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MArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 2) Compiled from Bartlett Books 2005–2017


Our Design DNA At The Bartlett School of Architecture, we have been publishing annual exhibition catalogues for each of our design-based programmes for more than a decade. These catalogues, amounting to thousands of pages, illustrate the best of our students’ extraordinary work. Our new Design Anthology series brings together the annual catalogue pages for each of our renowned units, clusters, and labs, to give an overview of how their practice and research has evolved. Throughout this time some teaching partnerships have remained constant, others have changed. Students have also progressed from one programme to another. Nevertheless, the way in which design is taught and explored at The Bartlett School of Architecture is in our DNA. Now with almost 50 units, clusters and labs in the school across eight programmes, the Design Anthology series shows how we define, progress and reinvent our agendas and themes from year to year. Professor Frédéric Migayrou Chair of The Bartlett School of Architecture Professor Bob Sheil Director of The Bartlett School of Architecture


2017 The Post-Millennial Revolution Izaskun Chinchilla, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor 2016 Women And Architecture Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor 2015 Empowering the Legacy of Generation Z Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor 2014 Designing the Future: Architecture as Hypothesis vs. Hypothesis as Synthesis Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor 2013 Wood And Fire: Towards a Definition of Mild Architecture Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor 2012 Dare to Care... Through a Year Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor with Helen&Hard 2011 (In-)Water Dwelling and Some Other Clues Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor 2008 Decadence John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak 2007 Patterns John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak 2006 Tales of the Unexpected John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak 2005 Ordinary/Extraordinary John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak


The Post-Millennial Revolution Izaskun Chinchilla, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor


Unit 22

The Post-Millennial Revolution Izaskun Chinchilla, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor

Year 4 Alex Anderson, Isabelle Tung, Laurence Flint, Rufus Edmondson, Timmy Whitehouse, Xin Zhan Year 5 Georgina Halabi, Hei Tung (Whitney) Wong, Huma Mohyuddin, Jack Sargent, Kuba Tomaszczyk, Laura Young, Supichaya Chaisiriroj and Yuen Nam (Elaine) Tsang The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Thank you to: Pedro Gil, Practice Tutor, Edward Hoare, Structural Consultant, and our magnificent crit panels during the whole academic year: Fany Kostourou, Kristina Causer, Marcela Araguez, Sol Pérez Martínez, Sabine Storp, Lara Lesmes, Fredrik Hellberg, Manolis Stavrakakis, Adriana Cabello, Cristina Traba, Eduardo Camarena, Bruce Irwin, Paolo Zaide, Sean Griffiths Thank you to our field trip workshop students and tutors from UDEM, Monterrey: Francisco Javier Serrano Alanís, Ana Teresa Furber Rodríguez, Sergio Gustavo Parroquin Sansores, Daniela Martínez Chapa, Rodrigo Gastélum Garza, Hilda Marcela Cabrales Arzola, Ana Paula Treviño Martínez, Alejandra Acuña Verano, María Catalina Gómez Elizondo, Lorena Guadalupe Cavazos Muñoz. Tutors: Arne Riekstins, Abril Denise Balbuena, Carlos García González (Dean Art, Architecture and Design) Thank you to our sponsors: Luis Vidal + Architects and UDEM (Universidad de Monterrey, Mexico)

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Those born between 1982-1996 (‘millennials’), and the generations born after this, are predicted to radically reform education and working systems not only via the massive resources of online activity and new relationships they engender, but also via a more qualitative aspiration: the search for new educational and working systems that also fulfil their potential. Millennials are the first generation that no longer require an authority figure to access information – they may enjoy external stimuli 24/7, be in social contact at all times, and learn more from a portable device than from a seminar. Unit 22 has explored how this will change the spaces in which we will play, learn, work and live in the near future. Every year, we use our brief to break the tension between the traditional axes of architectural design, still experienced by many as a set of technical achievements, or the outcome of an aesthetic manifesto, and understood generally as the core of the creative enterprise of the architect, or as a linear solution applied to a local problem. We aim to introduce a fourth dimension to our students’ work: people, and more specifically, people who are connected both to each other and to their environment. The first stage in our four-dimensional architecture is to understand all stakeholders involved in a given situation, and then to devise ways to represent their points of view and practices, and finally, to design on these grounds. Today, there is a pipeline of information available to everyone. The skills for making decisions have become dynamic. Co-working, for example, is the spatial translation of distributed decision-making. Our projects explore the political, spatial, urban and typological implication of such changes. Consequences in the architectural object have arisen: in most of the projects, the role of the furniture, soft materials and ‘software’ challenge the traditional role of structural elements. However, this has also allowed us to take a page from the analysis of power, as in the classic Bachrach and Baratz sense, and bring to the fore the relevance of nondecisions, in order to build isolated objects. We have discovered that transforming an existing building, offering the population better access to facilities, and providing services (perhaps not place-based) are sometimes much better solutions than a brand new building, in terms of reducing negative impact and creating benefits. A way to visualise this is to see the changing role of architects as part of the transition from an ‘empty world’ paradigm to that of a ‘full world’, a formulation which we borrow from Herman Daly, an ecological economist. This means that the tools, references, habits and criteria of excellence we use must be completely overhauled.


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22.3 Fig. 22.1 Yuen Nam (Elaine) Tsang Y5, ‘2027: The Reclaimed Japanese House’. As a remedy for the rapid housing disposal cycle and an ageing society in Japan, the proposal explores alternative strategies to ‘remake’ Japanese houses for a co-living lifestyle for the next generation. Using reclaimed materials, via communal structures, and connecting ground-level shared pods, the project empowers people in a wider urban context. Fig. 22.2 Rufus Edmondson Y4, ‘Hackney-Exchange‘. The Hackney-based school of culture uses empirical learning as a method of conservation in order to celebrate the world’s most threatened cultural characteristics - language, craft and culinary heritage. Millennials from Hackney will transform spaces within the building and construct their own cultural pavilions, reflecting the changing 286

identity of the borough. Fig. 22.3 Hei Tung (Whitney) Wong Y5, ‘University of Everywhere’. This project imagines how future education can be accessible without the constraint of time and location. Learning spaces become a community hub where learners, teachers, entrepreneurs, makers and designers all come together to work, learn and collaborate. The design of each spatial component reinforces the idea that learning can take place anywhere. Fig. 22.4 Alex Anderson Y4, ‘Bain Town Craft Quarter’ is a pilot scheme that’s part of the wider Bahamas Intangible Heritage Project. The design fosters community-based tourism, helping to decentralise the existing tourist market from a few large hotels to focus on smaller sustainable community initiatives.


