Reading 2050 - the journey so far

Page 1


INTRODUCTION

Map of Reading, illustrated by the Barton Willmore Graphic Designers


Cities can be vibrant hubs of enterprise and innovation, bringing together business, education and administration to generate economic growth and culture. Cities also present a huge impact upon our sustainability and can offer a significant opportunity for improvement. To be truly successful however, a city needs vision and ambition. A vision is a shared expectation about a plausible and desirable future.

Since 2013, Barton Willmore, Reading UK CIC and the University of Reading have been working in partnership with businesses from the private, public and third sector to help build a vision for ReadingUK 2050. Over the past 12 months work on the ReadingUK 2050 Vision has continued, with the team driving a diverse range of interactive sessions across Reading’s business and development community as well as beginning to engage with Reading’s wider population.

In March 2016, the ReadingUK 2050 team will be holding a two-day public engagement event, as part of Reading’s Year of Culture’s March focus on the future of Reading. The twoday interactive exhibition will be taking place in the centre of Reading, on the 18-19 March, which will offer Reading’s shoppers and commuters an opportunity to see the ideas generated so far, brought to life. Have a look at the story so far...


S K N A H T WITH E S O H T L L TO A . . . R A F O S D E V L O INV Neha

Abayawardana

Barton Willmore

Donald

Chambers

Greater Reading Environmental Network

Natalie

Ganpatsingh

Bob

Allies

Allies & Morrison

Nick

Chancellor

Meeting Place Communications

Jan

Gavin

Prof. Nigel

Arnell

University of Reading

Vicky

Charlesson

Blandy & Blandy

Andrew

Gibbons

ARUP

Martin

Baggs

Thames Water

Matt

Chillingworth

Hermes

Adam

Gibbs

WSP Group

Mark

Baker

Barton Willmore

Paul

Ciniglio

First Wessex Housing Association

Martijn

Gilbert

Reading Buses

Mark

Baker

Barton Willmore

Louize

Clark

Connect TVT

Prof. Roberta

Gilchrist

University of Reading

Richard

Baker

Ernst & Young

Aaron

Clarke

Barton Willmore

Stan

Gilmour

Andrew

Barron

Taylor Wimpey

Chris

Cobbald

Wessex Economics

Paul

Gittings

Stephen

Barter

Kim

Cohen

Barton Willmore

Oliver

Goodyear

Michael Aubrey Partnership

Chris

Barwick

SSE Plc

Chris

Collings

Barclays

Ian

Gough

Green education/Ecotricity

Matthew

Battle

UK Property Forums

Brian

Condon

FMW Consulting

Christopher

Grahame

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Steven

Beauchamp

Capital Properties

Rupert

Cook

Architecture PLB

Ben

Greatbatch

Ridge & Partners

Craig

Becconsall

Peter Brett Associates LLP

James

Cook

BroadwayMalyan

Stuart

Green

Reading University

Steven

Bee

Academy of Urbanism

Anthony

Cowling

Greater Reading Environmental Network

Carol

Griffin

Olswang

Steve

Belam

The Oracle

Ben

Cross

James

Gross

Barton Willmore

Alison

Bell

Reading Borough Council

Caroline

Crutcher

Olswang

Kristen

Guida

Climate UK

David

Bell

University of Reading

Caroline

Crutcher

Olswang Solicitors

Sarah

Hacker

Reading Borough Council

Whitney

Bevan

University of Reading

Bradley

Davidson

GCS Recruitment

Zoe

Hanim

Reading Borough Council

Chris

Blencowe

Hilson Moran Partnership

Richard

Davies

Emma

Harding

Environment Agency

David

Bloxham

Thames Valley Chamber of Commerce

Annemarie

De Boom

Studioreal

Tim

Harding

Haslams LLP

Dan

Bradbury

Bellway Homes (Thames Gateway)

