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Design Anthology Year 1 BSc Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 1) Compiled from Bartlett Books 2004–2017


Our Design DNA At The Bartlett School of Architecture, we have been publishing annual exhibition catalogues for each of our design-based programmes for more than a decade. These catalogues, amounting to thousands of pages, illustrate the best of our students’ extraordinary work. Our new Design Anthology series brings together the annual catalogue pages for each of our renowned units, clusters, and labs, to give an overview of how their practice and research has evolved. Throughout this time some teaching partnerships have remained constant, others have changed. Students have also progressed from one programme to another. Nevertheless, the way in which design is taught and explored at The Bartlett School of Architecture is in our DNA. Now with almost 50 units, clusters and labs in the school across eight programmes, the Design Anthology series shows how we define, progress and reinvent our agendas and themes from year to year. Professor Frédéric Migayrou Chair of The Bartlett School of Architecture Professor Bob Sheil Director of The Bartlett School of Architecture


2017 Occupying Routes: from the City to the Valley Frosso Pimenides 2016 Constructing Your Practice Nat Chard, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor 2015 Longing and Belonging: The First Year in Architecture Nat Chard, Frosso Pimenides 2014 Homing In: The First Year in Architecture Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2013 In Transit: A Journey in the Life of Year 1 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2013 Annex to The Bartlett Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2012 Annex to The Bartlett Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2011 (Re)Making Soane Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2010 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2009 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2008 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber 2007 Frosso Pimenides 2006 Frosso Pimenides 2005 Frosso Pimenides


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2017 Occupying Routes: from the City to the Valley Frosso Pimenides


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Occupying Routes: from the City to the Valley Director: Frosso Pimenides

Director Frosso Pimenides Design Associates Carlos Jiménez Cenamor, Gavin Robotham, Emmanouil Stavrakakis Lecture Series Nat Chard, Peter Cook Fabrication Consultant Emmanuel Vercruysse The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Installation Consultants Indigo Rohrer, Nick Westby Media Studies Tutors Joel Cady, Danielle Hodgson Design Tutors Fenella Colingridge, Stefan Lengen, Ifigeneia Liangi, Rebecca Loewen, Thandi Loewenson, Emma-Kate Matthews, Brian O'Reilly, Eva Ravnborg, Farlie Reynolds, Umut Yamac Partners B-made workshop, CRAB studio Thank you to: Jenna Al-Ali, Will Armstrong, Michael Arthur (UCL President and Provost), Julia Backhaus, Blanche Cameron, Mario Carpo, Nat Chard, Peter Cook, Stewart Dodd, Emma Flynn, Adrian Forty, Christine Hawley, Daniel Howarth, Richard Jeffries, Mary Johnson, Stephen Johnson, Lilly Kudic, Saskia Lewis, CJ Lim, Phil Medowcroft, Jack Newton, Alan Penn, Jonathan Pile, Juliet Quintero, Bob Sheil, Colin Skeete, Emmanuel Vercruysse, Patrick Weber, Gwendoline Webber, Paul Wenston, Nick Westby, Nick Wood, Paolo Zaide

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Initiating students into civic life and the world of architecture is the foundation of their education in the first year. Students are encouraged to develop their personality, learn skills, enter the world of ideas and cultivate creativity. Communicating ideas and expressing one’s imagination through drawing and making is our main intention. A series of experiments and a group project led to an individual building project situated in East London’s Lea Valley. The year started with a group fabrication project, ‘Return and Reinstall’, a celebration of a pivotal moment in the life and tradition of the School. It comprised three parts: a bonfire of old models, marking our departure from 140 Hampstead Road; a procession of 125 students transporting archived models back to our new home at 22 Gordon Street; and finally, installing these models to mark the start of a new era. The field trip to Northern Italy was a great source of inspiration and collective culture as students were exposed to some of the world’s most influential buildings and places. By surveying a small fragment of Bologna, students immersed themselves in a different culture that they then interpreted via their own personal understanding. The ‘Live-Work’ building project, located in Lea Valley, was an opportunity to explore the importance of ‘context’, enclosure, spatial qualities and the materiality of a proposed vision. The project was a vehicle for students to explore their own inspirations and focus on their own interests. A series of sites were chosen adjacent to the River Lea and Olympic Park area. Each student was asked to explore and understand the character of a site and inhabit it through a proposed story (each student’s personal programme) that established a dialogue with the surrounding area. The life of our first year students is a continuous process of testing, questioning, rethinking and visually communicating a series of design explorations over the course of a year, as part of a vibrant studio culture. It is a journey of learning skills and knowledge that give students the tools to think, experiment, make mistakes and celebrate their failures – and finally, to have fun designing.


Maria De Salvador Arnaiz, Imogen Dhesi, Amanda Dolga, Joe Douglas, Benedict Edwards, Miles Elliot, Charlotte Evans, Nanci Fairless Nicholson, Wan Feng, Georgia Green, Migena Hadziu, Bijou Harding, Eleanor Harding, Celina Harto, Holly Hatfield, Karl Herdersch, Yvonne (Yu-Wen) Huang, Abe (Zhongliang) Huang, Noriyuki Ishii, Maria Jones Delago, Peter (Yuen) Kei, Amy Kempa, Karishma Khajuria, Megan King, Sharon (Ting) Lee, Anson (Yiu) Lee, Kit Lee-Smith, Clement Le Pelley, Frances Leung, Yen (Su) Liew, Angel Lim, Jiana

Lin, Jessica (Chit) Liu, Joicy (Pinyi) Liu, Hugo Loydell, Aurelia (Yixuan) Lu, Francis Magalhaes Heath, Emily Mak, Diana Marin, Kai (James) McLaughlin, Luke McMahon, Owen Mellett, Zakariya Miah, Lucy Millichamp, Indran Miranda Duraisingam, Marcus Yang Mohan, Heba Mohsen, Emilie Morrow, Nandinzul Munkhbayar, Drew Murphy, Carlota Nunez-Barranco Vallejo, Chinwe Obi, Harriet Orr, Mimi Osei-Kuffuor, Szymon Padlewski, Maria Petalidou, Muyun Qiu, Yue Ren, Joshua Richardson, Thomas Richardson, Alessandro Rognoni, Thomas

Roylance, Imogen RuthvenTaggart, Malgorzata Rutkowska, Tao Shi, Luke (Hyosub) Shin, Faustina Smolilo, Baldeep Sohal, Connie Stafford, George Stewart, Olivia (Yaqi) Su, Eugene (Wei) Tan, Hau Tang, Anabelle Tan Kai Lin, Luke Topping, Tom Ushakov, James Van Caloen, Arina Viazenkina, Benjamin Webster, Maya Whittfield, Yerkin Wilbrandt, Jake Williams, Ryan (Sung) Wong, Bill (Chuzhengnan) Xu, Venessa Yau, Simon (Zifeng) Ye, Miki (Yue) Yu, William Zeng, Moe (Mengxuan) Zhao, Yanmin Zhang

BSc Architecture Year 1

Students Nasra Abdullahi, Vitika Agarwal, Temilayo Ajayi, Mohammad Aldoori, Alp Amasya, Jahba Anan, Basil Babichev, Daeyong Bae, Danheng Bai, Alexander Balgarnie, Danya Barysnikov, Sadika Begum, Sheryl Beh, Victoria Blackburn, Vladyslav Bondarenko, Ted Bosy Maury, Anna Cabanlig, Maria Castello, Jason (Chun) Chan, Kelvin (Kai) Chan, Terry (Weiting) Chen, Kyrah Issariyaporn, Viktor (Hiu) Chow, Pearl (Yu) Chow, Chris Collyer, Andrew Cowie, Kasia Dabrowska, Sofya Daniltseva, Elizabeth Day, Bengisu Demir,

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BSc Architecture Year 1 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Fig. Y1.1 ‘RE-TURN, RE-INSTALL’. Year 1 installation project. Studios 7 and 9: A series of garments placed in the void of the stairwell, holding artefacts and relics from the past. Fig. Y1.2 ‘RE-TURN, RE-INSTALL’. Year 1 installation project. Studios 2 and 6: A landscape of boxes opens up to reveal maps from the history of the Euston area, while a series of heads interacts with the city’s diversity, weather and tempestuous movement. Fig. Y1.3 Charlotte Evans ‘A Fish Restaurant in the Canal’. A series of tunnels disperses smells into the surrounding area and allows the movement of cats to remain separate from areas of public use. The cohabitation of the humans and the animals living at different scales initiated the design. Fig. Y1.4 ‘RE-TURN, RE-INSTALL’. Year 1 installation project. Bonfire of old relics set in the courtyard of 140 Hampstead Road to

initiate the procession. Fig. Y1.5 ‘RE-TURN, RE-INSTALL’. Year 1 installation project. Studios 7 and 9: Fragment of the ‘tickler’ mechanism. Fig. Y1.6 Abe (Zhongliang) Huang, ‘Artefacts’ Stories’. Mapping the story of an old model.

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Fig. Y1.7 Amanda Dolgā, ‘Kinetic Clock of the Watchmaker’s Tower’. A combined drawing of 1:100 rotational plans and morphing elevations of the building’s façade that visualises the changes over time in the exterior of the house, whilst emphasising and highlighting the shifting thresholds within the tower, thus providing different window frames which allow the resident a unique experience of the surroundings throughout the year. Fig. Y1.8 Basil Babichev, ‘Beekeeper’s Sanatorium’. The project involves bees colonising spaces beneath a bridge. Variations start as gestural models but conclude with more logic. As colonies diminish, the architecture thins from the core. Inside, wax and bee nutrients are processed and shared with the public. Fig. Y1.9 Malgo Rutkowska, ‘Bologna Site Survey’. Shadow emphasising façade of Palazzo del Podesta

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in Piazzo Maggiore. Fig. Y1.10 Jake Williams, ‘Vinyl pressing plant and record archive’. The building is composed of a series of niches that follow the ritual associated with vinyl record-pressing machines. The public observe the machines from below whilst experiencing the growth of the record archive that extends down the canal. The machines are semi-exposed, allowing the weather to affect them over time.


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Fig. Y1.11 Noriyuki Ishii, ‘House for Cinematographer’. Outdoor public projection space for film screenings, montage room and archive. A layered composition of screens and staircases frames the site. The living space occupies the back of the projection screen. Fig. Y1.12 Tom Richardson, ‘House for a Fabric Dyer’. Living and working are intimately connected with each room, serving both domestic and industrial purposes. In the kitchen, plants from along the Lee Navigation are turned into natural dyes and poured into the dye baths. Rolls of fabric thread through the building into the dye pools before being dried above the canal. Fig. Y1.13 Ted Bosy Maury, ‘Over the Edge: A House for Blue Shadows’. A series of cantilevered moving platforms above the trees form a workshop and display space for a performative cyanotype photographer and her

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friends, moving over the edge of the canal between land and water to come together when in use and apart when empty. Gradually, the wooden surfaces are covered with sun-exposed blueprints while changing shadows add to the shadows of trees. Fig. Y1.14 Owen Mellett, ‘A Horticulturalist Greenhouse Home’. A house along the River Lea, which wraps around and integrates into the nature surrounding it, creating a number of interconnected microclimates in which both the owner and her plants can thrive. Fig. Y1.15 Karl Herdersch, ‘King John’s Palace/Function 1’ The first of a series of public inns with self-build room extensions that sprawl across the greenway. Come celebrate its grand opening on the site where the original King John’s Palace burnt down – a roller disco to the soundtrack of the demolition of Fish Island.


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2016 Constructing Your Practice Nat Chard, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor


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Constructing Your Practice Nat Chard, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor

Year 1 Staff Lucy Leonard, Ifigenia Liangi, Emma-Kate Matthews, Frederik Petersen, Eva Ravnborg, Gavin Robotham, Emmanouil Stavrakakis, Catrina Stewart, Umut Yamac, Nick Westby Architectural Media Studies Tutor Joel Cady, Danielle Hodgson

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Year 1 Coordinator Emmanouil Stavrakakis Year 1 Administrator Izzy Blackburn We would like to thank The Bartlett School of Architecture and the Architecture Research Fund (ARF) for their constant support of and care for Year 1. We would like to thank Emma Flynn, CJ Lim, Hina Lad, Christine Hawley, Gergerly Kovács, Luke Pearson, Mollie Claypool, Matthew Butcher, Sara Shafei, Steve Johnson, Damjan Iliev, Blanche Cameron, Caroline Rabourdin, Joel Cady, Murray Fraser, Javier Ruiz Rodrigez, Chee-Kit Lai, Thomas Pearce, Dimitri Argyros, Danielle Wilkinson, Danielle Hodgson, Francesca Hughes, Regner Ramos, Jessica In, Sofia Krimizi, Paolo Zaide, Bernadette Devilat and Paz, Afra van 't Land, James Sale, Luke Olsen, Graeme Williamson, Natasha Sandmeier, Elizabeth Dow, B-made, ScanLAB Projects, Brian O’Reilly, Bob Sheil and the irreplaceable Frosso Pimenides. The Bartlett Architecture Office, with Emer Girling and Izzy Blackburn on the steering wheel, has made the year possible. Thank you so much!

