Page 1


Baskerville UniPress

7


R e l i g i o n i e F i l a n t ro p i a nel M e d i t e r r a n e o : Tra d iz io n i , S i mb o l i e I c o n ogr afie

a cura di Giuliana Gemelli

Legacy of MISP

LABORATORIO DI RICERCA SULLE FONDAZIONI E LA FILANTROPIA D’IMPRESA

Baskerville


Giuliana Gemelli (a cura di) Religioni e Filantropia nel Mediterraneo: Tradizioni, Simboli e Iconografie © 2015 Baskerville, Bologna, Italia

ISBN 978-88-8000-5094 La versione ebook di questo volume ne autorizza l'uso esclusivamente a scopo personale. È vietata la commercializzazione e la pubblicazione online (dell'opera completa e di parte di essa).

TUTTI I DIRITTI RISERVATI Questo volume non può essere riprodotto, archiviato o trasmesso, intero o in parte, in alcun modo (digitale, ottico o sonoro) senza il preventivo permesso scritto di tutti i possessori dei relativi diritti ed in primo luogo di Baskerville c. s. Bologna, editrice italiana del libro. Baskerville è un marchio registrato da Baskerville, Bologna, Italia. Il volume è composto in caratteri Baskerville e Gill Sans

Stampato in Italia


Nel ricordo di una giornata di gioia e di pace vissuta a Gerusalemme insieme ad amici ebrei, arabi, indiani ed americani e nell’amore per Giulia, che ha partecipato a questo incontro, e che ora non è più su questa terra ma guida il cammino spirituale di coloro che sono stati nel suo cuore generoso e leale.

Un ringraziamento particolare e un’espressione di profonda gratitudine alla Fondazione Roma nella persona del suo presidente prof. avv. Emmanuele Fancesco Maria Emanuele che ha generosamente sostenuto la realizzazione del progetto e della ricerca che é stata alla base di questo volume. La curatrice ringrazia personalmente le dottoresse Carla Capocasale ed Alice Brusa che hanno seguito costantemente le fasi di realizzazione del progetto con particolare riferimento alla parte iconografica.


Religioni e Filantropia nel Mediterraneo: Tradizioni, Simboli e Iconografie


Indice/Index Introduction Giuliana Gemelli

The past and present of religions and philanthropy in the Mediterranean: a dynamic space for intercultural dialogue 5 Radici storiche, religiose e culturali della filantropia nel Mediterraneo Giulio Sapelli

Alternative alla marginalità: le nuove forme dell’ azione sociale nelle città mediterranee 49 Antonio Carile

Filantropia nell’impero bizantino

69

Amy Singer

Same Same but Different: Food in Ottoman Public Kitchens 91 S. Sevda Kilicalp

Instrumentalization of Pious Endowments for Influence and Control in the Ottoman Empire: The Case of Learning Institutions 113 Suraiya Faroqhi

Philanthropy in the Ottoman world: charity towards dervishes and the charity of dervishes 147 Sebastiano Giordano

“Non del tuo fai dono al povero ma del suo fai restituzione”: propedeutica ad un’elargizione iconografica a tema filantropico 157

1


Netice Yıldız

Charity Undertakings for the Formation of Educational and Cultural Institutions in Ottoman Cyprus 229 Micol Ferrara

Self-government and social control in the Ghetto of Rome in the modern era

279

Paula Kabalo

‘Community Driven Philanthropy’. Jewish Voluntary Associations and Social Service Institutions in Eretz-Israel 1880s-1948 299 Paolo Pellegrini

Senza distinzione di culto. La filantropia delle élites ebraiche italiane dopo l’emancipazione: casi e problemi 325 Nicholas Terpstra

Caritas & Misericordia: Community, Civil Society, and Philanthropy in the Christian Tradition 351 Dariusch Atighetchi

L'oblazione del corpo nella medicina islamica contemporanea: difficoltà culturali e giuridiche 371 Enrico Bertoni

L'interculturalismo e le sue forme di rappresentazione museale

391

Girolamo Ramunni

The Pre-history of the Philanthropic Thinking: the Cosmos 409 Gli autori di questo volume 2

421


Introduction


The past and present of religions and philanthropy in the Mediterranean : a dynamic space for intercultural dialogue Giuliana Gemelli

The past and present of Religions and Philanthropy in the Mediterranean: a virtual exhibition as a space for inter-cultural dialogue The intellectual framework of the project is to connect the dots among fields of knowledge that – until now – have been unrelated and unevenly developed in their articulation: religious studies, research on the Mediterranean and philanthropy, by using cross – disciplinary analysis as the main leverage to generate research patterns, whose basic ground is the analysis of inter-cultural process, from the anthropological, institutional and socio-economic point of view, as well as through an innovative methodological perspective. It is focused on the articulation between already consolidated studies on religions and societies within specific geographical and cultural areas – Europe, Middle East, the Balkans, North Africa – and the analysis of patterns of representation of religions and philanthropy – visual, architectural, iconographic – in the Mediterranean as broad, complex, dynamic space. The aim of the virtual exhibition is to generate an educational framework whose main feature is to be an open, evolutionary, dynamic and fully accessible path of documentation and reflection, using visual patterns as tools of representation of philanthropy conceived as a

5


GIULIANA GEMELLI

long-term social practice and as a framework of cultures inter-linked with religeous traditions, largely diffused in the Mediterranean areas since the oldest times. Charitable practices have shaped various institutions and structures throughout the Mediterranean history, so that beneficence has become an important force of social cohesion and has worked as a kind of cultural glue to bind communities together. Nowadays philanthropy enters a phase of institutional, organizational and cultural change at global scale. The role of the Mediterranean in this process increasingly appears as a laboratory to explore patterns and paths, in cloth that connects the roots of the past and the evidences of the present. Many scholars from different disciplinary perspectives, in the last years, expressed a call for research on the "look" of charity. There are words in documents postures and gestures of giving and receiving in artistic paintings and sculptures, there are distinctive monuments and landscapes in different religious traditions that have been shaped by buildings, gardens, fountains, monuments through dedicated endowments that tell a lot about giving practices and the patterns of representation, formal and informal. It is a matter of fact that the roots of philanthropy in the Mediterranean – which is considered here in the broad meaning stated by the classical studies of the historian Fernand Braudel, as an “espace-movement”, dynamic and shaped by social, economic and cultural changes – are deep in terms of historical legacy, anthropological patterns as well as religious traditions. From this perspective the Mediterranean is the space of different, articulated, uneven stories rather than of an homogeneous and linear history: consequently as the poet Paul Valéry affirmed the Mediterranean is a fabric of civilizations, i.e. of crossing cultures and practices. It is world permanently reshaping its identity, precisely because of its multiple identities, a world in which 6


INTRODUZIONE

universalism and particularity cannot be separated, at the point that we can affirm that the more the identities are rooted the more they are dynamic and open to hybrid articulations. Actually hybridization process are recurrent features in the exhibition virtual paths that are strictly related to the specific configuration of philanthropy. The concept of philanthropy has not the same connotative and denotative meaning in the dimension of space as well as in the dimension of time, particularly when it is associated with religious practices. In the Christian tradition it is mainly associated with the concept and the practice of charity, in the Jewish tradition is mainly associate with the principle of social justice, in the Islamic tradition the offering of Zakat implies "purification" of the donor's greed and the donor's surplus property, allowing the rest to be maintained without blame for another year. Despite rooted differences there is however a common ground for philanthropic action with practical and theoretical implications as well: when philanthropy meets the need of societies and communities then it contributes to lower the rigidity of religious rules Despite differences there are also many relevant similarities that are connected significantly to the openness issues of the virtual exhibition and can be “detected” by each visitor by developing different path both diachronically and synchronically The aim of the project has been, in a preliminary phase, to identify in several “fabrics” of the Mediterranean – considered as a large dynamic interactive space which includes the North African countries, the Ottoman empire, Egypt and Israel as well as Southern European countries, the Balkans – in a word the dynamic articulations among three continents – the iconography, representing symbols and artefacts which testifies, in various forms and through different functions, the articulated relations between religions and philanthropy from the oldest times to the present. The project is 7


GIULIANA GEMELLI

based on a large collaboration of European, Turkish, Egyptians, Armenian, and Israeli scholars who have been linked through the publications of several works – with a cross-disciplinary aim. Actually the project will mobilize architects, historians of arts and architecture as well as computing experts and social scientists. And last but not least historians of philanthropy historians of medieval and modern age, experts of religious movements, not only at the level of the dominant monotheistic religions but also of movements and religious identities that we continue to define minorities, such as the Armenians and the Zoroastrian. Ancient Mediterranean One of the main stream in scholarly production on philanthropy – which is a quite recent and not entirely legitimized academic field of study (www.misp. it) is focused on how philanthropic institutions – by articulating individual freedom and social responsibility – extend the concept of legacy, as relations between the original founder and the beneficiaries to the principle of responsibility towards the next generations and create the tradition of applying private wealth to public purposes and benefits, which proved to be a universalistic need of societies in preserving their own identity. In their long-term historical evolution, as well as in structural configuration, philanthropic institutions are characterized by a differentiated isomorphism: they represent the adaptation to the evolutionary patterns of different societies and cultures of universal needs such as the legacy of the past generations to the future ones, and the quest for social justice as a principle of social and economic re-equilibration. This aspect has been substantially neglected by the recent scholarship whose main goal are financial and economic aspects, connected with the giving activities. Another key issue that has been 8


INTRODUZIONE

only partially explored by the scholars in the emerging field of knowledge of the studies in philanthropy is the articulation between the evolutionary patterns of philanthropy and the shaping of Mediterranean civil societies, through the reconstruction of long – term historical paths. Another focus which needs to be developed – after the pioneering studies of Mark Cohen – are the hybridization’s patterns among cultures and civilizations as well as between traditions and modernity. The hybridization process should be analyzed through different disciplinary approaches (anthropology, history, arts architecture, law, economics) having in mind that several paradoxes are at work in philanthropic institutions’ role and evolutionary patterns. They are universal in scope and aims and path-dependent in role and functions; they are deeply rooted in specific cultural and social tradition and they are agent of social change; they operate in preserving the values and the social identity of a specific society and social groups and they constitute a framework of cultural hybridization, which has deep roots in the past. Murat Cizazcka, analyses the similarity between Islamic waqf and English trust and underlines the fact that under both systems, property is reserved and the usufruct is appropriated for the benefit of specific individuals or for a general charitable purpose. The corpus become inalienable, estates for life in favor of successive beneficiaries can be created at the will of a founder without regard to the law of inheritance or the rights of the heirs and continuity is secured by successive appointment of trustees. Accordingly, philanthropic endowments have roots that are older than Islam. Islamic traditions emerged in a world in which patterns of philanthropic activities already existed. The lands where Islam spread its teachings had been part of great Hellenized societies the Christian Byzantine and the Zoroastrian Sasanian. The Sasanian Law book documents private endowments and 9


GIULIANA GEMELLI

charitable foundations. It was compiled during the reign of Khusraw II (591-628 A.D), but foundation existed in an earlier period. This framework of anlysis has been developed by the team on pre-Islamic philanthropy. Actually inscription on pottery from the Parthian period indicate that vineyards in the vicinity of Nisa were part of an endowment to perform services for the ‘repose of the souls’ of Parthian kings. The Law book delineates the Philanthropic trust. By testament in documentary form an individual would set aside or endow part of his private property to support a defined purpose. Control of the foundation was assigned to a trustee. When the Muslim Arabs appeared on the scene philanthropy traditions existed as accessible models, and it seems clear that whereas the ethical impulse to philanthropic works was securely rooted in Quiranic and Prophetic texts, the way in which, at least one of the formal institutions took shape, the philanthropic trust was strongly influenced by these already existing legal structures, especially the Zoroastrian foundation. The peoples of the ancient Mediterranean made enduring contributions to the definitions and practices of philanthropy. In their law codes from the third millennium B.C.E., Babylonian kings decreed special punishments for the strong who abused the weak. These provisions made justice and clemency hallmarks of nobility. Babylonian epic poetry, exemplified by the Gilgamesh cycle (c. 2000 B.C.E.), reiterated this message. Verses retold the misfortunes of misanthropic kings while celebrating generosity and self-sacrifice as vital steps toward civilization. Contemporaneous Egyptian sacred writings such as The Book of the Dead make it clear that anyone's successful passage to the afterlife depended on a lifetime record of benevolent acts toward the suffering. Egyptian deities expected postulants for immortality to swear that they had never denied food to the starving, drink to the thirsty, and clothing to the ragged. 10


INTRODUZIONE

Greek models. Westerners owe the word philanthropy to the Greeks, who, since the fifth century B.C.E. ceaselessly elaborated on their idea of philanthropia. This concept they first embodied in the benevolent god Prometheus, who dared to share divine fire with mortals and suffered Zeus's wrath for his generosity. Greeks also revered their gods Hermes and Eros as especially philanthropic for the gifts of wisdom and desire they imparted to men. Greek fascination with knowledge as a gift freely communicated to mortals by other wise men registers in Plato's presentation of the philosopher Socrates stating the philanthropic nature of teaching (Euthyphro, c. 400 B.C.E.). The love of learning and discriminating art patronage employed by the Persian ruler Cyrus the Great induced his Greek biographer Xenophon to praise the monarch's supremely phil-anthropic soul (Cyropaedia, c. 380 B.C.E.). Here are the origins of the honorific by which Greek subjects addressed the emperors of Byzantium for centuries: "Your Philanthropy." This title was doubly appropriate since, by the sixth century C.E., a "philanthropy" in Greek also meant the tax exemption Byzantine emperors regularly gave to their favorite charities such as hospitals, orphanages, and schools. The tax-exempt condition of many modern philanthropies is ancient, and this type of privilege has long contributed to shaping various status hierarchies within Western societies. In Greek cities, many forms of philanthropy combined to strengthen urban culture. Most important were the civic liturgies rich men assumed either voluntarily or under heavy peer pressure. These duties obligated wealthy citizens to subsidize personally the cost of temples, city walls, armories, granaries, and other municipal amenities promoting inhabitants' common identity and welfare. Prominent citizens vied with one another in the performance of these indiscriminate gifts 11


GIULIANA GEMELLI

to show the superiority of their own civic virtue. Personal vanity was a prime motive for donors, but rich citizens risked ostracism by peers and plebs if they failed to appreciate their wealth as a trust in which the community had a share. Greek philanthropists showed a genius for converting their gifts into potent symbols of communal strength and solidarity. Groups of wealthy men regularly paid for all the equipment necessary to stage the great Greek dramatic festivals. Such gifts of theaters, scripts commissioned from leading playwrights, costumes, and actors shaped the physical and cultural environments of Greek cities, gave audiences memorable lessons in civility, and enshrined drama as one of the greatest media of collective artistic expression in the West. Philanthropy in the Roman empire As conquerors, heirs, and cautious emulators of the Greeks, the Romans assumed better regulation of what they called philanthropia to be among the greatest obligations of their civilization. Influential authors like Cicero and Seneca composed manuals on the arts of proper gift giving and receipt. Seneca, tutor to the emperor Nero, emphasized that elite giving must generate gratitude between the vertical ranks of Roman society and argued that philanthropy rightly done formed the "glue" that held the Roman people together (On Benefits, composed c. 60 C.E.). Thus benefactors had to select appreciative beneficiaries carefully and choose presents capable of eliciting maximum acknowledgment from recipients. Heads must rule hearts in discriminate Roman philanthropy. Roman rulers took this advice with emperors asserting exclusive right to make choice gifts of baths, gymnasia, fountains, and gladiatorial games to the Roman population. The elaboration of Roman law aided less exalted philanthropists by giving legal status to trusts, charitable endowments, and mutual12


INTRODUZIONE

aid societies. But the propensity of many donors to use such legal instruments for self-glorification, personally advantageous politicking, and the conservation of family wealth did little to help larger numbers of the destitute in growing Roman imperial cities. To Latins, philanthropy also meant the proper conduct of diplomacy, special respect for foreign ambassadors, fidelity to sworn treaties, and generous terms of alliance offered to defeated enemies. The propagandists of empire cited these philanthropies as justifications of Roman imperialism and the superiority of Roman civilization. Christian Models of Philanthropy The radical, roving holy man Jesus of Nazareth rebelled against all existing regimes of self-serving philanthropy in the ancient world simply by proclaiming: "Blessed are the poor" (Luke 6:20). The master commanded early apostles to abandon without recompense all material possessions by almsgiving and to strive for ever deeper humility through personal alms seeking, courting rejection and abuse at every door. The earliest Christian writings, the letters of Paul—composed c. 54–58 C.E.— advocate in part this radical social ethic demanding that all believers become tireless benefactors. Those formerly accustomed to being mere protégés of greater patrons must now aspire themselves to become protectors of their neighbors no matter how humble they all may be. Paul raised up new communities of donors to be inspired by Jesus's manifest love and empowered spiritually and philanthropically through the church. New Testament evangelists amplified this charitable theme, emphasizing how Jesus immediately cared for the suffering even by doing good works on the Sabbath in contravention of Jewish worship protocols (Mark 3:4 and 6:2–5). Jesus personified as the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:29–37) emphasized that one's obligation to help the stricken 13


GIULIANA GEMELLI

must extend to all and transcend ethnocentric notions of racial superiority, caste privilege, and self-interest. Fundamental tenets of Christianity formed as its exponents did battle with more ancient regimes of philanthropy.Early Christian bishops, locked in vicious power struggles with old pagan elites for control of crumbling Roman imperial cities, could not be so generous. Anxious to portray themselves as potent "lovers of the poor," they continually revised Christian doctrines on alms, riches, and the poor to gain disciplined blocks of loyal followers. Fidelity to Jesus's more selfless teachings was sacrificed as bishops toned down earlier rebukes of the wealthy, courted rich donors with preferred places in new congregations, and increasingly described almsgiving as a means by which the ordinary faithful could atone for their personal sins under reinforced church discipline. The crucial Christian linkage of philanthropy and penance enticed givers to look upon their alms as a form of spiritual capital accumulation and intensified self-centered motives for giving. Worldly charitable deposits would ultimately enable pious donors to boast in heaven about the purity of their own souls and to secure personal salvation. Connecting the dots: religion, philanthropy and the Mediterranean. If philanthropy is a relevant aspect of religious practices, religious traditions and practices are crucial to understand and conceptualize the role of philanthropy in the past as well as in the present: not only because faith-based foundations and organizations are a relevant part of the landscape of philanthropy but because the relation between religion and philanthropy is a crucial driver in preserving identity for displaced people. Diasporas are powerful agents of philanthropic initiatives. From this perspective philanthropy is a factor of “social 14


INTRODUZIONE

cohesion” and preservation of traditional habits in changing contexts as well as in multi-cultural frameworks. The religious norms and their anthropological and cultural patterns are certainly factors of differentiation, which are particularly relevant in the Mediterranean areas where the coexistence of different religious traditions is a traditional feature. This statement is overwhelmed in the present configuration of European societies where, as an effect of the increasing streams of immigration and the role played in civil societies by minorities, the oxymoron of preservation of identities throughout the hybridization of social contexts is at work. Nowadays one can affirm that philanthropy and its institutional and associative networks entered in a phase of debate and change, which characterizes, with specific connotations, the Mediterranean areas and their strategic role within the global system. Since the Mediterranean is a cross-continental framework this process concerns European countries, Turkey as well as other continental areas, such as the Middle-East and the Northern part of Africa. It is a matter of fact, that the roots of philanthropy in the Mediterranean areas– are deeply characterised both in terms of historical legacy as well as of religious traditions. It is also a matter of fact that the most diffused religious traditions in the Mediterranean areas (Jewish, Islamic and Christian – Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox) – in the contemporary period as well in the past- are characterized by increasing interaction and shaped by the effects of the evolution of civil society in the framework of the persistence of long established religious and cultural practices, including social rules and legal norms. The Islamic as well as the Jewish tradition are characterized by an increasing interaction between religious statements and practice of social justice in which philanthropic activities and their institutional drivers, such as Foundations, NPOs and NGOs – are particularly relevant, because they include innovation as 15


GIULIANA GEMELLI

well as traditional patterns. The Jewish tradition made the act of giving a central and imperative duty for each believer. Ancient Judaism went farther, postulating a single God as the epitome of generosity. All of creation belonged to Jehovah, but he gave the Israelites the promised land, sheltering them as refugees ("for the land is mine; for you are strangers and sojourners with me"; Lev. 25:23). Israel itself is defined in Jewish sacred writings as a foundling nation, rescued by the Lord. Repeated Mosaic descriptions of the deity as an avenger of the orphaned, the widowed, and the homeless compel Jews, in turn, to help the bereft ("Love the stranger therefore, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt"; Deut. 10:19). Here, misanthropy equals apostasy, and pious Jews are required to be givers. Charity becomes a mode of divine worship, and rituals of giving organize all Hebrew calendars. Days of celebration and atonement marking the lunar year must be accompanied by shared meals and presents. Seasonal harvests close with free gleanings in the fields accorded to the impoverished. Tithes to benefit the poor, priests, and slaves run at three-, seven-, and fifty-year cycles, perpetuating acts of charity among the tribes of Israel. Synagogues themselves embodied Judaism's charitable imperatives with spaces designed for the kindly deposit and distribution of alms. Donors left gifts secretly in one room of the temple. Beneficiaries collected the offerings in a second room unseen by contributors and thus immune to any shame in the transaction. Amos, Isaiah and Micah took an innovating stand in attacking the problem of poverty and its roots. Jewish “charity� did not limit itself to the provision of eleemosynary patterns of donation. In the Jewish tradition it is important to participate in repairing the world by participating in the Tzedakah which means justice and righteousness as well as in g’milut hasadim which means act of loving-kindness. The analysis of evolutionary patterns of Jewish philanthropy reveals that 16


INTRODUZIONE

the relations between religion and philanthropy are a path-dependent process in which social action and the pursuit of social justice are strictly interconnected. In the long-term perspective these practices are characterized by patterns of adaptation to the evolution of Jewish community and particularly to the Diaspora communities. During the latter part of the Nineteenth century social and political movements and other ideological groups, espousing new ways of Jewish life, created organizations with new (non-religious) orientations and goals, backed to a large extent by Jewish philanthropy (local and "foreign"). Diaspora Jewish philanthropy emerged during this time as a major force for funding those endeavors. In recent times number of factors among which, quite paradoxically, a decline in donations from Diaspora Jewry, seem to encourage the development of new patterns of philanthropic issues, including venture philanthropy and the active role of emergent social entrepreneurs. The definition and the diffusion of Maimonides teaching represent a crucial turning point in the history of Jewish philanthropy. Born in Cordova in 1135 Maimonides was a physician, a philosopher and a Biblical and Talmudic commentator. Besides his philosophical works and medical text in Hebrew as well as in Arabic Maimonides is known for his teachings on Tzadakah. He defined eight degrees in giving practices and stated that the highest degree of Tzadakah is to assist a poor person (not-Jws as well Jews) by providing him or her with a gift or loan or by accepting him or her as a partner in business or by helping him or her to find an employment in order to become independent and to act as an active member of his community. The basic need, which respond to a universalistic aim, is to “repair a broken world� (Tikun Olam). Gary Tomin underlines the fact the religious/social societies of Judaism were transplanted and maintained in a multitude of Diaspora communities and that Jewish brought their philanthropic 17


GIULIANA GEMELLI

systems wherever they went, century after century. It is interesting to observe that the highest level of the Jewish Tzadakah contains some interesting analogies with the new patterns of modern philanthropy, which underlines the necessity to go beyond the grant-making as monetary donation and include in philanthropic activities, assistance in budgeting, financial planning, consolidation of loans, management capabilities. From this point of view the analysis of the relations between religions and philanthropy reveals that tradition and innovation can interact as the two facets of the same medal. Concerning the Muslim world, the Islamic law is represented, in the classical theory, as a tree with four roots (Koran, Sunna, Igna and Qiyas) and two branches (Ghadat – acts of worship – and Muamalat – legal relations). Zakaat, being one of the five pillars of Islam, is at the same time an act of worship and a legal alms, which has always been intended as a system of social insurance and security in the Islamic world.. Literaly Zakaat means to purify, to develop and cause to grow, but as Shariah terms it is an act of monetary worship according to which every Muslim who possesses equal to or exceeding a laid down minimum, has to give away a portion of it to the deserving poor and needy people. The payment of Zakaat purifies the remaining wealth. According to John Esposito “to practicing Muslims, Zakaat connotes the path to purity, comprehension of material responsibility, and an enhanced sense of spirituality”. The Koran defines in precise way the receivers of the almsgiving. “Alms are only for the poor and the needy, and the officials (appointed) over them, and those whose hearts are made to incline (to truth) and the (ransoming of) the captives and those in debts and in the way of Allah and the wayfarer; an ordinance from Allah, and Allah is knowing, wise”. Therefore, according to the Koran, the Islamic law identify eight categories of recipients and it is interesting that side by side with the poor and the needy we could 18


INTRODUZIONE

find also the jihad (in the way of Allah). In effect, Jihad must not be restricted only to military activities, but to a broader set of efforts Therefore, we can list four different meanings of Jihad: first, the financing of military movement, which defends Muslims and protect their land; second, supporting the efforts which aim at implementing the rules of Sharia; third, financing da’wa centers in non Muslim countries; fourth, financing the efforts directed to spread religious teachings among the Muslim minorities in non-Muslim countries.Another consideration is that the fiqh (which in a strictly sense represents the Islamic law) implies five categories of giving practices (obligatory or duty; recommended; indifferent; reprehensible; forbidden). The Zakaat is part of the first, it is a duty for the good Muslim, but the Islamic law distinguishes also between a personal and a communal duty. Personal duty means that a certain action is obligatory to individuals, the communal duty instead needs a compulsory system. The fact that the Zakaat is intended as a communal duty implicates the need of a state, or an organization, which collects the legal alms. Nowadays, we find only few Islamic countries that organize the collection of Zakaat, instead we find a lot of movements and foundations which are devoted to this task. In the Middle East for example the Muslim Brotherhood has Zakaat committees and in Western countries with Muslim minorities there are several Islamic foundations which collect this sort of religious tax. A relevant question, based on the fact that Zakaat was fixed in the Islamic tradition in the framework of a specific historical, economic and social configuration, concerns the adaptation of the concept and related practices to meet contemporary forms of income and wealth. In some countries the Zakaat system is based on a specific legislation, in other cases, for example in Western based foundations, one can find the so-called “Zakaat calculator�. It should be noted that in the 19


GIULIANA GEMELLI

Modern Muslim world law only in some countries like South Arabia, Libya, Pakistan and Sudan enforces the payment of zadaak. Developing the issue about the relations between past and present in specific countries and particularly in Turkey and Cyprus (see the contribution to this book by Suraiya Faroqhi and Netice Yildiz) one should consider another relevant shift that occurred in the last century. It is related to the decline of the role of the traditional waqf, as a basic complement to Muslim patterns of charity. A waqf is a pious endowment, which exists from the early records of Islamic history. According to the Encyclopaedia of Religions Waqf refers to the act of dedication property to a Muslim foundation and by extension means also the endowment thus created. The original meaning of the Arabic word is to stop that is to stop to be considered and treated as ordinary property. The property, which is usually a real estate, remains the possession of the founder and of his heirs but they cannot claim on it the usual rights of property. The historical development of waqf and their institutional configuration is quite complex. Amy Singer writes theat “though waqf –making has no explicit articulation in the Qur’an, there are versed that contain repeated admonition to the believers that they be charitable, that they give in addition to the alms (Zakaat)… Endowments existed throughout the Islamic world, serving as the agents of everything from smallscale beneficence to large public welfare projects. Building anything from mosques and schools, to roads and bridges, to neighborhood water fountains. Their beneficiaries included… scholars and students, surf dervishes, indigents and family members”. Waqf have a very long and articulated history that testifies the legal ambivalence of these institutions, which are represented as private as well as public bodies. Actually a relevant feature of the Islamic trust is the absence of a substantive distinction between private and charitable trusts (in the 20


INTRODUZIONE

Anglo-American meaning). Adam Sabra observes that in the oldest period “most of the attention of the legal sources is given to family trusts. It is a matter of fact, however that clauses of family trusts provided for the revenues of the trust to be distributed amongst the poor if the founder’s bloodline came to an end. Sabra writes that “this clause enabled the founder to claim that his endowment had a charitable purpose and that it would be perpetual and that “since perpetuity was an important condition of a valid waqf, such provision was attractive to the founder”. It is not until the modern period that a clearer distinction was set up between public and private trust, but this was less the result of an evolution in legal principles than the effect of an historic evolution in which the public aspects were emphasized against the private ones. The case of the evolutionary patterns of foundation in Turkey is particularly emblematic, in this perspective. During the Ottoman Empire charitable endowments grew up and represented for a long time an autonomous sphere. One has to keep in mind that some of the greatest trusts in Middle Eastern history, particularly those established in Egypt under the Turkish Mamluks (1225-1517), had a relevant role in supporting Sufi organizations, “building large and magnificent Khanqalhs or hostels for them and endowing them with commercial building and agricultural lands. Elsewhere the Ottomans lands, in Mogul India and Savafid Iran large-scale trusts were set up to provide permanent vehicles for the redistribution of revenues to these groups”. In the middle of the 19th century the Ottoman government promulgated a new land law that created a separate administration for waqf. After the collapse of the empire, in the modern period and particularly under the leadership of Kemal Atatürk, foundations provoked debates on whether they constituted a form of ‘Islamic’ civil society. Becoming secularized or confiscated by the State (this was the case, among others, of the Dervish 21


GIULIANA GEMELLI

lodges in 1925 as well as of the Bektashi lodges in 1926) during the 20th century until the present, they have been administered by the General Directorate of Pious Foundations. Nowadays, however, a crucial change is underway and can possibly generate a relevant change in the framework of the highly secularized Turkish society, as an effect of increasing Islamization of Turkish institutions, concerning education, public justice and financial system. It should be noted that during the last part of the 20th century, the philanthropic system in Islam became more and more linked to the concept of Da’wa, a welfare system with the final goal of an Islamization of society in opposition to the influence of Western models of secular states. Moreover after September 11, 2001 the role of Islamic Foundations as potential driver of support to terroristic groups is increasingly under scrutiny and philanthropic activties reveal their multiple facets in a complex framework in which the hybrid nature of many terrorist organizations, with their ambivalence between terrorist activities and philanthropic and humanitarian actions, emerge as a dramatic feature of the present. The need for financial transparency and accountability both for religeous NGOs as well as for other type of grantmaking organizations becomes crucial to avoid the danger of misuse of foundations in financing terrorist mouvements. What should be underlined is that the ambivalence it not the product neither of the reliegous norms, nor of the charible practices but is related to the behaviour of instituitional and individual actors. Ersilia Francesca observes that “perceived corruption among the Zakaat employees or suspectd misuse of the Zakaat funds contrubute to the disatisfaction of the beneficiaries of the system”. In itself the Zakaat as a charity tax presents differences but also similarities with other practices of tithing. While the Islamic radition distinguishes between the obligatory 22


INTRODUZIONE

taxation and the voluntary giving which is denominated with the word Sadàqa, in Mormons religeous behaviour tithing is at the same time a voluntary and personal matter and a moral obligation for the community. As observed by Thomas H. Jeavons the practice of thithing has its roots in the Old Testament. In Genesis 28:10-22 Jacob promises to give back to God “a tithe” of all he has (or will receive) in recognition of God's blessings to him. In Chapters 12 and 14 of Deuteronomy the Jews are instructed to offer a tenth of their produce (or income) as a contribution to support the Temple and the priests, their community, and “the widows and the orphans” – i.e., those in need in their community. In Deuteronomy 26, the tithe is a gift to be made, from the “first fruits” of the harvest, as a sign of thanksgiving. There is evidence that early Christians saw the tithe (10%) as a minimum level of giving to the church and the needs of the poor to be expected of all the faithful. Beyond the impact of specific teachings, those who participate in religious congregations also generally see giving model on a regular basis as a public act, and learn giving as a social behavior. Generally speaking one can affirm that religious people are more generous overall than non-believers but it is also a matter of fact that the most generous are not necessarily religious and, moreover, that in religious giving there is the risk that a significant proportion is utilized for the reproduction and the maintenance of the religious institutions themselves, as it can happen for any other type of non profit organizations. As an effect of combining these two contradictory sentences one can affirm that religious giving does not necessarily reflect the spirit of generosity. In extreme cases religion can also act to limit and contain the social benefit of civic entrepreneurship. Analyzing the Issues of Governance in Later Medieval and Early Modern Hospitals in Poland Wladyslaw Roczniak shows that the advent of the Catholic Counter-Reformation imposed a 23


GIULIANA GEMELLI

single minded governance that became detrimental to the quality of life hospital institutions offered to their charges. “Their role as guardian of Catholic orthodoxy was supported by ecclesiastical council decrees that stressed their religious nature and emphasized the necessity of greater religious control over the lives of the patients”. After all, as Robert Wuthnow has recalled it, giving is essentially a social – and to many extent political – transaction. The spirit of generosity depends on the contexts which means that it is shaped by other factors than religion as such and involves aspects of social life that are embedded in social institutions and in their evolutionary process. In this perspective it is not surprising that the poor and the people in situation of insecurity give more than the rich and the persons who live in situation of political, social and economic security. Giving within poor communities is crucial to their survival. Without mutual help survival will be more difficult. Starvation, maltunitrion, dissemination of diseases will be more severe. As observed by Adam Habib, Brij Maharaj and Ansilla Nyar in the developing world patterns of obligations “occur in ways fundamentally different to those of the industrialized western world. Family and informal networks are highly personalized and giving is influences by specific identity categories such as relatives, friends and neighbors”.. Some authors qualifies the behaviour of extended families in terms of mutual obligation or as “economy of affection”, based on affinities, kinship, community and last but not least religion. In monotheistic religions and particularly in the Jewish tradition, during the medieval and modern period. one can find several examples of “economies of affection” that are strictly tied to rituals and official ceremonies in which the identity of communities is preserved and strengthened. This is the case of the social role in support to the needy played by the chair of circumcision, “the operation performed on the mail 24


INTRODUZIONE

child on his eight day which symbolizes his entrance into the community of the sons of Israel, guaranteeing the continuity of the Jewish people in general and of his community in particular”. On the basis of archive documents and iconography sources Gioia Perugia describes the role of a quasi institutional space animated by the principles of mutual aid and solidarity between each individual, the family and the community as a whole and particularly analyses the role of benevolent voluntary societies created in the ghetto era who cared for the physical and spiritual needs of the disadvantaged. These societies “took on the task of assisting community members who could not afford to hold a respectable ceremony in the most meaningful moments of their life – including circumcision”. In this increasingly consolidated social space obligation and volunteering are strictly interconnected as moral imperatives. Patterns of obligations, within the more limited system of nuclear family, are at work also at present in the most developed countries, where differences in the style of giving are related to contexts and generated a pattern that I will define tentatively as differentiated isomorphism. The development of the research activities will demonstrate if this heuristic tool is an appropriate and strategic conceptual framework or not. Reflections on the present through the laboratory of the past: the challenge of the Mediterranean as a field of studies in philanthropy. In the US every income group gives more to religious causes than to non-religious. According to a special issues of “The Economist” which refers to a research report written by Richard Steinberg of Indiana University, the poorest fifth of the population gives an average of $234 a year to religion and $85 to other causes; and black people give $924 to religion, compared with $439 to non25


GIULIANA GEMELLI

religious causes. In 2005 giving to religious organization increased by 5.9% and represents 35.8% of total giving in the US. In the Mediterranean and particularly in Southern Europe if one considers congregations and religious associations the impact of religion on giving is much lower as compared to the United States. The picture changes dramatically, however, if one considers the role of the Catholic Church as an institution of charitable activities as well as the main driver of volunteering organizations. It changes also if the inquiry concerns Sooth Eastern Europe, where according to a detailed report by Seal, a research network of the European Foundation Center at present the Third Sector includes a diversity of religious and faith-based associations, sometimes established by citizens and sometimes by religious institutions. “Even within the old socialist system, these institutions had their own organizations that were mainly focused on helping the most vulnerable populations and organizing cultural events for their followers. Regardless of the fact that in the old system religious communities were marginalized, their influence on citizens remained very present. This became very obvious during the tragic war of 1992-1995. As they did during the war, religious communities in today's Bosnia and Herzegovina are aiming to become influential forces in the republic's political and social life. This is especially obvious when we look at mono-ethnic and religious activities, aid provision and support to nationalist political parties. Many religious-oriented NGOs are involved in overcoming inherent divisions and other barriers to reconciliation. Some of these organizations are explicitly religious, i.e. they are engaged in providing religious services. Others may be termed "faith-based". Faith-based NGOs engage in a range of activities, including promoting inter faith dialogue, providing immediate humanitarian aid, and fostering long26


INTRODUZIONE

term reconstruction and sustainable development”. Therefore one should take into consideration the difference of context between a situation of quasi – monopoly and a situation of increasing pluralism where there is a proliferation of different churches. A controversial theory which is known as “the religious market model”, states that American churches are subject to market forces and depend upon their ability to attract volunteers as well as new adherents by offering social services, including engagement in communities and support to their activities in arts and culture as well as in education. Wright or wrong this theory, it is a matter of fact that religious pluralism seems to facilitate the scholarly engagement in this field of research. In comparison with Europe where the study of religious organizations and their relations with giving practices is still the main field of research of few and isolated scholars, since the seminal book by Robert Wuthnow and Virginia Hodgkinson, North American scholars have produced a consistent number of studies. One of the aims of the research project is to contribute to fill the gap between two world the Anglo – Saxon tradition in which philanthropy is full legitimized both in theory and in practice and the Mediterranean world where the oldest roots of philanthropy are located but in which both the practice and their institutional framework as well as the academic work and institutions are still in a pioneering phase. In the US important research centers such as the Hauser Center at Harvard University and the Center on Philanthropy at the Indiana University have focused religions and philanthropy from different disciplinary perspectives. The increasing amount of publications about faith and secularization has certainly contributed to stimulate the debate. Among other scholars, Peter Dobkin Hall, a well-known specialist in history of philanthropy, has largely contributed to stimulate the research on the relations between religions 27


GIULIANA GEMELLI

and philanthropy. In one of his essays Peter Dobkin Hall reconstructs the recent evolution of the state of the art and situates the starting point of the scholars’ growing interest in religion and philanthropy in 1989 “when independent Sector, then a major convenor of not profit scholars, devoted its annual research forum to religion and, with funding from the Lily Endowment, conducted a major survey of the role of religion in the not profit sector, From Belief to Commitment: the Community Service Activities and Finances of Religious Congregations. Lily also funded major university – based research projects on religious philanthropy and the finances of American religious bodies”. Dobkin Hall states that the major studies of religion, giving and volunteering treat religion generically. They seldom take note of the important behavioral differences among religious communities, particularly in what concern patterns of civic engagement and mobilization of resources, not only in term of financial assets but also of capabilities and competencies in mobilizing resources for the community empowerment which means the necessity to highlight “the capacity of belief to shape not only religious organizations, but the secular organizations which, in most of the cases, are the means by which people of faith provide educational, health care, and social services”. Dobkin underlines the necessity to elaborate specific conceptual tools to analyze religious differences An interesting approach is the distinction between “bonding” and “bridging” drawn by Robert Putnam in his book Bowling Alone. The Collapse and Revival of American Community. In religious groups as in other communities, in fact, there is a difference between some forms of social capital /that/ are by choice or necessity, inward looking and tend to reinforce exclusive identities and homogeneous groups /and/ other networks /that/ are outward looking and encompass people across diverse social cleavages”. This 28


INTRODUZIONE

distinction implies several variations – it is not a black and white – and even some paradoxes. The Jewish Diaspora is traditionally a vehicle of protection of the community (particularly for the Haredi community, an ultra orthodox Jewish community, analyzed by Benjamin Gidron, 2007) as well as of social interaction and integration within and across different contexts. In a workshop organized by Klaus Weber and David Cesarani 10th and 11th of October, 2005, with the support of the Fritz Thyssen foundation on "Western European Concepts of 'Welfare', 'Philanthropy' and 'Charity': Changes in Meaning over Space and Time, c. 1800-1940", two papers whose subject was respectively "Individual approaches to Jewish philanthropy: Members of the Warburg family compared", and “The Dead's posthumous reputation' or the Creation and Destruction of Frankfurt's Foundation system during the 19th and 20th centuries" showed that in both cases there was no specific Jewish reason for patronage to be found, neither in personal lifestyle nor in sponsored institutions. Regarding the lifestyle of the Warburg brothers the range covered the strictly religious orientation of Fritz Warburg to the fully secularized lifestyle of Max Warburg who did not even make an effort to familiarize his children with the Jewish belief. Likewise the sponsored institutions (Institute of Cultural Studies, Scientific Foundation, Colonial Institute and Tropical Institute) did not feature any specific Jewish character. Regarding the question of motivation the author infers that there did not exist a specific Jewish reason for the patronage, but rather a civil implicitness of the family that did not differ from the patronage of non-Jewish wealthy citizens of Hamburg. The question of motivation and intention of Jewish benefactors is the focus of the second paper. The Jewish foundation activity began in Frankfurt in the late 1870s and 1880s. The author argues that a central motive of the sponsors was to shape the social and cultural features of their 29


GIULIANA GEMELLI

hometown. In doing so the foundations goal was twofold: to influence local conditions by strengthening the appeal of the town as a whole and to make the Jewish sponsors better integrated as members of a minority into the informal networks of the town. Both papers tend to argue that besides the diversity of individual motivations – certain religious and cultural imprints were noticeable but their influence and patterns should be related to the contexts and their historical variations. Gioia Perugia Sztulman demonstrate in one of the chapters of this book, through the support of empirical sources and visual evidences, the crucial role over 300 years of the ghetto and its paradoxes: “the isolation generated by the discriminatory and humiliating regulations against the Jews led to the consolidation of Jewish identity – Perugia writes – to the flourishing of a well defined Jewish culture and to the creation of self-government.. the ghetto was not only a physical and social boundary exposed to poverty, misery and humiliation but a vital and dynamic selfregulating neighborhood, sustained by principles of philanthropy, solidarity and reciprocal responsibility. In addition to the two focal institutions of ghetto lifethe family and the community – Jews created a wide network of benevolent societies (hevras) which were not only religious but also cultural and social”. The main question to b addressed by REPHIM is related to conceptual and heuristic implication that the study of the differences of practices mainly based one social , anthropological historical and legal perspective can have not only to enhance comparative issues but also to consider historical aspects as rooted in the longdurée and in the art6iculation between tradition and innovation.. This approach finds a building block in the argument developed by Ronald Inglehart and Pippa Norris in their book Sacred and Secular Religion and Politics Worldwide about the cultural tradition axiom. 30


INTRODUZIONE

It states that worldviews that were originally linked with religious traditions have shaped the culture of each nation or social group and have been transmitted to the citizens despite their religious orientation, not directly by the church or religious organizations but by the educational system, the mass media, the social networks. An relevant example is that “although the value systems of historically Protestant countries differs markedly and consistently from those of historically Catholic countries – the value systems of Dutch Catholics are much similar to those of Dutch protestants than to those of French, Italian or Spanish Catholics”. Even in highly secular societies, the historical legacy of traditional religious practices and values continue to define cultural differences. This concerns also organizational models (associations and congregations versus centralized institutions) and the attitude to other groups including philanthropic activities which enter this complex landscape by contributing to its shaping, being at the same time shaped by its evolutionary configuration. To many extent – not in all cases – philanthropy acts as a bridge between traditional sacred and secularized societies, being a social practice which frequently embeds religious traditions The theoretical framework: lessons from the past. The first consideration is that the complexity of the relation between religions and philanthropy are related to a fundamental paradox: their relations are universalistic and deeply rooted in the history of humanity and at the same time they are very specific and variable in different historical times. Since the modern age as an example the relation between religion and philanthropy has been shaped by the triangulation with the role of the Church in the consolidation of national states and related civil societies as well as to their 31


GIULIANA GEMELLI

differentiated model of emerging welfare states. In Great Britain, France and Germany in the 19th and 20th centuries substantial differences characterized the understanding and connotations of the terms "welfare", "charity" and "philanthropy”. While the corresponding action bears the term "charity" in British works, the French term "Charité" is predominantly associated to practices of the Ancièn Régime. The term "philanthropy" has been used in France since modern times, but discredited by the French Revolution. In Germany for a long time it was almost exclusively used in the field of art and culture. These differences can be ascribed to the different religious mentalities, values and traditions of the respective countries shaped by Catholicism, Calvinism, Lutheranism and Protestantism. In a recent paper based on quantitative data on the development of the welfare state Klaus Weber states that the inner – Protestant differences are stronger than differences between a Lutheran and Catholic tradition. The research conducted by a group of scholars, in the framework of the research activity of the Philanthropy and Social Innovation Research center, shows that this statement should be contextualized and reconsidered. Also in Catholicism as I mentioned there are different characterizations and orientations. At the origin of Christianity, as an example, there is a relevant shift in the behavior towards the poor. Actually this behavior is the basic framework to understand the shifting in the Roman Empire from the lover of the city to the lover of the poor. The establishment of the Christian Church in the Roman Empire in the late antique period between the years 300 and 600 of the Common Era implied that the love of the poor became a public virtue. Before that time to be evergetés might imply not “to be a philanthropist but a rich landowner who had decided that the time was ripe to offer his grain upon the market, thereby reaping himself both a handsome profit and the 32


INTRODUZIONE

additional glory of having contributed to save his city form famine”. The City was the focus, not the poor. Lover of the poor did not grow naturally out of the ideals of public beneficence in Greek and Roman times. Significantly it emerged – as stated by Peter Brown in his classical study Poverty and Leadership on the Later Roman Empire – when the ancient civic sense of the community was weakened. From this perspective Christian and Jewish charitable behavior were not simply a new pattern of generosity but a new departure which considered society as a whole. The relation with the poor became part of the life of the rich, also as a consequence of the increasing intertwining between the city and the countryside and of the growing visibility of the poor within the walls of the city, as an effect of the demographic revolution during the 4th and 5th century. In the Mediterranean areas this shift create a geographical differentiation between the Greco-Roman world and the Ancient Near East, whose essentially nonclassical cultural framework had a focus on the care of the poor. The same orientation prevailed until the modern times also in the Orthodox context where the accumulation of wealth was condemned as illicit. The Orthodox religious rules implied that wealth should be essentially used for the common good as a service to God as well as to those who need help. In Russia, Orthodox religious had a great influence on the development of philanthropy. Poverty wasn’t considered a vice: the poor were victims of society and not a threat. Significantly both in the Jewish and in the Orthodox religious traditions which are widespread in the Mediterranean basin, the highest level of charity is spontaneous donation, giving through the heart, that is with an act of generosity, empathy and love. In the Jewish tradition the most relevant aspect, as we have seen, is the Maimonides prescription along a scale of eight levels, from the lowest level of giving reluctantly to the highest 33


GIULIANA GEMELLI

level of giving to enable the needy to overcome their condition and become independent from other people’s help. In the Orthodox tradition the practice of philanthropy is also historically based on the XVIth century Domostroji. It indicates the prescriptions of religious behavior, which does not implies only eleemosynary practice but attentive cares towards the needy people. To be a philoptochos, a “lower of the poor” or a philentolos a lover of commandments of God to care for the poor, were qualities singled out for praise in upper class men and women both in the Christian and in the Jewish tradition. This was also the case in the framework of Islamic tradition where philanthropy was and still is formally related, through the Zakah prescriptions, to the care of poor. The specificity of the Catholic tradition, as demonstrated by Peter Brown, is that the establishment of the Church was not outside the picture, on the contrary the bishops and their helpers were themselves agents of change. Brown affirms that the Christian bishops invented the poor. They acted and claim for power in the name of the needs of the poor. The care of poor was a social construction in which also new patterns of power were shaped. The Christian Church gave a new meaning to the old demos. It designated the marginal groups that had always pressed in upon the city as the poor. It should be noted, however, that in the IVth and Vth century in the Jewish and Catholic tradition and in the framework of a society which was not marked by clear-cut cleavages, the poor were people vulnerable to impoverishment rather than individual leaving in deep desperate poverty. It is a matter of fact that in the early Medieval period the institutions of the Monti di Pietà analyzed by Giuseppina Muzzarelli – the ancestors of the modern micro-credit, lent money not the poorest but the people who were in danger of becoming poor. The Monti di Pietà created by the Franciscan movement founded collaboration in 34


INTRODUZIONE

terms of expertise in Jewish bankers marginalized by the official Catholic Church. The Franciscans according the original vision of the Christianity shared with the Jewish philanthropic tradition the principle of isotés, the leveling out, that is the idea that charity should be a vehicle of equalizing resources which means to state a principle of social justice. In the Jewish tradition it is expressed in the concept of Zedaka. What early Christians took for granted as part of an inherited conglomerate of notions shared with Judaism, was that they were responsible for the care of the poor of their communities. The Islamic tradition incorporated this vision and practices by implementing it with the principle of supporting the community with material goods delivered and administrated by the Waqf – fountains, schools, orphelinats, but also markets, as S. Faroqhi shows in her contribution to this book – with their benefits to be shared by the community. The triangulation among religion philanthropy and the economic aspects of social life of communities is a relevant subject that needs to be developed by scholarly research. It is an important chapter in this field of study since at present we need to understand the genealogy –that is the historical and theoretical framework – of an emerging approach in philanthropy which combines giving and business practices in the practical and theoretical framework of venture philanthropy and social return on investment. Analyzing the past throughout these lenses implies a focus on the blurring boundaries between profit and non-profit, which represents a theoretical tool, based on a more general separation between social and economic aspects, rather than a “reality”. Blurring boundaries between “business and giving” are at work in different religious frameworks and deeply influenced the practices of philanthropy and their impact in societies. At the end of the III Century – as an example – a silent revolution starts to emerge in the framework 35


GIULIANA GEMELLI

the Christian Church with the bishop claiming to be supported by their fellow believers, claiming their role of administrators – oikonomos – of a wealth to be collected and distributed to the poor. In some circles – as Peter Brown observes – even private almsgiving was discouraged: ideally all gifts to the poor were to pass through the bishop and his clergy for only they knew who needed support. This was also the framework in which the claim for tax exemptions emerged in the name of the care of poor. The institutionalization of religion is – to many extents- a relevant factor if the institutionalization of philanthropy (in which the role of tax exemption is still a crucial factor) but not necessary an engine of giving. Looking to more recent time one should consider the increasing divide between the dimension of giving in the framework of religious institutions and its role as a voluntary phenomenon related to faith-based associations and organizations. As I have previously mentioned in Europe, where Catholicism is largely diffused, giving to religion is lower if compared with the US. In recent times however it appears to be a growing phenomenon. The “Economist” reports that “In Germany, a ‘voluntary’ church tax collects an astonishing €8.5 billion ($9.9 billion) a year. In Britain, a recent study of charity trends by the Charities Aid Foundation, a non-profit body, found that 10% of income given to the 500 largest charities went to faith-based organizations”. In Italy the main attractor and engine of giving is, not surprisingly, volunteering. The practice of giving is less related to donations than to the creation of services, to support of communities. Significantly, however, organizational models in the framework of its related culture are still dominant at the point that some Catholic scholars tend to give a strict – actually reductive – definition of philanthropy as “compassionate capitalism”, Catholic scholars stress the dynamic reciprocal role of volunteering services and 36


INTRODUZIONE

consider philanthropy as a pattern of social action which is not able to produce neither reciprocity nor relational goods, It remains a question to be further investigated if the volunteering sector in Catholic countries like France and Italy and their related traditions of “economia civile” and “economia sociale” belong to models of social capital inward looking and tending to reinforce exclusive identities and homogeneous groups or to networks that are outward looking and encompass people across diverse social cleavages. A recent study by a group of Italian scholars reveals that most of the volunteering associations delivering services are more oriented to the first model, reinforcing Dobkin’s thesis about Catholic insularity. The evolution of Catholicism, however, observed from the long- term perspective reveals that there are several traditions in which charity and philanthropy are not opposed and Catholicism is a vehicle of civic impact. One of these traditions is social Catholicism that Dobkin recognizes as a vehicle to produce charitable organizations intended to serve society as a whole. Blending boundaries between profit and non-profit. Case studies in historical perspective. Going back to the medieval tradition I have mentioned Franciscanism, as has been a powerful driver of reshaping charity. Two Italian scholars, Ceccarelli and Muzzarelli, have written interesting case studies about this movement. The history of solidarity’s credit, which is now a powerful engine of social justice, has ancient origins dating back to the 15th century. In fact the pawnshop (“Monte di pieta”), an institute that still exists in Italian cities, originated at the end of the 15th century. Tailoring the type of credit to each client’s individual needs, the medieval pawnshops helped people to obtain credit they would normally have been 37


GIULIANA GEMELLI

denied at a regular bank. The pawnshops were directed, according to the original statutes, to people who were neither very rich nor absolutely poor. The pawnshops functioned like a bank but under particularly favorable conditions for a well-defined type of client, moderately poor and virtuous citizen. Similar to today’s microcredit, solidarity was the central point of pawnshops during the Middle Ages and first Modern era. The system of micro-credit is one of the modern approaches used to recognize and alleviate financial necessity; the foundation of the pawnshops confronted the same issue at the end of Middle Ages. The goal was to offer credit with special conditions; applying rates lower than fair market value instead of charity. The condition was to be confident in the possibility of escaping poverty and the establishment of a solid framework of trusts an trustable actors. The client would have the possibility to overcome the general condition of inability through the empowerment of his individual condition and the trust offered by the bank. The first pawnshop was founded in Perugia in 1462 ; in few decades the Monti di Pietà were more than 100. Beginning in the 13th Century, the small pawn-loans were officially exercised by Jewish bankers with whom the authorities of the citizens stipulated official agreement, the so-called “condotte”. These pacts stabilized the conditions of loans and of cohabitation between the Christian majority and the Jewish minority. These conventions indicated a new and important phase in the history of loan, and not only of small loan. These conventions represent a phase of consciousness of a widespread need for loans. At the same time, the rules also represent a phase of trust in these brokers that, although they were not Christian, were still trustworthy. The relationship with Jewish broker lasted many centuries. The pawnshops derived from the particular culture and sensibility of the Franciscan order, but also from Jewish experience. The idea of intervening 38


INTRODUZIONE

in this sector in order to give help originated from the Franciscans, but the practice came from the experience of Christian and Jewish bankers. With the pawnshops, the Christian world directly addressed the problem of small credit, separating the idea of charity. The later remained necessary to help the really weak, people who were not able to overcome independently poverty because of age, illness, and inability to work. The pawnshops, instead, were destined to help those who only needed economic help in order to overcome a temporary condition of necessity. They were the poor less poor (“pauperes pinguiores�). Pawnshops were effective economic venture not only for the clients, but also for the city. The city was alleviated from the obligation to assist men and women who risked to become really poor. For the city, the risk of potentially dangerous behaviors inspired by poverty diminished. The clients of pawnshops, the poor less poor, if appropriately sustained would have been able to access the goods and start small activities, consequently producing wealth. As noticed by Muzzarelli the more innovative aspects of this initiative, created in Franciscan framework, met also challenges. The request of reimbursement of expenses, was in fact considered usury and the assimilation of Pawnshop to business activities was condemned by the dominant ideology of the Catholic Church. The relations between business and charitable behaviour is also at the core of Suraya Faroqhi who has extensively analyzed the practice of giving in Turkey, in the framework of Islamic tradition within the Ottoman Empire, with a specific focus on the practice of intertwining social investment and charity and the consequent blurring of their boundaries as a relevant aspect of the historical evolution of the waqf. From these case study related to different historical and religious traditions a lesson to be learned: it is difficult to state the relations between religion and philanthropy without taking into account historical and evolutionary patterns, 39


GIULIANA GEMELLI

geographical and anthropological configurations as well as process of hybridization among different traditions in giving and finally without considering that philanthropy in itself is based on paradoxes that are shaped by several factors. Therefore it is important to analyze this complex system of practices, doctrines and visions from a prismatic perspective, that is from geographical and cultural areas in which cross-fertilization effects are visible and relevant. The Mediterranean areas are certainly a prismatic field of inquiry with their different social anthropological and institutional configurations. Hybridization are well documented in the work of Mark R. Cohen, whose main argument is that “Middle Eastern Jewish patterns may have been reinforced by the example of the Islamic waqf and its popularity as a nutriment for building mosques and schools in Europe, and the other hand some transformation, perhaps influences by Christian models, seems to have occurred”. Therefore in monotheistic religions patterns of crossfertilization have been at work since the oldest times. If philanthropy is a relevant aspect of religious practices, religious traditions and practices are crucial to understand and conceptualize the role of philanthropy in the past as well as in the present: not only because faithbased foundations and organizations are a relevant part of the landscape of philanthropy but because the relation between religion and philanthropy is a crucial driver in preserving identity for displaced people. Diasporas are powerful agents of philanthropic initiatives. From this perspective philanthropy is a factor of “social cohesion” and preservation of traditional habits in changing contexts as well as in multi-cultural frameworks. The religious norms and their anthropological and cultural patterns are certainly factors of differentiation which are particularly relevant in the Mediterranean areas where the coexistence of different religious traditions is a traditional feature. This statement is overwhelmed in the 40


INTRODUZIONE

present configuration of European societies where, as an effect of the increasing streams of immigration and the role played in civil societies by minorities, the oxymoron of preservation of identities throughout the hybridization of social contexts is at work (see the contributions by Daniela Modonesi and Bartolomeo Pietromarchi). One can affirm that philanthropy and its institutional and associative networks entered in a phase of debate and change which characterizes, with specific connotations, the Mediterranean areas and their strategic role within the global system. Since the Mediterranean is a crosscontinental framework this process concerns European countries including Eastern and Central Europe, Turkey as well as other continental areas, such as the MiddleEast and the Northern part of Africa. It is a matter of fact, that the roots of philanthropy in the Mediterranean areas – which are in this book are considered in the broad meaning stated by the classical studies of the historian Fernand Braudel, as an “espace mouvement”, that is as a dynamic space in a global context, shaped by social, economic and cultural changes – are deeply characterised both in terms of historical legacy as well as of religious traditions. It is also a matter of fact that the most diffused religious traditions in the Mediterranean areas (Jewish, Islamic and Christian – Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox) – in the contemporary period as well in the past- are characterised by increasing interaction and shaped by the effects of the evolution of civil society in the framework of the persistence of long established religious and cultural practices, including social rules and legal norms. The Islamic as well as the Jewish tradition are characterised by an increasing interaction between religious statements and practice of social justice in which philanthropic activities and their institutional drivers, such as Foundations, NPOs and NGOs – are particularly relevant because they include innovation issues as well as traditional patterns. 41


GIULIANA GEMELLI

The rules of the present: historical roots and globalization. This conceptual framework is overwhelmed by the effects of globalisation – particularly in what concerns the issues of social justice and multi-cultural integration – by the increasing demand for an integrated legislation on Foundations and non-profit organisations at the European level and by the process of adaptation of Foundations’ policies to the needs and identities of local communities, particularly in countries that experience an increasing process of immigration such as Germany, Italy and France. In this overview of an emerging and promising research field there is an element missed: it is the role of law and its relation with religion. As stated by Suraya Faroqhi. “In the classical Islamic system law and religion are closely connected. Accordingly pious foundations in the Ottoman Empire were established and managed according to Islamic religious law (shari’a), in addition local customs and edicts of the sultans (kanun) were also relevant in some cases. First of all the person establishing a pious foundation had to determine the religious and/or social aims that his/ her charity was supposed to serve; these rules were binding as long as the foundation in question existed. Secondly the founder needed to assign revenue sources that would finance the charity he/she had instituted; these had to be his or her full property (mülk), and for the most part – there were some exceptions – these sources of income were expected to be durable. This latter condition explains why real estate was so often preferred when it came to instituting a vakif. Thirdly he/she had to make provision for the management of his/her foundation, the administrator being called a mutevelli: often people chose to take care of their own charities as long as they lived. Men and women who established pious foundations were furthermore 42


INTRODUZIONE

expected to indicate future administrators who hopefully would make it possible for the institution in question to continue functioning throughout the centuries�. The exploration of the changing patterns of philanthropy and its relations with religious practices and cultures in the Mediterranean areas both from the historical point of view in the long period and in the present is no more a complementary aspect of research issues concerning the past and present of multicultural societies but it represents a core element in the study of the process of social inclusion and social exclusion as it is testified by some of the contributions to this book. As well as by research seminars focused on this subject. The case of Turkey, Israel and Cyprus are particularly emblematic and can be considered as a strategic focus to extend and improve research projects aiming to develop comparative issues in the relation between past and present as well as among different areas within the Mediterranean as well as in a global perspective. Accordingly it is crucial to compare the Mediterranean areas with other regions and/or continents. The relations between religion and philanthropy should be analyzed as a global prismatic system in which as previously noticed there are different patterns of reaction and interaction in the framework of historical change: - Assimilation and hybridization as it was the case in the course of the Fifteenth and early Sixteenth centuries when the Ottomans expanded in all of Eastern Europe and many old Christian foundations came to be situated on Ottoman territory: this was particularly the case for Christian communities submitted without a struggle. - Repression and incorporations as it was the case for towns that had been captured after a siege. In Salonika, for example, conquered from the Venetians the churches were transformed into mosques. Then there is to consider the case of differentiation of practices within the same religious framework. As stated by Faroqhi in her 43


GIULIANA GEMELLI

contribution to this book “in the larger cities of Anatolia and the Balkans, but not in the Arab world, there existed pious foundations lending out money at moderate interest, thus permitting people without real property to make charitable contributions. After these latter foundations had been in existence for several decades already there arose a debate about the legality or otherwise of pious foundations lending out money at interest; the head of the Ottoman juris-consults and judges in person intervened in the debate, opining that the damage to the Muslim community of outlawing such foundations would be so serious that further debate on the issue was best avoided”. Analogically these considerations recall the debate of the Franciscan movement in distinguish the usura which was forbidden by Catholic doctrine form lending out money to the benefit of community. In the Turkish case the comparison between past and present is an interesting field of analysis The traditional roots of Turkish philanthropy, old foundations, mainly mosques, libraries and fountains, form a significant part of the cultural heritage, now administered by the state’s Foundations Directorate. As it was the only autonomous sphere existing during the Empire, these foundations have provoked debates on whether they constituted a form of ‘Islamic’ civil society. The need to analyse the historical evolution of the waqf or more precisely vakif in Turkish, their role in the medieval period, their retrieval under the increasing domination of state authorities, is a crucial both for the scholars and the practitioners. Differentiated isomorphism can be used as an analytical tool to study the historical evolution of philanthropic institutions in the same context as well as to compare different institutional context in the same historical period. In Italy and Turkey despite different social and political configurations, the State has controlled for long time charitable associations, such as the opere pie in Italy and the old foundations in Turkey. In both countries at 44


INTRODUZIONE

present a crucial transition is at work, not only with the increasing privatisation of foundations but also because in both countries foundations begin to appreciate the potential of philanthropy to go beyond ‘helping’ towards the empowering of communities. When these creative patterns become a practice, grant-making activities can yield the transformative outcomes that encompass and embody social justice as a strategic goal of philanthropic activities. It is a crucial goal both in the Italian society, facing an increasing immigration of religious and cultural minorities as well as in the Turkish society characterised a twofold dynamism, between the increasing role of faith and the consolidated secularisation of institutions and social policies and between the emerging role of Islamic movement and its social and anthropological aspects and the attractiveness of European political and legal and social configuration, Multiculturalism and its effects in shaping the role of religious congregations are a crucial factor in structuring the relation between religions and philanthropy in the global context. This is the reason why we have decided to include in this volume the case of South Africa, as an interesting framework of social and cultural change in philanthropic culture and practices in a society in rapid transition as well a study of ethical roots of philanthropy in the North American continent, as a crucial background for the discussion of both the evolution of Protestant tradition faced to the development of a multi-cultural society (see Soma Hewa contribution to this volume). What we have said about the Islamic tradition, particularly its embodiment within the ‘building’ of civil society, is true also in the Jewish and Christian traditions in different European national contexts. Inter-cultural exchanges are a growing phenomenon and are generating new institutional configurations such as the micro-credit and the welcome banks that adapt financial tools to cultural and religious traditions. The elaboration of case studies 45


GIULIANA GEMELLI

of pro-activism in philanthropy of religious minorities can represent the following step of a research that needs intercultural scholarly teams and a lot of energy and commitment in structuring international collaboration. The study on religious aspect The Mediterranean is considered – according to the historian F. Braudel’s definition – as a large dynamic space in which religions and culture coexist with a basic conceptual approach; when the religious norms and rules meet the needs of society then they “lower” their rigidity and contribute to the social and community wellbeing, they generate mutual understanding and contribute to the growth of civilizations and their mutual interaction. The representations of philanthropy as a dynamic space of social change through the practice of giving, concretely testifies that the Mediterranean is the most vivid and interactive laboratory of creativity as well as a scholarly framework to develop comparative studies of practices, cultures and symbols of philanthropy in its evolutionary patterns. Many stereotypes that Western mental behaviour has generated towards Mediterranean cultures and religions – with a specific reference to the Muslim tradition – appear as inconsistent and wrong.

46


Saggi Radici storiche, religiose e culturali della filantropia nel Mediterraneo


Alternative alla marginalità: le nuove forme dell’ azione sociale nelle città mediterranee Giulio Sapelli

I. Sviluppo sostenibile “mediterraneo” Su quella straordinaria rivista che è “Current Anthropology”, apparve un articolo che è esemplare per sintetizzare il contesto in cui va compiendosi un passo decisivo per l’ affermazione del concetto di “sustainable development” inteso antropologicamente come critica relazione tra risorse naturali e popolazione.1 In esso, infatti, si discute tale concetto guardando alle povere popolazioni delle grandi città e in questo caso a quelle de Il Cairo.2 Ciò consente di porre l’ enfasi sulle competenze “naturali”, spontanee, che le popolazioni povere riproducono incessantemente per organizzare la propria sopravvivenza. Così facendo esse superano la condizione di svantaggio in cui si trovano nell’ accesso e nell’ allocazione delle risorse. Si tratta di un fenomeno universale, su cui abbiamo moltissimi esempi, soprattutto nei contesti urbani, anche non mediterranei.3 Il Cairo, secondo Wikkan, è un formidabile contesto di riproduzione delle strategie scelte dalle famiglie e 1 U.Wikkan,Sustainable Development in the Mega -City. Can the Concept Be Made Applicable?,n.4,1995,pp.635-649 Unni WikKan aveva già pubblicato il bel libro, Life among the Poor in 2 Cairo, Tavistock, London, 1980 Sempre di U. Wikkan ricordo, Managing Turbulent Hearts:A Balinese 3 Formula for Living, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1990 e cfr. anche: J.L.Christinat, Des parrains pour la vie. Parentè rituelle dans une communauté de Andes péruviennes, Editions de l’ Institut d’ ethnologie, Neuchatel et Editions de la Maison des Sciences de l’ Homme, Paris,1989;

49


GIULIO SAPELLI

dagli individui per “sostenere”, non tanto l’ ambiente, quanto la vita propria e dei proprii congiunti. Una somma impressionante di dati empirici è alla base della convinta asserzione che si è dinanzi a un livello di vita molto più “ sostenibile “ di quanto comunemente non si pensi e di quanto non facciano intravedere i repertori statistici consueti. E questo sia dal punto di vista alimentare sia da quello della criminalità, che é assai più bassa di quanto non si possa supporre. Queste evidenze emergono in grande evidenza allorchè si esaminano, comparativamente, le condizioni sociali di molte altre “mega-city” del mondo in via di sviluppo e in cui non si sviluppano in forma altrettanto forte – ecco il punto – le reazioni sociali che caratterizzano, secondo Wikkan, la vita dei poveri de Il Cairo. Attorno al “building block” della famiglia si dipanano scelte di sopravvivenza tutte incentrate sulla basilare strategia di “making a future for the children”. Il ché implica un livello di risparmio elevato e di capacità di sacrificare i benefici immediati a vantaggio di quelli futuri, di sviluppare relazioni di vicinato e di parentela essenziali per sfuggire tanto all’ usura quanto alle degradazioni del corpo e dell’ anima che fondano la miseria spirituale della povertà. I “saving clubs” e il ruolo delle donne come “managers of family plans and priorities” , sono i due poli di riferimento concreto di una via alla fuoriuscita dalla dipendenza clientelare e dalla povertà. La famiglia e l’ associazionismo non sono più presentati come antitetici. Come è noto erano, invece, antitetici nel consolidato e pur sempre valido- in taluni contesti- schema à la Banfield, che descriveva il “familismo amorale”4 come alternativo alle logiche ispirate al perseguimento di qualsivoglia bene pubblico. Ora essi si presenterebbero virtuosamente complementari e interagenti. Questo intreccio di comunità (il ruolo della donna e della 4

50

E.C.Banfield, The Moral Basis of a Backword Society, Free Press, Chicago, 1958.


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

famiglia, per esempio) e di società (i “saving club” e la ricerca di occupazione nelle nuove differenzazioni sociali più redditizie, come, per esempio, il turismo), riclassifica in forma radicale molte contrapposizioni e fonda la “città mediterranea” come modello virtuoso di fuoriusciuta dalla povertà con una forza e una efficacia analitica un tempo assolutamente impensabile. Si tratta di un assunto che si va diffondendo nelle scienze sociali proprio quando la città tout court viene assunta, invece, come epifenomeno della crisi della civilizzazione: “Città dopo città – Mosca, Rio de Janeiro, Bangkok,Shanghai, Londra, Roma, Varsavia, Tokio, Johannesburg, Delhi, Caracas, Il Cairo, Bogotà, Washington – la criminalità appare in vertiginoso aumento e gli elementi basilari della civiltà sembrano scomparire”. Così si dice nelle ultime pagine del libro di Hungtinton5 ed egli sintetizza senza dubbio un aspetto importante della realtà e la inserisce nella comprensione dei grandi cambiamenti in atto a livello macrosociale. La riflessione in corso, tuttavia, e proprio sui temi del classico capolavoro di Hungtinton6, segue un altro percorso. Gli studi, tanto sulla modernizzazione, quanto quelli sulla città mediterranea, si caratterizzano per l’ enfasi posta sulle relazioni micro – sociali. Solo partendo dal loro esame si può affrontare in modo nuovo il problema cognitivo decisivo delle scienze sociali: il rapporto tra analisi “micro” e analisi “macro”, tra azione degli attori sociali e conseguenze di essa nella determinazione del complessivo sistema sociale. Il percorso che l’ analisi delle città mediterranee indica è di tenere insieme, innanzitutto, analisi della comunità e analisi del mercato. È, questa, una mia antica convinzione7 che trova le sue radici teoriche S.Hungtinton , Lo scontro delle civiltà e il nuovo ordine mondiale,Garzanti, 5 Milano, 1997, p.479. S.Hungtinton, Political Order in Changing Society, Yale University Press, 6 New Haven (Conn.) , 1968. G. Sapelli, Comunità e mercato, Il Mulino, Bologna, 1986 e poi riedito 7

51


GIULIO SAPELLI

nella tensione simmelliana tra forma dell’ economia monetaria e forma della società. A differenza di quanto comunemente si pensa, la circolazione della moneta e lo scambio capitalistico non hanno soltanto una funzione disgregativa delle forme sociali comunemente intese come “precapitalistiche”, ma anche una funzione di individualizzazione, ossia di potenziamento dell’ attività del soggetto proprio a partire dalla “densità” dei rapporti di comunità: “Soltanto il denaro – affermava infatti Simmel – poteva realizzare forme comunitarie che non recassero alcun pregiudizio al singolo membro. Infatti, il denaro ha sviluppato la forma più pura di associazione di scopo, quel tipo di organizzazione, cioè, che unisce l’ elemento impersonale degli individui in vista di un’azione comune e che per ora costituisce l’ unica possibilità in base alla quale gli individui si possono associare mantenendo un’ assoluta riserva su tutti gli elementi personali e specifici...l’ allargamento di un gruppo va di pari passo con l’ individualizzazione e l’ autonomizzazione dei singoli membri”8. Le analisi più avvertite sulle città mediterranee comprovano queste assunzioni di Simmel, pubblicate originariamente ben 98 anni or sono e che manifestano una lungimiranza straordinaria. Gli studi più interessanti sulle città mediterranee, su questa scia, arricchiscono il quadro tracciato un tempo da quel capolavoro che era ed è The Gecekondu dell’ indimenticabile Maestro Kemal Karpat9. L’ analisi della città di Istanbul degli anni cinquanta-sessanta, a partire dai quartieri periferici, (“gecekondu”, appunto), confermava due ipotesi. Le comunità di villaggio, a cui appartenevano gli immigrati dall’ Anatolia, si riattualizzavano nell’ ambiente urbano-capitalisticoda Rubbettino, Soveria Mannelli, in forma ampliata, nel 1997. G. Simmel, Filosofia del denaro (a cura di A.Cavalli e L.Perucchi), 8 UTET,Torino,1984, pp.494-495. K.Karpat, The Gecekondu.Rural Migration and Urbanisation, Cambridge 9 University Press,Cambridge(Mass.)1976

52


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

periferico di Istanbul, “ruralizzando la città”, piuttosto che essere “modernizzate” dall’ “ urbanizzazione”. Quelle stesse comunità finivano per strutturarsi tanto nella società economica quanto in quella politica in forme che, mentre conservavano taluni elementi tradizionali (i sistemi di patronage e di kinship, ne facevano scaturire dei nuovi per effetto della competizione di mercato e della partecipazione politica, ora partitica e non più notabiliare. Infatti l’ inserzione nell’ economia monetaria e nelle nuove forme della partecipazione politica rompevano secolari equilibri senza tuttavia crearne di interamente nuovi rispetto al passato. Penso alle differenziazioni di ceto e di classe che si delineavano più nettamente, elevando e declassando contestualmente interi clusters di gruppi famigliari. Ma penso anche alla creazione di nuove cerchie sociali e di reti di riferimento politico, con leaders intermedi delle organizzazioni partitiche che garantivano la redistribuzione di risorse dal centro. Veniva così formandosi una società molto diversa da quella del modello “razionale’” weberiano. In essa i legami sociali tipici delle realtà rurali continuavano ad agire potentemente, ma in un contesto economico, sociale e politico, diverso da quello del passato. Una società, del resto e non di meno, attiva, attivissima, che rendeva manifesta una grande vitalità nell’ informalità dei rapporti e nella rifunzionalizzazione di antichissime relazioni sociali. Nell’ affascinante studio sulle famiglie ateniesi dell’ ottocento di Sant Cassia e Badia10, la tesi che abbiamo visto tanto scandalosamente comprovata dallo studio su Il Cairo, trova, a proposito dello schema analitico introdotto da Karpat, una nuova conferma, anche se in una prospettiva interamente nuova. Nel caso di Atene, infatti, per via della idropisia di questa città rispetto all’ 10 P.Sant Cassia with C.Bada, The Making of the Modern Greek Family. Marriage and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century Athens, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge,1992.

53


GIULIO SAPELLI

intero corpo della Grecia ( in essa vivono circa la metà degli abitanti dello stato) e a causa della debolezzaa delle elites regionali greche, il modello famigliare e di vita sociale configuratosi in più di un secolo a livello urbano ha finito per informare e sussumere a sè i modelli di socialità e di “families features” della Grecia contadina, dove le piccole imprese famigliari sono schiacciantemente predominanti. Ma ciò che ci interessa è verificare che questo è avvenuto in un processo di “riattualizzazione della tradizione” e di espressività affettiva e cognitiva fortemente soggettiva, secondo molecolari, discontinue ma incessanti trasformazioni che non sono state interrotte da nessuna forma di mobilitazione dall’ alto o di mobilitazione delle risorse pubbliche, come invece si prevedeva negli obsoleti schemi della modernizzazione. Il mercato e la necessità di accaparrarsi risorse pubbliche hanno determinato il contesto di riferimento dei mondi della vita, ma il modo e le forme con cui tanto il mercato quanto lo stato sono penetrati nelle cellule sociali, sono state costruite e preformate dalla società e non viceversa, ossia in primo luogo dall’ azione sociale dei soggetti individuali e collettivi. Non a caso le strategie matrimoniali sono state e sono la cartina di tornasole essenziale di questa attiva capacità di trasformazione dei soggetti. E questo perchè il matrimonio, come ogni forma di alleanza sociale, determina lo scarto del biologico verso il sociale, stabilendo sia i connotati della localizzazione famigliare sia i criteri di trasmissione della proprietà, inserendosi al crocevia tra mercato e appartenenza biologica, tra impersonalità individualizzante e comunità socializzante. La tesi degli studiosi greci dei processi di urbanizzazione è che questa centralità della famiglia e di modelli di trasmissione della proprietà che ne derivano in ambiente urbano ha posto le basi per uno specifico modello di “politismos” (che tradurrei, perdendo talune nuances, come modello di “civiltà della vita associata”). 54


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

Esso ha consentito a immense masse di resistere ai disagi della crescita in un ambiente arretrato, minizzando i costi sociali e sviluppando strategie di autodifesa individuali e collettive che hanno reso meno penoso il cammino vero la completa intersezione nel circuito del meccanismo di mercato. Ad Atene, per continuare con il caso che ho proposto, l’accumulazione della dote che si assegna alle figlie, continuando una antichissima tradizione di disperazione e accumulazione della ricchezza secondo i canoni dell’ “onore” famigliare, attraverso un processo secolare, non è soltanto più uno strumento di preservazione dal rischio, tipica di una società prostrata dalla scarsità. Nell’ ambiente urbano essa consente di accedere ora a cerchie sociali diverse dalla propria e in cui é possibile, alle figlie e alle loro famiglie, trovare degli sposi benestanti, fungendo in tal modo da strumento di ascesa sociale. E così è per l’ enfasi via via sempre più forte posta sulla famiglia nucleare anzichè sul lignaggio, sull’ affinità piuttosto che sull’ agnizione, sulla “koumbaria”, ossia sulla scelta di un “padrino” , e non più sull’ adozione, per terminare, infine sull’ affermazione, lenta e inesorabile, della divisione egualitaria dei patrimonii ereditari. Essa ebbe conseguenze disastrose sui regimi agrari di tutta la Grecia, disperdendo le proprietà con drammatiche cadute di efficienza11, ma costituì, d’ altra parte, con la dote, un formidabile mezzo tramite il quale, indubbiamente, poté formarsi una classe media urbana e una borghesia non soltanto polarizzata tra le grandi ricchezze della diaspora armatoriale e finanziaria e il “servizio” burocratico prestato nei meandri dell’ elefantiaco stato greco. L’elemento di fondo che emerge dalle ricerche sulle città mediterranee è una via alla modernizzazione totalmente diversa da quella dell’ Europa continentale e nordica. Non s’ instaura, nell’ Europa del Sud 11

G.Sapelli, Southern Europe since 1945, cit.

55


GIULIO SAPELLI

e quindi nelle città mediterranee, il mix tra forte istituzionalizzazione della politica e dell’ economia e, quindi, forte “razionalizzazione” della società civile, che fonda la via maestra delle modernizzazioni “weberiane”.12 In quel modello la società civile è fortemente “statuizzata”, ossia regolata dall’ obbligazione politica e morale all’ universalità della legge proprio mentre affonda le sue radici nelle “comunità naturali”, tra cui spicca le famiglia. È in questa tensione tra particolare e generale (che è la tensione tra finito e infinito nella realizzazione dialettica dello spirito assoluto hegeliano) che la società civile consente la mediazione tra individualità e statualità, realizzazione grandiosa, appunto, dello spirito assoluto. La visione hegeliana della società civile s’ incide concettualmente con forza nell’ immaginario di generazioni di intellettuali perchè bene sintetizza un processo storico reale. Forse questo andrebbe più tenuto a mente nelle pur pregevoli opere che ora si pubblicano sulla storia teoretica13 di questo concetto che è la chiave di volta della civiltà occidentale. Nel mondo mediterraneo la società civile è tutta incentrata sulla straordinaria vitalità del finito, per esprimersi- non me ne si voglia- in termini hegeliani. Chi voglia leggere i lavori, per esempio, di Press su Siviglia14 o di Thuren su Valencia15 o di Pardo su Napoli16, è 12 Un bell’ esempio di discussione a questo riguardo è quello proposto da R. Collins, German-Bashin and the Theory of Democratic Modernization, in “Zeitschrift fur Soziologie”, n.1,1995,pp .3-21. 13 A questo proposito ricordo J.L.Cohen and A.Arato, Civil Society and Political Theory, The MIT Press, Cambridge, 1992 e il, come sempre pregevole, lavoro di M. Magatti( a cura), Per la società civile. La centralità del “principio sociale” nelle società avanzate, Franco Angeli, Milano,1997. 14 I. Press, The City as Contest, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 1979 15 B.M. Thuren, Left Hand Left Behind, University of Stockolm Department of Anthropology,1988 16 I. Pardo, Life, death and ambiguity in social dynamics of inner Naples, in “Man”, n.1,1989,pp.103-123; ora si veda il lavoro, sempre di I. Pardo, Managing Existence in Naples. Morality, action and structure, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1966, su cui non posso non ricordare il bel commento critico, che condivido, di Jan Brogger, nelle “Reviews” di “Social Anthropology”,october 1998,pp.399.

56


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

immerso in un mondo di parentele e di amici, che servono per superare ostacoli burocratici ed esclusione e stabilire stabili cerchie sociali atte a consentire l’ acquisizione di beni e di servizi (la “sostenibilità della vita”) altrimenti impossibili da raggiungere in forma individualistica sul mercato, attraverso le impersonali regole della formazione dei prezzi e delle preferenze costruite dall’ accumularsi delle scelte tra le competenze offerte su un perfetto mercato del lavoro. L’antropologia mediterranea, insomma, ci dimostra che anche nella vita cittadina, e non più solo nei villaggi delle zone interne, campo originario di studio dei pionieri di questa disciplina, valgono quelli che chiamerò gli “schemi sostitutivi delle imperfezioni tanto dei mercati quanto della politica”. L’alta imperfezione dei mercati, la bassa razionalità burocratica dei sistemi istituzionali – e quindi la debolezza dell’ autorità dello stato- trovano i loro sostituti, per garantire la vita degli attori sociali, nella dinamica riattualizzata di forze tradizionali della vita associata, che si configurano come strumenti essenziali per la mobilitazione e la mobilità sociale. Certamente agiscono, in questo contesto della socializzazione, razionalità non soltanto limitate, ma molteplici17; oltre, naturalmente a logiche affettive che siamo ancora molto lontani dal saper interpretare teoricamente. II. La petty commodity production e Alexander Chayanov Un buon esempio di questa asserzione la si ritrova studiando una forma economica-sociale tipica dell’ universo storico-geograafico su cui riflettiamo: la cosiddetta “petty commodity production” . La forma analitica 17 Varrebbe la pena soffermarsi qui sui tentativi dell’ accademia neoclassica di interpretare e sussumere le tematiche antropologiche.Vedine un bell’ esempio in J.Tai Landa, Trust, Ethnicity and Identity.Beyond the New Institutional Economics of Ethnic Trading, Networks, Contract Law, and Gift Exchange,Foreword of James Buchanan,The University of Michingan Press, Ann Arbor, 1994.

57


GIULIO SAPELLI

più congruente al nostro ragionamento è ancora quella proposta dallo scienziato sociale menscevico – ucciso dal terrore staliniano negli anni trenta – Alexander Chayanov18, che a mio parere è (con Edith Penrose), uno dei due più grandi teorici dell’ impresa del XX secolo. Eppure ci ostiniamo a non applicare i suoi modelli analitici. Egli teorizzava la permanenza della piccola impresa contadina al di fuori dei consueti schemi applicativi fondati sulle categorie economiche “standard” dei prezzi, del capitale, dei salari, dell’ interesse e della rendita. Per Chayanov essa modella, invece, i suoi comportamenti sulla famiglia come unità di produzione di un output determinato dalla declinante utilità marginale delle risorse che essa incorpora nell’ impresa e dall’ invece esponenziale incremento, a fronte di ciò, della fatica dei membri della famiglia tutti impegnati nel duro lavoro di riproduzione di sè stessi e quindi della loro unità famigliare e quindi dell’ impresa. Questa teoria, che Chayanov pensava fosse applicabile solo all’ impresa contadina, rivela, a mio avviso, la straordinaria capacità euristica di comprendere i comportamenti e gli ordinamenti giuridici di fatto delle piccole imprese e delle forme sociali di produzione e di riproduzione tanto dei beni quanto delle relazioni sociali, tanto più allorchè esse – come accade in questo ultimo trentennio del novecento si diffondono velocemente nei paesi non europei e fuori dal Nord – America.19 L’ uso del lavoro famigliare, la bassa divisione del lavoro, la produzione che si svolge nelle vicinanze del 18 A. V. Tchayanov, L’ organisation de l’ économie paysanne, Librairie du Regard, Paris, 1990. (A.Chayanov, The Theory of Peasant Economy, (ed. by D.Thorner, B.Kerblay, R.E.F.Smith, The American Economic Association, Homewood, Illinois, 1966.) 19 R.Ward,R.Jenkins,(eds.) Ethnic Communities in Business. Strategy for Economic Survival, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1984. S.A. Kochanet, Patrons – Client Politics and Business in Bangladesh, Sage, New Delhi, 1993. P.Van Diermen, Small Business in Indonesia, Ashgate, Aldershot-Brookfield-Hong Kong-Singpore- Sidney, 1997.

58


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

luogo di vita della famiglia, l’ uso di semplici tecnologie: ecco le variabili che si riscontrano sempre in queste forme sociali di produzione e di riproduzione che si sviluppano in condizioni che appaiono, a prima vista, controproducenti e avverse (si pensi al caso delle cosiddette piccole imprese agricole cinesi, che si sviluppano negli interstizi dell’ economia centralizzata utilizzando le sinergie e le tradizioni dell’ economia di vilaggio dalle radici secolari). Tutto si riconnette in un’ ordito dove potere, pratiche sociali di lungo periodo, culture, si interpenetrano: è dalla forma dell’ interconnessione che lo sviluppo può inverarsi. 20 L’ esperienza del Mediterraneo, da questo punto di vista, è decisiva e lo studio delle piccole e medie imprese deve essere sottrattatto al dominio degli economissti e “allocato” teoricamente in quello degli antropologi, degli storici e degli intelligenti sociologi (ne esistono), come alcuni lavori, penso soprattutto a quello pionieristico di Ozcan, dimostrano21. III. Alternative al degrado, al declino, alla marginalizzazione... Mi pare che l’ insegnamento che emerga da questi studi sia quello per cui le città mediterranee non siano tutte assimilabili ai modelli di sostituzione dei mercati e della circolazione delle élites appannagio delle classi deprivilegiate, dei poveri, degli esclusi che non trovano vie di uscite dal degrtado, dal declino e dalla marginalità. Gli studi pionieristici che ho sistematizzato teoricamente dimostrano invece, a me pare, che i “popoli” dell’ Europa del Sud agiscono in tal modo contro l’ esclusione medesima e realizzano forme di inclusione 20 G. Sapelli, Southern Europe, cit. 21 G.B. Ozcan, Small Firms and Local Economic Development. Entrepreneurshio in Southern Europe and Turkey, Avebury, Aldershot-Brookfield-Hong KongSingpore- Sidney, 1995.

59


GIULIO SAPELLI

certo non alternative a quelle offerte dai mercati e dal pluralismo politico, ma autonome per morfogenesi: “ruralizzazione della città”, “riattualizzazione della tradizione”, “sostenibilità della vita”. Vi sono modelli di vita cittadina e di costruzione della socialità urbana senza dubbio diversi: là dove il Mediterraneo non è più soltanto il mare che lambisce la ruralità storica e il suo trasformarsi con il capitalismo indotto dall’ alto e imperfetto: là dove il Mediterraneo presenta alle rotte di traffico un orizzonte borghese e cosmopolita, che della borghesia ha avuto le stigmate rivoluzionarie, anche se in forme assai divere. Si guardi ai destini tanto diversi di Barcellona e di Instanbul. La prima è città della rivoluzione borghese endogena per eccellenza, la seconda di una modernizzazione autoritaria occidentalizzante, esogena, che pure pone le basi della travagliata formazione di una inedita borghesia in un plesso strategico del “mondo mussulmano”22. Il classico lavoro di McDonogh23 sulle “famiglie per bene” di Barcellona ci insegna che esse controllano l’ economia come in tutto il mondo accade: non soltanto agendo sui mercati, ma anche sviluppando pratiche comuni di socializzazione primaria e secondaria, pratiche di alleanza matrimoniale, strategie di omofilia nella circolarità tra potere economico e politico. La pratica della trasmissione ereditaria segue tuttavia il modello della “casa catalana”, ossia della indivisibilità del patrimonio tramite l’ erede unico, maschio o femmina che sia , che può anche non essere primogenito/a, e che ha per fine di non disperdere le ricchezze accumulate. Ma qui è troppo banale parlare di riattualizzazione della tradizione. Certo essa esiste, ma il ritmo della trasformazione sociale è dato dall’ inserzione in forma protagonistica nella competizione internazionale, nelle 22 Mi permetto di rinviare al mio, Southern Europe, cit. 23 G.W.McDonogh, Good Families in Barcelona,Princeton University Press,Princeton(NJ),1986

60


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

alte gerarchie dei mercati: è questa inserzione che si nutre della tradizione e vi è una bella differenza tra le pratiche di inclusione e di elevazione di barriere all’ entrata sul piano sociale e quelle di difesa dall’ esclusione e di rottura delle barriere della mobilità sociale verticale. Un ragionamento assai simile può compiersi riflettendo sulla storia dei sistemi famigliari di Instanbul nel pieno della modernizzazione dall’ alto24. Certo,si deve sempre affermare che: “ Turkey-even Instanbulcan still easily be called a familistic as opposed to an individualistic society.”25 Ma il familismo urbano prima della grande ondata dell’ immigrazione del secondo dopoguerra e quello delle èlites economiche di antica tradizione urbana è assai diverso dallo Hinterland turco. Istanbul incarna la cristallizzazione territoriale e sociografica di una sociatà fortemente polarizzata tra l’ Anatolia rurale e l’ Instanbul ottomana. Lo studio dei “marriages patterns” e l’“household formation” lo comprovano indubitabilmente. L’ età del matrimonio delle donne di Instanbul, per esempio, di qualsiasi classe sociale esse fossero, era assai più elevata di quella delle donne della Turchia interna ed era simile a quella che si stabilizza secolarmente nell’ Italia centrale a partire del rinascimento, ossia nel cuore di una modernizzazione endogena e virtuosa, in un rapporto sincretico tra città e contado.26 Alla periferia dell’Europa continentale e al margine del mondo mussulmano, Istanbul rivela una continua tensione, nei suoi sistemi di aggregazione famigliare, tra tendenze neolocali e tendenze alla residenza multigenerazionale, tra famiglia nucleare e famiglia allargata, con una netta prevalenza delle forme del primo tipo di configurazione famigliare nelle classi alte e delle forme del secondo tipo nelle classi basse e 24 A.Duben & C.Behar, Instanbul Household.Marriage, Family and Fertility,1880-1940,Cambridge University Press,Cambridge,1991. 25 Ibidem,p.247. 26 D.Herlihy and C. Klapsich-Zuber, Tuscans and their Familie:A Study of the Florentine Catasto of 1427, Yale University Press, New Haven, (Conn.),1985.

61


GIULIO SAPELLI

di più recente inurbazione. Insomma, lo scontro tra occidentalizzazione e ruralizzazione, che oggi si veste dei panni della laicità contro la confessionalità islamica, è in atto già ai primordi della modernizzazione dall’ alto e una delle città simbolicamente mediterranee per eccellenza ne è plastica testimonianza. Ho portato questi due esempi per cercare di riempire di contenuto storico-concreto la tendenza nomotetica che prevale sempre più quando si studiano le città mediterranee. Ma essa, a differenza che nel passato, si presenta ora, nell’ ondata “new age” che investe anche la comunità scientifica internazionale, come una affannosa scoperta a tutti i costi di una sorta di neo-romanticismo27 che sottolinea gli elementi di vitalità spontanea, sottovalutando troppo spesso le tensioni modernizzanti che hanno investito e investono le città mediterranea. Certamente in tutta l’esperienza urbana mediterranea, salvo poche eccezioni, la dialettica tra ruralità e industrializzazione non si è posta. E le eccezioni sono le eccezioni dello Hinterland28-industriale piuttosto che rurale- e caratterizzano le esperienze di Barcellona, di Genova, di Trieste, di Smirne(Izmir). Storicamente la dialettica “ruralità industrializzazione”, tipica di tutta l’Europa continentale, è stata sostituita, infatti, da quella: “ruralità/terziarizzazione”. La maggioranza delle società dell’ Europa del Sud, come è noto, son passate dalla società agraria a quella post-industriale, senza attraversare le lunghe stagioni di quella industriale. E si parla qui di “società” intendendo il significato che in essa ha la composizione proporzionale della forza di lavoro occupata nei tre settori canonici dei sistemi economici e non il contributo che gli stessi apportano al PIL. È questa composizione che costituisce 27 R.Handler, Anti-Romantic Romanticism: Edward Sapir and the Critic of American Individualism, in “Anthropology Quaterly”,n.1,1989,pp.1-13. 28 Generalizzai questa eccezionalità nel mio Trieste italiana,Mito e destino economica, Franco Angeli, 1989.

62


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

la base strutturale essenziale per determinare stili di vita e orientamenti all’ azione e alla costruzione dei mondi simbolici dei soggetti. Solo l’ Italia ha ripercorso il classico viaggio delle società europee continentali, ma in guisa profondamente diversa. E questo per via del suo ritardo nell’ industrializzazione e soprattutto per la sua rapidissima, concentrata crescita. Essa ha subitamente abbandonato quella configurazione sociale industriale per assumere quella della neo- industria e del declino, quindi, della popolazione industriale rispetto a quella del settore terziario.29 Le altre società sud europee non hanno neppure avuto questo repentino passaggio intermedio e la Turchia ha ancora il pesantissimo gravame sociale della prevalente occupazione agraria, che spiega molti dei suoi problemi. Le città sud-europee riflettono questa storica composizione sociale. Essa spicca in modo particolarmente significativo a partire dall’ inizio degli anni settanta, periodo storico a cui faccio riferimento per la possibilità di disporre di dati comparabili e per il significato storico che quegli anni assumono nella storia economica e sociale di questi paesi ( sono gli anni dell’ apertura dei loro mercati all’ Europa in senso meno protezionistico e della caduta degli autoritarismi dittatoriali che caratterizzano la loro esperienza storica, con l’ eccezione dell’ Italia e, anche se per motivi diversi, della Turchia, dove la democrazia e la dittatura sempre sono state “intermittenti” e “sotto tutela” militare e internazionale). Non è possibile sviluppare la comparazione includendo le città mediterranee extra europee, ma possiamo ben immaginare le varianze significative: maggior peso degli apparati amministrativi e dell’ economia informale, con forti componenti di 29 G.Sapelli, L’ Italia inafferrabile.Conflitti, sviluppo e dissociazione dagli anni cinquanta a oggi,Marsilio, Venezia, 1987.

63


GIULIO SAPELLI

popolazione ancora occupata in attività semi-agricole. L’ economia polverizzata e informale è la struttura più forte della composizione sociografica di questi aggregti urbani. Ma, tuttavia, in alcune di queste città, l’insediamento industriale non è stato di poco conto, anche se proprio nell’ ultimo trentennio, come sappiamo, esso inizia a essere ridimensionato fortemente se non quasi completamente. Si pensi alla siderurgia napoletana, per esempio. In altre città, invece, mi riferisco a Smirne (Izmir) e alla stessa Instanbul, l’ industrializzazione ha avuto un notevole aumento, così come a Il Cairo. È il “sud del sud” a continuare a percorrere la via dell’industrializzazione, con l’ ampliamento della periferia di quest’ ultima, dunque, anche se spesso senza ripercorrere gli errori della mobilitazione dall’ alto delle risorse. Pervasivo, in tutte queste citta, è il “rentiercapitalism”30 rappresentato dall’“industria” edilizia che drena e ricicla risorse finanziarie che, secondo coloro che l’ hanno studiata, potrebbero essere altrimenti ben utilizzabili nei settori manifatturieri. (L’attività edilizia, nè auto e nè etero regolata, ha inoltre arrecato danni irreversibili a quell’ attività delicatisima31, ma sempre più centrale per una crescita virtuosa dei paesi in via di sviluppo32, che è il turismo). Infine, meno importante di quanto spesso, invece, non si creda, è il peso relativo dell’ amministrazione pubblica e dei pubblici servizi. Quindi è azzardato affermare che tutte le città mediterranee sono un esempio di “urbanizanization 30 Su questo concetto e sulle sue implicazioni cfr. il bel dibattito tra J.Petros, Greek Rentier Capital:Dynamic Growth and Industrial Underdervelopment e A. Slouras, Rentier capital, Industrial Developmente and the Growt of the Greek Economy in the Post-War Period: a Response to Jame Petros, in “Journal of the Hellenic Diaspora”,n.2,1984,pp. 47-58;n.1,1985,pp.5-15. 31 A.Lanza e F. Pigliaru, The Tourist Sector in a Open Economy, in “Rivita internazionale di scienze economiche e comerciali”, N. 1, 1994, pp. 16-28;A. Lanza, Is Specialization in Tourism Harmful to Economic Growth?, in “ Nota di Lavoro. 49.95”, Ecomics Energy Environment. Fondazione Enrico Mattei, Milano 1995. 32 D.Harrison, Tourism and the Less Developed Countries, Behaven Press,London and New York,1992.

64


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

without industrialization”33. La questione è che si è dinanzi, in esse, a un processo eterogeneo e varissimo, non “razionalizzato” secondo i criteri weberiani, ma secondo quelli di micro-razionalità limitate individuali e collettive, che vanno dalla polverizzazione industriale alla stratificazione di attività e competenze nel campo dei servizi assai diversificate e ineguali. Si assiste, per esempio, in questi ultimi anni, a una ripresa dell’ attività portuale, sotto la spinta di processi di liberalizzazione e di miglioramento tecnologico e organizzativo in forme e tempi che pochi avevano previsto. E questo convive con l’ informale e instabile circuito del periferico addensarsi di piccole attività marginali, di piccole e medie imprese che hanno tanto un’ alta natalità quanto un’altrettanto alta mortalità. La distribuzione di capacità personali, di competenze professionali, di razionalità limitate e di masse di energia affettiva, si distribuiscono dunque in forme profondamente diseguali: l’ambiguità e la convivenza di diverse logiche dell’ azione sono dunque le caratteristiche spiccate delle città mediterranee. In esse si delinea l’ emergere di una nuova logica dell’ azione sociale e della mobilitazione collettiva. Quella che promana da ciò che Anna Anfossi, in suo lavoro, ha definito “le forme intermedie di aggregazione”34, quelle che stanno tra gli individui – ai quali le società occidentali riconoscono la più ampia gamma di diritti sul piano giuridico – e le organizzazioni formali, come i partiti e le associazioni di rappresentanza degli interessi – che, di fatto, negano quei diritti, nell’ agone della lotta politica ed economica. Le società non occidentali: “.. non attribuiscono analoghi diritti agli individui...riconoscono come fondamento della società altre e diverse unità: la tribù, 33 L.Leontidou, The Mediterranean City in Transition. Social Change and Urban Development,cit.,p.29 34 A.Anfossi, Prefazione, ad A. Anfossi e T.K.Oommen, ( a cura), Azioni politiche fuori dai partiti. Italia, India, Bolivia, Brasile, Cile, Mesico, Burkina Faso, Somalia:studi di casi, Franco Angeli, Milano, 1997,p.29.

65


GIULIO SAPELLI

il clan, la casta, nelle quali si colloca l’ individuo e attraverso le quali l’ individuo può sperare di conseguire i suoi scopi, di solito già largamente prefissati all’ interno di questi stessi gruppi.”35 Le città mediterranee, tanto più quelle del “sud del mediterraneo”, ossia delle regioni meridionali dell’ Italia e della Spagna, della Grecia, della Turchia e della costa nord africana, sono al crocevia tra le logiche dell’ azione e dell’ aggregazione sociale che l’ Anfossi definisce “occidentali” e quelle delle “altre società”, dove l’ azione collettiva sorretta da forme intermedie non partitiche è consustanziale alla stessa formazione dell’ individualità. Quello che è essenziale, delle logiche dell’ azione delle città mediterranee, è la presenza di forti “razionalità locali collettive”, nel senso di relazioni fondate sulla fiducia e sulla reciprocità di prestazioni e di sostegni36 che fuoriescono dal consueto modello clientelistico diadico e verticale: sono, appunto, orrizzontali, sono, appunto politiche e non clientelari. Consentono di instaurare una relazione feconda tra “razionalità locali “ e “razionalità generali”, spezzando il circolo vizioso del “familismo amorale” proprio nel contesto sociale da cui esso promanava storicamente37. E dimostrando, ancora una volta, che esso non è una catena inestricabile: la storia diviene antropologia solo quando si reitera. È la solidarietà politica, non necessariamente partitica che consente di stabilire il nesso tra generale e particolare, tra azione narcisistica e alveolare e azione generale. E questo perchè tale nuova forma di azione politica “intermedia” risolve il classico problema hegeliano del rapporto tra particolare e universale. Lo risove fornendo alla persona la possibilità di costruire una “società civile”, ossia una società fondata sulla 35 Ibidem 36 L.Roninger, Sul concetto di fiducia, Rubbettino Editore, Soveria Mannelli, 1992. 37 E.C.Banfield, The Moral Basis of a Backword Society, Free Press, Chicago, 1958

66


ALTERNATIVE ALLA MARGINALITÀ

graduale comprensione, da parte delle persone, di far parte di collettività che sono dialogiche, necessarie al raggiungimento degli stessi fini individuali38. Gli “altri”, gli altri attori dell’ azione sociale, divengono mediazione della particolarità e suo superamento, nella delineazione di un percorso educativo che costruisce legami orizzontali e che consente di spezzare le tradizionali e sempre riattualizzate logiche diadiche verticali. L’epifania di una nuova società civile che supera molte ideologiche contrapposizioni analitiche, si dipana dalla resistenza all’ impoverimento all’ autorganizzazione di mondi della vita autoriflessivi e in grado di generare comportamenti universalistici un tempo inaspettati. Anche le recenti ricerche di “genere”39confermano queste ipotesi e ci consentono di guardare al futuro del Mediterraneo con meno pessimismo teorico di quanto non si poteva fare un tempo. “Eppur... si muove!”. Per un vecchio moralista astiosamente nemico del “familismo amorale” come il sottoscritto non è una speranza di poco conto. Ma solo se a queste micro – società, che così potentemente si dimostrano in grado di autorganizzare i mondi della vita, si unirà la dignità dello stato e della legge, che sola rende l’ uomo libero perchè degno, solo allora la fuoriuscita dal familismo amorale sarà non soltanto possibile, ma irreversibile, e si delineerà un nuovo intreccio tra azione sociale e obbligazione politico-legale, che è l’ obbiettivo a cui ci invitano a guardare le “città mediterranee”, senza rimpianti e nostalgie nazionalistiche. L’ unione tra l’ autorevolezza dello stato, del nuovo 38 K.Kumar, Civil Society.An Inquiry into the Usdelfulness of an Historical Term, in “ British Journal of Sociology”,n.3,1993,pp.373-401. 39 Cito qui quella più pertinente al mio ragionamento:S.Rowbotham & S.Mitter (eds.), Dignity and Daily Bread. New Forms of Economic Organising Among Poor Women in the Third World and the First, Routledge, London nd New York, 1994.

67


GIULIO SAPELLI

stato non più verticistico della globalizzazione, e la forza vitale dell’ autorganizzazione delle persone associate è la chiave di volta della società civile “civilizzata”. Solo essa potrà costruire un “futuro sostenibile” per le città e per i popoli del Mediterraneo.