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22.7 Fig. 22.5 Xin Zhan Y4, ‘2.5D Garden’. Based in Hangzhou, China, this project proposes an immersive learning experience via a 3D holographic projection combined with a ‘cosplay’ performance space. The bamboo reciprocal frame construction takes inspiration from traditional Chinese gardens, and when juxtaposed with fantastical projections, it blurs local and online experiences of the space. Figs. 22.6 – 22.7 Georgina Halabi Y5, ‘Whatever the Weather’. The project re-inhabits Bethnal Green’s historic gasholders with an interactive weather playground, a co-living community and a co-working hub designed for millennials. The programme reflects on our relationship with the outdoors and aims to recalibrate our comfort zone in the light of happiness felt from environmental conditions. Variable building skins choreograph 288

comfort and thus temper internal environments according to user preference. Just as we change our clothes, the proposal aims to make the façades of the future more flexible. Fig. 22.8 Laurence Flint Y4, ‘Yokosuka 2020’. The project proposes to use the energy of the Olympics to foster social ambition in response to Japan’s vacant housing crisis, and Olympic shortcomings. The lightweight canopy system explores the potential of a shrinkable building to relate to the shortand long-term needs of residents within a shrinking city. By integrating a theatre school with topographic connections, the building provides for a variety of local present and future stakeholders.


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Figs. 22.9 – 22.10 Kuba Tomaszczyk Y5, ‘In Search of Kashubia’. An architectural speculation on the future of one of the most dynamic indigenous ethnic groups in Europe. The project explores Kashubian life on a number of different scales: urban, building and furniture. The masterplan discreetly combines the spheres of co-living, co-learning and co-working that interweave in the construction and on the landscape of the rural site. An emphasis on the inter-generational transfer of knowledge informed a strategic neighbourhood plan and approach to design. Figs. 22.11 – 22.12 Huma Mohyuddin Y5, ‘The New Women’s Club in Mayfair’. The scheme redefines the representation of female empowerment. By proposing a New Women’s Club, this project challenges the traditional values of a Gentleman’s Club and Mayfair’s brand of exclusivity. This new

environment empowers women by focusing on their current needs and allows for people of different cultural, ethnic, economic, educational and religious backgrounds to form a space with their own personal identity. Fig. 22.13 Timmy Whitehouse Y4, ‘Poly-hack Park’. An adaptive space for learning, play and production hacked by refugees, which cuts through an existing car park in downtown Athens. Multiple procurement strategies explore the potential of a ‘hacked architecture’ by re-appropriating the car park, and allowing refugees and city users to hack their own spaces.

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Fig. 22.14 Supichaya Chaisiriroj Y5, ‘Lumphini Fitness Academy and Lifestyle Centre’. The project imagines an extension to an urban park in Bangkok, Thailand. The centre offers exercise-oriented facilities to the ever-increasing users of Lumphini Park. The programmatic design investigates how buildings could reduce heat gains by way of passive systems powered by the exercising public. Fig. 22.15 Isabelle Tung Y4, ‘Homegrown City’. The proposed masterplan and up-cycling education centre within the Kamala Nehru informal settlement in Patna, India, aims to encourage settlers to turn plastic bag waste into beautiful daily objects. The project explores the idea of using plastic bags as a construction material, whilst creating flexible housing typologies aimed at improving the living conditions of current and future settlers.

Figs. 22.16 – 22.17 Jack Sargent Y5, ‘The Broadway Super Triangle’. Forming a physical manifestation of the internet age, this scheme proposes a cross-programmatic, super-urban scaled intervention that aims to facilitate inter-community engagement in Brooklyn, New York.

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Women And Architecture Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor


Unit 22

Women And Architecture From the Egalitarian Fight to the Female Brand Strategy – a Great Chance to Change Architectural Meanings Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor

Year 4 Georgina Halabi, Hei Tung (Whitney) Wong, Huma Mohyuddin, Yuen (Elaine) Tsang, Jack Sargent, Laura Young Year 5 Ana Alonso Albarrarín, Ruben Everett, Max Friedlander, Hao Han, Lily Papadopoulos, Oliver Partington, Li Wang, Shuo Yang, Timmy Yoon and Nawanwaj Yudhanahas. The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

We would like to thank the B-made team for their valuable support to all Bartlett students! We are grateful to Fani Kostourou, Athina Lazaridou, Covadonga Gutierrez Busto, Adriana Cabello, Gonçalo Lopes, Pedro Gil, Frederik Petersen, Jan Kattein, Bruce Irvin, Barbara Penner, Sophia Psarra, Blanche Cameron, Diego Delas, Marco Godoy, Yael Reisner, Christine Hawley, Chee-Kit Lai, Javier Lezaun, Eva Alvarez, Oscar Brito, Anna Mill, Joanne Preston, Clarissa Yee, Claire Taggart, Lulu Le Li, Ronald Cheape and Nerea Calvillo for bringing all their passion and knowledge to the Unit crits and workshops, and to Victoria Bateman for her marvelous teaching support and coordination of our Ho Chi Minh City workshop We would also like to express our enormous gratitude to the whole of the Bartlett Office – nothing could be achieved without you. What a team! Thank you to sponsors Luis Vidal + Architects and Ho Chi Minh City University of Architecture

