pool

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TH E BRIGH TO N CENTRE Sarah Keetch Acting as the catalyst for the wider East Brighton Masterplan, the relocation of the Brighton Centre enables vital technological improvements and expansion, to enhance its appeal as a venue, securing its long term future, as well as aiming to redistribute benefits across the city, bringing much-needed investment and facilities to the Whitehawk and Marina communities.

B RIG HTON

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The proposal is intended to be an extrusion of the cliff, redefining the man-made edge to create a rooftop pier and bridge the 18m level change from seafront to cliff top. It explores the language of the cliff in both materiality and layout, particularly the geological strata, different manifestations of flint and the inhabitation of plants as the Southdowns meet the sea.

From top: External seafront visual, Internal atrium visual

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BR I G H TO N C A N C E R C OM MU N IT Y C E N T R E Toni Riddiford

The Brighton Cancer Community Centre challenges the current lack of support for those impacted by the disease in the city and its immediate area. It is a statement building with an architectural language drawn from the surrounding context, reaching out to its community whilst providing the essentials of patient privacy. It creates an environment that is fit for the provision of specialist care whilst providing the essential comforts of home.

B RIG HTON

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

It promotes a quality of life, health and well-being alongside self-worth and dignity in illness and death, within a knowledgeable, supportive community, integrated within its social and natural surroundings.

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From top: Reflection space internal visual, Vessels external visual, External perspective from Boardwalk, External perspective from Undercliff Walk

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BRIGH TO N ARTS C ENTRE Georgina Smith Brighton suffers from a cultural paradox; where artistic and cultural wealth coexist with social and economic poverty. Brighton has a diverse population with highly segregated smaller pockets of communities of various ethnicities, religions and social backgrounds exist within the city. Engagement with the arts has been show to decrease social divide and improve wellbeing of a community.

B RIG HTON

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The proposed Arts Centre provides a facility for the exploration of art work through creation within public and private studios, and exhibition within galleries and informally around the building. The Centre will also hold the Aldrich Collection in a permanent display. The building faces south with dramatic views over looking the marina development and the English Channel.

From top: External visual, Gallery visual, Section cut, Approach visual

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VALLETTA Alexandra Noble James Williams Rosie Ives Fiona Magar With no rivers and minimal annual rainfall, Malta relies solely on abstraction of freshwater from its aquifers; a resource which will run out within the next 15 years. This masterplan seeks to tackle Malta’s freshwater issues via the conversion of a disused power station to a desalination plant. This power station is situated in Marsa, an ex-industrial precinct overlooking the Grand Harbour. The public realm provision of the scheme includes an urban beach and salt pan plaza. Atop the desalination plant on the existing topography, the scheme proposes an arid park with lush, tropical biomes converted from existing gasometers. The scheme’s various elements are linked by a waterfront walk which improves walkability and pedestrian connection from Marsa to both Floriana and Valletta. The proposal also puts forward a boat and ride system to help reduce the island’s overeliance on cars and alleviate the traffic burden on existing road networks

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HORTI CU LT U R A L RE S E AR C H C E N T R E & BOTA N IC G A R D E N Alexandra Noble

The landscape aspect of the scheme acts as a counterpoint to the built form of Valletta and provides an opportunity to witness the island’s heritage in a landscape setting. The layout of the garden draws from Voronoi tesselation, a pattern which accounts for many formations in nature such as the wings of a dragonfly.

V A LL ET T A

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

This research building has two remits; the preservation of endemic endangered plants as well as growth in arid climates. The strata-like length of the form references the site’s seventeenth century walls which originally served to protect the city of Valletta from attackers. Both built elements, building and bridge, serve to stitch the derelict site back together; a concept evocative of Kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold. This process inadvertently results in a decoration, the form of which is dictated by the breakage the piece has suffered.