68


Filantropia nell’impero bizantino Antonio Carile

L’impegno filantropico venne istituzionalizzato molto per tempo nell’impero bizantino. Si trattava anzitutto di una eredità storica della società antica1, che aveva elaborato la polemica ricchi/poveri2, propria già del mondo classico, e aveva sperimentato le sue forme di sostegno dei diseredati attraverso le clientele e le provvidenze pubbliche da parte di privati, economicamente in grado di esplicitare la propria megaloyuciva magnificenza3, la everghesia4. La politica di grandi costruzioni ad uso In una pagina fondamentale dell'Etica a Nicomaco Aristotele aveva 1 collocato la ricchezza elargitrice al centro della citt e del sistema sociale. Aristoteles, Ethica ad Nicomachum, IV, II, in Aristoteles graece, ex rec. I. Bekker, Berlin, II, pp. 1094-1181. E. Patlagean, Pauvreté éonomique et pauvret sociale Byzance, 4e-7e siècles, Paris La Haye 1977, p. 182, parzialmente tradotto in italiano: Povertà ed emarginazione a Bisanzio, IV-VII secolo, tr. it. Bari 1986. A. G. Hamman, Riches et pauvres dans l'église ancienne, Desclée de 2 Brouwer [Paris] 1982. Ricchezza e povert nel cristianesimo primitivo, a cura di M.G. Mara, Roma, III ed., 1998. Ch. Freu, Les figures du pauvre dans les sources italiennes de l'antiquité tardive, Paris 2007. Ken R. Dark – Anthea L. Harris, The Orphanage of Byzantine 3 Constantinople: an archaeological identification, in “Byzantinoslavica. Revue Internationale des Etudes Byzantines ”, 66(2008), 1-2, pp. 189-202. T.S. Miller, The Orphanotropheion of Constantinople, in E. Albu Hanawall and C. Lindberg (eds.), Through the Eye of the Needle: Judeo-Christian Roots of Social Welfare, Kirksville, Missouri 1994, pp. 83-104. J.-P. Caillet, L'évégetisme monumental chrétien en Italie et ses marges, 4 Rome, É cole françise de Rome, 1993. B. Köting, voce Euergetes, in Reallexikon für Antike und Christentum VI, coll. 848-860. J. Oehler, voce Euergetes, in Pauly-Wissowa, Realencyclopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft, VI, 11, coll. 978-981. A. M. Orselli, I Beni culturali nella committenza e nella cura dei vescovi. Il modello del tardoantico, “Quaderni di Scienza della Conservazione”, 3 (2004), pp. 35 46. Ch. Pietri, Donateurs et pieux établissements d'après le Legendier romain (Ve-VIIe s.), in E. Patlagean, P. Rich (eds.), Hagiographie Cultures et Société (IVeme-XIIeme siecles), Paris 1981, pp. 435-453. P. Brown, Povertà e leadership nel tardo impero romano, tr. it., Bari 2003, pp.7-9, 16-17, 42-43, 59-60, 62, 115-117. R. Volk, Gesundheitswesen und Wohlt ä tigkeit im Spiegel der Byzantinischen Klostertypika,

69


ANTONIO CARILE

pubblico, ajpovlausi”, come terme, musei, basiliche e l’attenzione alle distribuzioni alimentari già aveva caratterizzato l’azione del filocristiano Massenzio5, che Costantino si limitò a proseguire dopo la vittoria al Ponte Milvio. La Chiesa, nella consapevolezza che avrebbe aiutato la sua missione sociale, in particolare la sua missione fra i “barbari”, sancì canoni specifici per la organizzazione di istituzioni caritative: la fondazione di ospedali, ospizi per poveri, ricoveri per vecchi, orfanotrofi, ospitalità per pellegrini. L’ironia di Brodskij, sull’uso politico dell’assistenzialismo da parte della Chiesa e di Costantino, è del tutto astorica6: la struttura a chiostro di ospedali e monasteri deriva proprio dalle caserme in uso nel III secolo nell’esercito romano. Evangelizzazione e cura dei poveri furono missioni affiancate, per cui episcòpi e monasteri ebbero edifici annessi appositi per questa funzione sociale. I monasteri avevano annessi al “catholicon” (chiesa del monastero) ospedali, mentre gli xenones (ospizi per stranieri ed estranei alla città), ospizi per vecchi (gerocomeia), ospedali (nosocomeia), ricoveri per poveri (ptocheia), orfanotrofi, con camere separate per malati, per vecchi, per il clero e i monaci in visita, e anche forme di accoglienza per laici – erano al di fuori del circuito murario dello stabilimento monastico. Da Gregorio di Nazianzo7, nella seconda metà del III secolo, a Paolo di Monemvasia8, nel X secolo München 1983, Miscellanea Byzantina Monacensia 28, p. 114. R. Donciu, L'empereur Maxence, Bari 2012, pp.116 sgg. 5 I. Brodskij, Fuga da Bisanzio, tr. it. di G. Forti, Adelphi edizioni 6 Milano 1987, p. 176. Brodskij esiliato dalla Russia nel 1972 ha avuto il Premio Nobel per la Letteratura nel 1987. Malgrado le sue professioni di antibizantinismo si fatto seppellire a San Michele di Murano, nella Venetia alterum Byzantium. Greg. Naz. or. XIV, perì philoptochìas, in PG 35, 11. 7 J. Wortley, Les récits édifiants de Paul éveque de Monemvasie et d’autres 8 auteurs, Paris 1987. A. Carile, Ricchezza e gerarchia nel XIV e XV secolo, in Simposio Internazionale Ricchi e poveri nella societ dell’oriente grecolatino, a cura di Ch. Maltezou, Venezia 1998, pp.37-51. Id., Ricchezza e povert negli “specula principum” bizantini dal VI al X secolo, in Specula principum, a cura di A. De Benedictis,

70


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

fino alle satire del XIV secolo o al dialogo di Alessio Macrembolita, l fantitesi poveri e ricchi9 e il rapporto fra gerarchia e potenti10 rientrano nel repertorio topico del pensiero politico e sociale bizantino, che disegna il quadro normativo della philoptochìa11, dell’impegno sociale a sostenere moralmente e materialmente le forme di povertà sociale, in quanto debito di umanità. Il patriarca Atanasio I (XIII-XIV sec.) affronta il problema della fame dei diseredati le cui cause sono le sopraffazioni della classe di “quei potenti che ... agiscono contro la legge”; la invasione turca in Asia Minore, che riversa ondate di profughi verso Costantinopoli; l’Europa, messa a ferro e fuoco dai mercenari Catalani, e lo sfruttamento economico delle potenze occidentali di Genova e Venezia12. La critica della organizzazione sociale, accanto alla denuncia dell’insopportabile pauperismo, muove anche la riflessione di Tomaso Magistros (ca. 1270-1325) della cerchia di Andronico II Paleologo che propone programmi di riformismo sociale in chiave nazionalistica e solidaristica, Frankfurt am Main 1999, pp.1-20. 9 Sul Macrembolita cfr. I. Sevchenko, Alexios Makrembolites and his Dialogue between the Rich and the Poor, in “Zbornik Radova Vizantoloskog Instituta”, 6 (1960), pp. 187-228, edizione critica e traduzione inglese ripreso in Alessio Macrembolite, Dialogo dei ricchi e dei poveri, A cura di M. Di Branco, con una nota di B. Hemmerdinger, testo greco a fronte, postfazione di G. Fiaccadori, Palermo 2007. S.I. Kourouses, Hai antipeseis per ton eschaton tou kosmou, in “Epeteris Etaireias Byzantinon Spoudon”, 37 (1969-1970), pp. 223240; E.V. Maltese, Una fonte bizantina per la storia dei rapporti tra Costantinopoli e Genova alla met del XIV secolo: il Logos historikòs di Alessio Makrembolite, in “Atti e Memorie della Societ Savonese di Storia Patria”, 14 (1908), pp. 55-72. Pertusi, op.cit., p. 255. 10 A. Carile, Gerarchie e caste, in xlv Settimana di Studio del Centro Italiano di Studi sull’Alto Medioevo, “Morfologie sociali e culturali in Europa fra Tarda Antichit e Alto Medioevo”, Spoleto 1998, pp.123-176. 11 Cfr. n. 18. Brown, Povertà e leadership , cit., pp.3-65 dedica un ampio saggio alla assunzione dell “amore per i poveri a virt pubblica di cui l’eccelenza sociale deve essere dotata per mantenere il proprio ruolo. 12 A.M. Maffry Talbot, The Correspondance of Athanasius I, Patriarch of Constantinople, Washington 1975, CFHB, VII, ep. 3, 50-66, A. Pertusi, Il pensiero politico bizantino, Edizione a cura di A. Carile, Bologna 1990, (ma l’opera degli anni 1968-1978), pp. 231-234.

71


ANTONIO CARILE

non senza punte di critica al nepotismo imperiale13. Il pauperismo è una struttura tradizionale, proveniente dalle società anteriori, come quelle feniciopuniche, alla società romano-orientale, al pari della consapevolezza della origine funzionale del pauperismo, frutto in parte dalla struttura della società a causa della ingiustizia sociale nella distribuzione delle risorse. Un testo di lunga durata nel pensiero politico bizantino ed europeo orientale e occidentale, da Neagoe Basarab14 a re Luigi XIII15, la Ekthesis kephaleon parenetikòn (Esposizione di capitoli parenetici, ma noto anche come Scheda regia) del diacono Agapeto16, discorsi pronunciato forse nel 527 all fincoronazione di Giustiniano e di 13 Thomae Magistri perì politias, cc. 6-11 in PG 145, cc. 505-516; Lettera di Tomaso Magistros al gran logotheta Metochita in PG 145, c. 409. Toma Magistro, La regalità, Testo critico introduzione e indici a cura di P. Volpe Cacciatore, Napoli 1997 con sunto alle pp. 87-94. Traduzione in tedesco in W. Blum, Byzantinische Fürstenspiegel, Stuttgart 1981, pp.99-145. Su questa proposta di Tomaso Magistros cfr. Pertusi, op.cit., p. 241. 14 R. G. PÃun, ‘La couronne est à Dieu. Neagoe Basarab (1512-1521) et l’image du pouvoir pénitent , in P. Guran (éd.), L’empereur hagiographe. Culte des saints et monarchie byzantine et post-byzantine, Bucarest, 2001, pp. 186-223. Si veda la bibliografia relativa al voivoda in A. Carile, Teologia politica bizantina, Spoleto 1998, pp. 399-400. 15 Ibidem, p. 364. 16 Si veda la traduzione del diacono Agapeto stilata dai re Luigi XIII (figlio di Maria de Medici): Les precepts d’Agapetus a Justinien, sur une version latine, par le roi Louis XIII, en ses leçons ordinaires, Paris 1612, in -8°. Cfr. PG 86, (ristampa della notizia del Galland), cc.1155-1160 per un elenco di edizioni e traduzioni a stampa fino al XVII secolo. L’autore del discorso per la incoronazione di Giustiniano, 527, gode di una edizione critica – ma senza la tradizione indiretta, che pure la R. Frohne, Agapetus Diaconus. Untersuchungen zu den Quellen und zur Wirkungsgeschichte des ersten byzantinischen Fürstenspiegel, Tübingen 1985 poneva a disposizione Agapetos Diakonos, Der Fürstenspiegel für Kaiser Iustinianos, Erstmal kritish herausgegeben von R. Riedinger, Athenai 1995, e di varie traduzioni cfr. la traduzione in italiano con la tradizione indiretta: B. Cavarra, Ideologia politica e cultura in Romània fra IV e VI secolo, Bologna 1990; cfr. anche la traduzione di S. Rocca, Un trattatista di et giustinianea: Agapeto Diacono, in “Civilt Classica e Cristiana”, 10,2 (1989), pp. 303-328. Traduzione in tedesco in W. Blum, Byzantinische Fürstenspiegel, Stuttgart 1981, pp. 59-80. Si veda anche la traduzione in inglese in Three Political Voices from the Age of Justinian. Agapetus, Advice to the Emperor, Dialogue on Political Science, Paul the Silentiary, Description of Hagia Sophia, Translated with notes and an introduction by P.N. Bell, Glasgow 2009, pp. 99-122 e introduzione pp. 27-49. Per la tradizione letteraria e politica di Agapeto rimane fondamentale cfr. I. Sevcenko, Agapetus East and West: the Fate of a byzantine “Mirror of Princes, in “Revue des Etudes Sud-est Européennes, 16(1978), pp. 3-44.

72


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

larghissima diffusione nel medioevo, pone fra i compiti del basileus la promozione della giustizia distributiva nella direzione della isotes, la eguaglianza, il mito tardoellenistico caro all fimmaginario collettivo di varie culture, di fatto smentito e ricorretto dalla idea e prassi della gerarchia e del merito. La ricchezza non concorre in sé nella definizione del prestigio sociale, che viene definito invece a partire dal servizio imperiale e dalla appartenenza alla gerarchia17. La lunga durata di queste analisi intercambiabili per contesti storici diversi e lontani ci pone il problema della letterarietà dell’approccio e della convenzionalità dello schema. Si aggiunga la ambiguità dei termini povero/ ricco, che sono applicabili ad un ventaglio di figure sociali diverse nella stessa categoria, dall’emarginato di Gregorio di Nazianzo18 ai liberi indigenti della legislazione dell’età macedonica19; mentre il ricco sembra in realtà non distinguersi dalla gerarchia bizantina, che partecipa della legittimità stessa del potere imperiale. La esortazione alla solidarietà con i sympenites di Gregorio di Nazianzo, rientra nel complesso di virtù civili ed etiche della philanthropìa, termine che aveva rimpiazzato, anche nella cultura cristiana, il termine più proprio di agape, per indicare l’amore di Dio per la umanità manifestato nella incarnazione del Logos. In quanto attributo divino la filantropia diviene pertanto virtù imperiale per eccellenza, in un processo di precisazione semantica grazie a cui la ideologia ellenistica della filantropia, testimoniata in Libanio, in Temistio, – che pone la philanthropìa come prima fra le virtù “per cui solo l’imperatore può rendersi simile 17 R. Byron, The Byzantine Achievement. An historical Perspective CE 3301453, Axios Press Mount Jackson, 2010, rist. della edizione originale del 1928, pp. 50-53, 123, 134-139, 150-156 e passim. 18 Cfr. n. 7. 19 N. Svoronos, Les Novelles des empereurs macédoniens concernent la terre et les stratiotes, Introduction Edition Commentaires, Ed. posthume et index établis par P. Gounarides, Athènes 1994 cfr. trad. in A. Carile, Materiali di storia bizantina, Bologna 1994.

73


ANTONIO CARILE

a Dio” -, e nell’imperatore Giuliano, finisce per subire la sovrapposizione del processo cristomimetico, che induce il basileus ad “imitare la philanthropìa del signore” (Eusebio)20. La filantropia come virtù imperiale percorre tutta la trattatistica ideologica bizantina, dalle novelle di Giustiniano alla Ecloga di Leone III. Ma non è usuale vederne la applicazione sociale ed economica, secondo le affermazioni della Novella 163. Tra idealità consacrata in un testo legale e realtà della applicazione21 si rileva la consueta sfasatura del regime antico e non solo di quello. Il libro dell’eparco (912)22, normativa promulgata 20 Das Eparchenbuch Leons des Weisen, Lorenz, De progressu notionis filanqrwpiva”, Diss. Leipzig 1914. H.I.Bell, Philanthropia in the Papyri of the Roman Period, in Hommages J. Bidez et F. Cumont, Bruxelles 1949, Collection Latomus II, pp. 31-37. M.T. Lenger, La notion de bienfait (philanthropon) royal et les ordonnances des rois Lagides, in Studi in onore di Vincenzo Arangio-Ruiz, I, Napoli 1953, pp. 483-499. T.E. Gregory, The Ekloga of Leo III and the Concept of “Philanthropia, in “Byzantinà”, 1974, pp. 267-287. AN. Christophilopoulou, To; ejparciko;n biblivon Levonto” tou’ Sofou’ kai; aiJ suntecnivai eJn Buzantivw/, rist. Thessalonike 2000 (con aggiunta di due articoli e prosqh’ke” di Aikaterine Christophilopoulou), ed. or. Athenai 1935. 21 B. Stolte, The social function of the Law, in A social History of Byzantium, ed. by J. Haldon, Wiley-Blackwell, 2009, pp.76-91. 22 Das Eparchenbuch Leons des Weisen, Einfürung, Edition, Übersetzung und Indices von J. Koder, Wien, 1991, CFHB XXXIII, Leonis Sapientis Librum praefecti, cap. XXII. Cfr. A. Pertusi, Il pensiero politico bizantino, a cura di A. Carile, Bologna, 1990, p.205. AN. Christophilopoulou, To e’parcikon biblion Leontov” tou Sofou kai ai suntecniai e‘n Buzantiwı, rist. Thessalonike, 2000 (con aggiunta di due articoli e prosqnkev di Aikaterine Christophilopoulou), ed. or. Athenai, 1935. P. Schreiner, Die Organisation byzantinischer Kaufleute und Handwerker, in Untersuchungen zu Handel und Verkehr der vor- und fürühgeschichtlichen Zeit in Mittel- und Nordeuropa, Göttingen, 1989, Teil 6, pp. 46-48, 56-57, 61. Guilds, Price Formation and Market Structures in Byzantium, Surrey Ashgate 2009 Variorum Collected Studies Series 925 contiene sette saggi del Maniatis compresi i seguenti: G.C. Maniatis, The Guild System in Byzantium and Medieval Western Europe. A comparative Analysis of organizational Structures, regulatory Mechanisms and behavioral Patterns, in Byzantion, LXXVI (2006), pp. 463-570, cfr. p. 531. Id., The Guild-organized soap manufacturing Industry in Constantinople tenth-twelfth centuries, in „Byzantion, 80(2010), pp. 247-264. Id., Organization, market structure and modus operandi of the guild-organized leather manufacturing industry in tenth-century Constantinople, in „Byzantinische Zeitschrift, 103,2 (2010), pp. 605-678. Id., Organization and Modus Operandi of the Manufacturing Industry in Byzantium, Tenth-Twelfth Centuries, in « Byzantinoslavica. Revue Internationale des Etudes Byzantines  », 68(2010), 1-2, pp. 172-204. I due contributi segnalati convogliano il complesso della bibliografia sull’argomento. G. Dagron, The Urban Economy, Seventh-Twelfth Centuries, in The Economic History of Byzantium from the Seventh through the Fifteenth Century, 2, A. E. Laiou Editor in Chief, Washington, 2002, pp. 405-410. Christophilopoulou,

74


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

dal protospatario Filoteo eparco di Costantinopoli, in nome di Leone VI “per evitare che l’uno aggredisca l’altro spudoratamente e che il più potente distrugga l’inferiore”23, mostra la preoccupazione della difesa sociale dei più deboli, preda dei più forti, attraverso un sistema controllato di prezzi. La novella dell’aprile 92224 introduce la nozione di “potenza”, che nella novella del settembre 93425 Romano I Lecapeno definisce in chiave sociologica: la preminenza di alcune categorie di persone qualificate per “ischyròteroi”, potentiores, identificati come gradi determinati della gerarchia, con ciò aprendo la contraddizione fra strutture dello statalismo bizantino e sperequazione economica dei membri della società. La gerarchia, al tempo stesso condizione sociale e struttura mentale, era peraltro struttura fondante della centralità autocratica, dal IV secolo fino alla militarizzazione dell’impero e segnava la concentrazione di potere, potere economico, prestigio e riconoscimento sociale, secondo l’assioma consueto alle gerarchie di antico regime. Dalla inaugurazione di Costantinopoli nel 330 fino al suo crollo politico nel 1453, che però non coinvolse tutti i monasteri e il patriarcato, il governo bizantino svolse molteplici funzioni filantropiche. Ospedali, ospizi per viaggiatori, lebbrosari, nella capitale e lungo le vie di comunicazione, vennero eretti. Speciale cura si ebbe dei profughi e degli orfani, cui si provvedeva anche ad una forma di educazione, oltre che di mantenimento26. To e’parcikon biblion cit. , pp. 9-10, 92-95.29. Ibid., pp. 536-537. Favorevoli alla applicazione nel territorio imperiale Stoeckle, Christophillopoulou, Lopez, Charanis, Jacoby, Tivcev, Oikonomides, Magdalino,Ostrogorsky, Angold, Frances, Toynbee, Boissonade, Harvey, Litavrin. Opinioni contrarie o dubitative hanno espresso Dagron, Sideris, Runciman, Makris, Kazhdan Constable, Bouras. 23 Das Eparchenbuch Leons des Weisen, cit., p. 72, rr. 9-11. 24 A. Carile, Materiali di storia bizantina, Bologna 1994, rist. 2006, p. 136. 25 Ibidem, pp. 138-144. 26 T.S. Miller, The Orphans of Byzantium. Child Welfare in the Christian Empire, Washington 2003, pp.209-246 circa la “scuola degli orfani. R. Finn, Almsgiving in the Later Roman Empire. Christian Promotion and Practice 313-450, Oxford 2006. V. Dimitropoulou, Imperial Female Patronage in the Komnenian Era,

75


ANTONIO CARILE

Nel pensiero e nella vita dei bizantini la philanthropia era: in primo luogo una astrazione filosofica e teologica27; in secondo luogo un attributo politico28; in terzo luogo una forma di carità per i bisognosi29; in quarto luogo la philanthropia era una espressione istituzionale organizzata. La filantropia nel pensiero filosofico significava essere misericordiosi come il Padre celeste è giusto e misericordioso. Il giusto dona liberamente ogni giorno, dà largamente al povero e pertanto la sua giustezza dura per i secoli dei secoli (Mat 5.7). Benedetti i misericordiosi perché otterranno misericordia; benedetto chi si cura del povero e del mendicante, chi semina eleemosyne raccoglierà il frutto della vita (Hosea 10.12). Chi è caritatevole con il povero dà al Signore; chi opprime il povero insulta il suo Creatore; grazie alle elemosine e alla fede i peccati sono perdonati. Ecco le regole della filosofia filantropica bizantina: Dio richiede pietà per l’uomo a preferenza dei sacrifici. La perfezione, accesso al regno celeste, significava essere philotheos, cioè amante di Dio, e philoptochos, cioè amante del povero. Farsi monaco e vivere una vita di di preghiera e mortificazione dei bisogni materiali e distribuire le ricchezze proprie ai poveri significava raggiungere la perfezione. La pratica della philanthropia30 era un terzo modo di rinucia e sé medesimi a favore della società. in “Acta ad archaeologiam et artium historiam pertinentia, 22(n.s.8)(2009), Ediderunt S. Sande T. Karlsen Seim, pp. 109-128. Brown, Povert e leadership, cit., pp. 111-167 dedica un saggio corposo al tema della solidariet nei confronti della povert nelll’impero romano d’Oriente. 27 R. Le Déaut, Filanqrwpiva dans la lettérature grecque jusqu’au nouveau Testament, Citt del Vaticano 1964, Studi e Testi 231. G. Downey, Philanthropia in Religion and Statecraft in the fourth Century after Christ, in “Historia, 4(1955), pp. 199-208. 28 M. Gigante, Sulla concezione bizantina dell’imperatore nel VII secolo, in Synteleia V. Arangio-Ruiz, I, Napoli 1964, pp. 546-551 ristampato in Id., Scritti sulla civilt letteraria bizantina, Napoli 1981, pp. 55-63. Cfr. A. Pertusi, Il pensiero politico bizantino, a cura di A. Carile, Bologna 1990, p.205. 29 R. Volk, Gesundheitswesen und Wohlttigkeit im Spiegel der Byzantinischen Klostertypika, Mnchen 1983, Miscellanea Byzantina Monacensia 28 30 D. J. Constantelos, Byzantine Philanthropy and Social Welfare, New Brunswick New Jersey 1968, pp. 18-28, 128-130, 262-267.

76


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

Dionigi di Alessandria (+ 264-265), Giovanni Damasceno (660-750) nei forse suoi Sacra parallela, impartivano questi insegnamenti mentre Gregorio di Nazianzo nella sua Oratio XIV Perì philoptochias afferma: “Niente è più onorevole o filantropico per noi che essere pietosi e operare il bene, perché niente è più gradito a Dio… Dimostrati un dio per lo sfortunato imitando la pieta di Dio. Nulla è più divino nell’uomo che fare il bene”. La philanthropia era espressione di pentimento e riconsacrazione a Dio ed era l’antidoto al peccato: Giovanni Zimisce, assassino dello zio imperatore, dona metà dei suoi beni privati al lebbrosario a espiazione del suo delitto31. Secondo l’insegnamento di Gesù:”…vendi tutto quello che hai e distribuiscilo ai poveri e tu avrai un Tesoro in cielo…” (Lc 18.18; Mt 19.16; Mc 10.17). Teodoro Studita (759-826) rapporta la philanthropia a Cristo, cosicché il donatore verrà accolto nel seno di Abramo, secondo la iconografia bizantina del IX secolo che ammiriamo nel mosaico parietale della basilica di Maria Assunta a Torcello. Simeone di Tessalonica (+ 1429) vede nella philanthropia un mezzo per il perdono dei peccati. La corte imperiale e l’imperatore partecipavano di questa mentalità, pur vivendo in un ambiente di lusso ostentato e di competizione non certo caritatevole. Alessio I Comneno (1081-1118) consiglia al figlio: “Quando vedi un povero o un mendicante non voltargli le spalle, … figlio mio, ama il povero …perché Dio lo vuole..”. Isacco Comneno figlio di Alessio fondò il monastero della Cosmosoteira (Salvatrice del mondo) con le sue funzioni filantropiche “per la salvezza della sua anima”32. La filantropia costituiva una delle prerogative 31 J. Ph. Thomas, Private Religious Foundation in the Byzantine empire, Washington 1987, pp. 153-154, E. Patlagean, Santit e potere a Bisanzio, tr. it., Milano 1992, p. 123. 32 Volk, Gesundheitswesen und Wohlttigkeit, cit., pp. 200-215. T.S. Miller, The Orphans of Byzantium. Child Welfare in the Christian Empire, Washinton 2003, pp. 91, 136, 172.

77


ANTONIO CARILE

distintive dell’imperatore33. Ma anche i dignitari laici assumevano una connotazione socialmente accettabile mediante operazioni filantropiche. Basilio il Grande, Giovanni Crisostomo, Sansone, Giovanni il Misericordioso, Stefano parakoimomenos di Maurizio, Dexiocrate, Michele Attaliata e molti altri si illustrarono con private fondazioni caritatevoli34. Giustiniano nella novella 120, 6 fissò per legge le regole di queste istituzioni in tutto l’impero: “…In aliis vero sanctissimis ecclesiis et monasteries et xenodochiis et nosocomiis seu reliquis venerabilibus domibus quae in omnibus provinciis nostrae reipublicae positae sunt, verum etiam monasteriorum in regia civitate et eius circuitu adhaerentium consequenter definire praevidimus. 1. Licentiam igitur damus praedictis venerabilibus domibus non solum ad tempus emphytheosin facere immobilium rerum sibi competentium, sed perpetue haec emphytheotico iure volentibus dari. Et si quidem sanctissimae sint ecclesiae vel aliae venerabiles domus, quarum gubernationem loci sanctissimus episcopus aut per se aut per venerabilem clerum facit, cum voluntate eorum et consensus fieri huiusmodi contractum, iurantibus praesente eo oeconomo et administratoribus et chartulariis ipsius 33 Gli specula imperiali, confluiti nel diacono Agapeto nel 527, catalogano le virtu’ che rendono riconoscibile la santita’ imperiale o per converso il suo contrario la “tirannia” (cap. 65): programmaticamente l’imperatore, se cinto dalla “corona della pieta’” (cap. 15), se cinto della “corona della temperanza, ...rivestito dalla porpora della giustizia” (cap. 18), È “immagine di pieta’ fatta da Dio”,- con singolare consonanza con il nome-titolo “immagine vivente del dio”, che in tempi remoti era ricorso nella onomastica faraonica – (cap. 5), e diviene un semplice strumento di santificazione, “... uno specchio terso...” che “brilla dei raggi divini” (cap. 9), un recipiente di santita’ divina, destinato dalla funzione alla imitazione di Dio “attraverso le azioni” (cap. 45), nel limite invalicabile della misericordia, della filantropia, della beneficenza: “in questo potra’ imitare massimamente Dio, nel giudicare che nulla È piu’ prezioso della misericordia” (cap. 37), “...se fugge ogni atteggiamento contrario alla umanita’ come ferino ed esercita l’amore verso gli uomini come simile a Dio” (cap. 40); “abito che non invecchia È il manto della beneficenza; veste incorruttibile l’amore verso i poveri” (cap. 60). Cfr. in generale A. CARILE, Teologia politica bizantina, Spoleto 2008, pp. XII 443 con la relativa bibliografia sul tema della ideologia politica. 34 J. Ph. Thomas, Private Religious Foundation in the Byzantine empire, Washington 1987.

78


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

venerabilis domus, quod ex hac emphytheosi nullum damnum eidem venerabili domui infertur; si vero ptochia aut xenones aut nosocomia aut relique venerabiles domus sint propriam administrationem habentes, si quidem venerabilia oratoria esse contigerit, cum voluntate maioris partis ibidem adorantium clericorum, nec non oeconomi, si vero xenon aut ptochium aut nosocomium aut alia sit venerabilis domus, apud praepositum ipsius contracti fieri, iurantibus ordinatoribus earumdem venerabilium domorum praesentia deo amabilis espiscopi a quo praeponuntur aut ordinantur, quod nihil ad laesionem aut praescriptionem ipsarum venerabilium domorum de eiusmodi contractu efficitur”35. La assoluta libertà di cui avevano goduto i benefattori privati nella costruzione e nella dotazione delle loro fondazioni con il Concilio di Calcedonia (451) presero a venir regolate. La donazione del fondatore divenne irrevocabile e doveva venir sottoposta al controllo del vescovo locale, al pari delle proprietà rurali e delle chiese di campagna. Malgrado ciò la conversione di fondazioni pie in proprietà private costituirono per secoli una preoccupazione delle autorità ecclesiastiche. Gli ospedali che si trovavano nell’impero bizantino erano di solito ospedali generalistici, cliniche per la 35 Quanto alle altre santissime chiese e monasteri e xenodochi e nosocomi ovvero tutte le altre istituzioni venerabili che si trovano in tutte le provincie della nostra respublica ma anche i monasteri siti nella citt regia e nel suo territorio [il territorio entro cento miglia da Costantinopoli] conseguentemente disponemmo di decidere: 1. Diamo licenza alle predette istituzioni venerabili di stipulare delle enfiteusi dei beni immobili di loro propriet non solo a tempo ma anche in perpetuo a favore di chi le vuole. E se invero vi siano chiese o altre istituzioni venerabili il cui governo gestisca il santissimo vescovo del luogo o direttamente o attraverso il venerabile clero, sia fatto questo tipo di contratto con la loro volont e il loro consenso, sotto giuramento in presenza all’atto del contratto dell economo e degli amministratori e dei cartulari, che da questa enfiteusi nessun danno viene arrecato alla medesima venerabile istituzione; se per gli ptochia o gli xenones o i nosocomi o le altre venerabili istituzioni si trovino ad avere una propria amministrazione, se siano venerabili luoghi di preghiera, si faccia il contratto con la volont della parte maggiore dei preti che ivi officiano oltre che dell’economo, se invece si tratti dello xenon o dello ptochion o del nosocomio o di altra venerabile istituzione, il contratto si faccia presso il prevosto, sotto giuramento delle persone che amministrano le medesime venerabili istituzioni in presenza del vescovo, caro a Dio, da parte di cui sono preposti all’incarico o vengono imposti per suo ordine, che nessun danno o prescrizione alle medesime venerabili istituzioni derivi da questo contratto.

79


ANTONIO CARILE

maternità, dispensari oftalmologici, lebbrosari e fondazioni assistenziali. Anche gli xenones o xenodocheia e gerocomeia offrivano servizi medici. Lo xenon di Samson aveva un dispensario ben organizzato come pure lo xenodocheion di Euvoulos, lo stabilimento di Theophilos, l’istituzione del Myrelaiou e le altre istituzioni caritatevoli36. Ospedali, cliniche, e ricoveri di Chiesa, imperatori e laici, erano usualmente annessi a luoghi di culto e di pellegrinaggio e anzi si riteneva che alcuni santi, e relative reliquie e alcune colonne avessero poteri curativi miracolosi37. Nel 372 Basilio il Grande, vescovo di Cesarea di Cappadocia, fondò una istituzione benefica denominata Basileiàs con un ospedale e secondo Sozomeno (VI, 34, 9) fu “il più famoso ospizio per i bisognosi”38. Ma la Basileiàs aveva anche stanze per i lebbrosi, per i viaggiatori, disponeva di medici, cuochi, in modo da sembrare a Gregorio di Nazianzo “una nuova città, un magazzino di pietà, il tesoro commune dei sani…in cui la malattia era vista in forma religiosa e la compassione veniva messa alla prova”. Basilio, in aggiunta alle sue grandi ricchezze di latifondista cappadoce, per il lebbrosario della sua Basileiàs, chiedeva ai ricchi di fornirgli il denaro per organizzarlo e sostenerlo. I monaci che vi lavoravano dovevano guardare ai loro pazienti “come a fratelli di Cristo” (PG XXXI, c. 649B). L’impero bizantino del IV secolo affrontò carestie, invasioni barbariche, e la piaga del latifondismo che espropriava i piccoli proprietari terrieri, oltre alle catastrofi naturali. San Giovanni Crisostomo39 costruì 36 Volk, Gesundheitswesen und Wohlttäigkeit, cit., pp. 48-53. T.S. Miller, The birth of the Hospital in the Byzantine Empire, Baltimore and London 1985. 37 J. Harris, Costantinopoli, Tr. it di Laura Santi, Bologna 2011, ed. or. 2007, pp. 21 sgg. Freu, Les figures du pauvre dans les sources , cit., pp. 387449 distingue fra dichiarazioni e pratica assistenziale nella realt occidentale tardoantica. 38 Volk, Gesundheitswesen und Wohltätigkeit, cit., pp. 39-42. Miller, The birth of the Hospital, cit., pp.85-88. Brown, Povert e leadership nel tardo impero romano, cit., pp. 53, 58-60, 182 n. 150. 39 Sermo 45, in PG LX, c. 319. Constantelos, Byzantine Philanthropy, cit., pp.186-187. Miller, The birth of the Hospital, cit., pp. 89-90.

80


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

vari ospedali a Costantinopoli, infatti consapevole “che la necessità di assistenza era grandissima, innalzò altri ospedali, ai quali prepose preti devoti come pure medici e cuochi … di modo che gli stranieri venuti nella Città e caduti malati potessero ottenere cure mediche come cosa che non solo era buona in sé ma anche Gloria del Salvatore”. Il più antico ospedale di Costantinopoli era quello costruito da san Marciano vicino alla chiesa di Santa Irene a Perama (attuale Balikpazari). Il fondatore, molto ricco, visse ai tempi dell’imperatore Marciano (450-457). L’imperatrice Flaccilla, seconda moglie di Teodosio il Grande, restaurò alcuni degli ospedali esistenti e frequentemente visitava i ricoverati. Bassiano, vescovo di Efeso nel V secolo, partecipante al Concilio di Calcedonia, fissò settanta posti per malati nel suo ospedale40. San Saba, fondatore della Grande Lavra vicino a Gerusalemme costruì un ospedale accanto al suo monastero41. Due fratelli della Isauria, Teodulo e Gelasio furono gli architetti del complesso e vennero definiti i nuovi Beseel e Eliab, i biblici architetti del Tabernacolo. Teodosio il Cenobiarca (+ c. 529), oltre a praticare filantropie giornaliere, istituì fondazioni che durarono molti decenni. Pensava che il modo migliore per esprimere l’amore per l’uomo fosse di visitarlo quando era malato e prender parte alla sua afflizione. Egli fondò un ospedale per monaci e due ospedali per laici, distinti per categoria sociale, uno per persone importanti e uno per poveri e per monaci vecchi42. Nel VI secolo Joshua lo Stilita descrive le condizioni disastrose di Edessa nel 501-502. Carestia, locuste, peste e quindi fame, malattia e morte. La Chiesa di Edessa non risparmiò né denaro né sforzi per aiutare le vittime. Il governatore della città, Demostene, giocò un ruolo rilevante nell’opera di sostegno. “L’intera città era piena di essi e cominciarono a morire nei portici e per le strade. 40 41 42

Constantelos, Byzantine Philanthropy, cit., p.157. Ibidem, p. 159. Ibidem, pp. 157-158.

81


ANTONIO CARILE

Anche i soldati della città sistemarono giacigli per far dormire i malati e si fecero carico delle spese”43. Ad Amida Giovanni di Efeso ricorda che c’erano molti malati, storpi, ciechi e vecchi che non avevano nessuno che si curasse di loro e li consolasse. Un donna chiamata Eufemia “andava in giro per le taverne, le strade e le case …per vedere se c’era un bisognoso o uno straniero malato; in effetti ne trovò molti e li aiutò. Alcuni ne accolse a casa sua alcuni ne consegnò agli incaricati degli ospedali e li incaricò di farsene carico”44. Giustiniano costruì due xenones presso la Chiesa della Theotocos a Gerusalemme. San Saba mise in evidenza lo stato di necessità degli stranieri che cadevano malati quando visitano la città e la comunità monastica. Il piano originale prevedeva un ospedale con cento letti ma poi divennero duecento e l’ospedale venne dotato con 1850 soldi d’oro cioè 25 libbre e 50 soldi d’oro45. Giustiniano incrementò anche gli ospedali a Costantinopoli. Prima del suo regno un uomo pio, Sansone, aveva eretto uno xenon nella capitale in cui c’era una casa per gente che “soffriva di malattie serie ed era allettata” (Procopio, de aedificiis). Sito fra Santa Sofia e Santa Irene era stato distrutto durante la rivolta del Nika (532) e venne pertanto ricostruito da Giustinano su impianto più largo. Davanti allo xenon di Sansone Giustiniano e Teodora innalzarono gli ospizi di Isidoro e di Arcadio. 43 Joshua the Stylite, Chronicle, capp. 41-42, tr. by W. Wright, Cambridge 1882, p.31 44 Giovanni di Efeso, Vite di Maria ed Eufemia, ed. tr. E.W. Brooks, Patrologia Orientalis, XVII, fasc. 1, Paris 1923, p. 180. 45 Se si assume a paradigma schiavo senza qualifiche uguale a bracciante, ci si pu rendere conto del valore della somma. Il valore legale, secondo la legislazione giustinianea, di uno schiavo adulto senza particolari qualifiche, 20 soldi d’oro, rende 1850 soldi equivalenti a 92 schiavi. Tenuto conto che uno schiavo adulto poteva avere una speranza di vita di una ventina d’anni, il valore della somma equivarrebbe oggi al salario di 92 braccianti per venti anni, detratto vitto, alloggio e vestiario. Gli schiavi bambini valevano meno della met di un adulto, perch presentavano un rischio pi grande di sopravvivenza. A met del prezzo legale si potevano acquistare presso il gran principato di Kiev nel X secolo gli schiavi russi da rivendere al mercato di Costantinopoli, cfr. I trattati dell’antica Russia con l’Impero Romano d’Oriente, a cura di A. Carile A. N. Sacharov, Roma 2011.

82


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

Evagrio riferisce che durante la peste del 542 Giustinano costruì un ospedale a Daphne, il famoso sobborgo di Antiochia, ora centro turistico. Nel sobborgo costantinopolitano Irion sorgeva un leprocomion (ospedale per lebbrosi) denominato Zoticon. Una fonte citata dal Preger 46 afferma che fosse stato fondato da Giustino II e sua moglie Sofia (565-578)47. Il protovestiarios Zotico ne era stato il suo primo direttore. Secondo un’altra fonte il lebbrosario di Zotico era stato fondato dall’imperatore Costanzo II (337-361) in onore di san Zotico che aveva perso la vita per la sua filantropia verso i lebbrosi. Il lebbrosario durò fino al VII secolo quando fu incendiato durante una incursion di Slavi. Eraclio lo ricostruì in legno nel 624. Nel X secolo venne restaurato dall’imperatore Giovanni Zimisce (969-976) che lo dotò con la metà del suo patrimonio privato, a sconto dell’assassinio dello zio, l’imperatore Niceforo II Focas. Constantino VII Porfirogenito (913-959) lo allargò per ospitare “tutti quelli che soffrivano di lebbra” (Theoph. Cont.). Nel 1032 fu ricostruito dall’imperatore Romano III Argiro e nel XIII secolo il Pellegrino russo Antonio di Novgorod, scrive che “nell’ospedale sulla collina oltre IsPigas è sepolto il corpo di san Zotico. L’imperatore gli aveva ordinato di costruire un palazzo, egli invece prese il denaro e lo distribuì ai poveri; l’imperatore allora ordinò che venisse legato ai garretti dei cavalli fino a che morisse. Il santo fu sepolto e il popolo costruì là una chiesa. E I cristiani vi compiono opere di carità”48. Un altro ptochotropheion con lebbrosario si trovava nella regione di Argyronium, sulla costa del Ponto Eusino oltre la chiesa di San Panteleimon. Epifanio di Salamina narra che Eustazio vescovo di Sebasteia del Ponto l’aveva affidato a un prete di nome 46 Patria, ed. Th. Preger, III, 235, 267. 47 Jean Verpeaux, Pseudo-Kodinos, Trait des offices, Introduction, texte et traduction, Paris 1976, contrariamente alla affermazione di Constantelos, op.cit., p. 164, non reca citazione alcuna di questo fatto. Cfr. Volk, Gesundheitswesen und Wohlttigkeit, cit., pp. 44-48. 48 Constantelos, Byzantine Philanthropy, cit., p. 166, 167, 193.

83


ANTONIO CARILE

Aerio, che a causa del suo arianesimo dovette lasciare il posto. Procopio ricorda che Giustiniano lo restaurò completamente e vi accolse lebbrosi e altri malati. Non mancano esempi di ricchi laici fondatori di ospedali. Andronico e Atanasia, una coppia di Antiochia ai tempi di Giustiniano, alla morte dei loro figli partirono per la Terrasanta e Andronico affidò una grossa somma a suo cognato per costruire un ospedale in città e uno xenodocheion per monaci. Andrea arcivescovo di Creta (+740), che aveva in precedenza prestato servizio come direttore di un orfanotrofio e di un ospizio per poveri a Costantinopoli, costruì e mantenne a sue spese uno Xenon a Creta. In una vita anonima di san Filareto il Misericordioso (+792), nonno da parte della moglie dell’imperatore Costantino VI (780-797), apprendiamo che alla sua morte la moglie tornò nel Ponto e si dedicò al lavoro umanitario. Nell’XI secolo Costantino IX costruì un ospedale vicino alla chiesa di San Giorgio a Costantinopoli. Lo storico Michele Attaliata loda l’imperatore Niceforo III Botaniata per I suoi atti filantropici, cioè varie case per poveri ed ospedali a Costantinopoli e nei sobborghi. Nel 1077 Attaliata afferma che aveva istituito il suo ptochotropheion (ricovero per poveri) a Redesto (Tekirdag) “per il riscatto e il perdono dei suoi molti e grandi e innumerevoli peccati”49. L’uomo si salva attraverso la grazia e la philanthropia di Dio. Deve pertanto ricambiare la philanthropia del Creatore, con la philanthropia verso l’uomo. Ingiustizia e mancanza di philanthropia potevano causare l’ira divina come nell’assedio saraceno di Tessalonica nel 904, concluso con una strage e un saccheggio. La donazione di terre a fondazioni private si intensificò nella prima metà del IX secolo, in coincidenza con il processo di espansione territoriale dell’impero e di arricchimento dell’aristocrazia militare. Il governo 49

84

Thomas, Private Religious Foundation, cit. pp. 180-184.


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

sottopose a tassazione anche queste donazioni, per motivi di bilancio. Niceforo I (802-811), particolarmente impopolare per il suo aggravio di tassazione, fece acquartierare contingenti militari nei monasteri e nei vescovadi ponendo le risorse di queste istituzioni a disposizione dei confinanti con le terre di proprietà. Con una legge dell’ 810 Niceforo obbligò i contadini delle istituzioni filantropiche, delle chiese e dei monasteri imperiali a versare il kapnikòn (cioè la tassa personale) che Teofane il Confessore considererà la quinta delle dieci vessazioni dell’imperatore, particolarmente dannosa per la rendita fondiaria ecclesiastica. L’iconoclasmo procedette alla secolarizzazione in massa delle fondazioni private e dei monasteri. Niceforo II Focas (963-969) per osteggiare la tendenza ecclesiastica ad assorbire donazioni private per la salvezza dell’anima nel (964/965) stabilì per legge che i lasciti a favore delle istituzioni caritatevoli potevano essere in denaro ma non in terre, che erano alla base del reclutamento dei militari; stabilì anche che i fondi venissero impiegati per restaurare le fondazioni già esistenti piuttosto che per crearne di nuove50. La utilizzazione sociale dei beni caritatevoli venne incrementata in modo che alla fine del secolo XI interi monasteri erano nella disponibilità di privati beneficiari charistikarioi, di solito funzionari imperiali benemeriti del governo ricompensati con questa forma di rendita ai danni del ceto monastico. Nel 1136 Giovanni II Comneno insieme a sua moglie la principessa ungherese Piroska, che aveva assunto il nome di regno di Irene, fondò il grande monastero del Pantocrator, che aveva annesso un ospedale. Di questa istitutzione disponiamo del Typicon, cioè della regola, che sorprende per la sua attualità: dieta, malattie, attività dei medici e responsabilità verso i pazienti sono 50

Novella del 967 cfr. Carile, Materiali di storia bizantina, cit., p. 149

85


ANTONIO CARILE

minuziosamente previsti51. C’era un reparto per gli anziani, un reparto psichiatrico e un servizio di pronto soccorso. Il monastero del Pantocrator, le cui formelle d’oro della iconostasi furono saccheggiate dai Veneziani nel 1204 e compongono ora la Pala d’Oro, vanto di San Marco a Venezia, disponeva di cinque reparti di cui il primo dotato di dieci letti per gli interventi chirurgici. Otto letti del secondo reparto erano a disposizione delle affezioni oculari e intestinali. Dodici letti nel terzo reparto erano riservati alle donne. Altri venti letti in due reparti servivano per malattie generali. Ogni reparto disponeva di un letto libero per emergenze e altri sei per malattie terminali. L’ospedale era dotato di due medici primari addetti ai venti letti per le patologie generali, ed erano assistiti da tre aiuti e da due medici residenti o sovrannumerari, in tutto sette medici con uno studente e due infermieri. Gli altri reparti erano dotati allo stesso modo. In un ospedale di di sessantun letti operavano trentacinque dottori. Il Typicon prescrive inoltre che di notte cinque dottori, quattro maschi e una femmina, fossero presenti in ospedale. Ogni letto era dotato di una coperta distesa su un tavolato al modo orientale, una coperta, un cuscino e una coperta di pelo di cavallo mentre in inverno venivano fornite due imbottite. Il direttore si doveva curare della biancheria mentre i vestiti dei pazienti dovevano essere puliti e stirati. La dotazione del letto veniva rinnovata anno per anno. I vestiti scartati venivano donati ai poveri. Nel reparto donne operavano due dottori, una levatrice e quattro aiuti, due sovrannumerari e due infermiere. In ogni camera c’era una guardia notturna e un aiuto medico e, per le donne, una infermiera di 51 J.M. Hussey, Church and Learning in the Byzantine Empire, New York 1963, pp. 185-186. Miller, The Orphans of Byzantium, cit., pp. 44-45. A.-M. Talbot, A Monastic World, in A social History of Byzantium, ed. by J. Haldon, cit., p. 266. Il typikòn si legge nella edizione di P. Gautier, Le typikon du Christ Sauveur Pantocrator, in “Revue des Etudes Byzantines, 32(1974), pp. 1-145.

86


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

sicura condotta. Dottori e personale erano organizzati in due turni che cambiavano ogni mese. Due protomenitae decidevano sull’ammissione del malato. I primikerioi si occupavano del vitto dei pazienti e li visitavano spesso dando disposizioni al resto del personale e fornendo le prime cure agli spedalizzati. Un professore di medicina forniva lezioni ai dottori giovani. Ogni giorno il pronto soccorso veniva gestito da quattro dottori sovrannumerari, due dei quali trattavano le malattie e due curavano le ferite, abbastanza consuete nella città bizantina dove le risse erano all’ordine del giorno e della notte, tanto che si dovettero far chiudere le osterie alle venti della sera. Erano assistiti da quatto aiuti chirurghi e quattro aiuti dottori. Il direttore aveva ordine di non risparmiare nella cura del malato. Il personale subordinato comprendeva tre aiuto farmacisti, due sovrannumeari, un portiere, cuochi e loro aiuti, un mugnaio, un fornaio e un garzone di stalla per i cavalli dei dottori. La dieta era per lo più vegetariana con aggiunta di vino che di domenica veniva sostituito con idromele. I malati avevano diritto a due bagni la settimana o di più se prescritti dal dottore. In varie occasioni dell’anno, festività, annniversari imperiali, i malati ricevevano piccoli donativi in denaro o cibi. A Pasqua venivano loro dati tre pezzi di sapone per il loro bagno. I dottori, ben pagati per il loro servizio, non potevano praticare la medicina al di fuori dell’ospedale. L’ospedale disponeva di una cappella per i servizi religiosi e di un cimitero circondato da un muro che apparteneva al monastero di Medicarios, una dipendenza del Pantocrator fuori della città, dall’altra parte del Corno d’Oro. Il cimitero disponeva di quattro uomini incaricati delle sepolture e di un prete52. 52 G. Schreiber, Byzantinisches und Abendlandisches Hospital, in “Byzantinische Zeitschrift, 42(1943-1949), e in Gemeinschaften des Mittelalters: Recht und Verfassung, Kult und Frömmigkeit, Mnster Regensberg 1948.

87


ANTONIO CARILE

Amo ricordare, con una certa nostalgia per quel piccolo mondo antico, che nel 1980 a Patrasso nel cimitero cittadino, dove mi ero recato per una colliva (celebrazione dopo quaranta giorni dalla sepoltura) del genitore di un amico, ho trovato un papas che giocava a carte con gli addetti al cimitero, sulla porta di ingresso, in attesa di visitatori che intendevano arruolarlo per preghiere sulle tombe e per la consumazione di un piccolo pasto rituale sul piano della tomba stessa, uso ancora praticato nel mondo ortodosso. I feretri, allora come ora, venivano trasportati scoperti fino all’atto della sepoltura: entrare in una chiesa con una serie di feretri aperti e di defunti in vista – magari in ore senza pubblico come mi capitò nella deserta chiesa di Kalomenskoie, nei pressi del palazzetto in legno dello zar Pietro il Grande – è stata per me una esperienza che si è rinnovata di anno in anno fino alle mie frequentazioni antiochene, protratte fino al 2009, città in cui i feretri islamici scoperti vengono trasportati per le vie cittadine allo stesso modo degli ortodossi. Va detto che dall’età giustinianea la Grande Chiesa (Santa Sofia) disponeva del reddito di cento botteghe per celebrare i funerali pubblici gratuiti a disposizione di tutti. Giovanni II Comneno esortava inoltre medici e infermieri ad eseguire fedelmente i loro compiti e ad assistere i pazienti come se stessero servendo l’Onnipotente. Stessa esortazione valeva per i cuochi, le serve, i preti e il resto del personale: esortazioni che come sappiamo debbono poi misurarsi con il concreto agire proprio della natura umana. Isacco II Angelo (XII secolo), celebre per la sua vita dissipata e lussuosa, gareggiò in philanthropia, con i suoi predecessori. Niceta Coniata, che pure disprezza l’imperatore, scrive: “Fece donativi in denaro alla gente che aveva sofferto danni in case e in merci per incendio…53 53 Nic. Chon. XII, 1, si veda anche la edizione e traduzione in Niceta Coniata, Grandezza e catastrofe di Bisanzio, II, a cura di J.-L. Van Dieten A.

88


FILANTROPIA NELLL'IMPERO BIZANTINO

Durante la Settimana Santa concedeva amnistie ai criminali condannati a morte. Isacco inoltre forniva prestazioni caritatevoli alle vedove e donava alle giovani povere doti e il necessario per le nozze”54. La philanthropia55 era una delle virtù che caratterizzavano l’immagine dell’imperatore. Si trattava di un requisito politico atto a giustificare la funzione sociale della ricchezza, in sé valore negativo, ed era stato ereditato dalla teoria ellenistica della regalità risalente già alla Grecia classica rintracciabile in Platone, Aristotele e Isocrate. Il cristianesimo ereditò questa problematica attraverso l’opera di pensatori come Clemente di Alessandria, Eusebio di Cesarea, Sinesio di Cirene, il diacono Agapeto, problematica già presente nei pagani Libanio, Temistio e Giuliano. Il governatore universale del mondo non poteva che essere un dio terreno56, una copia del prototipo celeste. Giustizia, azione sociale e filantropia costituivano elementi dell’umanitarismo tardoantico e medievale.

Pontani, p. 315. 54 Ibidem, XIV, 7, trad. pp.523-525. 55 Cfr. nn. 20, 27-28. 56 Si veda la discussione della “divinità” personale o di similitudine dell’imperatore in L.Van Hoof P. Van Nuffelen, Pseudo-Themistius, Pros basilea: a False Attribution, in “Byzantion, 81(2012), pp. 412-423.

89


Same Same but Different: Food in Ottoman Public Kitchens1 Amy Singer

Imarets (public kitchens) were one of the institutions commonly found in Ottoman mosque complexes established as philanthropic endowments by the wealthiest and most powerful members of Ottoman society. These complexes were often endowed as the religious, social and cultural anchor of new neighborhoods, and served the Ottomans as a means for developing and expanding existing urban spaces, or for establishing new ones. The largest foundations included multiple structures, providing spaces for prayer, education, hospitality, hygiene, and commerce. Smaller complexes copied the large ones, touching fewer people, less grandly and in fewer ways, but nonetheless proliferating this model of philanthropic activity in additional neighborhoods, provinces or towns. A large complex could comprise one or more of the following institutions: a mosque, the founder’s tomb, a madrasa (college), a mekteb (primary school), an imaret, a hospice facility, a bath house, a sufi tekke (lodge), a library, a hospital, or caravanserai. The public kitchen usually fed the staff of the complex, the teachers and students in its madrasa and mekteb, and others, like members of the tekke, and in addition, some number of transient guests and local indigents. Stepping back to appreciate the imarets in the broad perspective of Mediterranean history, we can place them 1

This research was supported by the Israel Science Foundation (Grant #657/07).

91


AMY SINGER

in several overlapping contexts. The most obvious is that of hospitality offered to travelers and strangers, as vividly depicted, for example, in the chronicles of travelers like the fourteenth-century Moroccan Ibn Battuta and the seventeenth-century Ottoman Evliya Çelebi. The history of changing Mediterranean hospitality practices has been carefully traced in the medieval period by Olivia Remie Constable in her book Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean World.2 Another context for understanding imarets is that of repeated injunctions to generosity and charitable giving in Islamic texts, particularly in the Qur’an and hadith, which prompted the founding of public social and cultural facilities throughout the chronological and physical span of the Islamic world.3 The public kitchens were not usually the most prominent structures in a complex, neither in their architectonic situation and investment nor in the traces they left in various types of chronicles. However, documentary evidence suggests that the sums expended on the provisions, equipment, and staff of these kitchens accounted for a major proportion of the annual expenditures of the complexes. The imarets thus deserve close attention as the object of philanthropic spending, signaling the importance attached to providing food and sustaining certain population groups. Moreover, the similarity of the menu to be served in kitchens across the empire signals that the entirety of the foundation and its functions intentionally projected a model of Ottoman uniformity with regard to notions of benefit and desert offered by the empire’s rulers to their subjects. Diet and nutrition affect physical and psychological health, directly influencing individual development, strength, cognitive abilities, emotions, productivity, Olivia Remie Constable, Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean 2 World: Lodging, Trade, and Travel in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Cambridge, U.K.: CUP, 2003). Amy Singer, Charity in Islamic Societies (Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge 3 University Press, 2008).

92


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

fertility, and longevity. Differences of diet among the richer and poorer in any society are also one of the most important markers of their respective status. What foods and how much of them people can afford to serve themselves or are able to acquire on a daily basis, and to offer their guests on festival and ceremonial occasions, are immediate signs of who they are – economically, socially, and culturally. The foods that figure in charitable distributions are also an indication of the aims of the donors and the potential impact of the donation, in both substantive and symbolic terms.4 The present article explores the variations apparent in Ottoman imarets, especially with respect to the food served or distributed in them, but also noting distinctions of service and treatment. It adds an additional perspective to the idea that philanthropic endeavors serve as a tool of imperial legitimation: the imperial complexes announced and demonstrated the power and wealth of the Ottoman dynasty. Yet the complexes were multi-purpose not only in their social and cultural services. They also served to define what was Ottoman and to spread particular aspects of Ottoman culture across the empire. Most of the current understanding about food in imarets is gleaned from the texts of the vakfiyes (endowment deeds) drawn up by their founders. Typically, these documents included at least a minimal description of the dishes that were to be prepared in the kitchen, a budget for the necessary ingredients and a list of the intended clientele. Soup or stew served with bread appeared most frequently on imaret menus throughout the Ottoman Empire, for all clients. The richer dishes of dane (a savory meat stew with rice) and zerde (a rice dish sweetened with honey and flavored with saffron) were widely stipulated for the menus of festival days such as Friday and Ramadan nights, and sometimes daily for See, for example, the frequent references to food in Nathalie Zemon 4 Davis, The Gift (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2000).

93


AMY SINGER

guests of a certain standing. Although it is difficult to calculate precisely, imarets seem to have been important agents in the daily sustenance of Ottoman urban populations. The historian Stephan Yerasimos estimated that around the year 1600, food and bread were distributed daily to approximately fifteen percent of the population of Istanbul, from imarets and other endowments in the city which fulfilled similar purposes.5 His calculation excluded people who lived and worked in the palaces and military personnel in the barracks. If fifteen percent was typical of Ottoman towns which had imarets, then, when the imarets and similar institutions functioned reasonably well, they played a significant role in sustaining and shaping Ottoman society, physically and socially.6 In ongoing research, mention has been found of more than 350 imarets in over 150 different locations around the empire, although they varied according to capacity and not all of them functioned simultaneously. Thus, it is worth exploring the uniformity and diversity of imaret menus and service even as defined normatively in the foundation deeds: to see how they articulated a scale of nutritional standards and sufficiency; to discover how they projected imperial beneficence and established a horizon of expectations among their clients; and to understand in what ways food and the circumstances of its distribution were used to establish and maintain social divisions. Although this discussion presents more of a static ideal than an analysis of one particular historical Stéphane Yerasimos, “Feeding the Hungry, Clothing the Naked: Food 5 and Clothing Endowments in Sixteenth-Century Istanbul”, in Feeding People, Feeding Power: Imarets in the Ottoman Empire, Nina Ergin, Christoph K. Neumann and Amy Singer (Istanbul: Eren Yayınları, 2007), 242. Haim Gerber has also discussed the relative importance of imarets 6 in providing daily sustenance, for which see H. Gerber, “The Waqf Institution in Early Ottoman Edirne”, Asian and African Studies 17 (1983):  29-45. His calculations, however, have been addressed in a carefully researched critique by Kayhan Orbay, for which see Kayhan Orbay, “Distributing Food, Bread and Cash: Vakıf Taamhoran and Fodulahoran Registers as Archival Sources for Imarets”, in Feeding People, Feeding Power,  193-95.

94


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

example, it nonetheless establishes a useful basis from which more micro-historical studies on any single imaret or group of imarets may be conducted. At the same time, the uniformities discovered among kitchens clarify the ideology that infused the establishment of imarets and shaped their prototype. Accounting for Food Somewhat surprisingly, Ottoman imarets as distant from each other as Istanbul and Jerusalem were meant to serve their clients much the same foods. This uniformity of planning not only suggests some model or archetype prevalent in the minds of the imaret founders but had immediate implications for the actual management of the kitchens. It also had consequences for the people who ate at imarets. At the same time, several points of diversity existed in imaret menus: between regular and festival dishes; between the dishes served to different clients of the same imaret; and, in their actual operations, between different imarets. Distinctions were also made regarding the amounts of food served to particular groups, the order in which they ate, and the manner in which they were served, including where they consumed their food.7 The vakfiyes for the imarets, together with the muhasebe defterleri (annual account books) compiled by the managers of individual imarets, chronicles, and travel accounts each provide perspectives on Ottoman philanthropic culture, and contribute to an appreciation of how food was employed in the service of empire.8 Even if prescriptive, the vakfiyes nonetheless offer important For a discussion of how menus varied on a “top-to-bottom scale”, 7 see: Amy Singer, “The 'Michelin Guide’ to Public Kitchens in the Ottoman Empire”, Princeton Papers. Interdisciplinary Guide Journal in Middle Eastern Studies 16 (2010): 69-92. More extensive discussions of sources for the study of imarets may be 8 found in Amy Singer, Constructing Ottoman Beneficence: An Imperial Soup Kitchen in Jerusalem (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002), 11-13, and in the various articles included in the edited collection Feeding People, Feeding Power.

95


AMY SINGER

information about the way basic diets were imagined and about the distinction between ordinary meals and the dishes served at festivals. They also reflect how diets were imagined to differ among people of varied social status and economic class, and so reveal another aspect of how status and class were visibly marked and reinforced in the Ottoman Empire. While the vakfiyes often described the components of each meal as well as the ingredients of specific dishes, the muhasebe defterleri did not usually record such detail. Their very existence gives us some idea of how seriously the Ottomans regarded the matter of managing their large foundations. Detailed annual registers of the complex revenues and expenditures usually included a section on the kitchen, recording how much of each commodity was stocked in the pantries of the imaret as a result of prior acquisitions, whether through purchase or gift/delivery in kind; how much was purchased; and how much used in preparing meals. Muhasebe defterleri are all about business, with almost no descriptive information, anecdotes or observations. They are useful when analyzed for the categories of accounting and when it is possible to use several registers in sequence. Occasionally, marginal or explanatory notes, for example on about the cost of replacing or repairing implements reveal details about how meals were prepared, served, and consumed, how foodstuffs were acquired and stored, and how kitchens were cleaned and maintained.9 Sometimes ingredients or personnel not listed in the original vakfiyes are mentioned in the muhasebe, such that, read in series, these registers may reflect historical changes in the institution and/ or Ottoman recording processes, and the institution’s See the study by Kayhan Orbay for a critical explanation and 9 evaluation of the accounts registers, in Kayhan Orbay, “Structure and Content of the Waqf Account Books as Sources for Ottoman Economic and Institutional History”, Turcica 39 (2007): 3-47. For a discussion of kitchen maintenance, see: Nina Ergin, “Taking Care of Imarets: Repairs and Renovations to the Atik Valide Imareti, Istanbul, Circa 1600-1700”, in Feeding People, Feeding Power,  151-67.

96


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

response to local and conjunctural conditions. Chronicles are more anecdotal in their records; where they record feasts and festivities, they contribute important and unanticipated detail to our study.10 Uniformity Within the complexes, the imarets had a particular role to play. Their proliferation in the Ottoman lands gave a particular, Ottoman expression to a much older practice – distributing food free of charge to defined sectors or groups in the population. The uniformity of dishes in imarets across the empire worked as an Ottomanizing mechanism. It confirmed “Ottomans” in their culinary habits, imposing a uniform as visible as clothing, speech or architectural design; the same uniformity also displayed and disseminated “Ottoman” cuisine among the provinces and peoples of the empire. Like any cultural mode – dress, language, or aesthetic design – the imperial culinary frame could also absorb and co-exist with local forms and practices. In this way, imperial forms were altered and adjusted to fit (better, if not perfectly) into local contexts. This is yet another part of the Ottomanization – localization paradigm that has been articulated so fruitfully, albeit for a different period, to analyze the dynamic interaction between imperial officials posted to the provinces and the local notables who were incorporated into the ranks of Ottoman officialdom, creating an Ottoman ruling class.11 10 See, for example, the “feast book” edited by Semih Tezcan as Bir Ziyafet Defteri (Istanbul: Simurg Yayıncılık, 1998). This is a prose account of the individual meals served at the circumcision celebration festival for the princes Bayezid and Cihangir, the sons of Sultan Süleyman I, in 1539. It offers an important opportunity to comparison meals to be served to varying ranks of individuals with those served in the imarets. 11 Ehud Toledano, "The Emergence of Ottoman-Local Elites (17001800): A Framework for Research”, in Middle Eastern Politics and Ideas: A History from Within, ed. I. Pappe and M. Ma'oz (London, 1997), 145-62; Jane Hathaway, The Politics of Households in Ottoman Egypt: The Rise of the Qazdaglıs (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1997). See also the discussion

97


AMY SINGER

More specifically, the uniformity in imarets disseminated a specific idea of the size and shape of a basic daily subsistence meal, at least as imagined by the Ottoman elites. They established a standard norm against which to judge the imarets themselves, as well as other hosts, whether private individuals or institutions (including sufi tekkes, janissary kitchens, and imperial palaces). The uniformity in imarets also created a certain level of expectation among their clients: about the contents of a “free meal” and about the basic remuneration and perks that accompanied certain kinds of jobs or positions. In contrast, the diversity in meals at the imarets signaled to the clients how their relative status was perceived by their Ottoman hosts, when compared with the other people served from the same source. As is familiar to those studying Ottoman history, the most typical dishes served in imarets were bread together with either bulgur soup in the evening or rice soup in the morning, fortified with fat and onions, sometimes meat, and flavored with pepper and vegetables. The vegetables depended on the season of the year and the location of the imaret. Additional ingredients – pulses, yogurt, herbs, and spices – might be taken from local suppliers, kitchen gardens or other nearby sources.12 Except during the month of Ramadan, rice soup was served at mid-morning and bulgur soup after the ikindi ('aṣr) prayer in the late afternoon.13 Based on information about the Istanbul imarets, Yerasimos has also calculated that, where it was prepared as intended, even one regular portion of the soup including a piece of meat and served together with bread, provided the of Ottomanization in Aleppo in: Heghnar Z. Watenpaugh, The Image of an Ottoman City: Imperial Architecture and Urban Experience in Aleppo in the 16th and 17th Centuries (Leiden: Brill, 2004). 12 Faroqhi, “Food for Feasts”, 118-119. 13 A basic description of imaret meals may be found in Amy Singer, Constructing Ottoman Beneficence: An Imperial Soup Kitchen in Jerusalem (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2002),  58-65.

98


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

daily calories sufficient to sustain an adult.14 On Friday evenings and festival days, the richer dishes of dane and zerde were served in imarets throughout the empire. These two dishes were iconic for Ottoman feasts of all kinds. The Ziyafet Defteri of 1539 described meals served to twelve different groups of people ranging from the sultan and his viziers to poor people (fukara ziyafetleri) and those serving at the feast and some of the palace retinue (düğüne hizmet ederler içün ve hüdema içün). Dane and zerde were on the menu at all of them.15 At the same festival, these two dishes were also among the 5000 bowls of food laid out for the çanak yağması, the traditional “plundering of dishes” by the janissaries.16 This food was a fixed ritual of the janissaries, described at different celebrations and feasts over the course of several hundred years. It was most regularly repeated at three-month intervals when the janissaries were admitted to the imperial palace, waiting in silence to receive their quarterly pay at an official ceremony. After being paid, they were offered dane and zerde on copper trays laid on the ground. Upon a signal, they dashed forward to “plunder” the trays in a dramatic performance, one that was repeated at imperial festivals like the circumcision celebrations of 1539 mentioned above. This spectacle acknowledged the sultan as the provider and the janissaries as his disciplined, aggressive and energetic fighting force.17 It also confirmed dane and zerde as symbols of the compact to sustain, on the one hand, and to obey, on the other. Similarly, the 14 Yerasimos, “Feeding the Hungry”, 242 n.8. 15 Tezcan, Bir Ziyafet Defteri,  8-21. Only at one of the feasts is zerde omitted, while dane is mentioned (the Kabak meydanında ḳoşı ziyafeti, p.17), though this is conceivably an unintentional omission from the list since it is such an exception when compared with the others. 16 Tezcan, Bir Ziyafet Defteri,  15-17. 17 Artun Ünsal, “The Symbolism of Food: Tokens of Political Power and Status, Legitimation and Obedience and Challenging Authority”, in Turkish Cuisine, ed. Arif Bilgin and Özge Samancı (Ankara: Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Culture and Tourism Publications, 2008),  190.

99


AMY SINGER

distribution and acceptance of food at imarets were acts symbolizing a contract between the sultan and different parts of the Ottoman populace. Altogether, the daily soups, the Friday stew and sweet desert, and bread, infused with imperial significance, were the “uniform” of Ottoman imarets, whether in Istanbul, Edirne, Damascus or Jerusalem. They were as predictable then as are pasta and espresso in Italy, cheese in France or a pint in an English pub in our own day. It is unclear where the Ottoman culinary “uniform” had its origins. We are accustomed to think of the imperial palace as the paradigm for household organization among Ottoman officials, so perhaps the same is true regarding the imarets. Evliya Çelebi lists the imperial palace first in enumerating the imarets of Istanbul, and the scholar Zeynep Ertuğ claims that the extensive deliveries of foodstuffs and cooked foods from the palace to the needy in the city suggest that it should be included in a discussion of imarets.18 The meals served to the general population in the palace and the daily visitors included the familiar elements of rice, meat and soup, served with bread. Zerde was also served frequently in the palace, cooked in the usual way but with the addition of ground hazelnuts and almonds.19 Meals at the palace were served twice a day, at midmorning and after the ikindi prayer, as in the imarets.20 Unlike the palaces and the festivals, however, which from the fifteenth century were located primarily in Istanbul and Edirne, imarets were spread around the 18 Evliya Çelebi, Evliya Çelebi Seyahatnamesi, 1. Kitap: Istanbul stanbul, prepared by Orhan Şaik Gökyay (Istanbul: Yapı Kredi Yayınları, 1996; revised 2006), 152(a): “imâret-i sarâ-i cedîd mâh [u] sâl bi'l-guduvvi ve'l-âsâl bay u gedâya ve hâs [u] âmma yevmiyye kerre niʿ meti mebzûldür.” Ertug emphasizes this in Zeynep Tarım Ertuğ, “The Ottoman Imperial Kitchens as Imarets”, in Feeding People, Feeding Power,  251-59. 19 Arif Bilgin, “Ottoman Palace Cuisine of the Classical Period”, in Turkish Cuisine, ed. Arif Bilgin and Özge Samancı (Ankara: Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Culture and Tourism Publications, 2008),  88. This version of zerde may have been a richer and more prestigious version of the usual dish. 20 Bilgin, “Ottoman Palace Cuisine”,  82, 87.

100


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

empire. The imperial festival banquets were lavish and public versions of the private palace habits, and part of the imarets’ role was to give people outside the palace walls and in the provinces a taste (literally) of life at the imperial center and at the social apex of the empire. From a contemporary perspective, the uniformity of meals may seem a monotonous routine for the mosque complex staff, the scholars, students and sufis who ate the same thing day after day. Yet a relatively simple and locally unvarying menu was probably a constant of life for the vast majority of people in the pre-modern world. Marginal variations reflected the change of seasons, and richer fare marked collective festivals and private celebrations. For travelers stopping briefly at imarets in the course of their business, the predictability of the meal they were served affirmed that they were “at home” somewhere in the empire, even if quite distant from their personal dwellings. For everyone, the uniformity reflected a measure of imperial stability and the financial health of the institution at which they were hosted. The capacity of an imaret, any imaret, to serve its clients the minimum expected was a public declaration that things were as they should be. Even at festivals there were no surprises when it came to the food, since specific foods helped to define the festivals themselves. The familiar dishes of dane and zerde provided another measure that life was continuing undisturbed and that Ottoman power was intact. Despite its empire-wide uniformity, the food at the imarets was unfamiliar to some Ottoman subjects. The vast geographic span of the empire encompassed numerous and only partially overlapping culinary cultures. For example, vakfiyes for imarets in the region of Damascus included explanations of the dishes with phrases like: “what the Rum call yahne” or “the sweet dish known as zerde.”21 For the local Damascenes who ate 21 “mā sammathu al-arwām yakhnī,” in Kitāb waqf Lālā Muṣṭafā Pasha, 221; “al-taām al-ḥulw al-ma'rūf bi-zarda,” in Arnāūṭ, Mu 'tiyyāt 'an Dimashq, 160, both cited

101


AMY SINGER

at imarets, the food there might not only be unfamiliar, but perhaps not immediately appealing, even if it was offered free of charge. For the philanthropic endeavors of the Ottomans to be effective and acquire meaning among their subject populations, they needed to resonate. As art historian Gülru Necipoğlu has discussed with respect to Ottoman aesthetic culture, Ottoman philanthropic endeavors, too, needed to be “readable”, comprehensible among their target populations in order to convey their intended messages.22 If necessary, literal translations were supplied or encouragement such as that expressed in the vakfiye phrase: “as it was established in other imarets and takiyyas.”23 Readability was one characteristic necessary for the successful communication of Ottoman beneficence in the different parts of the empire. Another was quality, equally important in Istanbul as in the provinces. Thus, if it reflected a genuine situation, the nauseating description of imaret soups in Istanbul penned by the Ottoman administrator Gelibolulu Mustafa Ali at the end of the sixteenth century would certainly have destroyed people’s appetites – bread black as earth, like a lump of clay; soup turned to dishwater – if not casting doubts on the quality of imperial philanthropy.24 Philanthropy could be a risky business. Having established a horizon of expectations among their clients, imarets that failed to deliver the usual fare might compromise far more than their own local reputations. in Astrid Meier, “For the Sake of God Alone? Food Distribution Policies, Takiyyas and Imarets in Early Ottoman Damascus”, in Feeding People, Feeding Power, 142-43. 22 Gülru Necipoğlu, “A Kânûn for the State, a Canon for the Arts: Conceptualizing the Classical Synthesis of Ottoman Arts and Architecture”, in Soliman le Magnifique et Son Temps, ed. Gilles Veinstein (Paris: La Documentation Française, 1992),  195-216. 23 Kitāb waqf Lālā Muṣṭafā Pasha, 221-2; Kitāb waqf Fāṭima Khātūn, 24-5; for Sinan Paşa's, see Arnāūṭ, Mu 'tiyyāt 'an Dimashq, 159. As cited in Meier, “For the Sake of God Alone?”  142-43. 24 Andreas Tietze, ed., trans., & notes, Muṣṭafā ʿĀlī's Counsel for Sultans of 1581, 2 vols (Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1979),  II:27, 144.

102


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

Diversity Although the basic daily and festival menus established a uniformity among the imarets, diversity and distinction were also integral features of these kitchens, mirroring the ways in which diversities and distinctions were integral to philanthropic endeavors more generally. Not only does philanthropy exist because of economic and social diversities, but recipients are assigned differential status, starting from complete exclusion and ranging along continuums of greater and lesser deservedness. In the imarets, these distinctions were reflected in what and how much people were served, where they were served, and the order in which they received food. The best-documented of the imarets were those that belonged to imperial foundations in major Ottoman cities. Their records describe a range of dishes served to clients whose status varied widely. As in many places, travelers arriving at the Fatih complex in Istanbul were meant to receive honey and bread at the imaret immediately upon their arrival, to revive them after their journey. In Edirne, at the imaret of Bayezid II, the charter mandated that guests be treated according to their status,25 and be received initially with sweets and jams and pickles as part of their welcome.26 The higher ranking guests might eat daily meals of dane and sometimes zerde. A meat stew (yahni) or a dish with plums and fresh fruits (ekşi aşı) might be served. In some places, visitors of exceptional status, like members of the aşraf (those claiming to be descended from the Prophet 25 “vaktâ ki ol menâzil-i sa ʿâdât ve mahâfil-i kavâfil-i berekâtın müsafirînden sâdât-ı saʿâdet-şiʿâr ve meşâyih-i dindâr ve ʿulemâ'-i nâmdâr ve ʿâmme-i fukarâdan sığar ve kibar her ne ki var şeref-i nüzûliyle müşerref olduklarından merâtiblü merâtibine göre her birine ikbâl-vâr filhâl istikbâl ideceğine beşâşetle mülâkat idüb” See: M. Tayyib Göbilgin, XV. ve XVI. asırlarda Edirne ve Paşa Livâsı: Vakıflar, Mülkler, Mukataalar, reprint, 2007 (Istanbul: Üçler Basımevi; İşaret Yayınları, 1952), 108-11 (vakfiye). “bilâ imhâl cümle'-i nâzilîne mâ-hazar hulviyyât ve reçaliyyât ve humûzâtdan bi-hasbi akdârihim ve ihtârihim riʿayet idüb.” See: Gökbilgin, Edirne ve Paşa Livası, 110–13 (vakfiye).

103


AMY SINGER

Muhammad), ate sheep’s trotters (paça) for breakfast as a great delicacy, as well as a dish made of pumpkin or squash, honey, jam, cinnamon and cloves.27 Guests worthy of respect and attention (müsâfirîn ve ezyâfin kadr-i ihtarı merʿî) at Bayezid II’s Edirne imaret had paça and seasonal fruits in the morning together with jams and pickles (reçaliyyât ve humûzât).28 As with other celebrations, festivals at imarets, including Friday nights, were celebrated by replacing the usual soups with dane and zerde. These two dishes were the Ottoman holiday uniform. Yet while they probably seemed standard to the vast majority of people who ate them, dane and zerde, too, had variants for the privileged. At the 1539 circumcision festival, the menus of the three meals that the sultan attended with different groups of officials each included several types of dane, with additions of noodles, herbs, spices or other vegetables (e.g. dane-i birinc, dane-i reştiyye, saru dane, yeşil dane, kızıl dane, dane-i şerʿiyye, dane-i nardeng, dane-i simid) and two kinds of zerde (regular and südlü, with milk).29 On the Muslim holidays as well as at special celebrations, the imaret might distribute additional dishes, like another kind of stew or an extra sweet. One of the most notable distinctions between the routine imaret food and the dishes served to special guests or on festivals was the change from soup. Soup is (almost) infinitely elastic because water can be added easily to make it serve more people, even at the expense of taste and nutritional value. The stews and pilavs, however, are less mutable in regard to the quantity one can produce from fixed inputs. They are also more 27 A. Süheyl Ünver, Fâtih Aşhânesi Tevzîʿnâmesi (Ankara: Istanbul Fethi Derneği Yayınları, 1953), 4. The Süleymaniye also offered better foods to its traveler-guests, matching what was on offer elsewhere. Kemal Edib Kürkçüoğlu, Süleymaniye Vakfiyesi (Ankara: Resimli Posta Matbaası, 1962),  43, 45: “sâyir amâyirde ne vech ile ziyafet ve ikram lunursa dahi ziyade edeler, noksân üzere etmeyeler ”. 28 Göbilgin, Edirne ve Paşa Livası (144). 29 Tezcan, Bir Ziyafet Defteri,  1217.

104


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

nutritious given a similar size portion. As far as we know (which is actually relatively little given the large number of imarets that existed), there were also imarets in which there was little distinction among the foods consumed by people of different status. In those places, everyone ate the same soup and bread. Yet there were other kinds of distinctions. The diversity of dining experiences in imarets could be marked not only by what people ate, but also by the size of the portions. This was particularly important among the regular clientele of the imarets where everyone received the same daily meals of soup and bread. Thus, in the Jerusalem imaret of Haseki Sultan, the staff had two loaves of bread and one ladle of soup per meal, with a piece of meat each on Fridays. The guests residing in the rooms had only one loaf of bread and a ladle of soup at each meal, with a piece of meat on Fridays. The majority of clients, called “poor and needy, weak and destitute,” had one loaf apiece per meal and a bowl of soup shared between two people, with a shared piece of meat on Fridays.30 In other imarets, children studying in the mekteb, or indigents admitted to eat, might share their portions.31 The distinction among diners was also marked by the place in which meals were served. Although a few refectory spaces survive, like that at the imaret of Bayezid II in Edirne, detailed first-hand descriptions of service in the refectory of an imaret are rare; Mustafa Ali’s caustic remarks about the din of utensils and voices is a notable exception.32 However, if soup was served to large groups in the copper bowls listed in some 30 Singer, Constructing Ottoman Beneficence, 61. 31 See the examples from the Takiyya al-Sulaymāniyya in Damasacus (Meier, “For the Sake of God Alone?” 130–31) or at the Atik Valide Sultan imaret in Üsküdar (Nina Cichocki [Ergin], “The Life Story of the Çemberlitaş Hamam: From Bath to Tourist Attraction,” Ph.D. dissertation [Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2005], see the translation of the vakfiye in the Appendix. 32 This building is part of the fifteenth-century complex containing a hospital, and which is easily visited today as a museum of Ottoman medical knowledge and practice.

105


AMY SINGER

vakfiyes, one can imagine that Mustafa Ali’s complaint was not groundless.33 Even where people ate outside in a courtyard, without a proper refectory and using simple earthenware bowls, the congregation and traffic of dozens or hundreds of people waiting for meals, then drinking down their soup and filling their stomachs with bread would have created a regular noise and congestion of movement. Some foundation deeds, probably drawing on the experiences of foundation managers, provided for wardens or doorkeepers to keep order, admonished to treat people as dictated by their status.34 In contrast, the Habsburg diplomat Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, writing in the mid-sixteenth century, described his meal at a “Turkish han” as being “as hospitable a reception as if it were a royal palace.” The food itself appeared on “an enormous wood tray as large as a table, in the middle of which was a dish of barley-porridge with a piece of meat in it. Round the dish were rolls of bread and sometimes a piece of honeycomb...”35 Although he does not say where, Busbecq received what seems like it might be a standard imaret meal for a person of some status, with the addition of a piece of honey, which was the usual arrival snack for travelers. Typically for ranking guests, he was seated at a table (or sofra), apart from the mass of clients – staff, students, teachers, and poor people. At Fatih and Süleymaniye, sofras were arranged in this way, and in Damascus, the people staying in the twelve guest rooms (aḍyāf al-musāfīrīn) were served in these rooms twice a day, with food laid out in every room on two round tables for five people each.36 Given the numerous injunctions to remove no food 33 Tietze, Muṣṭafā ʿĀlī’s Counsel for Sultans of 1581, II:27, 144. The Takiyya al-Salīmiyya in Damascus listed 200 copper soup bowls among its equipment. See Meier, “For the Sake of God Alone?” 126. 34 Göbilgin, Edirne ve Paşa Livası,  vakfiye 108-12, (A). 35 Edward Seymour Forster, trans., The Turkish Letters of Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Imperial Ambassador at Constantinople 1554-1562 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2005),  18. 36 Meier, “For the Sake of God Alone?” 130.

106


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

from the imaret, it seems clear that people mostly ate with a confined space of some sort. However, a further distinction exists in the shape and location of the spaces where meals were served. The indoor seating clearly implied by the rooms and refectories mentioned above can be compared with the few known miniatures depicting imarets, in which the scene suggests that some people ate outside, within the perimeter of the imaret courtyard or perhaps in the garden of the complex.37 Local climate as well as the seasons probably also affected the way meals were served and where they were eaten. The illustrations of feasts and banquets such as those in the Surnames emphasize another distinction in the way people were served, and reflect the social expectations regarding the eating habits of different classes. In virtually every imaret for which a description exists, the service of meals, whether soup or dane, is measured by portion into bowls for individuals or to be shared by two people. However, cooked foods for high-ranking people, like the meal served to Busbecq, arrived at the sofra in a single dish. The diners in these images are shown, each with his own spoon, eating from that one plate. In the act of consuming food, it was assumed that these people would behave with the decorum and self-control required to enable a group of adults to share out of a common dish. No such assumption existed for the larger groups of employees and students. The scene for them, although not illustrated as far as I have seen, perhaps resembled something closer to the dramatizations of Oliver Twist, with long refectory tables and individual bowls, or people seated on the ground in a wide yard. The chaotic “plundering of the dishes” by the janissaries represents a further version of how food proffered traveled from plates to people. Higher-ranking 37 See the painting from Seyyid Lokman’s Hünername of the imaret belonging to the complex of Sultan Süleyman I at Belen (Bakras), as reproduced in Gülru Necipoğlu, The Age of Sinan: Architectural Culture in the Ottoman Empire, photographs and drawings by Arben N. Arapi and Reha G nay (London: Reaktion Press, 2005), 73, fig. 44.

107


AMY SINGER

people did not need to be rationed by others, nor did they have to prove their loyalty in mock battle; they rationed themselves to such an extent that our sources also assumed food would remain in these common plates, sufficient to feed people of lesser status with a stipulated right to the leftovers. This practice was explicitly set down for the imperial palace in the kanunname of Mehmed II. The law code provided that the members of the divan eat in three distinct groups, and that for each group, there was a corresponding rank of lower officials, who would replace their superiors at the dish.38 The Ziyafet Defteri of 1539 emphasizes that the separation of people of different status while eating was completely normal, one of the basic markers of social rank. Thus the document itself describes a dozen different feasts, each served separately to a specifically defined group. Images of similar feasts from the Surname-i Humayun of 1582 and the Surname-i Vehbi of 1720 give a good sense of the way people of different rank might experience such a meal with the notables sitting comfortably in elegant surroundings, attended by servants. In the Ziyafet Defteri, the feasts for the poor (fukara ziyafetleri) were served from nine imarets in the old city and at Eyüp.39 Such a step took advantage of the experience and equipment of the imarets and their personnel, and it also pushed the poor at least a little distance away from the At Meydanı and the center of festivities. Excluded from the public banquets, women might be included in separate feasts organized for them at a different location.40 38 The grand vizier and head treasurer ate at a table separate from the viziers, other treasurers, and nişanci, and there was a third table for the kaziaskers. After these high officials finished eating, lower-ranking officials replaced them at the same tables and finished what was left over. See: Bilgin, “Ottoman Palace Cuisine”, 82. 39 Tezcan, Bir Ziyafet Defteri,  8-9. 40 See the example recorded for 1720 in Günay Kut, “Banquet Dinners at Festivities,” in Turkish Cuisine, ed. Arif Bilgin and Özge Samancı (Ankara: Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Culture and Tourism Publications, 2008), 108.

108


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

As a final distinction among the diners at imarets, one should mention the order in which people ate. This was also specified in some places, spelling out a hierarchy of status and rights to a meal. In more than one imaret, the indigents were listed last, and they were sometimes meant to be served only if food was left over.41 Yet it is worth remembering that even leftovers from an imaret might constitute a “royal feast� for some. The basic meals served in imarets may have exceeded the daily consumption levels of some urban residents who did not have the right to eat in them. The fact that access to imarets was restricted and controlled suggests that there were those who made do with even less. The social range of people who were judged to merit only soup and bread twice a day was not insignificant: there was no great difference between what was meant to be served to mosque employees, students, teachers, sufis and the deserving, privileged poor. The distinction probably lay more in the size of their portions and in how able they were to supplement from other sources the basic diet provided by the imaret. Conclusions The Ottoman imarets offer a rich venue for exploring not only the food itself, but the total dining experience in them, which worked to define and reinforce status distinctions among people in the Ottoman Empire. At the same time, imaret ideals and realities do not illustrate either the very bottom or the very top of Ottoman culinary hierarchy. The poor probably fared much worse while the wealthy ate far better: more regularly, and if not in larger quantities, then food of more exceptional quality, in greater comfort, with finer utensils and more elegant surroundings. Imarets, too, were not uniform in their 41 Singer, Constructing Ottoman Beneficence, 63-64.

109


AMY SINGER

circumstances, which resulted from poorer or richer endowments, more able or incompetent management, declines in income, or conjunctural misfortune. The uniformity offered in imarets meant people could largely predict what they would get to eat, when it would be served, and with whom they were likely to eat. Diversity meant that the status of individual diners could be signaled in various ways, including distinctions of food, portions and service. Local spices and seasonal foods distinguished one place from another, as did the arrangements for eating and service. The culinary character of Ottoman imarets in general may be understood in the larger framework of the canon of Ottoman culinary culture, symbolized among other things by the iconic chimneys of the Topkapı Palace kitchens and those of other imarets. Minarets announced the mosques as places of worship, refuge and study. The Tower of Justice (Adalet Kulesi) rose over the imperial divan, a reminder that the sultan was the paramount source of justice in his realms. As Hedda Reindl-Kiel has pointed out, the palace chimneys stood juxtaposed to the Adalet Kulesi as the most prominent vertical monuments in the palace. Like the aesthetic canon, the culinary canon was linked to Ottoman ideals of justice and the well-being of the Muslim community.42 For the historian, the imarets provide key insights into the nature of philanthropic endeavors and the way they might be used to reinforce not only the status of the founders, but the entire social hierarchy. At the same time, the existence of the imarets acknowledges the wisdom of the Turkish saying: “Biri yer biri bakar kıyamet ondan kopar.” (Literally: One person eats one person looks on, from this all hell breaks loose.) The Ottoman rulers and 42 Hedda Reindl-Kiel, “The Chickens of Paradise: Official Meals in the Mid-Seventeenth-Century Ottoman Palace,” in The Illuminated Table, the Properous House: Food and Shelter in Ottoman Material Culture, ed. Suraiya Faroqhi and Christoph K. Neumann (Würzburg: Ergon-Verlag, 2003), 59; Necipoğlu, “A Kânûn for the State, a Canon for the Arts.”

110


SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT

their wealthy officials had little choice but to ensure that key sectors of Ottoman society could eat as regularly as did their superiors, even if they ate differently.43

43 Compare with Adam Sabra’s descriptions of the joint effort by the Mamluk sultan and his commanders to distribute food during Egyptian famines. See: Adam Sabra, Poverty and charity in medieval Islam: Mamluk Egypt 1250–1517 (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

111


Instrumentalization of Pious Endowments for Influence and Control in the Ottoman Empire: The Case of Learning Institutions S. Sevda Kilicalp

Charity is rooted in the religious thought and teachings of the world’s three major monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. These three religions taught that poverty could not be eliminated; giving to the needy was a pious act. All faith-based communities shared basic assumptions and questions during the medieval and early modern periods. The major distinctions among these religions concerned who exactly was worthy of charity, who exactly was obligated to give, and what form of charity was to be given. Individuals and communities had to decide about the scope of their beneficence. Religious ideology guided the actions of benefactors but so did aspirations for power, prestige and consolidation of religious solidarity. Poverty studies have often focused on the necessity for poor relief but a few of them properly examined the identities and motives of the donors. It is important not to reduce charity to an activity of the elites but rather to understand what kind of society produced these elites and how they influenced the policies governing philanthropy. In the Ottoman Empire, charity and charitable institutions were oriented towards the scholars and mystics rather than the poor and that learning was used as an instrument for cultural and religious survival. To give a snapshot of these trends in the Ottoman Empire, I examine one main form of institutional charity –learning institutions– in the social

113


SEVDA KILICALP

context in which they took shape as well as the groups associated with these institutions–scholars and mystics–. Through an analysis of learning institutions, which were supported by pious endowments, I aim to address how the use of connections between philanthropy and helping the needy favored the elites of the time. In this analysis, I use Sandra Cavallo’s supply approach to study poverty and charity. Her book, Charity and Power in Early Modern Italy, is concerned with how changes in the social composition of donors and administrators affected policy towards the poor and with how shifts of motivations for becoming involved in charity affected social composition of those groups for which the relief was intended. Similarly, I examine the factors which motivated actions of the donors and which influenced the structure, and aims of their giving. Nevertheless, I focus on the effects of religion while Cavallo is chiefly interested in secular motivations for charity. I look at the religious meaning of charity as found in the Islamic traditions, the social and political consequences of almsgiving, and the impact of the institutional form of charity on regarding societies. The motives and attitudes of the donors and the categorization of the recipients are given a special consideration in the course of the examination. In the following sections, I firstly establish the identity of the individuals and groups who introduced, controlled and funded philanthropic institutions; and secondly examine those conflicts and social dynamics within the actors’ social and political milieus, thirdly discuss why learning/education became the principal focus of charitable giving in the Ottoman Empire, and finally address how the changes in the structure of government and consequent reforms in the waqf administration introduced new modes of organization of social and welfare services.

114


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

Introduction Influenced by the Turco-Mongol, Arab, and Byzantine practices, the Ottoman philanthropy was partly shaped by the Muslim teachings and traditions. Assistance to the poor is not an altruistic voluntary behavior but profound obligation within Islam. The injunctions of the Qur’an for all to give alms to the needy, provide for their own kin, and help their less-fortunate neighbors are institutionalized and deeply embedded in the ethical code of the Islamic societies. In an Islamic state, the well-being of the Muslim community as a whole is extremely important. The Ottomans, like other Islamic societies, followed these principles and their charitable acts were mostly motivated by religious commands to do good. Rather than solely relying on zakat (a form of obligatory alms-giving and religious tax in Islam; one of the Five Pillars of Islam) collection, the Ottomans had charitable institutions funded through waqfs (religious endowments) to serve as a safety net. Waqf, although not mentioned specifically in the Qur’an, is referred as sadaqa mawqufa (an endowed chartable act) in the early Muslim texts (Cizakca, 1998). Hence, by creating a system of pious endowments, the Ottomans established a connection to the Qur’anic injunctions regarding sadaqa. Born out of religious ideals of benevolence as mandated in Islam, the Ottoman philanthropic institutions often represented a particular response to a specific need. From the founding of the Ottoman state in the fourteenth century until the nineteenth century, waqfs had been the chief means of financing the institutions that cared for the poor. The waqfs sustained much voluntary charitable activity of the time and maintained a wide range of social and economic institutions, supporting education, health, welfare, public services, and public works. Religious notions of merit and need were not the mere sources informing the Ottoman philanthropy. 115


SEVDA KILICALP

Along with practices and texts of the Muslim mystics (Sufis) and teachings of scholars steeped in the Qur’anic interpretation and the legal treatises, the nature of Ottoman philanthropy was also shaped by cultural values and interaction with other civilizations. In addition, socioeconomic conditions and patterns of conflict and power were influential in determining where the benevolence should be directed and in which ways. What were the primary motives reinforcing such formal giving? Was it individual piety, social recognition, fiscal advantage, political profit or altruism or some weighted combination of two or more of these motives? To answer these questions, one needs to survey reciprocal gift relationships in a broader historical and political context. This paper focuses upon one sector of services provided by the waqfs that of education. It looks at the role played by the waqf in the area of education through the study of the nature and operation manner of two kinds of educational institutions, namely madrasa (college) and zawiya (sufi lodge). In this specific example, I inquire whether support for learning and social groups such as the Sufis and the ulama were given preference over alleviation of poverty and provision of welfare services. Identity of the Elites The Ottomans, who came to power at the beginning of the fourteenth century, embodied two imperial heritages, Seljuk and Byzantine (Inalcik, 1980). The Byzantine Empire, in certain periods, maintained property at the expense of great landowners (Horden & Purcell, 2000). The Ottoman rulers adopted this paternalistic policy and just like their predecessors, utilized various legal, political, financial, and other types of institutions to build the foundations of their authority (CoĹ&#x;gel, Ahmed & Miceli, 2007). Their strong government became one of the well-known features of the empire. Mardin (1969) 116


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

asserts that the Ottoman polity was largely characterized by patrimonial bureaucracy, even greater than one can find in the medieval societies of the West. The sultan was the capstone of the system while his service elite was responsible for keeping under control any potential sources of opposition that appeared outside the boundaries of the legitimate power structure. Mardin (1969) defines the ruling stratum as “a class of slaveadministrators” (p. 259). İnalcık (1994) describes the position of the ruling class as such: Ottoman society was divided into two major classes. The first one, called askeri, literally the ‘military’, included those to whom the Sultan had delegated religious or executive power through an imperial diploma, namely officers of the court and the army, civil servants, and ulama [Doctors of Islamic law]. The second included the reaya, comprising all Muslim and non-Muslim subjects who paid taxes but had no part in the government. It was a fundamental rule of the Empire to exclude its subjects from the privileges of the ‘military’. Only those who were actual fighters on the frontiers and those who had entered the ulama class after a regular course of study in a religious seminary could obtain the Sultan’s diploma and thus become members of the ‘military’ class. (p. 44)

According to this description, the Ottoman society is ideally divided into two main segments: the sultan and his administrative servants (askeri) on the one hand, and the sultan’s subjects (reaya) on the other hand. In this picture portrayed by İnalcık, there is no room for intermediaries or feudal jurisdictions intervening between the sultan and the peasants. By contrast, Faroqhi (1984) argues that the Ottoman social formation was feudal, showing tax farming, the operation of political patronage and the activity of guilds as evidence. Heper (1980) defines the Ottoman centuries extending from the sixteenth to the nineteenth as a “progressive development from a

117


SEVDA KILICALP

centralized to a quasi-feudal polity� (p. 81). Rooted in the Islamic tradition, the Ottoman state was controlling economic life and the ruler was personally responsible for the welfare of his subjects. Unlike the Western system of economy, the state gave more support to artisans than merchants and denied corporate personality and independent government to towns. This, in return, hindered the growth of mercantile capital and the development of intermediary corporate citizens with legal standing and rights (Sunar, 1973). A disproportionate amount of private wealth was directed towards charity rather than toward commercial or mercantile investment. When the Ottoman administration was first established in Anatolia, all agricultural land passed to the ownership of the state. Then the land was assigned as timars (fiefs) to the timarli sipahis (cavalrymen). The timar-holders were not legal owners of their fiefs. They were entitled to collect taxes in the localities on behalf of the state in return for providing military services and securing the people in their timar (Heper, 1985). They did not have extensive political-territorial right. They only enjoyed the economic facilities and opportunities provided by the rulers. The state did not grant autonomous powers to the local lords and the sultans exercised a strict control over them. The reaya were ordered to pay the taxes demanded by bureaucrats as well as by local lords without opposition. The Ottoman sultans positioned themselves as the ultimate protector of the subjects against any local mismanagement. In this manner, the sultans were aiming to gain the loyalty of peasants and to obtain revenues in a consistent manner (Karpat, 1977). When the subjects appealed to the sultan to report exploitation by these elites, the sultan could intervene (Khoury, 2006). Hence, the power of local elites was circumscribed by the prerogatives of the sultan. The state used the legal community (ulama) to 118


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

legitimize and facilitate efficient collection of taxes. Ulama helped the state lower the cost of collecting taxes and maximize tax revenues by drafting law codes (kanunnāme) for newly conquered lands or new regulations for the existing tax payers. This was a give-and take situation in which the sultan was protecting the ulama and giving them a privileged status in the society while the ulama were legitimizing the sultan’s right to rule as explained by Coşgel, Ahmed and Miceli (2007): As was the case under the Ottomans, the rulers could exert control indirectly by paying the salaries of the legal community and granting tax exemptions to preferred activities, or directly by taking charge of their appointment and promotion decisions. These mechanisms could ensure an alignment between the interests of the ruler and the legal community and allow the ruler to tailor legal goods and services to his own objectives. Expenditures on these mechanisms constituted investment contributions in legitimacy toward ensuring the continuity of their returns. (p. 30)

The ulama were responsible for backing the sacred law as well as standardizing conventional systems of education, interpretation, and adjudication to ensure the transmission of skills and knowledge between generations and across regions. But their most critical task was giving legitimacy to the regime by building a moral and religious link between the sultan and his subjects (Armstrong, 2000). The Ottoman rulers ensured that the power the ulama derived from its monopoly in knowledge, education, and administration of the law actually belonged the sultan. By incorporating the ulama into the state bureaucracy, the Ottoman rulers made the ulama dependent upon them for support; hence they could oblige the ulama to apply the law according to their directives and avoid any significant legal constraints in seizing a surplus from their subjects. 119


SEVDA KILICALP

The ulama remained as a privileged social caste until the modernizing reforms of the nineteenth century. They were regarded as exemplars of faith and pious tradition. The legal personnel were trained in madrasas (colleges) starting from the sixteenth century. The müderrises (teachers) instructed future generations of the ulama. The Ottoman kadis (jurists) and muftis (jurist consults) were responsible for dispensing justice in the courts. Şeyhülislam formed the head of jurists and statesmanadministrator. The sultan appointed and dismissed the şeyhülislam who gave voice to the holy law. The sultan was subject to the law’s provision but it was not always easy to balance between the theoretical supremacy of law and the sultan’s authority over the law’s practitioners (Zilfi, 2006). The Ottoman religious institution (ilmiye) was an elite career, a coveted profession and status. Until the sixteenth century, people from all classes could enter into endowed schools and get their studies subsidized though the support of a patron. After that time, entry to madrasas or to the learned profession became overwhelmingly reliant on family ties. The domination of chief posts by a small number of important ulama families from Sultan Ahmed III’s accession in 1703 to the death of Mahmud II in 1839, was an evidence of the ulama’s transformation of professional status into patrimony (Zilfi, 1983). The ulama benefited from the waqfs as trustees and managers and therefore were concerned with its development and continuity. The ulama opposed to the state because of the centralization reforms in the nineteenth century, confronting to the growing accusations towards the waqf system that it had no religious basis and was harmful to the national economy (Çizakça, 2000a; Baer, 1969). The ulama positioned itself as the protector of waqf system, acknowledging the importance of waqf system for education, health, and poverty alleviation and resisting to the rulers’ attempt to nationalization and usurp of waqf revenues (Çizakça, 120


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

2000a; Yediyıldız, 1986). Sufis were the alternative powerful groups outside of the state elites. They came both from the upper class and lower orders of society. Through their devotional and ascetic practices, as well as through love and knowledge of God, Sufis tried to get closer to God. This path to approach God is called tariqa (Shulman & Stroumsa, 2002). The need of a guide along the path had long being acknowledged in Sufi circles. With the increased focus on distinctions between disciples and teachers, authoritative figures like masters (shaykh), elders (pir) or guides (murshid) emerged (Ephrat, 2008). Sufi masters supervised the moral behavior of their disciples by setting a role model of piety and moral rightness (Ernst, 2002). Sufi congregations started to center around one shaykh and developed into major fraternities (tariqas). Many Ottoman Sufis belonged to such established Sufi orders (Faroqhi, 2005). Sufis incorporated the traditions of the places they lived into the Sufism (tasawwuf). In this way, diverse Sufi traditions emerged according to geographical and historical settings. In Anatolia, Mevleviye and Bektaşiye tariqas showed patterns of heterodoxy (fusion of religious law with mystic insight) while Nakşibendiye tariqa stuck to strict religious law which was more common among the ulema. The Ottoman rulers sought to regulate internal affairs of each of these Sufi orders. By the sixteenth century, the state had established elaborate bureaucratic hierarchies that dispended funds and land revenue to the Sufi lodges while they appointed heads of each convent. Sufi institutions were exempted from ordinary taxes on the condition that the followers of the tariqa pray for the welfare of the rulers. There existed some chance for the Sufi masters to enter the elite ranks but mostly Sufis served in the empire as wayfarers, mediators and mystic leaders. From the beginning, Islam spread among the Turks through two channels: one was among urban, literate, elite populations, and the other was among rural and 121


SEVDA KILICALP

nomadic populations. Sufis played an important role in the process of colonization of newly conquered lands in the early periods of the Ottoman State and spreading Islam among nomadic populations (Barkan, 1942; Köprülü 1993). In return for their success in territorial control, the sultan gave a significant part of new lands to Sufis as waqf endowments. In the waqf lands, Sufis soon founded religious hospices (tekkes and zawiyas), where they fulfilled many social, economic, and cultural functions along with religious ones. Zawiyas rapidly became religious, cultural, and economic centers. Many villages were born around Sufi zawiyas, which were established on previously abandoned lands. For instance, although Bektashi saint Hacı Bektaş’ lodge was located far from urban settlements, the members of the Ottoman elite sought it out to gain his blessing and guidance (Fleischer, 1986). The Sufis long served as mediators between the state and rural population and contributed to the spread of Islam and consolidation of Ottoman rule (Deweese, 1994). Recognition of the Sufi orders meant a legitimization for the newly established Ottoman rule. Sufis also praised poverty and urged support for the poor (Livne-Kafri, 1996). In the absence of church and clergy as they are found in a Christian society, in Islam, the state, individuals and their fraternities became the sole agents of charity (Lev, 2007). While the bureaucracy was highly centralized in the Ottoman Empire, the distribution of services was not bureaucratized, systematic or impersonal. Even the donations of sultans were not considered state giving. They were expected to give because of their wealth and rank. Patterns of Power and of Conflict The conflict between the religious and secular leadership reflected itself through the continuous efforts of the state 122


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

to limit the ulama’s capacity for independent action on the one hand and religious institutions’ fight for a greater autonomy on the other hand. This battle was ultimately for power. In the founding years, the ulama were seeking to play leadership roles to create a religious orthodoxy. The ulama were perceived as the most esteemed members of society by the general public and long admired by the sultans. However, by the mid-sixteenth century, the Ottoman state started centralizing the ulama recruitment and functions; in response, from the seventeenth century, the ulama had to compete with other elite sectors and among themselves to hold offices and became “blind careerist[s], pursing office more than learning” (Zilfi, 2006, p. 211). Cultural conflicts were far more profound than one would expect to find in so-called ‘classless” Ottoman society. Some historians used dual model of analysis to explain cultural conflicts (Mardin, 1969; Heper, 1980; Faroqhi, 2005). Mardin (1969) labels two opposing cultural units as “palace” and “rural” culture. Others named the very same cultural dichotomy as high and folk cultures. The high culture was associated with Muslim identity, classical education and fluency in the Persian language. From the fifteenth century onwards, the Anatolian aristocratic families’ sponsorship for architectural works and literature was cut off by the state while sultan and high state officials became primary patrons of the high culture. The culture of all other individuals and groups living in the rural area was considered as a folk culture, which was dependent on oral transmission. The leaders of the nomadic groups made it clear that their outlook on certain matters was different from the high culture and showed no willingness to integrate into the culture developed in the Ottoman cities. It is not always easy to determine when or why the kind of antagonism gives way to a particular conflict. Faroqhi (2005) reminds us that even in a pre-industrial society like the Ottoman, there existed class conflicts, but adds that “conflicts between 123


SEVDA KILICALP

nomads and sedentary farmers or between demobilized soldiers and villagers were more conspicuous than those between rich and poor” (p. 13). This does not mean that rich-poor tension did not exist only that they are less visible in surviving documents. One can also discuss the tension between Sufis and the ulama. Lewis (1993) presents two kinds of exponents of Islam, one of which is the ulama, “the upholders of orthodoxy and authority, of dogma and law”; the other is the Sufis “preserving local traditions of popular religion and religiosity” (p. 4). These groups were sometimes in conflict because of their submission to political authority and their different approaches to the religion. The ulama actively supported the political authority while Sufis were passive and usually critical of it. Governments treated the Sufis with mistrust because of their “powerful pent up emotions and energies which could control or release” (Lewis, 1993, p. 4). Until the sixteenth century, Sufis led ascetic lives which challenged the practice of ordinary townspeople in general and the ulama in particular. They spread Islam through preaching, their spiritual example and their presence. Because of their closeness to potential converts, the Sufis were more successful in spreading Islam than the ulama who were based in the towns. In the first centuries of the Ottoman power, the sultan tolerated and sometimes even patronized the Sufis. The Sultans made land grants to the shayhks to fund zawiyas which created Turkish rural settlements in the conquered lands (İnalcık, 1994). Since every Sufi lodge was dispersed locally and not connected to any another, many cultural differences existed within the Sufi order itself as well as in relation to Sunni Islam. This locality stimulated the heterodoxy in religious practices of many nomadic Turkmen groups who stuck to their pre-Islamic beliefs and showed more interest in zawiyas than mosques in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries (Köprülü, 1966). When the Ottoman state’s priority was expanding 124


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

its borders at the expense of its Christian neighbors, the sultans tolerated the heterodoxy of the Sufi shaykhs who fought at the frontiers along with their nomadic followers. However, as Akin (1995) points out, after the wars against Shiite Safavids, governor’s approach to the heterodox Sufis changed. The Ottoman sultans saw themselves more and more as the defenders of Sunni Islam, which was represented by the ulama. Sufis who did not adhere to the religious law and conventions of urban society were brutally repressed (Faroqhi, 2005). Akin (1995) explains the reasons behind this sectarian clash: The Babai revolt which started in 1239 and rapidly spread throughout the Turkmen of Anatolia shook the Seljuq state. The Celali revolts which started in 1519 and involved the same groups caused difficulties for the Ottomans for a long time. The Ottoman-Safavid conflict, which also generated considerable political tension in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, was related to the Turkmen who immigrated to Iran from Anatolia in large groups and no longer felt committed to the Ottomans. These conflicts between the state and the Turkmen in Anatolia during the Seljuq and Ottoman periods can be related to administrative mechanisms which inevitably drifted away from the traditional values that continued to keep the Turkmen together. There were material reasons, such as taxes and the distribution of land at the source of the reaction of the Turkmen towards the state, but the fact that the central authority increasingly identified itself with orthodox Islam must also have played a role. This orthodox-heterodox conflict can be traced even to the hostility of the western Anatolia Tahtacls (who descended from the Turkmen) towards Sunni Islam and the state up to as recently as the beginning of this century. (p. 67-68)

The nature of relations between the state and the Sufi orders did not become completely hostile. The state elites’ support for the zawiyas continued in order to gain the 125


SEVDA KILICALP

sympathy of the heterodox groups and to use zawiya shaykhs as catalysts directing nomads toward Sunni Islam (Barkan, 1942). Sufis differ from the ulama in many aspects. They made charitable practice more altruistic by giving away all of their material possessions in the quest for spiritual wealth, believing that material poverty and even the humiliation of begging were a necessary experience on the path to achieve a closer understanding of God. Sharing food with those who had none was a standard recommendation in the exemplary lives of Sufis. Singer (2008) points out how Sufis were actors of giving both as both recipients and benefactors: Charity played a central role in the lives of Muslim saints and sufis because it was a means to approach God, which was their chief goal, even in Paradise. One of the obligations of the sufis is to give alms and charity, and God is said to be present in every such act. Wealth is seen as a test for the sufi murid, the one seeks God, and the sufi is supposed to resist the lure of wealth and the temptations it brings. Poverty has long been associated with the sufis such that the Arabic word “faqir” refers both to sufis and to the indigent people, sometimes distinguishably. Beneficent giving was the immediate cause of sufi poverty in many cases, since people who became sufis often gave away their possessions and chose material poverty in pursuit of spiritual wealth. (p. 141)

Many Sufis cared for the needy and the poor, combining ascetic piety with the service to others. Ephrat (2008) explains how the principle of service was central to their acts of piety: Deeply entrenched in the Sufi tradition, the maxim of service to others led to fraternal love, which became a prime aspect among the Sufis of a specific group. Caring for one’s compassions, preferring them to oneself and giving up prestige for the sake of one’s fellows was one

126


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

of the main rules for the Sufi, and it was applicable throughout his lifetime. “Whoever excuses himself from service to his brethren, God will give him a humiliation from which cannot be rescued,” asserts one tradition, and “if you cannot serve properly your human companion, how could you serve God?” demands another. To do good for his brethren, the Sufi should even disregard his religious principles. He should interrupt his fasting if he sees a member of his community who needs or wants food, since the joy of a brethren’s hearth is more valuable than the reward of fasting. (p. 102-3)

Sufis have established themselves in written sources and popular imagination alike as models of both charitable generosity and poverty. Their lives were written into bibliographies to illustrate what was expected of people and perhaps to inspire generous acts of charity even if people could not fully emulate them. On the contrary, the ulama took different positions regarding the relative merits of donors and beneficiaries in the gesture. They were able to influence organization and collection of charity while they secured changes to their own advantage. The jurists issued fatwas to respond specific legal queries on zakat calculation and payment or to remind to pay zakat according to the political concerns of the day (Humphreys, 1991). Moreover, while the ulama acted as arbiters of religious knowledge and practice within an established school, Sufis integrated Sufi norms and values into the fabric of social and communal life by practicing their virtues within the society. Despite the prestige assigned to the ulama, considering their fragile status in the social network, Brown (2005) argues that the ulama found themselves in a position similar to that of the poor who were in danger of being forgotten, and they often proved to be most articulate in pressing the claims of the poor. Brown (2005) points out how the ulama, like rabbis and clergymen in earlier societies, undertook guardianship of sacred scriptures 127


SEVDA KILICALP

that enjoined compassion for the poor and promised future rewards for it: The poor scholars of Islamic law who were assured of their place in the imarets of the Ottoman Empire could claim to be necessary persons. They lived in a society that valued them as judges, legal experts, teachers, and preachers. But, given the vagaries of the patronage systems that controlled their employment, none of them was assured of being remembered as necessary to anybody in particular. Such scholars might not have had to face the utter destitution of the poor, but their position in the social network was fragile in the extreme. At any time, they might feel the cold chill of “forgetfulness” by the great. Hence, they needed to subject the great to a moral pedagogy that encouraged them to remember the forgettable, whether the poor or themselves. (p. 522)

The ulama who provided services at madrasa and were employed in the establishments maintained by the waqfs received their salaries from these institutions. The ulama’s call for “remembering the poor” and undertaking the task of protecting the interests of waqfs might originate from their dependency on this system. Learning As A Core Form of Worship and Charity Learning has a paramount importance in Islam. The Qur’an puts a strong emphasis on the value of knowledge, placing learning as the highest form of religious activity for Muslims. When the Qur’an began to be revealed, the first word of its first verse was “read”. Qur’an 96: 1-5 exhorts: “Read! In the name of your Lord who has created (all that exists). He has created man from a clot (a piece of thick coagulated blood). Read! And your Lord is the most generous who has taught (the writing) by the pen. He has taught man that which he knew not.” Learning is thus considered as the starting point of every human activity. The duty to acquire

128


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

knowledge comes before than pray so as to ensure the correct performance of religious ritual. Knowledge of the oneness of God must be combined with faith and total commitment to him. According to Islamic principles, one can become truly a Muslim through knowing the meaning of Islam rather than through birth. Muslims believe that God is all-knowing and the human world’s quest for knowledge leads to further knowing of God. The Islamic law covers most facets of life as Judaism. Therefore, the necessity to learn is not limited to acquire knowledge about God’s laws but also includes going beyond imperfect human knowledge through constant exploration, research and experimentation. Qur’an repeatedly invites people to use their wisdom to ponder, to think and to know and discover the truth. Knowledge is attributed so much value not because of its own sake but because of the assumption that correct action comes with correct knowledge which brings believers closer to God. Knowledge is required to be linked with values and goals. A learned person is expected to use knowledge in a good way and to spread freedom and dignity, truth and justice. Hence, the practice of knowledge is connected with ethics and morality – with promoting virtue and combating vice, enjoining right and forbidding wrong. Muslim scholars used the texts written by the great scholars of the Islamic middle ages (the first five Muslim centuries) and sometimes interpreted differently the core of the Islamic knowledge. The values of Muslim society and social interpretation of the Qur’anic teachings determined the way knowledge is preserved in their generation and transmitting it to the next. Learning and knowledge were central in the Ottoman society, too. Ottomans gave a special importance to education. There were primary schools called maktab, devoted mostly to teaching boys the Qur’an and generally attached to a mosque. Madrasas were for college education. Schools were charitable foundations 129


SEVDA KILICALP

supported through the through the waqf system. Within the body of educational institutions, benevolence and learning came together and gained fundamental value. The madrasas evolved in the eleventh century as a combination of the mosque, which has always been the center of Islamic education and khan which provided housing for students and teachers. The Madrasas sustained both spiritual and intellectual aspects of the Ottoman Muslim society. In the madrasas, classical Islamic theology was taught by sunni ulama. The madrasas provided teachers and students both a place to study and to live (Makdisi, 1981). Waqf financing of education usually covered expenses of libraries, salaries of teachers and custodial staff, stipends to students, building maintenance. Evliya Çelebi (c. 1611 – after 1683) (1968), author of the ten volumes narratives of the time, describes Aya Sofia Madrasa and addresses how different fields of charity i.e. education, feeding and medical care were linked to together with the establishment of charitable institutions near to one another: The first college founded at Constantinople after its conquest by Sultan Mohammed was that of Aya Sofia, the next was the foundation of the eight colleges o the rright and lefti that is, on the north and south of Sultan Muhammad’s mosque; these eight colleges may be compared to eight regions of Paradise. The Sultan also founded a school for the reading of the Koran on a spot adjoining the college [madrasa], and on the east a hospital for the poor. This hospital is a model for all such foundations. On the north and south of the eight colleges are the cells of the students (sokhte), three hundred and sixty-six in number, each inhabited by three or four students, who receive their provisions and candles from the trust (waqf). There is also conservatory (dar-uz-ziafat), and a kitchen lighted by seventy cupolas, which may be compared to the kitchen of Kaikaus, where the poor are fed twice a day. Near this refectory there

130


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

is caravanserai, and a large capable of holding three thousand horses and mules. (p. 171)

The building of a madrasa was also accompanied with shops and markets which were part of the waqf. These constructions both contributed to the town’s economic infrastructure, as well as financed the salaries of the madrasas’ staff and operational costs (Hoexter, 2003). Zawiyas were one of the prime establishments for dissemination of knowledge and Sufi guidance. The zawiya was also a place for Sufis to live and study, though more closely identified with particular Sufi shaykhs and their families and with performance of the dhikr (the ritual “remembering” of God) through recitation of the names of God. Thanks to this institutional form, the loose Sufi associations left their place to an organized system of affiliation, instruction and ritual (Ephrat, 2008). Thus, zawiyas followed the example of madrasas which helped crystallization of the legal schools as scholar and communal organizations according to a commonly accepted narrative (Lapidus, 1988). Waqf provided the financial basis for institutionalized educational life in these lodges but also the monthly stipends and life expenses of the Sufis were covered by the waqf resources. Often a private benefactor or well-off Sufi founded a zawiya and granted to a particular shaykh and his family. Endowment charters of the lodges indicate that the founders wanted to make sure that the endowment would be used for safeguarding Sufism and promoting their image as their supporters. Sufi lodges served the needs of individuals and groups devoted to a particular shaykhs. Were these institutions exclusively designated for the Sufis or were they also offered other charitable services? Lev (2005) gives a vague answer to this question: Our efforts to make a clear distinction between the services rendered by these institutions to the mystics

131


SEVDA KILICALP

and other charitable functions is really misplaced. From the point of view of a medieval Muslim, both donor and recipient, each institution, whatever its precise designation and function, was a charity. This was the rational of waqf institution, and mystics deserved charity just as much as the poor, if not more. (p. 118)

But why education was principal focus of charitable giving in the Ottoman Empire? There might be several reasons for donors to support education. Lev (2005) argues that the medieval Islamic charity is oriented towards the scholar and mystic and the charitable institutions were identified with them rather than the poor since learning was an instrument for cultural and religious survival. Through teaching Qur’an to Muslim children, the Ottomans may seek to facilitate the transmission of religious knowledge essential to upholding the integrity of the Islamic community (Berkey, 1992). According to Singer (2008), financing the educational system was in the interest of people with money and power because the education promoted the existing power relationships. Although madrasas constituted an exceptional example of using charity to train people for profession and thus to enable them to provide for themselves in the future, the entry to these places became increasingly restricted to the established scholarly families (Zilfi, 1989). Singer (2008) states “It was the philanthropic apparatus sustaining the educational system that funded the privileged and exclusionary policies of these families” (p. 168) Furthermore, instead of financing madrasas, donors could support mosques (another form of charitable trust giving basic religious education) but the legal status of the mosque did not allow the donor to have control over it. On the contrary, the founder of a madrasa could reserve to himself the administration of his trust during his lifetime. Hence, the founder could protect his property against confiscation and secure his family’s welfare. Moreover the founder was

132


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

allowed both to administer his trust and appoint himself to the teaching post, thus to receive a compensation for his services. Benefactors’ support for their institutions might be also driven by a desire to seek salvation because religious learning is central in Islam and regarded as a form of worship. Reinforcing the elite position, gaining legitimacy in society and getting control over the ulama or the Sufis through patronage might be among the other motives for donors to finance such a system. Changing Definitions of the Deserving Poor and Charity Crisis Examination of the ultimate beneficiaries reveals the values of the society and which institutions and causes were regarded as worthy. Charities of the Ottoman state elites and the civilians were not merely directed to the poor, the needy and the sick but also to the scholars and mystics. Hoexter (2003) argues that a distinction between deserving and undeserving is made with the initiation of specific poor relief efforts: With the proliferation of endowments, the understanding of who came under the category of “poor” developed in two main directions: First, diversification of the definition of poor, that is allotment of the proceeds of an endowment to specific groups of poor o needy people; and second, broadening of the definition of poor to include as beneficiaries people who were not necessarily poor insofar as their material situation was concerned. (p. 148-9)

In Ottoman charity, we observe representation of both the ideal and the broader designation of the poor. Firstly, the Muslim Ottomans, like any other Islamic communities, followed the Qur’anic imperatives to care for the poor and idealized the poor for their charitable works in order to get closer to God. Furthermore, inclusion of the poor 133


SEVDA KILICALP

as the ultimate beneficiary of the waqf would give the founder a ground for perpetuity --a legitimization for the continuity of waqf activities-- which in turn provided the founder with eternal rewards for his good deeds, as well as permanent financial security for his family. Moreover, economic need was not the only and yet primary criterion for identification of the recipients. Rather the social classification i.e. scholars, students, mosque employees, travelers and Sufis might be considered for distribution of assistance. Donor’s attachment to these solidarity groups was influential. Hence, in the second development, the category of poor was extended to include men of religion who were not necessarily poor. In the founding years of the Ottoman Empire, the waqfs were not designed to provide salaries for the personnel rather the funds were to be used for the maintenance of the building. According to the ulama, the poor and the needy were legitimate beneficiaries. By the time, men of religion became the most frequent beneficiaries of waqfs. The ulama found a legal justification for approving men of religion as valid beneficiaries of the waqfs: they could be designated into the specific group of poor people (fuqara) because their mission of dealing with religious knowledge avoided them from earning and the poverty is the norm among them (Al-Qardawi, 1999). Especially Sufis were widely seen as the worthy object of the charity. The word “fuqara” became associated with them. The donations that they received were small but they gave continuously what they had to help others. Nevertheless, some Sufis totally refused poverty and adopted aesthetic lives and preferred begging to comfortable Sufi lodges. Frequent appearance of “Fuqara” in the Ottoman sources testifies to the increasing presence and role that Sufis played in contemporary society. The Sufis attracted growing support from the rulers in the form of charities, entitlement to payments of zakat, and the establishment of pious endowment for them, thus competing successfully with the jurists for the patronage 134


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

of the rulers and the allocation of economic resources Roded’s (1990) study on the identification of the most frequently cited objects of charitable endowments from a listing of 1484 waqfs, either established in Aleppo during the Ottoman period or brought under the supervision of the local government department of waqfs shows that the most popular beneficiaries of endowments were local zawiyas and neighborhood mosques. Roded also reports that major donors, who were usually government officials or wealthy notables, tended to appoint their descendants to manage their charitable endowments. Although we do not have a larger study at imperial level, we can assume that the situation throughout the country was similar. But, did the poor benefit enough from these charitable institutions? Did absence of uniform criteria on an assessment of economic need create an obstacle for the poor to have access to the services? Did they have primacy in the distribution of relief? From the history, we know that not all charitable institutions were available to everyone. Public utilities, such as fountains and bridges, were supported by waqfs for the benefit of whole public whereas some institutions provided services for certain groups of people. Although some services and good were available to the poor, they were not always in the privileged position. Singer (2008) gives an example to the conditions in which the poor were provided with a charitable service: Different kinds of institutions –zawiyas, mosquea, carvansarays – offered a place to sleep and shelter to travelers (and their animals) for the night. Many of the working poor, especially doorkeepers and custodians, may have found a sheltered spot at their place of work. Not surprisingly, to the extent we have any information on it, we find that housing for the poor was more crowded that for others, ill-repaired, with less privacy, fewer furnishings, and in less desirable locations. (p.72)

135


SEVDA KILICALP

In addition to residence, zawiyas also had kitchens, which cooked food for the Sufis and also fed travelers, needy people, and those who come to pray or participate in Sufi rituals. This quote (Singer, 2002) from the report of an imperial emissary, named Abd端lkerim who was visiting a zawiya in Jerusalem in 1555 gives some idea about the priority of their giving. When it was necessary to distribute [food], according to the regulations (kanun), after the bowls of those came first for food were set down and completely finished, [food] was given to those who lived in the rooms of residence (ribat-zawiya), and afterwards to the servants of it, and then because the refectory was not large enough [to hold all the people at once], the food was given first to the poor of the scholars (ehl-i ilm), and then to the remaining fukara and cumraya and then to the women. (p. 100)

It is useful to remember here that the Ottamon rulers encouraged the system of waqfs mainly to avoid the manipulation of land. Waqf resources could not be pooled and were for the most part unavailable for commercial investment. The sultans and the state officials were the main donors of the waqf system either by directly establishing waqf or by granting land to those who wanted to found a waqf and they had their own reasons to contribute to the functioning of the waqf system. With the help of waqf system, which was used as the primary vehicle for the provision of public services, the society had being transferred from a small and homogeneous community into a more complex society. The state was not aware of and able to meet all needs and demands in the local territories because of its huge constituencies (Kuran, 2001). A decentralized delivery system allowed utilizing local based knowledge about individual needs. Furthermore, the Ottoman state wanted to extend its power and to win over specific constituency.