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In his 1920s manifesto ‘Five Points of Architecture’, Le Corbusier proposed an architectural vision for the twentieth century. When we look at its five points, it is clear that they are all related to technology. Le Corbusier advised architects to support their buildings with pilotis; to design open plan; to show that the façade is independent of the structure; to design horizontal windows; and to design flat roofs that included gardens. Even this idea of including a garden was intended as a celebration of technology, given that the cityscape had recently become visible from planes. This year, we asked our students to design spaces in which the female mindset was fully applied and empowered. From this, we extracted five points: 1. Allow your inhabitants to hold their babies while they work. Many students mixed uses on the same plot and construction, allowing personal and professional life to overlap. 2. Encourage your users to bake bread, just like their Grandma did. A significant number of our projects suggest that happiness can be easily achieved through time-honoured activities such as cultivating roses, reading or drawing. This proposes a sort of critical disengagement: you don’t need to change your car every five years or update the colour of your sofa according to a magazine; there are ways to balance life that do not have such a direct link with consumption. 3. But also enable them to search for bread recipes on their tablet. Many of our projects found that the internet and digital networking were the best allies for successfully empowering the female brand. 4. Treat your users’ bodies well – allow them to be naked, sad, tired or happy, but comfortable. Temperatures, textures, sound and subjectivity were part of most of our exercises that centred on user experience; these are important and should not be overlooked. 5. Push the space to allow full development of users’ lifestyles. In a world where people make a living filming their daily activities on YouTube, architecture can promote the strategic development of customized lifestyles, allowing people to build relationships or make money through the buildings that they own, rent or use. The difference between our five points and Le Corbusier's is obvious: our goal is to empower people, rather than empowering industry. We can now ask our readers – are female architects more focused on improving inhabitants' lives, while their male colleagues are focused on pushing the boundaries of technological solutions? If this is the case, the idea of an egalitarian struggle doesn’t quite make sense. Female architects should not be fighting for the same identity as their male counterparts; they should instead develop their own. This, simultaneously, will improve what architecture is – and can be – for everyone.


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22.3 Fig. 22.1 Oliver Partington Y5, ‘The Newham Cooperative’. The project looks to employ female-led principles of urbanism to develop a large, disused site in Newham. Through the celebration of the collective, the new framework for housing concentrates on establishing new typologies for shared housing, work spaces and childcare. The method of housing delivery also looks to empower the residents by creating a structure where households take an equal stake in the land, allowing the groups to develop their own piece of city. Fig. 22.2 Max Friedlander Y5, ‘Women’s Community Bridge Saigon’. Traditional Vietnamese craft as a tool for social change is explored through the lens of the female user. The bridge forms a link between two contrasting communities, facilitating the urban cohesion of the city. It seeks to empower 264

women through challenging the existing domestic realities and allowing them to formalise an identity beyond the home. Workshops, parks, childcare and other functions are woven together into a playful landscape that reflects local cultural traditions and encourages dynamic engagement with the building. Fig. 22.3 Jack Sargent Y4, ‘Durbar Dharmasala School, Kathmandu, Nepal’. Via a series of interventions that work independently and alongside one another, this proposes a timeline of works that develop from small interventions tapping into broadcast networks through to purpose built communication, internet and structural systems. The responses combine programmes that empower women by facilitating and maximising their public exposure, breaking down the gender barriers and roles within Nepali society.


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22.4 0.0 The floating nature of the structure passively circumvents the issue of seismic activity in the region and lyrically embeds a sanitary operation within its programme. Fig. 22.4 Shuo Yang Y5, ‘Woman, Buddhism & Capital’. The project is a speculative proposal of a socially engaged Canary Wharf. It discovers how a new type of Buddhist built environment might apply female-centric principles in order to regenerate a socially engaged community within Canary Wharf. The challenge to the existing economic system is to integrate these new cultural and social forms of capital, creating new spatial networks within this revitalised context. The armillary sphere uncovers a new Buddhist archetype for Bhikkhuni activities.

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Fig. 22.5 Hao Han Y5, ‘The Matriarchal Energy Industry’. A masterplan investigating the physical infrastructure of a ‘female’ form of environmental engagement. Through a study of matriarchal principles and the clean tech industry, a series of typologies and energy agents are developed to be deployed around the city of Santa Clara, California. Action-based engagements and curated routine disruptions are put forward to produce a new form of sustainable lifestyle. Figs. 22.6 – 22.7 Ana Alonso Albarracín Y5, ‘Sweet Conciliation’. Through YouTube, a group of Spanish housewives have created a network of support and influence about housekeeping, a job they are both proud of and brilliant at. The project interprets them as 21st century material feminists. A reality series to be featured on YouTube’s new

subscription service is proposed. This enterprise aims to pump new life into rural Spain, filled with abandoned villages. The design is informed by the housewives’ YouTube videos, and applies their tips to urban and architectural scales. Fig. 22.8 Rubén Everett Y5, ‘In The Big City’. A closer look at London revealed a lack of commemoration for women in the city. This project reacts to this by creating a feminist microcosm within the big city. Inspired by five female figureheads, the project explores an urban landscape that aims to invigorate, enrich and rejuvenate Silvertown, through the exploration of a new community built to commemorate the work of these extraordinary women.