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Year 1 is a very special moment in every architect’s career – the time in which our creativity, passion and dedication meet a new challenge: to define the environment that nurtures the social context in which we all develop our lives. It is not a simple task, since it addresses all scales from furniture to urban design, from permanent to temporary constructions; and so perhaps our most important responsibility is to have an integral vision of reality. With this purpose we train our students to observe, analyse and respond through a series of projects. The outcome of these design questions will combine their radical creativity, their uniqueness and the technical expertise acquired in conversations with tutors, consultants and experts. This year students were asked how they might construct their practice. An introductory project teased out the personal knowledge they had already accrued about architecture from inhabiting it all their lives.  This work also probed how the process of drawing might be particular to the content that was being discussed, a theme that was developed in the second project. Four groups of students invented and built a variety of drawing boards (or surfaces) imbued with 'opinions', and the rest of the students built idea-specific drawing tools that were related to at least one of the boards. The project related the processes of making and drawing as content-led media, putting students in control of the materials and processes through which they would be thinking about their work. To help this we spent a day drawing aircraft and their components at the aeroplane museum at Duxford – an opportunity to use drawing to carefully observe how precise artefacts can be made.   In January we travelled to Madrid and drew on Carlos Jiménez’s wide range of contacts in the city. We visited and 3D scanned buildings by Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Andrés Jaque, Mi5 Architects, Langarita Navarro and Zuloark, architects who have forged a range of new types of practice during the recession. These encounters set the scene for the building project, set on a range of sites along the Regent’s Canal. A workshop at the start of the project helped each student set up their own framework for how they would practice. This introduction encouraged an experimental approach to the work, which was taken in different directions by the eight first year studios. The building projects also provided a vehicle for the students’ technical studies.  Early in the year there was a strong emphasis on developing handdrawing skills as well as the connection between what was being drawn, and how. In the second half of the year we introduced digital modelling, 3D scanning and offered a 3D printing workshop. The goal of Year 1’s digital implementation aims to facilitate the combination of analogue and digital thinking as complementary design methodologies and languages in order to trigger students’ contemporary creative thinking.


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Students Gunel Aliyeva, Assankhan Amirov Oliver Ansell, Kofi Arthur, Elizabeth Atherton, Moe Atsumeda, Jack Barnett, Grant Beaumont, Poppy Becke, Daniel Boran, Theo Brader-Tan, George Brazier, Paul Brooke, Liana Buttigieg, Yuqi Cai, James Carden, Teresa Carmelita, Yung Chan, Lauren Childs, Annette Choy De Leon, Wei Chung, Yoojin Chung, Theo Clarke, James Cook, Helen Cope, Bryn Davies, Caitlin Davies, Xavier De La Roche, Aleksy Dojnow, Joe Douglas, Hao Du, Camille Dunlop, Eleanor Evason, Sebastian Fathi, Mengzi Fu, Maxim Goldau, Gabriele Grassi, Millicent Green, Grey Grierson, Lola Haines, Alys Hargreaves, Zachariah Harper Le Petevin Dit Le Roux, Florence Hemmings, Shu Hoe, Yo Hosoyamada, Joe Johnson, Daniel Johnston, Sarah Jones,

Kyuri Kim, Rusna Kohli, Katarina Krajciova, Jie Yi Kuek, Dagyung Lee, Jiyoon Lee, Thomas Leggatt, Victor Leung, Yee Liang, Chi Ka Lo, Felix Loftus, Harrison Long, Yingying Lou, Oscar Maguire, Megan Makinson, Linggezi Man, Samuel Martin, John Mathers, Joanna Mclean, Lauren Mcnicoll, Nur Mohamad Adzlee, Anna O'leary, Patrycja Panek, Agnes Parker, Chandni Patel, Maya Patel, Jolanta Piotrowska, Lingyun Qian, Katherine Ramchand, James Robinson, Silje Seim, Hanmo Shen, Justine Shirley, Negar Taatizadeh, Edward Taft, Kenji Tang, An-Ni Teng, Jarron Tham, Emily Thomas, Giselle Thong, Olivia Trinder, Andreea-Ioana Vihristencu, George Wallis, Gabriella Watkins, Chun Wong, Hon Wong, Chloe Woodhead, Rupert Woods, Jun Yap, Yuk Yip, Renzhi Zeng, Yurou Zhang and Yanmin Zhang 17


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Figs. Y1.1 – 1.5 ‘The Drawing Room’. Fig. Y1.1 Camille Dunlop, Grey Grierson, Arthur Wong, ‘Waxing’, installation project. This drawing tool uses wax and candlelight to project the shadow of an object from which the formwork of a sculpture is created. The tool is comprised of a costume that holds two sculpting pens, one that provides heat and the other that cools down the wax. The wax is placed in layers so that the offcuts are not thrown away but instead create the negative of the sculpture while it’s being made. Fig. Y1.2 Theo Brader-Tan, Sebastian Fathi, Teresa Carmelita, ‘The Drawing Pause’, installation project. The drawing instrument allows the wearer to pause during moments of transition and draw onto the surface of the suit. Fig. Y1.3 Jarron Tham, Victor Leung, Justine Shirley, Yo Hosoymada, James Carden, Renzhi Zeng,

‘Piloti’, installation project. This collaborative drawing tool is inspired by the plans of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye. Fig. Y1.4 Installation project, Xavier De La Roche, Joe Jonston, Jie Kuek, Lauren Mcnicoll, ‘Ambidextrous Simultaneous’. This drawing device allows one to draw with both hands simultaneously. The vertical drawing surface enhances the method of this tool while it allows one hand to be guided by the other in the process of drawing. Fig. Y1.5 Rusna Kohli, Chun (Dereck) Wong, Joanna Mclean, 'Skin Tool'. This drawing tool is composed of two parts: the costume which has stitches representing an invented measuring system whose units relate to the body; and a series of stencils that are again designed from body curvatures and help to guide the hand to draw.

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Fig. Y1.6 Jack Barnett, ‘A Plumber and his Water Purification Temple’. This house sits on the canalside and collects the water for a pool, purifying it through a series of organic filters. Fig. Y1.7 Max Shen, ‘An attempt to capture the moment of falling asleep’. The project discusses the moment of falling asleep through a series of drawings which try to capture the threshold between being awake and falling asleep. Fig. Y1.8 Lingyun Qian, ‘Mario and his Mushroom Farm’. The project develops from a series of bird origami which are redesigned to fit inside one other. Y1.9 Megan Makinson, ‘A Ruined House for a Cello Teacher’. The house is composed of a series of walls which are assembled by the ruins of bombarded London. A collection of the teacher’s memories are displayed within the structure, organising an emotional and functional promenade.

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Fig. Y1.10 Daniel Boran, Yoojin Chung, Zak Harper Le Petevin Dit Le Roux, Eeda Lee, Oscar Maguire, Maya Patel, ‘The Hug Plane’. An immersive drawing surface which offers a range of curvatures to accept each of the drawing tools. Fig. Y1.11 Maya Patel, ‘Nettle House.’ Owned by a couple, this house comprises a foraging shop in which customers ‘forage’ for the products. The couple sell nettle pesto and also have an underground experimental herbal medicine project. Fig. Y1.12 Olivia Trinder, ‘The Afternoon Jamboree House’. A house that celebrates British traditions, where teas are served and fruits are dried, strained and pressed to make the perfect jam. The stains left upon the stretched skin of the building will be in constant transition, reflecting the fruits of the seasons. The customers can sail in to collect their orders whilst the

fruit produce filters through the roof structure. Fig. Y1.13 Lola Haines, ‘Tessie’s Vegetable Performance’. A little house in Mile End where Tessie makes puppets out of fruit and vegetables. A Victorian façade disguises the performance world which opens itself to the public only once they have decided to enter the grocery shop.

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Fig. Y1.14 Enoch Liang, ‘Clinic for Sleep Disorder’. A place that provides diverse types of spaces for various sleeping patterns. These spaces channel sounds from the animals around the canal, whilst the architecture allows for the growth of lavender, which enhances relaxation. Fig. Y1.15 Victor Leung, ‘The Percussionist’s House’. A public space and private residence that acts as an interactive aural experience that showcases the client’s vast percussion collection. The building also engages and links its residents and visitors through its musical ecosystem. Fig. Y1.16 Olivia Trinder, ‘The Afternoon Jamboree House’. Fig. Y1.17 Moe Atsumeda, ‘A Japaneseinspired teahouse’. A weaver’s studio and consultation space and a small house for the Mile End community.

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2015 Longing and Belonging: The First Year in Architecture Nat Chard, Frosso Pimenides


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Longing and Belonging: The First Year in Architecture Nat Chard, Frosso Pimenides

Year 1 Staff Dimitris Argyros, Tamsin Hanke, Lucy Leonard, Ifigeneia Liangi, Brian O’Reilly, Frederik Petersen, Eva Ravnborg, Emmanouil Stavrakakis, Catrina Stewart, Emmanuel Vercruysse Architectural Media Studies Tutor Joel Cady

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

Year 1 Coordinator Emmanouil Stavrakakis Year 1 Administrator James Lancaster Special thanks to Michael Arthur, UCL President & Provost, William Palin and James Willis We are grateful to Laura Allen, Carrie Behar, Peter Bishop, Matthew Butcher, Joel Cady, Kacper Chmielewski, Blanche Cameron, Kate Davies, Mike Hadi, Christine Hawley, Colin Herperger, Simon Herron, Danielle Hodgson, Steve Johnson, Susanne Isa, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor, Markus Lähteenmäki, Zoe Laughlin, Stefan Lengen, Tim Lucas, Samar Maqusi, Josep Miàs, Jack Newman, Alan Penn, Jonathan Pile, Regner Ramos, Peter Rees, Gavin Robotham, James Sale, Luke Scott, Rupert Scott, Bob Sheil, Matt Springett, Alex Sutton, Afra Van’t Land, Graeme Williamson, Simon Withers, Paolo Zaide, Peter, Abi, Bim and all our wonderful friends at B-made

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The Bartlett’s BSc Architecture degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture at the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and is taught to the year as a whole. The main intention of the first year is to explore ways of seeing, understanding and interpreting objects, events and places, and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can interpret. The importance of character and personality is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. Our aim is to be serious yet playful, passionate and ruthlessly experimental – always pushing the boundaries of possible realities. Year 1 aims to teach students to learn how to draw a thing and how to draw an idea. Thinking through drawing and drawing through making become the primary tools for students in a highly experimental environment. A series of diverse exercises and a group installation project lead up to an individual small building project sited in London. The students started the year in Greenwich, where each was allocated an eight-metre-long slice of the river edge. The students were asked to inhabit the place by drawing its visible and invisible qualities; they described things (river wall and beach) in drawings. Drawing the invisible qualities taught them how to find a way to express a personal sense of the place which surpasses the conventions of architectural drawing. The second project was a group installation where eight groups were situated in historic locations at the Old Royal Naval College at Greenwich. Under the theme ‘longing’ and ‘belonging’, the students explored ways of adjusting a given place, a dialogue was developed between the external beach sites and the internal character and stories of the rooms. It introduced thinking through making and provided the process of design as a collaborative experience. The theme of belonging to a place is constantly in dialogue with longing for another place, a memory or an idea. On a fieldtrip to Paris the students experienced the magic of exploring a city through its buildings, parks, museums, streets, food and air. The final project was to design a small building on the river sites that were surveyed at the beginning of the year. Each student pursed ideas of inhabitation of the river edge in relation to a process of making. Together, the projects form a collective proposal of inhabiting that stretch of the river edge in Greenwich. The life of our first year students is a continuous process of testing, questioning, rethinking and visually communicating a series of design explorations, as part of a studio culture, a community and the city of London. It is a journey of learning skills and knowledge that give students the tools to think, experiment, make lots of mistakes, celebrate their failures and, finally, have fun designing. In this sense we encourage research as the creation of knowledge through discovery.