136


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

By founding waqf, the Ottoman rulers extended their patronage, gained loyalty of the targeted population, and consolidated the political authority. Waqfs were also used to enjoy greater security of property from state confiscation and reduced taxation by the state officials who possessed significant purchasing power due to their political privileges. Kuran (2004) points out this delicate equilibrium: The waqf system represented, in effect, an implicit bargain between rulers and their wealthy subjects. Rulers made a credible commitment to leave certain property effectively in private hands; in return, waqf founders agreed to supply social services, thus unburdening the state of potential responsibilities. The system was basically decentralized. (p. 75)

The Ottoman state’s use of waqf system as a crucial vehicle of welfare support for ordinary people endured until the late eighteenth century which was marked by a profound structural change in the Ottoman Empire. In a broad sense this change can be described as a policy of centralization which resulted in expansion of the state bureaucracy (Shaw, 1977). The wave of centralization undermined the role of waqf and transformed these traditional institutions. Prior to the state centralization it was relatively easy to establish a waqf, but in 1863 the state introduced new conditions for the waqf establishment. These conditions were hard to meet and discouraged people from founding new waqfs, leaving them the option of contributing to previously established awqaf. A more destructive hit to waqf financials came with the Tanzimat. The Ottoman Empire began pursuing openly a more meddlesome policy towards waqf. Based on the new arrangements, instead of waqf trustees, treasury officials started to collect taxes from peasants who were cultivating the waqf lands. Only a certain percentage of these taxes

137


SEVDA KILICALP

turned to waqfs. The share was determined by the state and it declined over the time (Çizakça, 2000b). Thus the central government could redirect revenues towards central treasury. The Ottoman state got use from the substantial sums of waqf resources for reallocating them to the beneficiaries as well as for spending them on its own budgetary needs. The nineteenth century reforms in waqf administration created different consequences for the donors and the recipients. Firstly, the Ministry of Waqf, established in 1826, weakened the status of the ulama. Before the Tanzimat (Reorganization) period, which was in effect from 1839 to 1876, the ulama played a central role in collecting zakat and managing the waqf land. The ulama were secularized further on by replacing the Shari’a law with the French Mejelle system and the Napoleonic code (Clevelend, 2004). Through a government decree, all waqfs settled in the land of the Ottoman Empire were put under the supervision of an imperial ministry. Hence, the ulama’s financial basis was also brought under the direct control of the ministry (Barnes, 1987). Secondly, in the course of centralization, the state largely violated property rights of waqf founders. This violation was legitimized on the ground that waqf lands were expanding at the expense of the state owned lands (Powers, 1989). Expansion of religious waqfs and their exploitation for private purposes were one of the main drives behind these efforts. Centralization of the waqf system overrode the formal principle of inviolability of founder’s stipulations. Founders of waqfs saw that their personal property, which was endowed either for pursing a charity purpose or sheltering family wealth, was going into hands of central bureaucrats and being used for motives other than those declared in the waqf deed. As matters of both state policy and state practice, waqf resources thus became fungible and, consequently the adequate provision of goods was imperiled (Kuran, 2001). 138


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

Thirdly, the nineteenth century reforms had also farreaching results for people dependent on waqfs. Tekkes and zawiyas, which were affected harshly by the new policies, had not been only supporting the Sufis but also the local people. Their closure and declining funding reduced one major institution in genuine position of caring for the poor. Considering that the Sufis were also beneficiaries of these institutions, Barnes (1987) portrays how the Sufis were deprived from their livelihood and reduced a state of destitution. The government policy established from the beginning of Tanzimat toward the dervishes was that of a direct takeover and control of their revenue. The dervishes than necessarily became salaried dependents of the state, being provided with what was little more than a subsistence allowance. This income, more often than not, has to be petitioned for after the government took possession of the evkaf [waqf] property of the dervishes. Further, a system was institutes of granting salaries and increases in income only from vacated pay of religious officials who died without heirs… This restriction… proved seriously detrimental to the livelihood of many dervishes (p. 97)

In addition to taking over waqf lands belonging to zawiyas and tekkes, the government also started registering Sufis and assigning provision to only those who were officially entitled to them. Thus, the government avoided vagabond Sufis and students from taking refugee in Sufi lodges and occupying a shelter in order to reduce their cost to the state. In the past vagrant Sufis and beggars were tolerated and they were even focus of the charity. Hence, new criteria were set to define who the poor were and who deserved help. This policy change was not only directed to the Sufis but also to the indigent poor. As Ergut (2002) points out criminalization of vagrancy, though started during the Abdülhamid rule (1876–1909), was ‘rationalized’ with the creation of The Committee

139


SEVDA KILICALP

of Union and Progress (CUP) as a liberal and bourgeois reaction against the system developed since the Tanzimat. The efforts to create a native bourgeoisie had implications for the surveillance of the poor. Due to the unequal distribution of wealth, the poor were seemed as a threat to the newly developing bourgeoisie. Policing the public order found its expression in limiting the poor leisure activities and policing ‘vagabonds’, who were increasingly being defined as criminals. Under the veil of controlling ‘vagabonds’, the government aimed to control the poor and to prevent over-population in big cities. By contrast, the Islamic ethics expose both poverty and wealth as attributes of God and does not adhere any shame to the poverty nor a pride to wealth. As seen from these examples, with the start of government involvement in the welfare provision, deserving and undeserving categories of relief were redefined, leaving the poor in a more vulnerable position. Changes in the structure of government and consequent reforms in the waqf administration introduced new modes of organization of social and welfare services. By the nineteenth century, the Ottoman philanthropy started to evolve from family centered care and individual beneficence to a mix model combining both traditional and new forms of charity. As Brown (2002) stresses the impossibility of drawing clear borderlines (or, in other words, to identify distinctive stages in a history of charity) between new and old forms of Christian charity, in Islamic society of the Ottomans old models and institutions did not disappear suddenly, but were adapted and transformed, too. Conclusions In the Ottoman Empire, waqf institutions were long used as a mean for colonization and settlement in newly conquered areas. The Ottomans inherited waqf making from Byzantine and Seljuk Empires; but, under 140


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

the Ottoman patronage, individual charitable units became more ordered complexes which met various societal needs at the same time. In the cities, the ulema distributed the Islamic knowledge and strove for bringing the community under Islamic order though madrasa education while outside the cities Sufi loges paralleled the use of waqf complexes as a typical Ottoman instrument for colonization and Islamization of the predominantly Christian lands. Sufis also disseminated their traditions, formed communities and helped to shape united communities. The foundation of madrasas on substantial endowments was used by the rulers as a means for strengthening the mainstream Sunni Islam. While zawiyas were important tools for promoting rural development, Islamization and security, madrasas served dissemination the true and coherent knowledge Sunni Islam in the cities. Zawiyas and madrasas established a bond of shared norms and values between the rulers and beneficiaries. They generated a public approval of the right to rule in the newly conquered lands. The Ottoman rulers chose an indirect way to spread the empire ideology rather than directly achieving control over the beneficiaries. In this way, the sultans also showed their adherence to the norms of the proper social order inherited in these institutions. Islamic principles shaped philanthropic giving and institutionalization of benevolence in the Ottoman Empire but when charitable institutions spread out, deviations from the Islamic ethics of giving became much clearer. The Islamic ethics and ideals were not totally realized. The welfare of the society was identified with the free-floating resources at the disposal of the groups which identified themselves with the state. Charitable institutions were established not only for to poor but also for the needy members of notable families. Benefactors endowed the caused related with a particular public segment that they felt attach to, such as a specific school of law or Sufi order, than to support general Islamic purpose. 141


SEVDA KILICALP

The definition of the “worthy” of the charity changed according to the political context. Those who deserve charitable assistance were not identified regarding their condition per se.

References Akin, G. (1995). The muezzi̇n mahfi̇li̇ and pool of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. Muqarnas, 12, 63-83. Al-Qardawi, Y. (1999). Fiqh az-Zakat: A Comparative Study; The Rules, Regulations and Philosophy of Zakat in the Lights of the Qur’an and Sunna. London: Dar Al Taqwa. Armstrong, K. (2000). Islam: A Short History. New York: Random House. Baer, G. (1969). Studies on the Social History of Modern Egypt. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Barkan, Ö. L. (1942). Osmanlı İmparatorluğunda bir iskan ve kolonizasyon metodu olarak vakıflar ve temlikler; istila devirlerinin kolonizatör Türk dervişleri ve zaviyeler. Vakıflar Dergisi, II, 279 – 304. Barnes, J. R. (1987). An Introduction to Religious Foundations in the Ottoman Empire. Leiden: E. J. Brill. Berkey, J. (1992). The Transmission of Knowledge in Medieval Cairo: A Social History of Islamic Education. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Brown, P. (2002). Poverty and Leadership in the Late Roman Empire. London: University Press of New England, 2002. Brown, P. (2005). Remembering the poor and the aesthetic of society. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 35, (3), 513–522. Cavallo, S. Charity and Power in Early Modern Italy. Benefactors and Their Motives in Turin, 1541–1789. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Çizakça, M. (1998). Awqaf in history and its implications for modern Islamic economies. Islamic Economic Studies, 6(1), 43-70. 142


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

Çizakça, M. (2000a). A Histor y of Philanthropic Foundations: The Islamic World From the Seventh Century to the Present. Istanbul: Bogaziçi University Press. Çizakça, M. (2000b). Latest developments in the western nonprofit sector and implications for the Islamic waqf system. Proceedings from The Fourth International Conference on Islamic Economics and Banking. August 13-15, Loughborough, England. URL: http://www.mcizakca.com/pub%20LATEST%20 DEVELOPMENTS%20IN%20THE%20WESTERN%20 NONPROFIT%20SECTOR%20AND.pdf Cleveland, W. (2008). A History of the Modern Middle East. USA: Westview Press, 2004. Coşgel, M., Rasha, A., & Miceli. T. (2007). Law, state power, and taxation in Islamic history. Papers on Economics of Religion, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada. URL: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/working/2007-01r.pdf Deweese, D. (1994). Islamization and Native Religion in the Golden Horde: Baba Türkler and Conversion to Islam in Historical and Epic Traditions. Pennsylvania State University Press. Ener, M. (2005). Religious prerogatives and policing the poor in two Ottoman contexts. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 35(3), 501-511. Ephrat, D. (2008). Spiritual Wayfarers, Leaders in Piety: Sufis and the dissemination of Islam in Medieval Palestine, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Ergut, F. Policing the poor in the late Ottoman Empire. Middle Eastern Studies, 38 (2), 149-164. URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/714004457 Ernst, C. W., & Bruce B. L. (2002). Sufi Martyrs of Love: The Christs Order n South Asia and Beyond. New York: Plagrave. Evliya Çelebi (1968). Narrative of Travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa in the Seventeenth Century, Vol I. (Ritter Joseph Von Hammer, Trans.). London: Oriental Translation Fund. (Original work published in 1834). Faroqhi, S. (1984). Towns and Townsmen of Ottoman 143


SEVDA KILICALP

Anatolia: Trade, crafts, and Food Production in An Urban Setting, 1520-1650. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Faroqhi, S. (2005). Subjects of the Sultan: culture and daily life in the Ottoman Empire. London: I.B.Tauris. Faroqhi, S. (2006). The Cambridge History of Turkey (Vol. 3). Cambridge University Press. Fleischer, C. H. (1986). Bureaucrat and Intellectual in the Ottoman Empire, the Historian Mustafa Ali (1541-1600). Princeton: Princeton University Press. Heper, M (1980). Center and Periphery in the Ottoman Empire: With special reference to the nineteenth century. International Political Science Review, 1 (1), 81-105. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1600742 Heper, M. (1985). The State Tradition in Turkey. Walkington, England: Eothen Press. Hoexter, M., (2002). The Waqf and the public sphere. In Hoexter, M., Eisenstadt, S. N., & Levtzion, N. (Eds.). The Public Sphere in Muslim Societies. SUNY Press. Hoexter, M. (2003). Charity, the poor and distribution of alms in Ottoman Algiers. In M. Bonner, M. Ener, & A. Singer (Eds.), Poverty and Charity in Middle Eastern Contexts. New York: State University of New York Press. Horden, P., & Purcell, N. (2000) The Corrupting Sea: A study of Mediterranean History. London: Blackwell Publishers. Humphreys, S. (1991). Islamic History: A framework for Inquiry. New Jersey, Princeton University Press. Inalcik, H. (1980). The question of the emergence of the Ottoman state. International Journal of Turkish Studies, 2, 71-79. Inalcik, H. (1994). The Ottoman State: Economy and society, 1300-16000. In H. 襤nalc覺k, D. Quataert, & S. Faroqhi (Eds.), An Economic and Social History of the Ottoman Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Karpat, K. (1977). Some historical and methodological considerations concerning social stratification in the Middle East. In C.A. van Niewenhuijze (Ed.), Commoners, Climbers and Notables: A Sampler of Studies on Social Ranking in the Middle East. Leiden: E. J. Brill. 144


INSTRUMENTALIZATION OF PIOUS ENDOWMENTS FOR INFLUENCE AND CONTROL IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

Khoury, D. R. (1966). Türk Edebiyatinda İlk Mutasavvıflar. Ankara: Diyanet İşleri Başkanlığı Yayınları. Khoury, D. R. (2006). The Ottoman centre versus provincial power-holders: An analysis of the historiography. In K. Fleet, S. Faroqhi, & R. Kasaba (Eds.), The Cambridge History of Turkey: The Later Ottoman Empire, 1603-1839. New York: Cambridge University Press. Kuran, T. (2001). The provision of public goods under Islamic law: Origins, impact, and limitations of the waqf system. Law and Society Review, 35 (4), 841-897. URL: http://links.jstor.org/

145


Philanthropy in the Ottoman world: charity towards dervishes and the charity of dervishes Suraiya Faroqhi

Ottoman dervishes enter into our exhibition project because they both received and dispensed charitable aid. Some of the major Anatolian dervish lodges (zaviye, tekke, or if larger: dergâh) by far antedated the Ottoman conquest, going back to the Seljuk period in the twelfth or early thirteenth century, or at least to the unsettled years after the collapse of Seljuk rule and the institution of Mongol (Ilkhanid) control in the second half of the thirteenth century. Or else the dervishes founded their ceremonial centers under the various princely dynasties that controlled small sections of Anatolia, after the Mongols progressively had retreated from the area during the first half of the fourteenth century.1 Thus the oldest extant parts of the chief Mevlevi lodge in the central Anatolian town of Konya go back to this period.2 Yet other dervish lodges date to the early years of Ottoman domination in Asia Minor.3 However, the holy men of that period often were not as yet associated In spite of its age a fundamental study is: Ömer Lütfi Barkan, 1 "Osmanlı Imparatorluğunda bir Iskân ve Kolonizasyon Metodu Olarak Vakıflar ve Temlikler", Vakıflar Dergisi, II (1942), 279-386. Many stories not specifically attributed here come from Suraiya Faroqhi, Der Bektaschi-Orden in Anatolien (vom späten fünfzehnten Jahrhundert bis 1826), Wiener Zeitschrift für die Kunde des Morgenlandes, Supplement II (Wien: Verlag des Institutes für Orientalistik der Universität Wien, 1981). Abdülbaki Gölpınarlı, Mevlânâ'dan sonra Mevlevîlik (Istanbul: 2 İnkilap Kitabevi, 1953), p. 63. Zeynep Y rekli, Architecture and Hagiography in the Ottoman 3 Empire: The Politics of Bektashi Shrines in the Classical Age (Farnham/Surrey, Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2012).

147


SURAIYA FAROQHI

with the orders (Nakşbendi, Bektaşi and others) with which they were associated in later years. A sad story of destruction For the most part these dervish lodges and the items they once contained have not survived: many such structures were built of wood and have perished through natural decay, but also in fires and uprisings. Yet others disappeared through official action in the early nineteenth century, when Sultan Mahmud II (r. 1808-1839) abolished the Bektaşi order of dervishes and had the numerous lodges of the latter first inventoried and then destroyed. Thus the records documenting the zaviye of Abdal Musa in south-western Anatolia provide a tantalizing yet frustrating glimpse into a lost world: while the Ottoman traveler Evliya Çelebi (1611-after 1683), who visited the lodge in 1670-71 waxed enthusiastic about the hospitality of its dervishes, nothing survives except an unostentatious mausoleum and a number of gravestones, now recuperated by the local Alevi community.4 Yet further destruction occurred when in 1925, all dervish orders were abolished and the lodges in which their members had once congregated were closed down. Only the rich dergâh of Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi in Konya with its incomparable library and significant archive escaped, because it was immediately converted into a museum. On the other hand, the lodges of Seyyid Gazi (in the town of Seyitgazi, near Eskişehir) and Hacı Bektaş (in the town of the same name, near Ankara) were abandoned; and efforts to protect the buildings and establish local museums are of relatively recent date. Some of the properties of the lodge of Hacı Bektaş Evliya Çelebi b Derviş Mehemmed Zılli, Evliya Çelebi Seyahatnâmesi, 4 Topkapı Sarayı Kütüphanesi Bağdat 306, Süleymaniye Kütüphanesi Pertev Paşa 462, Süleymaniye Kütüphanesi Hacı Beşir Ağa 452 Numaralı Yazmaların Mukayeseli Transkripsyonu –Dizini, vol. 9, ed. by Yücel Dağlı, Seyit Ali Kahraman and Robert Dankoff (Istanbul: Yapı Kredi Yayınları, 2005), pp. 140-141.

148


PHILANTHROPY IN THE OTTOMAN WORLD

have been transferred into the Ankara Museum of Ethnography and a library in the same city. Furthermore in the early 1970s, when local personages in the town of Hacıbektaş organized a museum on the premises of the former lodge, the director was able to retrieve some of the dervishes’ former possessions. But in most places including Seyitgazi, nothing remains but the bare walls. Sultans, elite figures and ordinary people as the patrons of dervishes and their lodges If we can believe the Ottoman chronicles of the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the early sultans showed great veneration for certain Anatolian holy men. Admittedly, these early attempts at composing historical accounts were written more than a hundred and fifty years after the events they purport to describe. Yet references to this veneration appear quite believable. In fact some of the earliest surviving Ottoman documents concern the donations of members of the Ottoman dynasty, both male and female to certain dervish lodges, including the establishment situated in the little town/village of Mekece.5 Furthermore the zaviye of Postinpuş Baba, a former Bektaşi lodge near Bursa, of which once again only the bare walls survive, also was established in one of the localities that belonged to the Ottomans when they were still a petty princely dynasty.6 It thus makes sense to assume that this lodge also received benefactions from the members of what had still to become the ruling dynasty of a great empire. At this early stage, sultans and their relatives may have assumed that wandering dervishes could find shelter in the rooms that in fourteenth and fifteenthHeath Lowry, “Random Musings on the Origins of Ottoman Charity: 5 From Mekece to Bursa, Iznik and beyond,” in Feeding People, Feeding Power, Imarets in the Ottoman Empire, ed. Amy Singer, Christoph Neumann and Nina Ergin (Istanbul: Eren, 2007), pp. 69-79. Sedat Emir, Erken Osmanlı Mimarlığında Çok-İşlevli Yapılar: Kentsel 6 Kolonizasyon Yapıları Olarak Zaviyeler (Bornova/Izmir: Akademi Kitabevi, 1994), vol. 2 Orhan Gazi Dönemi Yapıları, pp. 51-62, Ill. No. 124, 127.

149


SURAIYA FAROQHI

century complexes, so often flanked Anatolian mosques and their entrance courts, the latter often roofed over as required by the cold winters characteristic of the local climate. This hypothesis, intended to explain the socalled “t-shaped mosques” was first proposed by Semavi Eyice; and Turkish architectural historians call mosques of this type zaviyeli cami.7 In some places, the side chambers of these mosques had fireplaces. Scholars have suggested that the demise of the zaviyeli cami in the early 1500s may have been due to the fact that once the Ottomans found themselves at war with the Safavids of Iran, official solicitude toward dervishes declined. After all, the Safavids had been a dervish order before Isma’il I made himself ruler of Iran, and the newly established shah and his descendants continued to send envoys (halife) into Anatolia to win over the sultan’s subjects, especially the nomads among them. Moreover the people who followed the rebel Şahkulu in his uprising in south-western Anatolia during the last years of Bayezid II (r. 1481-1512) may well have had contacts to the Safavid order as well. Ottoman sultans and their viziers therefore had come to view many dervishes as a potentially destabilizing element. But while the Ottoman ruling group was wary at least of certain dervishes, there remained many personages that retained a reputation for sanctity and continued to be welcome even in the palace precincts. Thus Bayezid II (r. 1481-1512) seems to have furthered the Bektaşi order of dervishes, perhaps to encourage them to bring their heterodox colleagues into the fold of Sunni Islam.8 When Sultan Selim II (r. 1566-1574) built his complex of mosque and adjunct charities in Konya, the administrators of the public kitchen that was part of this pious foundation were enjoined to deliver food to the Semavi Eyice, “Ilk Osmanlı Devrinin Dini-Içtimai bir Müessesesi, Zaviyeler 7 ve Zaviyeli Camiler”, I.Ü. Iktisat Fakültesi Mecmuası, 23, 1-2 (1962-63), 3-80. Irène Mélikoff, “Le problème kızılbaş”, Turcica, VI (1975), 49-67. 8

150


PHILANTHROPY IN THE OTTOMAN WORLD

adjacent central lodge of the Mevlevi order of dervishes. Certainly the dergâh already had numerous foundation lands from which to feed dervishes and visitors; but by his donation to the Mevlevi larders, the sultan evidently wished to show his devotion to Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi, highly respected by the Ottoman elite of that time.9 Once again the kitchen of Sultan Selim’s foundation does not survive, although the mosque certainly does. Selim’s successor Murad III (r. 1574-1595) admitted holy men into his entourage, wrote ‘spiritual letters’ to a favorite sheikh and must have given largesse to quite a few followers of the mystical path.10 Moreover the sultans were by no means the only possible patrons for dervishes wishing to build, enlarge or beautify their lodges. Certain lordly families that had aided the early Ottoman expansion into the Balkans also sponsored such projects. If the legend of Seyyid Ali Sultan/Kızıl Deli has any basis in fact, the founder of this Thracian establishment (near Didymoteichon/ Dimetoka in Greece) had been a conqueror and warrior who in later years settled down and reputedly had received his vocation as a religious figure from Hacı Bektaş in person.11 Other such founders were less “mythological”: thus Hacı/Gazi Evrenos bey endowed a dervish lodge in Komotini/ Gümülcine, now unfortunately destroyed.12 As for the Malkoç-oğulları, though long established in the Balkans, in the 1500s they made a pious donation to the lodge of Hacı Bektaş in far-away central Anatolia.13 Even Suraiya Faroqhi, “Seventeenth Century Agricultural Crisis and the 9 Art of Flute Playing: the Worldly Affairs of the Mevlevi Dervishes (1595-1652)” Turcica, XX (1988), 43-70. 10 Özgen Felek, Sultan III. Murad’ın Rüya Mektupları (Istanbul: Tarih Vakfı yurt Yayınları, 2012). 11 Once again this rich lodge was destroyed on the orders of Mahmud II, see Suraiya Faroqhi, “Agricultural Activities in a Bektashi Center 1750-1826: the tekke of Kızıl Deli”, S dost Forschungen, XXXV (1976), 69-96. Heath Lowry, The Shaping of the Ottoman Balkans 1350-1550: 12 The Conquest, Settlement & Infrastructural Development of Northern Greece (İstanbul: Bahçeşehir University Publications, 2008), p. 46. 13 Franz Babinger, "Beiträge zur Geschichte der Malqoč-Oghlus" in

151


SURAIYA FAROQHI

in the 1600s, when elite figures with money to spend in Aleppo perhaps had fewer means at their disposal than their counterparts during the first decades of Ottoman rule, they favored the construction of dervish lodges.14 In remote and impoverished central Anatolia moreover, a contemporary governor of Kırşehir sub-province showed his devotion to Hacı Bektaş by donating a silverplated door to the sanctuary of the saint. Moreover the early Nakşbendis, who established a major lodge in Istanbul, also found patrons to support their pious foundation and its inhabitants. By 1600 the lodge of Emir Buhari, the premier establishment of the Nakşbendis in the Ottoman capital, boasted a large collection of houses, shops and other pieces of real estate. Many were piecemeal donations by pious supporters: thus a probably quite wealthy Istanbul cloth merchant named Hacı İlyas b Mahmud in 908/1502-03 donated a house to serve as the residence of the prayer leader of the mosque associated with the lodge of Emir Buhari.15 Another donor had assigned his charitable donation specifically to the kitchen of the dervishes. Unfortunately two major fires in the twentieth century completely destroyed the building complex: but excavators recently have found an inscription that permits us to identify the rather shapeless ruins of the once famous Nakşbendi lodge (source: Emir Buhari website) Please delete: this information is no longer available. In addition any dervish community of some reputation also received small gifts from people of modest means. Aufsätze und Abhandlungen zur Geschichte Südosteuropas und der Levante, vol. 1 (Munich: Südosteuropa Verlagsgesellschaft, 1962), 355-369. Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh, The Image of an Ottoman City: 14 Imperial Architecture and Urban Experience in Aleppo in the 16th and 17th Centuries (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2005); eadem, “Deviant Dervishes: Space, Gender and the Construction of Antinomian Piety in Ottoman Aleppo.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 37:4 (November 2005). 15 Mehmet Canatar ed., İstanbul Vakıfları Tahrîr Defteri, 1009 (1600) Tarîhli (Istanbul: Istanbul Fetih Cemiyeti, 2004), pp. 316-321. On the early Nakşbendis on Ottoman territory see Dina Le Gall, A Culture of Sufism: Naqshbandis in the Ottoman World, 1450-1700 (Albany, NY:  SUNY Press, 2005).

152


PHILANTHROPY IN THE OTTOMAN WORLD

Many visitors brought victuals, which have not left any traces in the available imagery. But sometimes gifts were more durable: and the lodge of Hacı Bektaş at one point received a gigantic kettle. This item is still in the possession of the dergâh turned museum. Supposedly it was used in the distribution of aşure, a pudding of dried fruits and beans still popular in Turkey and which is prepared in some households in memory of the martyrdom of the Prophet Muhammad’s grandson in Kerbela. Apart from this gift, dervish lodges throughout the Empire might receive presents of copper pots and pans. More accessible than silver, copper was after all a convenient device for storing value: once these kitchen utensils were damaged, they could easily be melted down and remade. Well-to-do donors might choose gilded items, thus enhancing the prestige of their gift. Some lodges even received so many donations of this type that from time to time they sold off the extra items. Returning gifts: dervish sheikhs as providers of blessings A secular historian is liable to forget that to pious people, the most precious gift a dervish could bestow was his prayers and blessings. We can therefore assume that both dervish sheikhs and their adherents believed that the major charitable contribution of the former consisted in the healing powers and other benedictions that these saintly men (or very rarely women) might continue to exercise during their lifetimes, but also long after their deaths. While for obvious reasons we have no physical evidence of the blessings of dervish sheikhs, we do have indications that they were expected to convey supernatural benefactions. The most obvious instances are surely the bits of cloth tied to bushes near many pilgrimage sanctuaries, evidently meant to remind the saint of the petitioners’ problems. This custom persists to the present day, in spite of the efforts of religious 153


SURAIYA FAROQHI

authorities to eradicate it. Moreover not only dervishes but also people ‘from the outside’ might wish to be buried ‘ad sanctos’, in other words in the vicinity of a major dervish saint. Thus the lodge of Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi in Konya still is surrounded by the mausoleums of several Ottoman governors and their relatives; one of them had officiated in the province of Karaman, where Konya was located. It is not known whether these people were at least loosely affiliated with the Mevlevi order. “Nothing is for free!” (Official rewards to dervishes for putting up travelers) Private persons who made donations to dervishes presumably only wished for the prayers of the beneficiaries, as they often specified in their foundation documents. However in the case of grants that came from the sultans, the situation was often different; for in these cases the dervishes were enjoined to provide shelter and hospitality to travelers, or as the texts often put it “provide nourishment to those that come and go”. Particularly when the sultans exempted a dervish lodge from the burdensome avarız tax, the Ottoman registers quite often insisted on the obligation to provide hospitality. As a result, dervish lodges and public soup kitchens were quite often associated.16 In a society without inns or hotels, where only the major routes possessed caravansaries, in other words walled spaces with rooms and a water source that also provided some security, the role of dervishes as givers of hospitality was essential. In the eighteenth century, when quite a few lodges found themselves in financial difficulties, it became routine for would-be sheikhs and foundation administrators to accuse their rivals currently in office of neglecting this essential responsibility. 16

154

Lowry, The Shaping of the Ottoman Balkans, p 68.


PHILANTHROPY IN THE OTTOMAN WORLD

Some lodges seem to have had outer courtyards where travelers could spend the night; such an arrangement for instance existed in the zaviye of Hacı Bektaş.17 Presumably visitors of some distinction were let into the complex of buildings surrounding the second court: we have brief reports by Mustafa ‘Ali who visited in the later sixteenth century and the French traveler Pétis de la Croix, who met the then sheikh of Hacı Bektaş about a century later. However neither traveler had much to say about the hospitality accorded to him, and unluckily for us, Evliya Çelebi never made it to this place. However it would be over-optimistic to assume that accommodation in the court of a dervish lodge always provided security. On the contrary we possess a tantalizing edict from the sixteenth-century Ottoman chancery registers that refers to the murder of a family that had traveled on the Kayseri road and sought shelter on the dergâh’s property. Unnamed ’robbers’ were on record as the culprits. As the sheikhs of the lodge do not appear either as complainants or else among the accused, we may surmise that for reasons that we cannot reconstruct, these dignitaries were absent from the site, and so presumably were their dervishes. In other instances certain sheikhs, such as the personage in charge of the zaviye of Dediği Dede in the Akşehir region, were accused of making common cause with robbers. But we have no way of knowing whether there was any substance to this claim. Of course the sheikh may have merely been involved with some heterodox people, of the kind that the Ottomans labeled ‘Kızılbaş’ and that today are called Alevi. But just as Ottoman passguards quite often turned robbers, we cannot exclude genuine thievery. 17 Suraiya Faroqhi, The tekke of Hacı Bektaş: Social Position and Economic Activities”, International Journal of Middle East Studies, 7 (1976), 183-208; Y rekli, Architecture and Hagiography, pp. 101-133.

155


SURAIYA FAROQHI

In place of a conclusion Due to the wars and other upheavals of the past two centuries, buildings are the main visual source to which we can turn when documenting the charity given to dervishes and the even more elusive charity dispensed by dervishes. In addition there are documents; but unfortunately quite a few of the oldest items survive only in copies, a fact which has given rise to long debates about their authenticity. Why in spite of all the problems encountered, do we focus on dervishes? First of all, I think that the issue is important because of the numerous donations that elite and non-elite people in the Ottoman realm made to sheikhs and dervishes; these spiritual figures were thus major recipients of charitable aid. Secondly we must take into account the frequent association of dervishes with the charitable distribution of food and the provision of night-time shelter to travelers. And as a third point, at least certain dervishes ministered to the needs of ordinary people, because so often they catered for men and women on the road. In this respect, they differed from many sultanic foundations without dervish involvement, which to a significant extent functioned as government guesthouses and/or fed employees and students of the pious foundation to which they were connected. As a result ‘ordinary people’ -- and those who perhaps needed charity most -- often must have received short shrift in these institutions.18 By contrast dervishes were major actors when it came to genuine public beneficence in the Ottoman lands.

Ömer Lütfi Barkan, "Şehirlerin Teşekkül ve İnkişafı Tarihi 18 Bakımından: Osmanlı İmparatorluğunda İmaret Sitelerinin Kuruluş ve İsleyiş Tarzına ait Araştırmalar", İstanbul Üniversitesi İktisat Fakültesi Mecmuası, 23, 1-2 (1963), 239-296; Amy Singer, Constructing Ottoman Beneficence: An Imperial Soup Kitchen in Jerusalem (Albany NY: SUNY Press, 2002), p. 62.

156


“Non del tuo fai dono al povero ma del suo fai restituzione”: propedeutica ad un’elargizione iconografica a tema filantropico Sebastiano Giordano *

Alla Dott.ssa Francesca Romana Giordano, anestesista angelicata non ancora ribelle

Noi affidiamo alle parole i valori semantici1 – cioè di spessore di significato – e ai toni confidiamo l’emozionata espressione dei sentimenti comunicati verbalmente, sapendo bene che l’essere che può venir compreso è universo linguistico2; un istinto aurorale, il linguaggio, propriamente umano e adatto – per la sua flessibilità e plasticità – a spingerci verso possibili ipotesi fortunate, o indeterminate e non immediate aperture culturali3. Vivere nella società aperta4, quindi, equivale a * Redazione, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Roma. 1 Cfr. Semantic Ambiguities and Underspecification, edited by Kees van Deemter and Stanley Peters, Stanford, Calif. 1996; Paul Ricœur, Interpretation Theory: Discourse and the Surplus of Meaning, Fort Worth, Tex. 1976. 2 Si veda il magnum opus del filosofo ermeneutico Hans-Georg Gadamer [1900-2002], Wahrheit und Methode: Grundzüge einer philosophischen Hermeneutik, Tübingen 19906 (19601). Hans-Georg Gadamer. Wahrheit und Methode, Günter Figal (Hrsg.), Berlin 2007; Kai Hammermeister, Hans-Georg Gadamer, München 20062; Jean Grondin, Hans-Georg Gadamer. Eine Biographie, Tübingen 1999. 3 Giuseppe Mininni, Il discorso come forma di vita, Napoli 2003; Felice Cimatti, Il senso della mente: per una critica del cognitivismo, Torino 2004; Nancy Nersessian, Creating Scientific Concepts, Cambridge, Mass. 2008. 4 Girolamo Cotroneo, Popper e la società aperta, Messina 2006 (Milano 19811); per un confronto fra la prospettiva del viennese Sir Karl Raimund Popper e quella del francofortese Theodor Wiesengrund Adorno, vedi Ralf Dahrendorf, Anmerkungen zur Diskussion der Referate von Karl R. Popper und Theodor W. Adorno zur „Logik der Sozialwissenschaften“, «Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie» Jgg. 14 (1962), pp. 264-270; Sir Ralf Dahrendorf, Ripensare il concetto di “società aperta”: nuove minacce e vecchie

157


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

immedesimarsi in un dinamico mito vivente del senso della vita umana irripetibile, in una sfida creatrice di variabili di speculativo significato5, foss’anche ogni uomo autocosciente, più che una sonorità rappresa di molecole di emozioni, un libro bianco di vita dove Dio stesso scrive i suoi aforismi e che, quando colmo di parole rivelate, dormiente tace in attesa di ritrovare, con la sua vera trama identificativa, anche l’anagramma del nostro nome6: dando così ragione a chi avverte che l’avvolgente parola è un’ala del nudo sapiente silenzio7. Ma qual è, in verità, il miglior modello che io possa offrire a un disponibile pubblico internazionale incuriosito, in silenzioso ascolto e con gli occhi circospetti? Un modello, appunto, che catturi l’orecchio speranze. Conferenza nel decennale della Facoltà, Corso di laurea in Scienze internazionali e diplomatiche, Facoltà di Scienze politiche, Università degli Studi di Bologna, sede di Forlì, 1999; John A. Hall, The Sociological Deficit of The Open Society, analyzed and remedied, in Popper’s Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper [Papers presented at a Conference held at the Central European University, Prague, 1995], edited by Ian Jarvie, Sandra Pralong, London 2003 (19991), pp. 83-96. 5 Ernest Becker [1924-1974]: sulle indagini multidisciplinari di questo antropologo culturale americano, vedi Jarvis Streeter, Human Nature, Human Evil, and Religion: Ernest Becker and Christian Theology, Lanham, Md. 2009; Daniel Liechty, Transference & Transcendence: Ernest Becker’s Contribution to Psychotherapy, Northvale, N.J. 1995; cfr. Arthur I. Miller, Insights of Genius. Imagery and Creativity in Science and Art, New York, N.Y. 1996. 6 Si confronti la tradizione culturale indiana dei sūtra: ad es. Vasugupta, Gli aforismi di Śiva. Con il commento di Kṣemarāja (Śivasūtravimarśinī), a cura di Raffaele Torella, Milano 2013. 7 Victor Hugo [1802-1885], “Tout homme est un livre où Dieu luimême écrit”, verso tratto dal poema La vie aux champs, in Id., Les contemplations, Paris, Nelson, 1856. Alain Decaux, Victor Hugo et Dieu, Discours lors du bicentenaire de la naissance de Victor Hugo, Paris, Académie française, le jeudi 28 février 2002; Jean de Mutigny, Victor Hugo et le spiritisme, Paris 1981; Pierre Laforgue, Hugo, romantisme et révolution, Besançon-Paris 2001; La Gloire de Victor Hugo, Paris, Galeries nationales du Grand Palais, 1er octobre 1985 - 6 janvier 1986, exposition organisée par la Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris 1985; La réception de Victor Hugo au XXe siècle : actes du colloque international de Besançon, 6-8 juin 2002, textes réunis par Catherine Mayaux, LausanneBesançon 2004. “Sabrás que no te amo y que te amo / puesto que de dos modos es la vida, / la palabra es un ala del silencio, / el fuego tiene una mitad de frío” sono versi di Pablo Neruda [1904-1973], all’inizio del sonetto XLIV della sezione Mediodía in Cien sonetos de amor, stampati in edizione privata, limitata a trecento esemplari, presso la Editorial Universitaria de Santiago de Chile nella fine di novembre del 1959. Cfr. Michel de Certeau, L’invention du quotidien, I : Arts de faire, Paris 1990.

158


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

dell’anima e perciò stesso un modello acustico, magari proprio la lettura anagògica di un testo scritto fatto di confini, oppure quello figurativo, fatto di immagini che facciano presa sugli occhi dell’anima senza diminuirci alla vista del mondo dai rispettivi orizzonti8? Voltaire, nel momento di ridar corpo alla parola, non ebbe dubbi: “L’écriture est la peinture de la voix”9; ma potrebbe venirci in soccorso il fatto che in ebraico ‘parola’ e ‘cosa’ hanno un unico nome: il disemico davàr )‫ ָ(ּד ָבר‬10; non è dirimente, invece, ritenere l’uomo come una prigione in cui l’anima nuda resta libera11, né tanto meno l’affermazione dell’alchimista polacco Sendivogius: “Maior autem animae pars extra corpus est”12. Il mese di novembre sta per chiudersi, e forse è particolarmente vero che la misura di saggezza viene col concentrarsi al calore del silenzio dell’inverno – certamente non con l’inverno del cuore e l’afonia spirituale –, anche se non è mancato chi ha voluto aggiungervi che la serietà 8 Cfr. Axel Englund, ‘The Invisible’ / ‘The Inaudible’: Aspects of Performativity in Celan and Leibowitz, in Word and Music Studies: Essays on Performativity and on Surveying the Field, edited by Walter Bernhart, in collaboration with Michael Halliwell, Amsterdam-New York 2011, pp. 121-142, su due tardi testi poetici di Paul Celan; Paul Crumbley, Inflections of the Pen: Dash and Voice in Emily Dickinson, Lexington, Ky. 1997; Giuseppe Barzaghi, O.P., Anagogia. Il Cristianesimo sub specie aeternitatis, Modena 2002. 9 François-Marie Arouet, detto Voltaire [1694-1778], in Dictionnaire philosophique portatif, Londres [ma in realtà: Genève, Gabriel Grasset, juillet] 1764, prima edizione in-octavo pubblicata anonimamente e presto messa al rogo a Ginevra stessa, in Olanda, e a Berna, per esser poi ancora condannata al rogo il 19 marzo 1765 dal parlamento di Parigi e messa all’Indice a Roma; vedi ora, Voltaire, Le Dictionnaire philosophique, Christiane Mervaud (dir.), Oxford 1994-1995, 2 voll. Sylvain Menant, Littérature par alphabet :  le Dictionnaire philosophique de Voltaire, Paris 20082 (19941); Christiane Mervaud, Le Dictionnaire philosophique de Voltaire, Paris-Oxford 2008. 10 Questo termine ebraico si può anche leggere d′ver (‘peste’), oppure dabbàr (‘capo’, ‘guida’), o dibb′r (‘detto’, ‘profezia’): Giacoma Limentani, Dentro la D, Genova 1992. Cfr. John Langshaw Austin, How to do Things with Words, Oxford 1962 11 V. Hugo, “L’homme est un prison où l’âme reste libre”, verso tratto dal poema Ce que dit la bouche d’ombre, in Id., Les contemplations cit. 12 Cioè “la parte maggiore dell’anima è fuori dal corpo”, stando al pensiero di Michał Sędziwój [1566-1636] (meglio noto col nome latinizzato di Sendivogius): vedi Zbigniew Szydło, Woda, która nie moczy rąk. Alchemia Michała Sędziwoja, Wydawnictwa Naukowo-Techniczne, Warszawa 1997.

159


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

è l’unico rifugio canonico del superficiale13. Ecco, vorrei far tesoro della verve dello scrittore irlandese Wilde per le riflessioni a seguire, confessando che da storico dell’arte – pur avendo l’uomo una sola lente per la messa a fuoco oculare (a differenza del moscerino della frutta, Drosophila melanogaster, i cui due terzi del cervello sono dedicati al processo visivo e risulta provvisto di sofisticati occhi con molteplici lenti non deformabili)14 – io ho dimestichezza con lo sguardo multiplo per i dettagli delle opere d’arte, cosicché opterei per definirmi un accorto specialista di armi di distrazione di massa; ed accetto che il perfettissimo Dio sia scandalosamente proprio nei dettagli: in fondo, l’arte, come la religione, deve essere ben anche consolatoria, arricchendo nobilmente lo spirito debordante oltre i confini temporali come un suscitato passo rugiadoso della fugace natura verso l’infinito15. 13 Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde [1854-1900], figlio di William, un oculista della regina Vittoria, e di una poetessa anglicana femminista, Jane Elgee, nota come Speranza, la quale spesso aveva affrontato nei suoi primi scritti i temi della povertà e della fame che lei stessa in vecchiaia dovrà sopportare a Londra fino a morire nell’indigenza nel 1896 mentre Oscar era tenuto in prigione (Joy Melville, Mother of Oscar: The Life of Jane Francesca Wilde, London 1994): “But wisdom comes with winters”, sono parole recitate dal personaggio del mercante fiorentino rinascimentale Simone entro una sua battuta dell’opera teatrale di Wilde rimasta non finita A Florentine Tragedy (il manoscritto della seconda stesura fu rubato dalla casa londinese in affitto di Wilde al numero 16 [ora 34] di Tite Street a Chelsea nel 1895; una rappresentazione privata fu realizzata dal Literary Theatre Club nel 1906, e la prima rappresentazione pubblica fu data dai New English Players al Cripplegate Institute, Golden Lane, Londra EC1, nel 1907). Inoltre, “On the whole, then, the Royal Academicians have never appeared under more favourable conditions than in this pleasant gallery. Mr Furniss [Harry Furniss, caricaturista del «Punch», 1854-1925] has shown that the one thing lacking in them is a sense of humour, and that if they would not take themselves so seriously they might produce work that would be a joy, and not a weariness, to the world. Whether or not they will profit by the lesson, it is difficult to say, for dullness has become the basis of respectability, and seriousness the only refuge of the shallow”, in Epigrams of Oscar Wilde, Ware, Hertfordshire, England 2007, p. 49. Richard Ellmann, Oscar Wilde, New York, N.Y. 1988; Philippe Jullian, Oscar Wilde, Paris 1967; Joseph Bristow, Oscar Wilde and Modern Culture: The Making of a Legend, Athens, OH 2009. 14 Nell’uomo soltanto il 50% del cervello ha a che fare con la memoria visiva. 15 Cfr. Hermann Broch, Geist und Zeitgeist (1934), in Id., Philosophische Schriften, Paul Michael Lützeler (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 1977, IX, 2, pp. 177-200: p. 198 (oltre a quella stampata, del saggio di Broch disponiamo di

160


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

In questo senso, si è voluto riepilogare filosoficamente “che l’immagine… premessa di un pensiero profondo… costituisce lo specchio privilegiato della vita dello spirito”16, forse sull’onda di quanto già annunziato coralmente nel finale goethiano del Faust II – “Tutto ciò che trascorre è solo un’immagine simbolica [Alles Vergängliches / Ist nur ein Gleichnis]”17 – poi tradotto in musica da Franz Liszt nel Chorus mysticus dedicato in contraccambio al collega e paradossale “peintre dans son art” Hector Berlioz18. Inoltre – come soleva ripetere la madre Abby al più importante collezionista d’arte contemporanea, il filantropico Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller – l’arte “rende più equilibrati, più aperti, più attenti e comprensivi” nel sospeso sfasamento della tensione sociale tra dimensione individuale e dimensione comunitaria, risolvibile in un rapporto fra individui spettacolarmente esteriorizzato e mediato dalle immagini19. Invalso, ormai, l’estetico come secolarizzazione del religioso20, c’è stato chi – in questa mistificante recinzione della cosmicità del sacro che vede l’artista come adepto di una nuova irridente religione – ha pensato di riscontrare come “il dio non è altro che l’espressione figurata della società”21, e, a detta d’un celebre storico due versioni non pubblicate custodite nella Yale University Library). 16 Jean-Jacques Wunenburger, Philosophie des images, Paris 1997. 17 Cfr. Paul Weigand, Problems in Translating the Song of the Chorus Mysticus in Goethe’s Faust II, «The German Quarterly» Vol. 33, No. 1 (January, 1960), pp. 22-27; Cordula Grewe, Painting the Sacred in the Age of Romanticism, Farnham (Surrey, England) 2009. 18 Così il giovane musicista Berlioz fu definito dal suo maestro JeanFrançois Lesueur, pronipote del pittore classicista Eustache Le Sueur detto ‘le Raphaël français’ (Henry Barraud, Hector Berlioz, Paris 1979). 19 Abigail Greene Aldrich Rockefeller [1874-1948], detta Abby, figlia dell’influente senatore repubblicano Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich: vedi La collezione d’arte moderna di Nelson A. Rockefeller, a cura di Dorothy Canning Miller, Milano 1981, p. 5; Suzanne Loebl, America’s Medicis: The Rockefellers and Their Astonishing Cultural Legacy, New York, N.Y. 2010. 20 Cfr. Bryan S. Turner, Religion and Modern Society: Citizenship, Secularisation, and the State, Cambridge, England–New York, N.Y. 2011. 21 Émile Durkheim [1856-1917]: “On peut être assuré par avance que les pratiques du culte, quelles qu’elles puissent être, sont autres que des mouvements sans portée et des gestes sans efficacité. Par cela seul qu’elles ont

161


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

positivista, “ogni epoca [perfettibile] della Storia è in diretto contatto con Dio”22; lo ripeterà un acuto storico dell’arte della Scuola di Vienna di stampo formalista: pour fonction apparente de resserrer le liens qui attachent le fidèle à son dieu, du même coup elles resserrent réellement les liens qui unissent l’individu à la société dont il est membre, puisque le dieu n’est que l’expression figurée de la société”, in Les Formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse : le système totémique en Australie, Paris, F. Alcan, 19121, cito dall’edizione Paris, PUF, 1968, p. 323. Per la critica a questa espressione di Durkheim da parte di Claude Lévi-Strauss, vedi il suo Le Totémisme aujourd’hui, Paris 1962, p. 106; inoltre, Ivan Oliver, The limits of the sociology of religion: a critique of the Durkheimian approach, «British Journal of Sociology» Vol. 27, No. 4 (December, 1976), pp. 461-473. Cfr. “Or, dans le monde de l’expérience, je ne connais qu’un sujet qui possède une réalité morale, plus riche, plus complexe que la nôtre, c’est la collectivité. Je me trompe, il en est un autre qui pourrait jouer le même rôle: c’est la divinité. Entre Dieu et la société il faut choisir. Je n’examinerai pas ici les raisons qui peuvent militer en faveur de l’une ou l’autre solution qui sont toutes deux cohérentes. J’ajoute qu’à mon point de vue, ce choix me laisse assez indifférent, car je ne vois dans la divinité que la société transfigurée et pensée symboliquement”, in E. Durkheim, La détermination du fait moral, «Bulletin de la Société française de philosophie» t. 6, 4-5 (séances du 11 février et du 22 mars 1906), pp. 113138, 169-212 con la discussione animata da 14 soci. L’innovatore sociologo Durkheim – per il quale il sacro rappresenterebbe la matrice dei rapporti sociali – era di famiglia ebrea e zio di Marcel Mauss [1872-1950] suo erede intellettuale ed autore del celebre saggio sul dono Essai sur le don. Forme et raison de l’échange dans les sociétés archaïques, «L’Année sociologique» nouvelle série, I (Paris, 19231924, ma pubblicato nel 1925), pp. 30-186. Durkheim on Religion: A Selection of Readings with Bibliographies, William S.F. Pickering (ed.), new translations by Jacqueline Redding and W.S.F. Pickering, London 19751, nuova edizione Cambridge 20113; W.S.F. Pickering, Durkheim’s Sociology of Religion: Themes and Theories, London 19841, ristampato a Cambridge 2009; Reappraising Durkheim for the Study and Teaching of Religion Today, edited by Thomas A. Idinopulos and Brian C. Wilson, Leiden-Boston 2002; Steven Lukes, Emile Durkheim, His Life and Work: A Historical and Critical Study, London 1973; Gianfranco Poggi, Durkheim, Oxford 2000; Ivan Strenski, Durkheim and the Jews of France, Chicago, Ill. 1997. Cfr. François Bœspflug, Dieu et ses images. Une histoire de l’Èternel dans l’art, Montrouge 2008. Si veda, inoltre, l’intera seconda parte intitolata La solidarietà sociale come problema (Massimo Rosati, La grammatica profonda della società: sacro e solidarietà in ottica durkheimiana; Ambrogio Santambrogio, Verso un modello di solidarietà riflessiva; William Watts Miller, Alla ricerca di solidarietà e sacro) nel volume Durkheim contributi per una rilettura critica, a cura di Massimo Rosati e Ambrogio Santambrogio, Roma 2002, pp. 81-168. 22 Leopold von Ranke [1795-1886]: “Jede Epoche ist unmittelbar zu Gott, und ihr Wert beruht gar nicht auf dem, was aus ihr hervorgeht, sondern in ihrer Existenz selbst, in ihrem Eigenen selbst”, in Über die Epochen der neueren Geschichte. Vorträge dem Könige Maxmillian II. von Bayern im Herbst 1854 zu Berchtesgaden gehalten. Vortrag vom 25. September 1854. Historisch-kritische Ausgabe, heraugegeben von Theodor Schieder und Helmut Berding, München 1971, p. 60. Leopold von Ranke und die moderne Geschichtswissenschaft, Wolfgang J. Mommsen (Hrsg.), Stuttgart 1988; Leopold von Ranke and the Shaping of the Historical Discipline, Georg G. Iggers, James M. Powell (eds.), Syracuse, N.Y. 1990; Leonard Krieger, Ranke: The Meaning of History, Chicago, Ill. 1977.

162


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Alle Epochen sint gleichunmittelbar zu Gott23. Tutto il culto divino – per quanto possiamo apprendere dalle Leggi (Libro IV, 716 d) dell’ultimo Platone – “è la cosa più bella e nobile e giovevole per la vita felice”24. La formula “la Vita è Dio”, cioè “la Vita è come Dio”, è ancora abitualmente in uso anche in Giappone (“Seime soku shin”), e perfino nella chiusa solitudine d’una coscienza con la testa in vacanza dove permane la tormentata consapevolezza dell’assenza di un dio assoluto. Eppure come dimenticare che il mysterium della gravità dell’orbita di Dio ci si presenta sotto la struggente inadeguata maschera del povero, tanto che le beatitudini celestiali nel regno di Dio sono evangelicamente 23 Alois Riegl [1858-1905]: Michael Gubser, Time’s Visible Surface: Alois Riegl and the Discourse on History and Temporality in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna, Detroit, MI 2006; Hans Fiebig, Kunst - Natur - Geschichte, wissenschaftsphilosophische und wissenschaftsgeschichtliche Untersuchungen zum Positivismus in der Kunstgeschichte am Beispiel der Theorie Alois Riegls, Kiel 1979; Georg Vasold, Alois Riegl und die Kunstgeschichte als Kulturgeschichte. Überlegungen zum Frühwerk des Wiener Gelehrten, Freiburg im Breisgau 2004; Alois Riegl Revisited: Beiträge zu Werk und Rezeption – Contributions to the Opus and its Reception, Peter Noever, Artur Rosenauer, Georg Vasold (Hrsg.), Wien 2010; Andrea Reichenberger, Riegls „Kunstwollen“: Versuch einer Neubetrachtung, Sankt Augustin 2003; Willibald Sauerländer, Alois Riegl und die Entstehung der autonomen Kunstgeschichte am Fin de siècle, in Fin de siècle: zu Literatur und Kunst der Jahrhundertwende, Roger Bauer, Eckart Heftrich (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 1977, pp. 125-139; Diana Graham Reynolds, Alois Riegl and the Politics of Art History. Intellectual Traditions and Austrian Identity in Fin de Siècle Vienna, San Diego, Calif. 1997; Diana Reynolds Cordileone, The advantages and disadvantages of Art History to Life: Alois Riegl and historicism, «Journal of Art Historiography» Number 3 (December, 2010), 13 pp. 24 Platone [428/3-348/7 a.C.]: : “[716] ... σ  ττ  ι τ τ γ, τν στ  σττ  γ,  τ  γ   σ  τ    σ  σσ ε  στ  στ  σττ  τ ε [716] β    τ , ...”, in Platonis Opera, ed. John Burnet, Oxford 1903. Mark J. Lutz, Divine Law and Political Philosophy in Plato’s Laws, DeKalb, Ill. 2012; Christoph Horn, Antike Lebenskunst, Glück und Moral von Sokrates bis zu den Neuplatonikern, München 1998; Gerhard Müller, Studie zu den platonischen Nomoi, München 1951. Non mi pare inutile sottolineare, a confronto, un’espressione usata nella Dichiarazione d’Indipendenza degli Stati Uniti d’America ratificata a Filadelfia dai padri fondatori il 4 luglio 1776: “– We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. –” (corsivo mio) (David Armitage, The Declaration of Independence: A Global History, Cambridge, Mass. 2007).

163


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

riservate alle pazienti gratuità dei poveri in ispirito25: è, probabilmente, per questa tentazione metafisica che non ci lascia mai indifferenti la suggestiva battuta scespiriana “Date parole all’afflizione”26. Il mondo comincia con la somiglianza nella sofferenza e quindi là dove esiste un essere capace di sofferenza27; considerazione, questa, che non sfuggì ad Adolfo Venturi – il fondatore della disciplina storico-artistica a livello universitario in Italia28 – il quale volle sottolineare come “solo i poveri conservano, solo essi che non hanno i mezzi sufficienti a distruggere”: una tale valutazione ha portato ai nostri giorni a concludere: “Beata povertà, dunque, se il benessere serve ad indorare le mani dell’ignoranza”29! La libertà nell’amore di Dio, son convinto, può risultare feconda30, e anche sostengo – avvalendomi sia di 25 La constatazione che i “makrioi  ” o beati pauperes della pròtasi di Luca VI, 20 vadano duttilmente integrati e corretti coi “    ” o beati pauperes spiritu di Matteo V, 3 ci offre la testimonianza di una sorta di correttiva censura morale sull’originaria audace permissività etica dei Vangeli venutasi a stabilire nel corso del tempo della diffusione e trasformazione strutturale e sincretistica del cristianesimo primitivo. Vedi il recente contributo di Luciano Canfora, La crisi dell’utopia: Aristofane contro Platone, Roma-Bari 2014, Parte sesta, VI, 1, p. 331. Cfr. Dante Alighieri, Purgatorio, XII, 110, in analogia alla tomistica Summa theologiae. 26 William Shakespeare [1564-1616], Macbeth, circa 1603 – Prima rappresentazione documentata, nell’aprile 1611 al Globe Theatre; la tragedia fu poi pubblicata nel First Folio del 1623 –, Atto IV, scena III, 209, Malcolm figlio di Duncan re di Scozia: “Give sorrow words: the grief that does not speak / Whispers the o’er-fraught heart and bids it break”. Albert R. Braunmuller, Introduction, in Macbeth (The New Cambridge Shakespeare, Volume 24), edited by A.R. Braunmuller, Cambridge, England–New York, N.Y. 1997, pp. 1-93; updated edition New York, N.Y. 2008; Lloyd Cline Sears, Shakespeare and the Problem of Evil, Thesis, University of Chicago, Typescript, 1935. Cfr. John H. Harvey, Give Sorrow Words: Perspectives on Loss and Trauma, Philadelphia, Pa. 2000; Jennifer D.H. Walthall and Cherri Hobgood, Give Sorrow Words, «Academic Emergency Medicine» Vol. 19, Issue 3 (March, 2012), pp. 359-360. 27 Cfr. Francesco Remotti, La sofferenza e la morte nelle diverse culture, in Corso di perfezionamento in cure palliative, (a cura di) Fulvia Vignotto, Torino 2002, pp. 423-439. 28 Sul Venturi [1856-1941]: Giacomo Agosti, La nascita della storia dell’arte in Italia: Adolfo Venturi, dal museo all’università, 1880-1940, Venezia 1996; Stefano Valeri, Adolfo Venturi e gli studi sull’arte, Roma 2006. 29 Alvar González-Palacios, L’armadio delle meraviglie, Milano 1997, p. 154. 30 Isabel de la Cruz, francescana spagnola, primo XVI secolo: John E. Longhurst, La beata Isabel de la Cruz ante la Inquisición, 1524-1529, «Cuadernos de historia de España» vol. 25-26 (Buenos Aires, 1957), pp. 279-303; Id., Luther’s Ghost in Spain (1517-1546), Lawrence, Kans. 1964, pp. 91-99.

164


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

un santo cardiòfaro come Agostino d’Ippona31 sia della melodia d’un antichissimo versetto vedico – che “la fede, se non è pensata, non è nulla”32, “solamente quando si ha fede si pensa”33: potremmo aggiungere che l’intuire è la potenza del pensiero34. Provocatoriamente Heidegger ritenne con sicumèra che si può davvero pensare, solo in tedesco e in greco35; ma allora come accostarsi e meditare, per esempio, il complesso pensiero filosoficoreligioso dell’India, lì dove “la miseria è nascosta da una cortina di mendicanti”36? Sull’entusiasmo per l’inesauribile ricchezza delle idee in una mente umana desiderosa di assoluto, preferisco rievocare l’incanto dell’agorafobica ed autoreclusa Emily Dickinson, quando appuntò liricamente che “The brain is wider than the sky”37, pur ignara del punto 31 In quanto, iconograficamente, Agostino [354-430] regge con la mano un cuore fiammeggiante trafitto da tre frecce. 32 “… unde in omni opere bono et incipiendo et perficiendo sufficientia nostra ex Deo est: ita nemo sibi sufficit vel ad incipiendam vel ad perficiendam fidem, sed sufficientia nostra ex Deo est: quoniam fides si non cogitetur, nulla est; et non sumus idonei cogitare aliquid quasi ex nobismetipsis, sed sufficientia nostra ex Deo est”, in S. Aurelii Augustini Hipponensis episcopi De Praedestinatione Sanctorum liber ad Prosperum et Hilarium, caput. II, 5, in Patrologiae Cursus Completus, Series Latina, accurante J[acques]-P[aul] Migne, Tomus XLIV, Paris 1865, col. 963. 33 Tra i libri sacri della religione vedica, ho selezionato, del Sāmaveda, il manuale ritualistico noto come la Chāndogya Upaniṣad [VIII-VII secolo a.C.]: trad. it. di Carlo Della Casa, Torino 1983, VII, 19; cfr. Hindu Scriptures, edited with new translations by Dominic Goodall, based on an anthology by R[obert] C[harles] Zaehner, London 1996, pp. 141-151. 34 Giovanni Gentile [1875-1944], La filosofia dell’arte, Firenze 1950, è la seconda edizione riveduta nel 1943 (Milano 19311). Gabriele Turi, Giovanni Gentile: una biografia, Firenze 1995. 35 Martin Heidegger [1889-1976], Was heißt Denken?, Tübingen 1956; Id., Vorträge und Aufsätze, Pfullingen 1954; cfr. John D. Caputo, The Mystical Elements in Heidegger’s Thought, Athens, Ohio 1978. 36 Philippe Jullian [nato Philippe Simounet, 1919-1977]: per la sua biografia si veda Ghislain de Diesbach, Un esthète aux enfers : Philippe Jullian, Paris 1994. Cfr., per altri sguardi sul continente indiano, Rossana Dedola, La valigia delle Indie e altri bagagli. Racconti di viaggiatori illustri: Tagore, Ray, Rossellini, Pasolini, Moravia, Ginsberg, Flaiano, Paz, Manganelli, Tabucchi, Grass, Conte, Petrignani, Naipul, Milano 2006; Giuliana Benvenuti, Viaggiatore come autore: l’India nella letteratura italiana del Novecento, Bologna 2008; Pier Paolo Pasolini, L’odore dell’India, Milano 1974. 37 Emily Dickinson [1830-1886]: “Il cervello umano è più grande del cielo”; verso iniziale del componimento CXXVI, in The Complete Poems, Boston, Little, Brown, and Co., 1924, Part One; vedi ora The Poems of Emily Dickinson:

165


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

di vista che di lì a breve il professor William James – fisiologo-filosofo-psicologo di Harvard discendente da una facoltosa famiglia calvinista –, avrebbe teorizzato baldanzosamente convinto che le emozioni sono localizzate nel corpo e non nel cervello38. Penso, inoltre, che la fede sia un dono libero adamantino e non vanitoso univoco possesso di grazia necessaria. La fede è lo stato senza sigilli e assuefazioni in cui non si ha bisogno di elaborare norme di coercizioni pedagogiche o di coonestare deleghe intellettive – meglio l’insonnia che cadere in un sonno dommatico cristallizzato (una sorta di fossilizzazione o imbalsamazione o sacro cimitero delle idee dei seriosi guardiani e tutori ortodossi del Ministero del Mistero operante, grazie all’appannaggio di potere del sacro sapere, controllo istituzionale sulla libertà Reading Edition, R.W. Franklin (ed.), Cambridge, Mass. 1999. Thomas W. Ford, Heaven Beguiles the Tired: Death in the Poetry of Emily Dickinson, Birmingham, AL 1966; Jane Donahue Eberwein, Emily Dickinson: Being in the Body, in The Cambridge Companion to Emily Dickinson, Wendy Martin (ed.), Cambridge 2002, pp. 129-141; Suzanne Juhasz, The Landscape of the Spirit, in Emily Dickinson: A Collection of Critical Essays, Judith Farr (ed.), Upper Saddle River, N.J. 1996, pp. 130-140; Ead., “Is Immortality True?”: Salvaging Faith in an Age of Upheavals, in A Historical Guide to Emily Dickinson, edited by Vivian R. Pollak, Oxford 2004, pp. 67-102; William R. Sherwood, Circumference and Circumstance: Stages in the Mind and Art of Emily Dickinson, New York, N.Y. 1968; Wendy Barker, Lunacy of Light: Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor, Carbondale and Edwardsville 1987; Cristanne Miller, Emily Dickinson: A Poet’s Grammar, Cambridge 1987; Brita Lindberg-Seyersted, The Voice of the Poet. Aspects of Style in the Poetry of Emily Dickinson, Uppsala 1968; Alfred Habegger, My Wars are laid away in Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson, New York, N.Y. 2001; Kenneth Stocks, Emily Dickinson and the Modern Consciousness: A Poet of Our Time, New York, N.Y. 1988; Barton Levi St. Armand, Emily Dickinson and Her Culture: The Soul’s Society, Cambridge 1984; Emily Dickinson’s Reception in the 1890s: A Documentary History, Willis J. Buckingham (ed.), Pittsburgh, Pa. 1989; Life. The Recognition of Emily Dickinson: Selected Criticism Since 1890, Caesar R. Blake (ed.), Ann Arbor, MI 1964; The International Reception of Emily Dickinson, edited by Domhnall Mitchell, and Maria Stuart, London 2009. 38 Cfr. Susan Manning, How Conscious Consciousness could grow? Emily Dickinson and William James, in Soft Canons: American Women Writers and Masculine Tradition, edited by Karen L. Kilcup, Iowa City, IA 1999, pp. 303-333; Fraser N. Watts, Psychological and Religious Perspectives on Emotion, «The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion» Vol. 6, No. 2 (1996), pp. 71-87; Henry Samuel Levinson, The Religious Investigations of William James, Chapel Hill, N.C. 1981.

166


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

di coscienza39). Tra le costellazioni ideali dei concetti, oggetto di fede è quanto di trascendente si può mostrare, non quanto d’immanente si può dimostrare, che è invece oggetto di scienza; e la scienza è coscienza del vero, è il riflesso dell’uomo nello specchio della natura in funzione dell’universo intero pur ravvolto nella notte dell’oltrecielo dei possibili40. “Con la fede ci si crede, e con la scienza ci si vede”, è un’indicativa espressione fatta recitare da Pier Paolo 39 “Ogni elemento esterno che tenti di introdursi [nel proprio sistema di valori vivo e in vivace sviluppo (sia rispetto all’esterno sia rispetto al passato)] è una limitazione della libertà, una costrizione, un dogma, sicché si può addirittura sostenere che, dal punto di vista del sistema, è male tutto ciò che è dogmatico, e il male ha come contenuto immediato il dogmatismo” ha scritto Hermann Broch nel testo della conferenza Das Weltbild des Romans (Budapest, 14 marzo 1933; Vienna, 17 marzo 1933) edita in Id., Dichten und Erkennen. Essays, hrsg. von Hannah Arendt, Zürich 1955, I, pp. 211-238. Cfr. “… La ciencia es un cementerio de ideas muertas, aunque de ellas salga vida. …”, in Miguel de Unamuno [1864-1936], Del sentimiento trágico de la vida en los hombres y en los pueblos, Madrid, Prudencio Pérez de Velasco, 1912, cito dall’edizione Madrid, Alianza, 1991, pp. 97-98. Un’analisi filologica offre Paolo Tanganelli, Del erostratismo al amor de dios: en torno al avantexto del Del sentimiento trágico de la vida, in Miguel de Unamuno, Estudios sobre su obra. II, Actas de la V Jornadas Unamunianas, Salamanca, Casa-Museo Unamuno, 23 a 25 de octubre de 2003, Ana Chaguaceda Toledano (Editora), Salamanca 2005, pp. 175-194: spec. p. 180. Vedi inoltre, Miguel de Unamuno, La agonía del cristianismo, opera pubblicata prima nella traduzione francese dello scrittore Jean Cassou (futuro critico d’arte e futuro cognato del filosofo-musicologo di charme Vladimir Jankélévitch) – Paris, F. Rieder, 1925 – durante l’esilio parigino dell’autore, e poi in castigliano nel 1931: il libro fu incluso nell’Index librorum prohibitorum e per l’analisi gesuitica si può prender visione di Quintín Pérez, El pensamiento religioso de Unamuno frente al de la Iglesia, Santander 1946. Emilio Salcedo, Vida de don Miguel, Salamanca 1964; Colette Rabaté y Jean-Claude Rabaté, Miguel de Unamuno: biografía, Madrid 2009; Alfonso Botti, La Spagna e la crisi modernista. Cultura, società civile e religiosa tra Otto e Novecento, Brescia 1987, ora anche in traduzione spagnola, di Elena E. Marcello, Cuenca 2012. 40 Si confrontino, ad es., le riflessioni di un Premio Nobel per la Fisica (nel 1945) come Wolfgang Pauli – figlio di un medico ebreo convertitosi al cattolicesimo prima del matrimonio, fu educato nella fede cattolica (lo scienziato Ernst Mach gli fece da padrino prima di divenire socialista ateo) ma la perse non ancora trentenne, nel lutto per la perdita della madre suicida e da neosposo di una ballerina con la quale riuscì a convivere per meno di un anno, dandosi poi al bere e rimasto fino alla fine precoce in corrispondenza con Carl Gustav Jung per ben ventisei anni –, pubblicate postume in Aufsätze und Vorträge über Physik und Erkenntnistheorie, Braunschweig 1961, ed in Writings on Physics and Philosophy, edited by Charles P. Enz and Karl von Meyenn, translated by Robert Schlapp, Berlin-New York 1994, con le riflessioni di Jean Piaget contenute in Épistémologie des sciences de l’homme, Paris 1972, ed in Sagesse et illusions de la philosophie, Paris 19682 édition augmentée d’une postface (19651).

167


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Pasolini al protagonista del suo film Uccellacci e uccellini (1966)41, Totò42; mentre spetta al discusso attore e scrittore Carmelo Bene aver coniato la lapidaria frase “un altare comincia dove finisce la misura”43: ci si salvaguarda apoditticamente provvedendoci di occhi delegati in lode del Signore e, invece, s’ingiurierebbe un Dio assente o un idolo sconfessato se risultassimo assiomaticamente provvisti di occhi spontanei e inosservanti? Grazie all’incomparabile compiuta bellezza onnicomprensiva, disvelata e in stato di grazia venuta ad abitare appropriatamente nella plenitudine dell’immagine artistica che giunge a sollecitarci col suo ascendente e a farci trasalire nel dischiuso 41 Pier Paolo Pasolini [1922-1975], Uccellacci e uccellini. Un film, Milano 1966. Enrico Cerquiglini, Pier Paolo Pasolini: Uccellacci uccellini: dalla sceneggiatura alla realizzazione cinematografica, Udine 1996; Giuseppe Conti Calabrese, Pasolini e il sacro, prefazione di Gianni Scalia, Milano 1994; Tomaso Subini, La necessità di morire: il cinema di Pier Paolo Pasolini e il sacro, Roma 2008; Da Accattone a Salò: 120 scritti sul cinema di Pier Paolo Pasolini, presentati da Vittorio Boarini, Pietro Bonfiglioli, Giorgio Cremonini, Bologna 1982; Hervé JoubertLaurencin, Pasolini : portrait du poète en cinéaste, Paris 1995; Pier Paolo Pasolini: Dokumente zur Rezeption seiner Filme in der deutschsprachigen Filmkritik 1963-85, Michael Hanisch (Redaktion), Erika Gregor (Mitarbeiterin) et al., Berlin 1994. 42 Su Totò [1898-1967]: Emanuela Patriarca, Totò nel cinema di poesia di Pier Paolo Pasolini, Firenze 2006. 43 Carmelo Bene [1937-2002]: “È l’estasi questa paradossale identità demenziale che svuota l’orante del suo soggetto e in cambio lo illude nella oggettivazione di sé, dentro un altro oggetto. Tutto quanto è diverso, è Dio. Se vuoi stringere sei tu l’amplesso, quando baci, la bocca sei tu. Divina è l’illusione. Questo è un santo. Così è di tutti i santi, fondamentalmente impreparati, anzi negati. Gli altari muovono verso di loro, macchinati dall’ebetismo della loro psicosi o da forze telluriche equilibranti – ma questo è escluso –. È così che un santo perde se stesso, tramite l’idiozia incontrollata. Un altare comincia dove finisce la misura. Essere santi è perdere il controllo, rinunciare al peso, e il peso è organizzare la propria dimensione. Dov’è passata una strega passerà una fata”, parte del monologo nel romanzo Nostra Signora dei Turchi, pubblicato a Milano, da Sugar, nel 1965, trasposto nell’omonimo lungometraggio girato nel Salento – film antisessantotto per eccellenza, stando all’autore – diretto sceneggiato ed interpretato da Carmelo Bene nel ‘68 (vincitore quell’anno del Premio speciale della Giuria, presieduta da Guido Piovene, alla Mostra Internazionale del Cinema di Venezia); lo stesso romanzo fu adattato e messo in scena due volte a Roma: al Teatro Beat ‘72, il 1° dicembre 1966, e poi al Teatro delle Arti, il 10 ottobre 1973. Nell’attesa di girare l’ultima scena del film, alla bella attrice Lydia Mancinelli, nei panni aureolati di Santa Margherita, successe di vedersi baciare le mani da una moltitudine di fedeli devotamente accorsi davanti alla chiesa leccese nel miraggio di una miracolosa apparizione mariana. Carmelo Bene, Giancarlo Dotto, Vita di Carmelo Bene, Milano 1998.

168


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

stupore44 – intendo quelle gradevoli o perturbanti 44 L’origine della parola arte, infatti, riporta a una radice indoeuropea *ar – più precisamente ad una radice proto-indoeuropea *h2r.-tó- (aggettivo deverbale, o la sua sostantivazione traducibile ‘ordine cosmico’), *h2r-tó‘appropriatamente unito, giusto, vero’, e *h2r.-tú-, -tí- (nomi deverbali), a sua volta formata dalla radice *h2ar- ‘tenere insieme, unire appropriatamente’ (cfr. sumerico har ‘anello; allestimento (di un aratro, etc.)’; antico indoario r.tá-, r.tú- ‘regola, ordine’ e r.tí- ‘arte’ contengono il grado zero; forma suffissa *ar-ti- da cui deriva ‘artigiano’ ed il greco  ‘adatto, appropriato’) (si trova anche in *h2ar-yo-; cfr. sanscrito ¦Ï| ā́ rya ‘nobile’) – che significa ‘modo appropriato’ ‘cosa ordinata al suo fine’ (è ancora ben diffuso tra noi l’uso dell’espressione “a regola d’arte”), in rapporto col termine greco , da cui l’italiano ‘armonia’, ed il latino ars, artis da cui ‘arte’; questa stessa radice sopravvive nel sanscrito come ṛ- ‘muoversi, andare, sorgere, tendere verso l’alto’. Cfr. James P. Mallory and Douglas Q. Adams, The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World, Oxford 2006; Michiel de Vaan, Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the Other Italic Languages, Leiden 2008; The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, revised and edited by Calvert Watkins, Boston, Mass. 20113 (19851), p. 5. Per il mio riferimento alla ritualità, davvero utile risulterà la sintesi offerta dal professor Antonio Panaino sulla rivista «Alpina» n° 4 (aprile, 2003), che qui di seguito stralcio: “Il termine latino ritus, da cui l’italiano ‘rito’, ha una storia molto complessa; esso, infatti, deriva in ultima istanza da un’antichissima radice indoeuropea ar, che, mediante una serie di diverse suffissazioni, sta alla base di una famiglia semantica estremamente ricca, costituita per esempio in latino da ars, ar-ti-s ‘arte, abilità’, ar-tus ‘articolazione’, in greco da arthmos ‘legame, unione’, ar-thron ‘giuntura, articolazione, membro’, arithmos ‘numero’, ma anche dai verbi ar-ar-isko ‘adatto, armonizzo’ e artuno ‘adatto’. Tale radice indoeuropea ha trovato poi nelle lingue indoiraniche, come il sanscrito (la lingua dei Veda), e nell’avestico (quella dei testi più antichi attribuiti a Zarathustra e alla sua cerchia), ma anche nell’antico persiano (lingua dei sovrani achemenidi Ciro, Cambise, Dario, Serse, etc.), una serie di sviluppi di estremo interesse: infatti, sia nei Veda sia nell’Avesta, il concetto di ‘ordine’, di ‘armonia cosmica’ è stato rispettivamente rappresentato mediante un tema nominale, che in sanscrito appare come ri-ta- e in avestico come asha- (da ar-ta-), a cui si aggiungerà anche l’antico persiano arta-, che nelle iscrizioni dei sovrani achemenidi ha assunto anche un significato più connotato sul piano politico. A questa categoria fu opposta dualisticamente quella della ‘menzogna’ o del ‘disordine cosmico’, espressa dal sanscrito druh-, dall’avestico druj- e dall’antico persiano drauga-. Inoltre, con una suffissazione diversa, il sanscrito ri-tu- e l’avestico ra-tu- vennero a designare ‘l’ordine stagionale’, un ‘tempo fissato’, e quindi più in generale la ‘regola’, la ‘norma’ (si confronti a questo punto anche il greco ar-tus ‘sistema, ordinamento’). Non stupirà quindi più di tanto notare che il latino ritus, dal quale siamo partiti, abbia avuto alle sue spalle una pregnanza e un significato ben articolato, che, al di là delle ben note accezioni di ‘cerimonia, consuetudine, modo, costume tradizionale’, si estrinseca come una ‘ordinanza’, nel senso di un’armonizzazione ordinata, di una sorta di legame tra tutte le sue parti costitutive” (cfr. A. Panaino, Rite, parole et pensée dans l’Avesta ancien et récent. Quatre leçons au Collège de France (Paris, 7, 14, 21, 28 mai 2001), («Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Sitzungberichte der philosophisch-historischen Klasse», Bd. 716, Veröffentlichungen zur Iranistik, Nr. 31), édité par Velizar Sadovski avec la collaboration rédactionnelle de Sara Circassia, Wien 2004; Id., Rito e ritualità nella tradizione massonica tra storia e antropologia, in Storia d’Italia.

169


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

realizzazioni d’arte figurativa o non-oggettuale che abbiano esteticamente aureo carattere trasfigurante di vibrante assaporamento estatico – è possibile presentire e trasmettere il nitore della divina virtù che eccelle risana e salva, e l’opera d’arte – poeticamente mimetica o utopica – può, così, acquisire privilegiata magia e potere taumaturgico, fino a farsi ritualmente feticcio o reliquia in un’oscillante luce ch’è invisibile in sé stessa. Non a caso il profetico poeta cristiano-maronita Kahlil Gibran soleva proferire “Noi viviamo solo per scoprire nuova bellezza, tutto il resto è una forma d’attesa”; e questo pensiero preconizzava o sovente sposava l’altro non meno fascinoso “La generosità è dare più di quanto tu puoi, e l’orgoglio è prender meno di quanto tu hai bisogno”45. La misterica bellezza infinita di Dio, diffusa in modulate onde dell’indicibile e rivelantesi alla sapientia cordis dell’uomo pio al culmine della deditio nell’esperienza orante – foss’anche davanti alla maestosità ritualistica di sacre icone –, è compendiata nella Filocalìa. Meditando sul tema del generoso altruismo filantropico, si ha la fantastica rivelazione che davvero l’impalpabile bellezza è negli occhi emozionati di chi guarda senza pregiudizievole miscredenza o valutazioni preconcette, Annali 21: La Massoneria, Torino, Einaudi, 2006, pp. 753-770). 45 Nato Ğibrān Khalīl Ğibrān [1883-1931], fu – da praticante della Religione della Vita – poeta, drammaturgo ed autore di canzoni, e – col bagaglio di studi d’arte compiuti a Boston e Parigi e l’amichevole apprendistato da Auguste Rodin – volle cimentarsi in pittura, disegno ed illustrazione ad acquerello, e scultura: “We live only to discover new beauty. Everything else is a form of waiting”, “Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need”, in Kahlil Gibran, Sand and Foam. A book of aphorisms, New York, A.A. Knopf, 1926; cfr. “Generosity is not in giving me that which I need more than you do, but it is in giving me that which you need more than I do”, ibidem, senza tralasciare la sua suggestiva poesia On Giving, la quinta nella raccolta intitolata The Prophet, New York, A.A. Knopf, 1923. Suheil B. Bushrui, Joe Jenkins, Kahlil Gibran: Man and Poet. A New Biography, Oxford 1998; Alexandre Najjar, Kahlil Gibran, a Biography, London 2008; Edoardo Scognamiglio, Il cammino dell’uomo. L’itinerario spirituale di Kahlil Gibran, Roma 1999; Vincenza Grassi, Il tema della morte nelle opere di Ğibrān Khalīl Ğibrān, «Oriente Moderno», n.s., anno 4, 65, nr. 1/3 (gennaio-marzo, 1985), pp. 1-38; Poeti arabi a New York. Il circolo di Gibran, introduzione e traduzione di Francesco Medici, prefazione di Amedeo Salem, Bari 2009.

170


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

perché la felicità non è claustrofobica ed oscurantista ma è reale e piena – pur senza barlume di nostalgico significato – solo se ariosamente condivisa in dolcezza d’adesione46. Dico questo anche se, dopo la lunga insonnia di tredici anni d’esilio47, Victor Hugo, tutto dèdito al genio di Shakespeare, sperimentò che “l’uomo che non medita vive nella cecità, l’uomo che medita vive nell’oscurità”48. In quell’erranza, che per Heidegger diverrà tempo della notte del mondo – “tempo della povertà perché diviene sempre più povero… tanto povero da non poter riconoscere la mancanza di Dio come mancanza”49 –, spetterebbe al corroborante artista sciogliere il vertiginoso velame abissale dell’essere in un canto poeticamente evocatore del sacro. Quanto poi ha ragione il nevrotico egotista Marcel Proust quando precisava: “Il solo vero viaggio, il solo bagno di Giovinezza, non consisterebbe nel cercare nuovi paesaggi, ma nell’avere altri occhi, vedere 46 Dalle statistiche statunitensi per l’anno 2011 risulta che le classi alte di successo hanno devoluto in caritatevole beneficenza mediamente l’1,3% dei loro redditi con vantaggiose detrazioni fiscali, di contro al 3,2% generosamente donato dalle classi medio-basse senza le stesse agevolazioni di tassazione; chiaramente l’élite benestante beneficia soprattutto istituzioni prestigiose (i più costosi college ed università, scuole mediche d’eccellenza, musei, teatri, parchi, associazioni sportive come ad es. quella del golf), mentre spetta agli anonimi piccolo-medio borghesi supportare empatici programmi umanitari di miglioramento delle forniture d’acqua in Africa, o di educazione ai pericoli nell’uso di droghe (es. Drug Abuse Resistance Education), o aiuti ad organizzazioni di servizio sociale come United Way, Feeding America, Red Cross, Salvation Army, o ad ospedali non-profit, o ad enti religiosi. Sul concetto di felicità indagato sia dal punto di vista spirituale-mistico sia da quello coerente razionale-scientifico, cfr. Jonathan Haidt, The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding the Truth in Ancient Wisdom, New York, N.Y. 2006. 47 “L’exil est une espèce de longue insomnie”, frase che sarebbe stata condivisa da Victor Hugo. Jean-Marc Hovasse, Victor Hugo. Pendant l’exil I : 1851-1864, Paris 2008. 48 “L’homme qui ne médite pas vit dans l’aveuglement, l’homme qui médite vit dans l’obscurité. Nous n’avons que le choix du noir”, in Victor Hugo, William Shakespeare, Paris, Librairie internationale, 1864, Première partie, Livre V: Les Âmes I. Cfr. Graham Robb, Victor Hugo, London 1997, pp. 399-400. 49 Del trentasettenne Martin Heidegger – che ventenne aveva sfiorato il noviziato gesuitico – si veda la conferenza del 29 dicembre 1926 Wozu Dichter? poi rielaborata come quinto saggio del libro di svolta Holzwege [1935-1946], Frankfurt am Main 1950.

171


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

l’universo con gli occhi d’un altro, di cento altri, vedere i cento universi che ciascuno di loro vede, che ciascuno di loro è”50; al che si può angelicamente collegare la considerazione dell’eroico Saint-Exupéry: “Si vede bene solo col cuore, l’essenziale rimane invisibile agli occhi”51, a patto che la si integri con l’emendante specificazione di Oscar Wilde: “An artist’s heart is in his head”52. In ogni ricerca di nuovi sorprendenti paesaggi, si ricordi che la vera patria dell’uomo non privato di lucido 50 “Le seul véritable voyage, le seul bain de Jouvence, ce ne serait pas d’aller vers de nouveaux paysages, mais d’avoir d’autres yeux, de voir l’univers avec les yeux d’un autre, de cent autres, de voir les cent univers que chacun d’eux voit, que chacun d’eux est”, in Marcel Proust [1871-1922], A la recherche du temps perdu :  cinquième tome, La prisonnière, chapitre II: Les Verdurin se brouillent avec M. de Charlus, Paris, Gallimard, 19231; édition sous la direction de Jean-Yves Tadié avec la collaboration de Antoine Compagnon, Pierre-Edmond Robert, Paris, Gallimard 1988, t. III, p. 762. Roger Shattuck, Proust, London 1974, pp. 102-110. Va da sé che Proust non poté mancare d’intuire bene che ogni rivoluzione scientifica, cui spetta di sollevare il velo che nascondeva aspetti sorprendenti del mondo reale, procura nuovi occhi a chi si mostri interessato all’indagine dei misteriosi segreti della natura: infatti per Marcel non dovette essere trascurabile il fatto d’aver avuto come padre un medico del più antico ospedale parigino (l’hôtel-Dieu) e professore alla Facoltà di Medicina di Parigi reputato un luminare dell’igiene sanitaria – Adrien –, e come fratello cadetto un medico chirurgo, Robert (Daniel Panzac, Le docteur Adrien Proust : père méconnu, précurseur oublié, Paris-Budapest-Torino 2003; Bernard Straus, Maladies of Marcel Proust: Doctors and Disease in His Life and Work, New York-London 1980). 51 Antoine Marie Jean-Baptiste Roger de Saint-Exupéry [1900-1944]: “On ne voit bien qu’avec le cœur. L’essentiel est invisible pour les yeux”, in Le Petit Prince, avec dessins par l’auteur, New York, Reynal & Hitchcock, 1943, libro dedicato al caro amico scrittore e critico d’arte Léon Werth (la prima edizione fu pubblicata sia in originale francese, sia in inglese – The Little Prince, con la traduzione realizzata dalla cinquantasettenne Katherine Woods –; altra, pressoché coeva edizione in inglese, uscì pei tipi della nuovaiorchese Harcourt, Brace & World). Alain Vircondelet, La véritable histoire du Petit Prince, Paris 2008; Eliot G. Fay, Saint Exupéry in New York, «Modern Language Notes», Johns Hopkins University Press, Vol. 61, No. 7 (November, 1946), pp. 458-462; Id., The Philosophy of Saint Exupéry, «The Modern Language Journal» Vol. 31, Issue 2 (February, 1947), pp. 90-97. 52 Sono parole pronunciate dal pittore Alan Trevor – alla sera al Club dopo una giornata di lavoro dedicata a ritrarre, in un dipinto a grandezza naturale da cavalletto, un avvizzito vecchio straccione che non aveva mancato di muovere a pietà, fino a riceverne in elemosina una moneta del valore d’una sovrana, un amico dell’artista in visita allo studio di pittura; ma in realtà nei cenci del miserando modello aveva posato un carissimo amico del pittore e suo fedele collezionista, il Barone Hausberg, uno degli uomini più ricchi d’Europa, che gli aveva espressamente richiesto di voler essere effigiato nei panni d’un mendicante: “La fantaisie d’un millionnaire!” – nel racconto breve di Oscar Wilde, The Model Millionaire. A Note of Admiration [1881], London, Methuen & Co., 1908.

172


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

sguardo – sic et simpliciter – è l’umanità indisgiungibile dalla sua geografia delle emozioni non lesinate, solo dopo viene la geografia come scienza della Terra53; e chi impara sapientemente a vedere avverte il brivido dell’invalicabile avvicinandosi a sconfinanti territori dell’invisibile polvere di stelle54. Se Bukowski, lo spregiudicato scrittore tedescoamericano controcorrente (di rottura, si sarebbe detto ai tempi della Beat Generation), poté proclamare che si scrive solo per due motivi – o per amore o per rabbia55 –, ebbene, indagando il sostrato del sentimento anelante dell’altruismo filantropico mi si è chiarito, invece, che si 53 Si può confrontare Otto Wilhelm Rahn [1904-1939]: Hans-Jürgen Lange, Otto Rahn und die Suche nach dem Gral: Biografie und Quellen, Engerda 1999; Christian Bernadac, Le mystère Otto Rahn :  le Graal et Montségur  :  du catharisme au nazisme, Paris 1978; Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, The Occult Roots of Nazism: The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935, with a Foreword by Rohan Butler, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England 1985. 54 “Wer wirklich sehen lernt, nähert sich dem Unsichtbaren”, in Paul Celan (pseudonimo di Paul Antschel) [1920-1970], Mikrolithen sinds, Steinchen. Die Prosa aus dem Nachlaß: kritische Ausgabe, herausgegeben und kommentiert von Barbara Wiedemann und Bertrand Badiou, Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp, 2005. Su questo poeta rumeno ebreo – già amante della poetessa Ingeborg Bachmann e poi sposatosi con l’abile artista dell’incisione Gisèle de Lestrange – morto suicida a Parigi dopo essersi gettato giù nella Senna dal ponte Mirabeau, e le cui liriche hanno meritato nientemeno che l’attenzione dell’influente filosofo Hans-Georg Gadamer, vedi John Felstiner, Paul Celan: Poet, Survivor, Jew, New Haven, Conn. 1995; Paul Celan: Biographie und Interpretation, Andrei Corbea-Hoişie (Hrsg.), Konstanz-Paris-Iaşi 2000; Winfried Menninghaus, Paul Celan. Magie der Form, Frankfurt am Main 1980; Hans-Georg Gadamer, Wer bin Ich und wer bist Du? Ein Kommentar zu Paul Celans Gedichtfolge ‚Atemkristall‘, Frankfurt am Main 1986; Otto Pöggeler, Mystische Elemente im Denken Martin Heideggers und im Dichten Celans, «Zeitwende» 2 (1982), pp. 65-92; Francesco Camera, Paul Celan. Poesia e religione, Genova 2003. 55 Nato Heinrich Karl Bukowski [1920-1994]: si leggano i versi iniziali della sua poesia War Some of the Time, nella raccolta postuma Sifting Through the Madness for the Word, the Line, the Way: New Poems, edited by John Martin, New York, Ecco, 2003, p. 382: “when you write a poem it / needn’t be intense / it / can be nice and / easy / and you shouldn’t necessarily / be / concerned only with things like anger or / love or need; / at any moment the / greatest accomplishment might be to simply / get / up and tap the handle / on that leaking toilet...”; ma si potrebbero sfogliare, ad esempio, pagine di ossessiva e brutale onestà letteraria – tra depressione alcolismo depravazione e blasfemia alla vita convenzionale – nel suo romanzo Factotum, Los Angeles, Calif. 1975. Howard Sounes, Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life, New York, N.Y. 1998; Russell Harrison, Against The American Dream: Essays on Charles Bukowski, Santa Rosa, Calif. 1994.

173


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

può vivere e operare per amore e per rabbia, in sintonia, sulla rotta dell’indefinibile destino della sfuggente felicità, anche quando il mondo ci appare capovolto e impazzire nel disordine di una turba psichica potrebbe sembrare la sola perfetta salute mentale fino alla fallimentare morte volontaria (ne darò più avanti un esempio, con il ricordo tragico dello scienziatofilàntropo George R. Price). Non saprei decidermi, ora, se il saldo filàntropo vada più stigmatizzato ed ammirato come un sollecito e insofferente fedele d’amore piuttosto che ritenerlo semplicemente un puro e salutare devoto al rispetto verso gli altri, oppure vada decisamente soppesato, nel giudizio sociale, come un caritatevole surplus d’indulgente compassione e di benevola tenerezza che eccede la declinazione virtuosa e la giustizia imperativa della precettistica dei ristretti Codici56. Infatti, se il dettato dei nostri comportamenti umani è già compendiato nel pervasivo decalogo dei doveri elencati nei sacri Comandamenti mosaici57, con incentivanti promesse religiose di ricompense sia in terra sia in cielo, dovrebbe essere giudicato fuori ruolo e non previsto un impegnativo e oneroso comportamento di altruismo filantropico che non si attende fatui encomi o sbandierate ricompense o onorificenze di alcunché o mirabolanti santità ad eroicità d’azione ma è di disinteressato benefìcio e di miglioramento agli altri, al pari di un dono senza necessità di contraccambio58. Paul Ricœur era della ferma opinione che “la giustizia 56 Cfr. Paul Ricœur [1913-2005], Le sfide e le speranze del nostro comune futuro, «Prospettiva Persona» n. 4 (1993), pp. 6-16. 57 Non avere altri dèi oltre a me. Non farti scultura, né immagine alcuna; non ti prostrare davanti a loro e non le servire. Non pronunciare il nome del Signore, Dio tuo, invano. Ricordati del giorno del riposo per santificarlo. Onora tuo padre e tua madre. Non uccidere. Non commettere adulterio. Non rubare. Non attestare il falso. Non desiderare cosa alcuna del tuo prossimo. 58 Lewis Hyde, The Gift: Imagination and the Erotic Life of Property, New York, N.Y. 1979; Alain Caillé, Anthropologie du don :  le tiers paradigme, Paris 2000; L’interpretazione dello spirito del dono, a cura di Pierluigi Grasselli, Cristina Montesi, con un saggio di Alain Caillé, Milano 2008.

174


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

resta tale, pur nel suo rigore politico-giuridico, solo se si ammette l’eccezione del perdono59, ossia se l’economia del dono, con la sua logica poetica più che etica coopera con l’economia dello scambio, della giustizia, della reciprocità”60. ‘Dono’, ‘regalo’, ‘sacrificio’, ‘condurre sulla retta via’, sono il ventaglio di coesi significati che, in un percorso millenario, il termine arabo hadiya (‫ )هدية‬viene certamente a ricapitolare; ma tra le molteplici virtù del dare e darsi – generosità, filantropia, misericordia, carità, aiuto, conforto, disponibilità, benevolenza, sollecitudine, alleviamento, lenimento, acquietamento, accudimento, consolazione, compassione, benignità, liberalità, indulgenza, clemenza, giustizia, accettazione, convivenza – la carità ha lo sclerotizzato limite dell’assenza di reciprocità col questuante e non risulta assimilabile alla concezione di dono relazionale61. È tragico il pensiero che, pur nello sforzo più strenuo di generosità personale e di pura abnegazione, riaffiorerà sempre lo scacco dell’incapienza – oggi sarebbe più à la page dire del deficit – dei nostri doni di fronte alla viltà ombrosa di ogni persistente teodicea ed a tutto l’insensato dolore del mondo62: un mondo, di frequente, più prossimo all’afróre di un’esiliata valle di lacrime che alle fragranze di un rimpatriato giardino dell’Eden. Ecco, da questa sventurata asimmetria, da quest’apparente storia orfana dei linguaggi dell’aldilà, da questo notturnismo dell’anima acròma ci dobbiamo però attendere – quale strumento suppletivo a imperative norme comportamentali e prescrizioni codificate di premesse morali – un’introspezione possente, 59 In realtà, il per-dono risulta essere un vero iper-dono. 60 Ricœur, Le sfide e le speranze del nostro comune futuro cit., p. 15. 61 Cfr. Candace Clark, Misery and Company: Sympathy in Everyday Life, Chicago, Ill. 1997; Cristina Montesi, Un confronto comparato tra differenti business ethics nella prospettiva del bene comune, in Idee e metodi per il bene comune, a cura di Pierluigi Grasselli, Milano 2009, pp. 112-131. 62 Cfr., del sociologo e criminologo ebreo spentosi agli inizi del 2013 dopo lunga malattia di Parkinson, Stanley Cohen, States of Denial: Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering, Cambridge 2001.