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Fig. 22.9 Huma Mohyuddin Y4, ‘Learning Centre for Herbal Medicine and Building Construction’. It is common for women in rural Pakistan to be denied an education or the chance to pursue work. This proposal empowers women by allowing them to gain knowledge of herbal medicine, local construction methods and business skills, to help provide alternative means of health and income, as well as empowering other rural women through sharing their knowledge. Fig. 22.10 Georgina Halabi Y4, ‘The Lysistrata House and Forest Garden’. In response to the ‘New Homeless,’ the programme is a self-build shelter and edible landscape for a community of women in Athens, called Lysistrata. However, parallel to the misfortune that has hit the city, comes the opportunity for development – a rise in urban farming in the form of allotments and community

gardens. The project proposes common facilities and one-room housing typologies that accommodate vegetable gardens, walls, terraces, and of course, women. Fig. 22.11 Nawanwaj Yudhanahas Y5, ‘The Co-Op LAB of the Island of Widows Koh Kret, Thailand’. The project proposes four scales of interventions to raise awareness in everyday science and participation in environmental conservation. The typologies, located across the island, range from scale S: tool kits, M: mobile laboratories, L: field restaurants (pictured) and XL: the Co-Op Market. Each typology aims to empower the women, from their health, knowledge, and independence, to joining forces as a community. Architectural language is a hybrid between existing agricultural infrastructures and local architecture. Fig. 22.12 Hei Tung (Whitney) Wong Y4,

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22.13 ‘The Maids' Cooperative’. The scheme empowers domestic workers by restructuring the domestic service industry into a cooperative. In place of live-in domestic helpers, the domestic service industry is restructured into a professional business where users regenerate and improve skills, utilising their knowledge through economic and social interaction. Using the façade of the building, the cooperative manifests the empowerment of these women and creates a celebration between culture, nature and the strength of women, by exposing the production and organisation onto its external envelope. Fig. 22.13 Lily Papadopoulos Y5, ‘A Life-Giving Catalyst’. The Greek islands face a lack of maternity facilities, forcing women to travel to the mainland to give birth. This project's aim is to alleviate this situation, creating everyday

environments which recall past childbirth events as communal and celebratory, in contrast to today’s preconceived role of the pregnant body as a patient. Expanding family houses, start-up agro-businesses and doctors offering services in exchange for hospitality, allows for the rebirth of depopulating villages, which potentially dissolves hierarchies and transforms power relations.

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0.0 22.15 Fig. 22.14 Laura Young Y4, ‘House For Hillary [The New Transparent Parliament], Washington DC 2016’. Following Hillary Clinton’s elected presidency in 2016, her new parliamentary framework proposes a democratic forum of continued construction, both physical and digital, engaging the public with an equal and evolving politics accessible to all Americans. Originating from The White House Pavilions Project, the house will test architectural manifestations of Hillary’s key policies: domestic space, work space and climate. The scheme will grow into the surrounding National Mall, activating the key public space through political exchange and broadcast. Fig. 22.15 Yuen (Elaine) Tsang Y4, ‘Makers’ Market Community Project’. The project is used as the testing ground to reassert the programmatic relevancy of co-workspace, residence and 270

market as a place of collaborative enterprise led by online DIY communities favouring women. ‘Compartmentalising’ their lives into multiple cabinets encourages the fluid society to find the highest common factor of what could be reused and what is unique to each person to be shared to maintain near zero marginal cost through an online platform and offline physical world. Fig. 22.16 Li Wang Y5, ‘The Gentlewomen’s House.’ The project explores how weather recomposes the architectural environment, from the path to interior space through sensory perceptions. Where the sense of direction can be emphasised by silence and noise, physical boundaries can be soft. Spaces are defined by textures of the materiality, so that architecture is more intimate and sensitive to all users.


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Unit 22

Empowering the Legacy of Generation Z Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos Jiménez Cenamor

Year 4 Ana Alonso Albarrarín, Ruben Everett, Max Friedlander, Hao Han, Lily Papadopoulos, Oliver Partington, Li Wang, Shuo Yang, Tae-In (Timmy) Yoon, Nawanwaj Yudhanahas Year 5 Xiao Ying Li, Jiao Peng, Sirisan Nivatvongs, Joshua Thomas

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We would like to thank Pedro Gil, practice tutor, and Roberto Marín, structural consultant, for their incredible work. This year would have not been the same without the wisdom and expertise of the team of critics joining us: Julia Backhaus, Adriana Cabello, Rut Cuenca, Max Dewdney, Maria Elvira Dieppe, Ursula Orsaila Dimitriou, Marta Grinda, Sally Hart, Christine Hawley, Gonzalo Herrero Delicado, Nannette Jackowski, Jan Kattein, Fani Kostourou, Alice Labourel, Chee-Kit Lai, Ricardo de Ostos, Yael Reisner, Tania Sengupta, Bob Sheil, Sally Anne Stanton, Manijeh Verghese, Paolo Zaide We would like to express our enormous gratitude to our sponsors Luis Vidal + Architects and our partners Universidad Veritas, Costa Rica

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‘Generation Z’ refers to the children born between 2000 and today. This year, Unit 22 attempted to increase the rights of this community as citizens and to augment its urban legacy. The notion that design can empower community is fundamental for the unit and has allowed our students to build networks with existing institutions, researchers and designers from different disciplines. Empowerment is about making people live better and have more rights both individually and as a community. Our approach to empowerment expands in a double action: Extending benefits beyond target users In most traditional school design projects, only teachers, students and some parents would enjoy good design. What would happen if a school was built as a high street or as a botanic garden? Then local shops, elderly neighbours or universities would start being empowered by design. Designing potential heritage buildings of the future This forces our students to explore how an architectural design can condense the identity of a place and of a generation in a unique and memorable way. We are conscious that associating heritage architecture with singularity might be a controversial intellectual exercise, but we state that buildings kept as common legacy always contain an element of uniqueness. The brief for the year also contained strong political statements. We wanted our students to protest about how cities have become places which privilege drivers and compromise children’s physical integrity, denying them the right to play, walk, cycle, or exercise safely. We also reacted against the fact that marketing views children merely as potential future consumers when, we propose, they should be seen as builders of new jobs, new institutions and new spaces. For both pedagogical and environmental reasons we invited our students to learn from existing complex and industrial objects: they had to reassemble, reinforce, recycle and reuse. We aimed to prepare our students for a future in which there will no longer be vacant places – all plots will have valuable preexistences – and we encouraged them to reflect on how to practice in a world that is already full of objects that are no longer useful. We have transformed bicycle wheels with covers and forced cloth lines to double their structural capacity. Our approach to technique is therefore pedagogically inductive and adopts a cradle-to-cradle creative logic.