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From top: Section of the Shade House in park context, Botanic Garden Plan, Voronoi development study

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M ALTA AQ U AC U LTU RE CENTRE James Williams

V A LL ET T A

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The proposal’s aim is to reconnect the local and tourist populations of Malta back to the Mediterranean Sea. By providing public views into the vital aquacultural processes that keep the local fishing communities alive and celebrating the arguably lost maritime culture through a public aquarium and scuba diving school, the scheme seeks to re-identify the island back into a maritime nation that it traditionlly has always been.

From top: External visual from The Grand Harbour. Left: Aquarium Internal Visual. Right: External visual through aquacultural productive landscape. 20140613_Year 6 MArch.indd 233

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A G RI C U LT U R A L HE RI TA G E C E N T R E Rosie Ives

V A LL ET T A

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

The scheme is organised in a linear manner as a series of connected spaces denoted by individual roof forms. The site is conducive to linearity with this also favouring production. The exhibition spaces + circulation for the building are set up in a cyclic motion, inclusive of the external olive grove + salt pans. In terms of form, the progressive geometry expressed in the roofscape of the scheme creates a distinctive stepped appearance. This developed as an abstraction of form of the traditional construction technique of corbelling that originated in Malta. The architectural language is expressive of the production processes within. Chimneys are used as an architectural feature that provide ventilation + natural daylight. Alike the fortification walls of Valletta, the scheme is intended to be expressive of mass + solidarity. A gabion facade wrap envelopes the building, perceived from afar as solid yet providing permeability.

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From top: Olive Grove / Agricultural Heritage Centre / Salt Pans - Landscape Plan, Visual from Rooftop

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M ARS A O P EN C ENTRE FO R M IGRANTS Fiona Magar Malta’s location in the Mediterranean makes it a destination for small boats, filled to capacity with north African migrants. When identified and often rescued from Maltese waters, the Island becomes their gateway to Europe, similar to how Ellis Island was the gateway to America.

V A LL ET T A

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The project addresses the issues of integration, privacy and security for 500 migrants. The proposal links three elements as part of the new waterfront landscape and sport facilities. The tram-station restaurant and pavilion, the main Open Centre building and the cafe pavilion within the central courtyard balance public, semi-public and private areas. During the migrants’ short 1 year stay, they should feel comfortable and safe and have the time to learn and build their confidence in order to integrate into Maltese daily life.

From top: Scale Model, Ground floor site plan, Internal courtyard with perforated concrete walls, central courtyard and cafe pavilion 20140613_Year 6 MArch.indd 235

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PO RTS M O U T H Verity Lacey Craig Alexander The first and largest move in the proposed plan for Portsmouth is the removal of the railway line, embankment and Portsmouth Harbor Station. Not only does this remove the barrier that divides the city, but also releases a large area of prime development land that could in turn be sold to generate revenue. This move allows the existing communities to better connect to facilities that are physically in proximity but were not easily accessible due to the dividing nature of the railway. A 15m wide boulevard with integrated tram is built on some of the land to create a rapid transport connection as well as a pleasant promenade, that starts to facilitate connection between the civic centre and the historic dock and Gunwharf Quays shopping centre, greatly improving the legibility of the city. To mark the ends of the boulevard, transport interchanges are created to facilitate easy and efficient change, and promote the use of public transport. Enlarging Portsmouth & Southsea Station (in the city centre) into a larger terminus heightens the civic centre as the key arrival point in Portsmouth.

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N

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P O O L, S P A AND LIDO Verity Lacey Water, Life and Historic Wall Celebrated The site is divided by a naval defensive wall, a scheduled ancient monument. The proposal orientates around this and its conservation and celebration forms the key for the development of the site. The proposal is made up from 3 elements - Pool, Spa and Lido, each area develops a different spatial quality; while all spaces are part of one building, the characters of these areas remain distinct.

PO RTSM OU T H

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The historic wall is significant within the building; it borders all of the large pool spaces, the spaces within the arches are re-imagined as spa pools, and steam rooms enjoying views out to sea through the historic gun casements.