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Students Ella Adu, Nour Al Ahmad, Aya Ataya, Kelly Au, Nur (Sabrina) Azman, Gabriel Beard, Natasha Blows, Freya Bolton, Ella Caldicott, Alexandra Campbell, Jun Chan, Seowon (Sharon) Chang, Jade Chao, Lier Chen, Yihan (Zara) Chen, Nikhil (Isaac) Cherian, Hoh Gun Choi, Se (Elva) Choi, Wai (Tiffany) Chong, Lap (Justin) Chow, Krina Christopoulou, Nicholas Chrysostomou, Wai (Thomas) Chu, Wing (Melody) Chu, Peter Davies, Alex Desov, Ashleigh-Paige Fielding, Christina Garbi, Rupinder Gidar, Ela Gok, Christopher Grennan, Samuel Grice, Morgan Hamel De Monchenault, Arthur Harmsworth, Zeng Wei (Glen) Heng, James Hepper, Janis Yip Mun Ho, Qi (Nichole) Ho, Joanna Hobbs, Clementine Holden, Kaizer Hud, Hanna Idziak, Nnenna Itanyi, Hanadi Izzuddin, Georgia Jaeckle, Ziyu Jiang, Harry Johnson, Olga Karchevska, Jaejun Kim, Carmen Kong, Aleksandra Kugacka, Chess Lam, Ka Law, Rachel Lee, Valeriya Lepnikova, Tung (Sardonna) Leung, Hannah Lewis, Yidong (Isabel) Li, Alvin Lim, Minghan (Tom) Lin, Shi Ling, Yeung (Jimmy) Liu, Elissavet Manou, Simina Marin, Margarita Marsheva, Dustin May, Divesh Mayarmani, Oliver Mitchell, Jun Mo, Hoi (Aikawa) Mok, Carolina Mondragon-Bayarri, Holly Moore, Rosie Murphy, Elliot Nash, Rory Noble-Turner, Edie Parfitt, Gabriel Pavlides, Harry Pizzey, Daniel Pope, Samuel Price, Elena Real-Davies, Sam Rix, Felix Sagar, Luke Sanders, Edward Sear, Niraj Shah, Jack Spence, William Stephens, Sarmad Suhail, Zhi (Ryan) Sun, Zhi (Zoe) Tam, Karina Tang, Connie Tang Koon Cheong, Emily Thomas, Ryan Walsh, Claudia Walton, Chun (Heison) Wong, Ching (Cherie) Wong, Ella Wragg, Fan (Lisa) Wu, Yu (Amy) Wu, Ke Yang, Qiming (Douglas) Yang, Hyun (Kevin) Yoon, Fan (Jenny) Zhou, Ziyuan (Oliver) Zhu


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Figs. Y1.1 – Y1.9 ‘The Greenwich Instruments’, ORNC, December 2015 Fig. Y1.1 Studio 1: Ella Adu, Jun Chan, Jade Chao, Nicholas Chrysostomou, Samuel Grice, Kaizer Hud, Olga Karchevska, Simina Marin, Elliot Nash, Ryan Walsh, Ching (Cherie) Wong, Chun (Heison) Wong, ‘The Dome’. A triptych of acoustic reflectors amplifies and redirects sounds belonging to the Greenwich coast linking three floors in the dome of Wren’s iconic Old Royal Naval College. Fig. Y1.2 Studio 6: Freya Bolton, Tiffany Chong, Christina Garbi, Zeng Wei (Glen) Heng, Hannadi Izzuddin, Chess Lam, Oliver Mitchell, Harry Pizzey, Luke Sanders, Zhi (Zoe) Tam, Hyun (Kevin) Yoon, Jun Mo, ‘Admiral’s House’. At the Greenwich beach site the primary interest was how the tide hides and reveals the beach. The installation was designed to flood the room with light and movement by

creating a machine. The machine was a kind of baroque theatre piece, that created a notion of the room being flooded with water. Fig. Y1.3 Studio 7: Kelly Au, Ella Caldicott, Lap (Justin) Chow, Rupinder Gidar, Qu (Nichole) Ho, Georgia Jaeckle, Ka Law, Yeung (Jimmy) Liu, Holly Moore, Daniel Pope, Karina Tang, Fan (Jenny) Zhou, ‘Admiral’s House’. 3D scan. This installation exists upon a threshold, negotiating the worlds inside and outside the wall. Fragments of a body held in a frame lie motionless in the window as an echo of a previous presence. Longing for the seas beyond, the visitor is drawn towards the light, they soon find themselves inhabiting this structure which lifts the body, slowly revealing the views outside. Fig. 4 Studio 6: ‘Admiral’s House’. Fig. Y1.5 Studio 2: Nour Al Ahmad, Seowon (Sharon) Chang, Wai (Thomas) Chu, Nikhil (Isaac) Cherian, Arthur

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Harmsworth, Nnenna Itanyi, Valeriya Lepnikova, Margarita Marsheva, Sam Rix, Felix Sagar, Claudia Walton, Yu (Amy) Wu ‘The Crypt’. 3D scan. The journey of pieces of chocolate found on the river edge in Greenwich from the yard level where the steam box was placed onto the wooden baskets that sit inside the crypt. This performance reveals hidden connections of commerce, transportation and belonging between the present and the past of Greenwich.

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Fig. Y1.6 Studio 3: Aya Ataya, Yihan (Zara) Chen, Hoh Gun Choi, Wing (Melody) Chu, James Hepper, Ziyu Jiang, Yidong (Isabel) Li, Hoi (Aikawa) Mok, Imogen Newton, William Stephens, Fan (Lisa) Wu, Edward Sear, Tung (Sardonna) Leung, ‘The Skittle Alley’. Drawing by Edward Sear. This kinetic piece draws on the atmosphere, energy, motion and history of the now still skittle alley. Fig. Y1.7 Studio 4: Gabriel Beard, Lier Chen, Peter Davies, Alex Desov, Joanna Hobbs, Carmen Kong, Hannah Lewis, Alvin Lim, Carolina Mondragon-Bayarri, Niraj Shah, Sarmad Suhail, Rory Turner, Ke Yang, ‘The Skittle Alley’. The installation uses the vibrations caused by the balls rolling on the skittle alley to produce a drawing and a piece of music through a series of three instruments: the seismograph, the gramophone and the chalk tower.

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making a cup of tea. This act operates as a sequential negotiation of balance, sightlines and the flow of liquid over the abstracted and overlaid landscapes of Greenwich and the tea table.

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Fig. Y1.8 Studio 8: Nur (Sabrina) Azman, Alexandra Campbell, Krina Christopoulou, Ela Gok, Christopher Grennan, Janice Ho, Harry Johnson, Rachel Lee, Elissavet Manou, Rosie Murphy, Sam Price, Connie Tang, Emily Thomas, Ziyuan (Oliver) Zhu, ‘Admiral’s House’. A spectator positions her jaw in a neck rest and by moving forward she sets in motion a set of cinematic dolly zoom wings that rotate while the mechanically linked but obscured world behind the wings unfolds an orrery of building sites. Fig. Y1.9 Studio 5: Natasha Blows, Se (Elva) Choi, Ashleigh-Paige Fielding, Morgan Hamel de Monchenault, Clementine Holden, Aleksandra Kugacka, Minghan (Tom) Lin, Dustin May, Edie Parfitt, Gabriel Pavlides, Jack Spence, Zhi (Ryan) Sun, Qiming (Douglas) Yang, ‘Admiral’s House’. Performative work, where two people enact the ritual of

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BSc Architecture Year 1

Fig. Y1.10 Janis Yip Mun Ho ‘Skeleton Armature: Bicycle Builder’. Image capturing the process of modelmaking for the building project. Fig. Y1.11 James Hepper House for a bootlegger distillery, in the guise of a custom acoustic guitar maker. The secret distillery is concealed within and between the interlocking spaces. The illicit production is ambiguously suggested to a visitor yet never fully revealed. Design, material, and light studies on the scheme. Fig. Y1.12 Jaejun Kim ‘Percussion Maker’s House’. Image of the final model revealing the back entrance view of the percussion workshop, where you can experience the interior spaces and the materiality of the building. Fig. Y1.13 Harry Pizzey ‘House for an Automaton Maker’. A 1:50 section showing the relation of the house with the river during high tide.

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Fig. Y1.14 Simina Marin ‘The Place of Redefining Horizon’. building. Upon leaving after surgery, the patient is led out with Sectional model describing the two experiences: the sunlight becoming gradually stronger and more present in the inhabitants’ and the visitors’. Fig. Y1.15 Daniel Pope ‘House for building. a Catgut Stringmaker’. The South-facing elevation highlights how 20-metre lengths of raw sheep intestine connect the string stretching platform to shutters which close slowly as raw intestines are converted into violin strings. A musical bridge bridges the gap between the Thames Path and the entrance to the building inside the river wall. Fig. Y1.16 Arthur Harmsworth ‘Tea House’. A 1:100 model of the second form of the final design detailing materiality and elements. Fig. Y1.17 Shi Ling ‘House for an Eye Surgeon’s Clinic’. The project deals with the sensory aspects of having a poor sight and regaining it again. Tactilities on walls and floor guiding the patient in the

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Fig. Y1.18 Edward Sear ‘House for a Drum Collector’. Section 1:50 showing the final scheme of the building and moments of its inhabitation. Fig. Y1.19 Jaejun Kim ‘Percussion Maker’s House’. An image of the final 1:50 model (in elevation) showing the relationship with the river. The house creates sounds as the building moves in relation to the tide levels. Fig. Y1.20 Yeung (Jimmy) Liu ‘Greenwich Beach Site Survey’. A 1:20 plan of the river edge revealing layers of materials and light. Fig. Y1.21 Ziyuan (Oliver) Zhu ‘Mapping Spaces between the Real and the Imaginary’. The building façade provides opportunity for people to imagine the occupation of the interior spaces.

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2014

Homing In: The First Year in Architecture Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


Year 1

Homing In: The First Year in Architecture Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber

Special thanks to: Abi Abdolwahabi, Richard Beckett, Bim Burton, Emmanuel Vercruysse and Nick Westby from The Bartlett Workshop, and to Rachel Antonio, Danielle Hodgson and Afra van‘t Land

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

Thanks to Carol Swords, James Willis, and all the staff of Sir John Soane’s Museum and Pitzhanger Manor Year 1 Staff: Dimitri Argyros, Tim Barwell, Charlotte Bocci, Mary Duggan, Elie Lakin, Lucy Leonard, Brian O’Reilly, Sara Shafiei, Matt Springett Architectural Media Studies Tutor: Joel Cady

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The Bartlett’s BSc degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture and design from the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and is taught to the year as a whole. Students learn to observe, draw, model and design through a series of creative tasks, before embarking on an individual small building project sited in the context of London. The main intention of the first year at The Bartlett is to explore ‘ways of seeing’ – understanding and interpreting objects, events and places, and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen qualities of things and places. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can interpret. The importance of character and personality is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. A number of recording techniques are used as a way of clarifying the subject. By being aware of the possibilities and limitations of techniques, each student learns to develop an idea for an architectural proposition critically and independently. The aim is to be serious yet playful, passionate and ruthlessly experimental – always pushing the boundaries of possible realities. The life of our first year students is a continuous process of testing, questioning, rethinking and visually communicating a series of design explorations over the course of the year as part of a studio culture, a community and the city of London. It is a journey of learning skills and knowledge that give students the tools to think, experiment, make lots of mistakes, celebrate their failures and, finally, have fun designing. Students began the year by exploring their own domestic environments through drawing and making. After this they worked in groups on an installation project in Sir John Soane’s country house, Pitzhanger Manor in Ealing. Each of the six groups created a site-specific interpretation of a member of Soane’s household. Students worked collaboratively to conceive, prototype, test and craft their 1:1 temporary installations. The individual designs explored the relationship and spaces of the Chambermaid, the Footman, the Housemaid, the Butler, the Cook and the Coachman, and their spatial relationship to the Soane family. The second term started with an expedition to Barcelona. Three spaces were explored and recorded in a travel diary. This was closely followed by a trip to Margate and Broadstairs on the Kent coast. After making a short survey exploring the history and topography of the place, each student embarked on the design of a Seasonal Hermitage for a specific site within the fabric of Margate and Broadstairs. The buildings had to accommodate a domestic and a seasonal aspect.