175


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

tale da insegnarci la via maestra e quindi il percorso dell’organizzare il trasumanar in un contemperato stato di libertà e di rapporto di fiducia e d’amicizia dell’altro che cauterizzi le nostre ferite umane63, sgombri le sdegnose ombre della diffidenza e disciolga le vischiosità o amnesie del nostro cuore – guai ad un miocardio pietrificato nel mutismo dell’incomunicabilità! – in un ringraziamento per la vita che abbiamo avuto e per gli auspicabili doni che ancora possiamo elargire nel corso ulteriore della nostra esistenza; fosse pure la semplice trasparenza di una magica parola inaugurale nata dal centro di ciò ch’è condiviso64, nel rifiuto di ogni tragedia che imponga oppressi e oppressori, certi che anche noi non siamo passati per il mondo insensatamente o inavvertitamente e senza toccarlo con la nostra impronta d’impetuoso vizio divino65. In ciascuno di noi è fortissimo il bisogno di credere che la bestiale ferocia umana verrà punita e i nobili sentimenti, quali generosità e altruismo66, verranno in qualche modo premiati a vera sostanza del mondo; 63 Cfr. Gaëlle Fiasse, L’autre et l’amitié chez Aristote et Paul Ricœur. Analyses éthiques et ontologiques, Louvain 2006. 64 Cfr. Henri Lavondés, Magie et langage, «L’Homme» 3 (1963), pp. 109-117; Stanley Jeyaraja Tambiah, The Magical Power of Words, «Man» 3 (1968), pp. 175-208. 65 Cfr. Alberto Caracciolo [1918-1990], Religione ed eticità: studi di filosofia della religione, Genova, il melangolo, 1999 (Napoli, Morano, 19711): sulla sua riflessione filosofica, vedi Domenico Venturelli, Alberto Caracciolo. Sentieri del suo filosofare, Genova 2011; Giovanni Moretto, Filosofia umana: itinerario di Alberto Caracciolo, Brescia 1992; Andrzej Nowicki, Alberto Caracciolo i jego filozofia religii, «Euhemer. Przegląd Religioznawczy» n. 3, 89 (1973), pp. 73-82. 66 Non si tralascino le riflessioni di Roland Gérard Barthes [19151980] sulla generosità (Le lexique de l’auteur. Séminaire à l’École Pratique des Hautes Études, 1973-1974, suivi de fragments inédits du “Roland Barthes par Roland Barthes”, avant-propos d’Éric Marty, présentation et édition d’Anne Herschberg Pierrot, Paris, Éd. du Seuil, 2010), ad es.: “Avrei ben voluto essere ‘generoso’. Quante volte non lo sono, ‘sinceramente’, ‘lucidamente’! Quante volte questa scrittura mi appare pusillanime nei confronti di tutto ciò che mi indigna nel mondo ed a cui partecipo con tutto me stesso, emotivamente ed intellettualmente, via via che affluisce l’informazione quotidiana. Ma ecco, la ‘generosità’ è immediatamente bloccata dai suoi stessi segni: non posso infatti esprimere la generosità senza segnalarla, e dunque, per il mio disgusto di ogni teatralità, e diffidenza nei confronti di ogni ‘segnaletica’, io passo accanto, devìo verso l’indiretto...” (trad. di Carlo Maria Ossola); cfr. Claude Costa, Roland Barthes moraliste, Villeneuve-d’Ascq (Nord), PUS, 1998. Sul puro altruismo per bontà di cuore, Charles Daniel Batson, Altruism in Humans, New York 2011.

176


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

anche coloro che pensano che questo non accadrà sempre, vorrebbero invece che accadesse. L’uso che or ora ho fatto del termine teodicea67 fu inaugurato dal matematico e filosofo Leibniz68, e vale in quanto va inteso come giustificazione dell’ineffabile Dio rispetto ai mali nel mondo, o – in altre parole – come riconoscimento del frustrante cortocircuito fra l’esigenza di supremo assoluto Bene e il malcontento per la ritenuta imperfezione del Creato o per i ciechi e immorali decreti della Natura. Già l’umanista e teologo Erasmo e il veemente Lutero vollero disputare su ‘potenza’ divina e ‘giustizia’ divina, e di nuovo il contrasto si rinnovò fra Hobbes e l’arcivescovo John Bramhall; il momento critico di tutta la storia del problema si ebbe proprio nell’epoca che va da Malebranche in rottura con Descartes a Pierre Bayle69. In tempi ben più vicini a noi, lo stesso termine filosofico è divenuto, lessicalmente, sinonimo di teologia razionale. Il sostantivo Dio richiama l’idea di un Essere personale, di una positività assoluta, di un certo coefficiente di verità che si svela dal segreto cammino 67 Gerhard Streminger, Gottes Güte und die Übel der Welt. Das Theodizeeproblem, Tübingen 1992; Das Böse. Eine historische Phänomenologie des Unerklärlichen, Carsten Colpe, Wilhelm Schmidt-Biggemann (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 19932; Theodizee: das Böse in der Welt, Bernd J. Claret (Hrsg.), Darmstadt 20082; Barry L. Whitney, Theodicy: An Annotated Bibliography on the Problem of Evil, 1960-1990 (Garland Reference Library of The Humanities, Vol. 1111), New York, N.Y. 1993, volume bibliografico di ben 650 pagine; John Bowker, Problems of Suffering in Religions of the World, Cambridge 1970. 68 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz [1646-1716], Essais de Théodicée sur la bonté de Dieu, la liberté de l’homme et l’origine du mal, opera redatta nel 1705 ma pubblicata per la prima volta ad Amsterdam – chez Isaac Troyel – nel 1710: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Glaube und Vernunft. Texte zur Religionsphilosophie, hrsg. von Norbert Hoerster, München 1979; Id., Theodicy: Essays on the Goodness of God, the Freedom of Man, and the Origin of Evil, edited with an Introduction by Austin Farrer, translated by Eveleen M. Huggard, New Haven, Conn. 1952. Gregory Brown, Leibniz’s Theodicy and the Confluence of Worldly Goods, «Journal of the History of Philosophy» 26 (1988), pp. 571-591. 69 Su Bayle [1647-1706]: Hubert Bost, Pierre Bayle et la Religion, Paris 1994; Gianni Paganini, Analisi della fede e critica della ragione nella filosofia di Pierre Bayle, Firenze 1980; Elizabeth Labrousse, Pierre Bayle, T. 2: Héterodoxie et rigourisme, The Hague 1964.

177


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

di perfezione70, nella linea fatale di una particolare tradizione teologica oltreché di uno sbilanciamento nella conformistica ‘logica della pretesa’ in una contagiosa credenza o pratica religiosa tradizionale non immerse nelle acque del dubbio sapienziale. Il male e il nulla sono i due sgomentevoli aspetti di un’unica euristica questione d’intelligibilità delle indivisibili ingiustizie nelle quali possono palesarsi caotici echi dell’alluvio dell’Eterno. Nella testimonianza del pittore Vincent van Gogh – figlio di un pastore protestante e lui stesso maturatosi attraverso studi teologici e un’esperienza di predicatore ed evangelizzatore – ritroviamo, fiduciosamente, che “… dall’altra sponda della vita forse riconosceremo una ragion d’essere della sofferenza che, vista da qui, s’impossessa totalmente dell’intero orizzonte da sembrare un diluvio universale privo di speranza. Come tutto questo funzioni, sappiamo ben poco, e quanto di meglio possiamo fare in proposito è osservare un campo di grano, anche se è solo dipinto”71. Nell’orizzonte religioso il male non è semplice male morale72, è malattia 70 “Die Wahrheit ist die Unverborgenheit des Seienden als des Seienden” (“La verità è la disascosità dell’ente in quanto essente”), scrisse Martin Heidegger, e mantenne quest’espressione almeno fino all’edizione del 1950 di Holzwege, Frankfurt am Main, pei tipi di V. Klostermann, ma poi per la terza edizione del 1957 mutò linguaggio e scelse: “Die Wahrheit ist das sichlichtende Sein des Seienden” (“La verità è lo stagliantesi essere dell’ente”). 71 Als Mensch unter Menschen: Vincent van Gogh in seinen Briefen an den Bruder Theo, Auswahl, Vorwort und Kommentare von Fritz Erpel, aus dem Holländischen, Französischen und Englischen übertragen von Eva Schumann, München-Wien 1980 (Berlin 19591), 2 Bände: Bd. 2, p. 274. 72 Cfr. Paul Ricœur, Le mal. Un défi à la philosophie et à la théologie, Genève 1986; Susan Neiman, Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy, Princeton-Oxford 2002; Problem of Evil in Early Modern Philosophy [Papers presented at a Conference held at the University of Toronto, September 3-5, 1999], edited by Elmar J. Kremer and Michael J. Latzer, Toronto-Buffalo 2001; John S. Feinberg, The Many Faces of Evil: Theological Systems and the Problems of Evil, revised and expanded edition, Wheaton, Ill. 2004 (Grand Rapids, MI 19941); Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives, edited by Amélie Oksenberg Rorty, London 2001; M.B. Ahern, The Problem of Evil, London 1971; Cornelius G. Hunter, Darwin’s God: Evolution and the Problem of Evil, Grand Rapids, MI 2001, con utili riferimenti bibliografici alle pp. 177-189; Howard Littleton Philip, Jung and the Problem of Evil, London 1958; The Problem of Evil (Oxford Readings in

178


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

senza antìdoto73, disperante miseria74, disfacimento dell’esperienza interiore, occorrenza di comunicazione offesa dalla nostra ottusità o dalla distrazione altrui, è ritualizzato bigotto accecamento, astioso distacco da un centro di gravità, cedimento da finitudine, azzeramento di promesse di spontanee felicità, concordia di prepotenze, nebbia inattraversabile dall’aristocrazia di tènere parole, protettivo contatto tradìto, chiodatura in cono d’ombra, imbellettatura di contingente morte vergognosa: proprio il raggio della conoscenza del male come radicale negatività presuppone quello spazio della Trascendenza, quel rapporto originario con l’Assoluto in cui l’uomo bisognoso tanto più si riconosce quanto più diviene cosciente della personale stringente finitezza e delle assonanti disavventure. Vale sempre l’ammonizione di Aristotele che: ragionare di una cosa vuol dire ragionare di quella cosa e del suo contrario75; non possiamo, quindi, commisurare il trasparente bene tarandolo dell’angustiante male. La conoscenza umana è imperfetta di fronte all’infinito che ne è l’oggetto inesausto, ma non per niente il sapere aude oraziano76 divenne il coraggioso motto kantiano dell’Illuminismo77, senza tralasciare, poi, che “la ragione è un termine assai inadeguato per comprendere tutte le forme della vita culturale Philosophy), edited by Marilyn McCord Adams, and Robert Merrihew Adams, Oxford 1991; Problem of Evil: A Reader, edited by Mark Larrimore, Oxford 2001. 73 Cfr. John J. Medina, The Clock of Ages: Why We age, How We age, winding back the Clock, Cambridge 1997. 74 Cfr. Absolute Poverty and Global Justice: Empirical Data, Moral Theories, Initiatives, edited by Elke Mack et al., Farnham, England–Burlington, Vt. 2009. 75 Su Aristotele [384-322 a.C.]: Myles Burnyeat, Aristotle on Understanding Knowledge, in Aristotle on Science: The Posterior Analytics. Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium Aristotelicum held in Padua from September 7 to 15, 1978, edited by Enrico Berti, Padova 1981, pp. 97-139; Jan Łukasiewicz, Aristotle’s Syllogistic from the Standpoint of Modern Formal Logic, Oxford 19572; C.W.A. Whitaker, Aristotle’s De Interpretatione: Contradiction and Dialectic, Oxford 1996; Terence Irwin, Aristotle’s First Principles, Oxford 1988. 76 Epistulae, I, 2, 40: Dimidium facti, qui coepit, habet: sapere aude, incipe. 77 Vedi Immanuel Kant, Beantwortung der Frage: Was ist Aufklärung?, «Berlinische Monatsschrift» 4 (1784), pp. 481-494.

179


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

dell’uomo in tutta la loro ricchezza e varietà. Ma tutte queste forme sono forme simboliche”78. Se il regno di Dio comincia simbolicamente sulla terra, nella prospettiva assimilatrice cristiana la scomparsa del velenoso male, del rifiuto blasfemo, dell’impietas e dell’infliggere resta una possibilità affidata alla beatificante grazia, alla buona volontà, alla dedizione, alla pietas e all’alleviare79, dacché nell’era cristiana il dissimmetrico dolore e il memento della morte così come il peccato e la colpevolezza non sono serenamente scomparsi ma continuano crudelmente a sussistere. Nella vera religione rivelata Martin Lutero pretendeva che iustus ex fide vivit, senza necessità di ricorrere o cercare con acribìa la giustificazione attraverso le opere. Queste prospettive conflittuali e incompatibili si risolvono vivendo nell’autentica effusione dell’esperienza religiosa liberatrice, che non significa affatto esulare, esimersi, oppure chiudere gli occhi e rimanere inerti e passivi davanti ai mali della decrepitezza del mondo80, perché lo spirito devoto percepisce con acutezza esasperata l’ingiusta deumanizzazione, la sòrdida miseria, il gioco schernevole e i loro frutti; ciò non significa che gli efferati mali e offese del destino denunciati dai laici cessano davvero di essere mali o 78 Ernst Cassirer, An Essay on Man: An Introduction to a Philosophy of Human Culture, New Haven, Conn. 1944, Chapter II. Cfr. John Skorupski, Symbol and Theory: A Philosophical Study of Theories of Religion in Social Anthropology, Cambridge, England–New York, N.Y. 1976. Sul termine goethiano Gleichnis nel Faust come ‘immagine simbolica’, vedi supra. 79 Cfr. Hendrik Wagenvoort, Pietas: Selected Studies in Roman Religion, Leiden 1980; Costanza Mastroiacovo, L’Eneide di Virgilio: Ottimismo e Pessimismo, pietas e impietas di Enea nel dibattito critico, in Il mondo classico nell’immaginario contemporaneo, a cura di Benedetto Coccia, Roma 2008, spec. pp. 415-427; James D. Garrison, Pietas from Vergil to Dryden, University Park, Pa. 1992, spec. Auctores Pietatis: Classical and Christian Ideas of Pietas, pp. 21-60; Arnold Angenendt, Grundformen der Frömmigkeit im Mittelalter, München 2003; Frömmigkeit und Freiheit. Theologische, ethische und seelsorgerliche Anfragen, Friedrich Wintzer, Henning Schröer, Johannes Heide (Hrsg.), Rheinbach-Merzbach 1995; Werner Gruehn, Die Frömmigkeit der Gegenwart. Grundtatsachen der empirischen Psychologie, Konstanz 19602. 80 Cfr. La passività: un tema filosofico-politico in María Zambrano, a cura di Annarosa Buttarelli, Milano 2006.

180


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

causa di rimorso e appello al riluttante impegno civile quando cadono sotto i nostri occhi sensibilizzati81. Sì, la radice umana di ogni operare e agire è la libertà, ma la lucente libertà – ci ha testimoniato Nelson Mandela – non è soltanto spezzare le proprie catene dell’assoggettamento, è anche vivere in modo tollerante così da rispettare e accrescere le libertà degli altri. C’è quindi eventualità d’indignarsi e di capire82, e non si deve aver paura di poter suffragare la temperie – o farne anche tesoro – delle esperienze degli Illuministi, dei Socialisti umanitari, o delle non isterilite anime belle degli uomini di buona volontà; facendo non di meno attenzione a quanto un agile maître à penser come Marshall McLuhan additava: l’indignazione morale è la strategia adatta per rivestire di decorosa dignità un imbecille83. Il sincero filàntropo, nella tremenda vivezza del suo flusso di coscienza, non sa rassegnarsi al culto dell’individualismo metodologico o dell’io inadempiente – né alla smisurata egocentrica indifferenza per le sofferenze altrui, né è convinto che chi non ha nulla impassibilmente e/o atarassicamente non possa dare nulla –, ma è accompagnato dall’anticipazione progettante e motivato dall’affettuosa comunicativa pietà per l’umanità diversa84: qui il disvelamento 81 Caracciolo, Religione ed eticità: studi di filosofia della religione cit.; C. Daniel Batson, The Altruism Question: Toward a Social-Psychological Answer, Hillsdale, N.J. 1991. 82 Cfr. il pamphlet best-seller del figlio novantatreenne dell’avventurosa pittrice-giornalista luterana berlinese Helen Grund (allieva di Käthe [Schmidt] Kollwitz a Berlino e del terziario domenicano Maurice Denis a Parigi) Stéphane Hessel, Indignez-vous!, Montpellier 2011 (20101), édition revue et augmentée. 83 Marshall McLuhan [1911-1980]: “Moral indignation is a technique used to endow the idiot with dignity” (1967), citato in Philip Marchand, Marshall McLuhan: The Medium and the Messenger. A Biography, Cambridge, Mass. 1998. Inoltre, W. Terrence Gordon, Marshall McLuhan: Escape into Understanding. A Biography, New York, N.Y. 1997. 84 Cfr. “Mas la Piedad no es la filantropía, ni la compasión por los animales y las plantas. Es algo más: es lo que permite que nos comuniquemos con ellos, en suma, el sentimiento difuso, gigantesco que nos sitúa entre todos los planos del ser, entre los diferentes seres de un modo adecuado. Piedad es saber tratar con lo diferente, con lo que es radicalmente otro que nosotros”, in María Zambrano, Para una historia de la Piedad, «Lyceum» vol. V, n° 17 (La

181


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

dell’irrefutabile valore dell’offerta di pietà è uno squarcio di luce abbagliante su tutti i piani dell’essere e ha il sopravvento sull’olismo, sulla scorza della verità immanente e sulla complicata retorica di sincerità, foss’anche vero – come voleva Giacomo Leopardi – che l’uomo e gli altri animali “non nasce per goder della vita, ma solo per perpetuare la vita… per conservarla”85. Sarebbe stato intonato allo humour del brillante vegetariano George Bernard Shaw86 voler ironizzare affermando: “The more I get to know people the more I love animals”; ma parlava sul serio Mark Twain quando concludeva: “Ogni volta che guardo gli altri animali e realizzo che qualsiasi cosa facciano è irreprensibile e che non possono fare qualcosa di sbagliato, invidio la dignità del loro stato, la sua purezza e la sua nobiltà, e riconosco che il Senso Morale è qualcosa di totalmente disastroso”87; Habana, febrero de 1949), pp. 6-13. La Zambrano non poteva certamente ignorare la confessione di Montaigne: “ouy, je le confesse,… la seule varieté me paye, et la possession de la diversité, au moins si aucune chose me paye” (Michel de Montaigne, Essais, éd. Pierre Villey, Paris 1965, p. 988 (III, 9); cfr. Id., Les Essais [1595], sous la direction de Jean Céard, Paris 2001, livre trois [1588], chapitre IX: De la vanité, 1540: Frank Lestringant, Quelques réflexions à propos du chapitre III, 9 des Essais, « De la vanité » de Montaigne, «Études Épistémè» 22 (2012), Vanités d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, Variations). 85 Giacomo Leopardi [1798-1837], Zibaldone di pensieri [1817-1832, ma pubblicato postumo col titolo Pensieri di varia filosofia e di bella letteratura, 7 voll., Firenze, Le Monnier, 1898-1900], edizione critica e annotata di Giuseppe Pacella, Milano 1991, n° 4169 (11 marzo 1826). Lo Zibaldone cento anni dopo: composizione, edizioni, temi. Atti del X Convegno internazionale di studi leopardiani (Recanati-Portorecanati, 14-19 settembre 1998), Firenze 2001, 2 voll. 86 Su Shaw [1856-1950]: Michael Holroyd, Bernard Shaw, London 1988-1992, 4 voll.; Archibald Henderson, George Bernard Shaw: Man of the Century, New York, N.Y. 1956; The Genius of Shaw: A Symposium, edited by Michael Holroyd, London 1979; Geoffrey Russell Searle, Eugenics and Politics in Britain, 1900-1914, Leyden 1976. 87 Mark Twain [1835-1910]: “Whenever I look at the other animals and realize that whatever they do is blameless and they can’t do wrong, I envy them the dignity of their estate, its purity and its loftiness, and recognise that the Moral Sense is a thoroughly disastrous thing”, in What Is Man?, New York, printed at the De Vinne Press, July 1906, un amaro saggio filosofico in forma di dialogo – pubblicato anonimo e col titolo riecheggiante il Libro di Giobbe – che mette in ridicolo l’orgoglio umano; vedi ora Mark Twain, What Is Man? And Other Philosophical Writings (The Works of Mark Twain, Volume 19), edited by Paul Baender, Berkeley, Calif. 1973. Chard Rohman, What is Man? Mark Twain’s Unresolved Attempt to Know, «Nineteenth Century Studies» Vol. 15

182


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

probabilmente Twain non aveva riflettuto abbastanza su Kant, il quale non aveva dubbi che l’unione di virtù e felicità fosse l’espressione di una necessità morale soggettiva e di un’esigenza pratica della ragione umana88. Nel regno animale consideriamo naturale il ‘prendere’, anche quello aggressivo89, mentre invece reputiamo fenomeno squisitamente umano il ‘dare’, e nient’affatto naturale, visto che i nostri infanti abbisognano d’imparare a ‘dare’. Quest’insegnamento è fatto proprio dalla traditio d’una religione, così divenendo un pianificato strumento comunicativo universale di lunga durata. L’elemento comune che è alla base della straordinaria forza dei filàntropi è lo stupefacente animato entusiasmo, nutrimento sia all’irrinunciabile tensione etica mai vegetante sia alla vocazione alla speranza non caduca: intendo qui riferirmi a quella fibrillante certezza di presagire la verità evocata da sola a sola, di avere la missione di porre questa verità di fronte agli occhi apatici o insabbiati altrui affinché essa (May, 2001), pp. 52-72; Vincent Carretta, The Roots of Mark Twain’s Pessimism in What Is Man?, «Cithara» 18, 1 (1978), pp. 46-60; Alexander E. Jones, Mark Twain and the Determinism of What Is Man?, «American Literature» 29 (March, 1957), pp. 1-17; William R. Macnaughton, Mark Twain’s Last Years as a Writer, Columbia and London 1979; Roger Asselineau, The Literary Reputation of Mark Twain from 1910 to 1950: A Critical Essay and a Bibliography, Westport, CN 1971 (Paris 19541); S. Ramaswamy, Mark Twain’s What Is Man? – An Indian View, in Mark Twain and Nineteenth Century American Literature, E. Nageswara Rao (ed.), Hyderabad, India 1993, pp. 27-36; Norman C. Habel, The Book of Job: A Commentary, Philadelphia 1985. Cfr. Mark Bekoff and Jessica Pierce, Wild Justice: The Moral Lifes of Animals, Chicago, Ill. 2009. 88 Su Immanuel Kant [1724-1804], vedi Kant on Moral Autonomy, edited by Oliver Sensen, Cambridge, England–New York, N.Y. 2013; sulle molteplici revisioni interne imposte dalle difficoltà, tra teoretica e pratica, di concettualizzazioni quali virtù/felicità/sommo bene, vedi Daniela Tafani, Virtù e felicità in Kant, Firenze 2006; The Kantian Legagy in Nineteenth-Century Science, Michael Heidelberger and Alfred Nordman (eds.), Cambridge, Mass. and London 2006. 89 Albert Bandura, Aggression: A Social Learning Analysis, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 1973; sulla psicologia sociale e le teorie cognitive sociali sperimentate dall’autore, vedi Richard I. Evans, Albert Bandura, The Man and His Ideas – A Dialogue, Foreword by Ernest R. Hilgard, New York, N.Y. 1989, James R. Averill, Anger and Aggression: An Essay on Emotion, New York 1982 e la recensione a firma di Steven L. Gordon in «Symbolic Interaction» Vol. 8, No. 2 (Fall, 1985), pp. 314-317.

183


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

possa essere vista da tutti coloro che se ne sentiranno irrevocabilmente degni, aprendo le gelose miopie a una chimerica visione che va sempre oltre chi guarda il dilemma disconosciuto, verso ciò che ancora deve orgogliosamente accadere. Per me, indubitabilmente, l’arrischiato ottimismo etico del filàntropo è una sublime immagine di profezia senza abdicazione, nella quale nessuna passione risulta spenta o saturata dall’urgenza della remunerazione e dal fragore della lode. Il fisico francese André-Marie Ampère l’ha voluta confessare in modo elettrizzante: “Je posséderais tout ce qu’on peut désirer au monde pour être heureux, il me manquerait tout, le bonheur d’autrui”90. L’allegrezza dei filàntropi è ben sintetizzata dal gustoso concetto giapponese dell’ikigai: è il gaio tripudio che dà consapevolezza della riemersa bellezza cangiante della vita: cognitiva e materiale, emotiva e psicologica, etica e sociale. Nel giardino segreto del filàntropo – cioè a dire nel suo animo, luogo assoluto dell’universo – ogni vaso, dove i fiori son le risa della terra, è un vaso di botanica spirituale in cui gli sembra di vedere cose impercettibili o inosservabili che ad altri sfuggono: a un sussiegoso o protervo osservatore estraneo rimarrebbe solo l’impressione di un vivaio di simboli insussistenti o di disincantate geometrie giustapposte. 90 Di André-Marie Ampère [1775-1836] vedi André-Marie Ampère et Jean-Jacques Ampère. Correspondance et souvenirs (de 1805 à 1864). Recueillis par Madame H. C. [i.e. Henriette Cheuvreux], Paris, J. Hetzel et Cie, 1875, tome premier, p. 79: le citate parole di Ampère sono qui registrate alla data 9 maggio 1811, all’interno di una delle sezioni titolate “Journal de [Claude-Julien] Bredin”, in quanto ottenute col materiale documentario messo a disposizione dall’amico carissimo dell’illustre fisico, il veterinario Bredin [1776-1854] soprannominato il Giobbe di Lione, uomo sensibile al misticismo di Jacob Boehm. Altri materiali d’archivio e ricordi in André-Marie Ampère. Journal et Correspondance, publiés par Mme H. C., Paris, J. Hetzel et Cie, 1872; André-Marie Ampère. Correspondance et souvenirs (de 1793 à 1805). Recueillis par Mme H. C., Paris, J. Hetzel et Cie, 1873; Louis de Launay, Le Grand Ampère, d’après des documents inédits…, Lagny, Impr. E. Grevin – Paris, Perrin et Cie, 1925; James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère, Cambridge 1996; Claude-Alphonse Valson, La vie et les travaux d’André-Marie Ampère, Lyon 1886; Gérard Borvon, Histoire de l’électricité, de l’ambre à l’électron, Paris 2009.

184


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Sicuramente, stabilire un rapporto fiduciario – come fa il filantropo – richiede la forza plasmatrice della temporalità: nell’incerta tensione evolutiva fra tempo presente e futuro, si deve sensatamente essere a conoscenza sia del passato, per quanto incompleto o inaffidabile, sia delle anticipatrici scommesse dell’incognito futuro, poiché precisamente in un tale rapporto la considerazione essenziale sta nel rincontrarsi davvero esponendosi prim’ancora di affidarsi rischiosamente all’altro; già linguisticamente alla fiducia o fede s’abbina l’accezione semantica di verità, la cui radice indoeuropea *vṛ sta ad indicare ‘ciò che avvolge sopra’, ‘ciò che mette in relazione’ con ciò che è distinto o separato91. Insomma, l’assenso fiducioso è l’ingrediente indispensabile delle aspettative di una continuità storica che guidano la transitività della nostra quotidiana condotta relazionale, facendo sì che la coscienza del profondo passato dia all’uomo il senso della giusta primavera del futuro, inteso come avvenire migliore da emulare, in una continua evoluzione ed affinamento dei metaforici nodi inestricabili di scienza deterministica e fede rivelata. Si badi bene che è la persona che dona incondizionatamente la propria fiducia a rendere l’altro una persona affidabile, in quanto quest’ultimo, beneficiato, dovrebbe sentirsi responsabilizzato ed in dovere di ricambiare simpaticamente quanto ricevuto in umile dono92. 91 Tra gli esempi, il verbo russo верить [verit] che significa ‘avere fiducia’, ‘credere’. Franco Rendich, L’origine delle lingue indoeuropee. Struttura e genesi della lingua madre del sanscrito, del greco e del latino, Roma 2005; Johannes van der Schaar, Woordenboek van voornamen, Utrecht-Antwerpen 198414e (19671). Cfr. “*bheidh (to trust, confide, have faith): Expansion (bh), active subject (e), action (i), inside (dh). It refers to an expansion through an action on someone else’s interior. Latin: fidō (to trust), perfidia (perfidy). Greek: πιστεύω (to believe), πίστις (faith). English: abide, affidavit, confidence, diffidence, faith, federal, fiancée, fiduciary”, in Fernando Villamor, The Origin of the Indo-European Languages, Getafe 2012, p. 43. 92 Vittorio Pelligra, I paradossi della fiducia: scelte razionali e dinamiche interpersonali, Bologna 2007; cfr. Max Scheler, Zur Phänomenologie und Theorie der Sympathiegefühle und von Liebe und Hass. Mit einem Anhang über den Grund zur Annahme der Existenz des fremden Ich, Halle an der Saale 1913, riedito – sin

185


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Sarebbe, forse, da prediligere l’asserzione del poliglotta, discendente di Karl Marx, Martin Buber: “In principio è la relazione”93, rispetto a quella dell’evangelista Giovanni: “                ” (“In principio erat verbum [Dei] …”)94, o a quella dal 1923 – col nuovo titolo Wesen und Formen der Sympathie, hrsg. mit einem Anhang von Manfred S. Frings, Bern 1973; Niklas Luhmann, Vertrauen: ein Mechanismus der Reduktion sozialer Komplexität, Stuttgart 1968 e l’introduzione scritta dal suo amico e collega Raffaele De Giorgi all’edizione italiana, Bologna 2002; Trust: Making and Breaking Cooperative Relations, edited by Diego Gambetta, Oxford 1988, recensito da David Collard in «The Economic Journal» Vol. 99, No. 394 (March, 1989), pp. 201-203; Anthony Giddens, The Consequences of Modernity, Cambridge 1990; Barbara A. Misztal, Trust in Modern Societies: The Search for the Bases of Social Order, Cambridge 1996 (ristampato nel 1998), e Adam B. Seligman, The Problem of Trust, Princeton 1997, entrambi i volumi recensiti da Brian Steensland in «Theory and Society» Vol. 28, No. 2 (April, 1999), pp. 342-350; Piotr Sztompka, Trust: A Sociological Theory, Cambridge 1999, recensito da Bohdan Szklarski in «Polish Sociological Review» No. 133 (2001), pp. 123-126; Democracy and Trust, edited by Mark E. Warren, Cambridge 1999; Vertrauen. Die Grundlage des sozialen Zusammenhalts, Martin Hartmann, Claus Offe (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 2001; Vertrauen. Historische Annäherungen, Ute Frevert (Hrsg.), Göttingen 2003; Martin Schweer, Barbara Thies, Vertrauen als Organisationsprinzip: Perspektiven für komplexe soziale Systeme, Bern 2003. 93 Di Martin (in ebraico ‫מ ְר ֳדכַ י‬, ָ Mardochai) Buber [1878-1965] vedi Ich und Du, Leipzig, Insel-Verlag, 1923, e l’utile raccolta di scritti postuma Das dialogische Prinzip, Heidelberg 1973. Klaus Reichert, „Zeit ist’s“: die Bibelübersetzung von Franz Rosenzweig und Martin Buber im Kontext, [vorgetragen am 22. Oktober 1992 in einer Sitzung], «Sitzungsberichte der Wissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft an der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main» Bd. 31, Nr. 1 (Stuttgart, 1993), 33 pp.; Hans Duesberg, Person und Gemeinschaft. Philosophisch-systematische Untersuchungen des Sinnzusammenhangs von personaler Selbständigkeit und interpersonaler Beziehung an Texten von J. G. Fichte und Martin Buber (Münchener philosophische Forschungen, 1), Bonn 1970; Shmuel Hugo Bergman, Dialogical Philosophy from Kierkegaard to Buber, translated from Hebrew by Arnold A. Gerstein, Foreword by Nathan Rotenstreich, Albany, N.Y. 1991; Bernhard Casper, Das dialogische Denken. Eine Untersuchung der religionsphilosophischen Bedeutung Franz Rosenzweigs, Ferdinand Ebners und Martin Bubers, Freiburg-Basel-Wien 1967, poi riproposto col titolo Das dialogische Denken. Franz Rosenzweig, Ferdinand Ebner und Martin Buber, überarbeitete und erweiterte Neuauflage, Freiburg-München 20022; Oliver D. Bidlo, Martin Buber – Ein vergessener Klassiker der Kommunikationswissenschaft?, Marburg 2006; Martin Buber: Bildung, Menschenbild und Hebräischer Humanismus. Mit der unveröffentlichten deutschen Originalfassung des Artikels „Erwachsenenbildung“ von Martin Buber, Martha Friedenthal-Haase, Ralf Koerrenz (Hrsg.), Paderborn-München-WienZürich 2005; Martin Buber. Bilanz seines Denkens (Marṭin Buber, me'ah shanah lehuladto, Veröffentlichung der Ben-Gurion-Universität des Negev, Januar 1978), Jochanan Bloch Ḥaim Gordon (Hrsg.), Freiburg im Breisgau 1983. 94 Tra le innumeri esegesi, segnalo quella personale di un magister domenicano elaborata probabilmente a Parigi verso il 1311-1313 facendo tesoro

186


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

del Faust goethiano: “In principio era l’azione!”95. Infatti, ai tempi delle prime forme di vita sulla Terra, gli scambi comunicativi tra viventi potevano avvenire esclusivamente tramite l’abilità ad instaurare interazioni simboliche o segni, non certo per mezzo dell’uso riflessivo o già creativo della parola, che soltanto in prospettiva futura sarebbe diventata, invece, il mezzo più amplificato e pratico per giungere a costituire le coscienze socializzate96. Ogni embrione deve funzionare intanto che costruisce se stesso, e con l’uscita dall’utero materno, al neonato s’apprestano con fare relazionale, inutili risultano le parole o le prove di forza con finalità di persuasione o seduzione. Al di fuori della relazione – intendo quella tra l’integrata identità del sé biografico di Agostino, Giovanni Scoto Eriugena, Avicenna, Alberto Magno, Tommaso d’Aquino e del contemporaneo Teodorico di Freiberg: Magistri Echardi Expositio Sancti Evangelii secundum Iohannem (Die Lateinischen Werke, Dritter Band), herausgegeben und übersetzt von Karl Christ, Bruno Decker, Joseph Koch, Heribert Fischer, Loris Sturlese und Albert Zimmermann, Stuttgart-Berlin, Kohlhammer, 1936-1990; da confrontare con l’edizione francese Le Commentaire de l’Évangile selon Jean. Le Prologue (ch. 1, 1-8) (L’Œuvre latine de Maître Eckhart, Sixième volume), texte latin, avant-propos, traduction et notes par Alain de Libera, Édouard Wéber O.P., Émilie Zum Brunn, Paris, Cerf, 1989. Stephan Grotz, Zwei Sprachen und das Eine Wort. Zur Identität von Meister Eckharts Werk, «Vivarium» 41, 1 (2003), pp. 47-83. Sull’interesse dell’ideologia marxista per questo frate domenicano, vedi Alois M. Haas, Maître Eckhart dans le miroir de l’idéologie marxiste, «La Vie spirituelle» 53 (1971), tome 124, No. 578, pp. 6279; Ernst Bloch, Atheismus im Christentum, Frankfurt am Main 1968 (trad. it., Milano 1971, pp. 97-99); Wolfram Malte Fues, Unio inquantum spes: Meister Eckhart bei Ernst Bloch, in Das ‚einig Ein‘. Studien zu Theorie und Sprache der deutschen Mystik, Alois M. Haas, Heinrich Stirnimann (Hrsg.), Freiburg, Schweiz 1980, pp. 109-166. Si tenga presente, inoltre, quanto esposto in Christian Danz, Im Anfang war das Wort. Zur Interpretation des Johannesprologes bei Schelling und Fichte, «Fichte-Studien» 8 (1995), pp. 21-39. 95 “Im Anfang war die Tat”, in Goethe, Faust – Eine Tragödie, Tübingen, Cotta’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1808, Theil 1, 3. Szene: qui Faust, leggendo il testo greco della Bibbia s’accinge a tradurre l’incipit dell’Evangelo giovanneo e, scontento del riduttivo tedesco das Wort (verso 1224) per lógos, opta per der Sinn (‘intelletto’, ‘pensiero’) (v. 1229), ma anche questo lo delude, e allora prova col tradurre con die Kraft (‘forza’, ‘energia’) (v. 1233), finché, infine, faustianamente e invero borghesemente si decide per die Tat! (v. 1237), soluzione, quest’ultima, che nel corso della Storia sarà particolarmente amata dal Führer (cfr. Ernst Jockers, In Anfang war die Tat?, «The German Quarterly» Vol. XXIII, No. 2 (March, 1950), pp. 63-76). 96 Cfr. Alan Holland, Am Anfang war das Wort: eine Kritik von Informationsmetaphern in der Genetik, in Ethische Probleme in den Biowissenschaften, hrsg. von Marcel Weber und Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Heidelberg 2001, pp. 93-105.

187


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

e l’integrata identità di un altro –, non c’è possibilità, in ogni caso, di sviluppo vitale: il sé diventa reale grazie all’esteriorizzazione (l’Entäusserung hegeliana97), al riconoscimento dell’altro, e la stessa interrelazione con gli altri rinforza la personale costruzione ed il salutare mantenimento ed incremento del sé, aiutandoci psichicamente a capire meglio chi siamo nella nostra compòsita autobiografia98. La tendenza umana alla socialità, chiamata appetitus societatis dal giurista arminiano olandese Hugo de Groot99, sarebbe addirittura istintiva, a connotare il tratto principale della natura umana; e forse lui stesso non si sarebbe sorpreso più di tanto apprendendo gli attuali risultati scientifici secondo i quali l’andirivieni psichedelico di immagini, promosso in ognuno di noi dal sentimento nostalgico rivolto al vissuto relazionale collettivo, salvaguarda il nostro benessere mentale allontanando insorgenze d’ansia o depressive spersonalizzazioni o disturbi nelle insopprimibili interazioni socializzanti100. 97 Arturo Massolo, “Entäusserung” e “Entfremdung” nella Fenomenologia dello Spirito, «aut aut» 91 (1966), pp. 7-20, ristampato nella raccolta postuma di articoli del Massolo curata da Livio Sichirollo, La Storia della Filosofia come problema e altri saggi, Firenze 1967, pp. 202-215; e l’analisi dello studioso trentenne Emiliano Alessandroni, Alienazione e disalienazione della filosofia in Hegel e in Gramsci, «Giornale Critico di Storia delle Idee» anno 5, n. 9 (Sassari, 2013). 98 Bruce [MacFarlane] Hood, The Self Illusion: How The Social Brain creates Identity, Oxford 2012, con abbondanti riferimenti bibliografici alle pp. 297-341; Antonio Damasio, Self comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain, New York, N.Y. 2010. 99 Meglio noto col nome latinizzato di Grotius [1583-1645], autore del De iure belli ac pacis, libri tres, Parisiis, apud Nicolaum Buon, 1625; Editio secunda emendatior & multis locis auctior, Amsterdami, apud Guilielmum Blaeuw, 1631, testo storicamente importante per il giusnaturalismo razionalistico moderno, oltre ad essere la prima ampia trattazione sulla pena. Henk J.M. Nellen, Hugo de Groot: Een leven in strijd om de vrede, 1583-1645, Amsterdam 2007; Edgar Müller, Hugo Grotius und der Dreißigjährige Krieg. Zur frühen Rezeption von De jure belli ac pacis, «Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis» 77, 3-4 (Leiden, 2009), pp. 499-540. 100 Social Thinking and Interpersonal Behaviour (Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology, Series), Joseph P. Forgas, Klaus Fiedler, Constantine Sedikides (eds.), New York, N.Y. 2013; Handbook of Self-enhancement and Selfprotection, edited by Mark D. Alicke, Constantine Sedikides, New York, N.Y. 2011; The Self, edited by Constantine Sedikides and Steven Spencer, New York, N.Y. 2007; Intergroup Cognition and Intergroup Behavior, edited by Constantine Sedikides, John Schopler, Chester A. Insko, Mahwah, N.J. 1998; Constantine

188


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Eppure la civiltà umana non è né un’unità indifferenziata, né un’inculcata totalità omogenea; in essa si sono svolte e si svolgono svilenti alienazioni101 e discontinue lotte per la libertà, cedimenti etici e combattimenti per la verità, crassi conformismi e sanguigne ribellioni, gesti inconsulti e pacate discussioni, frìgide mistificazioni e lucide analisi. La prismatica varietà umana risulta irriducibile all’unità, così come è innegabile il totale non-sens della riduzione ad unità di tutto ciò che accade: questo punto cruciale non lasciò indifferente l’anagrammato Jean Améry – figlio di padre ebreo e madre cattolica che volle educarlo nella propria stessa fede – un sopravvissuto con la stella di David alle torture della Gestapo e ad Auschwitz ma non ad un eccesso di sonniferi per il suicidio in un hotel a cinque stelle a Salisburgo, il quale giudicò che “ il verbo perisce ogni qual volta una realtà pretende di essere totalità”102. Ogni diversità va rispettata perché, all’interno di una certa cultura, serve alla resilienza per il sovrano equilibrio sociale, e così parla anche al mondo Sedikides, Tim Wildschut, Lowell Gaertner, Clay Routledge, and Jamie Arndt, Nostalgia as Enabler of Self-continuity, in Self-continuity: Individual and Collective Perspectives, New York, N.Y. 2008, pp. 227-239; Tim Wildschut, Constantine Sedikides, Jamie Arndt, and Filippo Cordaro, Nostalgia as a Repository of Social Connectedness: The Role of Attachment-Related Avoidance, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 98 (2009), pp. 573-586; Tim Wildschut, Constantine Sedikides, and Filippo Cordaro, Self-Regulatory Interplay Between Negative and Positive Emotions: The Case of Loneliness and Nostalgia, in Emotion Regulation and Well-Being, Ivan Nyklíček, Ad Vingerhoets, Marcel Zeelenberg (eds.), New York-Dordrecht-Heidelberg-London 2011, pp. 67-83. 101 Cfr. Alberto Gaston, Genealogia dell’alienazione, con un saggio di Eugenio Borgna, Milano 1987. 102 Pseudonimo di Hans Chaim Mayer [1912-1978]: cito da Jean Améry, Jenseits von Schuld und Sühne. Bewältigungsversuche eines Überwältigten, München 1966, I: An den Grenzen des Geistes. Irène Heidelberger-Leonard, Jean Améry. Revolte in der Resignation, Stuttgart 20052 (20041); Lorenz Dagmar, Scheitern als Ereignis. Der Autor Jean Améry im Kontext europäischer Kulturkritik, Frankfurt am Main 1991; Siegbert Wolf, Von der Verwundbarkeit des Humanismus: über Jean Améry, Frankfurt am Main 1995; Guia Risari, Jean Améry. Il risentimento come morale, Milano 2002; Maria Teresa Cinanni, Testimoni di voci sommerse: l’esperienza del nazismo in alcuni scrittori ebrei europei: Joseph Roth, Primo Levi, Jean Améry, Miklós Radnóti, presentazione di Armando Gnisci, Cosenza 1997.

189


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

intero103: per Theodor Wiesengrund Adorno la capacità di avvertire il simile nel dissimile non è altro che l’amore104. Ma forse qui sarebbe meglio precisare: quella pulsione di partecipe sintonizzazione amorosa fondata sull’intelligenza dei cuori sensibilizzati alla dimensione spazio-temporale, quell’amorevole ed affettuosa condivisione occasione unica di diventare in se stessi un mondo105. A proposito, Jean-Jacques Rousseau giunse a dire che non tutto è bene ma forse il tutto è bene106; 103 Cfr. Tzvetan Todorov, Nous et les autres : la réflexion française sur la diversité humaine, Paris 1989. 104 Vedi Theodor W. Adorno [1903-1969], Minima Moralia. Reflexionen aus dem beschädigten Leben, Berlin-Frankfurt am Main 1951, Teil III [1946/47], Aphorismus 122. Theodor W. Adorno „Minima Moralia“ neu gelesen, Andreas Bernard und Ulrich Raulff (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 2003; Alexander García Düttmann, So ist es. Ein philosophischer Kommentar zu Adornos „Minima Moralia“, Frankfurt am Main 2004; Rahel Jaeggi, “No Individual Can Resist”: Minima Moralia as Critique of Forms of Life, «Constellations: An International Journal of Critical & Democratic Theory» 12, 1 (March, 2005), pp. 65-82; Dialektik der Freiheit. Frankfurter Adorno-Konferenz 2003, Axel Honneth (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 2005; Stefan Müller-Doohm, Adorno: Eine Biographie, Frankfurt am Main 2003. Cfr. Leo Strauss, Natural Right and History, Chicago, Ill. 1953, p. 122: “philosophy is meant – and that is the decisive point – not as a set of propositions, a teaching, or even a system, but as a way of life, a life animated by a peculiar passion, the philosophic desire, or eros; it is not understood as an instrument or a department of human self-realization”; The Embrace of Eros: Bodies, Desires, and Sexuality in Christianity, Margaret D. Kamitsuka (ed.), Minneapolis, Minn. 2010. 105 “Lieben... ist ein erhabener Anlaß für den einzelnen, zu reifen, in sich etwas zu werden, Welt zu werden, Welt zu werden für sich um eines anderen willen” (traduzione di Bernard Grasset: “L’amour, c’est l’occasion unique de mûrir, de prendre forme, de devenir soi-même un monde pour l’amour de l’être aimé”), in Rainer Maria Rilke, Brief, An Franz Xaver Kappus, Rom, am 14. Mai 1904, lettera indirizzata all’ufficiale cadetto Kappus [1883-1966] e, con altre nove, pubblicata postuma nel 1929 dallo stesso destinatario – divenuto scrittore e giornalista – a Lipsia, pei tipi di Insel. L’intensissimo poeta René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke [1875-1926], noto semplicemente col nome Rainer Maria, amò Lou Salomé coniugata Andreas, ma venticinquenne si sposò con la scultrice Clara Westhoff divenendo anche amico-biografo di Auguste Rodin e traduttore dei sonetti michelangioleschi, e, dopo la separazione dalla moglie, strinse una relazione bavarese con la pittrice Lulu Albert-Lazard: cfr. Gesammelte Briefe in sechs Bänden, hrsg. von Ruth Sieber-Rilke und Carl Sieber, Leipzig 1936-1939. Günther Schiwy, Rilke und die Religion, Frankfurt am Main 2006; Wolfgang Leppmann, Rilke. Sein Leben, seine Welt, sein Werk, München 1993; Rainer Maria Rilke und die bildende Kunst seiner Zeit, Gisela Götte, Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker (Hrsg.), München 1996. 106 Jean-Jacques Rousseau [1712-1778], Lettre à Monsieur de Voltaire datata 18 agosto 1756 (detta, polemicamente, Lettera sulla Provvidenza, scritta in risposta al Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne già concluso nel gennaio di quell’anno ed inviatogli dallo stesso Voltaire): “... Il n’est pas question de

190


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

mentre tra i distici eroici di chiusura della quarta epistola di An Essay on Man (1732-34 e ‘38) del poeta cattolico Alexander Pope – piccolo gobbo sciancato e apologista della Grande Catena dell’Essere – si legge: “God loves from whole to parts: but human soul / Must rise from individual to the whole” (vv. 361-362)107. Se la filantropia può essere còlta come gesto irriducibile e il calcolo della ragione inderogabile di una vita, allora può esserlo anche di ogni risentita vita umana, pur se quest’ultima non ne venisse platealmente riscattata dal plauso consacrato e rimanesse ignorata da ogni gratificante carezza o sorriso108; qualsiasi vita, in fondo, è un insolvibile sacrificio che si ignora109: “car Je est un autre”, per dirla con le parole di un angelo rivoltoso come Rimbaud soggiogato dal mettere in crisi il nostro mondo sotto il richiamo dell’altro110. savoir, si chacun de nous souffre ou non; mais s’il était bon que l’univers fût, et si nos maux étaient inévitables dans la constitution de l’univers. Ainsi, l’adition d’un article rendrait ce semble la proposition plus exacte; et au lieu de Tout est bien, il vaudrait peut être mieux dire: Le tout est bien, ou tout est bien pour le tout. ...” (Œuvres complétes, Paris, Gallimard, 1959-1995, 5 voll.: vol. IV, p. 1068). José Oscar de Almeida Marques, The Paths of Providence: Voltaire and Rousseau on the Lisbon Earthquake, «Cadernos de História e Filosofia da Ciência» Série 3, v. 15, n. 1 (Campinas, janeiro-junho, 2005), pp. 33-57; Russell R. Dynes, The Dialogue Between Voltaire and Rousseau on the Lisbon Earthquake: The Emergence of a Social Science View, «International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters» Vol. 18, No. 1 (2000), pp. 97-115; René Pomeau, La religion de Voltaire, Paris 1968, nouvelle édition revue et mise à jour (19561). 107 Alexander Pope [1688-1744]: di An Essay on man, le prime due Epistles apparvero nel 1732, la terza nel ‘33, la quarta nel ‘34 (London, printed for J. Wilford, at the Three Flower-de-Luces, behind the Chapter-House, St. Paul’s; anche re-printed in Dublin, George Faulkner; seconda edizione in Dublin, printed by S. Powell, for George Risk at the Shakespear’s Head, George Ewing at the Angel and Bible, and William Smith at the Hercules, Booksellers in Dame-Street), e la Universal Prayer di chiusura nel 1738: per l’edizione moderna, Alexander Pope, An Essay on Man, edited by Maynard Mack, London 1964. Anthony David Nuttal, Pope’s Essay on Man, Winchester, Mass. 1984; Cassirer, An Essay on Man: An Introduction to a Philosophy of Human Culture cit.; Maynard Mack, Alexander Pope: A Life, New Haven, Conn. 1985, spec. Chapter 21. 108 Non si trascuri che il più precoce ed universale segnale emotivo umano dell’identificazione degli altri esseri come propri simili è dato con piacere dal sorriso neonatale in risposta al riconoscimento degli occhi. 109 Cfr. Roberto Calasso, L’ardore, Milano 2010. 110 Vedi la Lettre du voyant indirizzata al poeta ed editore Demeny dal poco più che sedicenne Arthur Rimbaud [1854-1891] la cui alienazione non è distante da quanto già evidenziato da Karl Marx e Friedrich Engels nel loro

191


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Conoscere l’altruismo filantropico dovrebbe tradursi nella percezione di uno stato amoroso privilegiato della coscienza umana che non andrebbe acquietato o scavalcato con arbitrarie e codine attitudini a porre ostacoli, a costringere al dubbio antiutilitario, a imporre il criterio dell’efficacia materiale: “è all’amore e non al senso della storia che bisogna legare la speranza”111. Perché no, la leggerezza dell’amore è un prodotto inventato dalla specie umana112 e in una dimensione di sovrabbondante poetica non di retta virtù etica; ma una maggiore illusione verrebbe a configurarsi nell’affermazione secondo la quale l’uomo sia sempre a conoscenza di quel che deve fare ed inverare. libello, contro Bruno Bauer e consorteria, Die heilige Familie (marzo 1845): A Paul Demeny [15, place Saint-Jacques] à Douai [Nord]. Charleville [Ardennes], 15 mai 1871 “… Car Je est un autre. Si le cuivre s’éveille clairon, il n’y a rien de sa faute. Cela m’est évident: j’assiste à l’éclosion de ma pensée: je la regarde, je l’écoute: je lance un coup d’archet: la symphonie fait son remuement dans les profondeurs, ou vient d’un bond sur la scène. …”; ma ancor prima, vedi la lettera indirizzata al suo ventiduenne semisordo professore di retorica coniugato con Jeanne la figlia dello scultore René Fache: Lettre à Georges Izambard [27, rue de l’Abbayedes-champs, à Douai (Nord)]. Charleville, 13 mai 1871 “… Je est une autre. Tant pis pour le bois qui se trouve violon, et nargue aux inconscients, qui ergotent sur ce qu’ils ignorent tout à fait! …”. Cfr. la formula Je suis un autre usata da Hippolyte Taine, De l’intelligence, Paris, Hachette, 1870, 2 voll.; édition corrigée et augmentée, 18834, II, p. 466. Jacques Rivière, Rimbaud, Paris, Emile-Paul frères, 1938, nouvelle édition (Paris, éditions Kra, 19301); Id., Rimbaud : dossier 1905-1925, présenté établi et annoté par Roger Lefèvre, Paris, Gallimard, 1977; Adrian Mihalache, «Je est un Autre», in Littérature et dialogue interculturel : culture française d’Amérique, sous la direction de Françoise Tétu de Labsade, Sainte-Foy (Québec, Canada) 1997, pp. 165-191; Marie Guthmüller, Hippolyte Taine als Initiator der „critique scientifique“ und der „psychologie expérimentale“, in Ästhetik von unten. Empirie und ästhetisches Wissen, Marie Guthmüller, Wolfgang Klein (Hrsg.), Tübingen 2006, pp. 169-192. 111 Ricœur, Le sfide e le speranze del nostro comune futuro cit., p. 16; cfr. Remo Bodei, Geometria delle passioni. Paura, speranza, felicità: filosofia e uso politico, Milano 1991. 112 Vedi il classico lavoro del sociologo russo ortodosso – figlio di Aleksander Prokopievič Sorokin un artigiano orafo decoratore d’icone – fondatore dell’Harvard Research Center in Creative Altruism, Pitirim Aleksandrovič Sorokin, The Ways and Power of Love. Types, Factors, and Techniques of Moral Transformation, Boston, Mass. 1954; riedizione postuma, PhiladelphiaLondon 2002; cfr. Barry V. Johnston, Pitirim A. Sorokin: An Intellectual Biography, Lawrence, Kans. 1995; П.А. Тихонова, Социология П. А. Сорокина, Москва 1999; Sociological Theory, Values, and Sociocultural Change: Essays in Honor of Pitirim A. Sorokin, Edward A. Tiryakian (ed.), New York, N.Y. 1963; Social Sciences at Harvard, 1860-1920: From Inculcation to the Open Mind, edited with a Preface by Paul Buck, Cambridge, Mass. 1965.

192


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

D’altronde chi può prevedere le decisioni e prerogative che riguarderanno gli ipotizzabili ‘monopòli’ filantropici, probabilmente tediosi e orrendi, i quali, una volta costituitisi nella società del futuro, tratteranno – anche in questo caso – con meticolosa e sottile attenzione formale i dettagli dei problemi della pianificazione globalizzata e universale, regolarizzata unicamente in ossequio all’imponente efficacia e funzionalità speculativa aziendale: nell’affermazione dell’invadenza del valore degli interessi dell’economia di mercato fattasi società di mercato si dovrà negare la compiutezza senza tempo dell’essere di ascendenza filantropica. Per il dietetico nutrimento dello spirito filantropico, è difficile ammettere quanto sia esplicito che nella nostra società ‘manageriale’ non c’è spazio per le persone indipendenti, quelle che non partecipano all’enfatico gioco del vendere e comprare quali passioni acquisitive dell’homo oeconomicus ingordo di pleonexia113: anche se colui ch’è animato dalla filantropia sapesse coniare contanti/azioni, questo risulterebbe essere soltanto un primo passo di un lungo e spesso tortuoso percorso al cui arrivo si potrebbero assaporare non più che atmosfere dell’imperativo etico prive di squilibri tecnologici, prive di abbondanza di superfluo, prive di stagnazioni spirituali, prive di vacuità estetiche e di 113 Πλεονεξία – cioè bramosia, insaziabile avidità, cupidigia di avere ciò che propriamente appartiene ad altri, fino a divenire disordine psichiatrico – è termine che, oltre ad essere stato usato da Platone ed Aristotele, ricorre dieci volte nella Bibbia: cfr. Arthur G. Nikelly, The Pleonexic Personality. A New Provisional Personality Disorder, «Individual Psychology: The Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research & Practice» Vol. 48, Issue 3 (September, 1992), pp. 253-260. È appurato che attualmente la ricchezza dei tre cresi più ricconi al mondo corrisponde alla ricchezza totale delle pressoché seicento milioni di persone abitanti i Paesi meno sviluppati del pianeta; l’1% più ricco della popolazione mondiale detiene circa il 40% della ricchezza mondiale in un sistema economico in buona parte globalizzato la cui iniquità non è risultata corretta dalla liberalizzazione dei mercati. In Italia il 3% delle famiglie possiede quasi un quarto del totale patrimonio finanziario (esclusi i beni immobili) in circolazione. Cfr. del premio Nobel per l’Economia Joseph E. Stiglitz, The Price of Inequality. How Today’s Divided Society endangers Our Future, New York, N.Y. 2012, spec. il capitolo VII dedicato a ‘Giustizia per tutti? Come la disuguaglianza sta erodendo lo stato di diritto’.

193


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

gusto, prive di omogeneità d’appiattite prospettive, prive di residuale eclettismo delle ovvietà114. I parametri econometrici della pulsione filantropica non rapportano il parsimonioso benessere sociale esclusivamente alla parola d’ordine finanziaria della scala di valori e degli indici produttivistici o borsistici del Dow Jones, del PIL, dello Spread sul Bund o del NASDAQ. Ma qual è il rapporto riscontrabile tra i finanziamenti sostenuti dagli indòmiti filàntropi e le tesi e commistioni politiche, religiose o semplicemente culturali sostenute da loro stessi115? Come i filàntropi o le loro fondazioni nonprofit sono affrancati dalla disambiguazione negli aiuti umanitari e si pongono in contrasto con gli appetiti ed il dominio totale dei mercati nell’era dell’ingannevole mito dell’eguaglianza avere/valere e dell’utilitarismo speculativo, dello strapotere bancario e della lobbistica globalizzazione (con attori predatori come le holdings multinazionali, gl’insaziabili arrembanti filibustieri delle ipertrofiche speculazioni finanziarie calpestanti la fiducia civilizzata nella fiducia, i portentosi Mogul dei media, i cinici guru degli import-export, le abiette organizzazioni criminali e quelle contagiate dall’irretito fanatismo terroristico)116? 114 Cfr. Arlie Russell Hochschild, The Commercialization of Intimate Life. Notes from Home and Work, Berkeley, Calif. 2003. 115 Cfr. Richard C. Chewning, John W. Eby, Shirley J. Roels, Business Through the Eyes of Faith, San Francisco, Calif. 1990; David S. Landes, Dynasties: Fortunes and Misfortunes of the World’s Great Family Businesses, New York, N.Y. 2006. 116 Une histoire du monde global, sous la direction de Philippe Norel et Laurent Testot, Auxerre 2012; R. Glenn Hubbard, William Duggan, The Aid Trap: Hard Truths about Ending Poverty, New York, N.Y. 2009; Ron Mattocks, Zone of Insolvency: How Nonprofits avoid Hidden Liabilities and build Financial Strength, Hoboken, N.J. 2009; cfr. Michelle Bertho-Huidal, Charity Business : le grand marché de la santé mondiale, Paris 2012; L’argent du cœur, Nicolas Dufourcq (directeur), avec la collaboration de Daniel Bruneau et al., Paris 1996; Tony Vaux, The Selfish Altruist: Relief Work in Famine and War, London 2001; Ken Stern, With Charity for All: Why Charities are failing and a Better Way to give, New York, N.Y. 2013. Origins of Terrorism: Psychologies, Ideologies, Theologies, States of Mind, edited by Walter Reich, Washington, D.C.–Cambridge, England–New York, N.Y. 1990; Terrorism and Social Exclusion: Misplaced Risk, Common Security, edited by David Wright-Neville, Anna Halafoff, Cheltenham, England–Northampton, Mass. 2010; Walter Laqueur, No End to War: Terrorism in the Twenty-first Century, New York, N.Y. 2003; Id., The New Terrorism: Fanaticism and the Arms of Mass Destruction, New York, N.Y. 1999; Id., The Age of Terrorism, Boston, Mass. 1987; Id., A History

194


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Si può imporre una pubblica strumentalizzazione politica del destino dell’arte responsabilmente soggiacente alle accortezze di un’utilità sociale piuttosto che arroccata, snobisticamente, ad un lusso elitario: il bello e l’arte – nell’estetica di Hegel – passano per tutti i commerci della vita e… “dove non possono portare niente di bene, almeno occupano il posto del male sempre meglio di esso”117. Non di meno, si può essere anche abietto corruttore per mezzo di psicopatologiche opere d’arte118 e per mezzo di snaturato e fuorviante altruismo filantropico, per giungere ad un’ipocrita manipolazione della dipendenza, ad una falsa utilizzazione umanitaria del vizio perverso, o ad uno sfruttamento indottrinato dell’immolazione terroristica, secondo il camuffante principio della puritas impuritatis. Forse che qui l’amaro pessimista è un imbarazzato ottimista ben informato? Nient’affatto, e nemmeno voglio sentirmi un confliggente ottimista per disperazione da ossessiva onestà119. Anch’io ho tentato di cogliere il motivo della trasfusione of Terrorism, New Brunswick, N.J. 2001 (New York, N.Y. 19771); David E. Long, The Anatomy of Terrorism, New York-Toronto 1990. 117 Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel [1770-1831], Vorlesungen über die Ästhetik [1835-38], in Id., Werke in zwanzig Bänden, Band 13, Eva Moldenhauer, Karl Markus Michel (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main 1970, p. 16. Hegel and Aesthetics [Essays first presented at the 14th Biennial Meeting of the Hegel Society of America, held October 18-20, 1996 in Keystone, Colorado], edited by William Maker, Albany, N.Y. 2000. 118 Si confronti il caso clamoroso sollevato dalla dichiarazione del compositore Karlheinz Stockhausen – impegnato nel Music Festival di Amburgo – all’emittente pubblica amburghese Norddeutscher Rundfunk in data 16 settembre 2001, quando il musicista così si sarebbe espresso a proposito dell’attacco terroristico di uomini di al-Qaeda al World Trade Center di New York perpetrato l’11 settembre 2001: “Was da geschehen ist, ist – jetzt müssen Sie alle Ihr Gehirn umstellen – das größte Kunstwerk, dass es je gegeben hat” (“Well, what happened there is, is of course – now you all have to adjust your brains – the greatest work of art that has ever existed”), tant’è che subito dopo dovette dare una pubblica smentita (la fedele trascrizione delle parole originali in tedesco usate dal celebre musicista è stata pubblicata su «MusikTexte» (November, 2001), pp. 69-77; vedi, inoltre, l’edizione in lingua inglese del «Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung», September 18, 2001; Christian Bauer, Sacrificium intellectus: das Opfer des Verstandes in der Kunst von Karlheinz Stockhausen, Botho Strauß und Anselm Kiefer [Dissertation, Bergische Universität Wuppertal], München 2008; Paul Virilio, Ground Zero, London 2002). 119 Cfr. Nanni Svampa [Milano 1938-], Scherzi della memoria, Milano 2002.

195


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

dell’anima nei ritratti ufficiali dei filàntropi, dove si concentra la personalità e si rivela la virtuosa quintessenza di un individuo – alchimia di silenziose gioie, impulsive tristezze, pacatezze di litigi ingurgitati, lusso di sgorganti commozioni, corrispondenze di cuori frammentati, ammiccanti marosi di malinconia, armonie permeate di naturalezze –, e certo mi sono accorto che spesso s’incorre nel rischio dell’affettazione moralistica, del pretesto sòlito di eticità, o dell’eloquenza introspettiva del riserbo e del sorriso mesto ingessato; ma che volti addolciti di persone mirabili ho pur avuto davanti agli occhi, tali da stringere il vento di tramontana dell’indifferenza volgente le spalle al mondo120! E che ritratti di donne filàntrope assetate dell’imminenza dell’impossibile, loro davvero sono state, anche per me, degli strabilianti bàlsami oculari quando veniva spontaneo esprimere il proprio dolore aprendo i rubinetti degli occhi versando in dono lacrime: empatica espressione fisiologica, questa, unicamente umana e troppo spesso sinèddoche di un universo invisibile e inascoltato di vittime di prevaricazioni121. Ho scrutato i lineamenti reattivi delle filàntrope soprattutto quando sanno costringersi a prendere di mira, braccare e smascherare i corrotti programmi di sfruttamento umano o di discriminazione sociale122, e, magrado trafelate da fatiche virili, additare che la contrizione – perfino quella cristiana – in quei casi può essere soltanto una maschera

120 Cfr. Sebastiano Ghisu, Storia dell’indifferenza. Geometrie della distanza dai presocratici a Musil, Nardò (Lecce) 2006; Adriano Zamperini, L’indifferenza. Conformismo del sentire e dissenso emozionale, Torino 2007; Michael Herzfeld, The Social Production of Indifference: Exploring the Symbolic Roots of Western Bureaucracy, Oxford 1992 e la recensione a firma di Dimitra Gefou-Madianou in «Journal of Modern Greek Studies» Vol. 15, No. 1 (May, 1997), pp. 137-140. 121 Cfr. Karsten R. Stueber, Rediscovering Empathy: Agency, Folk Psychology, and the Human Sciences, Cambridge, Mass. 2006 con ampi riferimenti bibliografici alle pp. 251-270; Andrea Pinotti, Empatia. Storia di un’idea da Platone al postumano, Roma-Bari 2011; Philippe Mesnard, La victime écran. La représentation humanitaire en question, Paris 2001. 122 Cfr. Bradley R. Schiller, The Economics of Poverty and Discrimination, Upper Saddle River, N.J. 200810.

196


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

di eroicità123: così loro – altro che maschere di cera, bensì veri capolavori di Dio soprattutto quando hanno il diavolo in corpo! – instancabilmente si dispongono a dare l’anima operando in nobili sforzi di miglioramento di quei tristissimi statu quo della svantaggiata dismisura emarginata, facendo leva in primis su: l’educazione appresa non tramite obbediente soggezione e castiganti minacce ma attraverso elogi dei buoni sani e condivisibili comportamenti di contro alle trasgressioni e violazioni alle regole sociali124; la salvaguardia della cultura come accessibilità a nuovi spazi di libertà; la cura della salute e del delirio dei deserti affettivi negli infanti; il sinergismo della solidarietà come antìdoto all’asservimento125; l’affetto trasparente per le spoglie verità; il rifiuto dell’oggettificazione misogena della donna e l’estirpazione delle pratiche aberranti di odiosa manipolazione sul suo corpo; il sollecito al divieto di abusi sessuali sui minori; gli equilibri del pudore e l’onorevole dignità; il non esimersi dall’etica dell’equa giustizia sociale e l’amministrazione stessa di giustizia pacifica; l’emancipazione responsabile126; lo sviluppo delle opportunità di crescita giovanile lontano dalle 123 Vedi supra quanto additato da McLuhan. 124 Cfr. The Price We pay: Economic and Social Consequences of Inadequate Education, Clive R. Belfield, Henry M. Levin (eds.), Washington, D.C. 2007. 125 Forse un giorno si scolpiranno sugli stipiti delle case le memorabili parole, meditate sugli imprescindibili dialoghi platonici, di Johann Gottlieb [i.e. Amadeus] Fichte: “Der Mensch (so alle endliche Wesen überhaupt) wird nur unter Menschen ein Mensch” (“L’uomo… diventa uomo solo tra uomini”), in Grundlage des Naturrechts nach Principien der Wissenschaftslehre, Iena und Leipzig, Christian Ernst Gabler, 1796, Corollaria: 1., p. 31 numerata. Cfr. Duesberg, Person und Gemeinschaft. Philosophisch-systematische Untersuchungen des Sinnzusammenhangs von personaler Selbständigkeit und interpersonaler Beziehung an Texten von J. G. Fichte und Martin Buber cit.; Ulrich Schwabe, Individuelles und Transindividuelles Ich. Die Selbstindividuation reiner Subjektivität und Fichtes Wissenschaftslehre. Mit einem durchlaufenden Kommentar zur Wissenschaftslehre nova methodo, Paderborn 2007; Carla De Pascale, Etica e diritto. La filosofia pratica di Fichte e le sue ascendenze kantiane, Bologna 1995. 126 Si rammemorino le parole del venticinquenne Karl Marx [1818-1883] in Zur Judenfrage, I, «Deutsch-Französische Jahrbücher» 1ste und 2te Lieferung (Paris, Februar 1844), pp. 182-214: “… Alle Emanzipation ist Zurückführung der menschlichen Welt, der Verhältnisse, auf den Menschen selbst. …” (“Ogni emancipazione è ricondurre il mondo ed i rapporti umani all’uomo stesso”) (ora in Die Frühschriften, hrsg. von Siegfried Landshut, Stuttgart 1971, p. 199).

197


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

violenze; il miracoloso giudizioso sviluppo tecnologico ed economico armonizzato e conciliato all’egualitario progresso sociale127. Nell’indiscreto e omologante rimescolamento di valori e modelli culturali operato dalla globalizzazione, la solidale comunanza della filantropia non ha messo in discredito la farraginosità delle religioni del nostro tempo, dove ogni religione inerziale e inevitabile della società – da cui dipendiamo così come essa dipende da noi, ormai per lo più privi di entusiastica e disinteressata riflessione contemplativa – è la fragile e tautologica religio obbligata a confrontarsi col modello avanzato e paradigmatico di società occidentale prona all’adorazione delle seriali immagini pubblicitarie che senza tregua si rinnovano quali edonistiche formeoggetti di una suprema consumistica superstizione e colonizzazione interiore128. Si è giunti ad affermare genealogicamente e per parafrasi biblica che “In principio era la pubblicità”, evidenziando per di più come gli spettacoli pubblicitari, capaci d’incollarci per ore ed ore allo schermo delle Meraviglie commerciali, non siano altro che la lusinghevole ricostruzione mediatica dell’illusione religiosa senza frontiere129. Uno scrittore come Gilbert Keith Chesterton – divenuto cattolico romano nel 1922 e attivissimo fino al 1936 (creò, tra l’altro, il popolare sacerdote detective padre Brown) – ebbe chiaro che le grandi religioni si distinguono dalle irrimediabili superstizioni per il 127 Cfr. Genevieve Lloyd, Masters, Slaves and Others, «Radical Philosophy» 34 (Summer, 1983), pp. 2-9; ma soprattutto Susan Buck-Morss, Hegel, Haiti and Universal History, Pittsburgh, Pa. 2009, con ampi riferimenti bibliografici alle pagine 153-164, offre una preziosa lettura incentrata sul capitolo della Phänomenologie des Geistes di Hegel dedicato al rapporto servo-padrone; ancora utile Jean Hyppolite, Genèse et structure de la Phénoménologie de l’esprit de Hegel, Paris 1946. 128 Cfr. Victoria De Grazia, Irresistible Empire. America’s Advance through Twentieth-Century Europe, Cambridge, Mass. 2005. 129 Marco Maggio, In principio fu la pubblicità. Critica della ragione pubblicitaria, prefazione di Diego Fusaro, postfazione di Maria Angela Polesana, Saonara (Padova) 2014. Cfr. supra, le note 93-95.

198


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

loro robusto materialismo130. E fu Pasolini a prevedere con molti decenni d’anticipo che il mondo sarebbe stato come oggi è la TV, una pròtesi responsabile dell’ipnotica degenerazione dei sensi umani sedotti131. Ma se agli onnipresenti e inopportuni modelli dei Massmedia si deve l’intorpidimento dei muscoli oculari per effetto della minaccia di atrofizzare con i loro messaggi il loro pubblico, spetta all’Arte la terapia del massaggio benefico di quegli stessi muscoli, in un trattamento trasformante la letargia in frenesia132. 130 I libri di Gilbert Keith Chesterton [1874-1936] hanno contribuito al ritorno alla fede cristiana (anglicana) dello scrittore Clive Staples Lewis; hanno impressionato Gandhi; nel 1937 hanno avuto effetto sulla conversione al cattolicesimo di Marshall McLuhan, figlio di genitori metodisti, ed infine hanno insegnato molto anche a Jorge Luis Borges. Ian Ker, G.K. Chesterton: A Biography, Oxford 2011; Donald T Williams, Mere Humanity: G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien on the Human Condition, Nashville, TN 2006. Cfr. The Christian Tradition in English Literature: Poetry, Plays, and Shorter Prose, (edited by) Paul Cavill and Heather Ward, with Matthew Baynham and Andrew Swinford, and contributions from John Flood and Roger Pooley, Grand Rapids, MI 2007; e, per come ormai un neuroscienziato studia le innate credenze e superstizioni – utili alla promozione dell’omeostasi socioculturale per mezzo dello stabilimento di vincoli comunitari e sociali –, si può vedere Bruce M. Hood, Supersense: Why We believe in the Unbelievable, New York, N.Y. 2009. 131 “Si produrrà e si consumerà, ecco. E il mondo sarà esattamente come oggi la Televisione – questa degenerazione dei sensi umani – ce lo descrive, con stupenda, atroce ispirazione profetica”, dichiarazione di Pasolini in un’intervista rilasciata ad Alberto Arbasino, in Alberto Arbasino, Sessanta posizioni, Milano 1971, poi ripubblicata in Pier Paolo Pasolini, Saggi sulla politica e sulla società, a cura di Walter Siti e Silvia De Laude, con un saggio di Piergiorgio Bellocchio, cronologia a cura di Nico Naldini, Milano 1999, p. 1572. Cfr. dell’economista Giulio Sapelli, Modernizzazione senza sviluppo. Il capitalismo secondo Pasolini, Milano 2005, da leggere con qualche avvedutezza. 132 Achille Bonito Oliva [Caggiano (Salerno) 1939-]: “L’arte contemporanea è un massaggio al muscolo atrofizzato della sensibilità collettiva perché la nostra è una società di massa addomesticata dai media. L’arte ha una funzione energetica”, in un’intervista all’agenzia di stampa Adnkronos (2011); e ancora, “È un massaggio al muscolo atrofizzato della coscienza collettiva e dell’identità dello spettatore”, in un’intervista a Enrico Tantucci pubblicata su «il Mattino» di Padova del 14 novembre 2012. Cfr. Marshall McLuhan, Quentin Fiore, The Medium is the Massage, co-ordinated by Jerome Agel, New York, Random House, 1967 (il titolo è qui il fortuito e fortunato risultato di un refuso tipografico – massage invece di message – che tanto piacque a McLuhan stesso che volle lasciarlo, considerandolo provvidenziale!), ristampato con sottotitolo The Medium is the Massage: An Inventory of Effects, San Francisco, HardWired, 1996; Tom Koch, The Message is the Medium: Online All the Time for Everyone, Westport, Conn. 1996; Karl R. Popper, Cattiva maestra televisione, a cura di Giancarlo Bosetti, (con testi di John Condry, Karol Wojtyła, Raimondo

199


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Con la spettacolarizzazione dell’impudente intimità uniformata, con la devozione agli insignificanti surrogati, con la schiavitù delle quotidiane volgari banalità, con l’imperativo al presenzialismo martellante pur senza valore eroico, e con una pubblicità divenuta non più l’esibizione di un particolare prodotto propagandato quanto piuttosto il paranoico imitativo feticismo della merce, l’antieducativo e perverso bombardamento mediatico ed il vortice stesso della spasmodica vita postmoderna, che inducono l’amnesia storica, vengono in parte compensati dall’ossessione contemporanea per la memoria storica133. E la risvegliata memoria sociale – la cui offensiva perdita segnerebbe (per un popolo sovrano divenuto gigante dai piedi d’argilla) una condanna all’oscurità in una terra di rimozione dell’oculata consapevolezza storica – risulta fondamentale per sviscerare l’inadeguatezza umana all’universalità della morte e pur anco attenuare il senso di consumazione del naufragio della morte: l’esteriorità dell’estinzione mortale come notte dell’esprimibile non si vive, l’ineluttabile morte è quel che d’umano nudamente le sopravvive, e l’unica cosa cui l’angosciosa inafferrabile cessazione della vita non può nuocere è l’arte, perché quest’ultima ha già placato e risanato il fatale iato, apertosi dentro di noi, tra l’identità dell’uno e la molteplicità del mutevole, tra presenza del soggetto e senso dell’oggetto, tra sostanzialità della cosa e segreto della forma, tra assolutizzazione naturale ed assolutizzazione artificiale, tra aggredibile contingenza e intangibile idea, tra fisica dell’ordine e fisica del disordine, tra posta disintegrazione e trovata espressione134. Cubeddu e Jean Baudoin), Venezia 2002; Joshua Meyrowitz, No Sense of Place: The Impact of Electronic Media on Social Behavior, New York, N.Y. 1985; Mario Morcellini, La TV fa bene ai bambini, Roma 1999. 133 Cfr. Maurice Halbwachs, La mémoire collective, édition critique établie par Gérard Namer, préparée avec la collaboration de Marie Jaisson, nouvelle édition revue et augmentée, Paris, A. Michel, 1997; Bernard Lewis, History– Remembered, Recorded, Invented, Princeton, N.J. 1975; Paul Ricœur, Histoire et vérité, Paris 1955; Tzvetan Todorov, Les abus de la mémoire, Paris 1995; Abdón Mateos, Historia y memoria democrática, Madrid 2007. 134 Norbert Elias [1897-1990], Über die Einsamkeit der Sterbenden in unseren Tagen, Frankfurt am Main 1982 (cito dalla trad. francese La solitude des mourants,

200


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Ebbene il filantropo, conscio della sua identità sociale, sa prendere la decisione che è il momento di ricordare il futuro, invece di preoccuparsi soltanto del futuro della memoria: egli sa come non ci si difende dai ricordi135; anzi di più: egli sa verso quale futuro si sarebbe rivolto il ricordo136. Nel mondo tecnocratico, con l’avvento di Internet – specialmente delle chat e dei social network –, siamo testimoni di un flussuoso processo di estrema accelerazione del tempo e di compressione dello spazio Paris 2012 (19981), p. 88), e per una lettura critica di questo testo del sociologo tedesco, vedi Jean-Hugues Déchaux, La mort dans les sociétés modernes : la thèse de Norbert Elias à l’épreuve, «L’Année sociologique» vol. 51, 1 (2001), pp. 161183, dove l’autore premette che “au fil de notre critique parfois sévère, nous réhabilitons Elias contre lui-même”. Inoltre, Stephen Mennell, Norbert Elias. Civilization and the Human Self-Image, Oxford, England–New York, N.Y. 1989; Hermann Korte, Über Norbert Elias. Das Werden eines Menschenwissenschaftlers, Opladen 1997; Marc Joly, Devenir Norbert Elias. Histoire croisée d’un processus de reconnaissance scientifique : la réception française, Paris 2012. “Art is the one thing which Death cannot harm”, in Oscar Wilde, Art and the Handicraftsman [1882], in Id., Essays and Lectures, London, Methuen & Co., 1913, pp. 173-196: p. 195. Indimenticabili, e apparentemente paradossali, i versi montaliani “la morte non ha altra voce / di quella che spande la vita” (vv. 45-46 del Palio [nel ricordo del Palio senese del 16 agosto 1938 vissuto con l’amica insegnante ebrea americana Irma Brandeis, cioè il venerato personaggio di Clizia], la penultima poesia in Eugenio Montale, Le occasioni [1928-1939], Torino 1939). 135 “I ricordi, queste ombre troppo lunghe / del nostro breve corpo…” poetava Vincenzo Cardarelli in Passato (in Poesie, Roma, Edizioni di Novissima, 1936). 136 Cfr. Hermann Broch [1886-1951], Der Tod des Vergil, New York, Pantheon Books Inc., 19451; Id., Kommentierte Werkausgabe, hrsg. von Paul Michael Lützeler, 17 Bände, Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp, 1974-1981, Bd. 4: Der Tod des Vergil, p. 28: “... in welche Zukunft sollte Erinnerung da noch eingehen?”. Timm Collmann, Zeit und Geschichte in Hermann Brochs Roman Der Tod des Vergil, Bonn 1967; Robert A. Kann, Hermann Broch und Geschichtsphilosophie, in Historica: Studien zum geschichtlichen Denken und Forschen, Hugo Hantsch, Eric Voegelin und Franco Valsecchi (Hrsg.), Wien-FreiburgBasel 1965, pp. 37-50; Jürgen Heizmann, Antike und Moderne in Hermann Brochs „Tod des Vergil“: über Dichtung und Wissenschaft, Utopie und Ideologie, Tübingen 1997; Dietrich Meinert, Die Darstellung der Dimensionen menschlicher Existenz in Brochs Tod des Vergil, Bern 1962; Vasily Rudich, Mythical and Mystical in The Death of Vergil: A Response to Luciano Zagari, in Hermann Broch: Literature, Philosophy, Politics. The Yale Broch Symposium, Yale University, November 1986, edited by Stephen D. Dowden, Columbia, S.C. 1988, pp. 338-345; Anja Grabowsky-Hotamanidis, Zur Bedeutung mystischer Denktraditionen im Werk von Hermann Broch, Tübingen 1995; Jean-Paul Bier, Hermann Broch et La mort de Virgile, Paris 1974; Hermann Broch, Visionary in Exile. The 2001 Yale Symposium, New Haven, April 27-29, 2001, edited by Paul Michael Lützeler in cooperation with Matthias Konzett et al., Rochester, N.Y. 2003.

201


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

con risultanti simultaneità dell’accadere in un’opacità di trasparenza; i modelli imposti da Internet, così come già quelli della TV, presuppongono l’immediatezza dell’interazione con immagini virtuali che innescano l’ossimoro di un’eccitata passività nella nostra saturabile assuefazione psichica, la quale, quindi, risulterà succube nel favorire una tendenza imitativa verso quelle stesse fittizie immagini routinarie. In arte può essere incolmabile il contrasto tra due tipi opposti di solitaria bellezza visuale; ma tra artista e filàntropo è spesso un interfacciarsi, un rincorrersi l’un l’altro, un cercare l’altro vicendevolmente, l’Andersstreben della lingua tedesca: infatti l’artista, nei confronti del filàntropo, è pressoché il rovescio della stessa medaglia: artista è solo colui che genialmente sa creare un enigma da una soluzione137, mentre al filàntropo spetta di creare una soluzione da un enigma, e questo 137 Karl Kraus [1874-1936]: “Künstler ist nur einer, der aus der Lösung ein Rätsel machen kann”, nella sua rivista satirica «Die Fackel» Nr. 406, XVII. Jahr (Wien, 5. Oktober, 1915), p. 138; poi ripreso in K. Kraus, Nachts, Leipzig, Verlag der Schriften von Karl Kraus (Kurt Wolff), Wien, Jahoda & Siegel, Herbst 1918, p. 53; e ancora ristampato in Id., Beim Wort genommen (Werke von K. Kraus, Bd. 3), mit einem Nachwort hrsg. von Heinrich Fischer, München, Kösel Verlag, 1955. Sul tagliente scrittore boemo di nascita, che abbandonò la fede ebraica ma poi abbracciato il cattolicesimo col battesimo – Adolf Loos fu il suo padrino – presto se ne disamorò, hanno dedicato lunghe pagine saggisti sopraffini quali Walter Benjamin ed Elias Canetti, e non è mancato l’interesse da parte di Theodor W. Adorno; Kraus ebbe rapporti con Oskar Kokoschka, con Loos, Shönberg, Strindberg, Wedekind, Trakl, Werfel, Oscar Wilde etc., ma criticò, tra gli altri, Hermann Bahr: Walter Benjamin, Karl Kraus [1931], in W. B., Gesammelte Schriften, Bd. II/1, Frankfurt am Main 1977, pp. 334-367; Elias Canetti, Karl Kraus: Schule des Widerstands, in E. C., Macht und Überleben, Berlin 1972; e nel secondo volume dell’autobiografia di Canetti intitolato Die Fackel im Ohr, München-Wien 1980, spec. Abschnitt: Begeisterung für Karl Kraus; John Theobald, The Paper Ghetto: Karl Kraus and Anti-Semitism, New York, N.Y. 1996; Alfred Pfabigan, Karl Kraus und der Sozialismus, Wien 1976; Edward Timms, Karl Kraus: Satiriker der Apokalypse. Leben und Werk 1874-1918, Wien 1986; Reinhard Merkel, Strafrecht und Satire im Werk von Karl Kraus, Frankfurt am Main 1998; Hans Weigel, Karl Kraus oder Die Macht der Ohnmacht, München 1968; Werner Kraft, Das Ja des Neinsagers: Karl Kraus und seine geistige Welt, München 1974; Mirko Gemmel, Die Kritische Wiener Moderne. Ethik und Ästhetik. Karl Kraus, Adolf Loos, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Berlin 2005; Fausto Cercignani, Il fine secolo viennese. Arthur Schnitzler, Richard Beer-Hofmann e Karl Kraus, «Studia austriaca» – “SprachWunder”. Il contributo ebraico alla letteratura austriaca, (Milano, 2003), pp. 33-49; Albert Fuchs, Geistige Strömungen in Österreich 1867-1918, Wien 1949.

202


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

in un continuo sacrificio di sé ed estinzione della personalità. Filàntropi ed artisti vestono spesso lo stesso abito della vocazione all’approccio dissidente, piuttosto che quello della devozione soggiacente all’eternità. Nella società contemporanea, dal sorriso incoraggiante di imbelle buonismo e surrettizio perdonismo, da anni ormai si giustifica tutto aggirando o eliminando spesso le categorie dell’errore e della colpa: quasi tutto è possibile senza quasi rischiare né vero castigo né vero biasimo. E non s’impongono più norme alle distorsioni dell’immaginazione e al parossistico gioco dei desideri mondani138, in nome di una tolleranza recepita come debolezza borghese, identificando l’accidiosa democrazia con una maggioranza che equivale ad un’agghiacciante massa d’illusi e vulnerabili sprovveduti che non sono in grado d’essere protagonisti, irridendo – nel nome di una scalmanata o impura o autocombusta e bullesca giovinezza – ai sospesi diritti dell’uomo come soggetto mite e come civile inerme e dall’indifesa integrità139. Questi stessi irriverenti e dissoluti trasgressori – disadattate vittime per lo più delle monopolizzazioni dell’apparenza operate da loschi ‘persuasori occulti’, o del loro insulso e teatrale scimmiottamento – sono cinicamente convinti che la verità possa essere manipolata dileggiata e lesa in vista di un fine che giustifica tutto140. Anche le cattive e fraudolenti idee operative si diffondono come le epidemie e le millanterie, e troppo spesso si tace con rammarico o, da acquiescenti borbottanti, si soffoca 138 A contraltare, s’affacciano alla memoria le parole che solo la leggenda popolare ha potuto attribuire a Michelangelo Buonarroti: “Signore, fa che io possa sempre desiderare più di quanto riesca a realizzare”. 139 Roger Burggraeve, Violence and the Vulnerable Face of the Other: The Vision of Emmanuel Levinas on Moral Evil and Our Responsibility, «Journal of Social Philosophy» Vol. 30, No. 1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 29-45; Human Rights and Conflict: Essays in Honour of Bas de Gaay Fortman, edited by Ineke Boerefijn et al., Cambridge, England–Portland, Oreg. 2012; Norberto Bobbio, Elogio della mitezza e altri scritti morali, Milano 1994. 140 Cfr. Peter Stallybrass and Allon White, The Politics and Poetics of Transgression, London 1986.

203


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

il disgusto e lo sfogo per paura di apparire avvilenti dissuasori privi di virilità141, di contro ad un sistema che si autopercepisce come legittimo e si sente così fortemente obbligato a ottundimenti e a violenze e soprusi e svalutazioni – anche nei confronti delle coscienze – che il sacrificio non basta più a colmare la Legge e se ne ricava l’impressione che “hanno fatto di tutto per rendere intollerabile l’uso dei padri”142: viviamo in una società che da un lato àrgina forme di violazione, da un altro lato ne fomenta o innesca violentemente ulteriori143, e la povertà resta la peggior forma di cupa violenza sia ispirando idee di cambiamento sociale sia costituendo essa stessa minaccia sociale144. Invece, tra le virtù radicate anche sulle caducità di tutte le vicende umane, è l’osservanza del dovere che socializza il soggetto e lo storicizza irregimentandolo nella sincerità del nodale mutuo rispetto più che della gerarchizzante tolleranza. Se oggi, nella scommessa contro il declino, la dedizione a valori durevoli è in crisi, questo accade perché è in crisi l’idea stessa di durata e di immortalità, in quanto la fede fondamentale e quotidiana nella durevolezza delle cose verso le quali e dalle quali la vita umana può essere orientata e compendiata è fortemente indebolita dall’esperienza intonata alla parvenza dell’effimero ed ai paradigmi delle mode o, per meglio dire, intronata dai frastuoni dell’effimero 141 Cfr. Marcia P. Miceli, Janet P. Near, Blowing the Whistle: The Organizational and Legal Implications for Companies and Employees, New York 1992; Marcia P. Miceli, Janet P. Near, and Terry Morehead Dworkin, Whistle-blowing in Organizations, New York 2008. 142 Pasolini, Saggi sulla politica e sulla società cit., p. 1574. 143 Paolo Rossi (Monti) [1923-2012], Speranze, Bologna 2008. Sulla formidabile bibliografia storico-filosofica dell’autore fino al 1999, vedi Segni e percorsi della modernità. Saggi in onore di Paolo Rossi, a cura di Ferdinando Abbri e Marco Segala, Università degli studi di Siena, Dipartimento di Studi storicosociali e filosofici, Arezzo 2000. 144 Cfr. Paul Collier, The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are failing and What can be done About It, Oxford, England–New York, N.Y. 2007.

204


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

e dell’estemporaneo145. L’aberrante elevazione della visibilità del successo, della competitività e della ricerca incondizionata del massimo profitto al rango di criteri basilari, o persino monopolistici, di distinzione tra l’agire giusto e corretto e l’agire sbagliato e scorretto è in definitiva il sinistro ansioso fattore responsabile della paura ambientale, dello smarrimento e dell’insicurezza che pèrmea l’ingarbugliata esistenza di un gran numero di giovani individui insoddisfatti e derubati dei sogni. Sono soprattutto loro a non riuscire a massimizzare la propria irrequieta quantità potenziale in quanto incatenati al tòrpido fantasma dell’incertezza146; cosicché, in tutta questa frustrazione psicologica ed antropologico estraniamento sociale – aggravati dalle nuove inquietudini sistemiche della sperequazione dei redditi, del disagevole declassamento sociale o della deprimente disoccupazione e inattesa ridimensionante sobrietà e rigorosa austerità –, non aiuta davvero né l’istituzionalizzazione del lavoro precario né la diffusione dei contratti di lavoro temporaneo né la mancata applicazione dell’articolo 36 della Costituzione italiana alle collaborazioni coordinate e continuative, in un contesto sociale nazionale ancora dominato da presenza diffusa di economia sommersa e di umiliante lavoro nero incrementati dalle immigrazioni bibliche degli ultimi decenni147. 145 Zygmunt Bauman, Vite di corsa. Come salvarsi dalla tirannia dell’effimero, traduzione di Daniele Francesconi, Bologna 2009, che ripropone la “Lectio magistralis” che Bauman tenne all’Università di Bologna in occasione dell’inaugurazione dell’anno accademico 2007-2008. 146 Cfr. Zygmunt Bauman [Poznań 1925-], di questo ebreo polacco naturalizzato inglese – prim’attore nella deriva della sociologia contemporanea – si vedano Community. Seeking Safety in an Insecure World, Cambridge 2001; City of Fears, City of Hopes, London 2003; Work, Consumerism and the New Poor, Maidenhead, England–New York, N.Y. 20052 (19981). Su Bauman e le ambivalenti metamorfosi del postmoderno o la solitudine del cittadino globale e la società sotto assedio, vedi gli studi di Keith Tester, The Social Thought of Zygmunt Bauman, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, England–New York, N.Y. 2004; Bauman’s Challenge: Sociological Issues for the 21st Century, Mark Davis, Keith Tester (eds.), Basingstoke, Hampshire, England 2010. 147 Articolo 36: “Il lavoratore ha diritto ad una retribuzione

205


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Perfino i materiali dell’arte – coi colori dissolventi le forme di figura, e in un’escalation di nuovi mezzi espressivi in tempi di futili iperconcettualità, apparenze di autoreferenzialità, stridenti fantasie creative ed abusate paranoie oniriche – sfoggiano la propria deperibilità e natura effimera o di rapido smantellamento e smaterializzazione fino alla grottesca autodistruzione purché s’acquisti la notorietà del momento, in una raffinata o invero inaccettabile strategia di sopravvivenza del godimento. Ciò che va di moda nel ready made e nell’orientale gendai bijutsu scompare altrettanto rapidamente quanto rapidamente compare, senz’attesa di età pensionabile per gli slabbrati cascami; la sua attrattiva effimera racchiude già il germe della sua stessa autentica morte: e va notato che esiste un curioso rapporto inversamente proporzionale fra la neofilìa della moda o dell’opzione estetica e la necrofobìa o il nostro tabù che vieta di parlare dell’inabitabile morte, cioè di parlare di un ultimo riposo e di una futura naturale assenza148. Oggigiorno, viviamo nel nostro presente che ci induce addirittura alla liceità di capricciosi sogni di vita corporea ‘eterna’ grazie a terapeutici trapianti ed ingegneria genetica o, meglio ancora, a stucchevoli illusioni di omologata bellezza di gioventù che disconosce proporzionata alla quantità e qualità del suo lavoro e in ogni caso sufficiente ad assicurare a sé e alla famiglia un’esistenza libera e dignitosa. La durata massima della giornata lavorativa è stabilita dalla legge. Il lavoratore ha diritto al riposo settimanale e a ferie annuali retribuite, e non può rinunziarvi”. Cfr. Le politiche attive del lavoro nella prospettiva del bene comune, a cura di Pierluigi Grasselli, Cristina Montesi, Milano 2010. Sulle immigrazioni di persone povere in paesi ospitanti cosiddetti ricchi, gli alti costi e rischi disfunzionali di questi esodi, le conseguenze sociologiche ed economiche, il benevolo “mantra” del rispetto verso le altre diverse culture, nonché le inderogabili adeguate politiche di prevenzione, si veda il molto discusso libro di Paul Collier, Exodus: How Migration Is Changing Our World, Oxford 2013 con gli utili correttivi offerti dalla recensione di Michael Clemens e Justin Sandefur in «Foreign Affairs» (January/February, 2014). 148 Di Paul Connerton [sociologo contemporaneo inglese, Università di Cambridge], vedi How Modernity forgets, Cambridge, England–New York, N.Y. 2009; Id., How Societies remember, Cambridge 1989; cfr. Maurice Halbwachs, La mémoire collective, Paris 1950.

206


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

e dissimula l’età se non quella ridefinita dall’‘arte senza tempo’ della chirurgia plastica estetica; mentre il mondo è ormai paradossalmente ed irritabilmente diviso tra quelli che spendono un mucchio di denaro per non ingrassare in un ambiente temerariamente obesogenico, quelli austeri che si nutrono per vivere senza fare indigestioni, e quelli che non hanno da mangiare e ossessivamente s’affannano per restar vivi149. Certamente abbiamo, da non molto, lasciato un secolo che è stato dilacerato da raccapriccianti guerre mondiali, dalla nefanda violenza di totalitarismi che respiravano la ferità della morte e la spargevano in carneficine, da indicibili e indimenticabili orrori criminali150, da atroci persecuzioni razziali e scellerati genocidi ispirati alla riprovevole idea di pulizia etnica151, e pur nella nausea per tanto sangue innocente di capro espiatorio, per tante nefande barbarie collettive ed infamanti abusi continuiamo incoerentemente a oscillare, in una distorta situazione d’incertezza, tra l’imprevedibile speranza e l’impellente disperazione152. Tuttavia ogni storia umana è ridda piena di difficoltà e 149 David Saul Landes [1924-2013], The Wealth and Power of Nations: Why Some are So Rich and Some So Poor, New York, N.Y. 1998. 150 Storia, verità, giustizia: i crimini del XX secolo (Convegno Internazionale, Siena, 16-20 marzo, 2000), testi di Tzvetan Todorov, Michael Löwy, Maurizio Bettini, Zeev Sternhell, Gabriele Ranzato, Enzo Traverso, Hilmar Kaiser, David Bidussa, Karol Modzelewski, Mariuccia Salvati, Guido Crainz, Ben Kiernan, John Daniel, Annette Insdorf, Marcelo Viñar, Maren Ulriksen Viñar, Victor Zaslavsky, David Rieff, Paolo Calzini, Ruti Teitel, Charles Villa-Vicencio, Mark J. Osiel, Anne-Marieke Steeman, Paloma Aguilar, Catherine Coquio, Valentina Pisanty, Marcello Flores, a cura di Marcello Flores, Milano 2001. 151 Genocide and the Modern Age: Etiology and Case Studies of Mass Death, edited by Isidor Wallimann and Michael N. Dobkowski, Afterword by Richard L. Rubenstein, New York, N.Y. 1987; Murat Bardakçi, Talât Paşa’nın evrak-ı metrûkesi: sadrazam Talât Paşa’nın özel arşivinde bulunan Ermeni tehciri konusundaki belgeler ve hususî yazışmalar, Cağaloğlu, Ïstanbul 2008; Lorne Shirinian and Alan Whitehorn, The Armenian Genocide: Resisting the Inertia of Indifference, Kingston, Ont. 2001; Fire in the Ashes: God, Evil, and the Holocaust, edited and introduced by David Patterson and John K. Roth, Seattle, Wash. 2005; Annette Wieviorka, L’ère du témoin, Paris 1998. 152 Vedi Adriano Zamperini, Psicologia dell’inerzia e della solidarietà. Lo spettatore di fronte alle atrocità collettive, Torino 2001.

207


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

di travisamenti, di elusioni e d’incoerenze, di scissure e di disaffezioni, di oblii e velleità, e in quell’intreccio binario di bene e di male che ci costituisce e nella cui soglia d’ombra fluttuante ci è concesso di vivere non possiamo che ondeggiare tra le superstiti ragioni della speranza e il timore di infingimenti o scippi, ma con ubbidienza o deferente conformismo verso quale trónfia o incompetente dispotica autorità153? Per Aristotele “la speranza è il sogno dell’uomo desto”154; e già nell’antico Zoroastrismo iranico, in cui un monoteismo religioso conviveva con un dualismo etico, “il ruolo della storia appare essenziale, nonché conseguentemente quello degli esseri umani, giacché è proprio nella loro coscienza individuale che, ontologicamente, si combatte lo scontro più significativo contro le «devianze» del pensiero malvagio”155. Se avvertiamo il fatalismo della depressione e 153 Michael Frede, A Free Will. Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought (Sather Classical Lectures), Berkeley, University of California Press, 2012, interessante, qui, la dimostrazione di come il concetto di libero arbitrio non fu un’originale e radicalmente nuova creazione – come spesso ritenuto – di Agostino bensì quest’ultimo attinse a profusione dallo stoicismo di Epitteto; John Leslie Mackie, Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong, New York, N.Y. 1977; Simon Susen, The Philosophical Significance of Binary Categories in Habermas’s Discourse Ethics, «Sociological Analysis» Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1, 2009), pp. 97-125; Franco Rella, Le soglie dell’ombra. Riflessioni sul mistero, Milano 1994; Richard Sennett, Authority, New York 1980; Thomas May, Autonomy, Authority, and Moral Responsibility, Dordrecht-Boston 1998; Robert Audi, Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State, New York, N.Y. 2011; Jonathan Haidt, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are divided by Politics and Religion, New York, N.Y. 2012; Don Cupitt, Crisis of Moral Authority: The Dethronement of Christianity, Guildford, Surrey, England 1972; John A. Hall, The Importance of Being Civil: The Struggle for Political Decency, Princeton, N.J. 2013. 154 Vedi Diogene Laerzio, Vite dei filosofi, a cura di Marcello Gigante, Bari-Roma 1983³, V, 18. Tiziano Dorandi, Laertiana. Capitoli sulla tradizione manoscritta e sulla storia del testo delle Vite dei filosofi di Diogene Laerzio, Berlin-New York 2009; James O’Toole, Creating the Good Life: Applying Aristotle’s Wisdom to find Meaning and Happiness, Foreword by Walter Isaacson, Emmaus, Pa. 2005, spec. Part II: la sezione dedicata alla Philanthropy. 155 Antonio Panaino [Busto Arsizio (Varese) 1961-], Sacertà delle montagne e metafisica della luce nella cosmografia iranica mazdaica, in La Montagna cosmica, a cura di Alessandro Grossato, Milano 2010, pp. 43-67: 45; vedi, più in dettaglio, Id., Zoroastrismo e religioni dell’Iran preislamico, in Dizionario del sapere storico-religioso del Novecento, vol. II, Bologna 2010, pp. 1752-1792.

208


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

l’aggravante fine delle ideologie alla deriva156 è pur vero che la fabbrìle civiltà occidentale ci garantisce la generale democratizzazione di un livello di benessere materiale precedentemente esclusivo ed elitario; ci garantisce, oltre ad un’Europa senza frontiere, tutele sociali e società aperte e pluralistiche nelle quali si dovrebbero poter risolvere frizioni e contrasti sociali così come i linciaggi morali senza, auspicabilmente, far ricorso alla violenza157, ma semmai mettendone in luce anche con rumorosa e rabbiosa ostinazione i mai sopiti e pericolosi aspetti negativi soggiacenti. Nasca, dagli opposti, un ininterrotto movimento comunicativo dove “trattenersi non significa rinunciare ma esaltare la dote della pazienza”, in armonia al rassicurante insegnamento del pensiero contemplativo estremorientale158. Non è difficile persuadérsi che i veri intelligenti filàntropi hanno tenacemente fatto propria quella spiazzante idea ben espressa dal medico e scrittore 156 James Barr, History and Ideology in the Old Testament: Biblical Studies at the End of a Millennium, Oxford 2000; Harold Mah, The End of Philosophy, the Origin of “Ideology”: Karl Marx and the Crisis of the Young Hegelians, Berkeley, Calif. 1987; Daniel Bell, The End of Ideology: On the Exhaustion of Political Ideas in the Fifties: with “The Resumption of History in the New Century”, Cambridge, Mass. 2000 (Glencoe, Ill. 19601); Richard Lints, Progressive and Conservative Religious Ideologies: The Tumultuous Decade of the 1960s, Burlington, VT 2010; The End of Ideology Debate, edited, with an Introduction, by Chaim Isaac Waxman, New York 1969; Daniel Bell, The Coming of Post-Industrial Society: A Venture in Social Forecasting, with a new Foreword, New York 1999 (19731); Lev Nikolaevič Moskvichov, The End of Ideology Theory: Illusions and Reality: Critical Notes on a Fashionable Bourgeois Conception, translated from the Russian by Jim Riordan, Moscow 1974; Leonidas Donskis, The End of Ideology & Utopia? Moral Imagination and Cultural Criticism in the Twentieth Century, New York 2000; Ideology and National Identity in Post-Communist Foreign Policies, Rick Fawn (ed.), London–Portland, Or. 2003; William D. Rubinstein, The End of Ideology and the Rise of Religion: How Marxism and Other Secular Universalistic Ideologies have given way to Religious Fundamentalism, London 2009. 157 Cfr. Justice and Violence: Political Violence, Pacifism and Cultural Transformation, edited by Allan Eickelmann, Eric Nelson, Tom Lansford, Aldershot, Hants, England–Burlington, Vt. 2005. 158 Oltre alle ben diffuse opere di Daisetsu Teitarō Suzuki (鈴木 大拙 貞 太郎), che sposò una trentatreenne teosofista americana, compagna di classe di Gertrude Stein, si può leggere Hoseki Shin'ichi Hisamatsu, Die Fülle des Nichts: vom Wesen des Zen. Eine systematische Erläuterung, übersetzt von T. Hirata und J. Fischer, Pfullingen 1980. Cfr. Albert Bandura, Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control, New York, N.Y. 1997.

209


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

ebreo viennese Arthur Schnitzler – ammirato da Freud a Stanley Kubrick, ma esecrato dai saccenti nazisti – testimone impotente del suicidio della figlia diciannovenne: “la profondità del pensiero non ha mai rischiarato il mondo; è la chiarezza di pensiero a penetrarlo più profondamente”159. Perché possa salvare, l’infallibile e incorruttibile Dio supremo celeste deve essere chiaramente onnipotente – quindi imperscrutabilmente onnipresente, onniveggente ed onnisciente –, eppure ci sono religioni che conoscono il Dio salvatore ma non il Dio creatore primordiale, il Kosmokrator o Artefice intelligente o il demiurgo; peraltro la controprova della sua inebriante onnipotenza salvifica sarebbe il fatto stesso che – in proiezione archetipale – avrebbe dovuto, con assoluta sicumèra, creare ex nihilo160. I mali fuoriusciti dal vaso di Pandora nel mondo sono sempre sofferti dall’uomo come male accomunato del mondo, ma – a differenza degli altri animali esonerati 159 Stringe il cuore l’angosciosa testimonianza, su questo lucido pensiero di Arthur Schnitzler [1862-1931], offertaci da Jean Améry: “‘Profundity has never clarified the world, Clarity looks more profoundly into its depths,’ Arthur Schnitzler once said. Nowhere was it easier than in the camp, and particularly in Auschwitz, to assimilate this clever thought.” (Cito da Jean Améry, At the Mind’s Limits: Contemplations By a Survivor On Auschwitz and Its Realities, translated by Sidney Rosenfeld and Stella P. Rosenfeld, New York, N.Y. 1986, p. 20). Theodor Reik, Arthur Schnitzler als Psycholog, Minden 1913; Jacques Le Rider, Arthur Schnitzler ou la Belle Époque viennoise, Paris 2003 e la sua revisionata edizione in tedesco Arthur Schnitzler oder Die Wiener Belle Époque, aus dem Französischen übersetzt von Christian Winterhalter, Wien 20082; Giuseppe Farese, Arthur Schnitzler. Ein Leben in Wien 1862-1931, München 1999; Ulrich Weinzierl, Arthur Schnitzler. Lieben, Träumen, Sterben, Frankfurt am Main 1998; Anne-Catherine Simon, Schnitzlers Wien, Wien 2002. 160 Del benemerito Raffaele Pettazzoni, primo vincitore in Italia di cattedra di Storia delle religioni, si veda L’onniscienza di Dio, Torino 1955; cfr. la tesi di dottorato in Teologia fondamentale, Specializzazione in Scienze delle Religioni, discussa nel giugno 2001 nella Pontificia Università Lateranense e poi pubblicata da Giuseppe Mihelcic, Una religione di libertà: Raffaele Pettazzoni e la Scuola romana di Storia delle religioni, Roma 2003, un autore che alla teologia unisce oggi gli impegni di parroco esorcista; ma soprattutto la rievocazione di un rigoroso cattedratico come Giovanni Casadio, Raffaele Pettazzoni ieri, oggi, domani: la formazione di uno storico delle religioni e il suo lascito intellettuale, in Il mistero che rivelato ci divide e sofferto ci unisce. Studi pettazzoniani in onore di Mario Gandini: 1959-2009, a cura di Gian Pietro Basello, Paolo Ognibene e Antonio Panaino, San Giovanni in Persiceto-Milano 2012, pp. 221-240.