Kate

Dean

Dean Consulting

Rob

Harris

Elementa Consulting Ltd

Katie

Bradfield

Oculus

Inderpal

Dhanjal

Paul

Harrison

Berkshire NHS Estates

Alex

Brannen

Reading UK CIC

Andrew

Dickinson

Semperian PPP

Susan

Haslam

FMW Consultancy Ltd

Jannicke

Brar

Blandy & Blandy

Simon

Dimmick

Blandy & Blandy

Dave

Hasler

Oculus

Sammy

Brennan

Barton Willmore

Prof. Tim

Dixon

University of Reading

Andrew

Hawkins

Barclays Bank Plc

Lorraine

Briffitt

Ian

Dubber

Workspace Group

Joel

Hawkins

Bell Hammer

Tim

Brown

Margaret

Dunn

Global Heart radio

John

Haxworth

Barton Willmore

Karen

Brown

Rachel

Eden

Rhian

Hayes

Wokingham Borough Council

Alan

Bunce

UK Property Forums

Nick

Elford

Oracle

Preetam

Heeramun Singh National Grid

Ben

Burfoot

Reading Borough Council

Prof. Lorraine

Farrelly

University of Reading

Gordon

Hewitt

SSE Plc

Peter

Burgess

University of Reading

Jaimie

Ferguson

Turley

Nick

Hiles

Stanhope

Helen

Burnell

Boyes Turner

Daniel

Fernbank

University of Reading

Simon

Hill

Reading Borough Council

Stephen

Burt

University of Reading

Duncan

Findlay

i-Transport LLP

Richard

Hill

Thames Water

Eleanor

Burton

SEGRO

Thomas

Fitzpatrick

Upton McGougan

Nicky

Hodgson

Reading Festival Organisers

Ian

Campbell

Campbell Gordon

Tom

Fletcher

Lambert Smith Hampton

Nicklas

Holm

Dawnus Construction Ltd

Steve

Capel-Davies

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Jennifer

Forakis

Hoop Architects

Nigel

Horton-Baker

Reading UK CIC

Gordon

Carey

Landid

Rufus

Ford

SSE Plc

Graeme

Hoskin

Brendan

Carr

Reading Museum

Jane

Fowles

Novell Tullett

Nigel

Howe

Reading FC

Caroline

Carsey

Barton Willmore

Giorgio

Framalicco

Reading Borough Council

Philip

Hunter

Lambert Smith Hampton

Rory

Carson

Oxford Properties

Peter

Frankum

Savills

Aminal

Islam

Reading Borough Council

Kelly

Caulfield

Barton Willmore

Dave

Furby

Oculus

James

Jackson

WSP Group

Matthew

Chamberlain

ACG Architects

Barry

Gaffney

Barton Willmore

Adam

Jacobs

Jacobs the Jeweller

Balfour Beatty Construction

Nature Nurture


Roger

James

Boultbee Brooks

Peter

Newton

Barton Willmore

Angela

Shields

Pitmans

Chris

James

BroadwayMalyan

Victor

Nicholls

Bracknell Forest Council

Patrick

Smith

Dawnus Construction Ltd

Richard

Jobson

Design Engine

Maria

Noguer

Reading University

Andrea

Smith

Radian Housing Association

Steve

Jones

Kinnarps UK Ltd

Prof. Maria

Noguer

University of Reading

Edmund

Smith

University of Reading

Andrew

Jones

McKay Securities

Trevor

O'Hara

One City

Ben

Somner

BroadwayMalyan

Robert

Jones

Michael Aubrey Partnership

Jake

Osman

Reading Buses

Julian

Spence

Blandy & Blandy

Tony

Jones

Bill

Page

Legal & General Property

Rachel

Spencer

Reading Voluntary Action

Chloe

Jordan

Beard Construction

Tony

Page

Reading Borough Council

Tina

Spires

Barton Willmore

Steve

Kemp

OpenPlan

Prof. Kathy

Pain

University of Reading

Suzanne

Stallard

Jelly

Ben

Kite

EPR

Kathy

Pain

University of Reading

Nathan

Stevenson

Bellway

Katherine

Knight

Intelligent Health

Prof. Kathy

Pain

University of Reading

Duncan

Stuart

ABC

Steve

Lamb

Smart Agenda Ltd

Dominic

Papa

S333 (Almere Architects)