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Year 1 Linzi Ai, Richard Aina, Yat Au Yeung, Amelia Black, James Bradford, Hoi Chan, Bingqing Chen, Hoi Cheung, Lester Cheung, Yan Cheung, Jooyoung Cho, Maria Chodzen, Deedee Chung, Conor Clarke, Carrie Coningsby, Alessandro Conning-Rowland, Jack Cox, Charlotte Creber, Iman Datoo, Samuel Davies, Danny Dimbleby, Judy El-Hajjar, Iona Farrar-Bell, Peter Feehily, Alexander Findley, Dan Florescu, Christopher Grennan, Yangzi Guo, Melina Hadjiargyrou, Una Haran, Sarah Hollis, Ana-Maria Ilusca, Marta Jakubowska, Yufan Jin, Maria Junco, Emma Jurczynski, Klaudia Kepinska, Karolina Kielb, Jaejun Kim, Cheuk Ko, Ching Kuo, Yik Lai, Andrew Leather, Kwok Li, Yi Ning Lui, Xiao Ma, Divesh Mayaramani, Benjamin Mehigan, Liam Merrigan, Jun Mo, Iman Mohd Hadzhalie, Michael Mcadam, Adam Moqrane, Maria Moustroufi, Samuel Napleton, Xin Ng, Hoi Ngan, Maryna Omelchenko, Fola-Sade Oshinusi, Yu Pan, Achilleas Papakyriakou, Minesh Patel, Sophie Percival, Joseph Philo Powell, Calvin Po, Sze Poon, Duangkaew Protpagorn, Charles Redman, Manpreet Riat, Andrew Riddell, Bethan Ring, Samuel Rix, Joanna Rzewuska, Shona Sharma, Frederick Sheppard, Issui Shioura, Isaac Simpson, Yip Siu, Benjamin Sykes-Thompson, Sheau Tam, Nihal Tamang, Matthew Taylor, Rachael Taylor, Olufunto Thompson, Minh Tran, Tze-Chuan Tung, Hoang Vu, Fei Waller, Ngai Wang, Chun Wong, Kate Woodcock-Fowles, Ella Wragg, Xinyue Yao, Adeola Yemitan, Sum Yeung, Yuanchu Yi, York (Nerissa) Yeung, Wing Yiu, Yinong Zhang, Meng Zhao, Yehan Zheng


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Fig. Y1.1 Soane Installations on site outside Pitzhanger Manor House in Ealing in December 2013. Fig. Y1.2 ‘The Chambermaid’. The installation focuses on the link between the rhythmical repetition in Soane’s escapist morning walks to Pitzhanger Manor and the repetition inherent in his chambermaid’s tasks: scrubbing and dusting, with a particular focus on the biannual dying of the curtains yellow with turmeric. Operated through a repetitive straining action, it forces the viewer into a crouch position to glimpse the ground at floor level on the Pitzhanger façade. Fig. Y1.3 ‘The Butler’. The installation explores the role of the butler within the household, with a clear distinction between the back and the front. From the back the ‘butler’ controls what the viewer sees on the front side, guiding them through his daily routine.

Crucial also is the difference between the day, with its endless polishing, and the night-lit experience of the piece, which alludes to Soane’s obsession with entertaining his guests. Fig. Y1.4 ‘The Housemaid’. A series of frames assembled as an analogy of the serving experience of a housemaid’s daily routine in the Soane family: the opening and closing of shutters, the lighting of fires, and the whitening of the floors. Through the opening of each different frame, a sense of enclosure is created. It is a performance of the invisible hand, with shadows and silhouettes of the user reflected on frames with different symbolic treatment of materials, thicknesses and positions.

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routines fit together in perfect equilibrium of two worlds, one above and one below. Fig. Y1.7 ‘The Coachman’. This installation explores the peculiar relationship between Soane and the Coachman, focusing on the hierarchy of control between the two. The hand movements of the ‘controller’ cause the framed views of the ‘experiencer’ to change, mirroring the control that the coachman has over Soane’s environment while travelling. Looking through the viewfinder the ‘experiencer’ is shown the view of either the Coachman or Soane from their positions when arriving at Pitzhanger. Each of the suspended frames shows the thresholds visible to each. Soane has a clear view, looking straight through the building, whereas the coachman has an obstructed view with the thresholds overlapping.

BSc Architecture Year 1

Fig. Y1.5 ‘The Cook’. The installation explores the three distinct conditions of cooking, cleaning and sleeping hidden in Soane’s kitchen throughout a daily routine. Inspired by the processes of culinary preservation of the era, it is trying to capture the sensational experience of food through methods of hanging, drying and concealing. Scents are embedded in pockets to represent the effort made to mask repulsive smells; these smells longer upon the user as a live memory of Soane’s household. Fig. Y1.6 ‘The Footman’. This installation shows the paradox between the life and chores of the footman and Sir John Soane. The footman’s life, being the dark and hidden underworld, in which the dirty and menial chores must be done, and Soane being the clean and perfectly formed front shown to the public. Soane’s relentless control means these

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Fig. Y1.8 Judy El-Hajjar ‘Fossil Hunter’s House in Margate’. The building is constructed of chalk-lined concrete with timber frames housing the fossil collection. Two distinct but interweaving routes separate the public from the private areas. The collector has views to the sea to study the weather. Fig. Y1.9 Wing Yip Siu ‘A House for the Last Fisherman in Margate and his Seagulls’. Organised as a complex compact tower this dwelling is oriented to the owners fishing grounds and his boat. The project is an exploration of the enduring symbiotic relationship between fisherman and seagulls. The tower accommodates dwelling space for both, as well as a small shop for bycatch. Built from chalk-lined concrete the building will erode over time. Fig. Y1.10 Samuel Davies ‘A House in Memory of Margate’s Lost Butcher’. When a hoard

of animal bones were recently discovered buried in Margate harbour, it came to light that a Georgian butchers shop once occupied site. The architecture is drawn out of this memory, a detailed observation of anatomy and the requirements to preserve meat in two ways: one quickly over 30 days and one annually. The building envelope has been designed to catch wind and enhance the dry-curing process through enhanced airflow. Fig. Y1.11 Yunachi Yi ‘Margate Tailor’s Residence’. The building is located within a terrace of historical shop buildings facing the sea. A tailor shop, a dwelling and a studio fills the narrow site and connects the rear street to the promenade. The building is constructed of timber beams and columns forming a matrix with a threadlike sewn cladding forming a rain- and sun-screen.

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Fig. Y1.12 – Y1.13 Ching Kuo ‘The Fisherman’s House’. The Fisherman’s House in Broadstairs is a dwelling that doubles as a kiosk for the preparation, cooking and selling of the season’s bycatch fish. Studies into the filleting of fish have led to the development of a series of vertical slices and folds that act as primary structural steel fixed back into the cliff. Within these frames a secondary timber structure is hung. These house the main accommodation. The photos show a series of development models used to explore the structure and define the inhabited spaces. Fig. Y1.14 Issui Shihora ‘A House for a Rain Collector’. The project weaves a series of spaces for living with notions of how to collect and celebrate water through large-scale models exploring themes such as lighting and materiality. The private sequence of spaces are arranged at

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the core of the building while the public can occupy the ground and the roof. Both public and private are able to experience a sequence of spaces centred around the theme of water. Fig. Y1.15 Achilleas Papakyriakou ‘A House for a Beachcomber’. The project is driven by a journey both for the public but also for the owner who is a beachcomber. A defined route which begins on the beach as a series of fragmented workbenches wraps around the site. Views from neighbouring buildings as well as the accommodation are carved out of this route. A structural wall houses the collection as well as the living and working spaces and connects the beach to the promenade above.


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Fig. Y1.16 – Y1.17 York (Nerissa) Yeung ‘The Backyard Handyman of Margate’. The design responds to the context and the relationship of the site to the surrounding context. The building is a house and a workshop for a handyman. The form and materiality are driven by connections to neighbouring buildings in which the handyman works as well as exploring how to store objects and tools within the walls of the house. The project creates a series of visual and physical connections to it’s ultimate and wider context. Fig. Y1.18 Sophie Percival ‘A House for a Cleaner and a Landscape for the Beach Visitor’. The project explores the notion of how bamboo can naturally clean dirty water which regularly floods the site at high tide. The building is nestled within three walls of concrete and bamboo. The private accommodation braces between the

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walls while the ground floor provides a series of lockers, paddling pools and showers for the visitors of the beach. These spaces are carved out of the walls and the newly created landscape on the ground floor.


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2013

In Transit: A Journey in the Life of Year 1 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


Year 1

In Transit: A Journey in the Life of Year 1 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber The Bartlett’s BSc degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture and design from the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and is taught to the year as a whole. Students learn to observe, draw, model and design through a series of creative tasks, before embarking on an individual small building project sited in the context of London.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

The main intention of the first year at The Bartlett is to explore ‘ways of seeing’ – understanding and interpreting objects, events and places, and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and absurd qualities of things and places. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can personally interpret. The importance of character and personality is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. A number of recording techniques are used as a way of clarifying the subject rather than as purely graphic representation. Through being aware of the possibilities and limitations of various techniques, each student learns to express, and then develop critically and appropriately through their own intuition, an idea for an architectural proposition. Architecture is explored individually through cultivating ideas, exploring imagination and nurturing curiosity. Students explore, describe and communicate their ideas through a range of two- and three- dimensional techniques. The aim is to be serious, passionate and ruthlessly experimental – always pushing the boundaries of possible realities.  Being open and naïve in their working method, students are encouraged to take risks. Not being afraid of making mistakes forms the basis of the approach: a mistake can often form the basis of a new idea, a different way to see the world. It is the path to new possible architectures. 32

The life of our first year students is a continuous process of testing, questioning, rethinking and visually communicating a series of design explorations over the course of the year as part of a studio culture, a community and the city of London. It is a journey of learning skills and knowledge that give students the tools to think, experiment, make lots of mistakes, celebrate their failures and finally have fun designing. Students started the year by exploring the condition of being in transit, having just arrived in London and at University. They questioned this notion by designing and fabricating a London ‘suit’ that addresses the new experiences whilst remembering their past. After this they worked in groups on an installation project in Sir John Soane’s Country House, Pitzhanger Manor in Ealing. Each of the six groups adjusted the given spaces through the installation of a site-specific interpretation of a suitcase. The process of designing was a collaborative experience, where students worked in groups to conceive, prototype, test and craft their 1:1 temporary installations. Their designs considered Soane in transit, his life as a journey through the museum, his journeys to and fro between his two houses and the journeys of his artefacts. In the second term the whole year group explored Genoa through surveying. Dissecting a very specific set of locations through sectional drawings revealed qualities of the place. From February onwards each student was asked to first gain an understanding of the wider urban context of Camden, as an inbetween place, a place of transit and a place in transit. Students were subsequently asked to reimagine the lodging house for present day Camden, react against its seedy past and design a place that provides generous, engaging, uplifting spaces of temporary and permanent inhabitation.


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Special thanks to: Abi Abdolwahabi, Bim Burton, Nick Westby, Martin Watmough and Richard Beckett from the Bartlett Workshop, and to Danielle Hodgson, Afra van ‘t Land, Rachel Antonio, Patrick Laing. Thanks to Carol Swords, Beth Walker, James Willis, and all the staff of Sir John Soane’s Museum and Pitzhanger Manor.

Prichard, Louise Rymell, Soma Sato, Francesca Savvides, Laura Skudder, Anastasia Stan, Emilio Sullivan, Sophie Tait, Sheau (Amanda) Tam, Yu (Nicole) Teh, Minh Tran, Shi (Kiki) Tu, Laszlo Von Dohnanyi, Astrid Von Heideken, Valerie Vyvial, Zhi (Ernest) Wang, Angus Whitehead, Allegra Willder, Cara Williams, Priscilla Wong, Sammy Yeung, Yuanchu Yi

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Year 1 Staff Tim Barwell, Margaret Bursa, Johan Hybschman, Lucy Leonard, Brian O’Reilly, Sara Shafiei, Matt Springett, Nikolas Travasaros Architectural Media Studies Tutor: Joel Cady BASc – Architectural Media Studies Tutor: Dimitri Argyros Year 1 Kamola Askarova, Annecy Attlee, Florence Bassa, William Bellamy, Flavian Berar, Uday Berry, Hoi (Christy) Chan, Nicola Chan, Yee Ki (Kiki) Chan, Hsiao (Cindy) Chen, Pui Choi, Boon Yik Chung, Oliver Colman, Samuel Coulton, Douglas Croll, Thomas Cubitt, Naomi De Barr, Christophe Dembinski, Danny Dimbleby, Patrick Dobson-Perez, Kat Feltwell, Lucca Ferrarese, Grace Fletcher, Kelly Frank, Vincent Fung, Egmontas Gerasimovas, Ren-Zhi Goh, Jarrell Ye Lone Goh, Cheng Guo, Yangzi (Cherry) Guo, Alice Hardy, Francis Hardy, Katja Hasenauer, Sarah Hindle, Hilda Hiong, Jun (Michelle) Ho, Jessica Hodgson, Tae (Freddie) Hong, Patrick Horne, Cheung (Ivan) Hung, Lubna Ibrahim, Aqsa Iftikhar, Angus Iles, Niema Jafari, Niki-Marie Jansson, Rikard Kahn, Mouna Kalla-Sacranie, Lee Kelemen, Dina Khaki, Richard (Will) Kirkby, Subin Koo, Nikolas Kourtis, Clarence Ku, Kaela Kwan, Yiki Liong, Daniel Little, Wenya Liu, Yangyang Liu, Kin (Glynnis) Lui, Jonah Luswata, Alan Ma, Sonia Magdziarz, Michael Mcadam, Zi (Kevin) Meng, Douglas Miller, MateiAlexandru Mitrache, Masahiro Nakamura, Robert Newcombe, Morenike Onajide, Max Palmer, Oliver Parkinson, Tobias Petyt, Sylwia Poltorak, Rosa 33


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Fig. Y1.1 – Y1.3 Mrs Soane’s Gloves. The installation responds to the etiquette of being greeted and admitted into Pitzhanger Manor. It is formed of two connected parts, so that when a visitor signs in using the sliding pencil at the stand by the door the gesture is translated into a unique movement by the pendulum at the reception desk. As gloves become unique to their owner over time, our installation allows each visitor to initiate a personal show that reflects the grand nature of Mr Soane, his wife and his house.