210


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

– il senso della colpa, il senso del peccato, il senso dell’immoralità, il senso del rimorso, il senso della vergogna nascono nell’uomo a testimonianza di una legge etica del bene nel peso del comune amor fati di salvezza che inesorabilmente si affronta, anche qualora in controtendenza161. Non è tanto l’appagante forza delle evitabili passioni che conduce al male castigante, quanto piuttosto l’ottusità regressiva dell’intelligenza162. Nell’immediatezza dell’esistere si può essere tentati ad uscire dalla prigionia del mondo e a vederlo come uno dei mondi possibili; cioè si può essere stimolati, per non lasciarsi soffocare nell’esegesi cristallizzata dell’umano, a proiettarsi nell’incògnito cosmo, o a interagire con una realtà tridimensionale virtuale da Computer Graphics o da Cyberspace, o a godersi la vita attraverso immagini fisiche ologrammatiche dove ogni punto memorizza e contiene la sua integralità163; in fin dei conti, come non subire una magnetica attrazione dalla semplice constatazione che l’origine della vita è riposta nelle celestiali plaghe degli astri164. Nel disagio 161 A questo riguardo, tengo a precisare che non ignoro gli studi etologici che hanno confermato la possibilità di evidenziare precursori delle emozioni di natura sociale cosiddette morali, come vergogna e senso di colpa, in vari animali (vedi soprattutto Frans [suo nome completo Fransiscus Bernardus Maria] de Waal, Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals, Cambridge, Mass. 1996; Id., Primates and Philosophers: How Morality evolved, edited and introduced by Stephen Macedo and Josiah Ober, with contributions by Robert Wright, Christine M. Korsgaard, Philip Kitcher, Peter Singer, Princeton, N.J. 2006). Cfr. del conservatore e poliedrico professore di estetica Roger Scruton – educato al Jesus College di Oxford –, The Face of God (Gifford Lectures, University of St Andrews, May 2010), London 2012. 162 Emilio Cecchi [1884-1966]: Renato Bertacchini, Emilio Cecchi saggista e critico, «Convivium» XXVII, 4 (1958), pp. 467-472; cfr. Jean Duvignaud, La Genèse des passions dans la vie sociale, Paris 1990. 163 Edgar Morin, (La méthode, 3). La connaissance de la connaissance. 1, Anthropologie de la connaissance, Paris, Éditions du Seuil, 1986; Lev Manovich, The Language of New Media, Cambridge, Mass. 2002; Id., Software takes Command: Extending the Language of New Media, New York, N.Y. 2013. 164 Potrebbe risultare una cifra a nove zeri il numero statistico di pianeti extrasolari con dimensioni raccordabili a quelle del pianeta Terra nella sola nostra galassia della Via Lattea; resterebbe poi da annoverare tutti gli altri compatibili pianeti esistenti nelle altre decine e decine di miliardi di galassie computate nell’universo saggiato.

211


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

della civiltà d’Occidente, già da molto tempo, si avverte un provocativo bisogno intellettualistico di emergere carsicamente, di uscire dal languoroso annoiamento di anòdine beatitudini e mettersi in estatico o stupefatto ascolto di voci qui quiescenti o inaccessibili o usurpate o fallite (si pensi alla pubblicazione nel 1992 di Uscite dal mondo, opera di Elémire Zolla, uno dei più fecondi e sottili indagatori nostrani della vita intellettuale e degli echi di un’eterna voce nel mondo interiore spirituale e dell’emergere di una convergente coscienza nel mondo fisico che ci trafigge col suo sguardo). Io subisco la fascinazione di quegli eroici filàntropi i quali credono che progetti umanamente ragionevoli e praticabili possano nascere sulla base di una speranza, coniugata all’impegno, la quale – pur facendolo discendere dalle celestiali vette dell’eterno165 – sposta il paradiso in un raggiungibile futuro, senza ricorrere, però, all’uso sistematico di forza o violenza bensì alla riconfigurazione di un sogno infranto non più impossibile. Così mi si prospetta la tempra del filàntropo come visionario ispirato da un’epifanìa, che vorrebbe restituire alla Terra un suo originario concertato incanto, o come affidatario di una missione fondata sul pensiero – mai in fumo – che si apre alla dimensione del sacro promettendo reale salvezza prima ancora che imitabile verità o fiduciale logica della pretesa, e rinunciando ai trascendentali sradicamenti ancillari a obbligate soluzioni palingenetiche o teleologiche. Come 165 Cfr. Małgorzata Szcześniak, Die Philosophie der Kosmologie über die Ewigkeit der Welt, in The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy, Ioanna Kuçuradi, Stephen Voss, and Cemal Güzel (Editors), 13 Vols., Ankara 2006-2007, Vol. 5 (2007): Logic and Philosophy of the Sciences, Stephen Voss, Berna Kılınç, Gürol Irzık (eds.), pp. 81-86; Jean Delumeau, Une histoire du paradis : le jardin des délices, Paris 1992, vol. 1: Le jardin des délices, vol. 2: Mille ans de bonheur; Pierre-Antoine Bernheim, Guy Stavridès, Paradis, paradis, préface d’Etienne Roda-Gil, Paris 1991, si veda anche la prefazione del professor Giovanni Filoramo all’edizione italiana Torino 1994; Colleen McDannell, Bernhard Lang, Heaven: A History, New Haven, Conn. 20012 (19881); Jeffrey Burton Russell, A History of Heaven: The Singing Silence, Princeton, N.J. 1997; Alessandro Scafi, Mapping Paradise: A History of Heaven on Earth, Chicago, Ill. 2006.

212


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

contraddire Shakespeare, che nella Tempesta non esita a dire: “Siam fatti della medesima sostanza di cui sono fatti i sogni...”166; l’unico lusinghevole potere esercitato dall’autorevolezza della filantropia è l’ironico creativo potere di catturare i sogni, in un mondo attuale dove l’ottica delle mirabolanti illusioni è per lo più vista come un circolo vizioso o un rimedio peggiore del male. Può avverarsi – in un’impulsiva ansia d’impotenza di fronte a situazioni d’estrema evanescenza di successo e senz’alcuna potenziale garanzia di ricettività – che i filàntropi si lascino affidare alla serendipità (Serendipity)167 166 “... And like this insubstantial pageant faded, / Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff / As dreams are made on, and our little life / Is rounded with a sleep...”, Prospero, esiliato duca legittimo di Milano: Atto IV, scena I, 148-158. Dramma rispettoso delle tre unità aristoteliche, fu rappresentato per la prima volta il 1° novembre 1611 nel londinese Whitehall Palace e fu poi registrato da Edward Blount nello Stationers’ Register solo l’8 novembre 1623; risulta quindi pubblicato nel First Folio – edito per cura di John Heminges e Henry Condell e venduto al prezzo di un pound – del dicembre 1623 (“printed by Isaac Jaggard and Edward Blount”) con l’utilizzo di un testo della commedia preparato da Ralph Crane. 167 Serendipity: parola coniata, in una lettera al caro amico e lontano cugino Sir Horace Mann – già inviato britannico alla Corte di Toscana – datata 28 gennaio 1754, dal trentasettenne parlamentare Whig, scrittore ed eclettico collezionista neogotico inglese Horace Walpole, traendola dal titolo italiano dell’operetta Peregrinaggio di tre giouani figliuoli del Re di Serendippo, per opra di M. Christoforo Armeno dalla Persiana nell’Italiana lingua trapportato, In Venetia, per Michele Tramezzino, 1557, in 8° [altre ediz. 1584, ibidem; 1622 e 1628, In Venezia, appresso Ghirardo, & Iseppo Imberti; trad. francese del cavalier de Mailly, A Paris, chez Pierre Prault, à l’entrée du quay de Gévre, au Paradis, 1719; trad. inglese 1722; trad. tedesca 1723; trad. olandese 1766], che col tempo è risultata essere un adattamento in traduzione del poema persiano Hasht bihisht (Otto paradisi) completato nel 1302 dal grande poeta e musico persiano, nativo di Patiali ma attivo a Delhi, Ab'ul Hasan Yamīn ud-Dīn Khusrow meglio noto come Amīr Khusrau Dehlawī [1253-1325]: Serendippo valeva come riferimento all’antico nome dell’isola di Ceylon, l’odierno Srī Lanka, ed era vocabolo derivato dall’arabo Sarandib, a sua volta dal Tamil Seren deevu, o in origine dal sanscrito ØáÕÃ|gàÊ, Suvarṇadvīpa, traducibile ‘isola dorata’ quindi isola risplendente (il nome maschile varna significa ‘colore’ e l’aggettivo suvarna – su vale ‘buono’ e varna è appunto ‘colore’ – vuole intendere ‘dorato’, così come il nome neutro suvarna significa ‘oro’; dvīpa si traduce ‘isola’; cfr. Suvaróa dvīpa a significare l’‘isola di Sumatra’); altri studiosi rintracciano l’etimologia in Sinhaladvīpa che alla lettera vuol dire ‘isola dimora di [discendenti di / uomini simil-] leoni’. Serendipità significa la capacità o fortuna di fare per caso inattese e felici scoperte – specialmente in campo epistemologico – mentre si sta cercando altro. Schuyler Van Rensselaer Cammann, Christopher The Armenian and The Three Princes of Serendip, in Comparative Literature; Matter and Method, edited with Introductions by Alfred Owen Aldridge, Urbana 1969, pp. 238-252;

213


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

piuttosto che cadere vittime dell’apatìa e degli eccessi del solipsismo o esser resi immuni alle ottimistiche euforie; ed è straordinaria la loro capacità di saper rendere visita a sé stessi prima che sia tardi e che, in veste d’inani spettatori destinati a perdersi nell’implosione dello scoraggiamento, si vedano costretti a dirsi duramente allo specchio: “Abbiamo fatto esperienza, ma ci è sfuggito il significato”, facendo risuonare, involontariamente, un passo poetico di Thomas Stearns Eliot: “We had the experience but missed the meaning”168. Mohammad Habib, Hazrat Amir Khusrau of Delhi, Bombay 1927; Amir Khusrau: Memorial Volume, New Delhi 1975; Robert Wyndham Ketton-Cremer, Horace Walpole. A Biography, London 1964; Horace Walpole’s Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann (The Yale Edition of Horace Walpole’s Correspondence, Volumes 17-24), edited by Wilmarth Sheldon Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith, and George L. Lam, New Haven, Conn. 1954-1967, Vol. 20, pp. 407-411, il carteggio è definito dal Lewis “la cordigliera delle Ande della corrispondenza di Walpole”: Royston M. Roberts, Serendipity: Accidental Discoveries in Science, New York, N.Y. 1989; Robert K. Merton, Elinor Barber, The Travels and Adventures of Serendipity: A Study in Historical Semantics and the Sociology of Science, Princeton, N.J. 2004; Richard Gaughan, Accidental genius, New York, N.Y. 2010. 168 Thomas Stearns Eliot [1888-1965]: “… We had the experience but missed the meaning, / And approach to the meaning restores the experience / In a different form, beyond any meaning / We can assign to happiness. I have said before / That the past experience revived in the meaning / Is not the experience of one life only / But of many generations – not forgetting / Something that is probably quite ineffable: / The backward look behind the assurance / Of recorded history, the backward half-look / Over the shoulder, towards the primitive terror”, in The Dry Salvages II (composto alla fine del 1940 e l’inizio del ‘41, e pubblicato nel febbraio del ‘41 su «New English Weekly»), in Thomas Stearns Eliot, Four Quartets, composti nel 1935-1942 e ripubblicati in un unico volume a New York, da Harcourt, nel 1943. Staffan Bergsten, Time and Eternity: A Study in the Structure and Symbolism of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, Stockholm 1960; Rajendra Verma, Time and Poetry in Eliot’s Four Quartets, Atlantic Highlands, N.J. 1979; Kenneth Paul Kramer, Redeeming Time: T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, Boston, Mass. 2007; Thomas Howard, Dove Descending: A Journey into T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, San Francisco, Calif. 2006; Walter Weihermann, Sprachhermeneutik und Literatur: Ein Interpretationsversuch zu T. S. Eliots „Four Quartets“, Frankfurt am Main–Bern–Las Vegas 1978; Martin Warner, A Philosophical Study of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, Lewiston, N.Y. 1999; Paul Murray, T. S. Eliot and Mysticism: The Secret History of Four Quartets, New York, N.Y. 1991; Ronald Moore, Metaphysical Symbolism in T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, Stanford, Calif. 1965; Michael D.G. Spencer, Understanding Four Quartets as a Religious Poem: How T. S. Eliot uses Symbols and Rhythms to plumb Mystical Meaning, with a Foreword by Anthony Farrow, Lewiston, N.Y. 2008; Kinereth Meyer & Rachel Salmon Deshen, Reading the Underthought: Jewish Hermeneutics and the Christian Poetry of Hopkins and Eliot, Washington, D.C. 2010; Paul Foster, The Buddhist Influence in T. S. Eliot’s “Four Quartets”, Frankfurt am Main 1977;

214


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Non posso minimizzare o far finta d’ignorare che già nella formulazione marxista “Da ciascuno secondo le sue capacità, a ciascuno secondo i suoi bisogni” si progettava un paradiso sulla terra rifiutando di credere in un paradiso celeste come luogo di eterne beatitudini, riservato dall’assiologico Dio alle sole anime dei giusti in premio del loro confacente comportamento terreno. Insomma un passaggio del socialismo dall’utopìa – come “verità di domani”169 – alla scienza, dal regno della necessità al regno della libertà, “un regno di Dio senza Dio” in cui sorgesse un nuovo plausibile sole in un mondo di fratellanza perequativa senza ammissibilità di svantaggiosa povertà e nullatenenza, senza più guerre permanenti, senza più lotte di religione, senza più radicalizzata violenza, senza più incentivato sfruttamento e svilenti sopraffazioni: “ubi Lenin, ibi Jerusalem”170; Marshall McLuhan, Rhetorical Spirals in Four Quartets, in Figures in a Ground: Canadian Essays on Modern Literature Collected in Honor of Sheila Watson, edited by Diane Bessai and David Jackel, Saskatoon, Canada 1978, pp. 76-86; Dominic Manganiello, T. S. Eliot and Dante, New York, N.Y. 1989; Russell Kirk, Eliot and His Age: T. S. Eliot’s Moral Imagination in the Twentieth Century, LaSalle, Ill. 1984, revised and enlarged edition (New York, N.Y. 19711). 169 Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, Paris, Pagnerre (Imprimerie J. Claye), 1862 – romanzo diviso in cinque parti fu pubblicato in dieci volumi in-octavo il 30 marzo a Bruxelles, presso A. Lacroix, Verboeckhoven et Cie., e poi il 3 aprile a Parigi –, vedi il Livre premier, Chapitre XX: Les morts ont raison et les vivants n’ont pas tort: “L’utopie d’ailleurs, convenons-en, sort de sa sphère radieuse en faisant la guerre. Elle, la vérité de demain, elle emprunte son procédé, la bataille, au mensonge d’hier. Elle, l’avenir, elle agit comme le passé”. Edward Ousselin, Victor Hugo’s European Utopia, «Nineteenth-Century French Studies» Vol. 34, N. 1&2 (Fall-Winter, 2005-2006), pp. 32-43; Max Bach, Critique et politique: la réception des Misérables en 1862, «Publications of the Modern Language Association of America» Vol. 77, N. 5 (1st December, 1962), pp. 595-608. 170 Ernst Bloch [1885-1977]: mi ha sempre incuriosito il vissuto biografico di questo ateo filosofo marxista di origini ebraiche che convolò una prima volta a nozze nel 1913 con la scultrice Else von Stritzky e nel 1922 si sposò con la pittrice Linda Oppenheimer. La mia citazione è tratta dalla sua opera principale Das Prinzip Hoffnung, 3 Bände, Berlin 1954-1959. Peter Zudeick, Der Hintern des Teufels. Ernst Bloch – Leben und Werk, Baden-Baden 1985; Arno Münster, Ernst Bloch. Eine politische Biographie, Berlin-Wien 2004; Christina Ujma, Ernst Blochs Konstruktion der Moderne aus Messianismus und Marxismus. Erörterungen mit Berücksichtigung von Lukács und Benjamin, Stuttgart 1995; Ernst Bloch, utopische Ontologie, Gvozden Flego, Wolfdietrich SchmiedKowarzik (Hrsg.), Bochum 1986; Katharina Block, Sozialutopie. Darstellung und Analyse der Chancen zur Verwirklichung einer Utopie, Berlin 2011; Helmut Schelsky, Die Hoffnung Blochs: Kritik der marxistischen Existenzphilosophie eines

215


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

dopo tutto, è ormai lontano il “fiume senza rive” del tempo171 in cui si diceva che senza pane non c’è anima ed ai poveri piace mangiare solo promesse. Parafrasando il Manifesto dei comunisti, viene da dire che la filantropia non è un movimento storico le cui proposizioni teoriche poggiano su astruse idee, su velleitari princìpi di sviluppo sia dell’essere sia della coscienza inventati da questo o quel riformatore sociale, maestro di verità o salvatore del mondo, ma è semplicemente espressione generale di rapporti di fatto di un’avanguardia cosciente che va assecondata, comunque soccorsa, difesa e salvata. Sempre, il còmpito dell’avanguardia, è quello di prefigurare le metamorfosi dovute al dissenso: e senza crisi non ci sono sfide trasgressive né nuove idonee messe a fuoco né nuove coscienze. Nel lungo periodo, la nostra pace e prosperità dipendono dal benessere degli altri, ed ogni uomo – al pari di un ministro di Stato – è colpevole di tutto il bene che tranquillamente non ha fatto sedendo dalla parte del torto172 ed è chiamato a dar testimonianza della mancata condivisione d’umanità, infatti “la Terra è abbastanza ricca per soddisfare i bisogni di ognuno ma non l’avidità di tutti” come predicava la grande anima di Gandhi173. Jugendbewegten, Stuttgart 1979; Eberhard Braun, Grundrisse einer besseren Welt. Beiträge zur politischen Philosophie der Hoffnung, Mössingen-Talheim 1997. 171 Le temps est un fleuve sans rives è il titolo solitamente dato ad una surreale acquaforte del 1928 (realizzata durante il periodo francese e ora visibile al MoMA di New York) rielaborata in un olio su tela del 1930-39 (collezione Kathleen Kapnick, New York) del pittore ebreo russo Marc Chagall (vero nome Moishe Segal, 1887-1985). 172 Voltaire: “Un ministre est excusable du mal qu’il fait, lorsque le gouvernail de l’état est forcé dans sa main par les tempêtes; mais dans le calme il est coupable de tout le bien qu’il ne fait pas”, in Le siècle de Louis XIV, publié par M. de Francheville, à Berlin, chez C.F. Henning, 1752, Tome Ie, Chapitre V: Etat de la France, jusqu’à la mort du cardinal Mazarin en 1661, pp. 90-124: pp. 120-121, opera composta in una prima redazione tra il 1735 e il 1739, rielaborata a Berlino nel 1750, riedita nel 1756 nelle Œuvres complètes e ancora, con aggiunte, nel 1768. 173 Gandhi [1869-1948]: “‘E a r t h provides enough to satisfy every man’s need but not for every man’s greed’, said Gandhiji. So long as we cooperate with the cycle of life, the soil renews its fertility indefinitely and

216


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

Nel titolo di questo mio intervento congressuale ho voluto richiamare un passo di sant’Ambrogio meditato su Isaia, sui modelli classici e le omelie di Basilio, e fonte preziosa per Agostino174, Gregorio Magno, Pier Damiani ed Alberto Magno: “Non de tuo largiris pauperi, sed de suo reddis” (“Non del tuo fai dono al povero, ma del suo fai restituzione”)175, che così continua: “Ciò che è provides health, recreation, sustenance and peace to those who depend on it. But when the ‘predatory’ attitude prevails, nature’s balance is upset and there is an all-round biological deterioration” (1947), così riportato dal segretario di Gandhi, Pyarelal, nel suo libro Mahatma Gandhi: The Last Phase, Part II, Ahmedabad 1958, Chapter: Towards New Horizons; per la traduzione in lingua Hindi, vedi Id., Mahatma Gandhi: Poornahuti, vol. IV, Ahmedabad 1973, p. 166, dove la parola Earth è resa con pritvi, cioè ‘il pianeta Terra’; Māhatmā, in sanscrito ÎVÞHÎÞ, significa ‘grande anima’; cfr. quanto Gandhi aveva già scritto su «Navajivan» – il suo giornale in lingua Gujarati – il 29 maggio 1927: “Nature [kudarata] ... has implanted in its creation the instinct for food it also produces enough food to satisfy that instinct from day to day. But it does not produce a jot more. That is Nature’s way. But man, blinded by his selfish greed, grabs and consumes more than his requirements in defiance of Nature’s principle, in defiance of the elementary and immutable moralities of non-stealing and non-possession of other’s property, and thus brings down no end of misery upon himself and his fellow-creatures”. Mark Lindley, J. C. Kumarappa: Mahatma Gandhi’s Economist, Foreword by Amlan Datta, Mumbai 2007; e l’ulteriore articolo di questo erudito musicologo e storico americano scritto a quattro mani con l’ex Direttore del National Gandhi Museum, Rajghat, a New Delhi, l’ingegnere civile Y. P. Anand, Gandhi on Providence and Greed, «Mainstream» 40, 15 (New Delhi, 2007), 3 pp.; Judith Margaret Brown, Gandhi: Prisoner of Hope, New Haven, Conn. 1991; Antonio Vigilante, Il Dio di Gandhi. Religione, etica e politica, Bari 2009. 174 Giuseppe Ferretti, Influsso storico-spirituale e teologico di S. Ambrogio in S. Agostino, Roma 2001, ma già tesi di laurea, Pontificia Universitas Gregoriana, Facoltà di Teologia, Anno Accademico 1945/46, pubblicata in estratto col titolo L’influsso di S. Ambrogio in S. Agostino, Faenza 1951. 175 Sant’Ambrogio [339-397]: In De Nabuthe Jezraelita liber unus, (databile ca. all’anno 389), caput XII, 53: in Patrologiae Cursus Completus, Series Latina, accurante J[acques]-P[aul] Migne, Tomus XIV, Paris 1845, col. 747B; Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vol. 32, P. 2, Wien 1897, p. 498. Gian Domenico Gordini, La proprietà secondo Sant’Ambrogio, «Ambrosius» 33 (1957), pp. 15-35; Salvatore Calafato, La proprietà privata in S. Ambrogio (Pontificium Institutum Utriusque Iuris, 125), Pontificium Athenaeum Lateranense, Romae 1958; Ernesto Frattini, Proprietà e ricchezza nel pensiero di Sant’Ambrogio, «Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia del Diritto» (1962), pp. 745-766; Margherita Oberti Sobrero, L’etica sociale in Ambrogio di Milano: ricostruzione delle fonti ambrosiane nel De iustitia di san Tommaso, 2. 2., qq. 57-122, Torino 1970; James A. Mara, The Notion of Solidarity in Saint Ambrose’s Teaching on Creation, Sin and Redemption, Roma 1970; Baziel Maes, La loi naturelle selon Ambroise de Milan, Roma 1967; Alessandro Passerin d’Entrèves, La concezione del diritto in sant’Ambrogio, in Ambrosiana. Scritti di storia, archeologia ed arte, pubblicati nel XVI centenario della nascita di Sant’Ambrogio CCXL-MCMXL, Milano 1942, pp. 321-335; Biondo

217


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

comune è dato infatti in uso a tutti, ma tu solo l’usurpi. Di tutti è la terra, non dei ricchi”176; è evidente come qui l’accento venga posto sulla remissione in quanto rimborso, cioè sul dono non inteso in termini di liberale transazione bensì in quanto saldo di débito. E pensare che qualcuno tentò umoristicamente di convincerci che “i soldi aiutano a sopportare la povertà”177! Se il diritto canonico medievale poté suggellare l’equità, come naturale benevolenza verso il prossimo, nella formula in glossa “aequitas nihil aliud est quam Deus”, oggi quali opportunità contingenti abbiamo di contemperare e Biondi, L’influenza di Sant’Ambrogio sulla legislazione religiosa del suo tempo, in Ambrosiana cit., pp. 337-420; Raniero Cantalamessa, Sant’Ambrogio di fronte ai grandi dibattiti teologici del suo secolo, in Ambrosius episcopus. Atti del Congresso internazionale di studi ambrosiani nel XVI centenario della elevazione di sant’Ambrogio alla cattedra episcopale, Milano, 2-7 dicembre 1974, a cura di Giuseppe Lazzati, Milano 1976, 2 voll.: vol. 1, pp. 484-539; Ernst Dassmann, Ambrosius von Mailand. Leben und Werk, Stuttgart 2004. 176 “Quod enim commune est in omnium usum datum, tu solus usurpas. Omnium est terra, non divitum: sed pauciores qui non utuntur suo, quam qui utuntur. Debitum igitur reddis, non largiris indebitum”. Vedi Barry Gordon, The Economic Problem in Biblical and Patristic Thought, Leiden 1989; Jean-Rémy Palanque, Saint Ambroise et l’Empire romaine. Contribution à l’histoire des rapports de l’Église et de l’État à la fin du quatrième siècle, Paris 1933, pp. 336 sgg.; Ricchezza e povertà nel cristianesimo primitivo, a cura di Maria Grazia Mara, Roma 19983; cfr. Thomas O. Nitsch, Social Justice. The New-Testament Perspective, in Ancient and Medieval Economic Ideas and Concepts of Social Justice, edited by S. Todd Lowry and Barry Gordon, Leiden-New York-Köln 1998, pp. 147-162: pp. 157-158; Bruce J. Malina, Wealth and Poverty in the New Testament World, in On Moral Business: Classical and Contemporary Resources for Ethics in Economic Life, edited by Max Stackhouse, Dennis Patrick McCann, and Shirley J. Roels, Grand Rapids, MI 1995; Wayne Grudem, Business for the Glory of God: The Bible’s Teaching on the Moral Goodness of Business, Wheaton, Ill. 2003; Reginaldo Pizzorni, Il diritto naturale dalle origini a S. Tommaso d’Aquino, Bologna 20003. Inoltre, vedi Ronald J. Sider, Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger: A Biblical Study, Downers Grove, Ill. 1977 (2a edizione riveduta e accresciuta 1984; ripubblicato nel 1997 a Dallas e a Nashville col titolo Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger: Moving from Affluence to Generosity), e la riveduta risposta piccata a questo best-seller da parte del pastore riformato calvinista e Christian reconstructionist David Harold Chilton [19511997], Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt-Manipulators. A Biblical Response to Ronald J. Sider, Tyler, Tex. 19853 (19811). 177 “C’est curieux comme l’argent aide à supporter la pauvreté”, in Alphonse Allais [1854-1905], À dire et à lire :  petit théâtre et monologues, introduction de Michel Laclos, Paris 1956. François Caradec, Alphonse Allais, Paris 1997. L’aggiornamento, ai tempi attuali del compulsivo modello consumistico, porterebbe altresì ad aggiungere – sempre ironicamente e nell’ottica di McLuhan – che “il denaro è la carta di credito del povero”.

218


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

condiscendere, nella vigorosa coscienza sociale, a un valore positivo di virtù etica abitudinale qual è il sentimento di giustizia – vera e certa, rispettosa e imparziale, in quanto sommo bene – tra tragici eccessi passionali di piaceri mondani o intellettuali non più arbitrati nei conflitti d’interesse e nelle oltraggiose sconvenienze?178 Per offrire, ora, un brevissimo ricordo dell’altruismo filantropico dello scienziato newyorkese George Robert Price – cui sopra ho già accennato – comincerò dicendo che nel 1946, al tempo del compimento della sua specializzazione in chimica a Chicago, aveva già brillantemente partecipato per due anni, lui poco più che ventenne mezzosangue ebreo, alle ricerche sperimentali sull’uranio arricchito nell’àmbito del Progetto Manhattan per la prima bomba atomica. Benché rigidamente ateo, sposò una fervente praticante cattolica, ex studentessa in medicina, dalla quale ebbe due figlie e divorziò a trentatré anni. Lavorò alla Harvard University, all’IBM e in altre importanti istituzioni di ricerca applicandosi anche allo sviluppo dell’irraggiamento terapeutico per la cura dei tumori e alla perfusione epatica in campo medico, e interessandosi ai fenomeni sovrannaturali e alla Guerra Fredda oltre che praticando il giornalismo scientifico. A causa di un tumore tiroideo rimase semiparalizzato ad una spalla perdendo l’uso d’un braccio. Grazie all’indennizzo dell’assicurazione sanitaria nel 1967, cominciò una nuova entusiastica vita di studio nel Vecchio Continente. Qui ebbe una crisi spirituale che lo condusse a studiare intensamente i Vangeli fino a darne un’originale esegesi. Il nome di Price è legato soprattutto all’equazione matematica che da lui prende il nome e su cui è basato il modello di Hamilton di genetica evolutiva nel campo della biologia della generosità, di grande importanza per lo studio 178 Cfr. Arnaldo Biscardi, Aequitas ed epieikeia, «Rendiconti Morali Accademia dei Lincei» s. IX, vol. V, fasc. 3 (1994), pp. 389-397; Guglielmo Gallino, L’etica, la morale, l’ironia, ibidem, pp. 519-550.

219


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

della selezione naturale e a tutt’oggi da considerarsi la migliore descrizione matematica dell’evoluzione dell’altruismo in natura179. Egli stesso, che viveva di rèndita abitando in un elegante appartamento del Marylebone a Bloomsbury nel centro di Londra, cominciò ad assistere fraternamente il sottosuolo degli emarginati, diseredati, senzatetto, alcolizzati, accattoni, barboni, bambini poveri, donne maltrattate dai mariti, tutti girovaghi dei dintorni di King’s Cross e St. Pancras. Per quanto possibile li ospitò in casa e li assistette finanziariamente investendo in loro ogni suo avere. Ma la situazione degenerò: furti, danneggiamenti, gravi disagi, fecero sì che fosse costretto a lasciare quell’appartamento centrale. Prese a passare le notti in ufficio, al Galton Laboratory. Ma anche qui di nuovo e suo malgrado la situazione sociale ancora precipitò ed egli optò di vivere direttamente in mezzo agli straccioni e ubriaconi in edifici in disuso nella zona. Il doloroso sconforto per gli introiettati mali che affliggevano il pianeta lo ingabbiò e sopraffece del tutto nel giorno dell’Epifania – il giorno evangelico dei doni! – del 1975, non molto tempo dopo aver scritto in un suo curriculum vitae queste parole: “Ho lasciato perché ho avvertito che il tipo di questioni teoriche matematiche di genetica cui stavo applicato non fosse davvero rilevante per i problemi dell’umanità, e volli passare all’economia”. Si suicidò – lui buon samaritano dalla nobile semplicità e quieta grandezza – recidendosi la carotide con un colpo di forbici per unghie, in un edificio abbandonato abitato abusivamente a Drummond Street, Kentish Town (verso Tolmers Square e Euston Road, e non lungi dalla residenza di Karl Marx o i sepolcri dei pittori George Morland e John Hoppner), e fu sepolto in una tomba 179 Lee Alan Dugatkin, The Altruism Equation, Princeton, N.J. 2011; Steven A. Frank, The Price Equation, Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem, Kin Selection, and Causal Analysis, «Evolution» 51, 6 (1997), pp. 1712-1729; Matthijs van Veelen, On the Use of the Price Equation, «Journal of Theoretical Biology» 237, 4 (2005), pp. 412-426.

220


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

anonima nel cimitero di St. Pancras a nord di Londra180. Mi tornano in mente due tristi e gravi pensieri: quello del giansenista Pascal – vittima di emicranie con genetiche complicazioni addominali – maturato sul Duca di La Rochefoucauld181, su Michel de Montaigne182, su Nikolaus von Kues, su Erasmo e su Marco Porcio Catone: la follia degli uomini è talmente necessaria che non essere folli sarebbe un altro modo di esserlo (infatti – aggiungo io – la follia, se condivisa, non è follia)183; 180 Su George Robert Price [1922-1975], vedi Oren Harman, The Price of Altruism: George Price and the Search for the Origins of Kindness, New York, N.Y. 2010. 181 Réflexions ou Sentences et maximes morales, à Paris, chez Claude Barbin, vis à vis le Portail de la Sainte Chapelle, au signe de la Croix, 1665 (pubblicazione anonima), (1664 edizione olandese), 16755, n° 209. 182 Essais, livres I et II et III, Paris, Abel Langelier, 1588, III, 8. Degli Essais, tra l’altro, sono ora stati studiati anche i riferimenti alla povertà (povertà che – per gli antichi seguaci dell’indirizzo filosofico e stile di vita dei Cinici – rende liberi: Heinrich Niehues-Pröbsting, Der Kynismus des Diogenes und der Begriff des Zynismus, Frankfurt am Main 1988; Marcello Gigante, Cinismo ed Epicureismo, Napoli 1992; cfr. Karl R. Popper, Hubert Kiesewetter, Gegen den Zynismus in der Interpretation der Geschichte (Eichstätter Materialien, Bd. 14. Abteilung Philosophie und Theologie, 6), Regensburg 1992): si veda il contributo dello specialista Alain Legros, Pauvres et bohémiens dans les Essais de Montaigne, in Figures et langages de la marginalité aux XVIe et XVIIe siècles [Actes du Colloque, Tours, Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance, 21-22 octobre 2010], sous la direction Maria Teresa Ricci, Paris 2013, pp. 45-55. 183 Blaise Pascal [1623-1662]: “Les hommes sont si nécessairement fous que ce serait être fou par un autre tour de folie que de ne pas être fou”, in Pensées de M. Pascal sur la religion et sur quelques autres sujets, qui ont esté trouvées après sa mort parmy ses papiers, a Paris, chez Guillaume Desprez, 16702 (16691), edizione postuma detta di Port-Royal, con una prefazione del nipote di Pascal, Etienne Périer; Blaise Pascal, Les pensées, texte établi, annoté et présenté par Philippe Sellier, édition établie d’après la copie de référence de Gilberte Pascal, Paris 1993, mise à jour en 1999, p. 162, fragment 31. Charles BinetSanglé, La maladie de Blaise Pascal, «Annales médico-psychologiques» VIII, 9 (1899), pp. 177-199; Léon Brunschvicg, Descartes et Pascal lecteurs de Montaigne, Neuchâtel 1942; Bernard Croquette, Pascal et Montaigne : Etude des réminiscences des Essais dans l’œuvre de Pascal, Genève 1974; Géralde Nakam, Montaigne, la mélancolie et la Folie, in Études montaignistes en hommage à Pierre Michel, par le concours de Claude Blum et de François Moureau (éd.), Genève-Paris 1984, pp. 195-213; Otfried Höffe, Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. The Foundation of Modern Philosophy, Dordrecht-Heidelberg-London-New York 2010, Part VI, 24.2: Subversive Affirmation, spec. pp. 403-405; cfr. Marcel Jullian, Jean Orizet (dir.), Dossier : Les poètes et la folie : Arrabal, Bancquart, Bayle, Butor, Clancier, Daumal, Deguy, Mansour, Sabourin, Salager, Stefan, Winter, «Poésie 1» (24 septembre 1998), Paris 1998; Michel Foucault, Histoire de la folie à l’âge classique, Paris 1961; Rewriting the History of Madness: Studies in Foucault’s Histoire de la Folie, edited by Arthur Still, Irving Velody, London-New York 1992; Frédéric Gros, Foucault et la folie, Paris 1997; La Folie et le corps, études réunies par Jean Céard,

221


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

e quest’amara riflessione di Leonardo da Vinci sulla finitezza umana: “Quando io crederò imparare a vivere, e io imparerò a morire”184. Nell’ottica evolutiva darwiniana185, in cui a vincere e a trasmettere le proprie caratteristiche alle generazioni future sono sempre i soggetti più forti – cioè quelli più adatti ad accaparrarsi risorse – e i soggetti più fertili – cioè quelli con più vigorìa negli accoppiamenti – in base all’istinto di sopravvivenza, l’altruismo sembra a prima vista completamente estraneo e inidoneo, non avrebbe senso alla luce della logica della selezione naturale affinatasi in milioni di anni186. Nei confini adattativi imposti da un appropriato bilanciamento ambientale, gli atti altruistici, infatti, riducono il potenziale personale di successo. Ma nel regno animale e perfino nel regno vegetale187 un gran numero di esemplari mostrano tale comportamento, anche a costo di ridurre le proprie probabilità di vita e di colonizzazione. Sembrerebbe impossibile ritenere l’altruismo una risposta istintiva o un carattere innato, ma semmai quasi esclusivamente Pierre Naudin et Michel Simonin, Paris 1985. 184 Leonardo da Vinci [1452-1519]: Codex Atlanticus, fol. 680r [numerazione prima del restauro: 252r]: Leonardo da Vinci, Il Codice Atlantico della Biblioteca Ambrosiana di Milano, trascrizione diplomatica e critica di Augusto Marinoni, Firenze 1973-1980. Carlo Vecce, Leonardo, presentazione di Carlo Pedretti, Roma 1998. 185 Su Charles Darwin [1809-1882]: Robert J. Richard, Darwin and the Emergence of Evolutionary Theories of Mind and Behavior, Chicago-London 1987. Sembrava trascurabile il fatto che lo stesso Charles Darwin nel suo libro The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex (2 Vols., London, John Murray, Albemarle Street, February 24th, 1871; 18742) traccia una forma primitiva di selezione multilivello (vedi ora il molto dibattuto Edward O. Wilson, The Social Conquest of Earth, New York, N.Y. 2012). 186 Continuano ancora le indagini scientifiche mirate a studiare le azioni umane contrassegnate da stress da sforzo ed i livelli di produzione corporea di cortisolo (ormone glicoattivo), di testosterone e di ossitocina: il testosterone – ormone steroideo del gruppo androgeno – può, anche se non in associazione valida statisticamente, correlarsi al grintoso coraggio e all’aggressività; l’ossitocina – ormone peptico – è in relazione sia all’amorosa affettività e riproduttività sia al fiducioso empatico abbandono al sé in una data tesa situazione temporale. 187 Si veda la cosiddetta sindrome suberica, oppure l’altruistico sviluppo delle radici di due piante vicine nel terreno, della stessa specie ed imparentate (cioè a dire nate una dai semi dell’altra).

222


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

un affare reciproco di famiglia188; altri evoluzionisti e psicanalisti hanno pensato a uno spurio mascheramento di gretto egoismo189, infine altri sospettosi studiosi lo ritengono un’inventività emotiva unicamente umana. Nell’evoluzione non è importante l’individuo che sopravvive ma la sua prole con l’aumentata probabilità di replicazione del proprio patrimonio genetico in una certa popolazione, e l’adattamento è spiegato dalla selezione naturale190. Sia negli animali che nelle piante se si è stabilizzata come regola la riproduzione sessuale è perché la selezione naturale ha favorito quelle popolazioni che hanno potuto evolversi più rapidamente così da far fronte ai cambiamenti che si verificavano nell’ambiente. Quindi il processo sessuale è un mezzo per assicurare la duttilità sub specie evolutionis, benché con la riproduzione sessuale una femmina sprechi metà delle sue pur vantaggiose energie per produrre maschi191. 188 Come avviamento allo studio dell’evoluzione dell’altruismo reciproco – esaminato anche da vari altri ricercatori in contributi specifici pei casi di simbiosi ittiche detergenti, richiami d’allarme di volatili, protezioni del nido, alimentazioni di pipistrelli ematofagi, e socialità tra Macachi cinomolghi o tra Cercopitechi verdi –: Robert L. Trivers, The Evolution of reciprocal Approach, «The Quarterly Review of Biology» Vol. 46, No. 1 (March, 1971), pp. 35-57; Gabriele Schino e Filippo Aureli, The relative roles of kinship and reciprocity in explaining primate altruism, «Ecology Letters» Vol. 13, Issue 1 (January, 2010), pp. 45-50; Iid., A few misunderstandings about reciprocal altruism, «Communicative & Integrative Biology» Vol. 3, Issue 6 (November-December, 2010), pp. 561-563. Sull’acceso dibattito critico intorno a kin selection e kin altruism: contra, Wladimir Jimenez Alonso, The role of Kin Selection Theory on the explanation of biological altruism: a critical review, «Journal of Comparative Biology» 3, 1 (1998), pp. 1-14; Martin A. Nowak, Corina E. Tarnita, Edward O. Wilson, The evolution of eusociality, «Nature. International weekly journal of science» 466 (26 August, 2010), pp. 1057-1062; pro, Patrick Abbot e altri 136 autori, Inclusive fitness theory and eusociality, «Nature. International weekly journal of science» 471 (24 March, 2011), E1-E4. 189 Tra gli altri, si può vedere Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene, Oxford 1976; Richard Dawkins: How a Scientist changed the Way We think. Reflections by Scientists, Writers, and Philosophers, edited by Alan Grafen and Mark Ridley, Oxford, England–New York, N.Y. 2006; cfr. Gerald Alper, The Selfish Gene Philosophy: Narcissistic Giving, Bethesda, Md. 2011. 190 Evolution and Its Influence, edited by Alan Grafen, Oxford, England– New York, N.Y. 1989. 191 John Maynard Smith [1920-2004]: sulle straordinarie qualità di questo rinomato biologo evoluzionista inglese, vedi Kim Sterelny, Dawkins vs. Gould: Survival of the Fittest, Cambridge 2007; Brian Charlesworth, John Maynard Smith: January 6, 1920–April 19, 2004, «Genetics» 168, 3 (November,

223


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Vien da pensare che persino in economia (la materia d’interesse dell’ultimo George R. Price, come già ricordato) la ricchezza – magnete irresistibile – implica non solo consumo, ma anche spreco e sciupìo vistoso192. L’altruista umano, proteso com’è a scongiurare diseguaglianze – necessarie anche al capitalismo neoliberista per garantire sviluppo economico –, ha coscienza del suo comportamento e della sua prassi operativa, in un regime di mercato, e di proposito persegue l’atto morale come antitetico all’ingrata logica di potere, mentre gli uomini analfabeti dei sentimenti e privi dell’impulso d’incrociare lo sguardo e aprirsi all’altro, se smarrito, fanno la propria sfuggente vita senza poterne scegliere le condizioni di virtù e ciò che presumono vero tende ambiziosamente a diventare tale ed inverarsi di conseguenza in straniante epifenomeno o normopatica alessitimia193. Del bisogno dell’altro, e della responsabilità di soddisfare tale bisogno, l’ebreo lituano naturalizzato francese Emmanuel Lévinas ha fatto il landmark dell’eticità, e dell’accettazione di tale responsabilità ne fa l’atto di nascita dell’individuo etico nell’universo dell’alterità194; 2004), pp. 1105-1109. 192 Sulla tradizionale esistenza, in àmbito mediterraneo, di meccanismi sociali sufficienti a vietare l’accentramento cumulativo del capitale materiale al fine di controllare le esplosive strategie di dominio, vedi come il giudizio collettivo di un’assemblea poteva sentirsi obbligato ad intervenire espressamente per ingiungere a qualcuno della comunità di smettere di arricchirsi sproporzionatamente: René Maunier, Mélanges de sociologie nordafricaine, Paris, Félix Alcan, 1930, p. 68. Sull’attività di ricerca sul campo di questo docente universitario, vedi Thierry Paquot, Du lu avec du vu, la méthode de René Maunier (1887-1951), «Urbanisme» N° 324 (mai-juin, 2002), pp. 78-83. 193 Cfr. William Isaac Thomas [1863-1947]: W. I. Thomas On Social Organization and Social Personality: Selected Papers, edited and with an Introduction by Morris Janowitz, Chicago, Ill. 1966; Social Behavior and Personality: Contributions of W. I. Thomas to Theory and Social Research, Edmund H. Volkart (ed.), New York, N.Y. 1951; Elena Pulcini, L’individuo senza passioni. Individualismo moderno e perdita del legame sociale, Torino 2001. Per la vuotaggine e passività o indifferenza affettiva dell’alessitimia tipica dell’uomo-burocrate dell’organizzazione, vedi Manfred F.R. Kets de Vries, Alexithymia in Organizational Life: The Organization Man Revisited, «Human Relations» Vol. 42, No. 12 (1989), pp. 1079-1093. 194 Emmanuel Lévinas [1906-1995], L’autre dans Proust, «Deucalion» n° 2 (1947), pp. 117-123; Le temps et l’autre, in Jean Wahl, Alphonse de Waelhens,

224


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

ma non fu già lo scandaloso filosofo empirista scozzese David Hume a porre sensibilità affettiva e condivisione emotiva dei vissuti delle altre persone a fondamento del comportamento etico dell’uomo195? La constatazione che l’uomo si abitua abbastanza facilmente alle dissonanze musicali è stata appurata dal celebre organista e compositore francese CharlesMarie Widor196; a me, invece, piacerebbe registrare che – nell’impossibilità di rimanere in rugginoso silenzio tra le arbitrarietà e le necessità del dis-ascolto – ci si abituasse alle risonanze empatiche dell’altruismo Jeanne Hersch, Emmanuel Levinas, Le choix, le monde, l’existence, Grenoble 1947, pp. 125-196, poi in E. Levinas, Le temps et l’autre, Montpellier 1979; La trace de l’autre, «Tijdschrift voor Filosofie» n° 3 (septembre, 1963), pp. 605-623; Humanisme de l’autre homme, Montpellier 1972; De l’Un à l’Autre. Transcendance et temps, «Archivio di filosofia» vol. 51, n° 1-3 (1983), pp. 21-38; Etica e infinito, dialoghi con Philippe Nemo, introduzione di Gaspare Mura, Roma 1984, contiene anche Il volto dell’altro come alterità etica e traccia dell’infinito; La proximité de l’autre [1986], in Altérité et transcendance, Montpellier 1995, pp. 108-119; La vocation de l’autre, entretiens avec Emmanuel Hirsch, in Racismes. L’autre et son visage (Grands entretiens réalisés par Emmanuel Hirsch), Paris 1988, pp. 89102; Œuvre et altérité, entretiens avec Angela Biancafiore, in Augusto Ponzio, Sujet et altérité. Sur Emmanuel Lévinas (suivi de deux dialogues avec Lévinas), Paris 1993; Altérité et transcendance, Montpellier 1995. Didier Franck, L’un-pourl’autre. Lévinas et la signification, Paris 2008; Marie-Anne Lescourret, Levinas, Paris 1994; Salomon Malka, Emmanuel Lévinas : la vie et la trace, Paris 2002; Christian Ciocan, Georges Hansel, Levinas Concordance, Dordrecht 2005; Augusto Ponzio, I segni dell’altro. Eccedenza letteraria e prossimità, Napoli 1995; Julia Ponzio, Il pensiero dell’altro e la decostruzione, «Annali della Facoltà di Lingue e Letterature straniere dell’Università di Bari» (2000), pp. 221-245. La Chaire de l’Alterité, presso la parigina Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme, vede attualmente suo titolare il professor François Jullien, sinologo ed etnologo dell’universo concettuale filosofico. 195 David Hume [1711-1776], An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals [1751], Tom L. Beauchamp (ed.), Oxford 1998. Annette C. Baier, A Progress of Sentiments, Cambridge, Mass. 1991; Michael Gill, Hume’s Progressive View of Human Nature, «Hume Studies» 26, 1 (2000), pp. 87-108; Rachel Cohon, Hume’s Morality: Feeling and Fabrication, Oxford 2008; Louis Loeb, Hume’s Moral Sentiments and the Structure of the Treatise, «Journal of the History of Philosophy» 15 (1977), pp. 395403; David Fate Norton, Hume, Human Nature, and the Foundations of Morality, in The Cambridge Companion to Hume, David Fate Norton (ed.), Cambridge 1993, pp. 148-182; John Leslie Mackie, Hume’s Moral Theory, London 1980. 196 Su Charles-Marie Widor [1844-1937]: John Richard Near, Widor: A Life Beyond the Toccata, Rochester, N.Y. 2011; Ben van Oosten, Charles-Marie Widor: Vater der Orgelsymphonie, Paderborn 1997; Andrew Thomson, The Life and Times of Charles-Marie Widor: 1844-1937, Foreword by Felix Aprahamian, Oxford 1989; Giuseppe Clericetti, Charles-Marie Widor. La Francia organistica tra Otto e Novecento, Varese 2010.

225


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

filantropico riverberate idilliacamente in tutto il bacino del Mediterraneo, fino a renderle consuetudinarie. Sulla base di precisi e quasi maniacali calcoli, Andrej Platònov197, il George Orwell russo, dopo aver studiato le più stridenti dissonanze geografiche della sua patria, propose di abbattere con calibrate tonnellate di dinamite le montagne del Pamir per far entrare nel Nord i venti caldi e dorati del Sud e trasformare la tundra siberiana, ghiacciata e inospitale, in una terra fertile e vantaggiosa per gli onnipotenti rivoluzionari sovietici198. Acute riflessioni sul fatto che l’essere umano è “al di sopra della natura e insieme ineluttabilmente coinvolto in essa” – in un continuo palpabile rapporto di armonia e conflitto nella cattura degli infiniti orizzonti199 – sono state meditate da Ernest Becker. Resta innegabile che non si può del tutto uscire 197 Suo vero nome era Andrej Platonovič Klimentov [1899-1951]: Алексей [Николаевич] Варламов, Андрей Платонов, Москва 2011; Thomas Seifrid, Andrei Platonov: Uncertainties of Spirit, Cambridge 1992; Michel Heller, Platonov ou la quête du bonheur, Lausanne 1982; Stephan-Immanuel Teichgräber, Die Dekonstruktion der sozialistischen Mythologie in der Poetik Andrej Platonovs, Frankfurt am Main 1999; Mark D. Steinberg, Proletarian Imagination: Self, Modernity, and the Sacred in Russia, 1910-1925, Ithaca, N.Y. 2002. 198 Vedi il suo racconto Satana mysli (Fantaziia) [Satana di pensiero (Fantasia)], «Put’ kommunizma» 2 (Krasnodar, marzo-aprile, 1922), pp. 3237, dove è tratteggiato il prometeico personaggio dell’ingegnere Vogulov – designato dal Congresso Mondiale delle Masse Operaie a trasformare il globo terrestre per venire in aiuto dell’umanità – che decide di far saltare in aria per mezzo di un’incredibile energia esplosiva ultraluminosa (ultra-svet) intere catene montuose al fine di far scorrere liberamente le correnti d’aria calda e trasformare le aree geografiche fredde in giardini tropicali, scegliendo così la stessa soluzione tecnica che era stata suggerita dall’eccentrico pensatore esponente del cosmismo russo Nikolaj Fëdorovič Fëdorov [1828-1903] e raccolta nella sua opera postuma Философия общего дела [Filosofia del dovere comune] edita in due volumi, il primo a Verny nel 1906 e il secondo a Mosca nel 1913 (nuova edizione non completa post Rivoluzione: Kharbin 1928-1930). Seifrid, Andrei Platonov: Uncertainties of Spirit cit., p. 53; Steinberg, Proletarian Imagination: Self, Modernity, and the Sacred in Russia, 1910-1925 cit., pp. 145-146; Stephen Lukashevich, N. F. Fedorov (1828-1903): A Study in Russian Eupsychian and Utopian Thought, Newark, Del. 1977; Ludmila Koehler, N.F. Fedorov: The Philosophy of Action, Pittsburgh, Pa. 1979; Horace E. Byers, The History of Weather Modification, in Weather and Climate Modification, W.N. Hess (ed.), New York, N.Y. 1974, Chapter 1. 199 Cfr. Geology and Religion: A History of Harmony and Hostility, edited by Martina Kölbl-Ebert, Geological Society, Special Publications, Vol. 310, London 2009; Leonardo Benevolo, La cattura dell’infinito, Roma-Bari 1999.

226


“NON DEL TUO FAI DONO AL POVERO MA DEL SUO FAI RESTITUZIONE”

dalle coordinate geografiche e temporali, e, per la coesistente vita corrente dell’umanità urbana quale comunità di destino terrestre, destinata a vivere in assetti insediamentali definiti gli apocalittici formicai metropolitani d’Occidente come d’Oriente con sempre più pianificate periferie della modernità e degradanti enclave di disuguaglianza e segregazione ignote ai flâneurs e dov’è ignoto l’ethos di con-cittadinanza200, la natura si è a tal punto sfibrata da essere ridotta per lo più a una variazione meteorologica influenzabile i nostri seduttivi svaghi di fine settimana in cerca di lampi di ventiquattr’ore di contentezza e felicità. Ecco, allora, che io, senza ricorrere ad esplosivi, mi auguro che i vitali gesti filantropici – ripetuti innumerevoli volte in un insostituibile gioco di rifrazioni in tutto quell’arsenale-laboratorio di pensieri qual è il sommosso bacino del Mediterraneo201, fino a sedimentarsi nella fisiologia umana dei suoi popoli cooperanti e diventare l’audace modello stesso del patrimonio comune ancorato alle culture dei tre monoteismi – da leggère gocce spumose si facciano vorticose onde marine d’acqua di giovinezza e, persistendo e sempre più espandendosi, ségnino una spontanea e pacifica ‘prova del fuoco’ o dilagante rivincita della miracolosa luce classico-mediterranea sulla meteorologia nebbiosa dell’incombente bellicoso freddo privo di futuri arcobaleni202. 200 Cfr. Roland Barthes, Comment vivre ensemble : simulations romanesques de quelques espaces quotidiens : notes de cours et de séminaires au Collège de France, 19761977, texte établi, annoté et présenté par Claude Coste, Paris, Seuil–Institut Mémoires de l’édition contemporaine, 2002; Edward Albert Shils, Center and Periphery, Essays in Macrosociology, (Selected Papers, Vol. 2), Chicago, Ill. 1975; Shmuel Noah Eisenstadt, Arie Shachar, Society, Culture, and Urbanization, Beverly Hills 1987; Shmuel N. Eisenstadt, Luis Roniger, Patrons, Clients and Friends: Interpersonal Relations and the Structure of Trust in Society, Cambridge 1984; Giampaolo Nuvolati, Lo sguardo vagabondo. Il flâneur e la città da Baudelaire ai postmoderni, Bologna 2006. 201 Cfr. Arent Jan Wensinck, The Ocean in the Literature of the Western Semites, Amsterdam 1918. 202 Cfr. Emanuele Severino, La casa invisibile del Cristianesimo, «Corriere

227


SEBASTIANO GIORDANO

Concludo, immedesimandomi, per un attimo fuggente e ironicamente, in un attempato ma gagliardo filàntropo – uno imperturbabile e annoverato tra i coefficienti carismatici del secolo, non un aleatorio fuoco fatuo di autostima – che si appropriasse di certe ìlari battute da un copione di film scritto e diretto da Allan Stewart Königsberg in arte Woody Allen: “… Io so che la gente mi crede egoista e narcisista, ma non è vero. Sta di fatto che, se dovessi identificarmi con un personaggio della mitologia greca, non sarebbe Narciso”. E chi saresti allora? “Zeus!”203.

della Sera», 5 maggio 2000, elzeviro a pagina 35. 203 A woman in the audience: “A lot of people have accused you of being narcissistic”. Sandy Bates: “No, I know people think that I’m egotistical and narcissistic, but it’s not true. I, as a matter of fact, if I did identify with a Greek mythological character, it would not be Narcissus”. Another man in the audience: “Who would be?”. Sandy Bates: “Zeus” (Stardust Memories, Film statunitense scritto diretto e interpretato da Woody Allen, 1980). Su Woody Allen [New York 1935-]: Woody Allen on Woody Allen: In Conversation with Stig Björkman, New York, N.Y. 1995; Mary P. Nichols, Reconstructing Woody: Art, Love, and Life in the Films of Woody Allen, Lanham, Md. 19982; Vittorio Hösle, Woody Allen: An Essay on the Nature of the Comical, Notre Dame, Ind. 2007; Jews and Humor, Leonard J. Greenspoon (ed.), West Lafayette, Ind. 2011.

228


Charity Undertakings for the Formation of Educational and Cultural Institutions in Ottoman Cyprus Netice Yıldız

Introduction This paper will present a historical account of the Islamic educational institutions, mainly the schools and libraries which were all established as charity foundations so called waqf 1 by the Sultans and some dignified people from the Ottoman port who were somehow involved with Cyprus as well as wealthy citizens. The publications relevant to the awqāf (pl.) (pious foundations) institutions are an important part of Cyprus cultural studies. It is also one of the most important political conflicting issues in the agenda on the Cyprus peace talks between the two ethnic communities taking place under the custody of the United Nations, Turkish and Greek communities of the island, a similar case being the church estates located on the North part of the island under Turkish control. However, publications relevant to this institution are not at the required level. In this study, we are intending to give general information about the educational matters, the schools and the libraries which are all created by charity undertakings of such people mentioned above and give examples for the formation of such educational institutions as well as Islamic manuscript collection in Cyprus. 1 Spelt as vakıf (singular noun), evkaf (plural) in Turkish and pronounced as waqf (sn. noun) and awqāf (pl. noun).

229


NETICE YILDIZ

Islamic Culture in Cyprus Cyprus is an island in the Eastern Mediterranean sea which had been an attraction place for the Islamic people since the 7th century. Early Islamic States within the expansion policy to spread the Islamic faith to several parts of the Levant area extended their expedition route to this island since the early years of Islam. According to the Arab and Greek chronicles, the earliest one of these expeditions was in 632 A.D. when the Arab invaders under Abu Bakr showed themselves in Cyprus capturing the Byzantine city Salamis (Constantia) and converting the large basilica of St. Epiphanios into a mosque. Another expedition was made under the leadership of Muawiya, governor of Syria in 649, in which Umm Haram bint Milhan, wife of ‘Ubadah ibn as-Ṣamit, a close relation of the Prophet, died by a fall from her mule in Larnaca.2 Although the Arabs occupied the island several times, their sovereignty had never been in terms of establishing permanent Islamic settlements on the island. During the Latin periods, Mamlūk leaders continued their interest in the island again, the last one being during the Genoese occupation of Famagusta.3 On the other hand Turkopoles, a minority group of Turks, who were originally employed by the crusaders as light cavalry whose later descendants served to the Lusignan kings, lived in Cyprus.4 However, there is no material culture remained from the past Islamic Netice Yıldız (2006). “Cyprus” in Medieval Islamic Civilization: An 2 Encyclopedia, (Medieval Islamic Civilization, Medieval Islamic History, Medieval Islam, Medieval Islamic Culture, Daily Life, Rituals, Routledge Encyclopedias of the Middle Ages) ed. Josef W. Meri et al., 2 Volumes, New York: Routledge – Taylor & Francis Group. Vol. I, pp. 188-190. 3 L. de Mas Latrie (1970/1862). Histoire de L’Ile de Chypre Sous le Règne des Princes de la Maison de Lusignan, Paris, 1862. (Famagouste, Chypre: Les Edition l’Oiseau); George Hill (1949). A History of Cyprus, Cambridge: University Press, Vol. I: pp. 283-94, 326-329; Vol. II: pp. 467, 560, 562 4 R. M. Dawkins (ed.) (1932). Recital Concerning the Sweet Land of Cyprus Entitled ‘Chronicle’ by Leontis Makhairas, Oxford: Clarendon Press, (Les Editions L’Oiseau, Famaguste Chypre), Vol. II, p. 77

230


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

temporary settlements prior to the Ottoman conquest of the island. Thus, the foundation of a lifelong Islamic culture is dated back to 1570 which is the one when Cyprus was conquered by the Ottoman Empire, Nicosia being the first city. Nevertheless since there are some well-established theories about the sites of the places once being occupied and had been the graveyard of some Islamic martyrs deriving from the records of chroniclers or miraculous stories orally transmitted through the centuries, all these places were marked as holy places and they are sanctified with the establishment of new Islamic institutions such as mosque, tekkē, türbē (tomb) or zāwiya dedicatd to the memory of these martyrs during the early years of the Ottoman rule in the island in which religious sermons and practice took place. These places, that were always frequented by the devotees who seek temporary or permanent shelters to practice their prayers or meditate in a more peaceful atmosphere, also gained significance as the centres for education as well as research and artistic productions where religion and other scientific studies were performed. They also provided shelter for the sufi followers and pilgrims, the most noteworthy ones being Mawlawī Tekkē in Nicosia, Hala Sultan Tekkē and Tomb in Larnaca, Ömeriye Tekkē in Kyrenia and Kırklar Tekkē (Forty Martyrs)5 in Mesaoria district.6 Thus, well off people, mainly the Sultan and the other dignitaries, 5 Built by Es-Shaikh el-hac Abdülgafur Efendi in 1155. Ali Efdal Özkul (2005). Kıbrıs’ın Sosyo-Ekonomik Tarihi 1726-1750, İstanbul: İletişim, p. 223. 6 For Turkish monuments in Cyprus: see Halil Fikret Alasya (1964). Kıbrıs Tarihi ve Kıbrıs’ta Türk Eserleri, Ankara: Türk Kültürünü Araştırma Enstitüsü; Aslanapa, Oktay (1975). Kıbrıs’ta Türk Eserleri, İstanbul; Emel Esin (1965). Aspects of Turkish Civilisations in Cyprus, Ankara: Türk Kültürünü Araştırma Enstitüsü Yayınları. Tuncer Bağışkan (2005). Kıbrıs’ta Osmanlı Eserleri, Lefkoşa, Kıbrıs, Kuzey Kıbrıs Müze Dostları Derneği Yayını; Netice Yıldız (2009). “The Vakf Institution in Ottoman Cyprus”, in Ottoman Cyprus , A Collection of Studies on History and Culture, Eds. Michalis N. Michael, Matthias Kappler, Eftios Gavriel, Wiesbaden, (Germany): Harrassowitz Publishing House , Middle East Monographs 4, pp.117-159; Netice Yıldız (2002). “Kıbrıs’ta Osmanlı Kültür Mirasına Genel bir Bakış”, in Türkler, ed. Hasan Celal Güzel, Kemal Çiçek, Salim Koca. Ankara: Yeni Türkiye Yayınları, 2002, Vol.19, pp. 966-993.

231


NETICE YILDIZ

usually patronized these institutions by laying down a waqf (pious foundation, [Tr. vakıf], plural awqaf [Tr. evkaf]) in their own name or to an already existing one so that the people performing duties such as müderris (professor) or sufi scholars could get salaries while darvishes (hermits, Tr. derviş) as well as pupils could be provided with accommodation spaces with humble living conditions and amenities. In this way, they would be away from worldly affairs so as to perform their religious duties and scholarly studies or get education. Cyprus during the early era of the Ottoman period was governed by a mir-i miran (Beylerbeyi) resident in the capital city Nicosia who held the authority over the administration of a certain number of provinces in Cyprus and Anatolia like Famagusta, Kyrenia, Mersin, Tarsus, Karaman and Beyshehir until 1640s. Later when Cyprus had been removed from the status of Beylerbeylik. After this date, it was then administered by a müsellim (governor) or a muhassıl7 who was selected to that position by bidding the highest price since his main duty was making efficient organisation for collecting taxes from the island. Beside the main governor, there was a qadi (Tr. kadı) in each district responsible of legal matters and a muftü responsible of religious affairs. During the early years of the Ottoman rule, ten qadis were also appointed to each district as well as a Defter Eminliği (registry), a Timar Tezkireciliği (office dealing with all matters of state-holders), and a Defterdar (Treasurer).8 Jennings, one of the first scholars to deal with the socio-economic history of the Ottoman era of Cyprus, gives references to several qadis of these districts. Among these were the qadi of Mesarya (Mesaoria), Omorfo (Morphou), Tuzla (Salt Lake of Larnaca), Karpas (Carpasia), Baf (Paphos), 7 The chief-tax farmer, whose main duty was to collect taxes and revenues on behalf of the Ottoman Empire. See George Hill (1952). A History of Cyprus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, p. 74. 8 Ahmet C. Gazioğlu (1990). The Turks in Cyprus, London: Rüstem & Brother publishers, p. 95.

232


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

Mağusa (Famagusta).9 However, George Hill in his history book on Cyprus mentions about sixteen administrative divisions, each of which was governed by a qadi until the middle of the nineteenth century.10 Running in parallel with the organisation of the administrative matters in other Ottoman provinces, it was the responsibility and duty of the qadi to settle all legal matters regarding criminal cases, disagreements such as dealings in trade matters, family crises, inheritance discrepancies, drawing up the legal documents for the creation of waqfs (pious foundations) or land transactions, resolving the disputes arisen in the cases of waqf estates or personal ones. There was one müftü appointed in Cyprus whose duty was to act as the chief authority on all religious matters, social behaviours relevant to moral issues and maintenance and management of religious institutions. Our research on the Ottoman documents makes it clear that he was also the chief müderris of the island. The Turkish authorities always acted in justice for the whole community living in the island and respected the rights of Greeks and Turks, two major ethnic groups, as well as other minor groups such as Jews, Armenians or Maronites. However, any business regarding the non-Moslem citizens was in the authority of the ecclesiastic leader of the Orthodox society and consular representatives of their countries who could bring cases to the Ottoman Government of the island through the dragomans (translators). Waqf: God's Property to Serve the Needy Several ḥadīths11 discuss aspects of waqf making, one of 9 See Ronald C. Jennings (1993). Christians and Muslims in Ottoman Cyprus and Mediterranean World, 1570-1640 (New York: New York University Press, pp. 8, 79, etc. 10 Hill (1952). Vol. 4: p. 5. 11 The science that discusses the holy sayings of Prophet Mohammad. See Devellioğlu, Ferit (1980). Osmanlıca – Türkçe Ansiklopedik Lugat, Ankara:

233


NETICE YILDIZ

which is related to ˁUmar b. al-Khattab (634-644), who is thought to be the person to start this tradition with the recommendation of Prophet Mohammad. Accordingly, Umar having acquired some land at the battle of Khaybar (635 A.D.) and consider this land to be valuable, which is worth to make an endowment for the benefit of the Islamic society, asked Prophet about his opinion. Thus, Prophet gave him a rather wise answer, recommending him to give the land with the trees in charity on the condition that, the land and the trees would neither be sold nor given as a present, nor bequeathed, but the fruits are to be spent in charity. Thus Umar gave it in charity, and it was for Allah's cause, the emancipation of slaves, the poor, guests, travellers, and kinsmen. The person acting as its administrators could eat from it reasonably and fairly, and could let a friend of his eat from it provided he had no intention of becoming wealthy by its means.12 Similar to the case mentioned above, for the practice of patronising the religious foundations as well as almost every domain of socio-cultural life, the awaqf (pious foundations) formed the basis for the organisation of welfare matters of the cities and towns besides providing support for the needy almost in every part of the Islamic world. Respectively the Ottoman Sultans and their families took leading position to establish the waqf system which was followed by other Ottoman dignitaries and rich citizens with their generous endowments. In fact, the waqf institution in Islamic society owes its origin to religious faith and charity. It is a foundation based on the sense of individual responsibility to cooperate and coordinate for setting up a high quality living conditions in their environment or elsewhere in Islamic countries and Doğuş Ltd. Matbaası, 4th Edition, p. 370. 12 Amy Singer (2008). Charity in Islamic Societies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, p. 95; Al-Bukhārī, Șahīh al-Bukhāri, 55 (wasaya), bab 28; USCMSA, Bukhari, 51/26.

234


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

provide charity for the needy. Thus, it was one of the main initiatives of the citizens to take part in the organizations of social life and urban planning for the welfare of the citizens. Since one of the pillars of the Islamic religion is the recommendation to give sadaqa13 and zakāt14 to those who are in financial need, this institution developed on the basis of sadaqa and unlike many other charity acts previously seen in ancient societies, the waqf institution in Islamic societies developed within the framework of Islamic law. As pointed out by Singer (2008) the historian Marshal Hodgson maintained that from about the tenth century, private waqfs replaced zakat as “the vehicle for financing Islam as a society” so that they offered “the material foundation for most specifically Islamic concerns”.15 The waqf is assumed to be in the care of the God and it could not be transferred to the ownership of another person or institution than the one already recorded.16 Therefore the conditions and rules for the type of waqf or ways of utilising the concerned pious foundation is determined item by item and a board of mütevelli (trustees) is appointed for its management by the founder or his legal representative which was recorded and signed in the waqfiyya (deed of the pious foundation) in the presence of the qadi and witnesses.17 The waqfiyya (Tr. vakfiye) starts with prayers to God and some quotations from the Qur'an which mentions benevolent deeds made for the needy in the name of god. Then the estates or money to be endowed as a pious foundation are cited which follows the conditions of establishing the waqf and its management. The amount and way to spend from the income of the waqf and the appointed trustees who would do the management of 13 Alms-giving to needy people. 14 Giving away in charity 1/40th or 2.5% of the accumulated wealth. 15 Singer (2008). p. 91 16 Ömer Hilmi Efendi (2003). Ahkamü’l-Evkaf (Vakıf Hükümleri) Ed. Habib Derzinevesi & Mustafa Kemal Kasapoğlu, Lefkoşa: Rüstem Kitabevi, p. 19. 17 For more details about the waqf system in Islamic law and its Ottoman application, see Ahmet Akgündüz (1988). İslam Hukukunda ve Osmanlı Tatbikatında Vakıf Müessesesi, Ankara: Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi.

235


NETICE YILDIZ

the waqf are all recorded. Finally, the legal declarations of the qadi who is recording the waqf and the date of its establishment and his stamp are added.18 The properties endowed as a waqf under the care of the Awqaf Administration in Cyprus is classified under a few categories today. The first type is called the mazbuta waqf or evkaf-ı mazbuta. This is the type of property which was once laid as a waqf by a certain dignitary or citizen whose successor or members of mütevelli (trustees) had perished. Thus, any property classified as a waqf was created by the owner to serve for the welfare of the family or citizens and did not aim to yield any personal income to its m mütevellis, prayer and blessing for the soul of the founder being the only expectations. This type of waqf was administered by Awqaf-ı Hümayun Nezareti (The Office of the Awqaf of the Sultan).19 The awqaf of Ayia Sofia (localled called Ayasofya) and Ömeriye mosques, both established by Lala Mustafa Pasha, vizier and chief commander of the Cyprus expedition, the former in the name of Sultan Selim II and the latter in his own name, were the largest and most significant ones in Cyprus. Almost a waqf is launched for the care of each building that served the citizens in the Ottoman period. These religious or charity foundations include such building like the local mosque, tekkē, madrasa,20 imaret (almshouse), library, caravanserai or khan,21 administrative and military building, aqueduct, bridges, customs house and hospital. The government in Istanbul usually inspected the accounts of each waqf which was submitted at the end of each fiscal year in order to ensure whether the income was utilized properly. 18 Ömer Hilmi Efendi (2003). p. 32 n. 18. 19 Ömer Hilmi Efendi (2003). p. 36. 20 Originally Arabic word which means “place of study”. For detailed information see Jonathan M. Bloom & Sheila S. Blair (eds.) (2009).The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture, Vol. II, Oxford: University Press, p. 430. 21 Commercial building that provides short-term accommodation and storage facility for the merchants.

236


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

Almost any kind of waqf launched in the early days of the Ottoman Rule was administered by the local board of trustees, appointed by the founder or founder's legal representative, while the local qadi was the chief authority to register the waqfiyya (deed of pious foundation) which would include the conditions determined by the owner and the names and stamps of the appointed members of the trustees who would follow up the implementation of the deed for the benefit of the benefactors as well as the names of the witnesses who were present while this deed was recorded and signed. Any estate which is a family holding could be laid as a pious foundation in the category of mülhaka waqf by its owner in the office of the local qadi with the aim to ensure the ownership of the property would persist within the family and to last through the generations. However, official dignitaries and wealthy people, apart from those of family properties like chiflik (farm-house), shops, houses, khan (inn) which had been retained as family property, made other endowments for the welfare of their citizens. In such cases, the founder contributed either by building a new edifice or maintained the ones already existed. Mosque, masjid, madrasa, tekkē, baths, fountain, aqueduct, imaret, bridge, castle and military barracks were such buildings which were completely left to the care of the public or government. However, they were maintained with some money reserved in cash during the time of the creation of the foundation or from the fixed amount of the annual income of their personal waqf properties such as farm products of the chiftliks (farmhouses), rents of shops or houses, baths, inns, mills and aqueduct, which are also laid as pious foundations. The owner of such a waqf which is in the category of awqaf-ı mazbuta (mazbut waqf) appointed trustees to manage its expenses while the Awqaf Administration were responsible to control their accounts at the end of each fiscal year. Such establishments were allocating a certain 237


NETICE YILDIZ

sum of the income already defined in the waqfiyya to certain religious institutions as an endowment at the end of each fiscal year. The estates created as waqf by the Sultans and other royal family members, such as Chinili Validē Mahpeyker Sultan22 and Ayshē Sultan and İbrahim Pasha23 which were usually administered by appointed members as trustees, the accounts of which were then under the control of Darüss'a de Ağa in the Sultan's court, were such personal awqaf from which a certain percentage of their income were given to certain institutions. However, in the course of time, some of these pious foundations, either under the control of the Ottoman Empire or private families, were diminished or vanished due to different reasons, such as inheritance problems, wrong administration or abused use of the contractors. Subsequent to the new regulations put in practice on the estates in parallel to other provinces in 1826, the awqaf system was associated to a new office called 'Awqaf-ı Hümayun Nezareti', and El-Hac Yusuf Efendi was then appointed as the first director of this office in Cyprus.24 Thus, this new bureaucracy brought some kind of safeguard and better management to the pious foundations and it continued its subsistence throughout the British Colonial Rule. Another category is called Müstesna Waqf which are the pious foundations founded for the management of holy shrines or religious buildings.25 Mawlawi Tekkē and Hala Sultan Mosque and Tekkē were in this classification. For instance, Mawlawi Tekkē in Nicosia was directly 22 Kösem Sultan, wife of Ahmet I, mother of Murad IV. Mehmed Süreyya (1996). Sicil-i Osmani, ed. Nuri Akbayar, transcribed by Seyit Ali Kahraman, İstanbul: Tarih Vakfı Yurt Yayınları, Vol. 1, A-At, p. 22. 23 BOA – Cevdet – Evkaf, No: 12,689, 18,663. 24 Rauf Ünsal (1989). “Kıbrıs Vakıflarının Kuruluşundan Bu Yana Gelişimi”, VII. Vakıf Haftası Vakıf Mevzuatının Aksayan Yönleri, Kıbrıs Vakıf İdaresi Çalışmaları ve Türk Vakıf Medeniyetinde Vakıf Eski Eserlerinin Restorasyonu Seminerleri, Ankara, 5-7 Aralık 1989, p. 195 25 Ömer Hilmi Efendi (2003). p. 36.

238


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

attached to the Celaliye Waqf in Konya.26 During the early British occupation years, 'Awqaf-ı Hümayun Nezareti' represented the Ottoman Porte and later during colonial period operated as the representative of the Turkish Cypriot community alongside the Ottoman Sultanate. During those times, it also continued its mission to protect the Turkish estates and serve as one of the most important offices for the development and constitution of the religious, educational and health matters of Turkish society by setting up new schools in modern secular education, providing dormitory houses in the cities for those students coming from the rural areas and granting scholarship for higher education as well as opening houses for the orphan children besides its main function to run the religious affairs and care for the wellbeing of the waqf estates. Currently, it is managing religious and charity affairs with the income of its estates and other enterprises such as banking and tourism sectors while educational and health matters are the custody of the concerned Ministries Educational Institutions in Ottoman Cyprus It is clearly understood that educational institutions were rather important in Ottoman Cyprus even among the earliest pious foundations. Learning and knowledge are central in Islam because of the importance of legal knowledge for the correct performance of religious ritual and religious law orders most facets of life.27 The earliest schools in Islam began in the mosque as early as the reign of the second caliph ˀUmar (Tr. Hz. Ömer), who appointed preachers to the mosques of such cities as Kufa, Basra and Damascus for the purpose of reciting the Qurʾān (Tr. Kur'an-ı Kerim. Eng. also Koran) and the 26 Mustafa Haşim Altan (1986). Belgelerle Kıbrıs Türk Vakıflar Tarihi, Kıbrıs Vakıflar İdaresi Yayınları, Lefkoşa. Vol.I, p. 9; Vol. II, p. 1122. 27 Amy Singer (2008). p. 82.

239


NETICE YILDIZ

hadith (prophetic traditions). Gradually, instructions in Arabic grammar and literature became incorporated into the simple and rudimentary form of education, which became the foundation of the later and more fully developed education institutions. Out of this teachings in languages and religion originated the maktab (primary school, Tr. mekteb) and higher education.28 In the tenth century, khans were founded next to mosques in order to house students and teachers, and from this pairing, the institution of the madrasa (college) emerged in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, in particular in Iran, Iraq, Syria and Egypt. These endowed educational institutions proliferated in Syria and Egypt roughly from the time of Saladin (d. 1193) through the Mamluk era (1250-1517). Primary schools (maktab), devoted mostly to teaching the Qurʾān recitation, were founded alongside the madrasas as well as independently.29 It is known that in the Ottoman Empire, education of the civil people was not organised by the government. This was usually performed as a charity (khayrat), and wealthy people usually made endowments by setting up waqfs to contribute to the society by supporting the instructors and students for their learning and further research and scholarly writing as well as production of copies of important books. There were only two different types of educational institutions until the establishment of the Rushdiye Schools for the modern education in Cyprus in 1862. The first type of these was the primary school called sibyan maktab or simply maktab (Tr. mektep), which usually functioned either in the private house of the instructor or in one of the rooms somewhere within the mosque complex or a masjid.30 The Sheriye Sicils (Qadı 28 Seyyed Hossein Nasr (2001). Science and Civilization in Islam, with a Precaface by Giorgio Santillana, Chicago: ABC International Group, Inc., pp. 65-66. 29 Singer (2008). p. 84. 30 Ali Süha (1971). “Turkish Education in Cyprus”, The First International Congress of Cypriot Studies, Milletlerarası Birinci Kıbrıs Tetkikleri Kongresi), 14-19 Nisan, 1969,Türk Heyeti Tebliğleri, ed. by Halil İnalcık, Ankara, pp. 235, 239.

240


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

Sicilleri [Sharī'a Court Records])31 for the years 1726-1750 records these endowments. Accordingly, Maktab-i Sheriff established by Ebu Faruk Mehmed Pasha in Kızılkule Quarter; Maktab-i Sheriff established by Mahmut Chelebi, the ruznamche keeper, in Korkud Efendi Quarter; Maktab-i Sheriff in Ömeriye Quarter; Turunchlu Maktab in Korkud Efendi Quarter; Maktab-ı Sheriff in Sarachlar (Tanner's) Quarter, Maktab-i Sheriff in İbrahim Pasha Quarter were some of the schools in Nicosia .32 It was also customary to teach in the mosques or sometimes in an annexed building and for this reason, a müderris used to be appointed to the large mosques like Ayia Sofia (Selimiye) Mosque, Ömeriye Mosque, Cami'i Kebir Mosque in Paphos, Bayraktar Mosque, Masjid of Kutup Osman in Famagusta and Haydarpasha Mosque.33 The Ayia Sofia maktab registered in the awqaf of Selim II, which was maintained by the income of other awqaf; Ömeriye maktab next to the Ömeriye Mosque; and the Famagusta maktab next to the janissary barracks and the masjid, all of which were registered in the awqaf of Lala Mustafa Pasha were such schools that were traced out from the archive documents related to the early days of the Ottoman rule in Cyprus.34 Although these schools are usually referred to as maktab in the documents reviewed and there is not much explanation about their curriculum, it could be assumed that these are most probably the primary schools so called as sibyan maktab (children's school). We could assume that the main aim of the maktab education was to instruct the children in religious matters and to teach them reading and writing, reciting the Qurʾān by heart and perhaps 31 These are Ottoman judicial registers. They are under the care of the Awqaf Administration and some of them are curently on-loan in the National Archive in Kyrenia. Recent studies on these records are increasing and transcription of the books into Modrn Turkish is under process. 32 Özkul (2005). p. 249. 33 Hasan Behçet (1969). Kıbrıs Türk Maarif Tarihi, Lefkoşa- Kıbrıs, p. 39. 34 Behçet (1969). pp. 44, 46.

241


NETICE YILDIZ

practicing elementary mathematics. According to Süha (1971) the number of maktabs registered in the inventories between the years 1571-1600 were eleven. Six of these were mazbuta waqf which were directly administered by the Office of Awqaf. These were Ayia Sofia maktab, Balikitre maktab, Tath-el Kale maktab, Larnaca Zuhuri maktab and Limasol maktab. In addition to these, there were other ones, mainly Ömeriye maktab, Girne (Kyrenia) maktab, Baf (Ktima or Paphos) maktab and Lefke Pir Pasha maktab, which were all set up as mulhaqa waqf. Each waqf was used to be administered by their appointed trustees under the jurisdiction of Office of Awqaf. The number of these reached to 18 by the year 1800. Minareliköy Sibyan was established as a mazbuta waqf while the sibyan (children) schools in Yeni Cami'i, Saray Önü, Kara Nikola and Debbaghhanē (Tanners') Quarters in Nicosia as well as the ones in Peristorana and Episkopi villages were all mulhaqa waqf. There were eleven more names established as mulhaqa waqf between the years 1800-1878. The Sibyan Schools so called Chulhanē, Nöbethanē, Fethiye (Turnçlu), Abdi Chavush (Laleli), Malya, Argaki, Cami-i Sagir (Ktima Paphos), Omorfo (Morhou), Lapta (Lapithos), Kazafana (Ozanköy), Malatya were the names recorded in the waqfiyya records of the Awqaf Administration of Cyprus.35 It appears from the records of the waqfiyyas of later periods that almost each mosque holds a maktab either in an annexed building or a room and whenever there is no extra room, the mosque itself was used for such matters. One of the early sibyan maktab was Ömeriye maktab which was built next to Ömeriye Mosque (Nicosia), originally a Gothic style church adopted and rebuilt as a mosque by Lala Mustafa Pasha. Lala Mustafa Pasha created a waqf so that the maintenance of this maktab could be realized from the revenues of a garden called Dizdar Baghchē (Dizdar Gardens) outside Paphos Gate that had a water 35

242

Süha (1971). p. 247


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

wheel and trees.36 He also laid a foundation for the salary of the master and his assistant in 1578. It was also noted in the same waqfiyya for the reservation of an allowance so that clothes and shoes could be purchased for the orphan children of the school.37 Moreover maktabs or sibyan schools were built almost at every part of the island. There were several of these that can be cited here. For example, a school was built next to the masjid of kıshla (military barracks) in Famagusta while another one was built on the harbour of Kyrenia by Agha Cafer Pasha; a school was built in the courtyard of the mosque of Mehmet Bey Ebubekir in Baf (Paphos), originally a Latin building converted into a mosque, while a school building was added to the mosque in Lefka Mosque built by Piri Pasha, the governor of the island in 1585-1589. All of these were laid as pious foundations.38 However, education seemed to remain at lower levels in the sibyan schools in the rural areas while the ones in cities provided a better education. Thus, it is clear that wealthy families had significant roles to consider educational matters of the society with their charity undertakings. The second group of educational institution were the secondary schools called madrasa.39 Madrasa is the Islamic institution for higher education, usually residential, in which the traditional Islamic sciences mainly hadiths, tafsir and fiqh are taught.40 Thus, they were the colleges to teach Islamic jurisprudence and often comprising an open or roofed court surrounded by large rooms reserved for teaching and giving prayers, and small cells 36 Jennings (1993). p. 61. As Jennings provided a translation from a Sheriye Sicil record, the garden was neglected and fell into ruins with the stones of its walls falling down. So, it was then rented to another tenant for 400 akchē a year for a period of nine years with the condition that he would have the garden flourished once more, repair its walls and water wheel, and in return he would pay 1200 akchē per year to the school. ibid, p. 61. 37 Süha (1971). p. 46. 38 Behçet (1969). pp. 46-47. 39 Süha (1971). pp. 235, 239. 40 Robert Hillenbrand (2000). Islamic Architecture: Form, Function and Meaning, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, p. 173.

243


NETICE YILDIZ

for accommodation.41 An early dated document discovered in this case is an imperial order dated 18 Zilhicce 978 (13 May 1571) instructing the treasurer and the member of trustees of the mosque in Cyprus for the amount of monthly scholarship to be awarded to the students of the madrasa in Nicosia. Accordingly this must be the equivalent to the wages paid to the students of madrasa in Rhodes.42 Considering the date of the document, which is after the conquest of Nicosia but still the siege of Famagusta was going on at full speed, this document recalls an important fact that education of at least some of the janissaries, or those volunteers fighting in the conquest of Cyprus who were madrasa students, continued during the time of the first days following the conquest of Nicosia where they started to organise all necessary administrative and social systems. Also, the same document proves an important fact that all necessary religious and social institutions had been launched in Nicosia within a short period prior to the conquest of the entire island in 1571. Similar to the practice on the mainland Anatolia, education is the concern of the citizens rather than being a governmental responsibility. However, it was the top authorities of the Ottoman administration who laid pious foundations for educational purposes. The role of the reigning Sultan and royal family members is of course more significant in the educational matters. Although documents reveal so many different names who had opened maktab (schools) or madrasa in Cyprus, the first one to be opened was that of Sultan Selim II who built a madrasa called Dâr-al Hedâye (The Guidance School) and had it registered under his awqaf in Cyprus. A letter written to Mevlana Pir Mehmed, the teacher of Semaniye Madrasa 41 Bloom & Blair (eds.) (2009). p. 430. For architectural details of madrasa buildings also see: Hillenbrand (2000). pp.173-251. 42 BOA (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi [Prime Ministry Ottoman Archive, İstanbul]), Mühimme 13, No: 516.

244


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

in İstanbul and to the qadi of Nicosia dated 22nd Şaban 986 /24 October 1578 is one of the documents to provide this information. Accordingly, the Sultan gave an order for the inspection of the works performed by Mevlana Nȗrullāh, who was the müderris43 at the madrasa and also the müftü44 of the island, since there were several incoming intelligences about his misconducts.45 According to the Sicil-i Osmaniye, Nȗrullāh Efendi, a müderris capable in various sciences was appointed to the position of müftü of Cyprus twice.46 Several documents that have been inspected so far give no reference to any madrasa with the name Dâr-al Hedâye. This is most probably the one designated as the Great Madrasa or Sultan Madrasa throughout the period of Ottoman rule. However, the name of a school referred to as Dâr-al Hadith is known through an incident recorded into the Ruznamchē (Account) Book47 of Cafer Pasha. Accordingly, Mevlana Sa'adud-din was the müftü of Cyprus and the müderris of a school referred to as Dâr-al Hadith in 1598-99. Thus, both cases give a hint that they are referring to the same building built by the Sultan and this might be a higher school almost equal to university education in Nicosia. Compatible with several documents, Büyük Madrasa (Great Madrasa) was also known as Sultan Selim II Madrasa or Sultan Madrasa.48 It can be assumed 43 Professor or instructor in a high school. 44 Chief religious authority responsible of all matters relevant to the religion and religious buildings. 45 BOA, Mühimme 34, No: 422. 46 Süreyya (1996). Vol. 4, p. 1276; Ekmelleddin İhsanoğlu also cited this notable person in the list of biographies of the intellectual people who were connected with Cyprus. However, accordingly, Nurullah was a man capable of medicine who was in charge of health matters in the army during the Cyprus expedition. See Ramazan Şeşen – Mustafa Haşim Altan – Cevat İzgi (1995). Kıbrıs İslami Yazmalar Kataloğu, İstabul: ISAR, p. xxvi. 47 BOA – Maliyeden Müdevver Defterleri, Ruznamçe Defteri, No: 423, Sene 1007 /1598-99, fol. 14. 48 Burcu Özgüven (2004) claims that Büyük Madrasa was founded by Hacı İsmail and Haci Ramazan in 1632. without bearing any source. See Burcu Özgüven (2004). “From the Ottoman Province to the Colony: Late Ottoman Educational Buildings in Nicosia”, Journal of Faculty of Architecture, METU, 2004, 1-2 (21) (33-66), p. 41. Presumably this is a wrongly interpreted information which in fact was one of the sub-foundations that laid to contribute to the

245


NETICE YILDIZ

that both Dâr-al Hedâye and Dâr-al Hadith were the names officially used for the school founded in the name of the Sultan Selim II during early years and both names were used to define the level as well as the curriculum type of the school while Sultan Madrasa, the commonly known name was used among the public to distinguish the founder of the waqf as Sultan Selim II. Büyük Madrasa, as the most popular educational institution in Ottoman Cyprus, showed a steady development with the contribution of the Ottoman Sultans as well as several wealthy citizens by making endowments by allocating a certain income of their estates to this madrasa, which were recorded in several deeds of pious foundations until the mid-19th century. One of these is Hacı İsmail Ağa of Menteshzade (Farahzade) family. As it was recorded in his waqfiyya set up in in H.1159/ 1745, in addition to their original wage, ten akché per day to teachers and one akché per day to the pupils of the madrasa were to be paid from the income of his waqf. Belkıs Hanım, Menteshzade, from the family of Farahzade, also supported this waqf by laying a foundation for the imbursement of 1000 akché per year as a contribution to the Sultan Madrasa which was recorded in her waqfiyya while later Hatice Hanım, the wife of Hasan Ağa Menteshzade in 1826 laid another waqf so as the teachers working there would get an additional payment of 6 akché in every three month and also contribute to the expenses of the madrasa.49 Ludwig Salvator, Archeduke of Austria, mentioned about this madrasa located at the back side of Ayia Sofia Mosque, with a little orchard full of citrus trees and added that in addition to this one, there are several other madrasas and maktabs at Levkosia (Nicosia).50 It was one maintenance of Büyük Madrasa (Great Madrasa). In many documents, the donors usually records their contribution particularly for the restoration works of the buildings as if they have “built it” or “rebuilt it since it falls into ruins”. 49 Bağışkan (2005). 357; Behçet (1969). p. 32. 50 Ludwig Salvator, Archduke of Austria (1983). Levkosia, the Capital of Cyprus, (Reprinted from his original account of a visit to the island in 1873),

246


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

of the responsibilities of each governor to take care for its maintenance. One of the records in the Sheriye Sicil is giving information about the repairs to be made by the architect Nikola and his son Nikola v. Petro for 30,000 akché in Ramazan 1019 (1610) with the order of Shaban Pasha.51 This building survived until the first quarter of the 20th century. Jeffery mentioned about the madrasa in his book published in 1918.52 There are several other names of madrasas, some of which were recorded in Sheriye Sicilleri and also in personal waqfiyyas. The principal ones in Nicosia may be cited here very briefly: Büyük Madrasa (also called as Sultan Selim Madrasa or Sultan Madrasa) (1570), Küçük Madrasa (also called Mustafa Pasha or Müftü Madrasa (1578),53 Hamidiye Madrasa (1762)54 which is also called Arab Ahmet Pasha Madrasa (demolished in 1931), Sarayönü Madrasa established by Bekir Pasha in 1748, Laleli Madrasa founded by Governor Ali Ruhi Efendi in 1827, Es’ad Çelebi Madrasa (c. 17th cent.)55 and Menteshzade Hacı İsmail Agha Madrasa in Ayia Sofia quarter56 all located in Nicosia. Some of the madrasas in other provinces are İbrahim London: Trigraph, p. 49. 51 Jennings (1993). p. 155. 52 George Jeffery (1983). A Description of the Historic Monuments of Cyprus, Nicosia, (First edition printed in 1918), London, p. 3. 53 According to sheriye sicil records dated 23 Rebiülevvel 1138 [29 November 1725], this is also called as Saadeddin Efendi Madrasa. The concerned document was about a petition by the professors of this madrasa to Ottoman Port to complain and request for the change of the members of mütevelli (board of trustees) for their misconduct and causing to the subsiding of the income of the pious foundation. In that respect, they recommended for the selection of the new mütevelli among the scholars already working in the madrasa. Upon this appeal, Acem-zade el-Hac Osman Efendi, the professor of Saadeddin Efendi Madrasa, was appointed as the member of the trustees. Özkul (2005). p. 249. 54 BOA, Cevdet – Maarif: No: 60 (Dated 1214 /H. 1799/1800) 55 Behçet (1969). p. 34. 56 Özkul (2005). p. 249. BOA , Cevdet – Maarif, No: 7669, According to Bağışkan (2005: p. 357) this madrasa was mentioned in Capt. M. B. Seager’s reports (1879) in the list of the awqaf properties Capt, M.B. Seager (1879). Reports on the Evkaf Properties, p. 7. It was actually Büyük Madrasa (Great Madrasa) and this confusion presumably resulted due to the awqaf founded by Menteshzade family to support the Great Madrasa.;

247


NETICE YILDIZ

Efendi Madrasa in Paphos (1850);57 Iskele Madrasa (1816) founded by the custom's officer Hacı İbrahim Agha in 1816;58 Limassol Madrasa founded by Köprülü Hacı İbrahim Ağa (1829);59 Peristerona Madrasa60 (earlier than 1875) and Madrasa of Famagusta (c. 17th century). There was at least one madrasa in each district.61 Büyük Madrasa (Great Madrasa) also called as Sultan Madrasa in Nicosia functioned until 1925 and was demolished in 1931 to create a large square in the Selimiye quarter.62 A sketch picture in the possession of the Cyprus Awqaf Administration Archive published by Altan (1986) in his book on the history of Cyprus Awqaf is the only source to illustrate this complex of educational buildings next to the mosque, which includes the Büyük Madrasa and Library of Sultan Mahmut II.63 The madrasa building next to Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque in Famagusta and the madrasa room of the Mosque of Karşıyaka besides the Zuhuri Tekkē in Larnaca, in view of the registers of the Awqaf Administration dated 14 Muharrem 1282 (29 May 1865),64 could be recorded as the architectural heritages in the category of educational buildings in Cyprus. In fact, Zuhuri Tekkē in Larnaca is constructed as a complex of buildings with its mosque and the tomb dedicated to Zuhuri Hazretleri.65 The waqfiyya (deeds of the foundation) were always set up in such a way to cover almost all expenses of the institution. The müderris who was appointed to the madrasa used to practice his occupation under the supervision of the mütevelli of the pious foundations and his salary was paid from the income of the foundation laid for the undertaking 57 BOA, Maarif Nezareti Belgeleri- Mektub-i Kalemi, File No: 100/8, dated H.15 Za. 1305/24 July 1888. 58 Behçet (1969). p. 34 59 Behçet (1969). p. 34. 60 For details, see Bağışkan (2005). pp. 359-360. 61 Şeşen et al. (1995) pp. x, xi. 62 Söz, No: 500, 13 August 1931, p. 1. 63 See Altan (1986). Vol. I: p. 129. 64 Sevinç Andız (ed.) (1990). Kıbrıs’ta Vakıf – Tarihi Eserler, Lefkoşa, p.72. 65 BOA, İrade – Meclis-i Vala, No: 23,888.

248


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

of the school. The waqf set up for a madrasa always clarified the amount to be allocated for the teacher, assistant teacher and students66 as well as other staff working in the madrasa by having a certain allowance set aside for the wages and expenses. The income was usually from the rents, enterprises such as oil or grist mills and farm products mainly olives, cotton and silk. Besides the principal founder, other people also contributed to the waqf of the madrasa. Therefore, the teachers of the popular madrasas might get higher wages than others. Thus, education was a system completely dependent on pious foundations endowed by wealthy people. The pious foundations were carefully laid so as to provide a continuous maintenance with a fund that could come from the interest of another property such as mills, baths, rents, and agricultural products of the farms. Allocations for each person giving service in the school, such as calligrapher, the hutbe reciter (preacher), instructor and tutors in different topics, and the servants for cleaning, sweeping, burning candles and oil lamps, were all carefully recorded as well as the annual or monthly expenses for the provisions required for the school such as candles or olive oil. The entries in the Sheriye Sicil books for official use and the waqfiyya recorded to be handed to the founder are the source of information for the pious foundations. The inscription tablets attached on the buildings also provide information about the charity deeds. One such inscription on the fountain of the Great Madrasa built by Ali Ruhi Efendi transcribed by Alasya67 consists of sixteen lines of a dedication poetry praising the noteworthy charity act of the patron. Accordingly, the donor who was the governor of the island appointed by the Porte, made a great deed by providing the inhabitants of the madrasa with water where people suffered desperately. 66 Students had a daily allowance usally referred to as “yağlık parası” (oil money). 67 Halil Fikret Alasya (1964). Kıbrıs Tarihi ve Kıbrıs’ta Türk Eserleri, Ankara: Türk Kültürünü Araştırma Enstitüsü, pp. 181-182.

249


NETICE YILDIZ

He assisted them like a saint and built this fountain in 1243 H. (1827/28).68 Muhassıl Mehmed Agha, made an allowance to the Mosque of Bayraktar69 and the school annexed to it from the revenues of his waqfs in 1823.70 The teachers of these schools were also subjected to inspections in the case of any complaints for their aggressive behaviours towards the children. In one case recorded in a Sheriye Sicil book, a certain el-Hac Hüseyin ibn-i el-Hac Ali who sent his youngest son Ali to study Qurʾān reading with the school of the instructor Ali Halife, made a complaint against the instructor for his mistreatment. Accordingly, the parent decided to take his son away from the school after he found out that his son is not happy there since the instructor used to beat him during his education by bearing the words “veled-i zina” (son out of adultery). Upon his visit to the school to resolve the matter, he and his son were beaten by the teacher bearing the reason that they had interrupted the education. Subsequent to the parent's appeal to the court, the qadi (judge) summoned the teacher to the court and asked him to give his testimonials before the court. As he was asked to prove his innocence in the presence of witnesses for which he failed, it was decided that he had to move his residence elsewhere.71 This also gives a hint that the school was at the same time the personal residence of the instructor. Education Institutions for Females There was no female school in any part of the island except the local religious schools where they were taught to read the Qurʾān by women mollas. These schools did not even teach writing. It was almost the same in the Orthodox Greek community in the island. Kınalızade Ali Efendi 68 Yıldız (2009). p. 143. 69 Mosque dedicated to the Standard Bearer who planted the first flag on the Constanza Bastion during the siege of Nicosia and then martyred. 70 M. Akif Erdoğru (2008). Kıbrıs’ta Osmanlılar, Lefkoşa: Galeri Kültür, p. 233. 71 Özkul (2005). p. 237.

250


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

(d. 1571), one of the well-known ulema in the Ottoman Empire who had written treaties about the education of children, also remarked about the necessity for female education. However, his recommendations consisted of teaching of moral values so that they could be perfect mothers and housewives, but most essentially faithful wives.72 Despite this fact, schools to educate females had never been seriously considered until the end of the 19th century. According to Lorenzo Warriner Peas, the American missionary,73 female education in Cyprus was almost entirely unknown and few girls attended the schools. On his visit to Famagusta, he managed to make a short observation in the madrasa, where there was only one girl besides thirteen boys, all of them seated on mats on two sides of a low bench, facing each other. The first school for girls in Cyprus was opened by the Greeks in 1859.74 This was a primary school in Larnaca with Marigo Nicolaides being the first teacher75 whereas the decision to open a primary school for the Turkish girls was taken on 12th October 1888 and Zühtüzade Osman Nuri Efendi, the inspector of the Ottoman schools, appointed Nazife Hanım, 14 years old girl, as a teacher.76 Nazife Hanım was a graduate of Turunçlu Mosque School and she is known to have practiced calligraphy in sülüs style.77 The first school building was the house of Nazife Hanım. Later, it was decided to have a school built in Eski Saray (Old Palace) Street on a property belonging to the Bostancı Wakf.78 The Rüşdiye 72 Muhammet Şevki Aydın (2001). “Kınalızade Ali Efendi’ye Göre Kız Çocuklarının Eğitimi”, Osmanlı Dünyasında Bilim ve Eğitim Milletlerarası Kongresi, İstanbul 12-14 Nisan, 1999 Tebliğler, İstanbul: IRCICA, p. 179. 73 Rita C. Severis (ed.) (2002). The Diaries of Lorenzo Warriner Pease 1834-1838, An American Missionary in Cyprus and His Travels in the Holy Land, Asia Minor and Greece, II Vols. Aldershot – Burlington: Ashgate, p. 980. 74 Hill (1952). Vol. 4, pp.311, 345, 372. 75 Severis (ed.) (2002). p. 217. 76 Behçet (1969). p. 65. 77 Ahmet An (2002). Kıbrıs’ın Yetiştirdiği Değerler, Ankara: Akçağ Yayınları, p. 161. 78 Behçet (1969), p. 76.

251


NETICE YILDIZ

School for girls, higher education level after primary school, was established in 1902 in Nicosia.79 Ottoman Reformation in Education and Its Reflection in Cyprus The decline of the education system in the Ottoman Empire was realized in the late 18th century and efforts were made to introduce a new education system together with other reform movements beginning with Selim III by setting up a new military system and a school. At the same time, some students were given scholarship and send to Europe, particularly to Paris, London and Vienna, to study in European manner. The reforms starting with certain decrees issued by the sultans, the first one being Tanzimât Fermânı (Gülhane Hatt-ı Sherif-î) in 1839, then Islâhat Hatt-ı Hümâyûn-û reorganised to continue these reforms although it worked out to be more beneficial for the nonMoslem society living in the Ottoman Empire. An attempt was made to spread the movement to several provinces of the empire although they were not very successful due to the financial reasons as well as inadequate number of teachers and lack of printed books Modernising the educational system during this new era in Cyprus was again encouraged and supported by the endowment of several wealthy citizens. First attempts was made by organising the curriculum of Büyük Madrasa which is located Ayia Sofia Quarter near the central mosque in Nicosia. Another step was to set up a central library next to it by Ali Ruhi Efendi, the Governor, during the time of Sultan Mahmud II. However, more modernised educational institutions were opened during the last quarter of the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth centuries. The first Rusdiye Maktab (secondary 79 See Servet Sami Dedeçay (1985). Viktorya İslam İnas Sanayi Mektebi ve Kıbrıslı Türk Kadınının Hakları (1902-1985), Magosa: Lefkoşa Özel Türk Üniversitesi Yayınları: 3.

252


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

school) was opened in 1862 in Ayia Sofia Quarter, close to the Ayia Sofia Mosque and Büyük Madrasa. When the number of students increased to 100 in 1875, new additional class-rooms were made to the same building and another teacher was appointed.80 Other rushdiye schools were opened in the cities and towns and finally their number increased up to 20 by 1930.81 İdadi Okulu (high school) for the boys and the first girls' secondary school were opened later in Nicosia during the British Rule in 1897 and 1905 respectively82 with the encouragement of the British High Commissioner.83 Although the number of teachers was limited, graduates of the school were quite successful and several of them were accepted to several Idadi schools (Lyc) in Turkey.84 The information given about the lives of teachers of the first half of the 20th century by Ali Nesim is enough to understand the lack of higher education on the island and there were some challenging young men who dared to go to high schools located in different provinces of the Ottoman Empire to have Rushdiye and Idadi education. Mehmet Zia Efendi was one of these teachers who had his education in Istanbul and Egypt. Almost in all cases, the Awqaf Administration supplied the land and money for the construction of these new institutions. The reports prepared by the Delegates of Awqaf during the British period reveal the accounts and expenses made for all charity matters of the office. These reports are noteworthy to show the increasing number of schools almost in each city and 80 BOA, MF: MKT File No: 28: 132 dated: 10 Ca 1292 /10.06.1875; File No: 27/83 Dated 11 RA 1292 /17.04.1875. 81 Altan (1986). pp. 224, 240. 82 Haşmet M. GürkHarry Charles Luke & Douglas James Jardin (eds.) (1920). Haşmet M. Gürkan (1996). Dünkü ve Bugünkü Lefkoşa: Galeri Kütür Yayınları, (1st ed. Published in 1989), p.118; Behçet (1969). p. 52. 83 Gürkan (1996). p. 118. 84 See BOA, MF: MKT File No: 111 (19); No: 120(4);143(57), 158 (23), 180 (100) etc.

253


NETICE YILDIZ

village where the Turkish community lived.85 Usually, the Islamic cemeteries which were part of the pious foundations, located in the walled city or outside the walls, were allocated to these new projects. Cemetery near Yeni Cami Mosque was one of these that completely demolished when Atatürk Primary School building was constructed on its site in 1950s. Educational matters for the Turkish community in the British Colonial Period were not much changed although it was also regulated under the Education Law in force No: 18 of 1895.86 According to Luke & Jardin (1920), prior to the British occupation of the island in 1878, state aided education was confined to Moslem school. The Turkish government made an annual grant of 500 British pounds, which was distributed among certain Moslem schools in accordance with the recommendations of the Mejlis-i Idare of each district. The schools also received financial support from the Awqaf. The number of Moslem schools in each district in 1878 is as follows: Nicosia: 28; Larnaca: 8; Limassol: 4; Famagusta: 8; Paphos: 12; Kyrenia: 5. As it is also noted in the same source, in these Moslem schools, the principal subject of education was the recitation of the Qurʾān and these schools were badly attended. At the chief school for elder boys in Nicosia there were twenty five scholars.87 Islamic Educational Buildings in Cyprus: According to the Awqaf Administration records, there was a school building called Madrasa-i Cedid (Büyük Madrasa 85 See Altan (1986). Vol. 2, pp. 773-776 for the reports dated 1st March 1934, 29 March 1939, 29 March 1945 and 14 April 1947 which include the sum of money paid for the Boys’ High School in Nicosia and the scholarship awarded to a couple of students to carry on their education abroad with the condition that they would return and work as teachers in the High School. 86 Sir J. T. Hutchinson & Claude Deleval Cobham (1905). A Handbook of Cyprus, London: E. Stanford, p. 15. 87 Harry Charles Luke & Douglas James Jardin (eds.) (1920). The Handbook of Cyprus, London: Macmillan and Co. Ltd., pp. 137-138.

254


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

[Great Madrasa]), which was just opposite to the Library of Sultan Mahmut II. Consistent with the sketch provided by Altan,88 there was a building of two floors at the front side opposite to the library's northern facade. The entrance gate into the courtyard was running in symmetry with the entrance gate of the library while there is another large gate in the middle of the garden walls that runs in curve-linear shape and connects two buildings. The front building had an arcaded portico at the entrance and large windows on the first floor. This unit seems to be a small building and its roof is covered with terracotta tiles. At the back of this building, there is an arcaded building in Ottoman style, covered with a dome rising on a low square shaped drum wall and ending with an alem89 made of brass. The drawing also depicts an L shaped plan on two edges of the building. The sketch is rather clear to show the location of the building almost forming a U shape. There was a large garden between the madrasa and the library while the Venetian house, the building which is currently the Lapidary Museum, is visible at the back and is revealing the extent of the garden and the madrasa. An article unanimously published in Söz newspaper in 1931 is criticising the demolishing of this building.90 Also this building appears in some pictures from this century. One of these is a picture published in a book on Cyprus by Kemal Rüstem and Brother Publishers.91 Accordingly the building is a long rectangular building constructed with cut-stone and the entrance to the courtyard is just opposite to the library. A careful analysis of these illustrations in comparison with the current pattern of Selimiye Square could make one understand the identity of Selimiye Quarter of Nicosia as the centre of religious, educational as well as commercial institutions 88 Altan (1986). Vol. 1, p. 129. 89 Crescent as the symbol of Islam. 90 Söz, No: 500, 13 August 1931, p. 1. 91 Terry Parris (ed.) (1957). Cyprus in Colour, K. Rüstem & Brother, Nicosia, Cyprus. p. 8.

255


NETICE YILDIZ

while this could also make one realize the fact of the well planned actions during the second quarter of the 20th century for the wiping away the traces of the Turkish civilization on the island by demolishing somehow these buildings with the excuse that they were rather devastated. Küçük Madrasa was also called as Mustafa Pasha Madrasa or sometimes as Müftü Madrasa. According to the records of Sheriye Sicilleri, it was built in H.987/1578 AD. Accordingly Abdullah Efendi was appointed to this madrasa with a wage of 20 akçe. This building was located in the northern direction of Ayia Sofia square, between the mansion house of Kadı Menteş Efendi (Küçük Mehmed Efendi Mansion) and Küçük Medrese Street.92 The Ottoman madrasa building to survive is a domed building next to Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque in Namık Kemal Square, Famagusta. The Madrasa of Famagusta, now serving as a restaurant in the touristic centre, is still in a moderate condition. It is built of cut-stone and the entrance of the madrasa is through an unusually narrow and high archway bearing a crude muqarnas (stalactite) decoration. The building has a central square shaped space covered with a dome and an U shaped gallery encircling this domed hall on the southern, western and southern bays of the building. Each part of the gallery is divided into three bays by pointed arches, each of which is covered with an under-pitched vault.93 The pendantivedome of the main room of the madrasa is rising over a hexagonal drum wall. The decorative painting of the dome, blue floral patterns in pen style technique visible in 1990s, has been washed away recently. The entrance to the main hall is through a flat arched doorway at the western 92 Tuncer Bağışkan (2005). pp. 358-359. Also, the location is rather well defined in the LRSD site plans of the area which Sheet XXI. See Özgüven (2004). p. 40, fig. 6. However, Özgüven on p. 40 Fig. 7 made a mistake by providing an image of a late 19th century Turkish mansion house by accrediting it as Küçük Madrasa. 93 A construction formed by the penetration of two vaults of unequal size, springing from the same level. Cyril M. Harris ed. (1983). Illustrated Dictionary of Historic Architecture, New York: Dover Publ., p. 558.