Paul

Swinney

Centre for Cities

Michele

Lavelle

4D Landscape Design Ltd

Danielle

Parker

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Tao

Tao

Sunfor Lighting

Will

Lawrie

Patrizia

Guy

Parkes

Rare

Ashley

Taylor

BroadwayMalyan

Sam

Leckenby

Barclays

Kate

Parry-Jones

Olswang Solicitors

Colin

Tedder

Bouygues UK

Simon

Lickley

Blandy & Blandy

Matthew

Peake

M&G Real Estate

Liz

Terry

Reading Borough Council

Adam

Lloyd

SEGRO

Robert

Pearson

Hicks Baker

Leigh

Thomas

Kier

Jo

Lovelock

Reading Borough Council

Nigel

Penn Simpkins

Article 10 Design

John

Thompson

Academy of Urbanism

Chris

Luff

M&S

Simon

Perkins

McKay Securities

Rob

Thompson

planit-ie

John

Luther

Reading Arts Council

Tony

Pettitt

Reading Buses

Eleanor

Thomson

Barclays

Neil

MacDonald

GetReading

Tom

Pierpoint

Great Western Railways

Grant

Thornton

Reading Borough Council

Alan

Magness

Reading Borough Council

Robert

Poole

Muse Developments

Ally

Tow

Boyes Turner

Nick

Makemson

Scotts Brownrigg

Aaron

Pope

M&G Real Estate

Rowan

Turrall

Boyes Turner

Graciela

Malitsko

Reading Borough Council

Mark

Prescott

Reading Year of Culture

Stephen

Vigar

Reading Borough Council

Jonathan

Manning

Rare

Claire

Pulleyn

Haslams LLP

Nina

Virdi

Pollard Thomas Edwards

Jason

Margrave

Stanhope

Tracey

Rawling Church

Kyocera

Nina

Virdi

Pollard Thomas Edwards

Dave

Martin

First Group

Jeremy

Rawlings

University of Reading

Laura

Wainwright

Boyes Turner

Kathryn

Maskell

University of Reading

Jamie

Redman

Michael Aubrey Partnership Ltd

Robert

Wallace

Pitmans

David

Mather

JDP

Jamie

Renison

DTZ

Darryl

Ward

Clancy Consulting Ltd

Stacey

Meadwell

Estates Gazette

Alex

Reynolds

SEGRO

Ian

Wardle

Reading Borough Council

Graciela

Melitsko

Reading Borough Council

Cullan

Riley

Phil Jones Associates

Stacey

Waring

University of Reading

Jenni

Montgomery

Barton Willmore

Jim

Roberts

Fourth Street

Richard

Webb

Barton Willmore

Thomas

Moore

Trinity Mirror

Paul

Roseff

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Andy

Wells

i-Transport LLP

Andrew

Morgan

KPMG

Paul

Roseff

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Edward

Wheeler

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Juliette

Morgan

Tech City

Jon

Rowland

Jon Rowland Urban Design

Andrew

Willcock

Savills

Will

Morris

Haslams

Maria

Saltrese

Heather

Williams

University of Reading

John

Morton

Consult CPM

Flora

Samuel

University of Reading

Kirsti

Wilson

University of Reading

Graham

Mountford

Broad St Mall

Dominic

Scott

Barton Willmore

Scott

Witchalls

Peter Brett Associates LLP

Ben

Muirhead

Odyssey Markides

Neil

Seager

Haslams LLP

Steve

Woodford

Haslams LLP

David

Murray-Cox

Barton Willmore

Liam

Sharp

Barton Willmore

Jonathan

Woodroffe

S333 (Almere Architects)

Geeta

Nanda

Thames Valley Housing Association/Fizzy Living

Keith

Shearer

Adam Urbanism

Mark

Worringham

Reading Borough Council

Chris

Newman

Haslams

Brian

Shewan

Shewan Associates

Claire

Wright

Connect Reading


VISIONING A LOOK AT ACHIEVEMENTS & IMPROVEMENTS

RDG: EXCELLED AT...

RDG: UNDERPERFORMED AT...

RDG: HOW DO WE IMPROVE OVER 35 YEARS...