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addresses this tactile curiosity through a set of four fragments unpacked around Soane’s bedroom at Pitzhanger Manor. These pieces enable the visitor to inhabit the room through touch, by performing the everyday actions of opening a door, a window, a drawer, and by resting their head on the bed.

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Fig. Y1.4 Visitors Card Holder. The installation seeks to capture the movement of visitors entering the grounds of Pitzhanger Manor to produce a display based upon the traditional visitors card communication system. Three delicate arms register visitors as they pass through the pedestrian gate to Pitzhanger Manor. This movement causes folding in the faceted panel on the vehicle side of the gate. The visitor experiences a detachment from the visual message, similar to the delay associated with the posting of a traditional calling card. Fig. Y1.5 Sarcophagus. The Sarcophagus acts as the focal point of the Sir John Soane’d Museum, drawing you through the building on a journey of Soane’s collection in order to reach it. However, this experience is ultimately unfulfilled, as once you reach the sarcophagus you cannot touch it. The installation

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Fig.Y1.6 – Y1.7 Empty Pistol Case: The installation is inspired by the empty case that once displayed a 19th century pistol that was stolen from the Sir John Soane’s Museum in 1969. It responded to the missing artefact by analysing the etiquette of a pistol duel and interpreting this ritual in the act of unfolding two opposing ‘suitcases’ within the space of the library. This unpacking follows a pre-defined choreography that is set out through a language brass inlays.

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Fig. Y1.8 Model Temple of Vesta. The Temple of Vesta was centred around a sacred fire that had to be kept alight constantly. The installation responds to the idea of tending a fire, by picking up air currents created by visitors’ breath and movement. A series of finely balanced sails are placed in the breakfast room so that under certain conditions, the sails rotate, each sail fitting and just clearing the next one so that the gust is transferred across the room to the hearth.


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Fig. Y1.9 Thomas Cubitt, Camden Lock Allotments Lodging House. Fig. Y1.10 Jarrell Ye Lone Goh, Inverness Street Writer’s Lodge. Fig. Y1.11 Zi (Kevin) Meng, The Boater’s Lodging House. Fig. Y1.12 Jun (Michelle) Ho, Sliding Lodging House, Buck Street.

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Fig. Y1.13 – Y1.16 Cara Williams, Magician’s Lodging House. The lodging house is a magician’s trick, rebuilding the façade of No. 50 Hawley Street, a lone terrace house found by the discovery of a photograph of the street taken in 1972. The lodgers unknowingly share the house with the magician, apart from when they catch brief glimpses of him and the secret garden through a sequence of windows. The only way to understand the magician’s trick is to sit on the bench next to the lamppost facing the site: from here the lodger’s inhabitation and a glimpse of the magician’s secret stage is revealed.

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2012 Annex to The Bartlett Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


Year 1

ANNEX TO THE BARTLETT Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber

Year 1 Staff: Tim Barwell, Margaret Bursa, Johan Hybschman, Lucy Leonard, Brian O’Reilly, Sara Shafiei, Matt Springett, Nikolas Travasaros

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The Bartlett’s BSc degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture and design from the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and is taught to the year as a whole. Students learn to observe, draw, model and design, through a series of creative tasks before embarking on an individual small building project sited in the context of London.

B A RT LET T 2012

The main intention of the first year at the Bartlett is to explore ‘ways of seeing’ - understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and ‘absurd’ qualities of things and places. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can personally interpret. The importance of ‘character’ and ‘personality’ is emphasised throughout the design process whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. A number of recording techniques are used as a way of clarifying the subject rather than as purely graphic representation. Through being aware of the possibilities and limitations of various techniques, each student is learning to express and then develop critically and appropriately, through their own intuition, an idea for an architectural proposition. In the first year architecture is explored individually through cultivating ideas, exploring imagination and nurturing curiosity. Students explore, describe and communicate their ideas through a range of two- and threedimensional techniques. The aim is to be serious, passionate and ruthlessly experimental - always pushing the boundaries of possible realities. Being open and naïve in their working method, students are encouraged to take risks - not being afraid of making mistakes is forming the basis of the approach as they often form the basis of a new idea, a different way to see the world around them. It is the path to new possible architectures. Students started the year by exploring ideas around the term ‘Annex’. Through a series of iterations they designed a device that allowed them to annex themselves to a specific location or situation in London. After this they worked in groups on an installation project in Sir John Soane’s Country House Pitzhanger Manor in Ealing. Each of the six groups explored the space through the installation of a site-specific interpretation of a piece of furniture (chair, table, wardrobe, chest, desk and bed) and a building material (brick, glass, wood, brass, lead, stone). In term 2 the whole year explored Istanbul through surveying and interpretation. A ‘Section’ though a very specific location was chosen as the vehicle to narrate their findings.


The buildings ranged from a local Herb Library, a Natural Dye Library, a Puppet Library and Theatre, a Library for Botanical Illustrations specific to the site, to a strategic building starting the reforestation of the fields over the next 100 years.

— page 33 — B A RT LET T 2012

Year 1 Students: Nadira Amrani, Alexandria Anderson, Charlotte Archer, Laurence Blackwell-Thale, Matthew Bovingdon-Downe, Daryl Brown, Tom Budd, Max Butler, Amanda Campbell, Supichaya Chaisiriroj, Joyce (Xi Yao) Chen, Muzhi Chen, Yvonne Cheng, Harry Clover, Marcus Cole, Emma Colthurst, George Courtauld, Douglas Croll, John Cruwys, Clare Dallimore, Christophe Dembinski, Rufus Edmondson, Alexandra Edwards, Chloe Ellis, Katharine Feltwell, David Flook, Robin (Ruochong) Fu, Christian Georcelin, Robin (Xiang) Gu, Claire Haugh, Jamie Hignett, Konrad Holtsmark, Olivia Hornby, Casper Horton-Kitchlew, Mouna Kalia-Sacranie, Ysabel Kaye, Dina Khaki, Emma (Fong Yi) Khoo, Jaemin Kim, Min (Minkyoung) Kim, Suhee Kim, Will Kirkby, Karen Ko, Tomiris Kupzhassarova, Greg (Gregorios) Kythreotis, Paalan Lakhani, Maggie Lan, Shirley Lee Mei Ying, Perry (Wenhao) Li, Lichao Liu, Frances (Lingzhe) Lu, Lisa McDanell, Smiti Mittal, Ian Ng, Huynh Nguyen, Qianwen Ou, Nic (Cheol-Young) Park, Bethany Penman, Catherine Penn, Abigail Portus, Emily Priest, George Proud, Cassidy Reid, Louise Rymell, Ellie Sampson, Jack Sardeson, Akil Scafe-Smith, Claire Seager, Saskia Selwood, Rose Shaw, Laura Skeggs, Elin Soderberg, Sarah Stone, Chris Straessle, Carolyn Tam, Sam Tan, Benedict Tay, Ivo Tedbury, Joshua Toh, Joe Travers-Jones, Hei Man (Isabelle) Tung, Daisy Ursell, Marie Walker-Smith, Aviva (Yiren) Wang, Jessica Wang, Angus Whitehead, Timmy Whitehouse, Simon Wimble, Carolyn Wong, Max Worrell, Andrew Yap, Park Hin Yeung, Angel (Anqi) Yu

B Sc Arch Year 1

From February onwards each student was asked to develop and design a building sited in London Fields in East London. Interpreting the idea of a ‘Library’ each student developed an annex to the existing site. Students investigated the local site, history and culture; translating and incorporating these ‘findings’ into their ideas and building designs. A profound understanding of the ‘site’ and the magic of the place formed the basis for the work.


Fig. Y1.1 Small drawing room/chest/lead. Both lead, the material, and a chest, as a furnishing, have qualities that extend further than their physical presence. The installation attempted to convey the subtlety of these while manipulating the viewer into engaging with the room in a new way. Through its uses, lead conveys a strong sense of curiosity and balance — it is polished and attractive, yet toxic. The chest is an object linked with protection as you lock away your possessions in order to keep them from harm. The lock thus becomes paramount to create this security, and the piece can be seen as a device you must engage with in order to disclose the room’s history that might otherwise be overlooked. Due to a natural curiosity to participate with the new, visitors

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interact with the piece, moving handles to attempt to align and understand its workings. Through changing the focal lines that run through the slides, the observer is influenced into appreciating the small, often mundane details of the room that although may seem insignificant actually tell the rich story of inhabitation in the space.


Fig. Y1.2 — Y1.3 While there is a sense of deliberate orientation, it is contradicted by the ability to personally navigate your view to a partial degree. The installation was fundamentally pivoted between the many interrelating halves that seem to be opposed to each other yet actually rely on their conflicting elements in order to retain balance; be it physical, theoretical or aesthetic. Fig. Y1.4 The device is a tool to allowed the viewer to involve themselves with a room that may seem bare and lifeless at first. Having interacted with the piece, the participant is encouraged to explore the room without the limitations of the apparatus, thus directly understanding the space through personal interaction with it.

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Fig. Y1.5 Upper drawing room/chair/brick. The response to the upper drawing room involved elevating the participant, allowing them to see over the recently added roof, to the landscape that Soane and his guests would have seen. Alongside these visual ties, the rising seat encouraged visitors to interact with one another, provoking social interaction within the room. The visual focus is the Cedar of Lebanon, which can be seen through the window. It is estimated to be three hundred years old, making it an unchanged feature from Soane’s time in the house. Due to a series of extensions that occurred at Pitzhanger, the current roof hinders present visitors from indulging in Soane’s garden and consequently this installation was tailored to raising a seated guest to a height that will enabled them to view the tree. The

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elevation of the person, physically allowed them to see over the roof that is indicative of the present day and the time that has passed and to see the tree that Soane would have seen, allowing the participant to experientially travel back in time. The aesthetic of the ramps refer to the repetitive nature of the brick and this was expressed through the repeated parallel planks. This slating technique, reminiscent of the positive and negative spaces linked to bricks and mortar were also referenced in the design of the seat.


Fig. Y1.6 Library/bed/brass. This installation was set in Soane’s old Library, where he and his wife used to sit reading, sewing and socialising by the large window. Given the brief of a brass bed, the piece incorporated aspects of Soane’s character and architectural intentions. There are similarities between dreams in a state of sleep and of losing yourself in a fictional dream whilst reading. Soane would often fantasise and create imaginary situations, drawing his architectural designs as ruins in the future. Manipulation and the turning through layers of history and book pages transports you to another world in a similar way to falling asleep. Soane believed the use of light to be a key element of architecture, and incorporated many convex, concave and large flat mirrors into his rooms to reflect and create infinite fantastical effects. There is a

process of transition from awake to sleep, passing through the point of control to lack of control; the tipping point of balance to imbalance. This installation was designed to take you on this journey, from an awake state in the lit room to an enveloped dream-like space, distorting and intensifying the light directly as you fall further into the dream. This effect was achieved by standing on the two footplates, holding the handles and leaning forwards falling into the ‘dream state’.

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Fig. Y1.7 Monks dining room/desk/stone. The installation explored the moment of inspiration that can occur whilst seated at a desk. In conjunction with this it investigates the ideas of erosion and change. As the ‘desk’ is used, the view is altered, and specific areas are either framed or blocked from view. The process involved in this erodes the base of the installation. The piece was inspired by the story behind the Monk’s Dining Room. Soane created the character of Padre Giovanni or ‘Monk’ the guardian of the ‘ruins’ in his garden. As pieces of the ruins fell into disrepair the monk would collect them and bring them into the monk’s dining room in order to repair and archive them. In reality the room was used to store Soane’s various artifacts, such as his fragmented casts of ruins. Inspired by its surroundings the installation was intended

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to archive and document it’s own ruin over time. The movement of the arm and body piece wears away at the base below, and the channels are designed to collect the dust that forms. In order to study the moment of inspiration the installation focused on the window, and the idea that inspiration comes from both the exterior and the self. In this it was imagined the ‘Monk’ observing the ruins through the window.


Fig. Y1.8 Stairwell/wardrobe/wood. This installation was set out to capture the choreography of using a wardrobe to create a response, which would influence the views of another user of the device. This began through the research into the internal pockets of space within a wardrobe and the affect of exterior light; creating shafts and barriers within the casing. Tests were made using wood through Japanese joinery, along with hand made paper and examining the materiality of natural fragmentations. The group wanted to recreate the changing depths of a wardrobe; the transitions of light that occur within it and that were so significant to Soane’s internal architecture. The device had resistance between itself and the user; creating a depth through the movement of fragments that corresponded with

using a wardrobe. From below, it immersed the user through a dialogue of movements in Soane’s stairwell. These subsequently influenced the path of views for the upper user; possibly even withdrawing the views from their control. This project set out to create a unique experience that highlights the features of the stairwell as Soane intended, whilst also allowing viewpoints to be manipulated from the basement of the stairwell. At this level glimpses through casted fragments revealed shafts of light from the above skylight; creating a series of views obscured by the pockets within the structured frame.