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0.0 22.4 Fig. 22.1 Sirisan Nivatvongs Y5, ‘Integral Human & Sustainable Development District’. The project focuses on the social and environmental vulnerability of Klong Toey’s Generation Z and considers the possibilities of self-empowerment by the cultivation of new skills brought about by a series of architectural interventions that ultimately leads to the invigoration of the community. The active research methodology for this project is documented extensively in the thesis, which comprised of a two-day workshop with Klong Toey children to promote environmental education through participatory and child friendly practices. Figs. 22.2 – 22.3 Lily Papadopoulos Y4, ‘An Urban Orchestra’. The proposal aims to implement the qualities of ‘musical play’ into the wounded landscape of the divided city of Nicosia. Improvised and formal 264

orchestral compositions act as tools of reconciliation for this territory in conflict. A special thanks to the UCL Electrical Engineering department for allowing me to perform an acoustical test. Fig. 22.4 Xiao Ying Lin Y5, ‘You Are What You Eat’. The project looks to empower the legacy of Generation Z through re-establishing connections with traditional Chinese food. Sited in Suzhou, China, the architecture is designed as a series of large devices allowing the children to investigate the tradition methods of food production, the importance of quality and the historical significance of food in their urban context through entirely active means.


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0.0 22.7 Figs. 22.5 – 22.7 ‘1:1 Building Workshop’. In December, Unit 22 travelled to Costa Rica to take part in an intensive 5-day design and fabrication workshop with Vertias University in San Jose. During the week the collective worked together to build two 1:1 devices and spaces to empower the students at the University.

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Figs. 22.8 – 22.9 Oliver Partington Y4, ‘Contextualised Learning on the Thames’. The proposal creates a new educational landscape that focuses on providing real, lived experiences. Conceived as an entirely public entity the collection of workshops, gardens, classrooms, sports facilities and public spaces move up and down the river using the city as its extended classroom and reconnecting the city for a younger generation. The project aims to empower the wider urban context by reconnecting the North and South banks, celebrating the creative output of the workshops and reestablishing an engaging relationship with the water. Figs. 22.10 – 22.11 Tae-in (Timmy) Yoon Y4, ‘Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens’. This project proposes to regenerate the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens as a space for children of this generation

to engage with nature in order to bridge the gap between their concern and knowledge of the natural environment. Within the Botanical Laboratory, children are encouraged to participate in the plant growing process in a playful way most conducive to their learning.

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22.13 Figs. 22.12 – 22.13 Joshua Thomas Y5, ‘Harrow Building consistent dialogue with local government to support the Exchange’. The Exchange explores an alternative system effective devolution of funding from centralised bodies such of education and local governance. It focuses on the as the Greater London Council (GLC). dissemination of knowledge, responsibilities and skills to younger generations through a framework which allows children to interact with and influence the creation of social, spatial and economic structures in a local region. The exchange takes an optimistic view of the results that this social reconditioning might produce. Compassion advanced through participatory design and construction is seen to aid an agonistic conflict, which helps to curtail the effects of inequality and social-spatial polarisation in London. Local residents are granted the agency required to create equitable sustainable development in their local borough by acting in 267


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Figs. 22.14 – 22.15 Li Wang Y4, ‘Indoor Study’. Indoor study focuses on updating the habitable space for Generation Z by composing an indoor conditioned field that exceeds an architectural scale, yet is filled with minimum daily essentials that is less than a space in scale. Through the disappearance of architectural scale, the linkage between private and public becomes more permeable and extreme, so that the virtual world and the physical world of Generation Z meet. Figs. 22.16 – 22.17 Ana Alonso Albarracín Y4, ‘Children’s Urban Theatre’. This intervention seeks to bring Generation Z children out to the streets, and empower them to stand up as active citizens by giving them a voice of their own through theatrical performances on mobile stages. The project tackles current debates regarding children and gender, and urban regeneration

strategies on the site in Madrid. Fig. 22.18 Jiao Peng Y5, ‘Children’s Time Project: Less Commuting Time, More Fun Times for the children in Beijing’. This project proposes to reduce children’s commuting time in Beijing through new educational and residential environments. The proposal consists of two main elements, A Tutorial Bus that provides study spaces for children while they commute across the city and a series of new towers that look to provide study and residential spaces for families closer to their school districts.

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Fig. 22.19 Nawanwaj Yudhanahas Y4, ‘Baan Krua Silk Weaving School’, Bangkok, Thailand. Over consumption of digital technology among young children leads to many development problems, including short attention span, a lack of interpersonal skills and a lack of inter-generational relationships. The proposal is a silk weaving school located next to an existing old silk weaving community. The architecture learns from vernacular knowledge including the structure and joints of weaving looms. Silk weaving process is revisited to make traditional crafts more interesting for Generation Zs. Time consuming crafts, such as silk-weaving, increase children’s attention span and the Baan Krua residents become the grandparents whom Generation Z can learn from, and who also learn from Generation Z.

Figs. 22.20 – 22.21 Shou Yang Y4, ‘The Interdisciplinary Centre’, Euston 2025. The new working environment and public interface is proposed in the roof of Euston Station providing flexible working space for future professionals of Generation Z. This architecture is created through a collection of small tectonic fragments which play on the plug-in nature of the future working environment. The dynamic construction system also allows the space to evolve and adapt to the ever changing needs of Generation Z. The research for the project was developed through 1:6 models and prototypes which investigated the relationship between the ‘plug in tectonic fragments’ and the existing station room structure.