• Inward investment

• Congestion/traffic

• Strong leadership/unifying governance

• Public transport infrastructure/connectivity

• Cycle and footpath infrastructure

• Transport infrastructure – a smarter city, none car dependent

• Town centre redevelopment

• Connectivity beyond the town centre

• Invest in strategy and promotion

• The Oracle/Riverside

• No personality/identity

• Develop a stronger ID/sense of place that integrates culture and heritage

• Multicultural

• No sense of place

• Create multicultural and multigenerational spaces for inclusivity

• Reading Festival

• Civic pride

• Encourage entrepreneurial/innovation

• ICT capital of EU

• Start-up businesses/SMEs and independents

• Policies to promote greener buildings and energy solutions

• New and improved green spaces

• Diverse governance

• Reinvent IDR – less cars/more green space

• University of Reading

• Break out from LA boundaries

• Promoting and encourage cycling/walking – change attitudes

• Madejski Stadium

• Affordable housing

• Create collaborative world-class working spaces

• Town Hall

• Investment not reaching community level

• Cutting edge IT infrastructure

• Skills, training and maintaining tallent

• Maximising our heritage

• Shift socio/economic equality

• High end blue chip businesses

• IT infrastructure

• Pay explicit attention to value of waterways and green space

• Access to all waterfront and green spaces • A heart/civic space


EXPLORING GREEN TECHNOLOGY

Place & Environment

People & Lifestyle

Economy & Employment

• Bigger holistic hub from river to river

• Beyond boundaries

• ICT infrastructure

• Early adopters of technology

• Integrated connectivity travel – ICT apps based package

• Support for technology entrepreneurs

• Realise identity as high growth tech/entrepreneurial place

• Re-use the space used by a car

• Retail independents

• Non car dependent – step on step off service

• More liveable town centre

• Freer, more efficient movement of labour force

• Hub/connective spaces/not a drive through

• More walking/cycling

• Why go to town centre?

• A place with newly defined uses internationally

• Vibrant town centres

• Way we work/travel/do business

• Green buildings – push the trend

• Show room for retails in town centre – click and collect

• More attractive environment for diversity of commercial uses

• Renaissance of independents

• Trend in Real Estate

• A larger heart to our city • Influence lifestyles


EXPLORING RIVERS & PARKS

Place & Environment

People & Lifestyle

Economy & Employment

• Some loved, some unloved spaces - all loved by 2050

• Open spaces

• Shops in parks and spaces for people

• Sense of place

• Demand on road use

• Construct house boats

• Use the flood zones

• Build meeting places in communities

• Create flexible workspaces

• Make use of the river (like Oxford/ Cambridge do)

• Green gyms

• Outdoor learning hubs

• Thames for swimming

• Fobney Island/Green Park

• NW opportunity • Reading Great Water Park • Boat hire • Connection of rivers and town centre • Living on the water


EXPLORING FESTIVALS & CULTURE

Place & Environment

People & Lifestyle

Economy & Employment

• Culture woven into fabric of Reading

• Engage with existing diverse communities

• Attract more people to live in Reading

• City of festivals – not just ‘Reading Festival’

• Awareness/promotion of ‘cultural’ events

• Use smart technology to attract visitors to cultural events

• Reading as a cultural destination

• Creating civic pride

• Implement a heritage and culture strategy

• Improve attractiveness

• A place for people who live in Reading and visitors

• Develop heritage connection for pedestrians

• A larger heart to our city

• Look outside the centre

• Influence lifestyles


IDEAS ON HOW WE COULD ACHIEVE A SMART & SUSTAINABLE READING BY 2050.... CULTURAL LEADERSHIP – STAKEHOLDERS/ BUSINESSES

A TOWN MASTER PLAN INTEGRATING CONNECTIVITY AND OUR THEMES

PUBLIC ART

AN IDENTITY, AN ETHOS, OUR MISSION

SPACES FOR GRASS ROOTS MOVEMENTS

USE TRANSPORT MORE INNOVATIVELY – RIVERBOATS, TRAMS, CYCLE GREEN CHAMPIONS – PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

THIRD BRIDGE?