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Fig. Y1.9 Breakfast room/table/glass. Described as the most sombre room in Pitzhanger Manor, the Breakfast Room can be interpreted as a space of contemplation and solitude. The group’s initial experiments explored the concept of the table as a divider between the shared space above the table and the unknown space below the table. A glass table however, removes this division and effectively exposes the person who is seated in the space. In experiments glass was melted down, fused to other objects, crushed and encased to gain a more thorough understanding of it as a material. It was the property of transparency that was chosen. Experimenting and documenting different materials such as wax, glass wax, and salt crystals eventually led to soap as the material for the table. Through exploring the functions of a table, it became increasingly important that the

installation made reference to the fact that Soane only ever used the space for a finite amount of time. It became the intention to re-enact this fleeting moment through the use of a fragmented surface coming together when a human interacts with it. Much like Soane’s home, the surface of the table is made up of a varied collection of materials, each carefully encased in a crafted brass frame. The article that Soane blamed for his wife’s death entitled ‘Death Blows’ forms the mapping structure for the surface of the table. The use of light in the installation was intended to amplify the object within the space, creating shadows on the walls and ceiling which moved with the surfaces distorting the viewer’s perception of the space. Fig. Y1.10 Studio Space.

B Sc Arch Year 1 — page 41 — B A RT LET T 2012


2011 (Re)Making Soane Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


BS c A rc h Ye a r 1 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber, Margaret Bursa, Johan Hybschmann, Lucy Leonard, Karl Normanton, Brian O’Reilly, Gill Scampton, Nikolas Travasaros

(RE)MAKING SOANE An introduction to (an) ARCHITECTURE (School) The Bartlett’s BSc degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture and design from the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and is taught to the year as a whole. Students learn to observe, draw, model and design, through a series of creative tasks before embarking on an individual small building project sited in the context of London. The main intention of the first year at the Bartlett is to explore ‘ways of seeing’ — understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to p. 1 8

look beyond the visible into the unseen and ‘absurd’ qualities of things and places. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can personally interpret. The importance of ‘character’ and ‘personality’ is emphasised throughout the design process whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. A number of recording techniques are used as a way of clarifying the subject rather than as purely graphic representation. Through being aware of the possibilities and limitations of various techniques, each student is learning to express and then develop critically and appropriately, through their own intuition, an idea for an architectural proposition.


B S c A rc h Ye a r 1 Y1.1

In the first year architecture is explored individually through cultivating ideas, exploring imagination and nurturing curiosity. Students explore, describe and communicate their ideas through a range of two- and three- dimensional techniques. The aim is to be serious, passionate and ruthlessly experimental — always pushing the boundaries of possible realities. Being open and naïve in their working method, students are encouraged to take risks — not being afraid of making mistakes forms the basis of the approach as they often form the basis of a new idea, a different way to see the world around them. It is the path to new possible architectures. Students started their year with an initial set of projects centring on

each student’s passage to London and the adjustments made in their personal life during this transitional period. This was followed by a collective group installation set in front of Sir John Soane’s Country House Pitshanger Manor in Ealing. After that students embarked on a one-week study trip to Porto and the Douro region, exploring the social and cultural topography of the city. These projects form the basis for each student’s personal building project set around the Vauxhall area in London – the original site of Tradencant’s Ark, the first Curiosity Cabinet and museum open to the public in London.

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BS c A rc h Ye a r 1

Previous Spread: Fig. Y1.1 Year 1 Installation in front of Pitshanger Manor House in Ealing. This Spread: Fig. Y1.2 Loggia: The Alignment Cabinet. The installation links the loggia at the Sir John Soane Museum and Pitshanger Manor House. It does this by aligning certain parts towards the Museum at Lincoln’s Inn Fields. The steps and the door are directed towards the Loggia and raised by 400mm to elevate the viewer to the level of the raised ground floor of Pitshanger Manor. Fig. Y1.3 Crypt: A Soane Passage. The Crypt is a play on light and darkness, confinement and openness. Entering the space evokes feelings of confinement and anxiety. The central area is taken up by Pharaoh Seti’s sarcophargus. From here looking up feels like being immersed in Soane’s fragments with the space caving in giving you controlled glimpses

up and through the rest of the museum. Fig. Y1.4 Soane’s Dressing Room: In Sir John Soane’s dressing room, getting dressed is not necessarily the prime objective; situated behind the study, Soane’s obsession with theatre shines through. The room appears as a corridor from outside, and would have visitors believe that he emerges the perfect scholar from his study, however, when inside, the room evolves: Ceilings look like walls, skylights function like windows, and windows act as walls. Following the movements of Soane’s dressing process, the observer will see both the views seen by Soane in his same routine, and parts of Pitshanger Manor that echo Soane’s collections. Fig. Y1.5 Soane’s Study: The study in the Soane Museum is a passage with a desk; the installation is a desk with a passage. The structure is an outdoor cabinet of curiosities. The fragments inside the wall of the cabinet move to align with the facade of Pitshanger as soon as the viewer pulls

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Sir John Soane’s GHOSTS When the architect Sir John Soane died in 1837 he left his house and office to the nation. The Soane Museum in London’s Lincoln’s Inn Fields is a rich curiosity cabinet and an inspirational resource giving us an insight into the mind of one of most original British architects. It is not only a family house preserved as a museum — it represents a testing ground for the manipulation of public and private spaces, still filled with his IDEAS and his SPIRIT. Right from the p. 2 0

start Soane used the house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields as an architecture school, an office, a social venue in London, and a treasure chest holding his memories and artefacts of his travels. For the last three years the Sir John Soane Museum and Soane’s country house Pitshanger Manor in Ealing have been continuing his legacy by collaborating with the First Year Course. This year the groups followed the idea of ‘Soane’s Ghost’ through the echoing of a series of ‘rooms’ placed on the foreground of Pitshanger.


B S c A rc h Ye a r 1

out the desk to begin writing. The movements of the pen are connected to these fragments which controlled by the viewer individually turn depending on the turning of the pen. The movement of the pen is amplified by the movement of the fragments, which results in a projection of these rearranging fragments onto the facade of Pitshanger Manor.

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INSTALLATIONS – Adjusted Space Architectural ideas and qualities can’t be fully experienced solely through a set of plans, sections and elevations. They can only be fully tested and explored through the actual construction of a one-to-one space. Installations can only exist in dialogue with an existing site, a specific place or a special situation. Architects often use installations to test out new ideas. Their temporary nature offers freedom to experiment with a new understanding of space, different

uses of materials, and ultimately with the actual processes of making and crafting. Installations are not buildings as such — they should be understood as temporary structures adjusting a given place. In order to adjust a place you need to read, understand and interpret it from the social, urban, historical and cultural context. This context is the datum and reference between ideas and the crafting.

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BS c A rc h Ye a r 1 The value of MAKING When Richard Serra drew up his ‘Verb List Compilation: Actions to Relate to Oneself’ in 1967/68 he demonstrated that all objects are the result of actions on materials. A potential success of a project rests on one (or more) of these pre-determined actions: ‘to roll, to crease, to fold, to store, to bend, to shorten, to twist, to dapple, to crumple, to shave, to tear, to chip, to split, to cut, to sever, to drop, to remove, to simplify, to differ, to disarrange, to open, to mix, to splash, to knot, to spill, to droop, to flow, to curve, to lift, to inlay…’ Students joining the Year 1 course have very little past experience with real processes of making and manufacturing. They have the luxury of being naïve and unrestricted of what might be possible. Limitations are discovered and often broken rather than used as an excuse for not trying. Experimentation is at the very heart of the installation project. Right from the beginning a group of students are introduced to the idea that mind and hand should work in parallel to explore and test ideas. Architecture should not just be dreamed up on paper and put into the real world by a group of builders following a set of instructions in the form of plans, sections and elevations. In the context of our installation project students are encouraged to challenge preconceived conventions about what materials should be used and how they are appropriated. This freedom allows them to investigate and invent new possible realities instead of conforming to established real possibilities. p. 2 2

In this project students learn to get to grips with the scale of reality. They use the historical, cultural, and social as well as their own personal context as a departure point for their project. In the end it is down to the alchemy of the joy of making of things with their own hand, the learning of the necessary skills, the delight of working towards the highest possible standard of craftsmanship, and the magic of a finished piece capturing the essence of an idea. Caitlin Abbott, Nadia Arkhipkina, Robin Ashurst, Tahora Azizy, Chiara Barrett, Ben Beach, Vittorio Boccanera, Leo Boscherini, Matt Bovingdon-Downe, Hannah Bowers, Arti Braude, Zion Chan, Jacky Chan, Ziqi Chen, Qidan Chen, Joanne Chen, Melanie Cheng, Nicolas Chung, Jessica Clements, Katie Cunningham, Malina Dabrowska, Rufus Edmondson, Finbarr Fallon, Agnieszka Filipowicz, Charlie Fox, Max Friedlander, Xiang Gu, Qiuling Guan, Georgina Halabi, Han Hao, Stephen Henderson, Sonia Ho, Carl Inder, Jackey Ip, Tom James, Yu-Me Kashino, Arthur Kay, Alishe Khan, Jaemin Kim, Min Kim, Suhee Kim, Pavel Kosyrev, Vanessa Lafoy, Him Wai Lai, Yolanda Leung, Wenhao Li, Kathrine Loudoun, Matthew Lyall, Martyna Marciniak, Vasilis Marcou Ilchuk, Lauren Marshall, Huma Mohyuddin, Aiko Nakada, Phoebe Nickols, Tim O’Hare, Isabel Ogden, Qianwen Ou, Cheol-Young Park, Isobel Parnell, Chengcheng Peng, George Proud, Julia Rutkowska, Jack Sargent, Daniel Scoulding, Peter Simpson, Helen Siu, India Smith, Alexia Souvaliotis, Jasper Stevens, Josh Stevenson-Brown, Saijel Taank, James Tang, Jake Taylor, Carina Tran, Joseph Travers-Jones, Corina Tuna, Panagiotis Tzannetakis, John Wan, Henrietta Watkins, Anthony Williams, Miljun Wong, Vivian Wong, Carolyn Wong, Jamie Wong, Camilla Wright, Zhanshi Xiao, Yixian Xie, Lucy Yang, Yanhua Yao, Andrew Yap,Tung Yeung, Tae-In Yoon, Yoana Yordanova, Laura Young, Alexander Zyryaev


involved in opening out the walls, transforming the tiny gallery and revealing new, unexpected spaces. These walls move effortlessly on large, brass hinges and only one set of planes can open at any one time. The installation echoes the motion of the hinges, with the planes rotating on a central pole and locking together to restrict each other’s movement. The installation is a purely tactile experience, which contrasts with the current preservation of Soane’s collection but draws parallels with its initial intention as an interactive learning tool for his students.