From top: Section through Spa and Lido Tower, and internal view of main pool

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BE LG R A D E Iliya Boskovic Francisca Lopes dos Santos Derek Siu Belgrade is a city epitomising the tabula rasa condition, with destruction and large scale redevelopment a key theme throughout its history. Lying on the confluence of the Sava and Danube rivers, the city possesses a great natural wealth, which is currently under -utilised, with large areas of derelict and misappropriated land on the banks of the Sava in particular. As a result of these voids and barriers in the city fabric, a disconnection exists both between the city and the waterfront and between the two sides of the city, Old and New Belgrade. The Sava Masterplan aims to rejuvenate and reconnect the city and the waterfront within a framework which seeks to make Belgrade more environmentally, socially and economically sustainable. The urban fabric of both sides of the city is developed and extended to the waterfront to utilise its full potential and make it an integrated, yet characteristic zone within the city fabric. Connections are established to key routes in the existing fabric and continued towards the waterfront to allow the citizens to reconnect to the rivers, thus bringing the whole city to the water. The immediate waterfront zone is activated and made into a vibrant pedestrian riverside zone, with the creation of a variety of activity hubs on both sides of the river. The hubs are set within the context of a continuous integrated route which connects the two sides of the city and greatly increases accessibility between them. Three detailed building proposals were developed as a result of the Masterplan, a new intra-city transport terminal, the first purpose built city tourist and visitors centre and a key new academic library.

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KOS AN Č IĆ E V V E N A C A C A DEM IC L IB R A RY Ilija Bošković

B ELG RA DE

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

Once a temple for the written word, now an overgrown ruin, the site at Kosancicev Venac 12 is a deep physical and emotional scar for the city of Belgrade. On the 6th of April 1941, the Serbian National Library which stood there was destroyed in the German bombing of Belgrade. Close to 500 000 volumes were lost in the blaze including thousands of irreplaceable historic texts. The pain of this cultural loss is only deepened 70 years on, as the site has been simply left to fall to deeper ruin. The proposal seeks to embrace and integrate the rich layered history of the site, whilst creating an active hub which would bring new life and energy to the site. Symbolically the proposal returns books once again to the site in creating a new much needed academic library for the city.

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From top: Front Approach, Perspective Section, Central Atrium Visual, Top Floor Reading Room Visual

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BE LGRAD E INTE RC H ANG E Francisca Lopes dos Santos

One gridshell roof structure shelters all the activities of the interchange, spanning from pass the cornice line of the existing Glavna Zeleznicka listed building to the new Transport Headquarters building. The canopy meets the ground by virtue of different gridded vertical supports, which perform both structurally and visually, as the organic shape of the lattice columns, located in

both entrances and in the centre of the concourse. The concourse is the heart of the interchange. It is thought as a new enclosed public space which hosts and delivers both physical and social interchange activities. The central void gives access to the subterranean platforms while the different facades of the interchange feed different modes of transport to the concourse. Different LED interactive atmospheres within the concourse offer a range of media information, allowing simultaneous social scenarios: Ads, Arts, Data and Show. The scheme stands as a transport interchange, where the frenetic movement of transport merges into a social interchange

elevations

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B ELG RA DE

SOUTH/EAST

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Belgrade Interchange is a communication project, correlated to the responsibility of architecture in transforming public space by proposing the truce of physical and virtual space. The project ambition is to promote and encourage social interaction whilst acting as a pivot point in the city which accommodates the flow of passengers arriving and departing from Belgrade.