DEVELOP FESTIVAL CULTURE

WORLD-CLASS IT INFRASTRUCTURE

EXAMINE DESIRED FUTURES


EXPLORE OUTSIDE SPACES

A PLAYABLE CITY

CREATE A CATALYST FOR ENTERPRISE AND INNOVATION

CREATE A CITY WIDE GREAT READING PARK

WORKING ACROSS BOUNDARIES THROUGH A SHARED GOVERNANCE

A MULTI-SCALE AND MULTI-PURPOSE VENUE

EXPLOITING NEW IDEAS TECHNOLOGIES

AWARENESS AND TRAINING FOR SCHOOLS TO USE OUR OPEN SPACES

DIGITAL PLATFORM FOR OPEN AND GREEN SPACES

OWNERSHIP O F FLOOD ZONES AND WOODS


. .. E R U T U F ’S G IN D A E R WHAT DO WE NEED AND WHY?

Population Projections 1981 - 2011

Areas of Multiple Deprivation


Commute r Flow Data Household Projections 1981 - 2011

2011


ZOOMING IN ON S N IO T A C O L D IE IF T N E ID

Station Hill

Abbey Quarter

Rivers and Parks


Floating Community

The Oxford Road

The IDR


N O I T A T S HILL


BEYON COMM D THE UTERS AN URBAN HIVE


“Topography works in our favour across the Station Hill area to offer us opportunities to mitigate the boundary that is the railway line. We can bridge over or under the line 3-4 times, to deliver greater connectivity through this quarter to the river and town.” Keith Shearer, Adam Urbanism


“Intensification and permeability of the urban grain, can permeate south right through the town to Friar Street, Broad Street and even The Oracle.” Dominic Papa, S333



STATION HILL BECOMES A NEW URBAN QUARTER FOR THE TOWN, PROVIDING A RECOGNISIBLE, STRONG SENSE OF ARRIVAL.

By removing exisiting barriers the space can reconnect north and south encouraging movement from town to river, and opening up to provide an urban hive of activity, not just a place for transition but a place for events and socialising.


ABBEY QUARTER


RE-INV ENTING HISTOR Y



“With the Abbey and Reading Prison is at the heart of this quarter, we can drive higher density of development alongside a network of green spaces and streets that overcomes the current dead ends.” Craig Beaconsall, PBA

“The current out of town retail area could be transformed into new residential accommodation, close to the station but also linked through to Kings Meadow to the north. New premises for the Further Education College at the heart of this development could provide an anchor of employment and activity throughout the day.” Rupert Cook, Architecture PLB



THE ABBEY QUARTER COULD BE A CULTURAL HUB FOR READING. CELEBRATING AND ENHANCING OUR HERITAGE WE CAN BREATH LIFE INTO THE ABBEY RUINS, READING PRISON, FORBURY GARDENS AND FAR BEYOND.

With looping public realm and green spaces we could extend the town’s activity east, and provide a bohemian quarter of studio spaces, live/work units and activity that encourage and promote uniqueness.


RIVERS AND PARKS


STITCH ED BAC K INTO T HE TOW N


“We can be bold. A 200-300m wide bridge crossing the railway would be bold, but it could provide stunning urban development for the town and overcome this strong obstacle. In 50 years’ time, this could be a far easier feat of engineering.” Richard Jobson, Design Engine

“We need a big central civic park, but we also need to craft a smaller network of interventions in our denser urban areas. Greening and connecting the river back into the city is an immediate project the industry could grapple with.” John Haxworth, Barton Willmore


“The act of crossing the river provides people with the views of the river itself, east and west - we don’t have enough of these in the town and they will help to make the river part of our urban fabric.” Jamie Ferguson, Turley


“Reading needs to use statement architecture more. In a cultural, civic hub we need to emulate Potsdammer Platz and the likes, by delivering density and strong statement buildings, to provide a real celebratory centre; make it a proper city and not just a large suburb with a big railway station.� Jon Rowland, Jon Rowland Urban Design


BY RECONNECTING OUR RIVERS AND PARKS, WE CAN STITCH THEM BACK INTO OUR TOWN PROMOTING THEIR USE AND CREATING DESIRABLE DESTINATIONS. Our waterways and their surroundings could provide a new wild Great Reading Park or intimate boat cafes and a oating theatre, while also providing greater riverside opportunities, to collectively create a necklace of escapism and enjoyment that travels right through the town.