256


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

gallery. Three windows of this main hall are opening to the street on the northern side and to two to the gallery on the western side formed with dark and light grey marble lintels and posts. The first window near the entrance on the west gallery is having a grey granite stone lintel that has two lines of inscription in Hebrew while the second one has a coat-of arm from the Latin period. There are four buttresses on the western faรงade of the building which opens into the piazza, two of which are more imposing corner buttresses while the rest two stands in the middle and from the same direction also takes place the main arched entrance that can be reached through a flight of three steps. Two tall granite columns from the Venetian period are standing on two pedestal stones and crowned with capitals in front of the buttresses. This was one of the symbolic representations for the Venetian Piazza and Palazzo squares which were crowned with the sculpture of the lion of St. Mark, the insignia of the Venetian republic. There are four bay windows at the top of the exterior walls of the southern gallery that is separated into four sections by narrow pointed arches facing the inner courtyard of Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque (formerly St. Nicholas Cathedral) and again perpendicular buttresses supporting this wall at certain intervals. Although the date of the building is not exactly known, the dome reveals clearly its Ottoman style while lintels and the vaults of the galleries recall an earlier building. It could be added at this point that the current appearance is revealing an effort to create a harmony with the Gothic mosque which was originally the cathedral of the city. According to a waqf document dated 1863, there is an appeal to the Ottoman Port for the restoration of the madrasa in Famagusta which was said to have been built by Muhsinzade Abdullah Pasha since it was in a wrecked situation.94 Abdullah Pasha was one of the appointed governors of the island, who had the rank 94

Altan (1986). Vol.I, p. 239.

257


NETICE YILDIZ

with three tails, in 1745.95 The waqfiyya of Seyyid Abdullah Pasha also records a madrasa rebuilt by himself in Mağusa (Famagusta).96 However, an illustration designed by L. F. Cassas and engraved by Racine,97 published in the travel notes of Cassas and captioned as the “Moslem mosque”, depicted a building with arcaded porticos on three sides. The southern part of the building running in parallel to the mosque (so called Ayia Sofia Mosque in those days, formerly St. Nicholas Cathedral) had four arcaded portico, while on the western part three and northern direction had two arcades all running as a U shaped portico on three sides of the building. The dome of the building was rising so majestically. Again, an oil painting by Francis Arundale (c.1836)98 depicts the same building with three pointed arcaded portico opening into the square. Considering the similarity of the plan of the past building as compared to these illustrations, it is presumable that the building was either rebuilt during the late 19th century or early 20th century while they closed the porticos so as to provide a larger indoor space or the porticos visible in these illustrations has been completely removed. This building ceased to function as a madrasa in late 1920s when madrasa education was completely abolished in Turkey within the policy to bring a reform in Turkish education, a policy followed up by Turkish Cypriots as well. George Jeffery is said to have prepared a project to reuse the building as a luxury caf. Although the plan for this restoration was prepared and an estimated cost of 95 George Hill (1952). Vol. IV, p. 75. 96 Altan (1986). Vol. II, pP. 1228, 1233. 97 Le C. en Cassas (1799). Voyage Pittoresque de la Syrie, De la Phoenice, De la Palestine, et de la Basse Aegypt, Vol. III. Paris, Pl. 101. Netice Yıldız (1999). “Illustrated Books and Manuscripts about Cyprus”, 2nd International Congress For Cyprus Studies 24-27 November 1998. Ed. By I. Bozkurt et. al, Eastern Mediterranean University, Centre For Cyprus Studies Publications, Gazi Mağusa, TRNC, Vol.1b, Papers Presented in English, Economics and Miscellaneous, p. 649; This view of the square was later on copied by many other painters during the 19th century which were published in many illustrated travel books. See Rita C. Severis (2000). Travelling Artist in Cyprus 1700-1960, London. 98 Severis (2000). p. 43, Fig 39.

258


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

1000 English pounds was calculated, the project was not realised until the 2010s.99 It was used as a library in 1960s for a while, then as a bank office in 1990s and as a bistro restaurant since 2000. A madrasa building in the traditional courtyard style used to exist in Peristorana village. It was a madrasa which had several cells and classrooms organised around a courtyard. Although this building is not existing anymore, a plan based on its ruins was made by a team from Turkey in 1960s.100 Based on this plan, it could be said that there were four large rooms at the front side with an iwan entrance in the middle and two semi open arcaded sofas opening into the courtyard, each of them providing entrance to two rooms. Perhaps these were the classrooms. There are five rooms on the opposite end with varied sizes. Between each room was a semi-open arcaded space (perhaps we could define these as iwans or sofas) opening into the courtyard and some of them provided entrances to one cells while some of them had only window openings. One of the rooms at the left had three windows but no entrance opening. Probably it was a silo or a tomb. There were three rooms on the vertical direction of the plan separated by four sofas. Three of these sofas on each end provide private entrance to each cell while the first ones next to the corner rooms at street level are independent spaces. The courtyard most probably had a water device, either a fountain or a well in the middle, and a garden arrangement on four square plots. There were other madrasas in the other districts as well. A document dated 13 CA 1282 H./13 October 1865 requested for the registry of a madrasa in the district of Tuzla (Salt Lake) in Larnaca, a harbour city located on the southern coast of the island; this building consisting 99 Bağışkan (2005). pp. 360-361; Evkaf Archive File No: 202 Folder: 4421 (100). Date: 1930. 100 Fikret Çuhadıroğlu ve Filiz Oğuz (1975). “Kıbrıs’ta Türk Eserleri / Turkish Historical Monuments in Cyprus”, Vakıflar, Rölöve ve Restorasyon Dergisi, Vakıflar Genel Müdürlüğü Yayınları, No: 2, 1975, Fig. 33.

259


NETICE YILDIZ

of eight cells, a class-room and a fountain, to the pious foundation under the category of the Anatolian Awqaf of the Sultan.101 In view of some documents, this madrasa was built in H. 1232 (1816) by Hacı İsmail Agha, the director of the customs house, and it was designed with eight rooms on the ground floor to accommodate the poor students while the upper room was designed as the classroom.102 According to the registers of the Awqaf Administration, the Madrasa of Zuhuri Tekkē in Larnaca is another building still known to exist today.103 According to the waqfiyya records, there was a madrasa constructed in Limassol, dated H.1241 (1829) with seven dormitory rooms on the ground floor and a classroom on the upper floor. Accordingly, another madrasa was in Paphos (Baf) area built by Hoca İbrahim Sıtkı, the teacher from that district, in H. 1268 (1850) with 3 classrooms and 10 dormitory rooms.104 Another late document dated Ra. 1284 H./1832, remitted for the occasion of appointing a teacher, refers to the madrasa of Menteshzade Hacı İsmail Agha.105 A document relevant to the account minutes of the waqf is rather interesting to show that the income gained from the rent of the estates and water of the awqaf of Sheraibzade Hacı Osman Efendi in Piskobu in Limasol for the years 128890/1871-1874) was endowed to the Hamidiye Madrasa with the condition that the money had to be spent for the wages of Rasıh Efendi, the late müderris, for three months; Shaikh Efendi, the müderris, for three years; and to the students studying at the madrasa besides the expenses to be made for the repairing and furnishing of the madrasa.106 The schools set up during the early years of Ottoman administration were thought to have been located in some Latin buildings, mainly the monastic buildings. 101 102 103 104 105 106

260

BOA, Cevdet – Maarif, No: 6732. Behçet (1969). p.34. Sevinç Andız (ed.) (1990). Kıbrıs’ta Vakıf Tarihi Eserler, Lefkoşa, p.72. Behçet (1969). p.34. BOA, Cevdet – Maarif, No: 7669; also vis. n. 53. Altan (1986). Vol. I: p. 255.


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

The one constructed then were usually consisted of modest buildings and usually they were located in the personal houses of the teachers. Newly constructed buildings during the last quarter of 19th century and early 20th centuries were then started to be constructed with cut-stones again with personal endowments as waqfs under the management of Awqaf Administration, which was the only office under the authority of a Turkish director during the British Colonial rule.107 The Haydar Pasha building (now the Department of Antiquities and Museums) and Selimiye School building on the northern part of Selimiye Mosque and opposite to Menteshzade Qonak (mansion house) (nowadays used by the Union of Municipalities) are examples for these schools which are still used for educational purposes. The first building that served as the primary school for the females in Famagusta was constructed after 1908. This was financed by the donations collected from the people and also through the income of a theatre play staged for the first time by a group of Turkish youths. Hüseyin Zihni, a clerk from the Land Registry Office in Nicosia and Bahaeddin Bey, a lawyer from the District Government Office suggested the project of building a girls school in Famagusta since the school was located in a rented house which was in a rather wrecked condition. The play called Vatan Yahut Silistre, one of the works of Namık Kemal, a well-known author and poet who supported the democracy and nationalism in the last quarter of the 19th century and exiled to Famagusta for a couple of years, was staged by a group of young men from Nicosia in a warehouse near the harbour on 26th January 1908.108 107 G.S. Georghallides, (1979). A Political and Administrative History of Cyprus 1918-1926, with a Survey of the Foundation of British Rule, Nicosia: Cyprus Research Centre Publications No: VI , p.70. 108 Yaşar Ersoy (1998). Kıbrıs Türk Tiyatro Hareketi, Toplumsal ve Siyasal Olaylarla İçiçe, Lefkoşa: Peyak Kültür Yayınları: Volume 1, pp. 8-9; An (2002). p. 288.

261


NETICE YILDIZ

Libraries and Books as Part of Charitable Giving Relative to the mosques and madrasas, establishing libraries and enriching them with books was another responsibility procured by the citizens. In Islam, libraries were usually incorporated into such other institutions like mosques and madrasas. However, Islam inherited its tradition of founding libraries as charity from antiquity and Byzantium, and public and private libraries were built throughout the Islamic lands. Nevertheless, libraries and books were important in the Islamic world because of the primacy accorded to the written word in Islam.109 Although there is no information about the libraries in Cyprus for the pre-Ottoman era, we could assume that Orthodox monasteries produced and treasured books which were the attraction places for the European manuscript hunters. Islamic manuscript libraries in the Ottoman Empire are known to have been built after the conquest of Constantinople (İstanbul) in 1453 as part of charitable foundations, the first one being the mosque complex of Mehmed II. 110 Endowment of book as a charity in Islam is an old tradition. As charity foundations, they provided further opportunities for those scholars and students to enrich their knowledge and make research, or practice calligraphy by making copies of the well-known works. Thus, the libraries which had been formed within the mosques or tekkēs as part of the waqf of each institution were supported by individuals with their Islamic manuscript donations which were also laid as pious foundations. Most of the information relevant to the libraries is based on the waqfiyyas of some dignified people who had established a waqf in Cyprus. The details of laying the manuscript as a waqf by a benefactor recorded in the Islamic manuscripts is another source of information 109 Bloom & Blair (eds.) (2009). p. 420 110 Bloom & Blair (eds.) (2009). p. 420

262


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

about the libraries Nowadays there is a noteworthy number of manuscripts with such details in the collection of the National Archive of Northern Cyprus in Kyrenia. These manuscripts in this collection were assembled from the Library of Sultan Mahmut II, the only known historic manuscript library building, and from some mosques and tekkēs as part of the safety measures taken for their protection and preservation. According to Parmaksızoğu (1964)111 who was the first person to attempt to index a selected number of manuscripts, noted in his preface about a short history of the libraries. Accordingly there were six libraries established in Cyprus. These are Shaikh ‘al Seba Library in Aziz Efendi Tekkē; Muradiye Library in Selimiye Mosque (or Ayia Sofia) set up by Lala Mustafa Pasha; the library in Arab Ahmet Pasha mosque constructed by Arab Ahmed Pasha and madrasa112 set up by Ahmed Efendi, the ʿimām of the mosque; the library of the central madrasa built next to Ayia Sofia Mosque which is also known as the Müftü Madrasa and the library of Kutub Osman Fazlullah Efendi in Famagusta.113 The waqf (bequeath) inscription as well as ferağ (giving up the ownership right to another person) records give valuable information about the provenance of the books as well as the intellectual people who owned that certain manuscript. So, through these, we know the most significant libraries being the collections from the mosques of Ayia Sofia, Ömeriye, Arāp Ahmet Pasha and Laleli, Büyük Madrasa, Müftü Madrasa, the Mawlawī Tekkē (dervish lodge) and Shaikh’ al Seb’a Abd l Aziz Tekkē, all located in Nicosia, as well as the 111 İsmet Parmaksızoğlu (1964). Kıbrıs Sultan II. Mahmud Kütüphanesi, Ankara. 112 One of the books laid as waqf by Arāp Ahmed Pasha is Cam’i al-remuz fi Shehr-i elnekaye (M. 1292) which was in the collection of Library of Sultan Mahmud II and currently located in the National Archive, Kyrenia. See Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 168. 113 For the name of these libraries see Parmaksızoğlu (1964). p. 6; Şeşen et al. (1995). pp. xvi.

263


NETICE YILDIZ

private libraries of Tifli Efendi, Bulgari Efendi, Kıbrisi Shaikhzade Hacı Mustafa Efendi, Berberzade Hacı Mustafa Efendi and Shaikh al Seba (currently known as Yediler Türbe [Tombs of Seven Martyrs]). An illuminated “Qurʾān” (Inv. No: Mev.T. 135), currently in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) National Archive located in Kyrenia, could be considered as the first Islamic manuscript to have been bequeathed as a waqf to a mosque in Nicosia. In view of its waqf record on fol. 1a, this was bequeathed to the “Great Mosque” in Nicosia by Lala Mustafa Pasha. Although the name of the mosque is not mentioned in the waqfiyya records, it is a known fact that Lala Mustafa Pasha, the chief commander of the Ottoman expedition to Cyprus, converted the cathedral of the city into a mosque and performed the first prayer there with his army. Thus, the waqfiyya inscriptions that were inscribed on two different pages are noteworthy to quote here as the first endowed Islamic book ever made to a mosque in Cyprus in view of its historical significance. “Gratitude to the most merciful God who is unique and great and to the Prophet, who is the last and final Messenger of God, may peace and blessings befall upon him. To Lala Mustafa Paşa, the lion of war, brave man who destroyed the castles of the infidels, may the God give him blessings and power to perform all of his wishes and aspirations! He bequeathed this Holy Book by begging the benedictions of the generous, Great God to this dignified and honourable mosque, which is within the walls of the castle of Lefkosha (Nicosia), on the condition that it will always remain within this holy shrine and cannot be transferred to another place. Thus, the members of the trustees gathered to confirm the accuracy of the conditions of this deed of waqf to lay it as a pious foundation and it is in harmony with the decrees of the Islamic religion. Therefore, it cannot be disposed, sold out, purchased, transferred, inherited,

264


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

borrowed, lent or bequeathed. It is solely the property of the most generous, noble, immortal and great God.”

There is also another inscription on the last page of the Qurʾān giving the following meaning: “This Noble and Mighty Qurʾān, the holiest of the books, was bequeathed to the Great Mosque on the island of Cyprus which is protected by the God, by the generous will of Lala Mustafa Pasha, the conqueror of the island.”

On the top of this inscription is the stamp of a qadi, the top religious authority, who determined and confirmed the conditions of the pious foundation.114 Through the waqfiyya records in some of the manuscripts bearing high artistic characters with their illuminated title pages, colophons and bindings, it is known that Sultan Murad III, son of Selim II who conquered Cyprus, endowed several manuscripts for the mufti madrasa in Nicosia in the year H. 986 /1578. Some of these books that were later on transferred to the Library of Sultan Mahmud II formed the selected pieces in Cyprus Islamic manuscripts collection. This collection that formed the basis of the Islamic manuscript collection of Cyprus, three of which that could be cited here, El-Cüz ül-salis min El-Fetavi El Tatar Haniye,115 Al’ Fetavi-I al’ Tatar Haniye al’ mesmah bezad al mesafer by alim bn Ali Al hanefi116 El-Muhit el-Burhani fi elFıkıh el-Numani(M. 219)117 are noteworthy examples in 114 For a detailed study on this see Netice Yıldız (1991). “The Koran of Lala Mustafa Paşa”, New Cyprus, July 1991, pp. 22-25; Netice Yıldız (2005). “Wakfs in Ottoman Cyprus”, pp 179-196, in: C. Imber, K. Kiyotaki & R. Murphey (eds.) Frontiers of Ottoman Studies: State, Province, and the West, London: I. B. Tauris, pp. 181-183; Netice Yıldız (2005). “Kıbrıs İslam Yazmaları Koleksiyonları İçinde Tezhipli Eserler ve Dört Önemli Eser”, pp. 524-543, in Oktay Belli, Yücel Dağlı & M. Sinan Genim (eds.), İzzet Kayaoğlu Hatıra Kitabı – Makaleler, İstanbul: TAÇ Vakfı, pp. 530-534, 540. 115 Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 207: 330: M. 253. (M. is the abbreviation used for the Library of Sultan Mahmut II). 116 See Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 207: 330: M. 251. 117 See Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 135: 187: M. 219.

265


NETICE YILDIZ

point of their calligraphy, illumination and bindings. The tekkē founded by Shaikh ‘al Seb’a Aziz Efendi, the tutor of Sultan Selim II who joined to the conquest and preferred to live in Lefkosha for the rest of his life, is another shrine maintained by the Sultan's waqfs as well as other citizens which used to hold a significant library. Ömer Efendi Ibn-i Ali Efendi bequeathed his book related to medicine entitled Levazım el-Hikmet to the library of this holy shrine118 while another manuscript currently in the National Archive in Kyrenia119 entitled Dīvān-ı Hākānī was also bequeathed to the same shrine.120 Ownership records found in two manuscripts121 are interesting to reveal the presence of a library in the mansion house reserved for the followers of Shaikh al Seb'a which was located in the neighbourhood of Ayia Sofia Mosque in Nicosia. As the record says, it was one of the books of that certain relevant library. An admonition also was added so as residents would ensure its safety. One of these with Mamluk style illumination is entitled as Mukadimat-ül Al Ghaznavi written by Cemaleddin Ahmad b. Mohammad.122 “Similar” to the instances of the schools, furnishings and the collection of books of the libraries in specified buildings or inside the mosques and tekkēs were accomplished through the donations of those dignified people from the Ottoman Port and the citizens. An illuminated manuscript entitled Sherh’ Al Shufaˀ bears the waqf record of Muhassıl Esseyid Mehmed Efendi's bequeath to Ayia Sofia Mosque123 while Belkıs Hanım, Menteshzade, from the family of Farahzade, who is mentioned above for her pious foundation for the Büyük Madrasa, bequeathed several manuscripts again to Ayia 118 119 120 121 122 123

266

Şeşen et. al. (1995). İstanbul: p. 56. Tr. Girne. A historic harbour city on the northern coast of Cyprus. Şeşen et. al. (1995). İstanbul: pp. 30-31. Şeşen et. al. (1995).p. 97, 119: M.359; p. 132,190: M. 62 M.359, p. 132, 190: M. 62. Şeşen et. al. (1995).p. 443, 815: M: 287.


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

Sofia Mosque in H. 1149 /1736-7.124 Besides the books donated, money was also allocated so that they could purchase books, or commission to the scribes to copy some important books since the printing machine facility was not available in the island until the end of the 19th century. According to the waqfiyya of Karakash Elhach Osman Hacı Mustafa, a certain sum of money was given for the acquiring of books for the library in the Mosque of Ömeriye on the condition that the purchased books will be recorded as waqf and they were not to be taken out of the mosque.125 It is also interesting to see the conditions of bequeath of a certain book, which defines sometimes family ownership-right by indicating that it would continue to retain in family ownership, “from son to son, to son” and when their line is deceased, then the book would go into the property of a certain location, either the library of a mosque or a tekkē. All conditions required that the readers would use the book only in the certain place it is bequeathed. The founder added the clause for the prohibition of selling or exchanging it. An example for such a deed of the waqf is recorded in a manuscript indicating the donor being Béshir Agha from the Enderun School in the Sultan's Palace. Accordingly the manuscript was bequeathed to the mosque of Ayia Sofia in the city of Lefkosha (Nicosia) in the island of Cyprus with the condition that it would be used for the benefit of the students and other readers only within the walls of the mosque and it would not be taken out or this holy place, or the ownership right should not be transferred to another person or institution.126 124 The folowing entries in the catalogue of Cyprus manuscripts are bequethed by Belkıs Hatun. Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 4 (1: S.18, S. 18); p. 5 (1: M.76, S.36); p. 6: (1: M.69); p. 7 (1: S. 78); S.67, S.75); p. 8 (1: S.74; S.82, S.84); p. 9 (1: S.69, S.79); p. 10 (1: S.66, S.68); p.11 (1: S. 65, S.71, S.100), p. 12 (1: S. 86, S. 83); p. 13 (1: S. 63, S. 73). (S. is the abbreviation used for Selimiye Mosque (originally called as Ayasoyfa Mosque). 125 Behçet (1969). p. 41. 126 Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 52, 62: M.79.

267


NETICE YILDIZ

One of the manuscripts from the Library of Sultan Mahmud II, currently in the National Archive, is recording the amount paid for the commissioning of a manuscript. Accordingly, the first owner (presumably by Ali Dede) commissioned the work and paid to a scriber hundred and forty akché for the copying of the text, ten akché for the expenses made for paper, ink and pen. He had it bounded for six akché which made the total a hundred and fifty six akché. Later he synchronised the text by comparing it with the original with the help of Sinan khalifa. Then this book was exchanged for hundred and fifty six akché.127 The Library of Sultan Mahmud II in Nicosia is the only building that could be classified as a library. This library next to Selimiye (formerly Ayia Sofia) Mosque in Nicosia was built upon the order given to the muhassıl (tax collector) of the island for the use of the students studying at Büyük Madrasa in 1829. In fact, the main aim was to assemble the selected valuable manuscripts from the mosque libraries into a centralised library which could serve for the benefit of the scholars and the citizens as well as the students studying at Büyük Madrasa. It is interesting to find out from a document128 addressed to the muhassıl (tax collector) of Cyprus for the employment of a new hafız for the library of Sultan Mahmud II as well as other staff. The salaries of the first director, Hasan Hilmi Efendi and the librarian Sarachzadé Hacı Mustafa were 50 and 40 kuruş respectively, were rather high wages compared with the average rates of those days.129 The annual expenses of the library were 1640 kuruş while 40,000 kuruş was allocated for the purchase of books. Other people like Elhac Ömer Efendi and Ali Ruhi Efendi, the muhassıl, contributed to the expenses 127 See Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. 558, 1075: M. 154. 128 BOA, Cevdet – Maarif, No: 2190. 129 Acknowledgement goes to Prof. Dr. Mehmet Genç for his comment on this document.

268


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

of the library annually which were recorded in their waqfiyyas.130 He also personally contributed with ten items for the furnishing of the building as well as a copy of a Qurʾān manuscript.131 The library of Sultan Mahmud II which is located opposite to the eastern portal, so called Aziziye Portal of Selimiye Mosque and once stood next to Büyük Madrasa, which was demolished in 1931, is made of cut stone. The building consists of one central space covered with a dome, which rises over a hexagonal drum. The twosectioned eastern part is covered with two small cupolas under which takes place a small portico and a small room reserved for clerical works or probably as a resting area. The portico has two pointed arches on the eastern direction and one at the entrance. The front section is opened on the northern direction enabling access to the main building and to the small resting room while an iron railing closed its eastern part. There is an inscription over the entrance door with the signature of Feyzi Dede which reads as follows: “Fiha Kütübün Kayyime” (There are valuable books here). There is another long inscription carved on stone which praises the good deed of Sultan Mahmud II and about the newly built library while another on wood is again praising the mightiness of Sultan Mahmud II and the benevolent work of Ali Ruhi Efendi during his mission in Cyprus as a vali (governor) with the date H. 1245 (1829/30).132 The interior of the main space is decorated with bands of medallion mouldings containing inscribed poetical verses about the building by Hilmi Efendi on the cornice running all around the walls. There are four 130 Behçet (1969). pp. 41-42. 131 Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. xv. 132 For the details of these inscription tablets see Tuncer Bağışkan (2005). pp. 352-353; Kıbrıs’ta Türk Eserleri, Eski Eserler Dairesi Yayını, pp. 2930; Harid Fedai (1987). Kıbrıs Müftüsü Hilmi Efendi, pp. 147-155; İsmet Konur (1946). Kıbrıs Tarihi ve Kıbrıstaki Türk Eserleri, Adana: Seyhan Basımevi, pp. 79-8; İsmet Konur (1938). Kıbrıs Türkleri, İstanbul: Remzi Kitabevi, pp. 70-73.

269


NETICE YILDIZ

large bookcases in the library that have carved and gilded ornamentation in the neo-classical style while the poetry of Ali Ruhi Efendi runs in the cartouches on the same line as the ones on the walls. Although there is not much detail to show the original decoration of the library with the exception of the bookcases, it could be assumed from the records of endowments to the mosque that it was decorated with carpets and readers usually scouted on the carpets and read the books from the rahlés (Ar.& Pr. kursi. [low, crossed-legged lectern]). Soon after the completion of the construction of the Library of Sultan Mahmud II in 1829, Sultan Mahmud II bequeathed 102 volumes comprising of 80 titles. Beside these, there were several endowments by dignified people living in the island, mainly Tifli Bulgari Efendi with 223 books of his own property which were previously located on loan basis in the library of Arap Ahmet Pasha Mosque; Kıbrisi Shaikhzade Hacı Mustafa Efendi with 78 books; Berberzade Hacı Mustafa Efendi with 71 books, Hasan Hilmi Efendi, the muft of Cyprus with 35 books, Kıbrisi Hacı Ömer Efendi with 186 books, Hacı Ömer Efendi with 90 books and other waqf books from some principal mosques like Ayia Sofia, Laleli and Ömeriye, or Tekkē of Shaikh al Seb'a that were recorded into the first index of the library.133 The Current Islamic Manuscript Collections in Cyprus The library of Sultan Mahmud II is described by Hadi Sharifi, in the book published in 1991 by Al Furqan Islamic Cultural Heritage Foundation as one of the perfect examples of Turkish architecture to possess the largest Islamic manuscript collection on the island.134 Also, E. 133 Şeşen et. al. (1995). p. XVI. 134 Geoffrey Roper (ed.) (1992). World Survey of Islamic Manuscripts, 2 Volumes, London: Al-Furqan Foundation.

270


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

Birnbaum (1984)135 wrote a short description about Cyprus Islamic manuscript collection in an article that aimed to bring the manuscript collections in Turkish libraries which are not yet entered into union catalogues to attention of the scholars. He cited some noteworthy ones from Cyprus collection, some of which are not yet traced out in our research. According to this source, there were nearly 2000 manuscripts in Turkish, Persian and Arabic languages in the library of Sultan Mahmud II. He refers to the other collections located in the mosques of Ayia Sofia and Laleli, and Cyprus Turkish National Archive and Research Centre (CTNARC) besides the ones in the Library of Sultan Mahmud II through the information acquired from M. H. Altan, the founder and ex-director of the CTNARCR. There are several valuable Islamic manuscripts in Cyprus, the majority of which were located in the Ethnographic Museum and Library of Sultan Mahmud II until lately. Among these are the above mentioned Qurʾān bequeathed to the great mosque (Inv. No: Mev.T. 135), presumably to Ayia Sofia (currently known as Selimiye) by Lala Mustafa Pasha; the waqf Qurʾān of Sultan Süleyman II to Ayia Sofia (Inv. No: Mev. T. 134, dated H. 1102 /1691), the Qurʾān endowed as waqf to Hala Sultan Tekkē (Inv. No: Mev.T. 136) by Abdullah, mütevelli of Karpas, a 14th century illuminated copy of the Mesnevi of Mevlana Celaleddin Muhammed El Rumi (Int. No: M. 1006)136 and also another 14th century illuminated Qurʾān written in kufic letters (Inv. No: Mev. T. 85/1/1).137 135 E. Birnbaum (1984). “Turkish Manuscripts: Cataloguing Since 1960 and Manuscripts Still Uncatalogued. Part 5: Turkey and Cyprus, Journal of the American Oriental Society”, Vol. 104 (3), 465-503. For Cyprus case see p. 502. 136 For details see Banu Mahir & Netice Yıldız,“An Illuminated Mathnawi al-Ma’nawi of Jalaladdin al-Rumi Kept in the National Archive of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus”, 14th International Congress of Turkish Art, Proceedings, Paris, College de France Paris, ed. By Frederic Hitzel, Paris: College de France pp. 475-481 137 For detials and importance of this manuscript see: Netice Yıldız & Banu Mahir (2011). “An Example of an Archetype Format of the Qur’ān Design in the Early 14th Century”. Der Islam – Zeitschriftfür Geschichte und Kultur

271


NETICE YILDIZ

The Qurʾān-ı Kerim (Mev. T. 134) bearing high artistic character with its calligraphy as well as illuminations was part of the collection of the Turkish Ethnographic Museum (Mawlawī Tekkē) (Mev.T. 134) although originally it had been a pious foundation laid for Ayia Sofia Mosque in 1127 H. (1715). Nowadays it is located in the Cyprus Turkish National Archive in Kyrenia for security reasons. This manuscript bears resemblance with the style of illumination of the widely known manuscripts of Qurʾān copies attributed to Hafız Osman written and illuminated during the reign of Sultan Süleyman II.138 The colophon of the manuscript gives information that it was prepared by el-Fakir Halil Vamık, a student of the calligrapher Kamil Ömer Efendi, the chief secretary of Sultan Süleyman II. The inscription in the colophon also bears an acknowledgment that, it was completed in the manuscript workshop of the Sultan's palace by the calligraphers and illuminators and soon after it was proofread and corrected, then it was presented to Sultan Süleyman II (1687-1691), and was registered among his waqfs bequeathed to Ayia Sofia Mosque in Nicosia in 1127 H. (1715)139 presumably by Sultan Ahmed III. A Qurʾān manuscript (Mev. T.85/1/[3]), dated H. 717 (1317 AD) was one of the important bequeaths to the Mosque of Ömeriye140 by a certain Muharrem pasha, the sweeper and candle burner of the mosque, presumably a dervish or a Sufi, in H. 1019 (1610-11 des Islamischen Orients, 2010/1, Vol. 86, Issue, 1, pp.157-184. 138 See Ekmeleddin İhsanoğlu (ed.)(1992). İslam Kültür Mirasında Hat San’atı, IRCICA, İstanbul, p. 73. 139 For a detailed description and picture of this manuscript see Yıldız (2005). pp. 534-536, 541. 140 Ömeriye Camiʾī (Turkish name; also locally called Mosque of Ömergé and Hazret-i Ömer Camiʾī according to the deed of pious foundation in this manuscript). This is one of the waqf (pious foundation) monuments registered in the awqāf of Lālā Mustafa Pasha (d.1580). It is located in the southern part of the divided city Nicosia which is under the control of Cyprus Republic. The mosque is also called as Cami’i Cedid (New Mosque) in the 16th century documents. It was rebuilt on the ruins of St. Augustinian Church, which was part of a monastery.

272


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

AD).141 The manuscript, originally a pious foundation dedicated to Ömeriye Mosque in Nicosia, designed and illuminated in a free manner. This manuscript donated to the mosque and currently in the collection of Cyprus Turkish National Archive in Kyrenia is a unique piece of art in terms of calligraphy and organisation into seven parts, a tradition coming from the era of Prophet Mohammad and his circle, mainly Khalif Othman. The waqfiyya record in the manuscript is interesting to show the condition of the waqf which is as follows: “This certain holy book had been bequeathed as a waqf to the holy mosque dedicated to Hazret-i Omar (Caliph Omar), let the mercy of the God be upon him, by Muḥarrem Pasha, who is in the service of the mosque as an apprentice and in charge of sweeping the floors and burning the oil lamps, and it was located in the māḥfil-i shērif so that it could be recited there. With his bequeath he laid out the condition of his waqf that it would be safely secured in the māḥfil-i shērif of the mosque and not to be taken out of the holy mosque, amen. Let the person, who will dare to take it out of the mosque, be damned with curses in both universes. Also, let someone recite the sūras of Ţā Hā142 and Yā -Sīn during the first day of Receb month in every five years for the soul of the donor. On the year one thousand nineteen (1019/1610-11). May the prayers Fātiḥa go to the soul of the donor.”143

Another illuminated manuscript (Mev.T. 136) dated 1197 H. (1783) which was originally a waqf to Hala Sultan Tekkē also include the waqf record explaining the condition of laying this pious foundation: the sûra 141 Yıldız & Mahir (2011). p. 172. 142 This is the 20th sūrah of the Qurʾān which mentions about the conversion of Omar ibn al-Khattāb (c. 586/590 –644) (also Umar ibn alKhattāb), who afterwards became Caliph Omar. It is likely that the donor selected this sūra since the manuscript is bequeathed to the Ömeriye Mosque. 143 Yıldız & Mahir (2011). p. 172.

273


NETICE YILDIZ

al-fatiha was to be recited in the holy and venerated tomb of her ladyship Hala Sultan Efendi in remembrance of the soul of Esseyid Mehmed Muhsin, the deceased brother of Karpas mütevelli buried in Kaleburnu, and of his mother and grandfathers. The waqf was registered on 7 Muharrem 1299 (29 November 1881). There is a note added in the Qurʾān stating that it was inscribed by Seyit Mehmet Ali Hilmi, the student of Seyyit Mahmud Zühtü.144 All manuscripts stored in these collections and elsewhere until the mid-1990s have been transferred to the Cyprus Turkish National Archive in Kyrenia for security reasons. Although it is regrettable to encounter with empty bookcases in the library of Sultan Mahmud II, they are more secure in the newly constructed building within the premises of the Cyprus Turkish National Archive. This new manuscript library is designed in Islamic style with a portico covered with a cupola at the entrance. The decision to remove the collection was taken after the publication of the large union catalogue of the Islamic manuscripts in Cyprus. This catalogue,145 published by IRCICA (Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture), is a great contribution for the documentation of these manuscripts although some important manuscripts, mainly the illuminated ones which are lavishly decorated and bearing artistic value, such as the above mentioned Qurʾān of Lala Mustafa Pasha, are not recorded in this catalogue.146 The manuscripts that have been entered into the catalogue of Islamic manuscripts in Cyprus are not allreligious books. There were many books related to astronomy, ethics, chronicles, logic, philosophy, literature and linguistics and a great majority of them are in Arabic and Persian. This gives the idea that the students and the teachers were 144 For a detailed description and picture of this manuscript see Yıldız (2005). pp. 536-537, 542. 145 Şeşen et al (1995). Kıbrıs İslami Yazmalar Kataloğu, İstanbul: ISAR, 1995. 146 A project for the publication of a catalogue of the illuminated manuscripts in Cyprus collections is due to be completed by the end of 2017 by Netice Yıldız and Banu Mahir.

274


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

studying different sciences in the madrasas and were skilled in Arabic and Persian languages. Some astrolabes in the Turkish Ethnographic Museum also confirm this. Islamic Scholars in Cyprus It could be assumed that, as soon as the Ottoman administration was established in Cyprus, an effort was made to increase the population of the island by putting into practice an efficient settlement policy from Anatolian districts such as Karaman, Rum and Zulkadiriye. With imperial orders which defined the characteristics of the people to be encouraged to settle to the island, certain craftsmen and artisans were required mainly pabuçcu (shoemakers), başmakcı (makers of coarse shoes), derzi (tailors), takyeci (hatmakers), kemhacı (weavers), mutaf (spinners of goat hair), hallaç (wool-carders), kazzaz (silk manufacturers), aşçı (cooks), başcı (cooks of sheep's head), mumcu (candlemakers), semerci (packsaddle makers), demirci (blacksmiths), dülger (carpenters), taşcı (stonemasons), kuyumcu (goldsmiths or silversmiths), kazancı (coppersmiths) etc.147 Educated people were also appeared in the list of people enforced to migrate to the island. Whenever such cases occurred, the governor somehow was informed about their skills so as they would have a special treatment and have more privileges since people with religious or intellectual background are considered as respectable citizens. One such case was an ʿimām so called Mustafa, the son of Mehmed, from the quarter of Mosque in Seydishehir, who had the merits in various sciences.148 The Ottoman army that conquered Cyprus already had some intellectual men who would be appointed to important positions in Cyprus after the take-over. Ekmel Efendi was the müderris of the army149 and then also he 147 Jennings (1993). p. 219. 148 Mehmed Akif Erdoğru (2008). Kıbrıs'ta Osmanlılar, Lefkoşa-Kıbrıs: Galeri Kültür Yayınları, p. 41. 149 BOA, Divan-ı H mayun Ruus Kalem,i Defter No: 221, Özel Sayı: no: 14A, fol. 76, Date: Rebi lahir 978 (Eyl l 1570).

275


NETICE YILDIZ

was appointed as the first qadi of Lefkoşa.150 Mawlana Nȗrullāh was the müftü and müderris in the early years of the Ottoman rule.151 The müderris of the Great madrasa or other educational awqaf of the Sultans was usually the chief müderris of the island. A berat dated 9 L 1119/ 16 July 1690 is an order for the appointment of the Shaikh in charge of Aziz Efendi Tekkē,152 the foundation of the Sultan, as the müderris of Cyprus.153 The teachers appointed to these madrasas, in particular to the main madrasa of the Sultan and Mawlawī Tekkē (dervish lodge), seemed to be rather intellectual people. Documents show that some of these were poets. Among the most notables were the shaikh of Mawlawīhanē in Lefkosha at various dates such as Arif Dede who was also a poet, (d. H. 1138 /1725-26),154 Nevalizade Danish Ali Dede (d. H. 1095/1679-80), Muhammed B. Abdullah B. İbrahim (d. H.1246 /1830-31),155 and Handi Dede who was also a poet and he had a divan.156 Arif Dede also is the author of a chronicle of Cyprus, a copy of which is in the Topkapı Palace Library.157 The most famous of these scholars was Hilmi Efendi. He was the müftü and müderris of the island. He was also appointed as the director of the Library of Sultan II. The verses praising Sultan II written on the walls of the library was so much adored by the Sultan so that he was invited to the Palace in İstanbul and awarded 150 BOA, M himme No: 8 p. 1454 s. 128, Date: 11 R.978 (12 September 1570). 151 BOA, M himme No: 30, No: 21, p.10, Date: 23 M. 985 (12 April 1577). 152 Shaikh Aziz Efendi was the army shaikh of Selim II and he also took part in the conquest of Cyprus. He was buried in this tekkē on southern part of Selimiye Mosque after his name and this was registered in the name of the Sultan. BOA, Cevdet – Evkaf I, No: 7114, Dated: N. 1224/1809-10. 153 BOA, Cevdet – Maarif, No: 5826. 154 Süreyya (1996). Vol. 1 (A-At) p. 310. In fact, Süreyya cites Arif Dede who was the Shaikh of Mawlawihane in Istanbul (died in 1724/25), while another one is Arif Efendi who was the son of Mustafa Dede (Siyahi) and served in the Mawlawihane in Egypt and then as the Shaikh of the Mawlawihane in Lefkosha and died in 1725/26. 155 Şeşen et al. (1995). p. xxx. 156 Süreyya (1996). Vol. 2, p. 605. The literary works and divan of Handi Dede are published in a book by Harid Fedai. 157 Topkapı Palace Library, Ms. No: 696, YY.319. This manuscript is transcribed and published by Harid Fedai.

276


CHARITY UNDERTAKINGS FOR THE FORMATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS IN OTTOMAN CYPRUS

with the title of Malik-uś-Śuarā.158 The deeds of laying the book as pious foundation inscribed in the manuscripts also give the hint of some important scholars or religious authorities who worked in Cyprus such as El-Seyd el-Shaikh el-hac Feyzullah Dede (H. 1247/1831-32) (p. 81: M: 248/2; el hac Ahmed Hulusi Efendi el-müftü 1267/1850-51) p. 72: 110: M: 1885). One of the manuscripts entitled as Kanunname was copied by a scriber named as Ali b. Muhammed from Limassol (Cyprus) in H. 1182 (A.D. 1768/9). Another manuscript in British Library London (Add. 5887) was the copy inscribed by Bin Ali ibn-i elhac Hamza-el-Tokad Shaikh el-Kıbrıs from Mesaoria region in H. 1172-1174 (1757-1760 A.D.).159 Osman Efendi (Osman-ı Zinnûreyn Efendi) is another scholar who has studied astrology and wrote two books in mid-19th century about the measurement of altitudes according to the latitude of Cyprus. The manuscript of one of his work entitled as İrtifa Risalesi is nowadays is located in the CTNARC (A. 1081) while another one “El-Eseriye fi Rub’ el Mukantarãt” is in Istanbul University Manuscript Library (TY No: 6594).160 Some of these intellectual men were also skilled in the art of calligraphy. Mehmet Shemsi, the Shaikh of Hala Sultan Tekkē, and Shaikh Feyzullah from Mawlawī Tekkē who carved a beautiful tuğra on the Girne Kapısı (Kyrenia Gate) of the city walls in Lefkoşa (Nicosia) as well as several other works are two well-known examples. A document refers to Ahmet Sh kr, calligrapher, who worked in the Rushdiye School as the teacher of hüsn-i hat, master of calligraphy, for thirty-two years.161 158 Beria Remzi Özoran (1971). “Kıbrıs’ta Türk Kültürü: Tanzimat Devrinde”, Milletlerarası Kıbrıs Tetkikleri Kongresi (1. 14-19 Nisan 1969, Lefkose, Türk Heyeti Tebligleri, Ankara Türk Kültürünü Araştırma Enstitüsü, p.162; Süreyya (1996). Vol: 2, p.672. 159 Charles Rieu (1888). Catalogue of the Turkish Manuscripts in the British Museum, London, p. 5. 160 Şeşen et al. (1995). p. xxxi 161 BOA, Bab-ı Ali Evrak Odası, Mümtaze Kalemi, Kıbrıs ve Bosna Kataloğu, 1310-1337, Dosya No: 2, Sıra No: 31, Tarih 1314.3.11 Adet: 6.

277


NETICE YILDIZ

Final Remarks In this article, the author attempted to draw a general picture of the educational institutions that runs on a system completely depending on the waqf system which is an organisation at institutional level based on charity foundations set up by the Sultans and their families, high rank officials as well as wealthy and generous citizens in Ottoman Cyprus. The waqf institution is based on a simple principal theory that all movable or immovable possessions are laid as a pious charitable foundation that would endure for the happiness and welfare of the citizens.162 It is crucial that a more detailed study on the madrasa buildings and their activities is needed so as to understand fully their contribution to the socio-economic life of the island. Except the book by Hasan Behçet on the history of education, which gives the details about the type of schools particularly in the 19th century, there is little information derived until today about the educational buildings although the budget books of the waqfiyyas, like Ayia Sofia waqf, gives reference to the teachers, calligraphers etc. As the Prophet Mohammad pronounced, “When a person dies, his achievements expires, except with regard to three things on-going charity (sadaqa jariya) or knowledge from which people benefit or a son who prays for him”,163 I do have an anticipation that this article may have its fulfilment in shedding some light for the past experiences gone through in the path of providing free education for young people and scholars merely through the contributions of waqf means established by the benevolent people through their deep belief in their religion, still being a model to many successful private educational institutions.

162 Ömer Hilmi Efendi (2003). Ahkamü’l-Evkaf (Vakıf Hükümleri) Edited by Habib Derzinevesi & Mustafa Kemal Kasapoğlu, Lefkoşa: Rüstem Kitabevi. 163 Singer (2008). p. 90.

278


Self-government and social control in the Ghetto of Rome in the modern era Micol Ferrara

History of a boundary With the papal bull Cum nimis absurdum of July 14, 1555, Paul IV Carafa started the house arrest of Jews in the Ghetto, they were living distributed in different areas of the city, as evidenced by the census of 1526-271. Figure 1 Distribution of the Jews in the districts of Rome, each dot represents ten people or ten fractions exceeding five.

1 A. Esposito, Un’altra Roma. Minoranze nazionali e comunità ebraiche tra medioevo e Rinascimento, in, Popolazione e società a Roma dal medioevo all’età contemporanea, il Calamo, Roma, 1995; F. Gregorovius, Storia della citta di Roma nel Medioevo: illustrata nei luoghi, nelle persone, nei monumenti, Einaudi, Torino 1973.

279


MICOL FERRARA

String 1 Jewish presence in the city of Rome at the census of 1526-1527

1

Monti

-

2

Trevi

-

3

Colonna

5

4

Campo Marzio

5

5

Ponte

-

6

Parione

61

7

Regola

363

8

S. Eustachio

-

9

Pigna

-

10

Campitelli

-

11

S. Angelo

1013

12

Ripa

148

13

Trastevere

14

14

Borgo

-

Unlocated

153

Source: Italo Insolera

From the data collected during the expansion of the Jewish community of Rome, that had not yet been segregated in the Ghetto, we note that 62.6% of the population already resided in S. Angelo; another

280


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

large part lived in the Regola District (363 individuals surveyed) followed by the Ripa district (148), Parione (61), whereas the original community in Trastevere had only a small presence (14 individuals). Only a few privileged elite lived within the districts of Campo Marzio Colonna, where there were only 5 units in each one. During this time the Roman Jews were 3.2% of the city population (1.762 of 55.000). In every place of Catholicism, the Bull stipulated permanent isolation of the Jews: “all Jews should live in one area, or, if this is not possible, in two or three or however many are needed, and that these areas are to be contiguous and separated from the homes of Christians. These districts that have been established by Us and Our Magistrates in other cities, will have only one entrance and thus only one exit.2” The boundaries of these areas within the context of limited areas of urban spaces were built following the Venetian example and called ghettos3. In the case of Rome, it is evident how the area allocated for the Ghetto with a few boundary adjustments, coincided with the environment in which the Jews had already spontaneously converged, a free choice linked to that need of clinging to each other which is a typical attitude of minorities who are forced to deal with an environment perceived as hostile, with the mutual support of individuals. Divided into 14 points, Paul IV’s Bull apart from the establishment of the Ghetto included several other provisions, that in order of topic regulated the various aspects of the daily life of the community: the prohibition of owning real estate with the consequent obligation to sell their property, the obligation to wear a yellow badge, etc. In essence, the provision intended to abolish all 2 A. Milano, Storia degli ebrei in Italia, Einaudi, Torino 1992, p. 247. 3 J. Sermoneta, Sull’origine della parola Ghetto, Studi sull’ebraismo italiano: in memoria di Cecil Roth in Elio Toaff (ed.), Roma 1974, pp. 187-201.

281


MICOL FERRARA

prior privileges granted to the Jews. The ensuing new situation abruptly interrupted the modus vivendi that had long characterized the relationship between the Church of Rome and the Jewish Community: “however there was the suspicion that the plan for the Ghetto might have been prepared for some time before. In fact, a map designed at the beginning of the sixteenth century by the Vatican consultant Bartolomeo de’Rocchi, now kept in the Prints Section of the Uffizi Gallery, designed the Ghetto area, prior to the Bull, with three alternative routes, as well as with many tips on the area to be assigned for the Ghetto.4” Figure 2 Plan of Bartholomew De Rocchi for the ghetto of Rome, about 1555, Florence, Uffizi Gallery

4

282

S. Fornari, La Roma del Ghetto, Palombi Editore, Roma 1984, p. 23.


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

As attested by the Chamber warrants of 1555, papal architect Salustio Peruzzi 200 ecus on 9th October: “de pecunijs maleficiorum pro conficienda factory Clausuræ habitationum hebreorum.5” The provisions of the Papal Bull of 1555 were only partially applied with no definite information regarding the number of gates, which however, seemed to be three instead of the decreed two. These entrances were in Judea Square, the Square of Pescaria and the third on the eastern border towards Ponte Quattro Capi. Figure 3 A. Tempesta, View of Rome, especially of the area of the Ghetto with the first gates circled in red, G.G. De Rossi, 1693

During the sixteenth century the papal decrees alternated between the unyielding application of the Bull of 1555 and the granting of greater freedom mainly related to the way of life, the identification badge, economic and judicial rules. Policies closely related to each pope’s behaviour. Pius IV's Bull of 27th February 1562 Dudum Felicis recordationis6, eased the existing strict requirements by 5 6

Archivio di Stato di Roma (ASR), Mandati camerali, Camerale I, b. 898. Bullarium Romanum, Tav. 4, parte II, Romae 1745, pp. 105-107

283


MICOL FERRARA

contributing to an improvement of the living conditions within the Ghetto. In the same document rules were established to regulate the location of property to the Jews by giving the Camerlengo the task of laying down the criterias A new stiffening occurred under the pontificate of Pius V, which reaffirmed the provisions of the Papal Bull of 15557. With the ascent to the papacy of Sixtus V Peretti, the prohibitions and previous edicts were partially revised. In the Bull Christiana pietas of 22nd October 15868, the Pope stipulated that Jews could: “come and practice throughout the Ecclesiastical State and dwell in the cities, large state castles and lands, with the exception of villas and villages [...] and may freely do all sorts of art “they could thus” have and open the schools and synagogues, where to say and carry out their offices [...] it is lawful and permissible to regain places where they may bury the dead.9” The Jews got several benefits to open new schools, refrain from wearing the identification badge, guidelines for enforced sermons. But the most significant act is contained in the diploma of Camerlengo Enrico Caetani of 15th February 1589 to expand the Ghetto to the bank of the river, annexing the land beyond the via Fiumara. The task to follow the work was entrusted to Domenico Fontana, the new buildings constructed during this period correspond with the opening of two new accesses, near Bernardino Molinaro’s millstone and Monte dei Cenci, and next to the Quattro Capi bridge. This gave the Ghetto a new trapezoidal look within an area of about three acres and a length of 150 meters. So if from a religious point of view, the pope’s concessions could be regarded as being more apparent than 7 C. Benocci, E. Guidoni, Il Ghetto. Atlante Storico delle città Italiane, Roma II, Bondignori, Roma 1993 p.10 8 Bullarium Romanum, t. IV, p. IV, 1581-88, Roma 1747, n. LXIX, p. 265. 9 Ibidem

284


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

real, the expansion of the Ghetto and the strong building momentum that followed – even in the short pontificate of Sixtus V – was undoubtedly a significant intervention. Figure 4 G. B. Falda, Map of Rome, detail of the Ghetto area, 1676, outlining the five gates after Sistine’s intervention.

Obviously, the people’s problems were far from resolved, and the restoration of Clement VIII’s ancient prohibitions further aggravated the already difficult situation. Except for some building work carried out in the first half of the seventeenth century, the structure of the cloister area did not seem to be amended very much during the course of the next century, the cornerstone of the internal structure of the Ghetto continued to be represented by two main streets – the via Rua and the street along the river – and six smaller streets, as evidenced by tales of some travellers who visited the area. In the second half of the eighteenth century the restrictive requirements as evidenced by the Edict on

285


MICOL FERRARA

the Jews in 1775 by Pius VI were re-confirmed. This document that is divided into 44 sections provoked the reaction of many foreign historians and thinkers10. From the report of a French traveller in 1783, we perceive a sense of dismay: “The conditions of the Jews is even more miserable here than it is elsewhere. The question here is: when will the Jews convert to Christianity? But I question: when will Christians be converted to tolerance.11” Several hypotheses were brought forward in this period about a possible transfer of the Ghetto, based on real projects that were never concluded12. On 18th November 1825 among the first acts of the pontificate of Leo XII a decision was issued by the cardinal vicar P. Zurla and the vicegerent G. Della Porta, relating to the expansion of the Ghetto including via della Reginella and part of via della Pescheria, after which the number of entrance to the area from 5 to 8 was also increased13. With the proclamation of the Roman Republic in 1798 measures were brought forward to improve the condition of the Jews, the egalitarian and democratic European motions however were only fully implemented in 1848 with the demolition of the Ghetto gates14. The alternating historical events of the following years from time to time assumed provisions that were more or less restrictive towards the Jews; however the Ghetto gates were no longer closed15. The era of the 10 Archivio Storico del Vicariato di Roma ( ASVR), Atti della segreteria del Tribunale del cardinal Vicario, varie, f. 96. 11 G. Blustein, Storia degli ebrei in Roma dal secolo 140 a. C. fino ad oggi, Maglione e Strini, Roma, 1921 12 Rari e Preziosi. Documenti dell’et moderna e contemporanea dall’archivio del Sant’Uffizio, A. Cifres e M. Pizzo, Gangemi Editore, Roma 2009. 13 M. Caffiero, Botteghe ebraiche e organizzazione rionale a Roma in un censimento del 1827, in Popolazione e societ [ , cit. pp. 799-822 14 M. Caffiero, La Repubblica nella citt del papa. Roma 1798, Donzelli, Roma, 2005. M. Caffiero, La nuova era. Miti e profezie dell'talia in Rivoluzione, Marietti, Genova, 1991 15 F. Bartoccini, Roma nell'Otocento. Il tramonto della città Santa nascita di una capitale, Cappelli, Bologna, 1985

286


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

Ghetto in Rome – the last of the Italian ghettos to be abolished – finally closed only in the late 1870s. Life in the Ghetto Models conforming to those of the country in which Jews resided are highlighted within the internal organizational structures of the Ghetto. Not only institutions of self-government, but also brotherhoods were molded on those existing amongst Christians. The forced proximity of the Jews in the Ghetto was not enough to make it a compact community. Although the Christian rulers expected taxes collectively from the Jews and treated them in general, as if they were “one unit”, each Ghetto housed a heterogeneous mass16. The institutions of the Ghetto – self-government entities, voluntary associations or brotherhoods, Scole and Synagogues – guaranteed economic, religious and social support to the inhabitants that they needed and the opportunity to express themselves in microcommunities based on age, spiritual affinities, ethnic identity, economic class and family loyalty. To meet the daily needs of the community and especially its poorest members or the sick, the leaders of the Ghetto could count on the help of its inhabitants17. So when in 1848 the Roman Jews saw the Ghetto gates open up before them, they could place a plaque above it inspired by a saying (Pirqe Avot), which they held in consideration no less than those proverbs of Solomon “ The centuries-long imprisonment within this enclosure allows us to exit exhausted but not destroyed. 16 M. Caffiero, Storie di ebrei, cristiani e convertiti nella Roma dei Papi, Roma, Viella 2004. M. Caffiero, Gli ebrei italiani dall’età dei Lumi agli anni della Rivoluzione, in Gli ebrei in Italia, Storia d’Italia, Annali XI, vol. I, Enaudi, Torino 1997, pp. 1091-1122. A. Esposito, Gli ebrei a Roma tra ‘400 e ‘500, in «Quaderni Storici» 54, dicembre 1983, il Mulino, Bologna, pp. 815-845. 17 S. Siegmund, La vita nei Ghetti, in Gli ebrei in Italia: dall’alto Medioevo all’età dei ghetti,a cura di C. Vivanti, Storia d’Italia, Annali XI, vol. I, Einaudi, Torino, 1996, pp. 845-892.

287


MICOL FERRARA

Three forces have consistently supported us: The Law (Torah), worship (avodah) and the works of mercy (Ghemilùth Chasadìm18).” It was in fact mosaic teaching and prayer, followed by humble but scrupulous devotion, that saved the modest spiritual people who lived in the Ghetto from breakdown, whilst it was the gestures of sympathy and solidarity they were able to exchange with each other, those who were able to materially make an entity survive that was becoming more precarious from decade to decade. In this sense, it should be noted that ‘”charity work” is something more complex and noble than the mere giving of alms and donations which inevitably comes to mind as soon as we refer to fraternities or more generally to charities. In this sense, it should be noted that ‘”charity work” is something more complex and noble than the mere giving of alms and donations which inevitably comes to mind as soon as we refer to fraternities or more generally to charities19. In this sense “charity work” consists in giving to others with a spirit of brotherly love, giving not just money or material assistance, but also advice, comfort, education, deference as according to need. Thus directly to the poor as to the rich, to the alive as well as the dead, to everyone, with a feeling of love and not compassion: they are manifestations of charity that a smitten brother is entitled to expect from his more fortunate one. Not by chance, in the Hebrew language charity and justice are expressed in a single word: zedaqàh. This necessary clarification, which today may seem obvious, or rather according to the mentality and customs of socially 18 A. Milano, Storia degli ebrei in Italia, Einaudi, Torino, 1992. 19 P. Ferrara, G. Y. Franzone, Fraternalismo e compagnonnage in ambito ebraico. Attivita’ e regole della confraternita, o compagnia, Talmud Torà nella Roma del ghetto alla luce di alcuni documenti dei secoli XII-XIX secolo, con particolare riferimento al periodo 1814 – 1870. Talmud Torà e Ghemiluth Chasadim: premesse storiche e attività agli inizi dell’età contemporanea. Centro di Ricerca, Roma, 2011, pp. 33 – 85.

288


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

more advanced populations, a few centuries ago was an absolutely precursor. To get to the heart of the social situation of the Ghetto of Rome in the 700s it is useful to remember that in this era, approximately 40 associations were active for an estimated population between 5-6000 souls. It is in the eighteenth century (according to Attilio Milano, a wellknown scholar of the Roman Jewish community) that the number and activities of the brotherhoods expanded mostly, and this is not because the spirit of solidarity was more developed in the 700s than before, but because at the end of the seventeenth century and in the course of the next century, the increasing depressed conditions of the Ghetto of Rome caused a major incentive to create new first aid entities and the strengthening of existing ones. Conversely, this situation became more eased with the progression of the nineteenth century,. In 1857 the University created a company that was called Shomer Emunim (Keeper of the faith), whose task was to collect the remnants of companies that were in a state of neglect and hand them over to the poor. Later, that is between 1882 and 1885, instead of eliminating only atrophied charities, the University saw it fit to completely readjust them all. The main five which had been known until then as leading companies were kept, these were: Talmud Torah (Study of the Law) Ghemilùt Chasadim (Charity and death) Ozer Dallim (Help the poor) Moshav Zeqenìm (Hospice of the old) Shomer Emunim (Keeper of the Faith) Instead the other “secondary companies” were placed under the supervision of the Deputation of Charity. Each of these companies generally relied on one of five schools or synagogues in the Ghetto of Rome, often 289


MICOL FERRARA

just because the majority of its members belonged to that particular Scola. Figura 5. Cinque Scole Building

This could have lead to a duplication of the acts of charity exercised by various companies relying on a different Scola. “that the two companies could nevertheless offer dozens of shoes or shirts every year was not worth more than two drops of water in the great desert of the misery of the ghetto.20” Given the impossibility of entering into the merits of the function of each of these brotherhoods, (on which the virtual exhibition will dedicate three sections) it is useful to clarify that when they were being founded. They simultaneously intended to serve three purposes: • have frequent meetings with members for the 20

290

A. Milano, Storia degli ebrei in Italia, cit. p. 114


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

purpose of religious edification, both through prayer and college education • To exercise certain acts of charity (charity) • Keep certain constraints of solidarity amongst members of both happy and sad circumstances (mutual support) They were thus entities that carried out a complex of functions, both for the benefit of who was kept out and who was inside. It is clear that even though the brotherhoods of the Ghetto of Rome arose according to this same mold, some with the passage of time, they developed mostly in one direction and others in a different one. The assistance that the various “charities” could offer every poor person was not as important from the economic point of view as from the social one. To borrow the words of Attilio Milano: “If you consider that, in the masses of the people of the Roman Ghetto, one third was lacking in everything whereas the other two thirds had little money to spare, it is amazing how this long drawn situation has not ended up collapsing the whole Roman Ghetto. Well, it was exactly the brotherhoods who played a key role in this survival. It is true that they could handle a sum of just over 8,000 ecus a year, but we must not forget that behind this small sum of money, there was a large group of men who were ready to offer their help and comfort them where it was needed most.21” The compulsory crowding of the Jews in the Ghetto was a blow to the integrity and independence of the traditional middle or upper class family, conceived as a domestic unit, as the available private spaces were reduced drastically. Once the home was the site of many activities and served a number of functions, religious ceremonies were celebrated in a particular room, children and young people were educated by tutors 21 Ibidem

291


MICOL FERRARA

and sometimes the house itself housed a college within its walls. There was not only space in large kitchens to cook food but also for various household chores, such as spinning, which kept women and girls busy during the day. The richer families ensured a kind of social assistance by giving employment to poorer relatives or to widows and unmarried adults, as domestic servants or tutors. As the community provided education, health and other services to the poorer people in the house – often consisting of a single room or two – the Ghetto became a space that was only for eating, sleeping and raising young children. New “affinity” ties were created that substituted the family in its primary function of emotional and financial support. Thus the Ghetto can be divided into two areas, the first consisting of piazzetta del Mercatello, piazza delle Scuole and via Rua being the residence of the wealthier population, and the Piazze della Fontanella and dei Quattro Capi which was the home of the less well-off citizens. There were several small streets and alleys between these two major blocks. The urban situation of this part of the city within the walls of the Ghetto is extremely interesting, and far from being static as it has long been believed: “In the 330 years of its existence, the Ghetto's original structure did not substantially ; only the number of gates varied, from two to five and then up to eight.22 In fact, as the Jews were not allowed to own real estate since the houses were owned by Christians, through Jus gazagà they assumed the right of tenancy that could be handed down from father to son. Under these constraints it may be thought that one or the other would have little interest in doing restoration work on the old buildings or even less to create new ones. Only a few written documents, relating to the families 22

292

Ivi 191


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

of famous bankers, Toscano and Viterbo regarding real estate covenants, describe the dense network of interests, contracts and transactions between the Christian owners and their tenants. It is therefore highly probable that the centuries-old and alternating historical events in the neighbourhood and the difficult conditions of the Jewish community within a such a cramped space, led to several interventions in the area, such as creating an internal mesh of routes and communications – opening doorways, creating covered paths, moving partitions – responding not only to the individual but also collective needs of life. Scole were connected with a continuous path that allowed movement from every point of the neighbourhood without having to go onto the streets. This is mainly due to the frequent flooding of the Tiber. In fact, “On account of the floods it was normal practice to build wooden bridges on the upper floors of the houses, across the street from house to house, allowing the inhabitants to move about at will, and because many houses are adjoined to those near the bridge, doorways were sometimes opened in dividing walls.23” The same crowding index that is recorded in the cloister is a clear indication of the fact that the internal situation of the space could not be modified by time, the indiscriminate growth of buildings is one of the most obvious data, in the absence of precise estimates on the population, it is only from this analysis of town-planning that the most interesting ideas can be drawn. Three centuries of community life forced into a restricted area must have deeply affected the internal tissue, particularly in housing, that was inevitably moulded by the needs of communal life. The lack of space was a constant problem for the community whose partial remedy was the vertical development of the buildings. David Di Segnis’ house in 23 Archivio Storico della Comunità Ebraica di Roma (ASCER), b. Ampliamento del Ghetto, 1847.

293


MICOL FERRARA

Figure 7 is evidence of this, it was built seven floors high on the corner between via Rua and the Piazza Judea with its main entrance in the Ghetto, and based on this survey it can be said that this was not an exception. The reconstruction of the building is part of a wider descriptive project of the Ghetto, in fact, thanks to the information contained in the Pio Gregorian properties land registry, it has been possible to identify the various floors of every single house and shop within the cloister. The ensuing cartographic results depict a direct relationship between a strictly social aspect and its architectural implication. Figure 6. David Di Segnis’ house

294


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

Conclusion After briefly retracing its historical origins, we cannot help but consider how the Jewish Quarter constituted a complex system of great architectural interest. Its urban fabric has specific characteristics that indicate its inhabitants’ need for new housing, with buildings that exploited every available space to overcome “constraining forces” related primarily to life in an extremely reduced environment and secondly, even if only in appearance, to obvious limitations that were imposed on them by law for the construction of new buildings. In the absence of this opportunity, they had no other option but to add further floors on existing buildings. The mass segregation, urbanization and concentration of the Jews were the catalyst that led to the development of new associations and particular social areas. This network of support slowly became institutionalized; synagogues with a predetermined and essentially hereditary participation, paternalistic selfgovernment, religious and social brotherhoods. What really determined the true community of the Ghetto was the proliferation of entwined identities and subcommunities, which transformed what the state had created solely as a legal and material construction within a confined space in a viable community.

Bibliography F. Bartoccini, Roma nell’Ottocento. Il tramonto della “Città Santa” nascita di una capitale, Cappelli, Bologna, 1985 G. Blustein, Storia degli ebrei in Roma dal secolo 140 a. C. fino ad oggi, Maglione e Strini, Roma, 1921 A. Berliner, Storia degli ebrei di Roma, Rusconi, Milano 1992 295


MICOL FERRARA

M. Caffiero, Storia degli ebrei nell’Italia moderna. Dal Rinascimento alla Restaurazione, Roma, Carocci, 2014. M. Caffiero, Storie di ebrei, cristiani e convertiti nella Roma dei Papi, Roma, Viella 2004 M. Caffiero, Gli ebrei italiani dall’età dei Lumi agli anni della Rivoluzione, in Gli ebrei in Italia, Storia d’Italia, Annali XI, vol. I, Enaudi, Torino 1997 M. Caffiero, La Repubblica nella città del papa. Roma 1798, Donzelli, Roma, 2005 M. Caffiero, La nuova era. Miti e profezie dell’Italia in Rivoluzione, Marietti, Genova, 1991 R. Calimani, Storia del Ghetto di Venezia, Mondadori, Milano 2005 D. Calabi, La città degli ebrei. Il Ghetto di Venezia: architettura e urbanistica, Marsilio, Venezia 1996. D. Calabi, Les quartieres juifs en Italie entre XV et XVII siècle. Quelques hypothèses de travail, in «Annales : Historie, Sciences Sociales», n. 4 Juillet-Août, 1997 pp. 685-796 F. Cancellieri, Il mercato il lago dell’acqua vergine ed il palazzo panfiliano nel Circo Agonale detto volgarmente Piazza Navona, Francesco Bourlire, Roma 1811 A. Esposito, Gli ebrei a Roma tra ‘400 e ‘500, in «Quaderni Storici» 54, dicembre 1983, il Mulino, Bologna A. Esposito, Un’altra Roma. Minoranze nazionali e comunità ebraiche tra medioevo e Rinascimento, il Calamo, Roma, 1995 M. Ferrara, Dentro e fuori dal ghetto. I luoghi della presenza ebraica a Roma XVI – XIX secolo. Mondadori Università, Milano, 2015 M. Ferrara, Ebrei e legislazione pontificia in età moderna: le fonti dell’Archivio Storico del Vicariato di Roma, in «Archivi e Cultura», vol. XLII, 2010 p. 75-92 M. Ferrara, La struttura edilizia del “serraglio” degli ebrei romani XVIII-XIX secolo, in Gli ebrei e la città. Scambi e conflitti (a cura di) Marina Caffiero, in Roma Moderna e Contemporanea, Roma, vol. XIX, 2011, p. 83-102 A. Foa, Gli Ebrei in Europa: dalla peste nera 296


SELF-GOVERNMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN THE GHETTO OF ROME IN THE MODERN ERA

all’emancipazione, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2004 S. Fornari, La Roma del Ghetto, Palombi Editore, Roma 1984 F. Gregorovius, Storia della citta di Roma nel Medioevo: illustrata nei luoghi, nelle persone, nei monumenti, Einaudi, Torino 1973 S. Gremoli, C. Procaccia, Il Catasto urbano PioGregoriano, in I territori di Roma: storie, popolazioni, geografiae, (a cura di) R. Morelli, E. Sonnino, C.M. Travaglini, Roma 2002, pp.152-155. F. La Cecla, Perdersi: l’uomo senza ambiente, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2000 M. Luzzati, Il Ghetto ebraico storia di un popolo rinchiuso, Giunti, Firenze, 1987 A. Milano, Storia degli ebrei in Italia, Einaudi, Torino 1992 S. Siegmund, La vita nei Ghetti, in Gli ebrei in Italia: dall’alto Medioevo all’età dei ghetti,a cura di C. Vivanti, Storia d’Italia, Annali XI, vol. I, Einaudi, Torino, 1996, pp. 845-892. J. Sermoneta, Sull’origine della parola Ghetto, Studi sull’ebraismo italiano: in memoria di Cecil Roth in Elio Toaff (ed.), Roma 1974 K. Stow, Il ghetto di Roma nel Cinquecento. Storia di un’acculturazione, Viella, Roma, 2014.

297


‘Community Driven Philanthropy’. Jewish Voluntary Associations and Social Service Institutions in Eretz-Israel 1880s-1948 Paula Kabalo

The different values and methods of communal giving for “the benefit of the public good” are mentioned in Jewry’s most ancient texts. Some are phrased as binding religious rules, while others have gradually become familiar and widespread social patterns among Jewish communities worldwide.1 The term ‘philanthropy’, however, has never been translated into Hebrew. Since the inception of modernity and upon the awakening of the Jewish national movement, ‘philanthropy’ carried a negative connotation among the movement’s leaders due to its association with Jewish diasporic ‘weakness’, which they believed led to an economic and political dependency on ‘others’.2 The new national movement they championed was an attempt at eliminating such dependencies. Ben-Gurion, for instance, directly linked philanthropy with other characteristics of Jewish behavior that he believed led to the disintegration of the Jewish people, such as assimilation and dispersion. In 1941, as head of the Jewish Agency, he openly objected philanthropy “… as a system, as an attempt to solve the Jewish problem”.3 1 Kabalo, ‘Philanthropy and Religion – Judaism’, Entry, International Encyclopedia of Civil Society, NY: Springer, 2010: 444 2 A famous article reflective of this approach was written by the prominent Zionist Philosopher – Ahad Ha’Am (Asher Zvi Hirsch Ginsberg) ‘The Yishuv and its Patrons [Ha-Yishuv Ve-Epitropsav]’ Ha’Shiloach 9:2-6,1902. 3 DBG, Minutes from JA meeting in Jerusalem, May 16th 1941, BG

299


PAULA KABALO

On another occasion, he was even more radical: “… Zionism should be engaged in ideological and political warfare against false, illusive, damaging solutions such as: assimilation, philanthropy, immigration (i.e further dispersion), and territorial aspirations outside Eretz Israel”.4 This perspective among Zionism’s leaders partly explains why Israeli historiography tends to ignore or underestimate a broad sphere of philanthropic activity, which Robert Payton famously defines as “voluntary action for the public good”.5 If we accept Payton’s definition while discussing Jewish philanthropic activity in Eretz Israel (Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine) from the late 19th century onwards, ‘philanthropy’ is actually revealed as a central sphere of action present to every Jewish subcommunity in the country during the years in question. My contention therefore, is that philanthropy ought to be considered a central force, tool, or practice in the evolution of the self-governing Jewish community in Eretz Israel, i.e. the yishuv, on the road to sovereignty – and as such, a dominant factor in the establishment of the Israeli State. Furthermore, I believe that the institutional structures developed by the Jewish community in Eretz Israel can be linked to preceding communal organizational patterns that have shaped the nature of modern Jewish philanthropy as a whole. Central authorities in Europe and in many Mediterranean countries under Ottoman rule, gradually dismissed pre-modern Jewish community institutions during the mid-18th century and late 19th century; but this did not create the narrow organizational structure of a religious enclave one might expect. archives (BGA), JA Protocol Section 4 DBG, Minutes from JA meeting March 23, 1941, BGA, JA Protocol Section 5 Robert Payton (1988). Philanthropy: Voluntary Action for the Public Good. London.

300


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

Bartal demonstrates that alongside the “communities of ritual” recognized by Europe and North Africa’s central authorities, Jews developed alternative organizational patterns that substituted traditional community structures. He specifically notes the process by which voluntary organizations within the Jewish autonomy in Eastern Europe gradually assumed the roles of the Kahal (the local governing body), and one of the voluntary networks he mentions are the ‘societies’ (havarot) that endured after its abolishment. The societies did not require governmental recognition, as their source of power was the link they offered between religious faith and social organization. They fulfilled significant roles within the community such as regulation, management of communal funds, professional unions, and most importantly, maintaining traditional collective attributes despite the challenges of modernity. Bartal also mentions the simultaneous establishment of modernized, enlightened societies, who functioned as social networks within Jewish communities as well, but saw themselves as an improved version of traditional social organization. It appears that Jewish voluntary organizations in Eastern Europe, however, maintained the pre-modern link between religion, ethnic identity, and class structure.6 This study will seek to follow Bartal’s footsteps and track the development of these communal trends among Eretz Israel’s immigrant societies during the late 19th century and mid-20th century. One of this work’s central precepts is that the philanthropic models of communitybased Jewish organizations, whether formally recognized or not, were foundational to those that evolved among Jewish communities in Eretz Israel under Ottoman and British rule. These communal structures were in a sense ‘imported’ by the new comers and adapted to the 6 Israel Bartal (2004). ‘Jewish Autonomy in the modern period: Changing Contours’. In: Bartal (ed). Kehal Israel: Jewish self rule through the Ages. Vol.3 The Modern Period. Jerusalem. pp. 11-12 (Hebrew) (hereafter: Bartal, 2004)

301


PAULA KABALO

circumstances of their new environment. In reference to this particular type of associational pattern I will use the term ‘community driven philanthropy’, which not only describes the nature of the institutions and organizations founded by the new comers, but also suggests the preservation of traditional community structures within their newly established frameworks, articulated in part by the internal vocabulary they used. The Jewish community in Eretz Israel developed its institutional patterns against the turbulence of shifting authorities and a reality that fused traditional and modern modes of identity. During the years in question, it also experienced a demographic revolution (from approximately 35,000 inhabitants in 1880 to 600,000 on the eve of the statehood), which was considerably supported by philanthropic institutions. The following study will work to illuminate the nature and role of philanthropic activity within the Jewish community in Eretz Israel in context of these developments. ‘Community Driven Philanthropy’ – Frameworks and Terminology “The big factories that provided livelihood for the Jewish residents of Jerusalem were the charities and the kollelim”7. These are the words of Yehuda Aharon Segal Weiss, whose memoir portrays life in Jerusalem under Ottoman rule. His impression regarding the centrality of communal charities is indeed reinforced by the almanacs and reports of various contemporaries.8 The kollel was a well-known institution that oversaw all aspects of Jewish-Orthodox communal life during the late 19th century. Reminiscent of the pre-modern 7 Segal-Weiss, Yuda-Aharon. (1949). At Your Gates Jerusalem, Memories and Records. Jerusalem. P. 198 [Hebrew] (Hereafter: Segal-Weiss, 1949) 8 Eretz Israel’s Practical and Literary Almanac. (1909). Abraham Moses Luncz (ed). Jerusalem. (Hereafter: Luncz, Almanac)

302


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

community structures typical to Jewish diaspora, the kollel was a structured social framework based on immigrants’ ethnic orientation, and provided members with welfare, education, healthcare, and religious services. Many kollelim (pl.) offered overnight guest accommodations, burial services, and legal defense, as well as housing for members who were struggling economically.9 In 1866, several kollelim founded an umbrella organization called ‘The Committee of All Kollelim’ (Va’ad Kol Ha’kolelim) or ‘The General Committee’, which coordinated between the different social sub-groups and advocated on their behalf vis a vis Ottoman authorities. It also engaged in various initiatives such as establishing new Jewish neighborhoods and supporting Orthodox institutions along with individual kollelim.10 Many additional membership frameworks or ‘societies’ were established for young Orthodox men who sought an independent voice within their communities. These cultivated a committed support network, and their regulations advanced an almost familial level of social obligation among members.11 A notable example was the Achva (‘the brotherhood’) society, which was established in Jerusalem and expanded to Jaffa and other locations by establishing residential neighborhoods for its members, one of its most successful endeavors.12 Societies also worked to promote modern and national Jewish culture. One example is Eliezer BenYehuda’s revival of the Hebrew language, which has 9 Mordechai Eliav. (1978). Eretz Israel and its Yishuv in the 19th Century, 1777-1917. Jerusalem: 131 [Hebrew] (hereafter: Eliav, 1978);Weiss-Segal 1949: 63 ; Nahum Karlinsky. (1999). ‘The Hasidic Community of Safed During the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century as Immigrant Society’. In: Assaf, David, Dan, Joseph and Etkes , Immanuel (eds.) Studies in Hasidism, (Jerusalem Studies in Jewish Thought Vol. 15). Jerusalem; Menachem Friedman. (2001). Society in a Crises of Legitimization: The Ashkenazi Old Yishuv 1900-1917. Jerusalem: 31. (Hebrew) (hereafter: Friedman, 2001) 10 Ruth Kark & Micahl Oren-Nordheim. (1995). Jerusalem and Its Environs: Quarters, Neighborhood, Villages, 1800-1948. Jerusalem: 119-126 11 Friedman, 2001: 59-67 12 Segal-Weiss, 1949: 183-189

303


PAULA KABALO

earned a venerable place in collective Zionist memory. Ben-Yehudah and his colleagues formed a language society under the name Safa Berura (‘clear language’) to promote their ideology and implement Hebrew revival.13 The society’s founders articulated their mission as follows: “…to uproot the languages which are stuttered among the nation’s Jews…languages that have caused internal rifts and belittled Jews in the eyes of…other nations”.” This statement was the foundation of Safa Berura, which eventually became the Israeli Academy for the Hebrew Language in 1953, a statutory institution.14 This organizational model was also applied in various moshavot – agricultural towns founded by members of the First Aliyah (wave of immigration to Eretz Israel) during the1880’s and 1890’s – whose primary purpose was to establish a national Jewish home. In spite of actively striving toward independent nationalism, immigrants living in the moshavot preserved their former communal values and structures as they settled the land. Once new moshavot were established, residents would typically form a central local committee to which they referred with the traditional term ‘Kahal’. A variety of ‘societies’ based on previous models were usually established in the moshavot as well, whose services ranged from free loans, to caring for the infirmed (Linat Tzedek & Bikur Holim), to providing hospitality for strangers and visitors (Hachnasat Orchim). Hundreds of immigration and settlement societies recruited members, collected funds, and established headquarters in Eretz Israel. In conjunction with these traditional Jewish societies, the moshavot also initiated modern institutions dedicated to 13 Ben –Arieh, Yehoshua. (1979). A city Reflected in its Times, New Jerusalem – The Beginnings. Vol. 2. Jerusalem: 509 (hereafter: Ben-Arieh, 1979) 14 Shlomo Carmi. (1997). One People, One Language: the Renaissance of the Hebrew Language from an Interdisciplinary Perspective – History and Sources . Tel –Aviv: 93-95 ; Yosef Salmon. (1989). ‘The Urban Ashkenazi Yishuv in Eretz Israel 1880-1903’. In, Israel Kolatt (ed.) The History of the Jewish Yishuv Community in Eretz Israel since 1882, The Ottoman Period, Part 1. Jerusalem: 591.

304


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

promoting national ideology via kindergartens, schools, and ‘reading societies’.15 These aid systems, formed by modern Jews driven to immigration by national and socialist ideals, gradually evolved into modernized communal institutions; a primary example of which is Kupat Holim Ha’clalit (‘general health fund’). Zionist workers in Judea founded the Kupat Holim during the second convention of the Judea Agricultural Workers’ Federation in December of 1911, in order to provide medical care to members and their families. The Judea workers, as Shifra Shvartz reveals, had two ways of approaching the provision of medical services – a traditional approach and a modern approach. The traditional approach was based on shared communal responsibility for sick members, which was carried out by organizations such as Linat Tzedek (‘overnight care’) and Bikur Holim (‘house calls’). The modern approach on the other hand, advanced compulsory health insurance based on economic status under government supervision. Despite being acquainted with the modern European health insurance models for the working class, the Judea workers felt more comfortable following the traditional format.16 The founders’ terminology was another reflection of their linkage to traditional community structure. Their word for ‘fund’ for instance, was ‘kuppah’, which according to Salo Baron is a term equivalent to “community chest”.17 This same Hebrew term, however, was also used for charity boxes – kuppot tzedaka – with which community funds were 15 Paula Kabalo (2009). ‘Jewish NGOs in Palestine and Israel from the 1880s to the 1950s’. in: Ilan Rachum (ed). Back to Politics: the Modern State, Nationality and sovereignty. Jerusalem: 286-287 16 Shvarts, S. (2003) “Politics in Health: the Establishment of Sick Funds in Eretz Israel During the British Mandate,” in A. Bareli and N. Karlinsky (eds.), Iyunim Bitkumat Israel –Economy and Society in Mandatory Palestine 1918–1948, Sde Boqer and Jerusalem: 555 . [Hebrew] 17 Salo W. Baron (1977 [ 1942]), “The Jewish Community” its History and Structure to the American revolution, Vol.2 Greenwood Press , Westport , Connecticut, p. 320

305


PAULA KABALO

collected for benevolent purposes.18 Other words such as keren (‘foundation’) could have been used, but the term kuppah specifically connotes the act of collecting charity from the community. The health fund was therefore a familiar expression of mutual aid, as using special charity boxes to collect funds for Eretz Israel has been part of communal Jewish practice since the late 16th century. The original charity boxes were first placed in synagogues and eventually made their way into private homes. They were initially described as an allpurpose ‘kuppah of Eretz Israel’ and their collections were distributed to different Jewish communities in Eretz Israel according to an accepted allocation system. Gradually a different kuppah was designated for each of the Land’s ‘holy cities’ (Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed, and Tiberias), and different kuppot tzedakah (pl. ‘charity boxes’) were set up to collect funds for specific institutions.19 The term kuppah brings to mind another famous philanthropic Zionist institution – the JNF’s ‘Blue Box’. Although it linked itself to the traditional charity system by name, this was in fact a modernized version of the kuppat tzedaka that used the same well-known system of funds collection in the synagogue and later in private homes – a fixture of Jewish communal life – to advance modern Jewish national revival and the settling of Eretz Israel20 These preserved communal patterns make the impressive list of 1940’s Tel-Aviv institutions with traditional names and titles a bit less surprising. Tel-Aviv, 18 Maimonides is frequently quoted on the subject from his work Laws on Gifts to the Poor, Ch. 9: ‘Any city in which there is a Jewish community is obligated to raise up collectors of tzedakah, people who are well-known and trustworthy, to go from door-to-door among the people from Sabbath eve to Sabbath eve and collect from each and every one what is fitting…they should also distribute the money from Sabbath eve to Sabbath eve and give each and every poor person enough for food to last them seven days. This method is called ‘the kuppah’.” 19 Eliav, 1978: 115-116 20 Shaul Shtemper. (1981). ‘The Pushkeh and its adventures – The Funds of Eretz Yisrael as a social Phenomena’. Katedra 21: 8 ; Yoram Bar-Gal. (2003) ‘The Blue Box and JNF Propaganda Maps 1930-1947’. Israel Studies 8: 1 p.1

306


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

the first Hebrew city, was a symbol of the ‘new Jew’ and of modern Jewish life. It was considered a modern city, with an established municipality that collected municipal taxes, and included social work and health and hygiene departments. In terms of its philanthropic activity, however, the city bore a distinct resemblance to Jewish communities of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Institutions for assisting the needy, free loan societies, elderly homes and orphanages – these were only part of what constituted Tel-Aviv’s active associational life.21 Immediately striking are the institutions’ titles, which directly referenced Jewish community organizations of the late middle ages and early modern times: Hachnasat Orchim (‘hospitality’), Moshav Zekenim (‘elderly homes’), Hachnasat Kala (‘bridal services’), Someh Noflim (‘aid for the ailing and impoverished’) and Gmilut Hesed (‘free loan societies’). These names all draw a distinct line between traditional Jewish community structures and the philanthropic sphere in the first modernized, secular Hebrew city.22 Organizations and institutions established for what municipal officials considered the “public benefit”, distinguished between community members according to their country of origin. It is interesting to note the diverse ethnic affiliations that appear on the immigrant associations’ lists, which include Jews from European and non-European origin alike. Members of the TelAviv immigrant associations used their organizations as mediators when dealing with authorities on both a local and national level, and for assistance with confronting the challenging immigration process. The Tel-Aviv Municipality’s list of “institutions for the public benefit”, compiled around 1945, included twentysix immigrant organizations. Their common name 21 Tel Aviv Municipal Archives (hereafter: TAMA), ‘List of Institutions and Projects forPublic Utility in Tel Aviv’, Associations and Societies File, 3839/4 22 Ibid.

307


PAULA KABALO

was Hitachduyot Olim (‘immigrant federations’), which means they were a federation of various groups, whose main goal was assisting new immigrants. These umbrella organizations usually had a letterhead, chairman, treasurer, and executive, and would hold assemblies during which members elected representatives and voted on the current agenda. The aforementioned list strictly included organizations that received some type of municipal backing or recognition and therefore primarily contained umbrella organizations that took grassroots initiatives under their wing. Out of forty five entities affiliated with a country or town of origin in the Tel-Aviv Municipality’s 1940’s ‘lists and correspondence’ files, almost half represent Jewish communities of non-European origin including Syria, Libya, Yemen, Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Bukhara, Georgia, Afghanistan, and Morocco. Some immigrant groups were represented by more than one association, but in most cases they were part of a larger umbrella organization that had branches or sub-divisions for specific aspects of daily life – caring for the sick, providing special loans, or representing the younger generation of a certain ethnic group. Records demonstrate that immigrant groups mostly functioned as self-help organizations, assisting with relocation by providing special loans, supporting the needy, and advocating for jobs and housing. The immigrant federations were specifically obliged to assist their homeland communities and relatives who had been left behind, and provide them with special aid in times of hardship. The following case studies will uncover the ‘community driven philanthropy’ demonstrated in the activity and nature of these membership associations. The Centre of the Yemenite Organization in Palestine corresponded regularly with municipal authorities, and mainly with the city mayor himself. The organization described itself as representative of the entire Yemenite ethnic group (in Hebrew: ‘eda’) and was 308


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

therefore obliged to protect the ‘rights’ of its members in every domain. Following its 1944 annual assembly, the organization published a list of resolutions with which it approached national Jewish institutions, seeking their collaboration and assistance. The Yemenite Organization demanded support from the Tel-Aviv Municipality in the following domains: Assisting Yemenite Jews who had not yet immigrated to Eretz Israel and were suffering distress and oppression. Upgrading the status of Yemenite municipal employees by accepting them for office work and not strictly ‘bluecollar’ jobs. Designating a lot for Yemenite craftsmen and merchants, and assistance with establishing a community center to host the organization and its educational and cultural activities.23 Although it played a political role by forming a representative body based on ethnicity, the Centre of the Yemenite Organization in Palestine was also a typical membership organization that engaged in welfare provision through its charity council (Moetzet Ha’tzedaka – Hitachdut Ha’teimanim), and supported the educational and recreational activities of its youth organization Benei Yehudah. The Central Association of Bukharian Immigrants was re-established as an umbrella organization in 1946. A membership assembly was held that included members of Tel-Aviv’s twelve Bukharian synagogues, in which the organization declared its objective: the provision of “mutual aid for the improvement of their members’ economic and spiritual conditions”.24 The Turkish Immigrants Organization (Irgun Olei Turkia) provided business loans for new arrivals through a lending system based on membership fees. Their fundraising system had limited results, however, due to the poor economic conditions of most members. The organization held celebrations on Jewish holidays, 23 24

TAMA: 1363/3839, 14/11/1946 TAMA: 1363/3839, 3/1946

309


PAULA KABALO

established neighborhoods, founded a healthcare society (Bikur Holim) for its members, and collected funds for families that had remained in the Turkish diaspora.25 The Afghan Immigrants’ Organization of TelAviv and the Agricultural Towns (Hebrew: Irgun Olei Afghanistan be’Tel -Aviv ve’Hamoshavot), also proclaimed its main objective to be providing for the religious and physical needs of its ethnic group (‘eda’). Much like other ethnicity-specific organizations, it was committed to coordinating and motivating immigration from Afghanistan to Eretz Israel, and assisting its members as they settled and adjusted to the new country. The organization also founded a free-loan society based on one-time donations. They asked that the Tel-Aviv Municipality recognize them as the official representatives of Afghan Jews in Eretz Israel and turn to them with any matters pertaining to this ethic group.26 Associations founded by European immigrants from Hungary, Austria, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, and Czechoslovakia, followed the same organizational pattern as they established their own immigrant federations. The umbrella organization model implemented by these communities became rarer post-1948 and post-Holocaust, as members of perished communities established small associations primarily for remembrance and self-help purposes. These new societies now carried the names of specific Eastern European cities or regions such as Lublin, Bryansk, Mezritch, Podolski, and many others.27 While umbrella organizations had a clear advantage when it came to matters of relocation and integration, they found it difficult to tend to the more private domains of commemoration and remembrance. The phenomenon of landsmanshaft, which emerged out 25 TAMA: 1363/3839, 31.3.1945 26 TAMA: 1363/3839, 21.3.1945 27 Letter: N. Stavi to heads of investigation divisions in all districts, July 12, 1950, on the topic of Associations’, ISA, Israel Police Division, L 2176/2

310


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

of specific, concrete localities and related coteries from the ‘old world’, therefore became far more prevailing following the establishment of the State.28 Jewish vs. Christian Philanthropic Patterns – Jerusalem Health Care Institutions The development of healthcare services in Jerusalem during the late 19th century and early 20th century was influenced by the renewed activity of the Great Powers in Palestine, which was driven by political and religious incentives.29 This resulted in what Eliav refers to as 'diplomatic missions'; ever since the Egyptian conquest in the mid-19th century, the Powers “…aspired to wedge their way into Palestine in order to protect their subjects, and competed to advance Christian interests in the Holy Land that would increase their influence in the Ottoman Empire”. The immediate consequence of their interference in the region was the establishment of consulates as “privileged strongholds of power under the capitulations.”30 Healthcare provision was an inherent part of Christian missionary activities, and as early as 1838, the English mission opened a clinic in Jerusalem and distributed medication free of charge. The poor sanitary conditions, crowded housing, and deficient nutrition, attracted Jews to the missions’ health institutions. They also compelled Jewish philanthropist Moses Montefiore to send a physician to Palestine and fund his salary and a free healthcare clinic. The English mission also sent a doctor, who opened a hospital in 1844 that gradually expanded 28 ISA: L 2176/2, List of TA Associations, 1/9/1950 29 Mordechai Eliav, (1975). 'German Interests and the Jewish Community in Nineteenth Century Palestine'. In: Moshe Ma'oz (ed). Studies on Palestine during the Ottoman Period. Jerusalem: 424 (hereafter, Eliav, 1975 30 The capitulations were contracts between the Ottoman Empire  and  European  authorities concerning rights and privileges related to their subjects’ residence and trade under Ottoman dominions, see: Eliav, 1975, Ibid

311


PAULA KABALO

over the years. The hospital had mezuzahs on its doorposts and provided kosher food and prayer shawls to Jewish patients, but its nightstands displayed copies of the New Testament, and missionary publications were distributed in various languages.31 The Jerusalem rabbis banned the hospital and prohibited Jews from attending it. They even forbade Jewish butchers to sell kosher meat to the hospital, and declared that a Jew who is deceased there will not be buried in a Jewish cemetery. A lack of alternative health services however, led Jews to disregard the ban.32 New hospitals were gradually established, and their location led to an interesting development in the city’s landscape; as most ended up along a single street in the budding west Jerusalem, the ‘Street of the Prophets’ (Ha’nevi’im). Located in the heart of the city, the street connected residential neighborhoods to the commercial Jaffa Street, and therefore became a kind of mediator between the two worlds and a reflection of the city’s diverse cultural and religious life. It earned different nicknames and titles over the years, one of which was “the hospitals’ street”.33 The pioneering healthcare institution on the street was the English mission’s sanatorium, which was founded in 1862 as a convalescent home and transformed into a hospital in 1897.34 During the British mandate period, it became the primary hospital for the growing Anglican community.35 Another Christian healthcare institution was later established, which was specifically affiliated with the Protestant Deaconess order. Their first hospital was founded in the early 1850’s in Jerusalem’s Old City, and in 1894 they established a new hospital on the Street 31 Eliav, 1978: 63 32 Eliav, 1978: 64 33 David Kroyanker (2001), The Rothschild Compound Story – Jerusalem, Hanevi'im Street. Jerusalem:17. [Hebrew] (hereafter: Kroyanker, 2001). 34 Kroyanker, 2001: 17 35 Yehoshua Ben Arieh. (2011). The New Jewish City of Jerusalem During the British Mandate Period: Neighborhoods, Houses, People. Vol. 3. Jerusalem: 1109 [Hebrew] (hereafter, Ben-Arieh, 2001)

312


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

of the Prophets, the Deaconess Hospital (Das Deutsche Diakonissen-Krankenhaus).36When WWI broke out, the Deaconess Hospital served wounded German soldiers that had fought in the region.37 The deaconess sisters were later evacuated to Egypt, and the structure was used as a military hospital by the British after their conquest of Jerusalem. In 1923, it was returned to the Germans who operated it until 1939.38 The Street of the Prophets was home to another German health institution: The Marienstift Children's Hospital, nicknamed ‘Dr. Sanderetzky's Children’s Hospital’. This was a small hospital, founded by Duke Frederick Francis II of The Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg– Schwerin of Northern Germany, after his visit to Jerusalem in 1872 with his wife Maria. The Duke supported the hospital over its twenty-six years of operation (1872-1899). Dr. Sanderetzky, the hospital's lead physician, was an interesting figure, having fought for Poland and served in the French Foreign Legion (Legion Etrangere) in North Africa. When he arrived in Jerusalem the Protestant Bishop of Jerusalem Samuel Gobat requested that he head the pediatric clinic. In 1899, he committed suicide and the hospital was shut down.39 Another notable Jerusalem medical institution, monitored and developed by Bishop Gobat, was the Leprosy Hospital established in 1866. The German noble Von Keffenbrink gave the Bishop a generous donation to open a shelter for leprosy patients after witnessing their conditions. The institution was run by a committee made up of a Protestant minister, a German consul, and a Banker by the name of Frotiger as treasurer. The 36 Yehoshua Ben –Arieh. (1979). A city Reflected In Its Times, New Jerusalem – The Beginnings. Vol. 2. Jerusalem: 454. [Hebrew] 37 Shilony, Zvi. (1981). The Crisis of World War I and its Effect on the Urban Alignment of Jerusalem and the Jewish Community. M.A thesis handed to the Geography Department: the Hebrew University Jerusalem. P. 164 [Hebrew] (hereafter, Shilony, 1981) 38 Ben Arieh, 2011, Vol.3: 1104 39 Ben Arieh , 1979 Vol. 2 185-186

313


PAULA KABALO

German architect Conrad Schick served as technical advisor and the hospital’s lead physician was Dr. Chaplain. In 1867, the missionary Dr. Tappe and his wife arrived in Jerusalem in order to run the institute. After the death of Bishop Gobbat in 1879 and the nomination of an English Bishop as his replacement, the German Consulate requested ownership of the institution.40 The number of patients grew significantly over the following years and a new building was constructed. The hospital’s professional staff consisted of the deaconess sisters who were supported by the Protestant brothers’ community from Herrenhot, the ‘Bohemian Brothers’, who dedicated themselves to treating the chronically ill.41 The last Christian healthcare institution to join the Street of the Prophets was the Italian Hospital, established on the eve of WWI. According to Ben-Arieh, it was the Italian mission society that had invited the two prominent sibling architects Antonio and Giulio Berluchi to plan the hospital. They arrived in the city on October 1912 to begin planning and soon launched into construction; the building was mostly complete before the War broke out. Ben-Arieh mentions the famous Egyptologist Prof. Schiaparelli as the major force behind the project, who worked to coordinate fundraising and make sure construction was quickly moving along. When the War began Antonio Berluchi was forced to leave the country, but later joined the Italian forces that eventually conquered the land and delivered him back to Jerusalem. He sent reports to the mission society on the hospital building, which was being used as army barracks, and they decided to finally complete construction. Berluchi supervised the project himself and completed it successfully, after which it was run by an Italian physician along with a staff of Italian nurses during the British Mandate period. When Italy 40 41

314

Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 186-187 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 187


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

joined the Axis powers during WWII, the building was confiscated as enemy property. After Israel was established, it was returned to the Italian sisters from the Cottolengo order and eventually sold to the Israeli government by the Italians in 1963.42 Kroyanker claims that the choice to locate the Christian hospitals in the area was driven by a missionary agenda to influence the large Jewish population living in the region’s northern neighborhoods. The Jewish response to these attempts however, was to establish their own hospitals in proximity to Christian ones.43 The French Branch of the Rothschild family founded the Rothschild Hospital in Jerusalem’s Old City in 1854. With its maintenance expenses covered by the family, the hospital included a synagogue and drug store, as well as a kitchen and housing for staff.44 The first building was constructed on a lot that belonged to Sephardic Jews, and the leasing contract included a clause ensuring it will be returned to them should the hospital eventually relocate.45 Once a new building outside the Old City was complete, the property was indeed returned to the Sepharadic community, which followed by establishing the Misgav Ladach hospital, named after the healthcare society they had founded a few years prior.46 A committee elected by members of the Misgav Ladach society ran the hospital, and reported to the synagogues affiliated with the Sepharadic community. The heads of the society were some of Jerusalem’s most prominent Sephardic Jews, who were committed to caring for poor patients at no charge.47 42 Ben Arieh, 2011 Vol. 3: 1105-1106 43 Kroyanker 2001: 17 44 Kroynker, 2001, 12 45 Yehoshua Ben –Arieh. (1977). A city Reflected In Its Times, Old Jerusalem. Vol. 2. Jerusalem: 381. [Hebrew]. 46 Misgav Ladach Hospital, document submitted to: the Department for Social Work, the National Committee in Eretz Israel, the Central Institute for the research of Charitable Institutions in the Land of Israel, March 1938; Central Zionist Archive (CZA), J1/12960 47 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol 2: 328

315


PAULA KABALO

The new Rothschild Hospital building on the Street of the Prophets opened its doors in 1888. The hospital was funded by the Rothschild Foundation and initially run by its lead physician. A public committee later took charge, until disagreements among its members rose to the surface and it too had to be replaced. The Baron Alfonse de Rothschild eventually placed the hospital’s management in the hands of the French Jewish philanthropic society Alliance Israelite Universelle.48 The Rothschild Hospital provided free services for the impoverished and was open to patients from all ethnic and religious backgrounds.49 Despite an increase in the hospital’s activity upon the inception and beginning of WWI, the Ottoman authorities decided to shut it down, supposedly due to its affiliation with the French Alliance Israelite Universelle and the Paris and London branches of the Rothschild family. After extensive diplomatic negotiations, however, the hospital reopened in summer of 1916 and later became one of the institutions that supported the Medical Aid Committee for Jerusalem’s poor—an initiative led by the city’s Jewish physicians with the support of various Jewish philanthropic societies. Hadassah (the Women's Zionist Organization of America) was already part of the hospital during these early stages.50 In 1918, it was decided that the American Zionist Medical Unit founded by Hadassah would run the hospital with continued funding from the Rothschild family. The hospital in its new format was established in November 1918 and became the renowned Hadassah Hospital.51 Another Jewish hospital established in the Old City was Bikur Holim (‘visiting the sick’) of the Perushim 48 Kroyanker, 2001: 24-28 49 Ben Arieh, 1979 Vol. 2: 327 50 Shilony, (1991).'The Medical Service and Hospitals in Jerusalem during WW1', in: Eliav (ed) Siege and Distress: Eretz Israel during the First World War. The Bialik Institute: Jerusalem, 73 (hereafter: Shilony, 1991) 51 Ben Arieh, 2011 Vol. 3: 1110-1111

316


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

(Pharasees) kollel, which was supported by the German Consul under the precept that it would serve German residents. The hospital eventually relocated to the New City opposite the German Hospital, between the Street of the Prophets and Jaffa Street, right at the center of Jerusalem’s new hospital district.52 In 1909, the Eretz Israel almanac reported that the Bikur Holim hospital, which was under German sponsorship, supports sick people in their homes and offers doctor’s services and medicine. The hospital would also send patients for rehabilitation in Vienna and other European locations. A committee comprised of elected community leaders (rashei ha'eda) served as its management.53 German sponsorship kept Bikur Holim secure and fully functioning during WWI. The hospital was economically stable upon the War’s inception due to a combination of German aid, local support from the kollel, and different overseas supporters. It also received additional backing during the War from special aid funds provided by members of the American Jewish community, as did other Jewish hospitals in the country.54 The Frankfurt Jewish Committee initiated the establishment of another Jewish Jerusalem hospital by sending a young, Orthodox physician to assist with medical care in the city in 1890. Dr. Moshe (Moritz) Wallach initially worked at the Hachnasat Orchim institution in the Old City, and eventually rented a lot and opened a clinic and drug store. A local committee decided to renew its efforts to construct a new Jewish hospital and sent Wallach to Germany as their representative, who then returned with generous donations for the purchase of a lot outside the Old City.55 Thus, the Sha'arei Tzedek hospital was established in 1902. Reports emphasize the 52 53 54 55

Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2 : 329-330 Luncz, Almanac, 1909: 58 Shilony, 1991:71-72 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 331

317


PAULA KABALO

donors’ affiliation with the Jewish communities of the Netherlands and Germany (Amsterdam and Frankfurt de Main) and the support received from the German Foreign Office, which classified the hospital as a German-sponsored institution.56 Sha'arei Tzedek became one of the biggest and most progressive hospitals in Jerusalem, and continued to receive funds from Jewish communities in Austria and Germany during the War, in addition to aid funds sent from the United States to assist Eretz Israel’s Jews.57 Pharmacies were another healthcare service that began developing around that time, and provided members of the kollelim discounted medication (at drug stores affiliated with their organizations).58 Specialized healthcare clinics were also gradually established, such as the German Jewish society’s Le'Maan Zion (‘on behalf of Zion’), which opened a specialized ophthalmology clinic and accepted patients at no charge.59 The society sent an eye specialist to Eretz Israel by the name of Dr. Ticho who conducted operations and treated thousands of patients.60 The Straus Hebrew Health Station was established in 1912, and in 1913 Dr. Biham founded the Pasteur Institute. The institute, funded by the Jewish American philanthropist Nathan Straus, joined forces with two European societies—the Hebrew Physicians and Medical Scholars Association, and the German Committee for the War against Malaria. This umbrella network also included the Institute for the Treatment of Rabies.61 On the eve of WWI Jerusalem was home to at least fourteen hospitals. Seven belonged to the various Christian congregations, five were affiliated with the Jewish community, and two others operated on behalf of the authorities. Most 56 57 58 59 60 61

318

Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2 : 333 Shilony, 1991:72 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 334 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 335 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 335 Ben Arieh, 1979, Vol. 2: 335


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

hospitals included day clinics and pharmacies.62 Shilony lists three central resources that aided Jewish hospitals during War: American Jewish funds (as well as some German and Austrian aid), sponsorship and support from the foreign consulates of Germany, the US, and Austria, and the dedication of physicians, nurses, and the volunteers and Jewish public figures who made their work possible. This list suggests the fundamental difference between Jewish and Christian philanthropic tradition. While the Christian institutions were all directly affiliated with a particular religious congregation and supported by specific churches, the Jewish entities, even those originally established by individual philanthropists, were affiliated with a community. This affiliation took on many forms, such as connection to the kollel network, local committees, or international philanthropic organizations. In addition, every Jewish hospital was run and supported by representatives of various organizations and authorities, which enabled a certain flexibility to continue operating even when the political pendulum shifted. American aid funds were distributed in several installments over the course of WWI and Jewish aid committees were set up to distribute them. Forty four percent of US funds were allocated to four Jerusalem hospitals: Bikur Holim, Sha’arei Tzedek, Misgav Ladach, and Le'maan Zion. Fifty five percent of the second installment was designated to healthcare services in general and the Hadassah hospital in particular. These funds enabled the hospitals’ function during the critical War years and their quick recovery once it ended.63 One of the most stable Jewish healthcare institutions was the aforementioned ophthalmology hospital Le'Maan Zion. Like other Jewish institutions, it too 62 63

Shilony, 1991: 64 Shilony, 1981: 166

319


PAULA KABALO

enjoyed support from the German Consulate and ongoing donations from overseas. The hospital was founded by the Le'Maan Zion society, which was highly reputable and served members from all coteries and ethnicities. After the English ophthalmology hospital was shut down following the deportation of its English staff, Le'Maan Zion remained the only ophthalmology hospital in town and was mentioned in every target list for donors and aid funds.64 The Street of the Prophets medical center changed dramatically during the British Mandate period. While famous for its inclusive and primarily foreign medical institutions during the Ottoman period, under British rule the majority of its institutions were affiliated with the Jewish community. In addition to hospitals, physicians opened private clinics on the street, and additional healthcare and health-related research institutes were established in the area.65 'Community Driven Philanthropy' – Tracking the Sources of Influence The methods and approach of the various membership associations and healthcare institutions were reflective of the communities they represented. This was evident on two levels: formal representation opposite authorities and centers of power in the country, and the provision of cultural, religious, and social services in addition to basic welfare. By reassuring the well-being of their members and maintaining networks of mutual aid, healthcare, and local culture, these institutions gave their members a sense of ‘home away from home’—an expression coined by Weiser when referring to the American-Jewish landsmanschaftn organizational system in New York.66 64 65 66

320

Shilony, 1981: 169-170 Ben Arieh, 2011: 1110-1120 Michael Weisser (1985), A brotherhood of memory, Jewish Landsmanshaftn


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

An interesting aspect of this phenomenon in its Tel-Aviv and Jerusalem setting is the access it offered to disempowered members of society, who were often newly arrived, impoverished immigrants. The immigrant associations’ documents, which mostly include letters and memorandums sent to the Tel-Aviv Municipality, tell the story of the yishuv’s struggling pre-state Jewish community in Mandatory Palestine. They help reconstruct our knowledge about this community, and shift our attention from the centers of political power to the second and third circles of society, to immigrants who experienced the plight and distress of relocation and leaned on familiar associational patterns, thereby creating a safe haven for the disempowered sectors of society. While observing the American Jewish immigrant associations, or landsmanschaftn, Daniel Soyer concluded that immigrants modeled their societies after America’s republican form of government, and gained civic skills while serving as active members of their society.67 This conclusion is congruent with Goren's claim that: "Even as immigrants built institutions to preserve the solidarity of their particular group and provide a measure of personal security, they endeavored to fit these institutions into the American social landscape".68 Goren and Soyer, who represent two distinct generations of American-Jewish historiography, agree on two issues: the Eastern European origin of the landsmanshaft organizational format, and its Americanization due to the influence of democratic values. Observing the immigrant associations in Eretz Israel and the management systems of their healthcare institutions, however, brings the following question in the New World: 14 67 Daniel Soyer, Trans-nationalism and Americanization in east European Jewish Immigrant Public Life. In: Jack Wertheimer (ed) (2007). Imagining the American Jewish Community. Waltham: p. 52) 68 Arthur Goren, new York Jews and the Quest for Community The Kehillah Experiment 1908-1922. Columbia University Press, 1970: 2

321


PAULA KABALO

to mind: was this organizational model indeed an Eastern European phenomenon, or was it an inherent Jewish social pattern? The organizational models and networks employed by these communities also call into question the assumption that American Jews based their community institutions on the American democratic model. After all, Eretz Israel immigrant federations also implemented democratic practices; elections, assemblies, participation in decision making processes, advocacy, and more. It should also be kept in mind that the list of Tel-Aviv organizations established for the "public benefit" during the years in question included many other forms of selfrepresentation and incentive-based cooperation, such as the craftsmen organizations and societies dedicated to the promotion of various cultural, recreational, or ideological agendas. Most of these associations remained intact post-statehood and some are active to this very day. Of course, the Jewish communal tradition was not the sole inspiration for Jewish philanthropic patterns in Ottoman and Mandatory Palestine. The Muslim Waqf system influenced Jewish endowments, and the Christian mission institutions stimulated competition and led to the establishment of educational institutions, orphanages, and most importantly, hospitals. The impact these entities had on communal structure and organization merits its own research and discussion. It is nevertheless evident that a pronounced connection exists between the manifold Jewish community institutions of the late middle ages and early modern times, and those which represented ‘community driven philanthropy’; i.e. organizations based on grassroots initiatives, membership, and elected directorial committees that operated in Eretz Israel pre and post independence. These entities shared crosscultural common denominators, and carried out a similar model of community-centered organizational structure regardless of their ethnic or geographical affiliations. 322


'COMMUNITY DRIVEN PHILANTHROPY'.