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Fig. 22.22 Hao Han Y4, ‘Community Tinkering Garden’. This scheme is a celebration of the physical, experimental and haptic aspects of a child’s learning. A largely self-built construction, the building places particular emphasis on communal and family-oriented engagements; thus engaging various sectors, age groups and skill sets with equal prominence. Prefabricated and bespoke frames are juxtaposed with the handcrafted, fluctuating infills created by children. Fig. 22.23 Max Friedlander Y4, ‘San José Botanical Garden’. This pavilion provides learning spaces focused on the possibilities of algae cultivation. The algae is grown in synthetic ‘leaves’ and then extracted to be allocated to various uses such as energy production, water purification and dye making.

Fig. 22.24 Ruben Everett Y4, ‘Experimental Music School’. External view showing the façade of the faculty of music. Opening up the faculty of music and reusing elements of the existing condition were key in developing a renovation strategy for the school. This image shows key elements of the façade that have been moved and manipulated in various ways. The image draws focus to the opening façade of the auditorium, which is designed to move in order to open and close the auditorium to the elements. This opening allows for the building to adapt its sonic scape depending on the needs of the musician or performance.

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Designing the Future: Architecture as Hypothesis vs. Hypothesis as Synthesis Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor


Unit 22 Designing the Future: Architecture as Hypothesis vs. Hypothesis as Synthesis Izaskun Chinchilla, Carlos Jimenez Year 4 Xiao Ying Lin, Sirisan Nivatvongs, Jiao Peng, Joshua Thomas, Han (John) Wu Year 5 Akmal Afani Azhar, Victoria Bateman, Ko Wai Cheung, Sarah Firth, Yuen Sar (Lillian) Lam, Zhiyu Huang, Hisham Abdullah Muazzam, Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz, Joanne Preston The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

Thanks to our supporters Vidal Associates and the Faculty of Architecture, Chiang Mai University, Thailand Thank you to Pedro Gil, our Design Realisation practice tutor and Roberto Marin, our structural consultant Thanks also to our critics: Julia Bauhaus, Nerea Calvillo, Freya Cobbin, Gonzalo Coello de Portugal, Christine Hawley, Gonzalo Herrero Delicado, Jan Kattein, Lulu Le Li, Sophia Psarra, Peter Scully, Anthony Staples Our field trip to Thailand, where we developed the Future Natural workshop, was supported by Faculty of Architecture, Chiang Mai University (Thailand), Ajarn Sant, Julian Huang and 16 Thai students with their knowledge and generosity

Many architects define their design work as a synthesis of the present. Projects encompass the availability of local technologies, climate conditions, cultural preferences, contemporary aesthetic tendencies, and much more. History invites us to study buildings as a way to understand a period. The advanced version of this understanding gives synthesis the role of helping humans adapt to context. Christian Norbert-Schultz declared ‘modern architecture came into existence to help man feel at home in a new world’. 1 Several factors trouble this peaceful academic perspective. Firstly, the speed of change has suffered the ‘acceleration of history’. 2 Even while implementing a building, original ideas might become outdated. Secondly, our building technologies mix within the same body items that may reach obsolescence within different rhythms. Thirdly, the performance of a building can change dramatically throughout its life. 3 The notion of sustainability challenges any previous ignorance of the building’s evolution. Education demands students make decisions without knowing what is to come. Unit 22 works on a radically different premise, designing not from synthesis but from a consciously built hypothesis of what may lie ahead: The architect tests whether he/she might be wrong. Her/his principal task is checking, comparing scenarios, providing alternative solutions or even finding ways to demolish parts. There is not a simplistic vision of the problem-solving capacity of architecture. Wendell Berry proposes designs should act as a pattern; 4 solving several problems simultaneously, while minimising the creation of new ones. Direct cause-effect relationships are broken. Architects are more aware when they are imagining or building their own definitions of reality. The methodology for designing from hypothesis gives new opportunities for innovation. It encourages starting from the ‘state of the art’, avoids ‘design amnesia’ and values gradual innovation. 5 It helps integration of functions. It avoids potential innovation being rejected for not matching the puzzle. It allows true and subversive experimentation to take place.

1. C. Norbert-Schultz, Principles of Modern Architecture, (London: Andreas Papadakis, 2000), p.6 2. Lester R. Brown uses this term in Eco-Economy: Building and Economy of the Earth, (NY: W. W. Norton & Co., 2001) 3. E. Hollis, The Secret Lives of Buildings: From the Parthenon to the Vegas Strip in Thirteen Stories (NY: Metropolitan, 2010) 4. See ‘Solving for Pattern’ by Wendell Berry in The Gift of Good Land: Further Essays Cultural & Agricultural (NY: North Point Press, 1981) 5. A. Snodgrass & R. Coyne, Interpretation in Architecture: Design as a way of thinking (Abingdon: Routledge, 2006) 262


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Fig. 22.1 Ko Wai Cheung Y5, ‘House of the Future – Hong Kong 2047’. Elevated walkways connect skyscrapers in Hong Kong, the ground level often becomes hazy and forgotten. Connected to an elevated walkway, the proposal explores the possibilities for innovations in a family. Flexible living spaces use exchanged components for constructing a home with the specific needs for each family. The house is an integration of technology, materials, ideas and innovations. Fig. 22.2 – 22.3 Sarah Firth Y5, Zhiyu Huang Y5, Joshua Thomas, Y4 and students from FACMU, ‘Future Nature – Canopy Group’. In December 2013, 13 Students from Unit 22 joined the Faculty of Architecture at Chiang Mai University on a 7-day intensive design and fabrication workshop to revisit the design of curtains, parasols, louvres, canopies and carpets. These

architectural interfaces act not only as protection mechanism for inhabitants inside the building, but also as wider protection strategies for nature against human actions. Fig. 22.4 Jiao Peng Y4, ‘Student Accommodation‘. This project is targeted at students in Hongcun City, China. The building provides accommodation for local students, collects rainwater to satisfy the daily demands, and encourages tourists to cherish the water resources. Fig. 22.5 Xiao Ying Lin Y4, ‘The Elephant Embassy’, section of the Interactive Feeding Station. The proposal aims to retain the elephants’ natural living habitats in Bangkok. The Bamboo structure is a temporary residence and a medical centre for the elephants. The higher level contains a cafe, food workshop, and nutrition lab. The lower level contains an interactive space to feed the elephants passing through.