B S c A rc h Ye a r 1

Fig. Y1.6 Monks Parlour: Father John, in the Parlour, with the Rope. This installation is based around the key concepts that can be observed in the Monk’s Parlour: detachment – as the room itself is the most out of context in relation to Lincolns Inn Fields, the journey from the point of entry to the Museum to the monks parlour disorientates the visitor; narrative – as Soane would invite guests down to his basement to participate in the story of the fictional monk, Padre Giovanni (Father John); and engulfment – as reality merges with the reality of the monk one becomes completely immersed in Soane’s created world. The levels of the room and the transformation of the space when the picture room doors close give a sense of being enveloped in the room. Fig. Y1.7 Picture Room – Soane’s Resting Vessel. In the Picture Room, what is more intriguing to Soane is the room itself rather than the collections of famous paintings. Soane marvelled at the engineering feats

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2010 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


BSc Architecture Year 1 Design Students: Caitlin Abbott, Madiha Ahmad, Ben Beach, Amy Begg, Taimar Birthistle-Cooke, Ophelia Blackman, Arti Braude, Zion Chan, Hoi Yi Ginny Chau, Nuozzi Lizzie Chen, Jianhuang George Chen, Melanie Cheng, Petrina Chung, Tzen Chia, Kacper Chmielewski, Yin Hui Chung, Nichola Czyz, Samuel Dodsworth, Charles Dorrance-King, Samuel Douek, Kate Edwards, Gary Edwards, Sarah Edwards, Ivie Egonmwan, Amber Fahey, Roma Gadomska-Miles, Geethica Gunarajah, Georgina Halabi, Alice Haugh, David Hawkins, Joseph Hawsworth, Dean Hedman, Ashley Hinchcliffe, Mai Hitomi, Kawai Ho, Karen Hu, Jackey Ip, Tomasz Jasinski, Elzbieta Kaleta, Yu-Me Kashino, Yoonjin Kim, Celestria Kimmins, Emma Kitley, Fergus Knox, Janice Tsz Lau, Sandy Yin Lee, Carmen Lee, Lucas Wei Ler, Yolanda Leung, Jamie Lilley, Kok Lim, Brook Ting Jui Lin, Matthew Lucraft, Sam Mcgill, Anna Lisa Mcsweeney, Harriet Middleton Baker, Huma Mohyudin, Allanah Morrill, Hui Zen Ng, Shiue Pang, Chengcheng Peng, Rachel Pickford, Seth Pimlott, Sophie Richards, Luke Scott, Pippa Shaw Carveth, Lauren Shevills, Simran Sidhu, Julian Siravo, Helen Siu, Melody Lok Siu, Kate Slattery, Richard Smith, Marcus Stockton, Saijel Taank, Jacob Taylor, Dorota Urbanska, Deniz Varol, Leonie Walker, Nicholas Warner, Angeline Wee, Tao Wei, Amalie White, Nadia Wikborg, Vivian Wai Wong, Alexander Worsfold, Tim Shou Wu, Nawanwaj Yudhanahas, Xin Zhan, Songyang Zhou, Alexander Zyryaev

The Bartlett’s BSc degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture and design from the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and students observe, draw, model and design, based in the School’s design studios and workshop, from the first week onwards. The main intention is to explore ‘ways of seeing’; understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and ‘absurd’ qualities of things. The importance of ‘character’ and personality are emphasised throughout the design process whether in analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. A number of recording techniques are used as ways of clarifying the subject rather than as purely graphic representation. Through being aware of the possibilities and limitations of various techniques, each student learns to express and then develop critically and appropriately, an intuitive idea for an architectural proposition. This year, starting with a collection of objects the students built eight installations around Pitzhanger Manor, Sir John Soane’s house in Ealing. Each of these follies was designed and built as a response to Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress. After a mapping exercise in Marseilles and the Camargue the final projects of the year were individual building interventions on several small pocket sites around Borough Market and Southwark.

Year 1 Design Directors: Frosso Pimenides & Patrick Weber Tutors: Kyle Buchanan, Margaret Bursa, Lucy Leonard, Johan Hybschman, Brian O’Reilly, Jonathan Pile, Gill Scampton, Nikolaos Travasaros


Opposite page clockwise from the top: Jamie Lilley, Ashley Hinchliffe, Yoonjin Kim and Shiue Nee Pang. Top: Building development models by Sam Douek. Bottom: Building development models by Carmen Lee.


Installations based on William Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress in Sir John Soane’s garden in Pitzhanger Manor House, Ealing. Clockwise from top left: ‘The Heir’, ‘The Levee’, ‘The Orgy’, ‘The Arrest’.


Clockwise from top: ‘The Gaming House’, ‘The Madhouse’, ‘The Prison’, ‘The Marriage’.


Top: Building project by Ashley Hinchcliffe. Bottom: Building project by Nicola Czyz.


Top: Building project by Brook Lin. Bottom: Building project by Sarah Edwards.


2009 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


BSc ArchitectureYear 1 Design Muhammad Abd Rahman, Jae Ahn, Yll Ajvazi, Rachel Antonio, Emily Arries, Charlotte Baker, Chloe Baxter, Cherry Beaumont, Kun Bi, Ophelia Blackman, Charles Blanchard, Luke Bowler, David Caldwell, Emma Carter, Jia Chen, Jianhuang Chen, Nuozzi Chen, Ran Chen, Theclalin Cheung, Tzen Chia, Oliver Collins, Marcus Cornthwaite, Conner Cunningham, Emily Doll, Charles Dorrance King, Max Dowd, Natalia Eddy, Ivie Egonmwan, Ruthie Falkner, Frank Fan, Ying Fu, Yue Gao, Naomi Gibson, Georgina Goldman, Alicia Gonzales-Lafita, Rosemary Hahn, Ryan Hakimian, David Haslam, Mai Hitomi, Aaron Ho, Jonathan Holmes, Azuki Ichihashi, Ashleigh James, Sophia Kelleher, Anja Kempa, Rachel King, Amy Kong, Maryna Kuchak, Su Jin Kwon, Wai Lam, Samson Lau, Aaron Lee, Carmen Lee, Rebecca Li, Wendy Lin, Angela Lo, Mae Ling Lokko, Frederick Lomas, Laura Low, Titi Lucas, Sheung Tang Luk, Tess Martin, Gabrielle Masefield, Nickolas Masterton, Nabi Masutomi, Ami Matsumoto, Emily Mccaul, Samuel Mcgill, James Middelton, Ekaterina Minyaeva, Shireen Mohammadi, Gary Mok, Amada Moore, Rushda Morshed, Eri Nakagawa, Sirisan Nivatvongs, Patrick O’Callaghan, Bayan Okayeva, Augsutine Ong Wing, Suet Pak, Ahmed Patel, Adam Peacock, Natalia Petkova, Rachel Pickford, Asha Pooran, Joanne Preston, Tian Qin, Muhammad Sahrum, Aimee Salata, Arub Saqib, Robert Schultes, Francesca Seal, Hongmiao Shi, Samson Simberg, Julian Siravo, Kate Slattery, Louis Sullivan, Cho-Hee Sung, Emma Swarbrick, Stanley Tan, Nada Tayeb, Jonathan Tipper, Antonia Tkachenko, William Tweddell, Fidan Uryan, Deniz Varol, Tatum Wangsatimur, Zhang Wen, Sandra Youkhana, Li Zhou

The Bartlett’s BSc Architecture degree programme aims to develop a creative, diverse and rigorous approach to architecture and design from the outset. Year 1 is centred on the design studio and is taught to the year as a whole. Students observe, draw, model and design, based in the School’s design studios and workshop from the first week onwards. The main intention is to explore ‘ways of seeing’; understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and ‘absurd’ qualities of things. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can personally interpret. The importance of ‘character’ and personality is emphasised throughout the design process whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. A number of recording techniques are used as a way of clarifying the subject rather than as purely graphic representation. Through being aware of the possibilities and limitations of various techniques, each student learns to express and then develop critically and appropriately, through their own intuition, an idea for an architectural proposition. This year Sir John Soane was at the centre of all projects. Starting with a collected object the year completed his house in Ealing, Pitzhanger Manor, with a series of furniture interventions. After a mapping project in Athens each students developed an individual building proposal along a route stretching from Broadway Market and Columbia Flower Market to Brick Lane.

Year 1 Design Directors: Frosso Pimenides and Patrick Weber Tutors: Kyle Buchanan, Lucy Leonard, Brian O’Reilly, Romed Perfler, Jonathan Pile, Juliet Quintero, Toby Smith, Nikolas Travasaros


This page and facing page: Group installations in Sir John Soanes Pitzhanger Manor House, Ealing.


This page top Molly Yue Gao, Bird Nest Soup Restaurant; bottom Tess Martin, Narrowboat Repair Workshop.


This page, top Naomi Gibson, Experimental Brewery; bottom Wendy Lin, Sari Weaving Workshop.


This page, top Naomi Gibson, Experimental Brewery; bottom Sandra Youkhana, Flower Therapy Institute.


This page clockwise from the top Naomi Gibson, Experimental Brewery; Maryna Kuchak, Knitting School; Frank Fan, Noodle Restaurant.


2008 Frosso Pimenides, Patrick Weber


BSc Year 1 Design William Armstrong, Khalid AlSugair, Nichola Barrington-Leach, Nicholas James Blomstrand, Laura Brayne, Robert Burrows, Anton Chernikov, Giulia Cerundolo, Vinicius Machado Cipriano, Pasara Chaichanavichkij, Jia Chen, Gladys Yan Yi Ching, Haeseung Choi, Joseph Dejardin, Thomas Dichmont, Nicholas Elias, Yuan Gao, Maria Goustas, Joseph Gautrey, Alicia Gonzalez-Lafita Perez, Joshua Green, Emilia Hadjikyriakou, Frances Heslop, Alexander Holloway, Eleonora Christina Hadjigeorgiou, Katherine Hatch, Yugiao He, Stanley Ho, Kate Holt, Amelia Hunter, Azuki Ichshashi, Keiichi Iwamoto, David Jones, Kar Yeung Rina Ko, Bethan Knights, Lingyi Kong, Titilope Ebun-Olu Lucas, Rebecca Lane, Ka Man Leung, Lydia Lim, Christopher Haiman Leung, Yee Yan Lau, Daniel Lane, Stefanos Levidis, Thandiwe Loewenson, Peivand Mirzaei, Chritopher Mobbs, Grace Ugo Alache Mark, Rhianon Morgan-Hatch, Claire Morgan, Sarah Martin, Shireen Mohammadi, Hyder Mohsin, Rushda Ilham Morshed, Risa Nagasaki, Mei Zhi Neoh, Laura Neil, Sabina Nobi, Bayan Okayeva, Stefano Passeri, Michael Pugh, Francesca Pringle, Simone Persadie, Matteo Imran Perretta, Joseph Paxton, Adam Peacock, Emma Roberts, Charlotte Reynolds, Rupert Rampton, Manuel Ribeiro, Lucy Rothwell, Samson Simberg, Cho-Hee Sung, Hugh Scott Moncrieff, Sang-Soo Ha, Megan Townsend, Camille Thuillier, Rebecca Thompson, Jaymar Vitangcol, Yuchen Wang, Angela Ningyi Wang, Christopher Worsfold, Max Walmsley, John Han Owen Wu, Imogen Webb, Linlin Wang, Kirsty Williams, Clarissa Yee, Emily Yan, Sandra Youkhana, Mika Zacharias, Yuan Zhao, Alexander Zhukov.

The main intention of Year 1 Design is to explore ‘ways of seeing’: understanding and interpreting objects/places/events and learning to look beyond the obvious and visible into the unseen and often ‘absurd’ qualities of things. In this way a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can interpret in a different way. The importance of ‘character’ and ‘personality’ is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. Inventiveness and imagination are cultivated through a series of design projects which tackle a range of scales and experiences and are constructed or represented through models and drawings. The year started with an analytical study of a found object and a critical mapping of a place in Bow, in East London. This was followed by a group installation set on eight sites around Bow Church each exploring the term ‘field’. A measured architectural section of a critical part of Bilbao and Hastings explored a special quality of the chosen site. These initial investigations bring together all the skills developed throughout the year. They are distilled into a building project – a Crofters Residence in Hastings. Each student works individually on his/her own program brief. These range from a fly fishing centre to a gingerbread man bakery, from a pottery to a laundrette, from a fisherman’s spa to a beach glass blowing studio, from a pine tar workshop to a dead letter office.

Year 1 Design Directors: Frosso Pimenides and Patrick Weber. Tutors: Susanne Isa, Lucy Leonard, Joe Morris, Brian O’Reilly, Jonathan Pile, Renee Searle, Toby Smith, Nikolas Travasaros

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Opposite clockwise from the top left: Anton Chernikov’s Lobster Suit; Group Installation, Bow Church, Depot/Porcelain; Stefano Passeri Hastings Rabbit Section; Khalid AlSugair, Glove. Above, clockwise from the top left: Group Installation, Three Mills: Spice/Bridge; Group Installation Alleyway, Fish/Canal.

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Clockwise from the top left: Mika Zacharias, Fisherman’s spa; Bethan Knights, Preservation centre, Stefano Passeri Fly fishing centre.

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Above clockwise from the top left: Megan Townsend, Paper making poet; Joseph Gautrey, Winery; Nick Elias, Fish smoke house.

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Top: Charlotte Reynolds, Sail making workshop. Bottom: Stanley Ho, Pottery workshop in a cliff.

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This page: Kirsty Williams, Gingerbread Man Bakery.