This suggests another possible interpretation of the resentment felt by Zionist and Israeli leaders regarding the concept of 'philanthropy', and their reluctance to acknowledge the contribution of these organizational structures. The Zionist project and Jewish nationalist ideology rejected and even 'negated' Jewish life in the diaspora during its early formative years, referring to it as the golah (‘exile’). In the process, it also rejected or ignored the community structures related to diasporic Jewish life. National aspirations motivated attempts to establish centralized institutions that would bridge the gaps and differences among the various Jewish ethnicities and cultures. The persistence of the old organizational patterns in form, content, and title, reflected how relevant these structures still were to those who formed them, and suggested they had not fully disconnected from their former, ‘exilic’ characteristics. As far as the leaders of the national movement were concerned this was no feat, and they therefore tended to generally overlook the organizations’ role and influence. Although scholars and practitioners in non-profit organization in Israel are gradually adopting the term ‘philanthropy’, other terms that refer to self help and mutual aid are still preferred. Perhaps Hebrew speakers should not insist on Americanizing this term and stick to the traditional Hebrew fundamentals – tzedaka, hitnadvut, hevra (society), agudah, and of course, kuppah…

323


Senza distinzione di culto. La filantropia delle élites ebraiche italiane dopo l’emancipazione: casi e problemi Paolo Pellegrini

Negli studi sulla filantropia degli ebrei italiani in età contemporanea, tema sul quale la ricerca è ancora agli inizi, l’esame del ruolo svolto dalle élites ha trovato ampio spazio, ma in genere soprattutto per quanto riguarda il loro determinante contributo alla realizzazione di opere assistenziali interne alle diverse università israelitiche. In particolare, l’attenzione si è focalizzata sul periodo apertosi con la fine della prima emancipazione, quando le famiglie più abbienti – che in qualche caso, durante i quasi vent’anni di parità di diritti della parentesi francese, avevano fatto esperienza di incarichi di rilievo nella pubblica amministrazione – si fecero carico di un vasto progetto educativo finalizzato alla ‘rigenerazione’delle masse di correligionari indigenti, che sarebbero stati visti, secondo la chiave di lettura suggerita da Gadi Luzzatto Voghera, come un ostacolo alla già sperimentata integrazione: in altre parole, questi borghesi in ascesa non potevano permettersi, come sostiene appunto Luzzatto Voghera, “che la zavorra di una popolazione in gran parte composta di cenciaioli, mendicanti e piccoli commercianti legati a un patrimonio di superstizioni e di usi sociali del tutto estranei alla società moderna, impedisse con la sua sola presenza un’effettiva parificazione ed emancipazione

325


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

degli ebrei italiani”1. Dal punto di vista pratico, il programma di acculturazione allora incoraggiato dalle oligarchie comunitarie ebbe una delle sue leve principali nella riforma delle strutture formative funzionati in quasi tutti i ghetti della penisola, riqualificando gli istituti già esistenti, dove fu introdotto l’insegnamento di materie nuove come le lingue straniere o le discipline connesse alle pratiche commerciali, e fondando scuole di arti e mestieri che avrebbero dovuto dotare i giovani delle classi più svantaggiate di un’istruzione che li avviasse alle attività professionali2. Anche per questa fase, tuttavia, non mancano esempi di esponenti del notabilato ebraico italiano il cui impegno sul piano della beneficenza si estese al mondo ‘gentile’, anticipando, così, quella pratica di una carità senza distinzione di culto che nell’Italia unita diverrà cifra dominante dell’agire filantropico di tanti maggiorenti ebrei. Un caso abbastanza conosciuto è quello del livornese Isach Franchetti, che nel suo testamento dispose 1 G. Luzzatto Voghera, Il prezzo dell’eguaglianza. Il dibattito sull’emancipazione degli ebrei in Italia (1718-1848), Milano, Angeli, 1998, p. 124. Concordano con tale interpretazione diversi studiosi fra cui F. Cavarocchi, La comunità ebraica di Mantova fra prima emancipazione e unità d’Italia, Firenze, La Giuntina, 2002, p. 81 e L. Levi D’Ancona, “Notabili e dame” nella filantropia ebraica ottocentesca: casi di studio in Francia, Italia e Inghilterra, in “Quaderni storici”, 114 (2003), pp. 741-776, in part. pp. 750-751. Non pare essere dello stesso avviso, invece, M. Scardozzi, Una storia di famiglia: i Franchetti dalle coste del Mediterraneo all’Italia liberale, in “Quaderni storici”, 114 (2003), pp. 697-740, la quale non solo considera quello di Luzzatto Voghera un “giudizio molto severo” (p. 733, nota 41), ma ritiene anche che dietro l’adesione alle istanze della ‘rigenerazione’ possa scorgersi, piuttosto, “la convinzione [da parte ebraica] della possibilità di conciliare ebraismo e modernità” (p. 708). 2 Cfr., per esempio, A. Castracani, Gli ebrei a Senigallia tra Sette e Ottocento, in La presenza ebraica nelle Marche. Secoli XIII-XX, a cura di S. Anselmi e V. Bonazzoli, Ancona, Proposte e ricerche, 1993, pp. 161-163; T. Catalan, La Comunità ebraica di Trieste (1781-1914). Politica, società e cultura, Trieste, LINT, 2000, pp. 147-155; Cavarocchi, La comunità ebraica di Mantova, cit., pp. 77-86; G. Luzzatto Voghera, Gli ebrei, in Storia di Venezia. L’Ottocento e il Novecento, a cura di M. Isnenghi e S. Woolf, I, Roma, Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana, 2002, pp. 644-646; P. Ferrara e G. Yael Franzone, Fraternalismo e compagnonnage in ambito ebraico alla luce di alcuni documenti dei secoli XVII-XIX, con particolare riferimento al periodo 1814-1870, in C. Procaccia e altri, Le confraternite ebraiche Talmud Torà e Ghemilut Chasadim: premesse storiche e attività agli inizi dell’età contemporanea, Roma, Il centro di ricerca, 2011, pp. 31-85.

326


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

un cospicuo lascito in denaro da ripartire fra i poveri della città labronica sia ebrei che cristiani. Nel 1832, le ultime volontà di Franchetti ispirarono un necrologio pubblicato sulla “Antologia”, la nota rivista fiorentina, nel quale l’ebreo di Livorno veniva celebrato come “un Isdraelita, che insegna a fare i testamenti ai ricchi di ogni religione” e le sue disposizioni testamentarie additate come dimostrazione di una “generosità, senza distinzione di culti a favore della indigenza, la quale, colla voce dell’umanità, parla a tutti i cuori sensibili, e rammenta ad essi la fraternità della natura”3. Significative sono anche le testimonianze che riguardano Isacco Samuele Avigdor, mercante all’ingrosso di olio di Nizza, console commerciale del re di Prussia e del duca di Lucca e banchiere di fiducia di “varii illustri personaggi di Russia, di Francia e d’Inghilterra che sonogli raccomandati non che altri di Prussia, d’Austria e di Spagna a cui somministra i fondi di cui abbisognano”4. Di questo “piccolo Rothschild”, come lo avrebbe definito Arturo Carlo Jemolo, nel 1841 un alto funzionario del Regno di Sardegna ricordava come fosse solito distribuire “elemosine ai poveri senza distinzione fra ebrei e cristiani, [...] soccorre[sse] i conventi dei mendicanti, fornis[se], se non per tutto l’anno, almeno per una parte, l’olio delle lampade di alcune chiese cattoliche, verso cui [era] liberale di altre offerte” 5. Non è facile dire quanto in quegli anni comportamenti come quelli di Franchetti e di Avigdor fossero consueti, ma, al di là della loro frequenza, essi rivelano come negli strati superiori dell’ebraismo italiano, grazie alla 3 A.A. Paolini, Franchetti, in “Antologia. Giornale di scienze, lettere e arti”, 136 (aprile 1832), pp. 206-208 e Scardozzi, Una storia di famiglia, cit., pp. 708-709. 4 Archivio di Stato di Torino, Sezione Corte (d’ora in poi, AST Corte), Materie ecclesiastiche, Materie ecclesiastiche per categorie, categoria 37, Ebrei, mazzo 6, lettera dell’intendente generale di Nizza al primo segretario di Stato per gli Affari dell’interno, 17 maggio 1827. 5 A.C. Jemolo, Gli ebrei piemontesi ed il ghetto intorno al 1835-1840, in “Memorie della Accademia delle Scienze di Torino”, 3a serie, 112 (1952), I, p. 26.

327


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

privilegiata posizione economica e sociale e nonostante il permanere di legislazioni più o meno discriminatorie, si fosse già intrapreso un cammino di avvicinamento alla società maggioritaria senza per questo recidere o anche solo allentare i vincoli con il gruppo etnico-religioso di provenienza. Comunque, come si è anticipato, fu dopo la seconda e definitiva emancipazione, fra il 1848 e il 18606, che il fenomeno si generalizzò. A ciò concorse anzitutto il complesso di fattori richiamati da Luisa Levi D’Ancona: sul piano generale le istituzioni ebraiche italiane risentivano della mancanza di un coordinamento centrale e di una forte leadership che aiutasse a trovare una definizione del nuovo ruolo da attribuirsi alle Università Israelitiche, non più chiamate a mediare tra la popolazione ebraica e lo stato. Più specificatamente per quanto riguarda le istituzioni filantropiche, la legge sulla Beneficenza del 1862, prevedendo la costituzione di comitati di beneficenza non confessionali gestiti dal governo locale, seppur con tutti i suoi limiti, dava ai poveri senza distinzione di culto il diritto di ricevere assistenza e aiuto dai governi municipali e provinciali. Inoltre, malgrado rimanessero importanti parti della popolazione ebraica ancora indigenti – problema particolarmente grave per le comunità ebraiche di Roma e Livorno – i processi di acculturazione e di mobilità sociale ed economica degli ebrei poveri furono più rapidi rispetto a quelli delle masse rurali ed urbane del resto del paese7.

Vanno inoltre tenuti presenti gli effetti che anche in Italia la raggiunta equiparazione giuridica ebbe sulla fisionomia culturale della compagine ebraica e le dinamiche attraverso le quali andò rimodulandosi la ‘diversità’ di una minoranza che per secoli si era misurata 6 È noto che gli ebrei di Roma dovettero attendere il 1870 e l’annessione dell’ex capitale pontificia al Regno d’Italia. 7 Levi D’Ancona, “Notabili e dame” nella filantropia ebraica, cit., p. 753.

328


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

con quella che Marina Caffiero ha recentemente chiamato una “aporia difficile da sciogliere tra integrazione e mantenimento dell’identità differente”8. Nel momento in cui il regime di segregazione venne meno e contemporaneamente l’identità religiosa, anche per le spinte secolarizzatrici dell’epoca, perse la preminenza che aveva avuto nel passato, per gli israeliti, infatti, si ampliò il ventaglio delle appartenenze (territoriali, di ceto, culturali) sulle quali incardinare il sistema di relazioni e di scambi con l’ambiente circostante e anche gli atti di liberalità sembrerebbero essersi configurati, senza che ciò ne sminuisse la sincerità, come strumenti di costruzione, nonché di proiezione, di un “intreccio identitario molto più articolato, che oltrepassa la dimensione confessionale ed istituzionale per dare vita a forme di ebraicità animate da una molteplicità di valenze – sociali, religiose e simboliche – a dosaggio e intensità variabili”9. Un approccio, questo, che non necessariamente segnò una rottura con i principi della tsedaqah e della gemilat (o gemilat hasadim), i due cardini del concetto ebraico di filantropia10, ma che di certo rende insufficiente una spiegazione in termini esclusivamente religiosi di molte delle manifestazioni di solidarietà delle quali allora furono protagoniste le élites ebraico-italiane. Tutti i casi sui quali ci si soffermerà tra breve riguardano, perciò, pratiche filantropiche svolte al di fuori del mondo ebraico, ma è scontato che essi restituiscono solo in parte la pluralità e l’eterogeneità degli ambiti cui dalla metà dell’Ottocento le classi elevate dell’ebraismo italiano rivolsero i loro sforzi sul versante 8 M. Caffiero, Legami pericolosi. Ebrei e cristiani tra eresia, libri proibiti e stregoneria, Torino, Einaudi, 2012, p. x. 9 B. Armani e G. Schwarz, Premessa, in “Quaderni storici”, 114 (2003), p. 630. 10 Sul significato di questi due termini e le trasformazioni, anche sul piano semantico, del concetto da essi espresso, cfr. V. Marchetti, The Fundamental Principles of Jewish Philanthropy, in Religions and Philanthropy, a cura di G. Gemelli, Bologna, Baskerville, 2007, pp. 45-65.

329


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

della beneficenza. Nel ‘campionario’ qui presentato, frutto di quello che è solamente un primo sondaggio, non è compresa, per esempio, la partecipazione alla vita delle associazioni mutualistiche, che pure videro un consistente coinvolgimento di esponenti – anche donne11 – della borghesia ebraica, così come non si tiene conto del ruolo di alcuni notabili ebrei nell’amministrazione degli enti (Congregazioni di carità e poi Istituzioni pubbliche di beneficenza) attraverso i quali, fra gli anni sessanta e novanta, i governi del nuovo Regno d’Italia procedettero all’istituzionalizzazione del Terzo settore12. Resta fuori dalla casistica proposta, inoltre, l’azione di alcuni politici ebrei che nel loro impegno pubblico furono mossi da un forte spirito umanitario e di cui è autorevole rappresentante Leone Wollemborg, fondatore nel 1883 della prima Cassa rurale del paese e protagonista di battaglie parlamentari per migliorare le condizioni di vita dei contadini italiani13. Nelle prossime pagine, invece, ci si concentrerà su iniziative individuali o familiari di cui, però, la natura privata non è il solo denominatore comune. I personaggi che incontreremo facevano tutti parte, infatti, del vertice di quella élite alla quale si è sinora fatto riferimento: ebrei dotati di fortune ingenti, spesso imparentati fra loro o con correligionari stranieri di pari rango, il cui profilo altoborghese non di rado, con l’acquisizione di titoli nobiliari14 e l’acquisto di sontuose residenze e di estesi possedimenti fondiari, assunse tratti tipicamente 11 Cfr. M. Miniati, Le “emancipate”. Le donne ebree in Italia nel XIX e XX secolo, Roma, Viella, 2003 [ed. or.: Paris, Champion, 2003], pp. 120-124 e Levi D’Ancona, “Notabili e dame” nella filantropia ebraica, cit., pp. 754-757. 12 Al riguardo si veda E. Bressan, Percorsi del Terzo settore e dell’impegno sociale dall’Unità alla Prima guerra mondiale, in Il Terzo settore nell’Italia unita, a cura di E. Rossi e S. Zamagni, Bologna, il Mulino, 2011, pp. 21-81. 13 Cfr. R. Marconato, La figura e l’opera di Leone Wollemborg. Il fondatore delle casse rurali nella realtà dell’Ottocento e del Novecento, Roma, ECRA, 1984. 14 Sulle nobilitazioni di ebrei avvenute in Italia tra gli inizi del XIX secolo e la caduta della monarchia sabauda, mi permetto di rinviare al mio Ebrei nobilitati e conversioni nell’Italia dell’Ottocento e del primo Novecento, in “Materia giudaica”, XIX (2014), 1-2, pp. 267-289.

330


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

aristocratici. Di alcuni di essi, contemporanei e posteri hanno proposto raffigurazioni nelle quali quello del benefattore è un aspetto che prevale su tutti gli altri, quasi oscurandoli15. Narrazioni che, se non restituiscono la realtà di biografie molto più complesse, tuttavia sarebbe improprio liquidare come meri racconti agiografici. Le rappresentazioni di questi personaggi come di grandi filantropi trovavano riscontro, infatti, in una munificenza che effettivamente, per intensità e per continuità nel tempo, non poteva non impressionare e la cui analisi offre un’interessante prospettiva dalla quale addentrarsi in alcune delle principali questioni attorno alle quali anche nel nostro paese, fra ’800 e primo ’900, si articolò il rapporto tra minoranza ebraica e società maggioritaria. Una serie di comportamenti fa anzitutto emergere l’intreccio tra beneficenza e sentimento di appartenenza alla nuova patria. Fosse quella più circoscritta della propria città o quella più estesa della nazione, la più ampia comunità alla quale gli ebrei erano stati ammessi con l’emancipazione divenne, infatti, il catalizzatore di una generosità venata di patriottismo che si esprimeva anche tramite la creazione di strutture assistenziali in grado di migliorare le condizioni di vita della sua popolazione, come era, per esempio, negli intendimenti dei fratelli Giacomo e Isacco Treves de’ Bonfili. I due nel 1851 costituirono a Venezia una fondazione – la Fondazione delle Grazie dei nobili cavalieri Treves dei Bonfili – che ogni anno distribuiva cinque “grazie” a quattro “operai o remiganti” che fossero “onesti e bisognosi” e a una “povera e costumata donzella, prossima a collocarsi in matrimonio con uomo industre e di ottima condotta”, tutti da scegliersi “nelle trenta parrocchie della città 15 Cfr., per esempio, Cenni necrologici sul conte Sebastiano Mondolfo, Milano, Pio Istituto Tipografico, 1873; Omaggio alla venerata memoria del barone commendatore Giacomo Treves dei Bonfili, a cura di G. Coen, Venezia, Premiato Stabilimento Emporio, 1885; In morte del conte cavaliere ufficiale Augusto Corinaldi, a cura di I. Ghiron, Padova, Tipografia Sacchetto, 1889; In memoria del barone Giuseppe Treves dei Bonfili, Padova, Tipografia Salmin, 1893.

331


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

e nella comunità Israelitica”16. Nella città lagunare l’istituzione fu subito accolta come testimonianza di una carità praticata “pel bene e lo splendore della patria”17 e in segno di gratitudine verso i suoi promotori, ma anche per suggellare il legame dell’operazione con la realtà locale, il Municipio fece apporre nella sala del consiglio comunale un’iscrizione che perpetuasse “il nome dei generosi cavalieri Jacopo ed Isacco Treves dei Bonfili”18. Non è difficile scorgere nell’opera di questi due nobiluomini veneziani la promozione di un’etica nella quale l’esaltazione della laboriosità, presente anche nell’ebraismo19, si combinava con le esigenze di ‘decoro’ di una borghesia, ovviamente non solo ebraica, che vedeva nel pauperismo un fenomeno da controllare e limitare. Etica della quale sarà convinto interprete anche un altro membro della famiglia Treves de’ Bonfili, il barone Giuseppe (figlio del Giacomo appena citato), uno dei filantropi ebrei più conosciuti nell’Italia del XIX secolo. Una sua apprezzata dissertazione sulle ‘case di lavoro’ – che significativamente recava in epigrafe il passo della Genesi In sudore vultus tui vesceris pane – contiene insistenti richiami al valore del lavoro come fattore di sviluppo della persona e della collettività e come mezzo per mantenere la coesione e l’ordine sociale: Ogni individuo col prodotto del suo lavoro deve concorrere a soddisfare ai bisogni de’ suoi fratelli; il che è un patto di reciproca solidarietà indispensabile all’esistenza ed alla prosperità sì dell’individuo che dei popoli e delle nazioni. Chi fornito di valide braccia vagabonda od accatta, è come pianta parassita che senza produrre vive del prodotto altrui, e con ciò 16 A. Sagredo, Sulle consorterie delle arti edificative in Venezia. Studi storici, Venezia, Tipografia Naratovich, 1856, pp. 369-371, citazione p. 369. 17 Ivi, pp. 370-371. 18 P. Bembo, Delle istituzioni di beneficenza nella città e provincia di Venezia. Studii [sic] storico-economico-statistici, Venezia, Tipografia Naratovich, 1859, p. 419. 19 J. Attali, Gli ebrei, il mondo, il denaro. Storia economica del popolo ebraico, Lecce, Argo, 2003 [ed. or.: Paris, Fayard, 2002], pp. 124-126.

332


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

fallisce al biblico precetto scelto ad epigrafe di questo scritto. Vagabondi ed accattoni non iscarseggiano, sia per l’indole umana che generalmente ripugna dalla fatica, sia anche per malintesa distribuzione dei privati e pubblici soccorsi; sicché è manifesto il vantaggio di che trattasi, imperciocché moltiplicando la produzione si accrescono i mezzi, e coi mezzi si incrementa il benessere sociale. Numerosa è pur troppo la serie dei vizi, né scarsa di funeste conseguenze. Elemento principale generatore del vizio è un ozio continuato; combattendolo [...], mentre si porge valido aiuto al povero, si migliora la pubblica morale20.

A tale impostazione, nella quale la solidarietà verso i propri concittadini meno fortunati si combinava con evidenti finalità pedagogiche, rimanda anche la fondazione istituita a Torino dal barone Ignazio Weil Weiss, nato a Zagabria ma vissuto prima a Verona e poi nel capoluogo piemontese. Costituita in ente morale nell’aprile del 1886, questa aveva lo scopo di “promuovere il perfezionamento degli operai torinesi, mercé il conferimento di due premi annui di lire 500 a quelli tra i detti operai, senza distinzione di professione religiosa, i quali [avessero dato] prova di speciale attitudine nei lavori della loro industria”21. Anch’essa venne salutata quale esempio di filantropia illuminata e patriottica, come dimostrano i toni usati da Enrico Trivero, presidente dell’Associazione generale di mutuo soccorso ed istruzione degli operai di Torino, negli inviti per la cerimonia organizzata per fare “conoscere alla classe operaia l’esistenza del novello Istituto ed onorare l’uomo, il quale, mentre dimostra così vivo interesse al 20 G. Treves de’ Bonfili, Sopra il tema proposto dalla R. Accademia di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti di Modena proposto ne’ termini seguenti: Avvisare al modo più acconcio e meno dispendioso per istituire Case di lavoro che rendano possibile l’abolizione dell’accattonaggio, o almeno contribuiscano a diminuirlo [...], Modena, Tipografia Soliani, 1862, pp. 6-7. 21 “Gazzetta ufficiale del Regno d’Italia”, 3 maggio 1886, n. 103, p. 2296.

333


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

benessere della nostra classe, promuove il progresso delle arti e delle industrie, lieto che il nostro Paese si innalzi al livello delle nazioni più felici e prospere”22. Nel caso del barone Raimondo Franchetti e di Ulderico Levi, la vicinanza al proprio territorio, che per entrambi fu quello di Reggio Emilia, si tradusse, invece, in realizzazioni delle quali avrebbe beneficiato l’intera collettività. Dal 1870 circa al 1905, anno della sua scomparsa, il barone Franchetti, a proprie spese, nella città emiliana fece costruire strade, asili, scuole e abitazioni per i suoi contadini, guadagnandosi la fama di “padre dei poveri”, “consolatore del popolo”, “provvidenza di questi luoghi” 23. Nello stesso torno di anni, Ulderico Levi ugualmente si fece promotore, anche nella sua qualità prima di deputato e poi di senatore del Regno, di una lunga serie di interventi che segnarono altrettante tappe del processo di modernizzazione di Reggio Emilia: la creazione di una Esposizione Industriale Permanente, la costruzione del nuovo Politeama Ariosto, l’assunzione della presidenza della Società di Mutuo Soccorso tra gli Operai, della associazione di tiro a segno e della società di Beneficenza e divertimenti, l’istituzione di premi per i viticultori e per gli artigiani, l’avvio dei lavori per l’arredo cittadino e la demolizione delle mura, lo stanziamento di una caserma di un reggimento d’artiglieria, la costituzione di un comitato per le irrigazioni ed, infine, la costruzione dell’opera a cui legò il proprio nome: l’acquedotto, donato alla cittadinanza reggiana nel novembre del 188524. 22 Si cita da una copia di tali inviti, datata 11 giugno 1887 e firmata, oltre che da Trivero, dal segretario dell’Associazione Pietro Canedi, di proprietà dello scrivente. 23 L. Artioli, Presenza e contributo della famiglia Franchetti a Reggio Emilia, in “Ricerche storiche. Rivista quadrimestrale dell’Istituto per la storia della Resistenza e della guerra di Liberazione in provincia di Reggio Emilia”, XXVII (1993), 73, pp. 113-114, 117 e 120-121. 24 A. Ferraboschi, Borghesia e potere civico a Reggio Emilia nella seconda metà dell’Ottocento (1859-1889), Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, 2003, p. 80. A sottolineare il “santo amor di patria” che aveva spinto Ulderico Levi a finanziare la costruzione dell’acquedotto reggiano, fu anche la “Rivista della Beneficenza

334


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

Questo incastro di altruismo, senso civico e attaccamento alla patria (e anche alla monarchia) si riscontra – se si vuole – anche nelle oblazioni con cui diversi ebrei, così come tanti non ebrei, ottennero la nobilitazione e delle quali è possibile dare una lettura che non si limiti al loro carattere strumentale. Se è infatti fuori discussione che simili atti di beneficenza, peraltro spesso sub condicione, rientravano nel ‘commercio’ delle dignità gentilizie che caratterizzò la politica nobiliare dell’Italia liberale e che costituì “una sorta di versione aggiornata delle antiche prassi legate all’acquisto dei feudi o delle cariche nobilitanti”, è vero pure che essi ebbero “destinazioni tutt’altro che ignobili”25 e che furono funzionali al programma di edificazione del nuovo Stato, sostenendo economicamente strutture come ospedali, enti assistenziali e scuole. Tra le donazioni ricompensate con la concessione di un titolo nobiliare figurano, così, quella fatta nel 1892 da Moisè Iacout Levi de Veali “a benefizio dell’Ospedale per donne e bambini Maria Vittoria” di Torino o quella fatta quattro anni dopo da Giorgio Levi al costituendo “Istituto dei Bambini Poveri in Venezia”26. Ricorrenti risultano pure le elargizioni ‘nobilitanti’ a vantaggio dell’Istituto nazionale per le figlie dei militari italiani e dell’Ospedale oftalmico e infantile di Torino, entrambi vicini alla Corona: il primo, oltre al barone Ignazio Weil Weiss – che nel 1877 fece un’“offerta di lire venticinquemila” che “contribuis[se] sempre più alla prosperità di un pubblica e degli Istituti di previdenza”, che all’inizio del 1879, dopo l’annuncio della disponibilità di Levi “ad assumersi tale spesa per il benessere della sua città”, “colla più viva soddisfazione” diede notizia di questo “atto generosissimo” e tributò onori “al benemerito e generoso cittadino” (Atto generosissimo del comm. Ulderico Levi di Reggio Emilia, in “Rivista della Beneficenza pubblica e degli Istituti di previdenza”, VII (1879), 1 (31 gennaio), p. 70). Sul contributo che tanto Ulderico Levi e i suoi due fratelli quanto Raimondo Franchetti diedero allo sviluppo tardo ottocentesco di Reggio Emilia, si veda anche M. Bianchini, Imprese e imprenditori a Reggio Emilia, 1861-1940, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 1995. 25 G.C. Jocteau, Nobili e nobiltà nell’Italia unita, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 1997, pp. 31 e 46. 26 Pellegrini, Ebrei nobilitati e conversioni, cit., p. 273.

335


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

Istituto così altamente benemerito e patriottico”27 –, ebbe tra i propri benefattori il futuro conte Joseph Meyer Cahen e suo figlio Edoardo, poi insignito anche del titolo di marchese di Torre Alfina28, mentre il secondo ricevette somme di denaro più o meno consistenti dagli stessi Cahen e da altri aspiranti nobili come Michele Corinaldi, Michele Ephrussi e Sebastiano Mondolfo29. Nel caso di Leonetto Ottolenghi, invece, il patriottismo manifestato con le sue donazioni prese forme e contenuti tipici della simbologia nazional-patriottica dell’Italia postunitaria: questo ebreo astigiano, che alla sua morte (avvenuta il 20 febbraio 1904) fu ricordato da “Il Vessillo Israelitico” in un lungo necrologio che ne celebrava l’innata generosità30, nel 1898, in occasione del cinquantenario dello Statuto albertino, fece infatti dono “alla sua città natale del monumento dedicato al Risorgimento della Patria, che fu da esso ideato ed a tutte sue spese fatto costruire”, e si accollò quasi integralmente gli alti costi per l’allestimento 27 Cfr. il carteggio raccolto in AST Corte, Istituti Assistenza e Beneficenza, Istituto Nazionale per le Figlie dei Militari in Torino, categoria 10, Oblazioni, mazzo 639 (la citazione è tratta da una lettera, ivi conservata, scritta da Ignazio Weil Weiss al conte Alessandro Pernati di Momo, senatore del Regno, in data 14 giugno 1877). 28 Cfr. Archivio centrale dello Stato (d’ora in poi, ACS), Presidenza del Consiglio dei ministri (d’ora in poi, PCM), Consulta araldica (d’ora in poi, CA), Fascicoli, b. 3, fasc. 27, lettera del presidente della “Commissione promotrice dell’Istituto nazionale per le figlie dei militari italiani” al prefetto di Torino, 13 dicembre 1865; AST Corte, Istituti Assistenza e Beneficenza, Istituto Nazionale per le Figlie dei Militari in Torino, categoria 10, Oblazioni, mazzo 639, lettera del prefetto di Torino al presidente della “Commissione Promotrice per la fondazione di un Istituto per le figlie dei Militari”, 17 [...] 1864; A. Mancini, I Cahen, storia di una famiglia, Orvieto, Intermedia, 2011, pp. 23-25 e 41. 29 Cfr., rispettivamente, i documenti in ACS, PCM, CA, Fascicoli, b. 2, fasc.13; b. 69, fasc. 731; b. 5, fasc. 51. 30 Rabb. M.F., Conte Leonetto Ottolenghi, in “Il Vessillo Israelitico”, LII (1904), 3, pp. 96-105; nel necrologio l’autore scriveva, fra l’altro, che Ottolenghi, di “animo squisitamente nobile amò i giovani e molti a Lui debbono i mezzi per proseguire gli studi. Beneficava così, per istinto, per naturale bisogno dell’animo gentile, con delicata cortesia che avvinceva a Lui i beneficati con corrispondenza d’affetto. E da anni lunghissimi esplicava la funzione nobilissima: dall’età giovanile agli ultimi giorni della sua vita è una serie continua, ininterrotta di munificenze regali. Nella beneficenza si compendiava la sua vita: diremo meglio, Leonetto Ottolenghi visse per beneficare” (p. 97).

336


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

dell’“Esposizione vinicola e viticola della sua Asti” annessa all’Esposizione generale di Torino31. Alla nuova situazione determinata dal completamento del processo emancipatorio si ricollegano anche le attività assistenziali che furono promosse da alcuni personaggi nell’inedita veste di grandi proprietari terrieri. Escluse dal possesso della terra sino all’età napoleonica, furono infatti molte, tra le famiglie più facoltose, quelle che in seguito costituirono fiorenti aziende agrarie che divennero – come ha osservato Riccardo Bachi – “strumenti assai notevoli di trasformazione sociale e tecnica dell’economia agricola italiana”32. A tale proposito basti pensare al ruolo svolto in Veneto dai Sullam, i quali “fecero della terra il loro campo d’azione principale e quasi esclusivo”33, oppure dagli Sforni, dai Leonino e da altri casati della comunità ebraica di Milano che investirono massicciamente nel settore, sino ad arrivare, alla fine dell’Ottocento, a possedere patrimoni fondiari “del tutto paragonabili, per valore, ad alcuni fra quelli più consistenti detenuti dagli esponenti dell’aristocrazia ambrosiana”34. Nelle loro tenute molti di questi ricchi possidenti, con la realizzazione di strade e ponti, le bonifiche e l’impianto di nuovi servizi, intrapresero la modernizzazione di zone rurali spesso arretrate e si adoperarono per migliorare le condizioni di vita e di lavoro delle popolazioni del luogo. Indubbiamente si trattava di operazioni alle quali non erano estranei un certo paternalismo e l’idea, propria del ‘conservatorismo illuminato’, che il mantenimento dell’ordine esistente imponesse degli obblighi alle classi privilegiate, alimentando, così, rapporti di deferenza 31 ACS, PCM, CA, Fascicoli, b. 427, fasc. 2764, lettera del prefetto di Alessandria al ministro dell’Interno, 16 aprile 1898. 32 R. Bachi, L’attività economica degli Ebrei in Italia alla fine del secolo XIX, in Studi in onore di Gino Luzzatto, III, Milano, Giuffrè, 1950, p. 274. 33 A. Lazzarini, Possidenti e bonificatori ebrei: la famiglia Sullam, in Storia di Venezia, cit., pp. 603-617, citazione p. 603. 34 G. Maifreda, Gli ebrei e l’economia milanese. L’Ottocento, Milano, Angeli, 2000, pp. 211-238, citazione p. 215.

337


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

e favorendo un controllo del territorio che sovente agevolava l’ingresso in politica35. Nello stesso tempo, però, tali interventi si configuravano come strumenti di tutela delle fasce più deboli della società locale e non di rado facevano propria una concezione di welfare più nuova e più razionale come si sottolinea, per esempio, nell’articolo che nel 1910 il “Giornale di Agricoltura della Domenica” dedicò alle migliorie introdotte nel loro tenimento di Torre di Zuino, presso Udine, dai conti Corinaldi: I proprietari – vi si legge – [...] dedicarono la loro maggiore attenzione al nutrimento del contadino: si represse energicamente l’uso delle bevande alcooliche e i risultati furono davvero notevoli. Un validissimo contributo portarono nella lotta contro la pellagra, introducendo la coltura della segala, in sostituzione di quella del cinquantino; provvidero alla diffusione di colture secondarie e all’apicoltura, allo scopo di portare un miglioramento della alimentazione delle classi rurali. Il miglioramento delle abitazioni ebbe pure serio effetto sulla salute pubblica e sulla pubblica moralità. Molto opportunamente i conti Corinaldi introdussero i pozzi artesiani e pensarono ad applicare largamente la legge sull’iscrizione dei coloni alla Cassa Nazionale di Previdenza. Altri notevoli miglioramenti si andranno a poco a poco introducendo grazie alla liberalità dei Conti Corinaldi; 35 Si consideri, per esempio, il caso dell’Umbria, dove negli anni ottanta del XIX secolo le famiglie Franchetti e Cahen rilevarono estesi tenimenti: qui nel “1882 Leopoldo Franchetti, oltre ad entrare nel consiglio comunale di Città di Castello, fu eletto deputato. Avrebbe tenuto ininterrottamente tale carica fino agli inizi del 1909, dapprima eletto nel collegio regionale di Perugia e poi, dal 1892, nel collegio di Città di Castello. Nell’aprile 1909 fu nominato senatore. Ad Allerona Ugo Cahen, il secondogenito di Edoardo, fu sindaco dal 1915 al 1920; Paolo Franchetti lo fu a Piediluco dal 1920 e fu poi per breve tempo podestà” (L. Brunelli, Gli ebrei in Umbria dopo l’emancipazione, in Ebrei dell’Italia centrale. Dallo Stato pontificio al Regno d’Italia. Atti del Convegno (Perugia, 14-15 aprile 2011), a cura di L. Cerqueglini, Foligno-Perugia, Editoriale Umbra-Istituto per la storia dell’Umbria contemporanea, 2012, p. 151).

338


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

essi certo daranno impulso a iniziative ed attività feconde di utilità pubblica. Intanto i valorosi proprietari possono essere additati alla pubblica estimazione36.

Toni simili qualche anno prima erano stati usati da un altro giornale per descrivere quanto i baroni Leonino avevano fatto nelle loro terre in provincia di Milano37 e anche delle opere realizzate dal barone Weil Weiss all’interno delle sue tenute di Oppeano, Lainate e Zinasco erano state messe in evidenza le finalità filantropico-patriottiche: E siccome, in ben temprata natura, ingegno, previdenza e filantropia sono spesso congiunte, così, fin d’allora, compresi come Ella avesse preso di mira, principalmente, a procurare con tale lavoro nella stagione [...] fonte d’onesto guadagno ai poveri braccianti; opera questa di ben intesa carità che onora chi la pratica e non umilia chi la riceve, prova di altissimo patriottismo, perché accresce la ricchezza reale del paese non solo, ma rinvigorisce eziandio il sentimento di dignità e responsabilità che è la ricchezza morale della Nazione38.

L’attenzione di questi proprietari terrieri alle necessità delle popolazioni rurali talvolta si concretizzò nell’apertura di scuole per i figli dei coloni. Così, il conte Sebastiano Mondolfo, grande benefattore e poi presidente dell’Istituto dei ciechi di Milano, nel suo ‘feudo’ di Morguzzo, nel circondario di Como, fondò 36 E. Jelmoni, I grandi benemeriti nella lotta contro la pellagra, in “Giornale di Agricoltura della Domenica”, 2 gennaio 1910, p. 4. 37 C. Robecchi, Nuovo cascinale per la possessione Adelina di compendio del tenimento di Villamaggiore, Provincia di Milano di ragione del Sig. Barone Davide Leonino, in “Il Politecnico. Giornale dell’ingegnere architetto civile ed industriale”, XLVI (1898), agosto, pp. 473-487. 38 ACS, Ministero dell’Agricoltura, Industria e Commercio, Direzione generale dell’Agricoltura, IV versamento, b. 260, fasc. 1639, s.fasc. 22, relazione di Enrico Bosetti su “alcune opere agrarie nelle tenute Lainate e Bragagnani proprie del Signor Barone Ignazio Weil Weiss di Lainate”, 27 dicembre 1884.

339


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

e mantenne “del proprio una scuola elementare, aperta a tutti i figli degli abitanti di quel Comune, che prima ne era privo”39, mentre a Città di Castello, in Umbria, Leopoldo Franchetti e soprattutto sua moglie Alice Hallgarten, un’ebrea americana di origini tedesche e di cultura cosmopolita, agli inizi del ’900 crearono due scuole nelle frazioni di Montesca e di Rovigliano, alle quali nel giro di qualche anno si sarebbero aggiunti scuole serali, corsi popolari, cicli di conferenze di botanica e di agraria e lezioni di igiene pedagogica per le insegnanti della zona40. Fu proprio in queste due scuole umbre, peraltro, che la pedagogista Maria Montessori sperimentò il suo famoso metodo, “tanto che alcuni studiosi parlano di un metodo Franchetti-Montessori”41. Le iniziative di questo tipo, che davano continuità al forte impegno nell’ambito dell’istruzione che dall’inizio del XIX scolo caratterizzò l’azione filantropica delle élites ebraiche del paese, furono portate avanti non solo nelle campagne, ma anche nelle realtà urbane, dove spesso l’industrializzazione aveva provocato la nascita di nuove povertà. È infatti urbano il contesto in cui si collocano l’inaugurazione, nel 1877, della scuola edificata a Trieste, nel quartiere popolare dell’Arsenale, grazie al generoso lascito del barone Elio de Morpurgo, proprietario della banca Morpurgo & Parente e per dieci anni, fino alla sua scomparsa, presidente del Lloyd triestino42, e la fondazione a Mantova dell’istituto 39 Ivi, PCM, CA, Fascicoli, b. 5, fasc. 51, lettera del presidente dell’Ospedale oftalmico e infantile di Torino al ministro dell’Interno, 14 dicembre 1863. 40 Cfr. R. Fossati, Il lavoro culturale e la vita affettiva di Alice Hallgarten Franchetti, in Leopoldo e Alice Franchetti e il loro tempo. Atti del convegno (Città di Castello, 7-8 aprile 2000), a cura di P. Pezzino e A. Tacchini, Città di Castello, Petruzzi, 2002, pp. 157-194; S. Bucci, La scuola della Montesca. Un centro educativo internazionale, ivi, pp. 195-242; M.L. Buseghin, Alice Hallgarten Franchetti, un modello di donna e di imprenditrice nell’Italia tra ’800 e ’900, Selci Lama (PG), Pliniana, 2013. 41 M.L. Buseghin, “Cara Marietta...”: un epistolario per la ricostruzione della vita di Alice Hallgarten Franchetti e del suo mondo, in Leopoldo e Alice Franchetti, cit., p. 244. 42 Cfr. Scuola elementare di fondazione barone Elio de Morpurgo, Centenario della fondazione, 1877-1977, a cura del Consiglio di circolo del II

340


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

finanziato con l’ingente eredità lasciata nel 1903 da Giuseppe Franchetti (non era imparentato con gli omonimi baroni cui si è spesso accennato) e che aveva “per iscopo di soccorrere con premi da determinarsi a quei giovani italiani e preferibilmente a famiglie non agiate che in qualunque ramo di scienza civile e militare, d’industria e d’arte dimostr[assero] seriamente distinta intelligenza e capacità e po[tessero] quindi fare onore al [...] paese”43. Con l’apertura di questo istituto, nel cui consiglio d’amministrazione avrebbero dovuto sedere, secondo quanto disposto dal testatore, anche due membri scelti “dalla commissione israelitica di culto e beneficenza” di Mantova, veniva coronata l’esistenza di un uomo che, come scrisse un giornale locale all’indomani della sua scomparsa, “aveva dedicato tutta la sua lunga vita alle pubbliche cariche amministrative e a opere di beneficenza”44. Molti altri sono gli esempi di questa carità ‘trasversale’ – segno chiarissimo di una volontà di superare la separatezza del passato – che potrebbero essere portati, ma anziché ampliare la casistica, il che lascerebbe il quadro sostanzialmente immutato, è invece opportuno affrontare in breve due aspetti del fenomeno oggetto di esame. Il primo attiene all’interrogatvo, peraltro già sollevato da Mirella Scardozzi, se un impegno filantropico di simili proporzioni, oltre alle implicazioni cui si accennava all’inizio, non abbia un altro significato e cioè se non costituisca la spia di un percorso di affermazione sociale reso più problematico dall’“ebraicità come ostacolo aggiuntivo da superare”45. A questo proposito giova ricordare che proprio l’appena citato Giuseppe Franchetti, con altri esponenti della comunità ebraica mantovana, fu il bersaglio di una campagna antisemita Circolo didattico, Trieste, Mosetti, 1977. 43 G. Vigna, Istituto Giuseppe Franchetti, Mantova, senza editore, 1988, p. 14. 44 Ivi, pp. 14 e 9. 45 Scardozzi, Una storia di famiglia, cit., p. 723.

341


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

ingaggiata da organi di stampa locali che investì anche il tema della beneficenza46 e che lascia intravedere alcuni limiti e alcune incongruenze del processo di inserimento degli ebrei italiani nel tessuto nazionale. Testate come “Mah!!!...” e “Il Lirone”, la prima uscita dal 1885 al 1900 e la seconda dal 1891 al 1899, si scagliarono contro la presenza di israeliti negli organi direttivi delle Congregazioni di carità (di cui si ometteva di ricordare la natura di istituzioni laiche), contrapponendola all’assenza di ‘gentili’ nella gestione degli enti benefici ebraici (che invece avevano un carattere confessionale al pari di analoghi sodalizi attivi in ambito cattolico), e reclamarono la chiusura di questi ultimi, accusati di indifferenza verso chi non appartenesse all’università israelitica o se ne fosse allontanato. Quello che in buona sostanza i due giornali sostenevano era che gli ebrei, malgrado l’emancipazione, si mostravano solidali solo con i propri correligionari – di fatto riproponendo lo stereotipo di un corpo rimasto estraneo alla comunità nazionale – e che pertanto andavano estromessi da ogni forma di assistenza pubblica47. Negli stessi anni, inoltre, toni e argomenti non molto diversi furono usati nella polemica portata avanti da alcuni giornali cattolici friulani e veneti contro l’elezione di Elio Morpurgo a sindaco di Udine. Gli attacchi al futuro deputato, senatore del Regno e barone si intrecciarono insistentemente con la denuncia del ‘rischio’ che i pubblici amministratori ebrei assumessero il controllo delle opere pie, un ‘rischio’ reso più grave dal fatto che 46 Cfr. Un secolo di stampa periodica mantovana, 1797-1897, a cura di C. Castagnoli e G. Ciaramelli, Milano, Angeli, 2002, pp. 160 e 169-170. 47 Nel 1879 anche La Civiltà Cattolica polemizzò contro gli “usi di beneficenza [...] a profitto d’ebrei e di patrioti” (Cronaca contemporanea. II. Cose italiane, in “La Civiltà Cattolica”, 1879, serie X, vol. IX, quaderno 687, p. 362); sull’atteggiamento verso la ‘questione ebraica’ della rivista ideata dal gesuita Carlo Maria Curci, nella quale si sarebbe parlato, ancora nel 1898, di una “solidarietà di razza, anteriore e superiore negli ebrei a qualsiasi altro patriottismo”, si veda R. Taradel e B. Raggi, La segregazione amichevole. “La Civiltà Cattolica” e la questione ebraica, 1850-1945, Roma, Editori Riuniti, 2000, citazione p. 101.

342


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

“per gli ebrei valeva ‘il dio oro prima di tutto’, che essi erano sempre gli stessi (ossia subdoli e pericolosi […]), e che stavano regolarmente a capo della rivoluzione laicista e secolarizzatrice, sempre pronti a calunniare quello stesso cattolicesimo che – si sosteneva con una evidente finzione storica – li aveva tanto benignamente e caritatevolmente trattati nel corso dei secoli”48. Pure in questo caso, dunque, si riproponeva la pregiudiziale raffigurazione degli ebrei come di individui distanti dal sistema di valori, compreso quello della solidarietà, di una nazione che stava autodefinendosi sulla base di un coacervo di elementi ‘naturalmene’ condivisi, incluse la religione e l’etnia49. A rendere complessa la posizione di questi grandi benefattori era anche – e con ciò veniamo al secondo aspetto da trattare in conclusione – l’interpretazione che della loro filantropia senza distinzione di culto diede la stampa ebraica. Nel 1854, per esempio, Lelio Della Torre, docente del Collegio rabbinico di Padova e figura di primo piano della cultura ebraica italiana dell’Ottocento, su “L’Educatore Israelita” pubblicò un articolo intitolato Beneficienza israelitica che aveva lo scopo di informare i lettori sulle recenti iniziative con cui, in varie parti del mondo, alcuni ebrei si erano prodigati per i correligionari indigenti. Ciò che di questo scritto qui ci interessa non sono, tuttavia, i gesti filantropici in esso elencati, ma le considerazioni introduttive del suo autore: La carità israelitica – scriveva Della Torre – è universale. Che questa non sia una verità meramente speculativa e teorica, ma pratica e immedesimata nei sentimenti, nelle opinioni e nelle opere, il prova il notevole, irrecusabile 48 V. Marchi, Il “sindaco ebreo”. Scambi polemici sulla stampa per l’elezione di Elio Morpurgo (Udine 1889), in “Metodi e ricerche. Rivista di studi regionali”, XXVI (2007), 2, pp. 107-130, citazione p. 121. 49 Cfr., su questi temi, B. Armani, “Ebrei in casa”. Famiglia, etnicità e ruoli sessuali tra norme pratiche e rappresentazioni, in “Storia e problemi contemporanei”, XX (2007), 45, pp. 31-56.

343


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

fatto, di cui si possono citare molti e luminosi esempi che i più ortodossi, i più rigorosamente ligi alle proprie credenze, i più affezionati ai proprii correligionarii, come la vita intera ne fece continua testimonianza, non dimenticarono mai nè in vita nè in morte i poveri e le instituzioni degli altri culti.

Il richiamo al carattere universalistico della filantropia ebraica era immediatamente seguito, però, dalla puntualizzazione che se è dovere principalissimo dell’Israelita di largheggiare anche coi non-Israeliti, specialmente se sieno suoi concittadini, non è men vero che oblighi anche più gravi e più sacri gli corrono verso i suoi fratelli in religione, nella stessa guisa che ogni individuo è prima tenuto a sovvenire i congiunti che non gli estranei e dee sovrattutto vantaggiare col suo superfluo gl’istituti religiosi da cui dipende la conservazione e l’ampliazione del culto.

A questo punto Della Torre indicava i veri destinatari del suo appello in favore di una solidarietà che privilegiasse i bisognosi della propria comunità religiosa: se dall’una parte consola lo scorgere gl’Israeliti fedeli al precetto della carità universale, addolora dall’altra l’osservare che non mancano pur troppo opulenti Israeliti, pochi e rari, la Dio mercé, i quali credono di non poter far migliore professione di tolleranza, che col trascurare i proprii fratelli, a cui forse si sdegnano di appartenere, e col far quasi unicamente a non Israeliti sentire gli effetti della loro generosità, il che altro non serve a dimostrare se non se essi non operano che per ostentazione, non sodisfanno ad un bisogno del cuore, non son mossi da spirito di carità50.

Gli argomenti di Della Torre nel 1872 furono ripresi 50 L. Della Torre, Beneficienza israelitica, in “L’Educatore Israelita”, II (1854), 5, pp. 181-182; 7, pp. 213-215; 8, pp. 233-235; 10, pp. 303-306.

344


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

da Giuseppe Levi, un altro rabbino, che nell’articolo I banchieri ebrei e gl’interessi israelitici, alla generosità verso i propri correligionari dimostrata da famosi filantropi ebrei stranieri come Moses Montefiore o i Rothschild, contrappose l’indifferenza delle élites ebraiche del suo paese e il loro ossequio a “convenienze sociali” irrispettose “del proprio nome e della propria causa”: gli ebrei sono sempre ben disposti. E questo è un gran bene, benché i maligni [...] vogliano dire che la vanità e le convenienze sociali vi abbiano molta parte, come hanno parte nella generosità dei cristiani. Trattasi di un interesse israelitico? ecco che la piaga dà sangue. Vi sono molte eccezioni, è vero, ma non credo che queste eccezioni sieno tante da formare la regola. Talvolta s’è ridotto a tale che i poveri collettori (e i rabbini informino), tremano a chiedere per un interesse israelitico, come se fosse cosa di contrabbando. E questa è gran vergogna; vergogna, intendiamoci bene, per quelli su cui possono assai più le convenienze sociali, che il rispetto del proprio nome e della propria causa. V’ha di peggio ancora. Talvolta, per queste pretese convenienze sociali, quello che si rifiuta per un interesse israelitico si dà invece per uno scopo che, quantunque di beneficenza, ha un carattere odioso verso la causa israelitica. E non s’ha il coraggio di rispondere “Io sono pure disposto a fare del bene: ma volete ch’io contribuisca a un’opera che ha proponimenti contrarii alla mia causa?” Non s’ha il coraggio, perché ci facciamo schiavi di questo fantasma delle convenienze sociali51.

Le prese di posizione più dure, però, furono quelle assunte al principio del Novecento da “Il Corriere Israelitico”. Sul contenuto degli articoli apparsi nel mensile triestino, per il quale “la causa e gli interessi del giudaismo venivano prima delle entusiastiche

51

G. Levi, I banchieri ebrei e gl’interessi israelitici, ivi, XX (1872), 3, pp. 65-69.

345


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

identificazioni con le nuove patrie”52, si è già soffermato Valerio Marchi53, alle cui considerazioni, dunque, si rimanda. A titolo esemplificativo si riporta quanto nel 1905 scriveva Isaja Levi: Quando la morte miete, colla sua inesorabile falce, la vita di qualche ricco Israelita, i giornali riboccano di notizie… sulle disposizioni testamentarie del deceduto. Gli enti beneficati sono – o Scuole pubbliche Maschili e Femminili, produttrici sovente di ferventi antisemiti; od Opere così dette umanitarie, delizie di socialisti ed anarchici; od Istituzioni di borse di studio, vero semenzaio di spostati; od Accademie per favorire, o meglio infiacchire, le arti e le scienze; o per instradare a carriere militari od universitarie… chi non sa più da qual parte rivolgersi. – Ecco dove affluiscono i milioni dei nostri ricchi. Né tali vistosi lasciti, tutti particolari ad Israeliti, destano gratitudine, dove piovono a catinelle, in chi li riceve o ne risente utile. Risulta, al contrario, che ravvivano l’astio, il quale, palese o latente, s’annida nel cuore di chi mostra volere così poco bene al semita. Chi scrive si ricorda di una polemica, dovuta pubblicamente sostenere in città italiana, la quale deve ad individui nati Israeliti, ed acquedotti costosissimi, ed ameni siti di passeggio, e locali per esposizioni, e molte e molte altre opere di pubblica utilità. In risposta a tanto scialacquio, si buttava in faccia all’Ebreo, fra i minori epiteti, quello di sordido avaro. Mi si dirà che un fiore non fa primavera, ma io ripeto che di tali singoli fiori è pieno il giardino d’Europa. In altre città si erigono, per nonnulla, busti, monumenti all’aperto, ai non Israeliti, ma all’Ebreo che lasciò la miseria di due milioncini al Municipio locale, nulla si eresse per onorarne il nome, e ciò forse anche nella tema di non occasionare vandalismi da parte della popolazione, antisemita per eccellenza. – Quanto 52 Cfr. B. Di Porto, “Il Corriere Israelitico”: uno sguardo d’insieme, in “Materia giudaica”, IX (2004), 1-2, pp. 249-263, citazione p. 250. 53 V. Marchi, Il cuore ebreo del sig. Morpurgo. Elio Morpurgo e gli ebrei di Udine: frammenti di una storia difficile, in “Metodi e ricerche. Rivista di studi regionali”, XXVIII (2008), 1, pp. 197-231.

346


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

sarebbe stato meglio, ad onore dei testatori, se una minima parte dei vistosi capitali così sperperati, fosse stata, da chi lo poteva, destinata all’incremento del culto Israelitico, che nelle città, dove si ripetono tali eccessi nei doni, procede negletto e tisico, tanto da prevedere che stia per cessare in epoca più o meno prossima, coll’assottigliarsi continuo della comunità e quindi col mancare dei sottili proventi che ora le sorreggono a stento! – Quanto siamo lontani dalle esortazioni bibliche di offrire spontaneamente con lealtà, con sincero cuore, a norma delle proprie forze, pel culto! […] Allora sì, avrebbero lodi i ricchi pel buon uso della facoltà loro; allora sì, la ricchezza si mostrerebbe vera corona di savii […]: allora sì che ogni ricco acquisterebbe il diritto di essere benedetto, di giacere in sepolcro onorato. La stolta mania di rendersi popolare (vano desiderio) induce a far altrimenti e così procurar onta al proprio nome, a danno irreparabile dell’Israelitismo54.

A questi generici attacchi alla categoria degli “opulenti Israeliti” si alternarono, poi, articoli polemici contro singoli individui. Furono così chiamati in causa, fra gli altri, Ignazio Weil Weiss, Alessandro Vita Todros, Ulderico Levi, Elio Morpurgo, Alberto Franchetti. A quest’ultimo, per esempio, era rivolto il Comunicato, pubblicato dal “Il Vessillo Israelitico” nel 1888, nel quale Moisè Mortara esprimeva tutto il suo “biasimo”: E qui mi si concedano alcune parole di biasimo verso coloro che pur mostrandosi larghi nel beneficare il povero di altra fede dimenticano gli stenti di quelli cui essi dovrebbero tener in conto di fratelli perché comuni hanno con loro le memorie, le speranze, il sangue, il cuore, l’altare. Spesso l’ambizione più che la carità, spesso la sete di popolarità e di fama, muove le azioni tuttoché degne e

54 I. Levi, I testamenti dei ricchi Israeliti, in “Il Corriere Israelitico”, XLIV (1905), 5, pp. 136-137.

347


PAOLO PELLEGRINI

meritorie di encomio55.

I destinatari di giudizi così severi, in realtà, spesso erano tutt’altro che distanti dall’ebraismo e insensibili alle necessità dei correligionari meno fortunati. Dalle loro biografie, infatti, emerge una realtà che si discosta da quella raffigurata negli articoli ricordati sinora: se, infatti, Ulderico Levi fu presidente della Congregazione israelitica di carità di Reggio Emilia56 e il barone Weil Weiss risulta tra i maggiori benefattori che consentirono l’apertura nel 1862 dell’Ospizio israelitico di Torino e inoltre “elargì una rendita annua alla Università Israelitica” del capoluogo piemontese57, nondimeno Raimondo Franchetti, il padre di Alberto, finanziò la fondazione a Gerusalemme di una ‘casa di lavoro’ dove a giovani ebrei in condizioni disagiate veniva offerto un ricovero e data la possibilità di imparare un mestiere58. Le critiche rivolte loro, insomma, erano per lo più infondate, ma allo stesso tempo appaiono strumentali alla visione di quella parte del rabbinato cui le diverse riviste diedero voce, sostenendo posizioni nelle quali l’entusiasmo per l’emancipazione e per l’inserimento nella nuova patria aveva il suo contraltare, come scrive Carlotta Ferrara degli Uberti, in “uno sgomento, la paura di uno sgretolamento, di una frammentazione dell’ebraismo italiano in migliaia di definizioni e interpretazioni strettamente individuali, in tanti ebraismi quanti sono gli ebrei”59. Timori di questo tipo dovevano accentuarsi proprio in 55 M. Mortara, Comunicato, in “Il Vessillo Israelitico”, XXVI (1888), 6, pp. 215-216. 56 Pellegrini, Ebrei nobilitati e conversioni, cit., p. 280. 57 B. Maida, Dal ghetto alla città. Gli ebrei torinesi nel secondo Ottocento, Torino, Zamorani, 2001, p. 58 e ACS, PCM, CA, Fascicoli, b. 78, fasc. 790, lettera del questore di Torino senza indicazione del destinatario, 9 marzo 1880. 58 Istituzioni di carità israelitica in Gerusalemme, in “L’Educatore Israelita”, IX (1861), 11, pp. 393-395. 59 C. Ferrara degli Uberti, Rappresentare se stessi fra famiglia e nazione. Il “Vessillo Israelitico” alla soglia del ’900, in “Passato e presente”, 70 (2007), p. 41.

348


SENZA DISTINZIONE DI CULTO.

presenza di famiglie e personaggi come quelli incontrati nelle pagine precedenti. Nel loro caso, il coinvolgimento in questioni cruciali per l’intero ebraismo italiano assunse, infatti, dimensioni e contorni particolari, legati alle identità plurime di cui erano portatori e al ruolo di “mediatori naturali fra la comunità d’origine e la società più larga”60. Una mediazione che sembrerebbe essere passata anche attraverso la loro intensa attività filantropica.

60

Armani e Schwarz, Premessa, cit., p. 641.

349


Caritas & Misericordia: Community, Civil Society, and Philanthropy in the Christian Tradition1 Nicholas Terpstra

What values animated Catholic philanthropy, and how did these shape political life and civil society in the urban communities of the western Mediterranean? This paper briefly sketches the distinct approaches, both theologically and practically, represented by the concepts of ‘caritas’ and ‘misericordia’ in the Christian tradition. These two words were at the core of what we could call the language of Catholic philanthropy; they have a theological content, a metaphorical meaning, and an iconic presence which together shaped public philanthropy in Catholic communities before the French Revolution. Briefly, caritas emphasized an obligation to help those with whom one was in close relation, while misericordia emphasized assistance to the poor and needy in general. Caritas was very specific help to kin and to clients, and it deliberately strengthened those bonds – it arose out of obligations placed on the giver and it placed obligations on the recipient. This was why it usually and very deliberately reinforced the ties between wealthy patrons and their 1 This paper was prepared for the context of the conference on Religions & Philanthropy in the Mediterranean held in Bologna in November 2010 as part of the project by Prof. Giuliana Gemelli to prepare an on-line Virtual Museum of Philanthropy in the Mediterranean area. As a result, it is not a research paper but a survey which aims to propose categories for understanding some basic themes in Catholic and Protestant philanthropy, as a preliminary to engaging in comparative dialogue. The paper incorporates and expands on material found in Cultures of Charity: Women, Politics, and the Reform of Poor Relief in Renaissance Italy. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2013), which offers a more detailed analysis based on archival material and recent scholarship.

351


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

clients and also between members of extended families or kin groups. Misericordia by contrast was given to members of a communitas or corporate group (such as a guild, confraternity, or town) by virtue of their membership in it. Misericordia often was organized as mutual assistance or insurance. To borrow the terms of modern political sociology, it was help that was characteristic of civil society, and that arose from and reinforced a more general store of social capital. This is not to suggest that caritas and misericordia were in opposition to or competition with each other. They were distinct emphases within Catholic Christianity, and they generated distinct sets of metaphors, icons, and associations. Today I wish to pick up on those metaphors, icons, and associations in order to show that caritas and misericordia were not simply theological or spiritual concepts. They were public and political virtues, and their implementation demonstrated perhaps better than anything else how for medieval, renaissance, and early modern society, our modern distinctions between ‘sacred’ and ‘secular’ were largely meaningless. 2 That notwithstanding, each generated distinct forms of public 2 See most recently: M. Garbellotti, Per carità: Poveri e politiche assistenziali nell’Italia moderna. Roma: Carocci, 2013. For other studies of this theme: R. Parenti, “Santa Maria della Scala: Lo Spedale in Forma di Città” in R. Barzanti, G. Catoni, & M. De Gregorio (eds), Storia di Siena I: Dalle Origini alla fine della Repubblica. Siena: Alsaba, 1995, pp. 239-52. M. Garbellotti, Le risorse dei poveri: Carità e tutela della salute nel principato vescovile di Trento in età moderna. Bologna: il Mulino, 2006. J. Henderson, The Renaissance Hospital: Healing the Body and Healing the Soul. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006. D. D’Andrea, Civic Christianity in Renaissance Italy. The Hospital of Treviso, 14001500. Rochester: Rochester University Press, 2007. See also the collections: G. Pinto, La Società del Bisogno: Povertà e Assistenza nella Toscana Medievale. Firenze: Salimbene, 1989. O.P. Grell & A. Cunningham, (eds) Health Care and Poor Relief in Counter-Reformation Europe. London: Routledge, 1999; V. Zamagni (ed), Povertà e innovazioni istitutzionali in Italia dal Medioevo ad oggi. (Bologna: il Mulino, 2000). T. M. Safley, The Reformation of Charity: The Secular and the Religious in Early Modern Poor Relief. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2003. J. Henderson, P. Horden, and A. Pastore (eds), The Impact of Hospitals, 300-2000. Basel: Peter Lang, 2007: 131-52. Stefano Filipponi, Eleonora Mazzocchi, Ludovica Sebregondi (ed)., Il mercante, l’ospedale, i fanciulli. La donazione di Francesco Datini, Santa Maria Nuova e la fondazione degli Innocenti.Florence: Nardini Editore, 2010.

352


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

and private philanthropy. The social dynamics around caritas were more vertical, and those around misericordia were more horizontal. To draw again on political sociology, both forms of aid were ‘boundary-making’, yet they set quite different boundaries as to who was in or outside the corporate group or civil community. If we follow their practice from the late medieval into the early modern period, we can see how caritas and misericordia reinforced different political and social systems both in Europe itself and in some European colonies. We can also see how their distinct values and associations help shape the different paths taken by Catholic and Protestant forms of philanthropy after the Reformation of the sixteenth century.3 To begin with caritas. The visual forms that it took go back to the gospel of Matthew in the New Testament, and specifically a parable in which Jesus compares the fate of the charitable and uncharitable at the Last Judgment. To put it most briefly, Jesus states explicitly that those who in their life offered particular forms of help to the poor, had been offering it to Jesus himself: “I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me” [Matthew 25:35-36]. These generous individuals do not recall helping Jesus personally, but he states “just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.” By the same token, the failure of others to offer help to the hungry, thirsty, sick, and naked had been a failure to offer it to 3 Brian Pullan makes a similar distinction while reversing the terminology in his essay: “Catholics, Protestants, and the Poor in Early Modern Europe,” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 35/3 (2005): 441-56. For the background to my framing of the distinction between Charity and Misericordia, see “Charité,” Dictionnaire de Spiritualité II (Paris,:1953): 507661; and “Miséricorde (Oevres de),” Dictionnaire de Spiritualité LXVIII-LXIX (Paris,:1979): 1328-49.

353


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

Jesus individually and personally. These ones complain that they had never meant to refuse aid to Jesus, but he replies that whenever they refused any poor person, they were effectively refusing him. They are sentenced to eternal punishment while the generous individuals are rewarded with eternal life. There is no clearer statement in the Bible of Christ identifying himself directly and individually with the poor, and of telling his followers that if they wish to join him in heaven, they must extend caritas to him – that is, to the poor -- on earth. With the addition of the burial of the dead, Jesus’s parable in Matthew 25 set out what the Catholic Church defined as the Seven Works of Corporal Charity, cardinal virtues whose practice would secure a place in heaven. These became motives for action, and their literary and visual forms became iconic within the Catholic imaginary. We can see them often used in public art that demonstrated what activities went on in hospitals, as for example the glazed terra cotta reliefs which stretch across the facade of the Ospedale del Ceppo in Pistoia. While the Ospedale itself was founded in 1277, the reliefs date to the period 1514-25, and are the work of Giovanni della Robbia.4 Each of the individual 7 works of charity is represented in a separate relief which illustrates clearly the poor needy recipients, the generous lay or clerical donors, and the action itself. The images depict what charitable work goes on both in the hospital and in the city at large, and in this way can be seen as forms of advertising that remind both the recipients and the agents of charity of what to expect. The seven works of corporal charity framed the institutional, iconographical, and social forms of Catholic philanthropy. They directed much of early philanthropic 4 Giovanni della Robbia completed six panels with the help of Santi Viviani Buglioni, and the seventh panel was carried out by Filippo di Lorenzo Paladini in 1584-86. A. Macadam, Tuscany (London: A&C Black, 1999): 180-81. The reliefs form part of the Virtual Exhibition.

354


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

work through hospitals and confraternities, which expanded rapidly in number and size as cities and towns themselves grew from the thirteenth century. Through hospitals like Pistoia’s Ceppo, Siena’s S. Maria della Scala, Florence’s S. Maria Nuova, and Bologna’s S. Maria della Vita (all established or significantly expanded in the Trecento) laypeople expanded the charitable work which monks, nuns, and friars had offered in their religious houses. While hospitals and confraternities were the favoured institutional form of lay charity, the favoured iconographic reference was to saintly patronage. The saints in their charitable actions modeled what laypeople ought to be doing, and sermons, stories like those found in Jacopo Voragine’s Golden Legend of 1260, and icons and paintings expanded on the details: St. Nicholas of Bari was the model for dowry charity, St. Martin of Tours the model for clothing the naked, St. Christopher a model for assisting pilgrims, St. Gregory the Great a model for feeding the hungry, St. Leonard a model for charity towards prisoners, and so on. The chronology of charitable actions might follow saints’ days, as believers imitated a saint’s particular act of charity on that saint’s feast day, like hosting a feast in the local prison on November 6, the feast day of St. Leonard. These charitable actions had established the objects central to these saints’ iconography, and as history painting expanded through the fifteenth century, images of these saints’ works of charity multiplied in chapels, churches, and public buildings. When social problems intensified, Catholic philanthropy responded by expanding the cults of particular saints. Perhaps the most notable example is the cult of the French pilgrim St. Roche, known in Italy as San Rocco. Modern research is rewriting the early history of his cult, but the legend associated Roche firmly with relief from plague, and as plague or peste spread across Europe from the fourteenth century, new processions, 355


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

confraternities, and hospitals spread the cult of St. Roche with it across the Mediterranean and north into France and Germany.5 At the same time, other saints might find their appeal fading, or their cult shifting in nature: St. Bartolomew was immensely popular in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries as a healing saint, but his cult faded after that. St. Jerome similarly enjoyed a period of great popularity as a wonder-working and healing saint from the fourteenth through the early sixteenth century, but after the Council of Trent his cult went into a relative decline and his identity became more restricted to the areas of education and doctrine.6 While the dynamics were complicated, at a certain level, St. Roche quite literally eclipsed St. Bartholomew and St. Jerome as the favoured saintly patron in the particular area of charitable healing. What is important for us to recall here is that saintly legends did not simply model charitable actions, but also social relationships. The saint was a patron for the believer who performed an action in his name, and so those who clothed the naked in imitation and in the name of St. Martin could expect that he would intervene in heaven on their behalf. In imitating St. Martin, they were also replicating him, and locating themselves as patrons in the relationship of charity with the poor. This could be on the small scale of caring for a sick person, assisting a widow, liberating a prisoner or contributing to a poor neighbour girl’s dowry, the kind of act which reinforced purely local ties and small favours. We can see these actions illustrated in a series of lunettes frescoed by the workshop of Domenico Ghirlandaio on the interior walls of the Oratory of the Florentine confraternity of the Buonomini di San Martino -- St. 5 Paolo Ascogni and Pierre Bolle. Rocco di Montpellier: Voghera e il suo santo. Documenti e testimonianze sulla nascita del culto di un santo tra i piÚ amati della cristianità (Voghera, 2001). 6 E. Rice, St. Jerome in the Renaissance. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985.

356


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

Martin’s Good Men -- after 1479. The frescoes show that these actions could also take place on a far larger scale. From 1442, as he was attempting to consolidate his power, Cosimo de’Medici used this confraternity as his own private almoner, with a particular focus on aid to those more prominent Florentines who were among the shame-faced poor. Half of the wealthy confraternity’s income came directly from the Medici. This was not simply abstract charity to friends and clients. Florentine electoral rules disqualified from office any citizens with unpaid taxes. Helping to keep his clients solvent earned Cosimo their gratitude, and may have ensured that some of the more indebted ones could also remain active and supportive players in republican politics.7 We cannot tell for certain whether the banker Cosimo used philanthropy to maintain that kind of balance sheet. Yet to the extent that charity functioned by individual will and through patron-client relationships – with the wealthy donor being simultaneously the client of the saint and the patron to the poor – it was certainly about personal favours rendered and reciprocated.8 By contrast, misericordia was mercy or compassion, and was expressed more through more generalized protection than through particular acts. If caritas was linked in the popular imagination to the Jesus’s parable of the sheep and the goats in Matthew, then misericordia was rooted in account of the 1230s from the Dialogus Miraculorum of Caesarius of Heisterbach. Caesarius wrote in the period when Marian piety was expanding rapidly to incorporate ideas of the Virgin as an intercessor and 7 A. Spicciani, "The 'Poveri Vergognosi' in Fifteenth Century Florence" in Aspects of Poverty in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Thomas Riis (Florence: Le Monnier, 1981): 119-82. D. Kent. “The Buonomini di San Martino: Charity for ‘the Glory of God, the Honour of the City, and the Commemoration of Myself’” in Ed. F. Ames-Lewis, Cosimo “il Vecchio” de’Medici, 1389-1464 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992): 49-67. 8 See most recently: J.M. Bradburne, Voce nascoste: alle scoperte dei Buonomini di San Martino. Firenze: Giunti, 2011. Published simultaneously in English as: Hidden Voices: Discovering the Buonomini di San Martino.

357


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

even co-redemptrix with Jesus. His strongly clerical Dialogus offered tales of Mary protecting priests, nuns, and monks from thunderstorms and devilish temptation, and it closes with a Cistercian monk’s vision of the Virgin surrounded by many high clerics, among which he could see no Cistercians. When the monk asked the Virgin why, she threw open her cloak to reveal a host of Cistercians in a privileged place under her mantle. This proved an extraordinarily compelling and infinitely adaptable image, and clergy in particular competed for that favoured place under the Virgin’s protective cloak. Among the earliest images is one by Duccio in 1280 showing Franciscan friars under Mary’s cloak, but another of the fourteenth century from Bologna shows Dominicans, and Francesco Zurbaran’s image of the seventeenth century gives us the Carthusians of Monasteria de la Cartuja in Seville. But was it only monks, friars, and other clergy who could gather under Mary’s mantle? The Misericordia image spread rapidly through the fourteenth century. A devotional movement in 1399, triggered by plagues and by fears that they together with the schism in the Church and wars between states meant that the Last Judgement was near, moved the evocative image of the Virgin’s protective cloak more clearly into lay culture.9 A French peasant had a vision of Mary pleading with an angry Jesus, who is preparing to unleash apocalyptic judgement on the earth. As she pleads for Mercy, she spreads her cloak protectively over the people whom Jesus wants to punish – we need to remember that in most cases the Virgin protects believers from God himself, who uses plague and sickness to punish his people and bring them to repentence. Preachers spread the peasant’s vision, and the devotional movement that followed featured vast public processions of penitents dressed in white robes, 9 D. Bornstein, The Bianchi of 1399: Popular Devotion in Late Medieval Italy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993.

358


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

calling out ‘Misericordia’, and moving from city to city until the climax in the 1400 jubilee in Rome. This movement took the name of the Bianchi (from the white robes) or the Misericoridia (from the cry), and its spread across Europe helped push the concept and iconic image of Mary with her protective cloak as well: in Italy as the Madonna della Misericordia, through France as the Vierge de Miséricorde, and in Germany as the Schutzmantelmadonna. The 1399 Bianchi movement helped the public cult of the Madonna della Misericorida to expand rapidly through the fifteenth century. Icons multiplied, but so too did a host of new hospitals and confraternities dedicated to the devotion. What characterizes this devotion’s philanthropy is its focus on help for the community huddled underneath the Virgin’s robe. The many icons that we have paint distinct pictures of that community. Some gather a broad range of men and women from different social classes (judging by their clothing) while others gather narrower communities -courtiers, confratelli, guildsmen, clerics. This is the most important detail: there is spiritual equality under the Virgin’s cloak, and I would argue that there is also social equality – or at least communitas. Now at a certain level, there seems to be little that distinguishes caritas and misericordia. They were complementary rather than opposed values, and indeed believers were expected to extend charity to their counterparts gathered under the Virgin’s mantle. Both were expressed through philanthropic actions and institutions, and both left a toponomastic presence which continues into the present, although the political changes and institutional mergers of later centuries often obscures earlier distinctions. If we go back chronologically and are alert to these toponomies, can we recover any distinctions and associations in the mentality of renaissance and early modern Catholic 359


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

philanthropy? I believe that we can, and that in the case of misericordia in particular, it was the icon of the Madonna della Misericordia, stretching her cloak over communities of believers, that led it to be used by particular social groups in order to express their social and philanthropic relations. The key here is communitas, and particularly the community gathered under the virgin’s cloak. As I mentioned already, this is sometimes a very selective community of clergy, elites, or confraternity members. Yet it is often a very broad community – the entire community gathered together. Examples include a processional banner by Benedetto Bonfigli from Perugia in 1464, and a remarkable fresco by Benozzo Gozzoli for the Church of S. Agostino in S. Gimignano the same year showing St. Sebastian, and not the Virgin, as the one who spreads the protective cloak over the members of the community (one of the very few that does not feature Mary, and an interesting hybrid of caritas and misericordia). Both of these images were ex voto images created in response to the plague of 1464, when entire urban communities were under threat, and in both cases the arrows of judgment are being launched from heaven. The Perugian banner has Christ hurling arrows and directing two avenging angels, while Saints Bernardino da Siena, Sebastiano, Francis, and Domenic stretch Mary’s cloak over the entire population huddled above an image of the city before which Death processes in triumph. In the San Gimignanan fresco it is God himself who throws arrows and spears while Christ and Mary intercede and angels hold Saint Sebastian’s cloak over the townspeople. These were dramatic but far from isolated images. If we move a step towards toponomies, that is, the names of institutions, we see that confraternities of Misericordia were created across Italy from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries. Some emerged soon after the 1399 movement of the Bianchi, some earlier and some later. 360


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

Many commissioned public images of the Misericordia, like the brotherhood in Borgo San Sepolcro, which had to wait 17 years for Piero della Francesca to complete (in 1462) the landmark painting they had first commissioned in 1445. Many Misericordia confraternities also quickly opened hospitals which aimed to serve the entire population of their city. Among the earlier foundations we have two of the most important, Venice’s Scuola Grande di Santa Maria della Misericordia (from 1308) and Florence’s Compagnia di S. Maria della Misericordia (from 1244). Both built prominent headquarters and both emphasized charity towards the entire urban community. Florence’s Compagnia della Misericordia became a model which was imitated throughout Tuscany, and the members aimed to carry out all seven acts of charity. Bartolomeo Daddi’s fresco of 1352 painted for the loggia of the new headquarters of the Misericordia on the square of S. Giovanni Battista in front of the Cathedral, depicts a version of the Madonna della Misericordia with all the people of Florence and the city itself below her. In this case, the Madonna’s cloak is not extended over the citizens, but rather is closed to show a series of rondels depicting the 7 works of charity, and also other familiar symbols of charity, most notably a nursing mother and the pelican who has pricked her own breast to feed her young. Daddi’s fresco underscores the fact that misericordia and caritas were complementary values. The focus then is on who is helped, that is, what is the communitas? Certainly in both Venice and Florence, the communitas was the entire urban community. This comes clear with Florence’s Compagnia della Misericordia when it, as the wealthiest confraternity in the city, was merged by public authorities in 1425 with another confraternity of S. Maria del Bigallo, to create a single hospital service which organized charity and particularly hospital work for all Florentines. The merger was partially reversed in 1489, and in 1525 the Misericordia recovered its independence and moved into the separate building 361


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

facing the Cathedral which it occupies to this day. Through this period it received a portion of the public taxes on salt, wine, and contracts in order to carry out its community service, and public officials subsidized it heavily in the plagues of 1522-23 and 1526-28 in order to quarantine and feed the sick, bury the dead, and disinfect their homes. These funds facilitated the work of scores of confraternity members who volunteered to carry out these charitable works, an activity which continues to distinguish Misericordia confraternities across Tuscany and other parts of Italy today. The pan-urban focus can also be found in Bergamo and in Cortona, where large confraternities of the Misericordia marshaled wealth and resources far larger than any religious house or even the bishop. The example of Cortona is instructive, because it shows the political side of philanthropy. As Daniel Bornstein has shown, the Madonna’s cloak did not simply protect the people of Cortona from plague or famine; it protected the Cortona elite from interference by both ecclesiastical and Florentine authorities after the town came under Florentine control in 1411.10 Florentine rectors supervised local government, and Florentine candidates were appointed as bishops, while lesser offices remained in local hands. This included over 20 hospitals offering a wide range of charitable services, all of them dwarfed by the wealthy S. Maria della Misericordia (purportedly founded by Margaret of Cortona in 1286). Shortly after the Florentine takeover, the Misericordia itself began taking over many of the properties and responsibilities of other hospitals, and began constructing a magnificent new hospital in the centre of the city, opposite the Palazzo Communale. By 1571 its revenues were 4 times those of the bishop, and 5 times those of the Cathedral Chapter. Cortona’s politically-dispossessed elite consolidated hospital revenues and used the funds to give food to the 10 D. Bornstein, “Civic Hospitals, Local Identity, and Regional States in Early Modern Italy.” in N. Terpstra, A. Prosperi, and S. Pastore (eds), Faith’s Boundaries: Laity and Clergy in Early Modern Confraternities. Turnhout: Brepols, 2012, pp. 17-30.

362


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

hungry, clothing to the naked, and lodging to the homeless within the city. While they had lost political authority, the Misericordia allowed them to retail social influence locally. In Bergamo the Misericordia came to be known simply as the MIA, and followed much the same pattern.11 What might this suggest? When we explore the toponomy of Misericordia in towns like Cortona and Bergamo, we find confraternal hospitals under the control of lay elites which have gathered extraordinary property and financial resources. Their financial wealth grows as a result donations, mergers with other institutions that are ordered by the local political councils, and special favours. Their expansion often accelerates after a community has fallen under the control of another power – Cortona with Florence and Bergamo with Venice. The concentration of resources creates an island of local autonomy, or at least local agency, the neither that outside power nor ecclesiastical authorities can touch. They become what post-colonial theorists would call ‘sites of resistance’. Are there other political associations? The misericordia hospitals do not simply protect local resources from predation by outside authorities, they also perpetuate the political forms of an oligarchical republicanism. In this way, we can connect their charitable scope of reaching out to the entire community, with their political practice of claiming to represent the entire community, and see them as elements together of a single civil religion: one that is local, protective, representative. The legacies and properties gathered over the centuries are protected for local use, and are to be for all members of the civil communitas, either through outright charity or as a form of mutual assistance. I would like to stretch this even further, and suggest that in this form misericordia becomes politicized in the 11 R. Cossar, The Transformation of the Laity in Bergamo, 1265 – c. 1400. Leiden: Brill, 2006.

363


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

political struggles around republicanism and oligarchy in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. No Italian city demonstrates this more clearly than Bologna. 12 It has a Misericordia confraternity from 1399, and a Misericordia hospital opens soon afterwards. This much is entirely conventional. It is in the sixteenth century that the language of misericordia seems to become more political. Bologna was formally part of the Papal State from at least 1274, but had enjoyed a form of de facto independence from the 1390s. This came to an end in 1506 when Pope Julius II brought his army to the city and forced the signorial family of the Bentivoglio to flee. In Bologna, as in Florence and many other cities where a ruling family was expelled, the sixteenth century became a time of debate and conflict as different groups of citizens and outsiders aimed to implement their own vision of the communitas. Those who believed in a small hereditary elite holding absolute power for life terms in conjunction with the papal legate gathered around the Senate. Those who believed in communal republicanism with power shared among many more people from a broader range of society and serving for short terms only, gathered around older magistracies of the Elders, the Guild Masters, and the Tribunes of the People. This latter group spearheaded an effort to provide a public welfare service for the city, built upon the existing network of confraternal hospitals and shelters for the poor, for orphans, and foundlings, and augmented with a beggars’ hostel – the first in italy. This hostel they called the Ospedale della Misericordia. It was a civic welfare service and an example of republican civil society at work: hundreds of volunteers elected to short-term positions on different Ospedale committees carried out the work of 12 The broader dynamics behind these developments, and particularly around the imagery of misericordia and carita are described in greater detail in Cultures of Charity and in “Tra Misericorida e Carità: Icone della carità e limiti alla riforma dell’assistenza pubblica a Bologna nel Cinquecento.” in M. Carboni (ed), L’iconografia della solidarietà (Venice: Marsilio, 2012): 69-90

364


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

surveying the poor, finding work for them, administering the home, and raising funds through a tax-like levy that was collected door to door. They worked together with a patrician republican called Giovanni Pepoli, who independently promoted an investment fund to provide grain at cheap prices to the poor of the city in times of famine. The fund’s initial capital was donated by Pepoli, its administration was in the hands of a republican-style collection of confraternities and religious houses, and it would be called the Pio Cumulo della Misericordia. I have argued that the republicans and Pepoli chose their words deliberately here, and that the use of the term misericordia in this very charged political context was a deliberate way of signaling the association of the communitas of misericordia with the communitas of republicanism. Certainly when the oligarchs of the Senate finally defeated the republicans and took firmer control of the city in the 1570s, they renamed the Ospedale della Misericordia as the Ospedale di San Gregorio -- a historical name which was also the name of the pope of the day, Gregory XIII, a Bolognese patrician who was a generous and effective patron of the Ospedale. Similarly, after Pepoli was seized and executed in 1583 by another pope, his Pio Cumulo della Misericordia was gradually taken over by oligarchs of the Senate, diverted from its charitable intention (it never sold a bushel of grain to the poor but it did provide mortgage funds for other patricians). It was eventually eliminated altogether by yet another pope in 1620, and the funds were placed under the archbishop’s control and were used to provide charitable dowries to poor girls. It was these developments in Bologna that first alerted me to the possibility that the very iconography of ‘misericordia’ might give the term political resonance in the disputes of the sixteenth century, and might then in turn politicize institutions of ‘Misericordia.’ We certainly need to reflect why it is that in a number of cities like 365


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

Cortona and Bergamo, it is specifically confraternities and hospitals of Misericordia which become the charitable agencies serving a whole urban community. They do not simply protect the community’s health and subsistence, but also its civil society. They also become powerful institutions that protect the political authority of traditional elites who have recently been subordinated under the overlordship of expanding states. This is purely hypothetical, and I would invite further comparative research both in Italy and in other places. Certainly the notion of a protective and isolated community is not always associated with open republican politics. The Vespucci family in Florence put itself under the Virgin’s mantle in a fresco by Domenico Ghirlandaio in their neighbourhood church of Ognissanti. So too did the elite confraternity brothers of the Bolognese company of S. Maria della Morte in their revised statutes of 1562. The Misericordia confraternities established from 1498 by the Portuguese across the Kingdom of Portugal and around the entire Portuguese empire operated under royal privilege (and thus could avoid ecclesiastical oversight), enjoyed numerous monopolies and tax concessions, and offered charitable benefits from medical care to dowries to orphan care and education.13 And who was under the cloak of this Misericordia? In Portugal itself, it was all the members of the urban community. In the Portuguese empire, it was only the Portuguese colonizers themselves, who usually comprised a demographic minority in their towns. The Portuguese model and very consciously the name of the Misericorida was taken up by Spanish colonizers in Manila in 1594.14 When they established a Compagnia della Misericordia, they simply translated the Portuguese statutes, and similarly decided that the communitas gathered under the 13 Sá, I. dos Guimarães, “Assistance to the Poor on a Royal Model: The Example of the Misericórdias in the Portuguese Empire from the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century”, Confraternitas Vol. 13 (2002):. 3-14. 14 J.Mesquida, “Negotiating the Boundaries of Civil and Ecclesiastical Powers: The Misericordia of Manila (1594-1780s)” in N. Terpstra, A. Prosperi, and S. Pastore (eds), Faith’s Boundaries: Laity and Clergy in Early Modern Confraternities. Turnhout: Brepols, 2012, pp.

366


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

cloak of the Virgin Mary was limited to Spanish colonizers and their abandoned mixed race children. The virgin’s cloak might stretch far, but it had limits or boundaries, and we need to recognize these: ‘communitas’ meant help to one’s own, but really only one’s own. This concept of misericordia, of mercy or compassion exercised by and within communities as a right and obligation of membership in the corpus christianum, was also the form of Catholic philanthropy that survived into Protestantism. Protestants rejected theologically the notion of the seven works of charity as a means of achieving salvation. They rejected even more explicitly the saints as necessary patrons whose intercession would help a believer get to heaven and would provide a model for how the believer ought to help others on earth. Yet the concept within misericordia of ‘helping only ones own group or communitas’ became the defining form of Protestant philanthropy. When German towns followed Luther’s injunctions and secularized all the wealth of the church, turning it into a Community Chest under lay control which would pay priests and offer charity to the poor, they always helped only their immediate and local poor. Radical communities of anabaptists also did the same – offering extensive mutual aid, but only to those who were full members of their own separate and often deliberately isolated communities. Calvinist communities, and particularly those in exile, similarly gathered donations within groups and offered charity only to their own members. So, for instance, in the international Calvinist refugee centre of Geneva, the Italian, German, French, and English communities all had separate churches with separate funds under separate administration to serve only their own co-nationals. The same was true of the Huguenot safe towns which the Edict of Nantes established in the south of France, and also of at least some of the less embattled or surrounded Calvinist cities of the Dutch Republic – philanthropy was 367


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

a means of securing cohesion, discipline, and civil society within the community, and not a means of extending a missionary outreach beyond its borders. All of these protestant groups followed the forms of boundary-making mutual assistance that was symbolized by the icon of the Madonna della Misericordia although without, of course, invoking the Madonna. They emphatically rejected the Virgin Mary’s protective and intercessory role, and would certainly not have approved of the idea of her as a co-redemptrix with Jesus, which was a common undercurrent in the Misericordia devotion. Yet what they preserved, and what was distinctive of misericordia as opposed to caritas, was the idea that the Christian communitas must help its own members, and preferably that it ought to help them help themselves. They underscored this with the language of brotherhood and sisterhood, a language drawn from guilds and confraternities which eventually moved into the secular trade unions and mutual assistance fraternities of the nineteenth century.15 If we see Protestants as continuing the civil values of misericordia, and if we associate misericordia in both protestant and political circles with a practical republicanism where a corporate body shares responsibility and helps all its members, then we can see why misericordia is more open to secularization: it is built around horizontal social ties, taxlike fundraising, lay administration, and an emphasis on mutual assistance. The institutions of Protestant systems of poor relief took misericordia as the foundation on which they built public and secular institutions like the common chest, where funds for the poor and needy were gathered by obligatory taxes, and distributed by lay leaders to citizens (and only citizens) as a right of citizenship. The poor often had to pass certain tests that judged both their means and their morals – being a member of the community under 15 M.A. Clawson, Constructing Brotherhood: Class, Gender, and Fraternalism, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989. R. Weir, Knights Unhorsed: internal conflict in a gilded social age movement, Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2000.

368


CARITAS & MISERICORDIA

the cloak meant that you were eligible for aid, but also that you subjected yourself to the standards and processes that the community established for mutual aid and for proper behaviour. If misericordia set the boundaries for mutual aid in self-governing communities, what then of caritas? Oddly enough, the image and toponomy of the Madonna della Misericordia, which is so widespread and evocative from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries, begins to fade away and become more rare in the catholic world by the seventeenth. The images and toponomy of caritas, on the other hand, continue to expand and multiply: the actions, the saints, the images, and also the confraternities and hospitals. Caritas, with its emphasis on individual charity, voluntary almsgiving and personal relations, and with its delivery through vertical patronage ties by which superiors helped inferiors, was a form of aid that fit well with hierarchical societies and with oligarchical and absolutist regimes.16 Cosimo ‘il vecchio’ de Medici was not the only individual to use charitable patronage to secure his own political faction. His later distant relative Duke Cosimo I expanded this with personal dowry charity that emphasized to his subjects that the Duke was the father of his people. The Medici dukes aimed to establish the idea that public charity came from the Duke’s hand; it reflected his generosity and lent religious legitimacy to his rule. The charitable Duke truly was the agent of God on earth, and his government fashioned around patronage and courtiers reflected the order and dynamics of heaven. It was his grace and favour that set the boundaries of his charity, and one had to appeal to and for these just as one had to appeal for the grace and favour of the saints. These are sweeping generalizations, and one could no doubt find numerous exceptions and counter-cases. I 16 T. Nichols, The Art of Poverty: Irony and Ideal in Sixteenth-century beggar imagery. (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2007).

369


NICHOLAS TERPSTRA

would emphasize again that I am aiming here to sketch caritas and misericordia as distinct and complementary emphases within Christian charity, and to see how, in the case of misericordia, the iconography reinforces and advances social and political messages. One of the reasons for examining how they differ is to see both how they fit into the different social and political systems that emerge in the Renaissance and early modern periods, and also how they reflect the approaches to social philanthropy that we see in Catholicism and in Protestantism respectively. They were not just theological abstractions, but public and political virtues, and seeing how they were put into practice demonstrates how for medieval, renaissance, and early modern Christian society, our modern distinctions between ‘sacred’ and ‘secular’ were largely meaningless. I’ve mentioned that each was boundary-making, but if we paint with a broad brush in this way, we may equally see that each had parallels in the Jewish, the Islamic, the Orthodox, and Zoroastrian communities. Each community deals with the dynamics of helping those inside and outside the community, of organizing efforts vertically or horizontally, of relying on laypeople or clergy to deliver aid. The focus of Professor Gemelli’s collaborative research program and virtual exhibition project on Mediterranean Philanthropy is on religious communities and their boundaries, but we probe the boundaries of faith communities in order to find better ways of understanding the bridges between and within them.17 17 The 2010 Bologna conference on “Religions and Philanthropy in the Mediterranean” offered significant examples of this comparative discussion, which continued in the first Takaful conference on Philanthropy and Civic Engagement in Arabic Societies organized by the John D. Gerhart Center for Philanthropy and Civic Engagement at the American University of Cairo and held in Amman, Jordan 16-17 April 2011. A version of the current paper adapted to that comparative discussion of Catholic and Arabic philanthropy appears in the collection of essays which was generated by that conference as “Charity, Civil Society, and Social Capital in Islamic and Christian Societies, 1200-1700: Models and Hypotheses for Comparative Research” Barbara Ibrahim et al, eds, Philanthropy and Civic Engagement in Arab Societies (Cairo: American University of Cairo, 2011): 184-95.

370


L'oblazione del corpo nella medicina islamica contemporanea: difficoltà culturali e giuridiche Dariusch Atighetchi

Le nuove possibilità e applicazioni offerte dalla donazione del corpo o di parti di esso a beneficio del prossimo rientrano quasi totalmente nei campi di frontiera trattati dalla medicina contemporanea e specificamente dalla bioetica. Tali donazioni o ricadute sul prossimo, indipendentemente dal fatto che siano dirette o indirette, volontarie o involontarie vengono anche trattate dalla bioetica islamica. I campi coinvolti riguardano principalmente la procreazione assistita; i trapianti d’organo; la produzione e utilizzo di cellule staminali embrionali; la donazione del sangue ed emoderivati; il commercio di organi e l’autopsia sui cadaveri a beneficio del prossimo. Tutti questi temi sono oggetto di un complesso dibattito di carattere giuridico-religioso ed etico-medico. Per motivi di chiarezza ogni tema verrà sviluppato separatamente ed autonomamente. Il principio del beneficio pubblico (maslaha) è il principio giuridico che mira alla tutela (a differenti livelli) della comunità dei fedeli musulmani (la umma) ed è il principio di riferimento principale nel legittimare le eventuali oblazioni del corpo o i limiti ad esse frapposti fino ad un loro rifiuto. La procreazione assistita Il Corano e i “detti” del Profeta condannano come zinâ cioè fornicazione e/o adulterio ogni rapporto

371


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

sessuale tra uomo e donna che non sia sua moglie o sua schiava (Corano 17,32). Di conseguenza, per il diritto musulmano la sessualità rimane consentita esclusivamente nel matrimonio. Giuridicamente oggi, l’Islàm sunnita assimila agli atti zinâ (fornicazione e/o adulterio) tutte le tecniche di procreazione artificiale eterologa nelle quali cioé un estraneo alla coppia fornisce, per qualsiasi ragione sperma, ovuli, embrioni, utero, ecc.. Viceversa vengono tollerate o accettate le pratiche omologhe in quanto non prevedono interventi o innesti da parte di estranei a favore dei partner biologici legati dal contratto matrimoniale. Dunque, la donazione di gameti o utero rimane proibitiva nell’ambito islamico sunnita. Il motivo di tale atteggiamento rigido risiede nel fatto che, secondo il diritto musulmano, l’unica filiazione legittima è quella rispetto alla figura paterna. Di conseguenza i figli generati da un individuo ed una donna diversa dalla moglie (rapporto di zinâ) non fanno parte della famiglia paterna; non hanno legami col padre, nessun diritto alla successione di questo; il figlio spurio (walad az-zinâ) ha vincoli solo con la madre e la famiglia materna. Oggi questo approccio tradizionale è stato moderato in parecchie legislazioni. Di fronte all’impossibilità di avere figli la coppia non può ricorrere all’adozione in quanto istituto vietato dalla Sharî‘a a partire dal Corano 33,4-51. È accettata solo un’adozione di “ricompensa” o “testamentaria” secondo la quale una famiglia può allevare un bimbo presso di sé senza, però, considerarlo figlio proprio in quanto rimane legato alla famiglia d’origine. 1 Corano 33,4-5: “Dio non ha posto nelle viscere dell’uomo due cuori, né ha fatto delle mogli vostre che voi ripudiate col zihar, delle madri, né dei vostri figli adottivi dei veri figli. Questo lo dite voi con la vostra bocca, ma Dio dice la verità e guida sulla Via! – Chiamate i vostri figli adottivi dal nome dei loro veri padri: questo è più equo agli occhi di Dio. E se non conoscete i loro padri, siano essi vostri fratelli nella religione e vostri protetti. . .”. Il termine zihar indica una delle modalità del ripudio.

372


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

Anche se il Corano vieta l’adozione legale, contemporaneamente incoraggia l’allevamento e l’educazione degli orfani. Tuttavia, nonostante questa disponibilità coranica, permane nelle società islamiche una forte riluttanza culturale e sociale nella condivisione di questa soluzione umanitaria. Un’eccezione che conferma la regola è rappresentata dall’Iran in cui esiste un’adozione legale che consente al bimbo di ricevere un certificato di nascita con il cognome dell’adottante dopo un periodo di sei mesi trascorso nella nuova famiglia. Anche in questo caso, però, la resistenza sociale e culturale alla pratica rimane molto forte. Nel 1985 a La Mecca (Arabia Saudita), l’VIII sessione del Consiglio della Giurisprudenza Islamica, organo del Muslim World League (MWL), si è pronunciata sulla fecondazione artificiale e la donazione di gameti. Il testo giudica lecite le tecniche di fecondazione omologa interna ed esterna (cioè in vivo ed in vitro), mentre tutti gli altri sistemi di procreazione assistita tramite donatori vengono proibiti (haram), rientrando nella categoria degli atti zinâ cioé assimilati alla fornicazione e all’adulterio. Nel corso dell’VIII sessione del Consiglio della Giurisprudenza Islamica è stata riesaminata anche la decisione adottata nella VII sessione, svoltasi nel 1984, la quale aveva acconsentito alla fecondazione artificiale in vitro attuata in un rapporto poligamico, cioè tramite l’innesto dell’embrione frutto dei gameti del marito e di una delle mogli priva dell’utero in un’altra delle mogli che diventava prestatrice di utero. In un contesto poligamico questo rapporto procreativo “a tre” si realizza all’interno del medesimo nucleo familiare, ragion per cui la stessa tecnica di fecondazione artificiale è considerabile come omologa dove la poligamia è tollerata o accettata, viceversa è considerata eterologa dove la poligamia non è riconosciuta. Inoltre, l’VIII sessione ha rifiutato l’embryo-transfer cioé la donazione tra mogli di uno stesso marito al 373


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

fine di garantire il più possibile una filiazione lineare e rendendo immediata l’individuazione di un’unica figura materna legittima. Nonostante questo ed altri documenti dello stesso tenore non manca qualche opinione meno tradizionale. Ad esempio nel mondo sunnita si può segnalare l’opinione del parlamentare egiziano Abdel M. Bayoumi, direttore della facoltà Uṣūl al-Dīn (Fondamenti della Religione) all’Università del Cairo il quale, nel 2001, sosteneva che le donne possono affittare l’utero in caso di gravi necessità economiche. In pratica, il contestato trasferimento di embrioni tra mogli di uno stesso uomo all’interno del contesto poligamico costituisce l’unica possibilità di donazione di parti del corpo all’interno del dibattito sulla procreazione assistita nel mondo sunnita. La stessa possibilità di impiantare un embrione, i cui gameti provengono dai coniugi legittimi, nell’utero della moglie dopo la morte del marito sembra assai osteggiata nell’ambito sunnita. Modelli alternativi Il divieto della donazione di gameti estranei alla coppia sposata prevale anche nel mondo shi’ita (che comprende il 15% circa dei musulmani nel mondo soprattutto in Iran, Iraq e Libano). A differenza del mondo sunnita, la possibilità di ricorrere all’ ijtihâd, cioé all’interpretazione personale delle fonti (formalmente non legittimata nell’Islàm sunnita dal X-XI secolo d.C.), ha prodotto una notevole quantità di posizioni diversificate su questo come su molti altri temi bioetici. Ad esempio, per alcuni dottori della Legge islamica shi’ita il bimbo privo di diritti ereditari e di rapporti giuridici col padre è soltanto quello frutto di un diretto rapporto carnale adulterino; di conseguenza, nelle tecniche artificiali eterologhe il figlio rimarrebbe 374


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

giuridicamente legato al proprietario del seme. Nel suo sito ufficiale, il leader spirituale della Repubblica Islamica dell’Iran, l’ayatollah Khamenei, dichiara che la donazione artificiale dei gameti femminili non è legalmente proibita (fatwâ n° 1265). Anche secondo Khamenei un atto zinâ (adulterio e fornicazione) è tale solo quando si verifica un diretto rapporto carnale. Di conseguenza, le tecniche artificiali eterologhe non sarebbero vietate. Per la stessa ragione Khamenei non ritiene necessario il ricorso al matrimonio a tempo – la cosiddetta mut‘a o matrimonio di piacere – tra il marito di una donna sterile e una donatrice celibe che si unirebbero in matrimonio fino alla donazione dei gameti femminili alla moglie sterile, in modo di evitare l’accusa di rapporti extraconiugali (zinâ) tra marito e donatrice di ovuli. In modo simile si era pronunciata la più nota autorità shi’ita libanese, l’ayatollah M.H. Fadlallah, il quale accettava la donazione del gamete femminile; anche costui rifiutava il matrimonio temporaneo (mut‘a) quale soluzione per evitare all’uomo e alla donatrice l’accusa di essere coinvolti in atti zinâ. Inoltre nel paese la poligamia è presente per cui la donazione di uova risulta praticabile all’interno del medesimo gruppo familiare. Anche a detta del Grande ayatollah dell’Iraq al-Sistani, è permesso fecondare in vitro il seme di un marito con gli ovuli di una donatrice diversa dalla moglie sterile per poi impiantare. Nonostante ciò, tra quei dotti shi’iti favorevoli alla donazione di ovuli, la maggioranza ritiene indispensabile che l’uomo si leghi alla donatrice tramite matrimonio temporaneo regolamentato e legittimato dal Codice Civile iraniano (art. 1075-1077). Nel 2003 il Parlamento iraniano ha approvato la donazione di embrioni da coppie sposate ad altre coppie sposate ma sterili ciò costituendo un caso unico nell’intero contesto islamico. Nello stesso anno il Parlamento ha vietato la donazione del gamete maschile. 375


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

Attualmente nella Repubblica Islamica si segnalano numerosissimi casi di maternità surrogata, cioè di prestiti di utero, mentre programmi per la donazione di ovuli ed embrioni sono stati istituiti nella maggioranza delle cliniche preposte alla FIVET. Le donne sterili portano generalmente una sorella quale donatrice ma con ciò violano il Corano 4,23-24 che si oppone al matrimonio tra un uomo e due sorelle viventi. Gli uomini sterili portano spesso i fratelli quali potenziali donatori di sperma. In ogni caso si verifica una transazione commerciale con poche regole e controlli. Anche in Libano la maggioranza dei musulmani rimane contraria alla donazione di gameti; nonostante ciò, le pratiche eterologhe non sono rare all’interno di matrimoni poligamici. Negli Stati musulmani in cui si ricorre alla procreazione assistita lo si fa quasi esclusivamente con coppie eterosessuali sposate. Tranne eccezioni, la donazione di gameti è ufficialmente presente solo nelle aree shi’ite oltreché negli Stati di immigrazione qualora tali tecniche procreative siano lecite. In conclusione, il divieto sunnita della donazione da terzi viene indebolito dalla possibilità di ricorrere a pratiche eterologhe nell’Islàm shi’ita, area in cui si recano molte coppie sterili abbienti provenienti da nazioni sunnita. Si noti come nelle donazioni dei gameti, solo il gamete femminile viene coinvolto in quanto tradizionalmente più “debole” e più “manipolabile” rispetto a quello maschile. Circa la procreazione assistita rimangono fondamentali le raccomandazioni conclusive formulate nella prima conferenza internazionale sulla “Bioetica nella Riproduzione Umana nel mondo musulmano” svoltasi nel 1991 all’Università di Al-Azhar del Cairo (Egitto). Limitatamente alla donazione il documento precisa: 1. Le ricerche sulla fecondazione in vitro sono permesse solo se i gameti appartengono alla 376


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

coppia sposata e se l’uovo fecondato viene trasferito nell’utero della moglie. 2. La donazione ed il commercio di sperma ed uova sono proibiti. 3. Il trasferimento dell’uovo fecondato ad una “madre surrogata” è proibito anche in un contesto poligamico. Le cellule staminali embrionali Nel contesto della donazione del corpo o parti di esso sia a favore del prossimo che dello stesso soggetto malato rientrano i temi dell’utilizzo delle cellule staminali embrionali, di quelle adulte e di quelle provenienti da placenta o cordone ombelicale. Anche nell’ambito islamico i contrasti coinvolgono principalmente il ricorso a cellule staminali embrionali. Molte autorità giuridico-religiose e mediche islamiche (forse la maggioranza) approvano la ricerca su cellule staminali embrionali nei primi giorni di vita allo scopo di incrementare il bene comune (maslaha). In questi casi, il suddetto principio viene anteposto alla tutela degli embrioni precocissimi cioé privi di anima e viventi al di fuori del corpo materno. Permane il rifiuto della produzione di embrioni al solo scopo di produrre cellule staminali. Ovviamente esiste anche un’autorevole corrente di medici e dottori della Legge per i quali l’embrione rimane intoccabile sin dalle prime fasi dello sviluppo, il che equivale a vietare ogni ricorso all’embrione (comunque venga procreato) per produrre cellule staminali. È utile citare almeno tre documenti medicogiuridico-religiosi, i primi due favorevoli il terzo più limitativo riguardo alle modalità di produzione delle cellule staminali embrionali: Nel 2001 l’Accademia di Diritto Musulmano del Nord America si è espressa a favore dell’utilizzo di embrioni in sovrannumero per ricerche sulle cellule staminali 377


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

nei primi giorni dopo la fecondazione, anziché lasciarli morire inutilmente. Analogamente si è pronunciata l’Associazione Medica Islamica del Nord-America. Il documento finale della prima Conferenza Internazionale su “Bioethics on Human Reproduction in the Muslim World”, 1991, Università di Al-Azhar, Cairo (Egitto), sottolinea: “Le uova fecondate in sovrannumero possono essere conservate tramite crioconservazione ... Questi preembrioni possono essere usati a scopi di ricerca … a condizione che un libero e informato consenso venga ottenuto dalla coppia”. Una Risoluzione del 2005 dell’Accademia di Diritto Musulmano di Jeddah (organismo dell’Organizzazione della Conferenza Islamica, OIC), precisava che è lecito ottenere cellule staminali per finalità terapeutiche e scientifiche. Le cellule possono provenire: 1) dalla placenta o cordone ombelicale; 2) da feti abortiti naturalmente o a causa di aborti terapeutici; 3) da embrioni in soprannumero inutilizzabili dai legittimi genitori in vista di ulteriori gravidanze. Circa le politiche statali, nel Marzo 2003 l’IRNA, cioé l’agenzia di stampa ufficiale della Repubblica Islamica dell’Iran, ha annunciato che il paese rientra tra i primi dieci Stati al mondo in grado di produrre, coltivare e congelare cellule staminali embrionali. Analogamente alle posizioni religiose, anche gli Stati musulmani appaiono incerti. L’8 Marzo 2005 l’Assemblea Generale delle Nazioni Unite ha approvato la “Dichiarazione delle Nazioni Unite sulla Clonazione Umana” il cui art. (b) recita: “Gli Stati membri sono richiamati a vietare ogni forma di clonazione umana .... incompatibile con .... la protezione della vita umana” includendo nel divieto anche la ricerca su cellule staminali embrionali2. Dei 191 Stati idonei al voto, la Raccomandazione venne approvata con 2

378

D. Atighetchi, Islam e Bioetica, op. cit., 140-141.


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

84 voti a favore (es. Marocco, Arabia Saudita, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Sudan, Emirati Arabi Uniti, Qatar, Afghanistan, Bangladesh); 34 contrari (nessuna nazione musulmana); 37 astenuti (es. Algeria, Egitto, Indonesia, Iran, Giordania, Kuwait, Libano, Malaysia, Oman, Pakistan, Tunisia, Turchia, Somalia, Siria, Yemen); 36 Stati erano assenti (es. Libia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger e Senegal). Il documento possiede un carattere di raccomandazione che parecchi Stati hanno dichiarato di non voler rispettare proprio a causa degli ostacoli frapposti alla ricerca sull’embrione. I progressi nei trapianti d’organo Dopo i dubbi iniziali espressi dai “dotti” musulmani sulla pratica, si è passati ad una progressiva approvazione dell’operazione, anche se permangono opposizioni giuridico-religiose rivolte alla pratica in generale o limitatamente ad alcuni ambiti applicativi (es. espianti da cadavere). Principi fondamentali Dalla dottrina giuridica islamica vengono ripresi tanto i principi favorevoli quanto quelli contrari ai trapianti. Tra i criteri e i principi favorevoli segnaliamo: Il Corano 5,32 “Chiunque salva la vita di un uomo, sarà come se avesse salvato l’umanità intera”. Il principio giuridico “La necessità fa eccezione alla regola e rende lecito ciò che altrimenti sarebbe vietato”. Il principio del “male minore”, in base al quale un danno (ar. darar akhaf) su un cadavere (violare un morto per prelevargli un organo) è tollerato per prevenire un danno maggiore su un vivente (la morte). La cura del malato rientra tra le responsabilità collettive e la donazione di organi è un obbligo sociale (ar. fardh al-kifāya); se qualcuno muore perché non si 379


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

trova un organo, la società ne è responsabile. Gli oppositori dei trapianti si basano su tre principi: 1) la sacralità del corpo e della vita umana; 2) il corpo ci è donato in amministrazione fiduciaria, vale a dire che l’uomo non ne ha pieno possesso; 3) il corpo viene ridotto a oggetto-fine materiale. Tra gli avversari della pratica troviamo religiosi di primo piano quali il Gran Mufti del Pakistan, Muhammad Shafi‘, oppure l’egiziano ‘Abd al-Salam al-Shukri. Un’opposizione esplicita ad ogni tipo di trapianto venne sostenuta nel 1988 dal popolare predicatore egiziano, il mufti Sha‘râwî, sulla scorta dei seguenti motivi: 1) il corpo è proprietà di Dio; 2) l’espianto da vivente danneggia comunque il donatore; 3) l’espianto da cadavere equivale ad una mutilazione per cui è proibito dalla Sharî‘a. Alcune peculiarità del dibattito La Sharî‘a (la Legge di Dio) divide l’umanità in due categorie, i fedeli e gli infedeli3. La prima comprende i credenti musulmani la cui “specificità” è sottolineata dal Corano 3,110: “ Voi siete la migliore nazione mai suscitata fra gli uomini”. Gli infedeli, invece, si distinguono in due gruppi: Gente del Libro e idolatri. I primi sono i credenti in una scrittura rivelata (Ebrei e Cristiani) ai quali è riconosciuto, in territorio islamico, lo status giuridico di dhimmī cioè “protetti” ma parzialmente discriminatorio rispetto ai musulmani; i secondi sono i politeisti e gli idolatri coi quali dovrebbe esistere solo un rapporto di natura bellica. Conseguentemente anche la terra viene distinta in territorio islamico (dār al-Islām) e territorio di guerra (dār al-ḥarb). Questa bipartizione classica d’origine giuridica può suscitare problemi nella donazione di organi e sangue tra membri di religioni differenti4. Per autonomasia il 3 4

380

D. Atighetchi, Islam e Bioetica, op. cit., 140-141. D. Atighetchi, Niente organi dagli infedeli! in IL SOLE 24 ORE, 14


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

principio della maslaha fa riferimento alla promozione del bene comune con riferimento alla umma, cioé alla comunità dei fedeli musulmani. Eventuali contrasti tra la tutela della comunità islamica e quella degli infedeli si devono risolvere a vantaggio della umma. Ad esempio, una fatwâ (opinione giuridica) dell'Università di Al-Azhar dei primi anni '70 sosteneva che il trapianto di cornea (in realtà è un tessuto) da musulmano o infedele era permesso se l'organo veniva ceduto a un musulmano, ma proibito se prelevato da un fedele per donarlo a un infedele. Lo sheikh siriano Yaqubi ritiene che i donatori andrebbero innanzitutto ricercati tra i membri del partito nemico (harbis), in quanto il loro corpo è facilmente violabile, o tra coloro che meritano la morte per crimini quali l'omicidio e l'apostasia. A quest’ultima interpretazione si avvicinava anche M.S. Tantâwî, Gran Mufti della Repubblica Araba d'Egitto (1990), secondo il quale è lecito prelevare organi dai cadaveri dei condannati a morte. Un’impostazione analoga è individuabile nella legge del 1972 sui trapianti d'organo della Repubblica Araba di Siria quando, tra le condizioni che consentono l'espianto da cadavere, troviamo che l'operazione è lecita se la morte è il risultato della pena capitale. Nel luglio 1992 le agenzie di stampa hanno riportato dall’Egitto la notizia dell’esecuzione di un condannato al quale, dopo il decesso, sono stati espiantati i reni ed il cuore per salvare dei cittadini egiziani. Riferimenti alla distinzione giuridica – musulmani, Gente del Libro (dhimmī) e infedeli (kāfir) – sono riscontrabili anche nella Risoluzione sui trapianti n. 99 del Comitato dei Grandi Ulama sauditi del 25/8/19825. In una fatwâ del Giugno 2002, l’autorevole sheikh sunnita Yûsuf al-Qaradâwî dichiarava illecito per i musulmani donare organi a non-musulmani che Settembre 2008, 42-44. 5 Atighetchi, Islamic Bioethics: Problems and Perspectives, op. cit.