From top: External visual, clock tower sketch, north and west elevation, section cut

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S AV A TO U R IST I NFO RM A T IO N E XC H A N G E Derek Siu

Belgrade has emerged as a popular tourist destination in the Balkans since the 1999 NATO bombing with the improved political and economic stability. While catering the soaring number of visitors, the Sava Tourist Information Exchange is a critical response to the existing tourist information centre typology, transforming the current official one-way communication channel, into an open social platform for the exchange of travel advices and experiences amongst the tourists, the locals and the officials with the integration of break-out, congregation spaces and accommodation spaces to stimulate social and cultural exchange under an undulating timber canopy structure. The project also seeks to reconcile the broken link lost to the modern utilitarian structures between the River Sava and Belgrade Fortress by extending the existing pedestrian route from the Fortress, cutting through the core of the building mass, onto the Sava riverfront, bringing the fortress and the city closer to the riverfront.

SAVA TOURIST INFORMATION EXCHANGE

SAVA TOURIST INFORMATION EXCHANGE

SECTION BB’ 1:100 4

6m

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WC

B ELG RA DE

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From top: Section cut, axonometric drawing showing the route through the building, first floor plan

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G RI M S B Y SH [ A R ] E D L A NDS C AP E Huseyin Acar Rachel Brown Gaudre Znutaite Lara Kerrison Jamie Erskine The theme of ‘Sustainable Cities’ in Design Studio 6.1 resonates clearly as a challenge to Grimsby, which has found it difficult to sustain itself for nearly three decades, economically, socially and environmentally. The aim of the masterplan has been to reactivate public spaces that no longer hold the sense of purpose afforded them by the busy fishing industry. We found that although some beautiful architectural assets remain, the majority of infrastructure left behind is acting as a barrier within public spaces with large sheds occupying the waterfront; railway lines disconnecting previously harmonious quarters of the town; motorways severing the port from the town centre; and a network of roads and streets that privilege the motor vehicle above the pedestrian. By carefully considering the local identity and the opportunities for economic viability, we formulated a solution that, through minimum means, would maximise the use of existing potential and embrace the real nature of the development of the town. Rather than negating the large retail units and pushing them to the outskirts, they are condensed onto a grid that acts both as a generator of economic and communal activity, and also as a connecting tissue between the currently disconnected areas. The existing infrastructure constraints have been manipulated to create pedestrian friendly shared spaces, including the main ‘Shed Landscape’ that would integrate a carpark and pedestrian flows, as well as accommodating occasional outdoor events. The waterfront is liberated to fulfil its potential as an urban community realm, and the historical parts of Grimsby are made more accessible and celebrated so that residents are able to cultivate pride in a common identity, and visitors can take away a rich experience of the once glorious industrial port town.

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revived docks

renovated freeman str.

mixed use area

shed landscape

Institutions + seateries

CULTURE

Residential area


OF F S HO R E W IN D E N E RGY TR A I NIN G SC H O O L Huseyin Acar Once glorious industrial port town with one of the busiest fishing ports in the world, today Grimsby gives the impression that all the cultural, social and economical activity ended with the Icelandic Cod Wars and the collapse of the fishing industry. However, the same qualities which led Grimsby to become a successful fishing port for decades still exists today; Its port, infrastructure, people.

GRI MS BY

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

This proposal aims to contribute to the start of a new cycle of growth created by the wind farms in the North Sea. It also sets the ground for a platform so Grimsby can use its other assets to diversify its skill base. Reactivating public areas that were once beautiful architectural spaces caused by the busy industrial activity is one of the main themes of this proposal.

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From top: School Section, Public Section

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S CH O O L O F ART AND D ES IG N Rachel Brown

The proposed School of Art and Design is an extension to the existing Grimsby Institute, elsewhere in the town. The school is a key element in the regeneration of the area, helping people to transfer and develop their creative skills. The public areas of the scheme focus on viewing artworks in an historical, industrial context incorporating a new public art gallery which provides a home for the large municipal art collection, whilst the private spaces focus on the creation of art within studios and workshops.