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22.7 Fig. 22.6 Sirisan Nivatvongs Y4, ‘Bangkok Noi Flood Shelter‘. A 1:20 Scale Model to investigate hanging floor structures and innovate traditional façades. The proposal makes use of elevated public infrastructures to host a series of ephemeral floating structures to provide living and temporary shelters for a flooded Bangkok Noi District in 2050. The architecture seeks to innovate local sensibilities, vernacular techniques to interact to its bio-climatic conditions. Fig. 22.7 Joshua Thomas Y4, ‘Citizenry Association Hotel’, Penzance. Four coastal towns in Cornwall have been chosen to host Citizenry Associations in ‘Special Tourism Areas’, which contain the most affluent economies in the county. Inflated land values, however, make access to activity, property and work difficult for local people. The founding structure in Penzance aims to move local life,

decision-making institutions and government offices and skilled jobs back into the town, therefore empowering residents to partake in the discussion, distribution and use of the land and resources in their region.

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Fig. 22.8 Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz Y5, Photo showing the tested structure as a layered inhabitable volume, allowing for cross-ventilation. Set in 2080, this project is based on a hypothetical vision of the city of Murcia in south east Spain. It aims to find an optimised archetype to improve the environment and meet the demands of an increasingly saturated city, respecting its best traditions and culture. The project looks at geometries and ventilation of spaces and structures as a way to achieve to stop the dependence on air conditioning, abused at present by its increasing population. Four main towers rise from in between the existing buildings to compose an ‘Upper City’ landscape: The Water Tower, the Orchard Tower, the Kitchen Tower and the Sleeping Tower.

Fig. 22.9 Zhiyu Huang Y5, ‘The New Urban Village, Shenzhen’. A reconstruction of the unique settlements occupied by migrant workers, promoting sustainable living and the value of agriculture. The knowledge of urban villagers is harvested to tackle the crisis and challenges faced by the city. The architecture is a response to the seasons and 24 solar terms, which is an ancient calendar that guides people’s daily routine according to the climate and the ecliptic coordinate system.

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22.11 Fig. 22.10 Hisham Abdullah Muazzam Y5, ‘Dhaka Adaptive Factory Typologies for Manufacturing Welfare’. A detailed axonometric drawing showing the infrastructural, technical and spatial programme layout of the proposed new garment factory typology in Bangladesh. The drawing envisages building above and around existing skyscrapers in the heart of the dense urban Dhaka landscape. Vertical expansion and flexible architecture is key to ensuring sustainable growth in the booming garments industry in 2050. The innovations present a more symbiotic relationship between consumers and producers within the industry by promoting positive dialogue through direct interactions and trading. Fig. 22.11 Akmal Afani Azhar Y5, ‘The New House of the Future in Malaysia’, Assemblage of ‘Train House’, ‘Bicycle House’, ‘Suitcase House’,

‘Flying House’ and ‘Floating House’. The designs are derived from one hypothesis: in the year 2050, human mobility will increase following the existing pattern of movement in the country from rural to urban areas. This future scenario challenges societies conservative perception of a ‘house’ being rooted in one place. New House of the Future in Malaysia deals with different cultural issues such as, bathing traditions, food culture, traditional performance and alternative healthcare influenced by multiple contextual and multicultural population of the country.

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Fig. 22.12 – 22.15 Ko Wai Cheung Y5, ‘Innovation Catalogue Component Kits‘. In the proposed masterplan of the Lok Ma Chau Loop in Hong Kong, the government uses a non-plan approach to encourage re-industrialisation in the rural parts of the New Territories with Shenzhen, the border. Villagers in allocated plots of land can choose kits from the catalogue of innovation to construct their own homes and industries within the limitation of the government’s main structure. This provides flexibility in function and freedom for further development, as kits can be reassembled and are highly adaptable. The kit of components combines advanced technology with indigenous techniques and materials to suggest an innovative approach to the future. Fig. 22.16 Sarah Firth, Joanne Preston Y5, ‘Group Project’, 1:10 physical

model. In response to London’s housing crisis, a new typology of vertical dwelling is proposed for disused brownfield sites such as old quarries, farmsteads, and golf courses within the London Metropolitan Greenbelt. Modular units are stacked to form a vertical terraces, with modest individual house plans and generous shared spaces which allow for home working, shared recreation and dining.

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22.19 Fig. 22.17 Sarah Firth Y5, ‘Negotiation and the Future of the New Town’. Showing Neighbourhood Block’s 30 years of growth (from top left, clockwise). Investigating the potential of government New Town, suburban Hemel Hempstead, to respond to the current housing crisis through densification by means of localism. Fig. 22.18 Joanne Preston Y5, ‘Garden Cities of “To-morrow”: A Manifesto for the UK’s Garden Cities of 2050‘. 1:50 Section Hybrid Typology, Welwyn Garden City, UK. Based on a more transient idea of ‘home’, a future is envisaged where everyone can have a place to call home in the city the, greenbelt and the suburb. Fig. 22.19 Joanne Preston Y5, ‘Desk Buggy’, 1:25 plan. A new infrastructure is linked with existing rail networks and made habitable by kinetic walls and furniture modules. These innovations bring together childcare

and working from home, that have been separated through the failures of Ebenezer Howard’s 1898 model. Influenced by Howard’s Cul-de-Sac formations, the tessellation of the proposed typology forms a patchwork landscape of contained gardens and terraces. The dwellings are designed to accommodate a community rather than a ‘nuclear family’. Divisions between one dwelling and the next are made unclear inorder to encourage neighbourly interaction.