381


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

aggrediscono l’Islàm; analogamente, è vietato donare organi a un apostata in quanto traditore della propria religione e del proprio popolo, reati per i quali merita la morte. Infine, quando sia un musulmano che un non-musulmano necessitano di un organo o di una donazione di sangue, il musulmano ha la precedenza in base al passo coranico 9,71 che recita: “Ma i credenti e le credenti sono l’un l’altro amici e fratelli”6. Simili atteggiamenti discriminatori hanno origine giuridica e appaiono minoritari in quanto la maggioranza dei “dotti” islamici sembra condividere l’opinione secondo la quale la donazione di organi è un atto di carità, altruismo e amore verso il genere umano. Costoro riprendono la propensione umanitaria dell'etica medica connessa a specifici passi del Corano (es. 5,32) e della Sunna orientati in questo senso. Lo sheikh egiziano Gamāl Qutb, penultimo presidente del Comitato delle Fātāwa egiziano, ha dichiarato che niente nell’Islàm impedisce a un musulmano di ricevere o donare organi da o a un non-musulmano. Tuttavia, quest’ultima impostazione non contrasta con l'orientamento di chi, nel rispetto delle categorie giuridiche citate, preferisce ricorrere prima di tutto a donatori musulmani per ripiegare, qualora indisponibili, su organi provenienti da musulmani. Tra gli immigrati c'è chi considera la donazione come religiosamente lecita oppure doverosa. Viceversa c'è chi può rifiutare la donazione per tutelare l'integrità del cadavere di un musulmano; oppure per diffidenze sulla donazione a favore di infedeli, sulle vere intenzioni dei sanitari o per ragioni imprecisate. La donazione del sangue Le distinzioni giuridiche tra fedeli, dhimmī e politeisti 6

382

D. Atighetchi, Islam e Bioetica, op. cit., 143-144.


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

potrebbero ostacolare la donazione di sangue mentre i principi dell’etica medica islamica risultano più favorevoli a motivo della loro impostazione eticoegualitaria. Agli ostacoli giuridici andrebbero aggiunti quelli rituali. Infatti, il sangue è ritualmente impuro (najas)7 per cui parecchi dotti islamici si sono chiesti se il destinatario della donazione finisca in uno stato di impurità permanente che gli impedisca di effettuare le preghiere quotidiane obbligatorie (salah) in un adeguato stato di purità. Altri si sono chiesti se sia lecito ignorare che i musulmani rischiano di mescolare il proprio sangue con quello di non-musulmani il quale è inquinato da cibi e bevande (maiale e alcool) vietati ai musulmani. Nonostante queste premesse e limitatamente al contesto religioso sunnita, il criterio di necessità consente la trasfusione da non-musulmano secondo l’orientamento prevalente nelle scuole giuridiche hanafita, shafi’ita e hanbalita mentre i malikiti la permettono se non è disponibile un donatore musulmano. Comunque si tratta di sofismi giuridici scarsamente applicabili sul piano pratico, come dimostrato dall’utilizzo degli emoderivati. Espianto da vivente La maggioranza dei trapianti realizzati in Medio Oriente e Nord Africa avviene da donatori consanguinei viventi o da parenti stretti, sia perché interventi meno complessi rispetto ai trapianti da cadavere, sia per la difficoltà nel reperimento di organi da quest’ultimo. I giurisperiti sembrano in maggioranza favorevoli 7 I dottori della Legge distinguono due tipi di impurità (ḥadath): impurità maggiore (janāba) principalmente emissione di sperma, mestruo e lochi (liquidi che fuoriescono dai genitali femminili durante il puerperio); impurità minore vale a dire ogni escrezione corporea dalle due vie. Per il diritto musulmano tutto ciò che esce dal corpo umano è impuro: aria, mestruo, urina, feci, sangue, sperma, pus, ecc..

383


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

alla cessione di un organo doppio se la sopravvivenza del donatore è garantita, il danno non è grave e lo scopo è umanitario. Anche sui trapianti da vivente sono presenti opinioni divergenti. Ad esempio, Mokhtar Sallami, Gran Mufti della Repubblica Araba di Tunisia rammentava che l'espianto di un organo doppio (es. cornea, rene) da vivente implica comunque un certo grado di invalidità a danno del donatore. È perciò preferibile non cedere parti del proprio corpo. Se l'espianto avviene –continua il mufti tunisino- , gli organi devono essere oggetto di donazione e non di un commercio. A detta dell'egiziano Abd al-Salam al-Sukkari gli organi doppi rispondono ad un progetto del Creatore per cui il loro numero non deve essere modificato neppure a beneficio del prossimo. L’Accademia di Diritto Islamico di New Delhi, nella seduta del 8-11 dicembre 1989, limitava la liceità della donazione di rene da vivente esclusivamente ai parenti malati. Con questa misura si intendeva rafforzare la famiglia oltre a limitare il commercio di organi. Espianto da cadavere I principi su cui si basano i fautori dei trapianti da cadavere sono il Corano 5,32 e il principio di necessità per la salvezza della vita. Circa gli oppositori, anche costoro si appellano alle Fonti della Sharî‘a; tra gli argomenti si fa riferimento al principio secondo il quale ogni cosa appartiene a Dio, incluso il corpo ed il cadavere umano che l’uomo non ha il diritto di manipolare arbitrariamente neppure a vantaggio del prossimo. Oggi la maggioranza dei "dotti" sembra favorevole all'espianto da cadavere purché costui, da vivo, lo abbia autorizzato o, in alternativa, vi acconsentano i parenti; purtroppo spesso i parenti si oppongono all’espianto da un loro congiunto. Il consenso presunto che permetterebbe di 384


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

espiantare rapidamente da cadavere in mancanza di un’autorizzazione espressa in vita ed evitando la vincolante autorizzazione dei parenti, incontra una forte (ma non unanime) opposizione nel mondo islamico. Infatti, un espianto che sia il risultato "automatico" di un silenzio in vita sminuirebbe il rispetto dovuto al defunto. Inoltre, trascurerebbe la volontà dei parenti. Ecco perché le legislazioni degli Stati musulmani richiedono generalmente di esprimere da vivi la volontà di donare i propri organi (per esempio firmando una tessera di donatore) mentre, in assenza, rimane vincolante l’autorizzazione dei parenti. È evidente come il divieto del consenso presunto ed i limiti ad esso frapposti contrastino con la tutela del beneficio pubblico, principio fondamentale nel diritto ed etica medica islmaica. Un ulteriore presupposto culturale influisce sullo sviluppo della pratica dei trapianti nel mondo islamico. La più alta propensione manifestata dai musulmani a donare organi durante la vita a consanguinei o parenti e, in minor misura, a non consanguinei, piuttosto che cederli post-mortem, è principalmente spiegabile con la volontà di tutelare la salute e la dimensione della famiglia. In sostanza il principio della maslaha viene applicato in prevalenza a tutela della famiglia allargata. La compravendita di organi Il commercio appare generalmente condannato da parte dei dottori della Legge islamica in quanto il corpo è un dono divino da rispettare. Tuttavia, nel caso l'unica alternativa praticabile sia quella di acquistare l'organo, la maggioranza degli esperti dell'IOMS (Islamic Organization for Medical Sciences) riuniti in Kuwait nel 1987 ha giudicato lecito tale acquisto. Contemporaneamente, per evitare soprusi, fu richiesta la supervisione da parte di organismi 385


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

statali all’atto del pagamento della cifra richiesta e per effettuare preventivamente gli screening indispensabili sul donatore. Viceversa appare più decisa la condanna del commercio di organi umani nelle legislazioni statali: l'acquisto di organi è sempre proibito e nessun medico deve procedere al trapianto qualora informato dell’esistenza di simili trattative. Tale rigore è giustificato dalle drammatiche situazioni cliniche che si sono determinate per molti dei pazienti che hanno acquistato organi all’estero (es. India, Pakistan, ecc.), una volta tornati in patria. È da rammentare che la possibilità di una trattativa commerciale riduce la propensione della gente e dei parenti del malato a donare organi per altruismo: perché donarli quando posso venderli? L'autopsia La Legge islamica presenta due principi potenzialmente contrastanti circa l'autopsia. Il primo afferma “la mutilazione è proibita nell’Islàm” allo scopo di abolire l’usanza preislamica di mutilare i corpi dei nemici uccisi nelle lotte tribali. Il secondo principio giuridico afferma che le necessità del vivente hanno la priorità su quelle del defunto, principio fondato – a sua volta – su quelli del beneficio pubblico (maslaha) e di necessità. Attualmente l’autopsia si sta diffondendo negli ospedali musulmani per fini legali (in particolare in caso di omicidi e incidenti) e scientifici. Proprio per il rispetto che accompagna il cadavere è consuetudine, dopo la dissezione, riunire le parti del corpo, risuturarlo e avvolgerlo in un sudario. Ai fedeli che chiedono conferma della sua liceità, i dottori della Legge favorevoli all’autopsia rispondono che, nonostante la violazione del corpo e nonostante il ritardo della sepoltura, le informazioni che si possono ottenere 386


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

soddisfano il beneficio pubblico (es. in caso di omicidi) per cui giustificano la dissezione. A differenza di ciò che avviene con gli espianti da cadavere, nelle autopsie diventa sempre più facile superare le obiezioni delle famiglie ricorrendo al principio del beneficio prioritario della comunità oltre a motivazioni medico-legali. Nel Qatar, la Legge n° 8 del 2003 consente l’autopsia per scopi penali, patologico-diagnostici e didattici8. Tuttavia, l’autopsia per finalità diverse da quelle penali, cioé per fini patologico-diagnostici e didattici richiede il permesso di un tribunale sharaitico. Inoltre, un’autopsia praticata per studiare il corpo umano deve essere approvata per iscritto dall’interessato prima della morte o dagli eredi; tale autopsia è inoltre lecita su cadaveri non identificati o quando non se ne conoscano i parenti. Infine, i medici maschi non possono effettuare autopsie su cadaveri femmine tranne a scopo di insegnamento o quando non siano disponibili medici femmine. Beneficio pubblico e oblazione del corpo Tra i propri scopi il diritto musulmano intende tutelare tre categorie di interessi (masalih) utili a realizzare le finalità dell’esistenza umana articolandoli in base ad un ordine di priorità: interessi indispensabili, interessi necessari e interessi migliorativi. Nel primo gruppo (il più importante) rientrano in ordine di valore decrescente: la difesa della fede; della vita; della ragione; della prole; della proprietà9. Ne consegue in sintesi che la tutela della religione risulta prioritaria rispetto a quella della vita; la tutela della vita risulta prioritaria rispetto alla tutela della ragione o delle proprietà; ecc.10 Le complesse elaborazioni classiche su tali priorità non 8 D. Atighetchi, Islamic Bioethics: Problems and Perspectives, op. cit., 302.. 9 A.A. YACOUB, The Fiqh of Medicine, TaHa Publication, London., 2001, 27. 10 S.A.A. ABU-SAHLIEH, Il diritto islamico, Carocci, Roma, 2008, 357-359.

387


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

sono immediatamente trasferibili o applicabili all’ambito biomedico. Ciò significa che ogni tema (ad es. quelli sopra trattati) richiede un bilanciamento tra principi diversi, talvolta specifici all’argomento in questione. Tale dato contribuisce ad alimentare le differenze di posizioni tra i “dotti” islamici sui vari argomenti. Nel campo della procreatica domina ancora il modello di famiglia islamico tradizionale-patrilineare in cui l’unica filiazione legittima si determina sostanzialmente rispetto alla figura paterna; a questo si somma il vincolo giuridico che deriva dalla equiparazione di ogni atto procreativo eterologo ad atto zinâ (adulterio e/o fornicazione) con il conseguente divieto di qualsiasi tecnica in cui un estraneo alla coppia legalmente coniugata fornisce, per qualsiasi ragione sperma, ovuli, embrioni, utero, ecc.. L’unica eccezione è talvolta costituita dal trasferimento di embrione tra mogli di uno stesso coniuge, vale a dire in un contesto poligamico. Se si aggiunge il divieto dell’adozione si capisce come il modello giuridico classico precluda la formazione di modelli alternativi di famiglia associabili a modifiche dei ruoli tradizionali dei suoi membri. Se tutto ciò è vero per il contesto sunnita, alcuni spiragli di cambiamento sono rilevabili in quello shi’ita. Resta il fatto che da una valutazione complessiva dei mondi sunnita e shi’ita il gamete maschile rimane “intoccabile” mentre quello femminile e l’utero appaiono “più accessibili” a donazioni e prestiti, almeno in specifici casi. Il principio della maslaha (beneficio pubblico) si limita a favorire le coppie sposate per tentare di ovviare ai loro problemi di sterilità; si tratta di una maslaha la cui applicazione è limitata al nucleo familiare ma i cui effetti positivi si dovrebbero riverberare sull’intera comunità islamica in cui la sterilità è vissuta come un dramma e un castigo divino. Nell’approvare la ricerca sulle cellule staminali embrionali il principio giuridico del bene comune 388


L’OBLAZIONE DEL CORPO NELLA MEDICINA ISLAMICA CONTEMPORANEA

(maslaha) è fondamentale in quanto il beneficio della comunità viene anteposto alla tutela degli embrioni precocissimi cioé privi di anima oltreché viventi al di fuori del corpo materno. Questa priorità rivendicata al principio del bene comune viene contestata da quella corrente di medici e dottori della Legge per i quali l’embrione rimane intoccabile sin dalle prime fasi dello sviluppo. Nel campo dei trapianti il principio del bene comune viene articolato sulla base dei principi favorevoli alla pratica: Corano 5,32 (vedi sopra); principio di necessità; principio del “male minore”; principio della responsabilità collettiva nel salvare colui che necessita di organi. Anche i contrari o critici ai trapianti (“in toto” o solo verso alcune varianti) fanno riferimento ai Testi Sacri senza rifiutare il principio della maslaha ma ricorrendovi in misura meno estensiva. Tale applicazione appare evidente nel dibattito squisitamente giuridico sui limiti o accettazione della donazione/ricezione di organi verso/da fedeli musulmani, infedeli, apostati e nemici dell’Islàm. Sia riguardo alla donazione-ricezione di organi che di sangue è utile fare riferimento alla seguente sintesi: “c'è chi considera la donazione come religiosamente lecita oppure doverosa. Viceversa c'è chi può rifiutare la donazione per tutelare l'integrità del cadavere di un musulmano; oppure per diffidenze sulla donazione verso infedeli, sulle vere intenzioni dei sanitari o per ragioni imprecisate...... Comunque la preoccupazione prioritaria sembra quella di essere vittima di una qualche forma di sfruttamento "fisico" da parte dei sanitari non-musulmani”11. Per parecchi fedeli l’opzione mediana (qualora possibile) consiste nell’accettare ciò che è disponibile, ma solo dopo aver cercato (con discrezione) organi di fedeli musulmani. In concreto, nel campo della trapiantologia la nozione di maslaha si incrocia e si misura con concezioni e valori provenienti da 11

D. Atighetchi, Islam e Bioetica, op. cit., 144-145.

389


DARIUSH ATIGHETCHI

ambiti diversi sia giuridici che sociologici: la tripartizione tra musulmani, gente del Libro (dhimmī) e idolatri; il valore della famiglia che dà luogo alla preferenza verso donazioni da consanguinei viventi o da parenti stretti rispetto a quelli da cadavere al fine di tutelare la famiglia e (eventualmente) limitare il commercio; ecc.. Un’applicazione coerente della maslaha alla donazione di organi richiederebbe il ricorso al consenso presunto il quale permette un espianto “automatico” da cadavere in assenza di autorizzazioni espresse in vita dal defunto, oltre a rendere indipendenti dal vincolo (spesso negativo) rappresentato dall’autorizzazione dei parenti. Frequentemente nella donazione da cadavere il ricorso al principio del beneficio pubblico (maslaha) confligge e si sottomette al valore prioritario riconosciuto alla volontà dei parenti rispetto alla salvezza del prossimo e della comunità. Una situazione inversa avviene, invece, con l’autopsia in quanto l’ignorare le obiezioni della famiglia viene prevalentemente giustificato con il ricorso al principio del prioritario beneficio della comunità nonostante la violazione del corpo del defunto. Non si può non notare l’asimmetria nel ricorso e nell’applicazione del principio del beneficio pubblico che manifesta, tra l’altro, una trattazione asistematica dello stesso nel dibattito bioetico islamico. Le resistenze vanno principalmente individuate nelle mentalità e costumi locali piuttosto che in resistenze basate su solide elaborazioni giuridiche.

390


L'interculturalismo e le sue forme di rappresentazione museale Enrico Bertoni

Rispetto agli altri Paesi europei, da diversi anni l’Italia si sta avviando verso l’interculturalismo, in primo luogo a seguito degli importanti flussi migratori che hanno interessato la Penisola, soprattutto dal Nord Africa e dai Paesi del Vicino Oriente. Il contesto sociale, culturale e politico italiano si è dovuto interrogare su un aspetto importante del suo patrimonio storico e del suo passato che avevano visto l’Italia, in particolare nella sua parte meridionale, come crocevia delle principali religioni e culture presenti nel Bacino del Mediterraneo. Non si è trattato sempre di incontri pacifici o dettati da un aperto spirito di dialogo. Gli esempi canonici della Sicilia di Federico II, piuttosto che della Spagna dei Mozarabi, devono indurre a riflettere su quelle modalità che hanno consentito lunghi periodi di convivenza pacifica, senza ricorrere a particolari restrizioni nei confronti delle minoranze religiose, sicuramente apprezzate negli ambienti di corte, perché espressione di una cultura avanzata e raffinata. Uno dei punti di forza e, probabilmente, una delle sfide che l’interculturalismo deve riuscire a vincere, risiede nella capacità di valorizzare le diverse culture presenti all’interno di un determinato contesto sociale. Da questo punto di vista, la musealizzazione delle culture, in modo particolare di quelle religiose, può rispondere a questa necessità di rappresentare, in modo storico e scientificamente corretto, le diverse componenti che trovano espressione 391


ENRICO BERTONI

in una società multiculturale. Il Museo Interreligioso1 di Bertinoro, oggetto del presente intervento, è dedicato all’Ebraismo, al Cristianesimo e all’Islam, e può rappresentare un esempio concreto e operativo di museo interculturale. La realizzazione di un Museo così particolare ha dovuto prendere in considerazione alcune variabili del contesto sociale e culturale nel quale andava a collocarsi. La prima di queste variabili riguardava il luogo, inteso come città, palazzo e contesto monumentale, dove il Museo sarebbe stato allestito. Da questo punto di vista era necessario avere presente quale fosse stata a storia e di quali messaggi fosse portatore questo luogo. La seconda variabile riguardava l’allestimento del percorso espositivo, che doveva rispondere ad un’esigenza di equilibrio, dettata non tanto dalla metratura destinata ad ogni fede religiosa, quanto dalla capacità che gli oggetti esposti avessero nel restituire l’identità di ogni religione abramitica. La terza variabile era rappresentata dal contesto sociale e dal pubblico al quale il Museo si fosse rivolto e di conseguenza quali obiettivi si sarebbe prefissata la nascente istituzione museale. Nel caso del Museo Interreligioso, il primo problema da affrontare era dato dalla storia del luogo nel quale l’esposizione doveva nascere. Il luogo fu identificato nell’antica Rocca di Bertinoro2 che dal 1584 al 1970 fu il 1 Voluto dalla Diocesi di Forlì-Bertinoro, il Museo Interreligioso fu ideato, progettato e realizzato dal sen. Leonardo Melandri (1929-2005). Dedicato al dialogo tra Ebraismo, Cristianesimo e Islam, il Museo fu inaugurato nella segrete della Rocca Vescovile di Bertinoro il 10 giugno 2005. Sulla figura del sen. Melandri e sul suo ruolo nel decentramento dell’Università di Bologna in Romagna vedi: Il valore della cultura, la tradizione dell’ospitalità a cura di A. Bandini, E. Bertoni, O. Mazzotti e P. Rambelli, Bertinoro 2006; V. Melandri, Un uomo libero. Tracce della vita di Leonardo Melandri, Forlì, 2007. 2 Il borgo di Bertinoro (FC) sorge su un colle che si affaccia in posizione predominate sulla via Emilia, tra Forlì e Cesena. La presenza di una fortificazione costruita in pietra, nucleo originario della futura Rocca di Bertinoro, è documentata da un placitumconservato presso l’Archivio Arcivescovile di Ravenna e datato 27 novembre 995. Del fortilizio altomedievale sono rimaste le fondamenta lungo il percorso del Museo Interreligioso. Ampliata a partire dal XII secolo, la Rocca di Bertinoro mantenne una funzione

392


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

palazzo episcopale della città. Si trattava, quindi, di un luogo con un passato culturale e religioso ben preciso, che affondava le sue radici nella tradizione culturale cristiana3. La memoria della città di Bertinoro, nata e cresciuta intorno alla Rocca, la consapevolezza di essere stata una delle diocesi più importanti a livello regionale, rappresentavano una resistenza alla creazione di un Museo che avrebbe portato in questo luogo oggetti appartenenti ad altre fedi religiose. Tale resistenza fu superata a partire dalla capacità che il nascente Museo seppe esprimere nell’interpretazione dei testi sacri di ognuna di queste religioni e, per quanto riguarda il Cristianesimo, a partire dalla raccomandazione evangelica dell’accoglienza, che vedeva nella concezione dell’altro un’immagine di Cristo sulla terra4. Un altro elemento culturale di fondamentale importanza si localizzava nella storia particolare di Bertinoro: fondata da monaci provenienti dalla Britannia francese, nei essenzialmente militare e di controllo del territorio durante tutto il Basso Medioevo: ancora nel XIV secolo fu scelta come base dal cardinale Egidio Albornoz, impegnato nella riconquista della Romagna allo Stato Pontificio. Con la dominazione dei Malatesta, in particolare di Domenico Novello (1418 – 1467), la Rocca perse la sua funzione prevalentemente militare a favore di un ruolo di tipo culturale. A Bertinoro, si stabilì una parte significativa della corte malatestiana e dello scriptorium che avrebbe portato alla nascita della Libraria di San Francesco a Cesena, la futura Biblioteca Malatestiana. Abbandonata per un secolo dopo la fine della signoria dei Malatesta, i ruderi della rocca furono acquistati da Giovanni Andrea Caligari (1527 – 1613) nel 1581. Nominato due anni prima vescovo di Bertinoro, quando ancora era nunzio apostolico alla corte di Stefano I Bàthory in Polonia, il Caligari ricostruì interamente la Rocca di Bertinoro che dal 1584 divenne il palazzo episcopale della città. Cfr. G. Rabotti, Il placito di Bertinoro, in “Studi Romagnoli”, vol. XLVII, 1996, pp. 23-26 e F. Fornasari, L. Melandri, A. Bandini (a cura di) La Rocca di Bertinoro (995 – 2000). Castello comitale, sede vescovile, centro universitario, Forlì, 2002. 3 Nonostante gli importanti rinvenimenti archeologici nella zona, non è possibile documentare con certezza la presenza di un insediamento abitativo sul colle di Bertinoro in età romana. L’antico Forum Trevintorum, probabile toponimo originario di Bertinoro e citato da Plinio il Vecchio nella Historia Naturalis, non è mai stato identificato con certezza. Il primo insediamento risale all’VIII secolo ad opera di pellegrini cristiani, che di ritorno da Roma, fondarono un monastero vivente secondo la regola benedettina. 4 Nel capitolo XXV del Vangelo secondo Matteo, i giusti sono riconosciuti per avere praticato l’accoglienza nei confronti dei “fratelli più piccoli”: “[…] ero straniero e mi avete accolto”.

393


ENRICO BERTONI

secoli del Basso Medioevo Bertinoro si era caratterizzata per il valore dell’ospitalità accordata ai pellegrini diretti verso Roma. Non si trattava però di una semplice ospitalità demandata a confraternite o ad ordini religiosi: nei documenti dell’Archivio Storico del Comune di Bertinoro mancano riferimenti alla presenza di hospitales all’interno della cerchia muraria o nelle sue immediate vicinanze. Le cronache medievali e i primi commentatori della Commedia ricordano che, a provvedere all’ospitalità, erano le famiglie nobili della città, attraverso la creazione di una colonna di pietra dotata di anelli: ad ogni anello corrispondeva uno dei casati nobiliari bertinoresi. I pellegrini, arrivando a Bertinoro e legando il proprio bastone e la propria cavalcatura ad uno degli anelli, erano automaticamente ospiti di quella famiglia. Le cronache attribuiscono la creazione di questa colonna, nota oggi come Colonna degli Anelli o Colonna dell’Ospitalità, al giudice ravennate Guido del Duca5, storicamente esistito, attestato a Bertinoro dal 1202 al 1218 e protagonista del canto XIV del Purgatorio. Come dimostrato da Andrea Battistini6, la dimensione mitica della Colonna degli Anelli non intacca il valore e la pratica dell’ospitalità, intesa come particolare derivazione dal valore della cortesia, certamente rimpianta da Dante, ma ancora così radicata nella coscienza dei primi commentatori della Divina Commedia, tra i quali lo stesso Boccaccio, da avvertire l’esigenza di identificare la pratica dell’ospitalità in un manufatto realmente tangibile come una colonna di pietra. L’ospitalità era dunque concepita a Bertinoro come valore fondante della convivenza civile, dove il pellegrino e lo straniero erano parte integrante della comunità. 5 Per la figura di Guido del Duca si rimanda alla voce curata da E. Chiarini nell’Enciclopedia Dantesca, vol. III, pp. 274-273. Per la lettura dell’incontro tra Dante e Guido del Duca, si rimanda a E. Pasquini, Lettura del c. XIV del Purgatorio, in La Divina Commedia, vol. II, Milano, 1993, pp. 225-230. 6 A. Battistini, Miti, ideologie, e simboli nella cultura letteraria, in Storia di Bertinoro, a cura di A. Vasina, Cesena, 2006, pp. 333-352.

394


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

L’ospitalità, dunque, rappresenta un valore di lunga durata, come dimostrano le modalità di insediamento e le vicende della comunità ebraica stabilitasi a Bertinoro all’inizio del 1397. Se l’apertura di un banco di prestito, gestito da personale israelita, avvenne secondo un processo consolidato (la prima famiglia ad insediarsi erogò un prestito a fondo perduto all’autorità comunale di Bertinoro), la vita della comunità ebraica di Bertinoro si svolse sempre in modo libero e secondo modalità raramente rintracciabili in altre città della Penisola7. Infatti la comunità ebraica era esente dall’indossare il segno di riconoscimento, aveva la possibilità di possedere beni immobili, gli fu affidata un’area di sepoltura all’interno della cinta muraria, un edificio per la panificazione, uno per la macellazione rituale e un altro per la vinificazione. Tali diritti furono riconfermati dal comune di Bertinoro anche dopo l’emanazione della bolla papale Cum nimis absurdum di papa Paolo IV Carafa8, che andava ad interessare anche la giurisdizione 7 R. Bonfil, La presenza ebraica in Romagna nel Quattrocento. Appunti per un profilo socio-culturale, in ‘Ovadyah Yare da Bertinoro e la presenza ebraica in Romagna nel Quattrocento. Atti del Convegno di Bertinoro, 17-18 maggio 1988, a cura di G. Busi, Torino, 1989, pp. 3-20. 8 La bolla di papa Carafa imponeva la costituzione dei ghetti su tutto il territorio dello Stato della Chiesa: la scelta, compiuta dal pontefice a favore di una rigida segregazione, era motivata dalla necessità di rimarcare l’inferiorità religiosa e sociale del popolo ebraico. In un passaggio della bolla, si afferma: “[…] abbiamo appreso che a Roma e in altre località sottoposte alla Sacra Romana Chiesa la loro sfrontatezza è giunta a tanto che essi si azzardano non solo a vivere in mezzo ai cristiani, ma anche nelle vicinanze delle chiese senza alcuna distinzione di abito, e che anzi prendono in affitto delle case nelle vie e nelle piazze principali, acquistano e posseggono immobili […]”. Il documento papale descrive la condizione di vita quotidiana delle comunità ebraiche in numerose città della Penisola: anche a Bertinoro, gli ebrei non solo avevano affittato le loro abitazioni, ma in numerosi casi le possedevano direttamente. La giudecca bertinorese sorgeva su una delle principali strade della città, a poche decine di metri dalla cattedrale di Santa Caterina. L’anno successivo alla bolla Cum nimis absurdum, il Consiglio degli Anziani del Comune di Bertinoro rinnovò sostanzialmente la condotta della comunità ebraica, che prevedeva l’esenzione dall’obbligo del segno di riconoscimento, la possibilità di possedere beni immobili e di continuare ad esercitare il prestito. Furono comunque introdotte alcune restrizioni, come la proibizione ad uscire di casa durante il triduo pasquale cristiano e la mancata restituzione dei beni mobili in caso di saccheggio. Solo il pontificato di Clemente VIII, che impose l’obbligo

395


ENRICO BERTONI

di Bertinoro, essendo territorio di competenza diretta dell’autorità pontificia. Solo alla fine del XVI secolo, con la bolla di espulsione degli ebrei dai domini pontifici, la comunità ebraica fu costretta ad abbandonare Bertinoro, lasciando comunque una traccia profonda nel tessuto urbano, tanto che ancora oggi la città, nelle immediate vicinanze del duomo di Santa Caterina, conta su una delle giudecche meglio conservate del territorio emiliano-romagnolo. Fu nel contesto di pacifica convivenza che visse e si formò il rabbino ‘Ovadyah Yare9 (1445-1518), conosciuto nella tradizione come il Gran Bertinoro, che compose un commento alla Mišnah che rappresenta ancora oggi un classico per chi si avvicina allo studio della materia halakica. Di questo rabbino di residenza delle comunità ebraiche dello Stato della Chiesa nelle sole città di Ancona e Roma, determinò la fine della presenza ebraica Bertinoro; cfr. M.G. Muzzarelli, Momenti e aspetti culturali, in Storia di Bertinoro, cit., pp. 199-211. 9 Nato a Bertinoro probabilmente a metà degli anni Quaranta del Quattrocento, ‘Ovadyah di Abramo di Salomone completò i suoi studi a Bologna sotto la guida del maestro Yosef Colon (1420-1480). Lavorò presso i principali banchi di prestito presenti in Umbria, in Toscana e nelle Marche, affiancando l’attività di insegnamento, per la quale risulta particolarmente apprezzato dai suoi studenti. Nel 1487 lasciò l’Italia per stabilirsi definitivamente a Gerusalemme. Della sua esperienza restano le Lettere indirizzate al padre e al fratello rimasti in Italia, nelle quali descrive il suo viaggio verso la Palestina. Si tratta di un documento importante, che descrive i modi di vita e i riti delle diverse comunità ebraiche incontrate da ‘Ovadyah nel suo cammino. Dalle Lettere emerge la figura intellettuale e umana del suo autore: ‘Ovadyah è il tipico esponente dell’ebraismo italiano del XV secolo che, senza perdere il punto di vista “israelitico” sulla realtà, lascia trasparire una costante attenzione all’uomo e alle sue vicende, testimoniando la profonda influenza che l’Umanesimo italiano ha avuto sulla sua vicenda intellettuale. La prima lettera documenta i rapporti particolarmente favorevoli delle comunità ebraiche del Mediterraneo orientale nei confronti dei cristiani e dei musulmani. Per quanto riguarda il suo ruolo all’interno dell’Ebraismo, la figura di ‘Ovadyah Yare si lega al suo Commento alla Mišnah che, per la sua chiarezza espositiva, rappresenta una delle opere esegetiche più pubblicate in Europa dal XVI al XVIII secolo. Alla fine del Settecento, il suo Commento fu tradotto in latino (l’unico altro esempio di traduzione latina di un commento alla Mišnah è quello di Mosè Maimonide). Altra opera fondamentale del Gran Bertinoro è il suo Supercommentario a Raši; cfr. G. Busi, ‘Ovadyah da Bertinoro come viaggiatore, in ‘Ovadyah Yare a Bertinoro e la presenza ebraica in Romagna nel Quattrocento, cit., pp.21-33; B. Chiesa, Il supercommentario di ‘Ovadyah da Bertinoro a Raši, ibidem, pp. 35-46; G. Tamani, La diffusione del commento alla Mišnah di ‘Ovadyah Yare da Bertinoro, ibidem, pp. 47-56; ‘O. Yare, Lettere da Gerusalemme, a cura di G. Busi, Rimini 1991; A. Toaff, ‘Ovadiah da Bertinoro nella realtà italiana del suo tempo, in L’interculturalità dell’Ebraismo, a cura di M. Perani, Ravenna 2004, pp. 257-268.

396


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

resta inoltre l’importante testimonianza delle lettere scritte da Gerusalemme, dove visse gli ultimi vent’anni della sua vita, descrivendo la pacifica convivenza tra ebrei, cristiani e musulmani alla fine del Quattrocento. La storia locale di Bertinoro, caratterizzata dal valore dell’ospitalità, intesa come valore fondante per la convivenza civile, la presenza di una comunità ebraica, che ha vissuto per secoli in ottimi rapporti con quella cristiana, hanno offerto la base teorica sulla quale costruire il Museo Interreligioso. Se da un punto di vista storico la fede islamica non contava su testimonianze importanti, la sua presenza è comunque garantita dal punto di vista sociale dalla crescita di diverse comunità, formate dalla migrazione dai Paesi del Magreb, che si sono inserite positivamente nel contesto culturale di Bertinoro e della Romagna in generale. La scelta della Rocca Vescovile offriva un altro elemento a vantaggio della creazione del Museo Interreligioso: la presenza di un Centro di Alta Formazione dell’Università di Bologna. A differenza delle istituzioni politiche o religiose, l’Università è uno spazio autonomo dove le diverse appartenenze si ritrovano riunite sulla base di metodi di analisi condivisi: metodi che possono essere cambiati e discussi sempre sulla base di una comune ricerca scientifica. La presenza dell’Università ha garantito la costituzione di uno spazio nel quale le religioni, in particolare quelle monoteistiche, e le culture nate da esse, potessero incontrarsi sulla base del valore condiviso della conoscenza. Su queste premesse, è stato possibile creare un allestimento capace di interrogare nuovamente i testi sacri delle fedi abramitiche, riscoprendo da una parte gli aspetti comuni dell’Ebraismo, del Cristianesimo, dell’Islam, dall’altra consentendo una rilettura delle identità in senso dialogico: l’identità è diventata lo strumento principale dell’incontro e del dialogo con l’altro. Dando priorità all’identità, le differenze non sono più colte come ostacoli, ma come elementi preziosi 397


ENRICO BERTONI

per la scrittura della grammatica e della sintassi del dialogo interreligioso.Il percorso si è andato a definire come valoriale, dove i singoli oggetti svolgono una duplice funzione, da una parte raffigurano l’identità della religione di appartenenza, dall’altra mostrano il contributo che ogni fede porta al dialogo. L’adozione di questa soluzione ha garantito l’equilibrio espositivo, dato non dalla metratura occupata, ma dalla qualità, dal valore degli oggetti esposti, evitando di scadere nel sincretismo. La scelta dei pezzi ha cercato sempre di attendere ad un ruolo di eccellenza, sia quando si trattasse di opere di autori di riconosciuto valore storico e culturale, sia quando i pezzi, maggiormente familiari al pubblico degli specialisti, potessero consentire al visitatore un punto di osservazione privilegiato su una particolare religione. La bellezza è l’elemento conduttore di tutta la collezione, consentendo di cogliere come l’idea del bello, anche nelle sue inclinazioni drammatiche, per le religioni monoteistiche si sia manifestato nel sacro, dalla copiatura e dalla stampa dei testi rivelati, alla raffigurazione dei momenti fondamentali della religione, alla preparazione degli arredi sacri. La collezione, inserita in un allestimento stabile, offre lo spunto per approfondire particolari aspetti legati alle dinamiche del dialogo interreligioso, così come le problematiche riguardanti il modo di porsi dell’uomo davanti al problema religioso tout-court. Volendo presentare un breve saggio della complessità di significati che ogni singolo pezzo abbraccia all’interno della collezione, si può assumere, come elemento di partenza, l’Haggadah stampata a Livorno nel 1832. Pur trattandosi di una stampa ottocentesca, l’esemplare conservato presso il Museo Interreligioso è rilevante per il ricco apparato xilografico che riporta. Le xilografie sono molto più antiche, rispetto al testo nel quale sono state inserite, e si possono datare intorno alla metà del XVI secolo. Prodotte e destinate ad un pubblico di 398


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

origine sefardita, le immagini non risentono soltanto dell’importante acculturazione avvenuta nei confronti della tradizione figurativa cristiana, ma in primo luogo svolgono quel processo di trasmissione della memoria, quella necessità di continuare ad interrogarsi su quale significato abbia oggi per il singolo fedele e per l’intera comunità israelitica la liberazione dalla schiavitù egiziana. Dopo la parte inerente alla preparazione rituale dell’abitazione per la festa di Pesach, l’Haggadah del Museo Interreligioso presenta al lettore la parte relativa alla storia e alle vicende di Abramo. Del primo patriarca, la narrazione sottolinea il suo essere stato un uomo giusto, osservante della legge noachica e meritevole di essere il protagonista del primo patto che il Signore stipula con il popolo ebraico. Le vicende di Abramo sono esemplari per la definizione del rapporto tra Dio e l’uomo nella dimensione del monoteismo: per il primo tzadik, la fede non è un a-priori incontestabile o una semplice illuminazione dall’alto. La fede in Abramo matura come concreta esperienza di vita che, nel suo svolgersi, richiede il passaggio di prove dolorose come l’abbandono della terra dei propri padri, l’arrivo e la successiva cacciata dall’Egitto, l’allontanamento del figlio Ismaele, la lotta contro i re politeisti d’Oriente10. 10 Gn 14, 1-24, in La Sacra Bibbia, edizione ufficiale a cura della Conferenza Episcopale Italiana, Roma, 1992. In merito al percorso di fede di Abramo, il sacro Corano si esprime in termini molto simili al racconto biblico. Il percorso che conduce il profeta Ibrahim a diventare hanif, un sincero credente nell’originaria fede dell’unico Dio, lasciando dietro di sé il culto idolatrico dei propri avi, è descritto nella Sura VI – Al-An‘âm vv. 74-83, trad. it. a cura di Hamza Picardo, Milano, 1994: “Quando Abramo disse a suo padre ‘Azar: «Prenderai gli idoli per divinità? Vedo che tu e il tuo popolo siete in palese errore!». Così mostrammo ad Abramo il regno dei cieli e della terra, affinché fosse tra coloro che credono con fermezza. Quando la notte l’avvolse, vide una stella e disse: «Ecco il mio Signore!». Poi quando essa tramontò disse:«Non amo quelli che tramontano». Quando osservò la luna che sorgeva, disse: «Ecco il mio Signore!». Quando poi tramontò, disse: «Se il mio Signore non mi guida sarò certamente tra coloro che si perdono!». Quando poi vide il sole che sorgeva, disse: «Ecco il mio Signore, ecco il più grande!». Quando poi tramontò disse : «O popolo mio, io rinnego ciò che associate ad Allah! In tutta sincerità rivolgo il mio volto verso Colui che ha creato i cieli e la terra : e non sono tra coloro che associano».”; sulla figura di Abramo come hanif vedi M. Jevolella, Il vincitore, in Corano, libro

399


ENRICO BERTONI

Solo al termine di simili esperienze, quando Dio, presentandosi come rifugio, promette all’anziano patriarca una discendenza “numerosa come le stelle del cielo”, Abramo compie la sua professione di fede: “«Guarda in cielo e conta le stelle, se riesci a contarle» e soggiunse: «Tale sarà la tua discendenza». Egli credette al Signore, che glielo accreditò come giustizia”11. L’essere giusto del patriarca non emerge solo dalle prove che affronta, ma è sottolineato anche dal suo abito mentale, dal modo tenuto nel confrontarsi con gli altri uomini. Abramo avverte la responsabilità della cura della sua gente, senza dimenticare i valori dell’accoglienza e dell’ospitalità che, segnando secondo Louis Massignon, la nascita delle religioni monoteistiche12, sono praticati nei confronti della figura dello straniero. Esemplare è l’episodio dell’ospitalità alle querce di Mamre: “Allora Abramo andò in fretta nella tenda, da Sara, e disse: – Presto tre staia di fior di farina, impastala e fanne focacce. All’armento corse lui stesso, Abramo, prese un vitello tenero e buono e lo diede al servo, che si affrettò a prepararlo. Prese latte acido e latte fresco insieme al vitello, che aveva preparato, e li porse a loro. Così, mentre Abramo stava in piedi presso di loro sotto l’albero, quelli mangiarono. Poi gli dissero: – Dov’è Sara, tua moglie? Rispose: – È là nella tenda. Il Signore riprese: – Tornerò da te tra un anno a questa data e allora Sara, tua moglie, avrà un figlio”13. L’accoglienza di Abramo, che si inserisce in un lungo filone della letteratura antica dove l’ospitalità riservata agli stranieri fa parte di un tessuto culturale comune, si arricchisce di un valore: l’episodio si conclude con la rivelazione della di pace. I brani più belli tradotti e commentati con uno sguardo interculturale, Milano, 2013, pp. XV-XXVII. 11 Gn 12-15 passim; 12 L. Massignon, L’ospitalità di Abramo. All’origine di Ebraismo, Cristianesimo e Islam, a cura di Domenico Canciani, Milano, 2002. 13 Gn 18,6-10, cit.;

400


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

nascita del figlio Isacco14, riportando l’ospitalità alla sua dimensione primaria ed essenziale di accoglienza riservata alla nascita di una nuova vita fin dal momento del suo annuncio. Infine la richiesta di sacrificio e la conseguente salvezza di Isacco15 non sono soltanto una prova per verificare la fede dell’anziano patriarca, ma completano il profilo di tzadik di Abramo. L’uomo giusto si definisce sulla base di quattro elementi: il rispetto delle norme noachiche, la preoccupazione e la cura mostrate nei confronti del proprio popolo e in generale nei confronti dell’uomo16, la pratica dell’ospitalità, il rispetto e il riconoscimento della sacralità della vita umana. La Torah presenta al fedele anche il modello negativo dell’accoglienza e dell’ospitalità, rappresentato dall’esperienza della schiavitù del popolo ebraico in Egitto. Faraone non solo nega l’accoglienza, riservata in un primo tempo ai discendenti di Giuseppe, riducendo gli israeliti in schiavitù, ma nega anche l’accoglienza alla vita, ordinando la morte di tutti i figli maschi del popolo ebraico che vengono sistematicamente gettati nel Nilo17. 14 Ibidem, 22, 6-18, cit.; l’episodio del sacrificio di Isacco si conclude con la stipula definitiva dell’alleanza tra Dio e Abramo, con la specifica che, attraverso i discendenti dell’anziano patriarca, e dunque attraverso il popolo di Israele, si diranno “benedette tutte le famiglie della terra”. 15 Nella tradizione ebraica e in particolare nei commenti dei maestri del Talmud, l’episodio di Isacco è interpretato in un’ottica particolare: se per la tradizione cristiana, il sacrificio di Isacco è una prova per verificare la fedeltà di Abramo e anticipa il futuro sacrificio di Gesù, nell’Ebraismo la prova dell’anziano patriarca sottolinea la sacralità della vita umana davanti a Dio, che non chiede per sé il sacrificio degli essere umani. 16 Abramo cerca di intercedere ripetutamente presso Dio per gli abitanti di Sodoma, portando come motivazione la possibile presenza di “uomini giusti”. La risposta dell’Altissimo in merito è netta: anche la semplice presenza di un solo uomo giusto risparmierebbe la città dalla distruzione; cfr. Gn 18,22-33. L’ebraismo rabbinico enunciò l’importanza dell’uomo giusto per la prima volta nella Tosefta: “Quando il giusto viene al mondo, il bene pure viene e la sventura è scacciata, ma quando il giusto se ne va, è catastrofe e il bene lascia questo mondo”. Successivamente le accademie rabbiniche di Babilonia, sulla base della ghematria, elaborarono la leggenda dei trentasei uomini giusti: “Ci sono almeno trentasei uomini giusti in ogni generazione che dimostrano di contenere la Shekinah [la presenza di Dio]”. 17 Nel Libro dell’Esodo, si afferma che la presenza degli Ebrei era percepita dagli Egiziani come un incubo, come una paura irrazionale alla quale il Faraone rispose negando ogni tipo di accoglienza, dalla privazione

401


ENRICO BERTONI

La narrazione dell’Haggadah sottolinea con forza che le dieci piaghe, mandate dall’Altissimo contro gli egiziani, non sono determinate da spirito di vendetta, ma dalla volontà di ristabilire il valore della giustizia, arrivando a determinare anche la morte dei primogeniti degli egiziani. Faraone ha compiuto un male talmente grande che, non punirlo, significherebbe mancare di rispetto alla giustizia e Dio non può contraddire il suo essere giusto, il suo agire secondo giustizia e la sua ricerca della giustizia tra gli uomini. Nella narrazione dell’Haggadah, che va a commentare il passo di Esodo 13,3-7, le dieci piaghe, compresa l’ultima, sono rivendicate da Dio stesso: “Ed il Signore ci fece uscire dall’Egitto non mandando un angelo, non mandando un serafino, non mandando un incaricato, bensì provvide direttamente nella Sua gloria il Santo benedetto Egli sia. Come ci dice la Torah: – Io attraverserò la terra d’Egitto quella notte; Io ucciderò ogni primogenito degli egiziani, uomo o bestia; Io farò giustizia degli dèi degli egiziani: Io sono il Signore, Io, non altri”18. Dall’esperienza della schiavitù, dal rispetto nei confronti dei primogeniti e dei soldati egiziani morti, la Torah ricorda che occorre dare un senso al dolore per impedire che si trasformi in disperazione o in semplice spirito di vendetta. In questa prospettiva il primo insegnamento riguarda l’atteggiamento nei confronti dello straniero, espresso in Esodo 22,20: “Non molesterai lo straniero, né lo opprimerai, perché voi siete stati forestieri nel paese d’Egitto”. La dolorosa esperienza della schiavitù non deve essere riversata su altri popoli e a questo si aggiunge il ricordo del comportamento di Dio nei confronti del popolo ebraico: “Dio ama lo straniero gli dà pane e vestito”. Il passo del Deuteronomio ricorda che l’unico Dio si rivela agli ebrei della libertà del popolo ebraico fino all’uccisione di ogni figlio maschio. Nella Torah ritorna il tema della paura che determina la fine di ogni rapporto umano; cfr. Es. 1,1-17, cit. 18 Haggadah, trad. it. a cura di David Pacifici, Roma, 2004, pp. 16-17.

402


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

quando erano stranieri in Egitto e, udendo il loro grido, ha provveduto loro, non solo conducendoli fuori dalla schiavitù, ma sostenendoli e prendendosi cura di loro durante il pellegrinaggio nel deserto del Sinai. Dunque, credere nell’unicità di Dio significa credere in una divinità che non solo ha chiamato Abramo, perché divenisse straniero a sua volta, lasciando la terra dei suoi padri, ma in una divinità che si rivela al popolo straniero per eccellenza. Un popolo piccolo per testimoniare la presenza di Dio nella storia. Infine il terzo insegnamento è espresso in Levitico 19,34: “Amerai lo straniero come te stesso”. L’amore per lo straniero diventa il segno della santità d’Israele: in questo atteggiamento, Israele ritrova la sua identità più profonda il popolo realizza la propria vocazione e la propria identità di popolo “altro” rispetto agli altri popoli. Lo sviluppo di altri percorsi tematici dai pezzi esposti dal Museo Interreligioso possono nascere dall’incisione all’acquaforte di Rembrandt intitolata Cristo davanti a Pilato19. Se da un punto di vista storico si colloca in 19 L’incisione è datata 1636 e riporta la firma autografa di Rembrandt. Di questa incisione ne esistono ancora due versioni: una è conservata presso il Museo Interreligioso di Bertinoro e risulta essere l’ultimo stadio di incisione su una serie di cinque. Un’altra versione, più antica ma incompleta, è conservata al Rembrandthuis ad Amsterdam e risulta essere il quarto stadio di incisione. In questo periodo, lo stile dell’artista olandese sta raggiungendo la sua piena maturazione: il sapiente dosaggio di luce e ombra, al di là di ogni criterio empirico, per determinare lo svolgimento delle azioni e per indagare i profili psicologici dei personaggi, la resa drammatica della scena attraverso i gesti momentaneamente trattenuti della parola pronunciata, la ricerca di un marcato realismo, testimoniato dalla maniacale accuratezza della resa lenticolare degli abiti, dei tratti fisiognomici, delle armature dei soldati, a scapito della rigorosa resa prospettica dello spazio, costituiscono scelte stilisticheche Rembrandt trasporrà nelle opere pittoriche e alle quali rimarrà fedele fino alla sua tarda produzione; cfr. M. Bockemühl, Rembrandt, Colonia, 2001, pp. 35-45 passim. Se si considera poi la modalità, cupa e caricaturale, scelta da Rembrandt per raffigurare i componenti del Sinedrio, secondo i canoni di un radicato antigiudaismo, l’incisione diventa un importante documento visivo per testimoniare i difficili rapporti tra Ebraismo e Cristianesimo. Occorre comunque sottolineare come a partire dagli anni Cinquanta del XVII secolo, Rembrandt mutò sensibilmente il modo di rappresentare il popolo ebraico: oltre alle frequentazioni assidue con le comunità portoghese e askenazita di Amsterdam, con le quali l’artista si troverà a vivere l’ultima parte della sua esistenza, Rembrandt condivide le posizioni di una parte della comunità

403


ENRICO BERTONI

un periodo chiave per comprendere l’evoluzione dello stile del pittore olandese, nel percorso del Museo Interreligioso, essa assume un significato più profondo: se la condanna emessa da Pilato è il momento decisivo nel processo di Salvezza, perché storicamente determina il mistero centrale del Cristianesimo, la morte e Risurrezione di Gesù costituiscono il principale elemento di confronto che il Cristianesimo offre alle altre religioni, sottolineando come Gesù muoia e risorga per l’intera umanità. Nell’incisione, Rembrandt raffigura la portata universale del messaggio cristiano attraverso tre personaggi, un uomo di colore, un’orientale e un’occidentale che, sporgendosi dalla balaustra in secondo piano, osservano direttamente il Cristo: è la rappresentazione dell’umanità che si trova riunita intorno al mistero pasquale. Nel contesto del percorso l’opera assume un ulteriore significato, presentandosi come un’immagine in negativo di che cosa può verificarsi nel momento del rifiuto del riconoscimento della verità, di cui l’altro è portatore: il dialogo, al pari della religione, si manifesta nella società e, nell’immagine di Rembrandt, pur avendo compreso chi sta giudicando, Pilato si rifiuta di testimoniare la verità di cui è portatore Gesù, cedendo ad uno degli elementi di maggiore pericolo per lo svolgimento del dialogo, soffocandolo spesso sul nascere: la paura. Di pari intensità emotiva è il bassorilievo di Giacomo Manzù intitolato Lo scheletro crocifisso del 1966: l’opera si inserisce nel filone che l’artista realizzò a partire dagli inizi della Seconda Guerra Mondiale fino alla metà degli anni Sessanta, intitolato Cristo nella nostra umanità20. Lo calvinista filoebraica, che ricercherà un dialogo con le comunità israelite e, in particolare, con rabbi Menasseh ben Israel; cfr. A. Seghers, Ebraismo ed ebrei nell’opera di Rembrandt, Firenze, 2008; M. Zell, Reframing Rembrandt: Jews and the Christian Image in Seventeenth-Century Amsterdam, New York, 2002. Sulle condizioni di vita delle comunità ebraiche di Amsterdam nel XVII secolo cfr. A. Foa, Ebrei in Europa. Dalla Peste Nera all’emancipazione, Bari, 2004, pp. 192-201. 20 Manzù iniziò la realizzazione dei bassorilievi nel 1939, come segno di protesta contro la guerra e l’ideologia fascista.Negli otto riquadri di cui è

404


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

stile essenziale, primitivo di Manzù, pone sulla lastra uno scheletro appeso ad una croce, attorniato da un bambino che accompagna un cane al guinzaglio e da un prelato coperto unicamente dal suo cappello. Da laico, lo scultore affronta il tema della perdita della sacralità della vita umana e della dignità della sofferenza, raffigurata dallo scheletro, che è comunque appeso, quasi aggrappato alla croce, simbolo, anche nella personale poetica di Manzù, di speranza. Lo scheletro si protende in cerca di un dialogo verso il bambino, caratterizzato dal ventre rigonfio, dagli occhi appena accennati e dall’assenza delle labbra e della bocca: è l’immagine dell’indifferenza della vita quotidiana, che non ha modo di vedere la sofferenza dell’uomo e non ha parole per alleviarla o dare speranza e conforto; al contrario, il bambino conduce il cane vicino alle ossa dello scheletro in segno di disprezzo. Alla sinistra della croce, la grottesca figura del prelato, con gli occhi rivolti verso lo scheletro, raffigura come i rappresentanti delle religioni possano, posti davanti alla sofferenza umana, dimenticare la propria autorità terrena, quanto di essere portatori dei messaggi e dei valori più profondi delle religioni monoteistiche, che cercano di fornire una risposta positiva al tema del male. Influenzata dalle vicende del secolo del “male assoluto”, l’opera di Manzù introduce alla riflessione sul silenzio e sulla morte di Dio, decretata composta la serie, Gesù è rappresentato nella sua condizione di uomo, nel momento della crocifissione o della deposizione, mentre i carnefici possono assumere le fattezze di generali tedeschi, con l’elmo appuntito e le decorazioni in vista sul petto, oppure di prelati. Di questi stessi anni, sono le prime sculture dei Cardinali, nelle quali si approfondisce l’impressione suscita nell’artista dalla vista del Sacro Collegio: di quella ieraticità, Manzù cercherà di indagarne l’aspetto umano. In questi bassorilievi, Manzù inizia la riflessione sui temi della sofferenza e della morte nella vita dell’uomo, che troveranno piena espressione nella realizzazione della Porta della Morte per la Basilica di San Pietro a Roma. Nel bassorilievo esposto al Museo Interreligioso, è la sofferenza stessa ad essere appesa alla croce, davanti alla quale passa un’umanità indifferente, che non si lascia più colpire dalla realtà della morte e risurrezione di Gesù; cfr. G. Carandente, Manzù, Firenze, 2002, pp. 18-37, A Paolucci, Il Male di vivere, in Novecento. Arte e vita in Italia tra le due guerre, Catalogo della mostra, Forlì 2 febbraio – 16 giugno 2013, a cura di F. Mazzocca, Milano 2013.

405


ENRICO BERTONI

dai regimi totalitari del Novecento, ma al tempo stesso una chiusura nei confronti delle religioni rivelate, che conduce la condizione umana a sostituire Dio con una nuova religione costituita da divinità effimere, assurte alla dignità di Assoluto. Di valore storico e artistico non minore, rispetto al corpus degli artisti appena citati, sono gli oggetti appartenenti alle tre religioni. La collezione conserva un piccolo monetiere formato da rupie appartenute a tre grandi Moghul, gli imperatori musulmani, che dominarono l’India dal 1526 fino alla colonizzazione inglese. Le monete sul recto affiancano al nome del sovrano regnante l’epiteto Nur ad-Din, cioè Luce della Religione: si tratta di uno dei riconoscimenti più alti di cui si possa fregiare un sovrano musulmano, in particolare per il rispetto e l’intima adesione ai dettami dell’Islam. Al tempo stesso, questi imperatori promulgarono leggi a favore delle religioni non-musulmane presenti in India, arrivando ad abolire la tassa sui non-musulmani, che rappresentava una delle principali voci di entrata nel bilancio dello Stato. Il governo dei Moghul rappresentò per l’India del XVII secolo un momento importante di pacifica convivenza tra religioni e confessioni diverse, in un momento in cui l’Europa con grande difficoltà si accingeva ad uscire dal periodo delle guerre di religione, iniziando a maturare i primi principi filosofici, che nel Settecento avrebbero consentito la nascita della tolleranza religiosa. Il governo dei Moghul costituisce la controprova della grande età mentale che accomunò l’Islam, fin dalla sua nascita, ai monoteismi che lo avevano preceduto, capaci di maturare un pensiero ed una visione articolata per definire l’“altro da sé”, così come espresso nella Sura della Mensa, nella quale la diversità religiosa è intesa come dono di Allah agli uomini, affinché competano nelle opere buone, per offrire il meglio di sé stessi21. 21 Sura V – Al-Mâida, v. 48: “E su di te abbiamo fatto scendere il Libro secondo verità, a conferma delle Scrittura che era scesa in precedenza e lo

406


L’INTERCULTURALISMO E LE SUE FORME DI RAPPRESENTAZIONI MUSEALI

L’azione di governo dei sovrani Moghul si illumina di nuova luce se considerata avendo a fronte la Sura II – Al Baqara v. 177: “La pietà non consiste nel volgere i vostri volti verso l’Oriente e l’Occidente, ma nel credere in Dio e nell’ultimo Giorno, negli Angeli, nei Libri, nei Profeti; nel dare dei propri beni, per amore Suo [di Dio], ai parenti, agli orfani, ai poveri, ai viandanti diseredati, ai mendicanti e per liberare gli schiavi, compiere l’orazione e pagare la decima, mantenere fede agli impegni presi, essere pazienti nelle avversità, nelle ristrettezze e di fronte al pericolo. Queste sono le virtù che caratterizzano i credenti pii e sinceri”. Come si può dunque comprendere da questo rapido excursus, il percorso del Museo Interreligioso offre una ricchezza stratificata per possibili approfondimenti e conferma come il progetto di allestimento non sia compiuto e concluso in sé, ma risponde piuttosto alla necessità che ogni progetto porta con sé, l’essere un progetto vitale e aperto, rispecchiando anche in questo la personalità del suo fondatore che scrisse: “Un progetto, come constatiamo ogni momento, non è un punto terminale, sconosciuto e inconoscibile, ma è il necessario punto di partenza sul quale, con addizioni e sottrazioni, del più diverso genere, si costruisce la vita”.

abbiamo preservato da ogni alterazione. Giudica tra loro secondo quello che Allah ha fatto scendere, non conformarti alle loro passioni allontanandoti dalla verità che ti è giunta. Ad ognuno di voi abbiamo assegnato una via ed un percorso. Se Allah avesse voluto, avrebbe fatto di voi una sola comunità. Vi ha voluto, però, provare con quel che vi ha dato. Gareggiate dunque nelle opere buone: tutti ritornerete ad Allah ed Egli vi informerà a proposito delle cose sulle quali ora siete discordi”, in Il Corano, trad. it. a cura di Hamza R. Picardo, Milano, 1994, pp. 114-115.

407


The Pre-history of the Philanthropic Thinking: the Cosmos Girolamo Ramunni

Should we consider as a pure chance that the word philanthopy changend his signification, in Europe at least, at the transition from the XVIth century to the XVIIth century ? At this period we find still the “classical” meaning for philanthropy: the love of God for the humans. This meaning has been forgotten. For example, the ethymological dicionaries, as Le Trésor de la langue française, enregister only the actual meaning. From the middle of the XVIth century, the image of the cosmos changed. Borrowing the title of the famous book of A. Koyré, we pass from a closed world to an infinite world. In relation with this “astronomical revolution” we can raise a question: did this radical transformation have an influence on the general culture of the period? Did this transformation introduce the new meaning for philanthropy, which is our one? Should we suppose that there is a connexion between the scientific revolution, that is the new image of the cosmos and the discovery of the word philanthropy in the european culture? If we give credit to Freud we should answer positively. Freud affirms that heliocentrism was the first hurt to the human self respecting1. Then we can claim that, at least in the Western world, and especially in the Medeterranean area, the link between man and cosmos has radically 1 R. Brague, Au Moyen Age : philosophie médiévale en chretienté, judaisme et islam, Paris, 2004

409


GIROLAMO RAMUNNI

changed in the XVIth and XVIIth centuries. The idea of cosmos in Ancient world It is usefull to remind that cosmos means fundamentally order. In this sense, we must consider that ancient anthropology cannot be defined whithout the reference to the idea of cosmos. Certainly, we find different models of the universe, but, before the XVIth century, reinforced by the diffusion of the works of Ptolemy, most of them are geocentric. This puts openly the question of the relationship between the Earth and the Heaven, the earth and the rest of the cosmos, between the man and the heavenly bodies. In the different civilizations of the Antiquity, this relationship is represented differently, but the main idea is the same: the cosmos is essential in order to give a stable fundament to the idea of governance of the city. In the old mesopotanian culture, the king was the garantor of the social order, of the good organization of the city and represented the gods which were in charge of the cosmic order. In ancient Egypt, men contributed actively to construct the cosmic order by their wise actions. We find similar notions in Babylone, and in Greece, for example in Hesiode’s Theogony. Quite symmetrically, Plato argues that the cosmic order is the model that man should follow in order to have a wise comportement. In the Timaeus, Plato explains how a mythical being, the demiurge, operates to create the order of the cosmos from a chaotic material. Aristote also discuss the relationship between our world and the cosmos. So we find, in the mediterranean area, as a common idea that there is a coincidence between human and cosmic wisdom. Another way to affirm the same idea, is to believe that what happens in the cosmos affects the earth, that cosmos is the mirror of the man. We find similar ideas in the Bible. In the Old Testament, especially in the books written in the 410


THE PRE-HISTORY OF THE PHILANTHROPIC THINKING

hellenistic period, as the book of Ecclesiastes; we read that the Wisdom was with God when He created the cosmos from the chaos, the tohou-bohou. The same idea is present at the beginning of the Gospel according to Saint John. The book of Job in the Bible tells us that the wise man is the man which reflects in his action the cosmic order2. And very often we find the idea that God operate by means of cosmic events in order to punish or to save, as in the book of Exodus. This rapid reminder of some topics of the relationship between man and the cosmos shows us tha the cultural exchanges are an essential component of our questionning. Can we affirm that a cultural basis was common of the mediterranean peoples? The relationship of the man with the cosmos represent a part, an image, of the cultural koiné. From the beginning of our age untill the end of the Middle Age, the translation from Greek to Syriac, from Syriac to Arabic language, and then to Latin, from greek to latin, was a way to save this cultural capital. We have also to take into account the influence of gnostic religions, of Iranian notions, and the dualistic conceptions of the cosmos. The experts have put in evidence the transfers between the different cultural areas. It is important to note that the migration of notions does not mean a simple loan of this or that one, but a working-out in a new frame of these ideas. But did these exchanges alter the relationship with the cosmos? Essentially no. It is sufficient to look to the images which reflects the medical knowledge and practice; this knowledge is largely founded on the interaction of man with nature, and particularly with the cosmos.

2 T. Römer, « Devant l’incompréhensible. La leçon de Job  », Biblia, 80, juin-juillet 2009. Les exégètes ont montré comment on peut retrouver des influences diverses dans la structure du livre, dont certaines parties remontent fort loin dans le temps.

411


GIROLAMO RAMUNNI

The Middle Age, the theology and the place of the cosmos. The essential frame is the neo-platonic vision of the cosmos, since Plotinus (205-270 AD) to Henry More (1614-1687). The neoplatonic philosophy of Plotinus was schematically based on the structure of the world which was the basis of the elevation of the soul in order to attain the One. Or, the neoplatonic cosmology is very important because one of the main thematic is the filling of cosmos with gods and creatures in order to construct the continuity between the One and the multiple. In this sense the cosmography plays an axiologic purpose: the right and the wrong are distributed as the high heaven and the down earth. Following Saint Augustin, the heaven is the open face of the nature and prooves that nature could not lie, be misleading. So the cosmos becomes the general model at which man must look as the main example. Albert the Great affirmed that the “entire cosmos is for the man the theology.� In this sense, man had to observe the cosmos and reproduce his order as the basis of a harmonious life of his country, of the people. So each man was a microcosmos and reflected the structure of the heaven. This vision was adopted from the Hebrew and transfered in the chritian philosophy. For exemple, the Temple was considered as a microcosm, constructed following the plans ariginally conceived by God. This is the reason why the qualities we find in the Creation are also present in the craftsmen chosen to construct the Temple. And we find something very similar in the plan of the cathedrals, which reproduce the structure of the cosmos. This was also an element in the liturgy, which was consiered a mean to establish a connection with the divinity. And in order to remeber that the cosmos is a permament reference to the order, the High Priest had on his pectoral habit an image of the cosmos; the sun, the moon and the stars were engraved. 412


THE PRE-HISTORY OF THE PHILANTHROPIC THINKING

It is not surprising then, that we can find the same topics in the different cultures. One is the man as microcosm. In the kabbala, for example, we find the idea that men was the last created being, so he summirized all the creation. Talmudists, long before the establishement of the kabbala, developped the idea of a correspondence between the Law in the Tohra and the structure of the human body. The Torah preexisted to the creation and was the model that God utilized to create the cosmos. The heaven is not void. Angels, sefirots constitutes the connection between the earth and the heaven. This connection can also be imagined in the form of a tree. The tree of life, as the Torah says, or the tree of the good and the evil, as is reported from the Torah transmitted orally. We have the tree of the sefirots, the cosmic tree which can be substituted by a human body with his correspondence with the sefirot. The Cross is also considered as the tree which connects the man and the Heaven. The christians hymns have largely utilized this analogy. If the heavenly space is full and the men can ascend to the heaven, the image of the ladder is another general topic. We have the Jacob ladder, that of Saint Bonaventura, and of Origene. The ascension of Mohammed develops the same topic. And Saint John Climacus composed The Ladder of Divine Ascent. The elevation of the soul is represented as an ascent, step by step, to the heaven. So, as for exemple in the kabbalist Luria, man’s ethic is not perfection but perfectibility. So we have the link between the cosmos and the rules, the Mitsvot, or the coranic injuctions, or the christain charitable actions: orphans, poors and travelers, those who are subjected to difficult situation. If there is a strong link between the action of men on the earth and the heaven, the fight between the good and the evil will become a cosmic struggle which will create a new order. Apocalipses, especially at the turn of 413


GIROLAMO RAMUNNI

the Ith centuries before and after our era, utilize largely the idea of a cosmic upset, the birth of a new world on the ruins of the old one. In fact as at the beginning, all what has been created, was considered as good by God. So, it is in the contemplation of the cosmos that man descovers what is the desorder in which he lives, in which he acts. For this reason, only an intervention of God can change the situation. It is a topic that there will come a day when JHVE will reconstruct the cosmos, will destroy the actual cosmos, to establish a new one. That is the reason why all the laws have a cosmic dimension, the preparation of the apocalyptic event in order to construct a new order. A new intellectual frame The discovery of the Aristotelian philosophy in the XIIth century proposed a new frame of thinking. The aristotelian philosophy was easly associates with the model of Ptolemeus. People had then a coherent vision of the world. Now this was the proprierty of “intellectuals”, a little minority, which coulr read and write. Was the ptolemaic image of the cosmos so different of that of the majority of people could inferred by the simple observation of the heaven? Still in our common language, we afirms that sun rises, which is what people perceives naively. The majority of people did know this, looking at the images. In his book on the ethymologies, Isidore bishop of Seville gives a picture of the world. This book had an enormous influence because it is full of citations of the ancient authors. P. Duhem, at the beginning of the last century, has profoundly studied these authors, essentially theologians of the Middle Age, and the importance of the cosmologicals ideas on their toughts. «L’Astronomie ne sépare point de l’Astrologie » say Duhem. And he adds «  Dans la main droite elle tient 414


THE PRE-HISTORY OF THE PHILANTHROPIC THINKING

l’alidade, dans la gauche, l’astrolabe ; aux hommes intelligents elle explique tout ce qui, à l’intérieur de la sphère inerrante, a le mouvement et la grandeur qui conviennent au Ciel... Si un homme pouvait s’approprier cette Astronomie, rien ne lui serait caché non seulement en l’état présent des choses du monde inférieur, mais encore en leurs états passés ou futurs. En effet, les êtres animés supérieurs et divers sont le principe et les causes des natures inférieures.  » Duhem presents in this way the intellectual cosmological frame of the Ecole de Chartres. I chosed this text because it reflects what theologians thought at a period when numerous arab texts were translated. This was a general idea, which was the common basis of numerous debates about the predominance of the Ptolemaic vision on the opposants, as the visions of Averroes and Al Bitrogi. Duhem explains it very clearly: “sans doute, les mathématiciens purs, d’une part, et, d’autre part, les mathématiciens qui savent la Physique, emploient des procédés différents en vue de sauver ce qui apparaît dans les corps célestes  ; toutefois, bien que par des voies diverses, ils tendent tous à un même but, qui est de connaître les positions des planètes par rapport au Zodiaque...» This paradigm of a closed world in which the man was a part, an important element submitted to the influences of the celestial bodies, was the frame of the culture until the XVIIth century. People believed that there is a strong link between the action of mens on the earth and the heavenly bodies. There was a fight between the good and the evil, the basis of a cosmic struggle which would create a new cosmos, a new universus. Just remember that the general believing was that at the beginnig, all the creation was considered good by God, but the contemplation of the cosmos showed to the men that the creation was profoundly affected by the disorder. In order to participate to the creation of the new order, cosmos inspired largely 415


GIROLAMO RAMUNNI

the every day life, the rules which structured the city, the laws which regulated the life of men. We perceive in this rapid remind of the cultural frame of this period, the unity of the image, based on the relationship between the organization of life on the earth and the cosmos. There was a way to manage the life on the earth, on thaking inspiration from the order of the heaven. The scientific revolution The scientific revolution was based not only on the change of the image of the cosmos, passing froma geocentric vision to the heliocentric model, but on the interdiction that there was no influence of the celestial bodies on the earth. What was knwon as the “action at distance” was banned. All what happens on the earth should be explained by forces exterted on the earth. We know that this supposition was so strong thet Galileo was unable to find a correct explanation of the tides, because he would never accept the influence of the moon on the earth. Galileo contributed to the scientific revolution showing that there are more bodies on the heaven that astronomers had thought. Now the idea of the new way of observe the heaven conducted Galileo to distroy the unity of the cosmos, introducing different aims for different fields of knowledge. As he affirms in the well known lettre to to Cristina di Lorena (1615): “io direi è l’intenzione dello Spirito Santo essere come si vadia al cielo, e non come vadia il cielo.” If the unity of knowledge should be found again, the only mean was to establish a hierarchy between the various fields of knowledge. Galileo begins in this same letter to establish a kind of hierarchy. In his times, the real problem was the place of theology in the field of knowledge. But there was also a problem : what is the basis of the life of men in the city? For our purpose, it is interesting to note that the 416


THE PRE-HISTORY OF THE PHILANTHROPIC THINKING

change hoped by Galileo was not so easy to impose. For example, Isaac Newton wrote his Philosophia Naturalis to prone that the order that reign on the heaven should reign also on the Earth. Certainly he was doing a political action, but as he found a unity in the cosmos, the earth was part of this unity, as before Galileo. It is not so astonishing that Newton’s intellectual background were Alchemy and a heretic theology. His contemporaries were aware of this coming back, as was openly declared by Leibniz. We could follow how since then we can find in the history of the culture the two way: newtonian and galileian way of considere the globality, the supposed unity. Globally we can say that the change in the meaning of the word philanthropy is the consequence of this split. What is the basis of life in the city? But after the XVIIth century, man could no more look at the cosmos and find the idea of order, he had to create his own cosmos. Then, what is the function of all these heavenly bodies? At the beginning of the XIXth century, the italian poet Giacomo Leopardi wrote:”Che fai tu luna in ciel, dimmi, che fai? Silenziosa luna? Sorgi la sera, e vai, contemplando i deserti ; indi ti posi...  » The breaking of the link between man and the cosmos, gave the space in order to construct a new frame in which could be argued the necessity of the action of man in favour of the others. The philanthropy was born. She had to find his own ideology.

417


GIROLAMO RAMUNNI

418


Gli autori di questo volume

Dariusch Atighetchi è Professore di Bioetica Islamica, presso la Facoltà di Teologia di Lugano (Svizzera) e UPRA, Facoltà di Bioetica, Bologna. Per ulteriori informazioni ed approfondimenti si può far riferimento ai seguenti lavori: Dariusch Atighetchi, Islam e Bioetica, Roma: Armando Editore, 2009; Dariusch Atighetchi, Islamic Bioethics: Problems and Perspectives, New YorkBerlin-Dordrecht: Springer, 2009; D. Atighetchi, L’inizio della vita nel diritto islamico in Dariusch Atighetchi Daniela Milani - Alfredo M. Rabello, Intorno alla vita che nasce. Diritto ebraico, canonico e islamico a confronto, Torino: Giappichelli Editore, 2013, 189-295; Dariusch Atighetchi, Aspects of the management of the rising life comparing Islamic Law and the laws of the modern Muslim States, in DROIT ET CULTURES, numero monografico dal titolo Actualités du droit musulman: genre, filiation et bioéthique (Ed. Fortier C.), L’Harmattan, 2010, 59 (1), 305-329; Introduction to Islamic Bioethics, in Dariusch Atighetchi – Federico G. Duran – José Enrique Gomez Alvarez, Reflexiones sobre la ciencia y la religion, Huixquilucan (México), Facultad de Bioética de la Universidad Anahuac, 2007, 9-25. Enrico Bertoni è il direttore del Museo Interreligioso di Bertinoro, dedicato al dialogo tra Ebrei, Cristiani e 421


Musulmani. Ha curato le seguenti pubblicazioni: Il valore della cultura, la tradizione dell’ospitalità, a cura di A. Bandini, E. Bertoni, O. Mazzotti, P. Rambelli , Bertinoro 2006; Il dialogo interreligioso come fondamento della civiltà, Milano, 2009; Mettere a fuoco la libertà. Religioni e democrazia, Forlì, 2015. Antonio Carile laureatosi magna cum laude presso l’Università Cattolica di Milano nell’a.a. 1962-1963, iniziò la sua carriera tra il 1964 e il 1970, nell’ambiente internazionale e cosmopolita della fondazione Giorgio Cini di Venezia. Ha conseguito la libera docenza in Storia medievale nel 1971 e nel 1976, a 36 anni, divenne professore straordinario di Storia Bizantina – ordinario dal 1979 – presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum. La produzione scientifica di Antonio Carile conta, ad oggi, 279 lavori a stampa, di cui 28 monografie. I suoi interessi vanno dalla cronachistica bizantina e veneziana all’impero latino d’Oriente, dalle strutture socio-economiche del mondo bizantino alla sua ideologica politica, dalle capitali imperiali alle società regionali dell’impero, dall’età giustinianea all’età paleologa. Centrale e ricorrente è, nella sua storiografia, l’attenzione verso le costruzioni culturali delle rappresentazioni del potere nel medioevo e verso le dinamiche del suo concreto esercizio. Suraiya Faroqhi, between 1988 and 2007, was a professor at the Ludwig Maximilians Universität in Munich, Federal Republic of Germany. Between 2002 and 2007, Suraiya Faroqhi chaired the ‘Institute for the History and Culture of the Middle East and Turkish Studies’ (Nahost-Institut). After retirement in 2007, she accepted a position as a professor of history at Istanbul Bilgi University, where she is currently teaching. She studied at the universities of Hamburg (Dr. Phil. Germany) and Istanbul (Republic of Turkey), as well as at Indiana University/ Bloomington (MA for Teachers). 422


Before becoming a professor in Munich, she had a lengthy career in Turkey (from instructor to full professor, 1971-1987), working at Middle East Technical University (Ankara). She must has been crazy, for she went through the ordeal of the doçentlik/Habilitation not once but two times: 1980 in Turkey, 1982 in Bochum/FRG. Micol Ferrara PhD in “Culture and Territory”, was a researcher in the Department of Economic History of the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Rome Tor Vergata. She is a lecturer of “Jewish History in the Modern Age” at the three-year Degree Diploma UCEI, she also works closely with other research institutions. She is part of of the editorial staff of the Journal of History (http:// www.giornaledistoria.org, www.giornaledistoria.org). She is a member of the Italian Association of Urban History (AISU), the Italian Society of Historians of Economy (SISE), of Mediterranean Studies Association (MSA) and the Italian Society of Historical Demography (SIDeS). She has taken part in seminars, national and international conferences, speaking on the history of Roman Jews. On this same theme she has published several essays, including: In the footsteps of the priest: the Parish of Saint Crisogono in Trastevere in the eighteenth century, in Urban transformations: the case of the Trastevere district, edited by L. Ermini Bread and CM Travaglini, Roman Society of National History, Studies Conference, 13-14 March 2008, LV, II, Rome 2010, pp. 363-398; The building structure of the “menagerie” of the Roman Jews (buckets. XVI-XIX), in “Modern Rome and Contemporary”: Jews. Exchanges and conflicts between the fifteenth and twentieth century, edited by M. Caffiero, XIX (2011), n. 1, pp. 83-102; Population and territory in the Rome of the eighteenth century: an analysis on the States of the Souls of the parishes of St. Chrysogonus and St. Bartholomew on the Island, in “Population and History”, 2011, no. 1-2, pp. 43-63. Together with S.H. Antonucci, she has also edited the volume The punishment that became 423


salvation, Saving the Sonnino family during the Holocaust by Prof. Giuseppe Caronia, Udine, Forum, 2014. Giuliana Gemelli, Docente di storia contemporanea e di studi comparati di Filantropia all'Università di Bologna è direttore del centro di ricerca PHaSI Philanthropy and Social Innovation. Tra le sue pubblicazioni piu recenti Hospice e Multiculturalità, Bologna, B.U.P. 20014 e Il Regno di Proteo. Ingegneria e scienze umane nel percorso di Adriano Olivetti, Bologna, 2014.

Sebastiano Giordano, dopo studi nelle università di Roma e Napoli, ha svolto ricerche e collaborazioni, tra gli altri, con Romeo De Maio, Margherita Guarducci, Pico Cellini, Maurizio Marini. Ha tenuto lezioni nei programmi culturali di “didattica trasferita” dell’Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici di Napoli. Da più di vent’anni è collaboratore nella Redazione dell’Accademia dei Lincei di Roma. Tra i suoi libri ed articoli storico-artistici: San Giorgio e il drago: Riflessioni lungo un percorso d’arte, Roma 2005; A proposito di Daphnis et Chloé, Roma 2006; Una nuova lettura dell’allegorismo cinquecentesco: “Igne Natura Renovatur Integra”, dal chaos alla redenzione in Giulio Romano, Roma 2007; Un’inedita volta affrescata a temi augustei nella Roma rinascimentale di papa Paolo III Farnese, Sora 2009; Gabriele D’Annunzio: Francesco e le visioni d’Oriente, Firenze 2015. Paula Kabalo is currently the director of the BenGurion Research Institute for the study of Israel and Zionism, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and chair of the Israel Studies international MA program. Her research focus is on the history of citizen associations and Civil Society in Israel and the inter-relations between David Ben-Gurion and various strata of society in Israel and the Jewish World. Kabalo mapped, reviewed and shed light on the role of common people in central 424


historical junctions. Her book: Shurat Ha’Mitnadvin – The Story of a Civic Association, is a case study for the understanding of the evolution of Israel’s democracy. She published dozens of articles on the patterns and roles of civic associations during Israel’s early history (pre and post 1948), on the history of Israel’s youth, on state-citizen relations in Israel and on David BenGurion’s concept of civic engagement. Sevda Kilicalp has a diverse set of professional experiences that span nonprofit, international development and academic settings. Sevda currently pursues a doctoral study at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Sevda earned a B.A. degree (2004) in Political Science and International Relations from the University of Marmara and an M.A. degree (2009) in International Studies in Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship (MISP) from University of Bologna. Paolo Pellegrini è dottorando di ricerca presso il Dipartimento di Storia, culture e religioni della Sapienza Università di Roma, dove sta completando una tesi sulle nobilitazioni di ebrei avvenute in Italia fra l’età napoleonica e la caduta della monarchia sabauda. È socio dell’Associazione italiana per lo studio del giudaismo e dell’Associazione per la storia degli ebrei nel Lazio e nei territori dell’ex Stato della Chiesa. Tra le sue pubblicazioni più recenti, Ebrei nobilitati e conversioni nell’Italia dell’Ottocento e del primo Novecento, in “Materia giudaica”, XIX (2014) ed Ebrei e protestanti nell’Umbria postunitaria. Origini, caratteristiche e sviluppo di due minoranze, in Storia dell’Umbria dall’Unità a oggi, a cura di M. Tosti, I: Poteri, istituzioni e società, Venezia, Marsilio, 2014. Girolamo Ramunni è professore al Conservatoire d'Arts et mètiers di Parigi e autore di diverse monografie tra le quali Cent ans d'histoire de l'Ecole Superieure d'electricite 425


- 1894-1994, 1995 (Paris - Saxifrage) e con Giuliana Gemelli Isole senza arcipelago. Imprenditori scientifici, reti e istituzioni tra Otto e Novecento, Bari, Palomaqr,2004 Giulio Sapelli è nato a Torino nel 1947, dove si è laureato in Storia economica nel 1971 e ha conseguito la specializzazione in Ergonomia nel 1972. Ha studiato nel 1972 presso l' Institut fur Weltwirschaft di Kiel e ha insegnato e svolto attività di ricerca presso la London School of Economics and Political Sciences nel 19921993 e nel 1995-1996, nonchè presso l' Università Autonoma di Barcellona nel 1988-1989 e l' Università di Buenos Aires negli anni 1993-1993, 1993-1994, 19951996 e 1996-1997. Negli anni 1981-1982, 1982-1983, 19861987, 1991-1992 e 1994-1995 è stato Directeur d' Etudes presso l' Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales di Parigi. Ha svolto attività di ricerca e di consulenza per le fondazioni Onassis, Schlumberger, Goulbenkian e l’ Eric Remarque Institute. È stato stato fellow dell' Università Europea di Fiesole e della Fondazione Gulbenkian di Lisbona e visiting professor presso le università di Praga, Berlino, Buenos Aires, Santiago del Cile, Rosario, Quito, Barcellona, Madrid, Lione, Vienna, South California, Wollongong/Sidney, New York. È attualmente professore ordinario di Storia Economica presso l' Università degli Studi di Milano, dove insegna anche Analisi Culturale dei Processi Organizzativi. Negli anni 2000-2001 è stato Direttore del corso post laurea in “Economia, impresa e discipline umanistiche tra oriente e occidente” della Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell'Università di Milano. Per la stessa Facoltà è stato, dal 1989 al 2003, responsabile dei Progetti SOCRATESERASMUS. Dal 2008 è consigliere di amministrazione del Museo Poldi Pezzoli Opere piu recenti: Vecchi versus giovani: La questione generazionale nella crisi economica mondiale, Sapelli Giulio, goWare, 2014; Il potere in Italia (sulle orme della storia), Sapelli Giulio, goWare, 2014; 426


L'attualità di Marx, Sapelli Giulio, Claudio Napoleoni, Giorgio Lunghini, Fabio Ranchetti, goWare, 2014; Dove va il mondo? Per una storia mondiale del presente, Sapelli Giulio, Guerini e Associati, 2014. Amy Singer (Ph.D. Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University, 1989) teaches Ottoman in the Department of Middle Eastern and African History at Tel Aviv University. Her research began with an in-depth study of the relations between Ottoman officials and Palestinian peasants, in an effort to move Ottoman agrarian history beyond cataloguing the demography and agricultural production of villages (Palestinian peasants and Ottoman officials, 1994). From the documentary materials of this study there emerged another story, that of the foundation (waqf) for a public kitchen (imaret) established by the wife of Sultan Süleyman I in Jerusalem in the midsixteenth century (Constructing Ottoman Beneficence, 2002). The study of one endowment provoked a more general interrogation of Islamic charity (Charity in Islamic Societies, 2008). At present, her research focuses on the city of Edirne/Adrianople and on public kitchens across the Ottoman Empire. Nicholas Terpstra is Professor and Chair of History at the University of Toronto. His research has focused on how Renaissance cities handled orphans, abandoned children, criminals, and the poor in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. His Cultures of Charity: Women, Politics, and the Reform of Poor Relief in Renaissance Italy (Harvard: 2013) won the Gordan Book Prize of the Renaissance Society of America and the Howard Marraro Prize of the American Historical Association.  His most recent book, Religious Refugees in the Early Modern World (Cambridge: 2015) explores exclusion and exile in the period of the Reformation.  An ongoing project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council 427


of Canada is DECIMA (Digitally Encoded Census Information and Mapping Archive) an on-line digital tool that maps social, sensory, and built environments in Renaissance Florence. Netice Y覺ld覺z is Assoc. Prof. Dr. in Art Historian, Faculty of Architecture, Eastern Mediterranean University, Famagusta (Gazi Magosa), North Cyprus.

428


B Ba s ker v ille

Centro studi e casa editrice Fondata a Bologna nel 1986 da Mario Marinelli, Maurizio Marinelli, Maurizio Marozzi e Maurizio Petta con Pier Vittorio Tondelli

I libri Baskerville possono essere acquistati nelle migliori librerie o nei bookshop on line. Librerie, biblioteche o istituzioni possono effettuare acquisti attraverso FASTBOOK spa www.fastbookspa.it

Baskerville Casella Postale 113 Bologna 40125 (Italia) P. IVA e Cod. Fisc.: 04215210370 www.baskerville.it info@baskerville.it Facebook.com/Baskerville.it Twitter.com/Baskerville_it


Baskerville BSC - Biblioteca di Scienze della Comunicazione Fondata nel 1993 e diretta, fino alla sua prematura scomparsa, da Mauro Wolf, la collana è dedicata a saggi sulla comunicazione, sull'informazione e sulla trasformazione della cultura e della società in relazione alla nuova centralità dei media.

Andrea Fava EBOOK, QUALCOSA È CAMBIATO Scenari, trasformazioni e sviluppi dei libri digitali Introduzione di Peppino Ortoleva © 2011 - Pag. 221 Euro 18,00 ISBN 9788880003113 Daniele Perra IMPATTO DIGITALE Dall'immagine elaborata all'immagine partecipata: il computer nell'arte contemporanea © 2007 - Pag. 140 Euro 17,00 ISBN 9788880000259 Michele Cogo FENOMENOLOGIA DI UMBERTO ECO Indagine sulle origini di un mito intellettuale contemporaneo © 2010 - Pag. 182 Euro 22,00 ISBN 9788880003106 Michelantonio Lo Russo PAROLE COME PIETRE La comunicazione dell rischio. © 2004 - Pag. 214 Euro 22,00 ISBN 9788880000235 Elena Esposito I PARADOSSI DELLA MODA Originalità e transitorietà nella società moderna. © 2004 - Pag. 176 Euro 22,00 ISBN 9788880000242 Leonardo Benvenuti MALATTIE MEDIALI Elementi di socioterapia. © 2002 - Pag. 353. Euro 22,00 ISBN 9788880000112


S. Graham e S. Marvin CITTA' E COMUNICAZIONE Spazi elettronici e nodi urbani. © 2002 - Pag. 528. Euro 22,00 ISBN 9788880000070 Enrico Menduni (a cura di) LA RADIO Percorsi e territori di un medium mobile e interattivo. 2002 - Pag. 572. Euro 22,00 ISBN 9788880000129 Paola Bonora (a cura di) COMCITIES Geografie della comunicazione. 2001 - Pag. 427. Euro 18,50 ISBN 9788880003083 Antonio Pilati e Giuseppe Richeri LA FABBRICA DELLE IDEE Il Mercato dei Media in Italia. 2000 - Pag. 313. Euro 18,00 ISBN 9788880003076 Lucio Picci LA SFERA TELEMATICA Come le reti trasformano la società. 1999 - Pag. 200. Euro 15,00 ISBN 9788880000105 Patrice Flichy STORIA DELLA COMUNICAZIONE MODERNA Sfera pubblica e dimensione privata 1994 - Pag. 200. Euro 16,53 ISBN 9788880003045 Carlo Sorrentino I PERCORSI DELLA NOTIZIA La stampa quotidiana italiana tra politica e mercato. 1995 - Pag. 284. Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880003052 George P. Landow IPERTESTO: il futuro della scrittura La convergenza fra teoria letteraria e tecnologia informatica. 1993 - Pag. 280. Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880000075 Pier Luigi Capucci (a cura di) IL CORPO TECNOLOGICO L'influenza delle tecnologie sul corpo e sulle sue facoltà. 1994 - Pag. 170 (ill.). Euro 16,53 ISBN 9788880000082


Gianluca Nicoletti ECTOPLASLMI Esistere nell'aldilà catodico: il potere medianico della televisione. 1993 - Pag. 200. Euro 16,53 ISBN 9788880000099 Derrick de Kerckhove BRAINFRAMES: mente tecnologia, mercato Come le strutture tecnologiche generano nuovi modelli mentali 1993 - Pag. 196. Euro 16,53 ISBN 9788880000013 Marco Guidi LA SCONFITTA DEI MEDIA Ruolo, responsabilità ed effetti dei media nella guerra della ex-Jugoslavia. 1993 - Pag. 188. Euro 16,53 ISBN 9788880000051 Bruce Cumings GUERRA E TELEVISIONE Il ruolo dell'informazione televisiva nelle nuove strategie di guerra. 19943 - Pag. 374. Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880000020 Stewart Brand MEDIALAB: il futuro della comunicazione Viaggio nei segreti del famoso laboratorio del M.I.T. di Boston in cui si inventano i nuovi media. 1993 - Pag. 300 (ill.). Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880000006 I. Miles, H. Rush, K. Turner, J. Bessant I.T. - Information Technology Orizzonti ed implicazioni sociali delle nuove tecnologie dell'informazione. 1993 - Pag. 291. Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880000044 Joshua Meyrowitz OLTRE IL SENSO DEL LUOGO L'impatto dei media elettronici sul comportamento sociale. 1993 - Pag. 609. Euro 24,80 ISBN 9788880003069 Howard Rheingold LA REALTA' VIRTUALE I mondi artificiali generati dal computer e il loro potere di trasformare la società. 1993 - Pag. 547. Euro 19,70 ISBN 9788880000037


Daniel Dayan, Elihu Katz LE GRANDI CERIMONIE DEI MEDIA La Storia in diretta. 1994 - Pag. 282. Euro 19,70 ISBN-10: 88-8000-300-3 ISBN 9788880003007 Fred Davis MODA: cultura, identità, linguaggio Un sistema di comunicazione che parla di noi e della nostra identità. 1994 - Pag. 200. ISBN 9788880000068 Kevin Robins, a cura di Antonia Torchi GEOGRAFIA DEI MEDIA Globalismo, localizzazione e identità culturale. 1993 - Pag. 270. Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880003021 Giuseppe Richeri LA TV CHE CONTA Televisione come impresa. 1993 - Pag. 223. Euro 18,08 ISBN 9788880003014


Baskerville Coordinate

Strumenti di studio e di lavoro, manuali, saggi In questa collana sono raccolti manuali per l'università, saggi di approfondimento sui temi di attualità e materiali di discussione del dibattito culturale e politico contemporaneo

a cura di Paola Bonora [Laboratorio Urbano] ATLANTE DEL CONSUMO DI SUOLO per un progetto di città metrololitana © 2013 - Pag. 254 Euro 45,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 703 6 Daniele Pugliese APOCALISSE, IL GIORNO DOPO L'Emila "post-comunista" e l'eclissi del odello territoriale © 2012 - Pag. 245 Euro 20,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 702 9 Leonardo Benvenuti LEZIONI DI SOCIOTERAPIA La persona media/afferma e media/mente © 2008 - Pag. 265 Euro 21,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 701 2 Paola Bonora ORFANA E CLAUDICANTE L'Emila "post-comunista" e l'eclissi del odello territoriale © 2005 - Pag. 95 Euro 12,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 700 5


Baskerville UniPress

Saggi, ricerche, materiali, papers per l'università Nella sua forma agile e sobria e con una modalità produttiva rapida ed economica questa collana raccoglie materiali di studio per l'università a disposizione di docenti e studenti. Una university press in grado di passare dal testo al libro stampato e in formato eBook in pochi giorni.

a cura di Giuliana Gemelli RELIGIONS AND PHILANTROPHY Global Issues in Historical Perspective Introduzione di Giuliana Gemelli. Contributi di: Valerio Marchetti, Brij Maharaj, Giovanni Ceccarelli, Soma Hewa, Gioia Perugia Sztulman, Suraiya Faroqhi, Maria Giuseppina Muzzarelli, Netice Yıldız, Brigitte Piquard, Benjamin Gidron, Yael Elon, Deby Babis, Daniela Modonesi, Bartolomeo Pietromarchi Egnatia. A Path of Displaced Memories @ 2007 - Pag. 361 - Euro 23 ISBN 10 8880005081 Patrizia Adamoli e Maurizio Marinelli (a cura) COMUNICAZIONE, MEDIA E SOCIETÀ Premio Baskerville "Mauro Wolf" 2004 Saggi di: Andrea Segre, Annalisa Pelizza, Stefano Russo, Mauro Scanu, Elisa Giomi e Tommaso Ceccarini, Lorenzo Facchinotti, Oliver Panichi © 2005 - Pag. 290 - Euro 18,00 ISBN 10 8880005073 Giuliana Gemelli (a cura di) FONDAZIONI UNIVERSITARIE Radici storiche e configurazioni istituzionali Introduzione di Giuliana Gemelli. Contributi di: Benjamin Scheller, Christopher D. McKenna, Jon S. Dellandrea, Joe McKenna, Matthias Schumann, Bruno van Dyk, Joseph Tsonope, Giovanni Maria Riccio, Flora Radano, Giuseppe Cappiello, Enrico Bellezza e Francesco Florian, Alessandro Hinna, Marco Demarie, Pier Luigi Sacco. © 2005 - Pag. 290 - Euro 18,00 ISBN 10 8880005065 Rosario Sommella e Lida Vigagnoni (a cura di) FILANTROPI DI VENTURA Rischio, responsabilità, riflessività nell'agire filantropico Contributi di: Jed Emerson, Laura Bertozzi, Emanuele Cassarino, Giuliana Gemelli, Flaminio Squazzoni, Claudia Rametta, Giorgio Vicini, Girolamo Ramunni ISBN 10 8880005057 Giuliana Gemelli e Flaminio Squazzoni (a cura di) NEHS / Nessi Istituzioni, mappe cognitive e culture del progetto tra ingegneria e scienze umane. Contributi di: Marisa Bertoldini, Giuliana Gemelli, Kenneth Keniston, Giovan Francesco Lanzara, Enrico Lorenzini, Vittorio Marchis, Guido Nardi, Girolamo Ramunni, Flaminio Squazzoni, Pasquale Ventrice, Alessandra Zanelli. © 2002 - Pag. 484 - Euro 20,00 ISBN 10 8880005014


Rosario Sommella e Lida Vigagnoni (a cura di) SLoT - quaderno 5 Territori e progetti nel Mezzogiorno Casi di studio per lo sviluppo locale Contributi di: Ornella Albolino, Fabio Amato, Aldo di Mola, Luigi Longo, Mirella Loda, Maria Gabriella Rienzo, Ugo Rossi, Rosario Sommella, Luigi Stanzione, Sergio Ventriglia,, Lida Vigagnoni ISBN 10 8880005049 Paola Bonora e Angela Giardini SLoT - quaderno 4 Orfana e claudicante L’Emilia “post-comunista” e l’eclissi del modello territoriale ISBN 10 8880005030 (RISTAMPATO NELLA COLLANA COORDINATE) Cristiana Rossignolo e Caterina Simonetta Imarisio (a cura di) SLoT - quaderno 3 Una geografia dei luoghi per lo sviluppo locale Approcci metodologici e studi di caso. Contributi di: Marco Bagliani, Angelo Besana, Federica Corrado, Egidio Dansero, Giuseppe Dematteis, Raffaella Dispenza, Fiorenzo Ferlaino, Francesco Gastaldi, Cristiano Giorda, Oscar Maroni, Carmela Ricciardi, Cristina Rossignolo, Carlo Salone, Marco Santangelo, Caterina Simonetta Imarisio. © 2003 - Pag. 141 - Euro 12,00 ISBN 10 8880005022 Paola Bonora (a cura di) SLoT - quaderno 1 Appunti, discussioni, bibliografie del gruppo di ricerca SLoT (Sistemi Territoriali Locali) sul ruolo dei sistemi locali nei processi di sviluppo territoriale. Contributi di: Giuseppe Dematteis, Francesca Governa, Egidio Dansero, Carlo Salone, Vincenzo Guarrasi, Paola Bonora, Unità locale dell’Università di Firenze, Lida Viganoni e Rosario Sommella, Sergio Ventriglia, Ugo Rossi. © 2001 - Pag. 141 Euro 12,00 ISBN 10 8880005006


Baskerville B.art Baskerville artbooks: arte, musica, spettacolo Fondata nel 2006, in occasione dei vent'anni della Baskerville, questa collana raccoglie volumi sull'arte, la musica e lo spettacolo con immagini e illustrazioni a colori su carta di qualità e con rilegatura cartonata.

Umberto Palestini LA CRUNA. SIMONE PELLEGRINI i quaderni de l'ARCA © 2013 - Pag. 160 - foto a colori - Euro 20,00 ISBN 9788880008941 Umberto Palestini ATTRAZIONI Sul collezionismo i quaderni de l'ARCA Attrazioni, a cura di Umberto Palestini, è una mostra che vuole riflettere sul ruolo svolto dalla collezione quale autoritratto del collezionista e quale simbolo dell’estetica contemporanea, frutto di molteplici intrecci e sovrapposizioni. La considerevole raccolta di opere provenienti da collezioni private proposta da Attrazioni è strettamente legata al rinnovato interesse per la prassi del collezionismo e per la complessa logica compositiva che la presiede. La mostra vuole essere un primo sguardo dentro una cultura e una passione testimoniate dalla particolare attenzione nei confronti dell’arte contemporanea, espressa dal territorio gravitante intorno a L’ARCA, laboratorio per le arti visive. © 2013 - Pag. 160 - foto a colori - Euro 20,00 ISBN 9788880008934 Enrico Scuro ( con la collaborazione diMarzia Bisognin e Paolo Ricci) I RAGAZZI DEL 77 Una storia condivisa su Facebook Da un album fotografico sul ‘77 a Bologna, pubblicato quasi per caso su Facebook da Enrico Scuro, è nato un fenomeno che ha coinvolto e appassionato oltre un migliaio di persone. Con più di 1200 foto, corredate da migliaia di commenti, riflessioni, ricordi, questo libro ricostruisce in oltre 500 pagine la singolare esperienza condivisa su Facebook e racconta un’epopea del passato con gli occhi del presente ma dal punto di vista dei protagonisti. © 2011 - Pag. 532 - foto e illustrazioni in B&N e a colori - Euro 45,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 892 7 a cura di F. Calcagnini eU. Palestini ( con la collaborazione di C. Cassar) LA FABBRICA DEL VENTO Accademia di Belle Arti di Urbino - Scuola di Scenografia 1990-2010 © 2010 - Pag. 242 - foto e illustrazioni a colori - Euro 45,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 891 0


Oderso Rubini e Massimo Simonini (a cura di) ALLA RICERCA DEL SILENZIO PERDUTO - IL TRENO DI JOHN CAGE Racconto per immagini, suoni e filmati originali dell'evento che John Cage ha creato a Bologna nell'estate del 1978. Il volume contiene testi critici e fotografie oltre a tre CD e un DVD con le registrazioni originali del Treno di Cage. L’evento bolognese è rimasto nella memoria di tutti coloro che vi hanno partecipato e l’eco che questo treno preparato del compositore americano ha lasciato si è trasmessa nel tempo. Questo raro documento contiene testi critici sull’evento in italiano e inglese, le registrazioni audio con l’elaborazione dei tre viaggi del treno e materiali filmati fino ad ora inediti e raccolti per la prima volta in questo libro. © 2008 - Pag. 160 - Foto e illustrazioni a colori - tre CD e un DVD - Euro 45,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 890 3 Silvia Camerini (a cura di) LE FESTE MUSICALI Saggi, interventi, testimonianze, fotografie e documenti su una delle più innovative esperienze italiane di organizzazione di eventi teatrali e musicali. Le Feste Musicali, che hanno avuto luogo a Bologna dal 1967 grazie alla volontà e all’iniziativa del loro direttore Tito Gotti, sono state ispirazione ed esempio, negli anni successivi, per altri eventi simili in Italia e in Europa e sono tutt’oggi un modello di riferimento culturale e organizzativo per la valorizzazione della tradizione musicale e teatrale. © 2007 - Pag. 240 - Foto e illustrazioni a colori - Euro 45,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 889 7 Umberto Palestini (a cura di ) SULLA STRADA Fotografie, saggi e riflessioni su arte e spazio pubblico in occasione di un intervento di pubblic art a Teramo, dove i lavori di giovani artisti figurativi hanno trasformato un chilometro di spazi per affissioni (6x3 metri) in un suggestiva galleria d’arte contemporanea a cielo aperto. © 2006 - Pag. 150 - Foto e illustrazioni a colori - Euro 38,00 ISBN 978 88 8000 888 3


Baskerville BIBLIO

Edizioni del patrimonio bibliografico storico Collana dedicata alla valorizzazione del patrimonio bibliografico storico conservato nelle biblioteche pubbliche e private. Di ogni volume vengono prodotte copie limitate e numerate fuori commercio. I volumi poi sono editati in formato digitale (Pdf) e distribuiti gratuitamente alla comunitĂ scientifica.

a cura di Renzo Noventa GIORNALE DELLE ENTRATE E DELLE USCITE DEL CONVENTO DI SAN DOMENICO IN BOLOGNA in due volumi Primo volume: ASBo_DEM238 (1330-1337) Secondo volume:ASBo_DEM239 (1349-1357) @ 2015 - Pag. 857 + 724 ISBN 9788880009030 L'edizione su carta è stata stampata in tiratura limitata, numerata (15 copie) fuori commercio. Edizione digitale disponibile gratuitamente: www.Baskerville.it


Baskerville Collana Blu

Libri d'affezione Piccola collana di narrativa e poesia con cui è nata Baskerville nel 1986, inaugurata con il libro "privato" di Pier Vittorio Tondelli "BIGLIETTI AGLI AMICI" e che raccoglie inediti di autori affermati, opere prime di esordienti o opere tradotte poco conosciute in Italia. I libri pubblicati sono autonomamente scelti dal comitato editoriale.

Pier Vittorio Tondelli BIGLIETTI AGLI AMICI © 1986 (esaurito e fuori catalogo) ISBN 108880009001 Gianni Celati LA FARSA DEI TRE CLANDESTINI © 1987 ISBN 10 888000901X Fernando Pessoa NOVE POESIE DI ÀLVARO DE CAMPOS E SETTE POESIE ORTONIME A cura di Antonio Tabucchi © 1988 ISBN 10 8880009028 Georges Perec TENTATIVO DI ESAURIRE UN LUOGO PARIGINO © 1989 ISBN 108880009036 Orson Welles LA GUERRA DEI MONDI Prefazione di Fernanda Pivano e una nota di Mauro Wolf © 1990 (seconda edizione) ISBN 10 8880009044 Eiryo Waga (eteronimo di Raul Ruiz) TUTTE LE NUVOLE SONO OROLOGI © 1991 ISBN 10 8880009052 Astro Teller EXEGESIS © 1999 - Pag. ISBN 10 8880009060 Daniele Pugliese SEMPRE PIU' VERSO OCCIDENTE e altri racconti © 2009 - Pag. 226 ISBN 9788880009078


Baskerville Bologna Gennaio 2016 www.baskerville.it

Š 2016 Baskerville, Bologna Tutti i diritti riservati All right reserved