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2007 Frosso Pimenides


BSc Year 1 Design Leander Adrian, Zahir Ahmad, Mark Attmore, Karen Au, Aminah Babikir, Emma Bass, Janinder Bhatti, Jane Brodie, Emi Bryan, Joel Cady, Xueting Snow Cai, Keti Carapulli, Yu-Wei Chang, Ko Wei Gabriel Cheung, Joanne Clark, Jason Claxton, Olivia Crawford, Alexandra Critchley, Alisan Dockerty, Daniel Dodds, Lucinda Dye, Pooh Eamcharoenying, Kenzo Ejiri, Daryl Fitzgerald, Katie Fudge, Theo Games Petrohilos, Victor Hadjikyriacou, Alevtina Golovina, Tamsin Hanke, Ben Hayes, Kaowen Ho, Imogen Holden, Theo Jones, Sonlia Kadillari, Matilda Keane, Thomas Kendall, Joyce Lau, Paul Leader-Williams, Young Woo Lee, Hong Jin Leow, Stafanos Levides, Joanna Levy, Keong Lim, Meng Liu, Jialun Vincent Mao, Nur Md Ajib, Richard Moakes, Chiara Montgomerie, Charlotte Moon, Saturo Nakanishi, Lucy Ottwell, Byeong-Ju Park, Sungwoo David Park, Dhiren Patel, Olivia Pearson, Nicola Perret, Chi Philip Poon, Felicity Price-Smith, Isabelle Priest, Tingting Qin, Rida Qureshi, Dimple Rana, Harriet Redman, Louise Robson, Francis Roper, James Sale, Alistair Shaw, Young Song, Jack Spencer-Ashworth, Alex Sprogis, Cathrine St Hill, Claire Taggart, Martin Tang, Eryk Ulanowski, Ellen Utomo Thomas Vie, Anthony Whittaker, Rain Wu, Suyang Xu, Yan Yan, Congjing Yao, Michelle Young, Tim Yue, Jingru Zhang, Yuan Zhao.

The main intention of Year 1 Design is to explore ‘ways of seeing’: unerstanding and interpreting objects/places/events and learing to look beyond the obvious and visible into the unseen and often ‘absurd’ qualities of things. In this way a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can interpret in a different way. The importance of ‘character’ and ‘personality’ is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. Inventiveness an imagination are cultivated through a series of design projects which tackle a range of scales and experiences and are contructed or represented through models and drawings. The year started with an analytical study of and object, a critical mapping of a place along the River Fleet, and a group installation set on eight sites along its course, all of which respond to different notions of ‘receptacle’, ‘well’, basin, and ‘repository’. A measured architectural section of a critical part of Palermo explored a special quality of the chosen site. These initial investigations bring together all the skills developed throughout the year into a building project – a ‘Live – Work – Vessel’. Sited along course of the River Fleet in London this building responded to the existing condition of the site and it explores moments of the past.

Year 1 Design Director: Frosso Pimentides. Coordinator: Patrick Weber. Tutors: Luke Chandresinghe, Lucy Leonard, Brian O’Reilly, Jonathan Pile, Renee Searle, Toby Smith.


This page: Group Installations Along the River Fleet. Facing page: Analytical Studies of Objects.


This page, top: Jason Claxton; bottom: Daniel Dodds. Facing page, top: Janinder Bhatti; bottom: Louise Robson.


This page, clockwise from top: Tamsin Hanke, Kate St Hill, Rain Wu, Aminah Babikir. Facing page: Richard Moakes.


2006 Frosso Pimenides


BSc Year 1 Design Craig Allen, Carmelo Arancon, Jacob Attwood-Harris, Zahra Azizi, Aminah Babikir, Emma Bailey, Jan Balbaligo, Nicole Barcley, Alisia Bourla, Chris Burman, Kathrine Cannon, Rachel Sung Cha, Stephanie Pui Chung, Jason Claxton, Ben Dawson, Jonathan de Wind, Canzy ElGohary, Ross Fernandez, Kim Foster, Kathrine Fudge, Dalina Gashi, Kevin Green, Min Gu, James Gunn, Rachel Wanyu Guo, Chiara Hall, Daniel Hall, Ben Harriman, Kathrine Hegab, Laura Herriotts, Danielle Hodgson, Julian Huang, Michael Hughes, Alice Iu, Lewis James, Laurie Jameson, Sophia Jones, Antony Joury, Basil Jradeh, Anastasia Kaisari, Marina Karamali, Nattakorn Kointarangkul, Rina Kukaj, Anthony Lau, Daniel Lauland, Na Li, Meng Liu, Vincelt Jialun Mao, Kate Marrinan, Anna Mill, Caroline Mok, Jay Morton, Nathaniel Mosley, Chantanee Nativivat, Dos Bodin Nilkkamhaeng, Gregory Nordberg, Gordon O'Conner-Read, Alyssa Ohse, Paniz Peivandi, Marcos Polydorou, James Purkiss, Tingting Qin, Ayeza Qureshi, Justin Randle, Ned Scott, Catrina Steward, Amy Sullivan-Bodiam, Daniel Swift Gibbs, Ashmi Thapar, Richard Thebridge, Emilia Tsaoussi, Freddy Tuppen, Afra van 'T Land, Jen Wang, Gabriel Warshafsky, Joseph Wegrzyn, Christopher Wong, Ai Yamauchi, Ruofan Yao, Jung Yoon, Jennifer Young.

The main intention is to explore 'ways of seeing': understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and 'absurd' qualities of things. In this way a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can interpret. The importance of 'character' and 'personality' is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. Inventiveness and imagination are cultivated through a series of design projects which tackle a range of scales and experiences and are constructed or represented through models or drawings. These include the analytical study of an object; the critical mapping of a part of Istanbul; and a group installation in and around the main quadrangle of UCL, all of which respond to different notions of 'museum', 'theatre', 'panopticon' and 'market'. An architectural section through a key part of their installation explores a special quality of the site and the event. These initial investigations bring together all the skills developed throughout the year into a building - the 'annex' to a UCL department or society. Sited in the heart of Bloomsbury it responds to the existing condition and explores moments of density and intensity.

Year 1 Design Director: Frosso Pimenides. Coordinator: Patrick Weber. Tutors: Luke Chandresinghe, Stuart Munro, Brian O’Reilly, Jonathan Pile, Gavin Rowbotham, Matt Springett.


Opposite from top - bottom: Alyssa Ohse, Marina Karamali, Lewis James. This page: group projects in the Main Quadrangle of UCL, Museum, Theatre, Market, Panopticon.


Top: Nat Mosely. Bottom: Paniz Peivandi.


Top: Jay Morton. Bottom: Danielle Hodgson.


Top: Kathrine Hegap, Ayeza Qureshi. Bottom: Cathrina Steward, Kathrine Cannon.


Top: Craig Allen. Bottom: Daniel Hall.


2005 Frosso Pimenides


BSc Year 1 Design Aditya Aachi, Zahra Ahmad Akhoundi, Mayu Akashi, Peter Alexander, Sarah Alfraih, Silvya Aytova, Ioana Barbantan, Byron Bassington, Amanda Bate, Victoria Bateman, Beatrice Beazley, Charmian Beedie, Natalie Benes, Matthew Blaiklock, Julian Bond, Sarah Bromley, Naomi Bryden, Chris Carver, Peter Charalambous, Sheila Clarkson Valdivia, Philip Cottrell, James Crick, Sarah Custance, Alpa Depani, Rory Donald, Canzy El-Gohary, Costa Elia, Ed Farndale, Lois Farningham, Anna Field, Helen Floate, Kim Senwelo Foster, Stephanie Gallia, Thajinder Ghai, Mark Goddard, Antonia Hazlerigg Amanda Ho, Adam Holland, Momo Hoshijima, Brian Hoy, James Hughes, Jade Hutchinson, Yea Jin, Alexander Kalli, Tom Kay, Thomas King, Benjamin Kirk, Chloi Kletsa, Danielle Kudmany, Rosanna Kwok, Janice Lee, Christopher Lees, Wise Leung, Xiaojing Li, Kara Melchers, Elizabeth Mitchell, Negin Moghaddam, Tayvanie Nagendran, Emily Norman, Gordon O’Conner Read, Neil Oddie, James Palmer, Kuljinder Pank, Luzy Paton, Maxine Pringle, Tia Randall, David Rieser, Georgina Robinson, Benedetta Rogers, Luke Rowett, Savpreet Seehra, Elizabeth Shaw, Oliver Sheppard, Deena Shuhaiber, Anthony Staples, Alastair Stokes, Sarah Syed, Christopher Thompson, Spencer Treacy, Natalie Tsui, Andrew Walker, Simon Walker, Elizabeth Watts, Peter Webb, Bethany Wells, Dominic Wilson, Amy Wolfe, Saman Ziaie.

The main intention is to explore ‘ways of seeing’ – understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and ‘absurd’ qualities of things. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can personally interpret. The importance of ‘character’ and ‘personality’ is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. Inventiveness and imagination are cultivated through a series of design projects, constructed or represented through models or drawings that tackle a range of scales and experiences. These include the analytical study of an object; the critical mapping of a place; a critical survey and sectional drawing; and 12 installations along Regents Canal that respond to different notions of ‘floating’, ‘sinking’, ‘drifting’ and ‘mooring’. These initial investigations bring together all the skills developed through the year into a building, the ‘annex’. Sited along the Canal between Camden and Kings Cross it responds to an existing condition and explores the mundane character of canals in London versus the exotic character in Venice.

Year 1 Design Director: Frosso Pimenides. Coordinator: Patrick Weber. Tutors: Rhys Cannon, Dean Griffiths, Jonathan Pile, Mette Ramsgard Thompson, Gavin Rowbotham, Matt Springett, Tomas Stokke.


Opposite, clockwise from top: Saman Ziaie, Neil Oddie, Neil Oddie, Natalie Benes. This page, top: Group installations, bottom: Chris Lees.


Clockwise from top: Elizabeth Shaw, David Rieser, Deena Shuhaiber, Ed Farndale.


Clockwise from top: Ed Farndale, Sarah Custance, Deena Shuhaiber.


2004 Frosso Pimenides


Year 1 Xenia Adjoubei, Tala Akkawi, Jenna Al-Ali, Fran Alexander, Bea Beazley, Charmian Beeide, John Briggs, Pascal Bronner, Rob Brown, Josephine Callaghan, Charles Catto, Jacqueline Chak, Anabela Chan, Lik San Chan, Ronald Cheape, Barry Cho, Tammy Chow, James Church, Louise Coates, Ali Cooke, Grace Cooper, Elspeth Cornish, Phil Cottrell, Isabel Crewe, Rob Croft, Mary Dalton, Chris Day, Colomba De La Panouse, Cai-jia Eng, Olasubomi Fapohunda, Lois Farningham, Andy Friend, Veronique Geiger, Christina Gerada, Mark Goddard , Ed Greenall, Jack Gregory, Damian Groves, James Halsall, Richard Hardy, Geraldine Holland, Tsin Tee Hin, Jonathan Horsfall, Momo Hoshijima, Desmond Hung, Jan Isvarphornchai, Antony Joury, Zak Keene, Tom King, Klementyna Klocek, Elie Lakin, Ilwoo Lee, Ric Lipson, Kei Matsuda, Naomi McIntosh, Azusa Murakami, Tay Nagendran, Geri Ng, Nancy O’Brien, Gen Otsubo, Lucy Paton, Safia Qureshi, Sandesh Raj, Zurine Raper, David Rieser, Rupinder Sharma, Saana Shaikh, Oliver Simpson, Miriam Sleeman, Laura Smith, Kyna So, Alvin Tan, Rebecca Tappin, Aymee Thorne-Clarke, Alicia Tklacz, Will Trossell, Oli Udo-Udoma, Ruth Watkinson, Lukas Westcott, Abi Whitehead, Rae Whittow-Williams, Kyla Williams, Amy Wolfe, Nick Wood, Lucy Wood, Yang Yu, Zhi Zhao.

The main intention is to explore ‘ways of seeing’: understanding and interpreting objects/events/places and learning to look beyond the visible into the unseen and ‘absurd’ qualities of things. In this way, a place can also be seen as something with its own identity, which each student can personally interpret. The importance of ‘character’ and ‘personality’ is emphasised throughout the design process, whether it concerns analysis, site interpretation or architectural vision. Inventiveness and imagination are cultivated through a series of design projects, constructed or represented through models or drawings that tackle a range of scales and experiences. These include the analytical study of an object; the critical mapping of a place; 15 group ‘shelter’ constructions that respond to a particular pocket of space in Borough Market; a critical survey and sectional drawing of a fragment of Rome (field trip); and the building – ‘ante portas’. This key project of the year brings together all the skills developed through the year into a building. It is sited on the fringe of the city in Southwark and explores themes of trading, crafting, healing, feasting, debating and keeping.

Year 1 Design Director: Frosso Pimenides, Coordinator: Patrick Weber, Tutors: Peter Hasdell, Jonathan Pile, Gavin Robotham, Matthew Springett, Graeme Sutherland, Yen-Yen Teh, DoJanne Vermeulen.


Opposite, Group ‘Shelter’ installations. This page, clockwise from top left: Damian Groves, Safia Qureshi, Olasubomi Fapohunda, Veronique Geiger, Yang Yu, Nick Wood, Nick Wood, Jacqueline Chak.


Top: Andy Friend, bottom: Pascal Bronner.


Top: Safia Qureshi, bottom: Ric Lipson.


ucl.ac.uk/architecture

Bartlett Design Anthology | BSc Architecture Year 1  

This anthology showcases the work of students from The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 1) Year 1. www.ucl...

Bartlett Design Anthology | BSc Architecture Year 1  

This anthology showcases the work of students from The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 1) Year 1. www.ucl...