C A F E

G R I M S B Y

S C H O O L O F A R T

A R T G A L L E R Y

GRI MS BY

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

S C H O O L O F A R T

The scheme responds to the rich history of Grimsby and the beautiful light that reflects off the sea, whilst making use of the dock-side views and local parkland. Constructed in steel and concrete, the industrial nature of Grimsby is reflected and updated, creating a visually new modern building. This, along with the nine storey tower to the north, create a monument symbolic of ‘The New Grimsby’.

From top: External visual from park, External visual from dock-side, Internal visual of public gallery, Roof plan

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TH E F R E S H N E Y PL AC E P R OJ E C T Gaudre Znutaite The project continues the theme of consumption explored in our masterplan and proposes a mixed use intervention in Grimsby’s main shopping centre, replacing a current multi-storey car park.

GRI MS BY

| MA rc h A rc h ite c t ure

While still seen as the focal point of town activity, shopping centres around the world have been increasingly failing to sustain their cultural and social relevance. The changed nature of Freshney Place, too, has been triggering public discussions on its contradictory relationship with the rough and ‘imperfect’ reality of Grimsby.

The scheme aims to bring the inherent, humble ‘culture’ of Grimsby back into its urban heart by recreating the spectacle of production processes – namely that of beer brewing and traditional Grimsby fish smoking. It is the first hand experience of things we consume and their embodied meaning of heritage shared by each Grimbarian that can encourage the gradually lost element of social interaction.

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From top: Section through the main space, visual of the fish smokery counter, visual of the main space during a community flea market.

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GREAT GRIM S B Y IC E FACTO RY Lara Kerrison

GRI MS BY

| M A rc h A rc h ite ct u re

The project is a conversion of Grimsby’s derelict Grade II* listed Victorian Ice Factory, which has remained closed for 30 years since the decline of the fishing industry. Addressing Grimsby’s lack of leisure and cultural facilities, the proposal is to convert the Ice Factory into a new arts venue. The scheme includes a 650-seat theatre, a 130-seat studio theatre, a 186-seat arts cinema, rehearsal and function spaces, a gallery, retail units, cafés/bars/restaurants and back-of-house/ workshop spaces so that the venue may stage its own productions.

From top: External model photograph, perspective section through auditorium.

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Lillie Square, London

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P RIZE W INNE R S BSc Architecture Prize Winners

Basil Spence for Interdisciplinary Design

Rebecca Plaza Jensen Choy Lucy Edwards

Liam Bryant Joe Bunting BSA Prize Abigail Murphy Jacob Long Hays Exhibition Prize

Isheeta Sachdeva Emma Thomas

Ken Smithies Design Prize

Charlotte Eley Amani Radeef

DKA Computer Graphics Prize

Sophie Beagles

Keep Architecture Prize for Appropriate Design

Samarth Syal

MArch Architecture Prize Winners

BDP Nick Terry Urban Design Prize:

Sam Clarke Oliver Justice Tommy Stoney Jason Turner

E3 Sustainability Prize Eleanor Gerrard RIBA Pt 2 Design Prize

Elizabeth O’Neill

MArch Dissertation Prize Tim Cambridge Lara Kerrison

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Bath Architecture Annual Team

Printed in England by:

Harry Streuli Oliver Choyce Sophie Beagles Arthur Chia Emma Thomas Emma Seaton

Manor Printing Services

Fourth Year Report Otis Sloan Brittain

Copyright 2014 University of Bath, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering. All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. For further information and a full range of programmes please see University of Bath Undergraduate and Graduate Prospectus.

Photographs Tom Glendinning Ferla Paulo Additional photographs from students

Publisher University of Bath

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Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK tel +44 (0) 1225 385394 fax +44 (0) 1225 386691 ace@bath.ac.uk www.bath.ac.uk/ace

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University of Bath Architecture Annual 2014  

Showcasing student work from our BSc and MArch architecture courses. This annual is produced by students in the Department of Architecture &...

University of Bath Architecture Annual 2014  

Showcasing student work from our BSc and MArch architecture courses. This annual is produced by students in the Department of Architecture &...

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