G N I T A O L F Y T I N U M M CO


LET’S T H DIFFER INK ENTLY


“Reading’s water can work harder for the town. A floating community can provide homes for people that are already connected in to existing, sustainable river transport opportunities. A Thames river bus and improved cycle paths will further assist the connectivity north to south over the river and railway.” Peter Frankum, Savills


“There are some fantastic examples of how floating homes can work. Currently no one in Britain is grabbing this idea, yet it can provide inspirational architecture. We can capitalise on the creativity of residents by facilitating cost effective self-build, whilst also tackling affordability and climate change.” Jonathan Woodroffe, S333



THE LAKES OF READING OFFER NATURAL, UNDER-UTILISED ASSETS. A NEW FLOATING COMMUNITY COULD PROVIDE AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE HOMES AND A DIFFERENT LIVING EXPERIENCE FOR RESIDENTS.

Changing perceptions as to what housing should look like and how it functions, residents could enjoy a community that thrives on a natural habitat whilst oямАering great river, cycle, pedestrian routes straight into town and a low carbon footprint.


THE OXFORD ROAD


CELEB RA HOME TE OUR GR DIVER OWN SITY/ CULTU RE


“The Oxford Road’s strong multi-cultural vibe must be retained but can be significantly enhanced through minimal intervention. Traffic calming, enhanced public realm and intensification of activity and occupation at key points could radically transform the opportunities for residents and visitors, and build an even stronger, unique identity.” Matthew Chamberlain, ACG Architects


“Notional subdivision along this long road enables us to provide transition, different experiences and the sense of a journey. The east end relating to the town while the west end relates more to the suburbs and industry.” Barry Gaffney, Barton Willmore



ALREADY AN ICONIC, DIVERSE AREA FOR READING, WE COULD ENHANCE EXISTING NEIGHBOURHOODS, IMPROVING AND INTENSIFYING RESIDENTIAL AND EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT IN ‘LOWER’ AND ‘UPPER’ OXFORD ROAD, WHILST FOCUSING COMMERCIAL AND SOCIAL OPPORTUNITIES IN A CENTRAL ‘HEART’.

Enhanced to support local businesses and entrepreneurialism ‘The Heart’ could encourage community ownership, be greener and pedestrian friendly, offer a space in which to host pop-up events that celebrate food, people and music etc. all coming together to create a diverse and unique space to explore and socialise.


THE IDR


FROM G RE TO GRE Y EN


“This is a radical opportunity for Reading to deliver ‘Room to Breathe’. Through modal shift and diverted through town traffic, we can reduce the reliance upon the IDR and use the space to create memorability for Reading. By greening the route, we can ‘un-define’ Reading’s limits, create new developable space and a new ‘living room’ of green space for a multitude of activity.” Steven Bee, Academy of Urbanism




RATHER THAN A GREY BARRIER CONSTRAINING OUR TOWN, THE IDR COULD BE A GREEN LUNG, PROVIDING THE OPPORTUNITY FOR FLEXIBLE, SMART AND SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL OPPORTUNITIES, SHARED BY CARS, TRAMS AND BICYCLES. With the barriers broken we could rebuild routes through and across town, reconnecting our town and suburbs through a ribbon of movement and greenery, with nodes for rest and nodes of intensiямБcation providing new areas for activity, retail, employment and even play!



WE WANT YOU TO STEP INTO READING 2O5O... WHAT DO YOU WANT TO SEE?

SHARE YOUR VIEWS...

• More opportunities for art and culture • A greater variety of housing

www.reading2O5O.co.uk

• Sustainable transport networks

www.facebook.com/reading2O5O

• Community owned spaces • More festivals and pop-up events • Better use of our rivers and green spaces • Innovative workplace environments e.g spaces for start-ups • Greater use of green technology • Better architecture

Printing kindly supplied by ABC Imaging www.abcimaginguk.com



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