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Wood And Fire: Towards a Definition of Mild Architecture Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor


Unit 22

Wood And Fire: Towards a Definition of Mild Architecture Izaskun Chinchilla, Carlos Jimenez

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Unit 22 researches, among others things, how architecture can welcome users through small details and a soft and cosy understanding of materiality. For that reason, two material facts provided the title for the year: wood and fire. Wood was selected not only for its technical qualities but for its contextual dimension. Using local wood consciously implies understanding the structure of an ecosystem and managing geographical notions, while maintaining perception of memory, craft and biology. Placing real fire in our spaces has forced us to think about thermodynamic functioning while offering a place to gather and talk. Wood and fire have been inspirations for the beginning of our year and the small details that welcome and empower users have been one of our major interests. But we quickly jumped out of a linear methodology to go deeper into the contextual implications of material and energy. In this process, the objective and subjective values of wood and fire have been melded together. The technical skills of the students, the details which serve as interfaces to users, and a deep contextual reflection, have met. If we began the year wondering around what ‘mild architecture’ could be, we now have new words and definitions providing a wider frame to architecture for its future. Folk Academic architecture typically avoids an association with folk. Architecture has been decontextualised and abstract languages and materials have provided the aesthetic. It is now time to look at human rituals, daily life and communal celebrations. In those episodes, space, objects and material systems reassemble the human figure and restructure community. Many of our students have researched ancestral rituals from different areas of the world. The decoration of the floating boats and platforms made by the Bajau Laut tribe in Semporna, Malaysia, for their annual festival; communal bathing rituals in Greece, Russia and Japan; rice 266

transportation in Kerala, India; craft activity in Beijing Hutongs, China or the puppet theatre in Indonesia have been part of the reflection of Akmal, Megan Townsend, Joanne, Lulu and Kirsty. Within their designs they have challenged the tradition in which technical aspects command the design process. Their architecture does not fundamentally follow an abstract function or occupy a structural frame. Their drawings and models take the footprint of human activity, assume its vernacular precedents and shape this activity in a soft materiality that wraps the inhabitants and occupies the place between their body and their shelter. Technical elements have to find their place and scope within this folk nature. Cute While Western cultures encourage women and children to value ‘cuteness’ there is also a real masculine tradition of fighting it. Architecture, as part of a masculine domain of knowledge and practice, has systematically refused cuteness as a major value. One obvious yet evident effect of this battle has been the colourblind tradition affecting architecture throughout the last century. Meanwhile Claire has placed sky blue tiles in her Coventry project, Akmal has been daring with pink chimneys, delicate star patterns cover Kirsty’s skins and embroidery gives character to Clarissa’s textiles. These students have found that part of the charm of British medieval cities can be underlined by bringing fairytales to visitors’ minds or that delicate embroidering can challenge the significance of digital fabrication techniques in the construction industry. Cuteness may have a strategic communication value in future decades; it is already used by advertising agents, pop singers and food brands. Alive and Vibrant The methodology of the year was planned to make the students aware of the types of life architecture has to preserve. The main project, ‘harbour’, forced students to face an open definition of the built


MArch Architecture Unit 22

A Bigger Pattern Unit 22’s design core implies a strategic vision of architecture. Therefore we have encouraged students to propose specific combinations of sites and projects with strategic intentions. Many of our students split the project across several locations or transform a whole urban area in the frame of a new institutional activity. Most of the projects include benefits for locals and visitors. Some create typologies that can be replicated. All of them try to think on how architecture can help make a life. All act within a larger pattern. These principles can be found in the collaboration that Lilian established between Cambodian medicine, floating architecture and income coming from tourists. They are also crucial to how Clarissa has understood the participation of Tunisian workers in Sicilian agriculture. This sensibility has enabled Freya to distribute her student location tactically in Cartagena de Indias, enabling students and businesses to work together. This vision is the one

helping Lulu imagine Beijing Hutong can be an architecture school and a local necessity, with reinforced income ensuring not only preservation but a respectful upgrade. This year Unit 22 has been generously supported by Vidal Associates and Roca. Pedro Gil has supported the Unit as a Practice Tutor for Design Realisation. Roberto Marin has been our Structural Consultant. During the year Catrina Stewart, Hugh McEwen, Felipe Mesa, Miguel Mesa, Nerea Calvillo, Felipe Hernández, Nacho Martin of Mi5 architects, Carlos Arroyo, Nuria Lombardero, Curro Canales, Yael Reisner, Luis Vidal, Max Dewdney and Chee-Kit Lai have participated in our intense and deep crits. Our fieldtrip to Colombia was especially amazing for the support of MAMM Museum in Medellin and the direction of Felipe Mesa or Plan B Arquitectura. Medellín Digital, Mesa Editores and Universidad Bolivariana de Medellin were also some of the welcoming institutions. Year 4 Akmal Azhar, Georgia Follet, Jiang Dong, Yuen Sar (Lillian) Lam, Jose Ignacio Ortiz-Muñoz, Joanna Preston, Kirsty Williams Year 5 Victoria Bateman, Freya Cobbin, Le (Lulu) Li, Megan Smedy, Clarie Taggart, Megan Townsend, Clarissa Yee

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environment. Open air facilities, infrastructures, landscape treatment, links and connection between architectural objects have been framed in each exercise. Each project helps architecture to meet and organise different environmental levels. The architecture of many of our students presents exceptional continuity with its surrounding landscape. Many details have been designed to flow with the wind, to keep moving during their lifespan, to change with the rhythm of seasons and tides – to create an architecture that breathes. The roof over Lilian’s floating architecture swings slightly with the rainwater, helping its collection and its direct use. Jose Ignacio has learned from tropical architecture to keep his designs open to natural flows; he has even learned to knot them. Water is storage; it evaporates, forms cloud and mist, and softly condenses in Megan Townsend’s indoor bathing landscape. To use Megan Smedy’s hotel facilities one needs to cycle and walk. The movement around the landscape and its surroundings helps users find comfort and beauty.


MArch Architecture Unit 22 22.1 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013 22.2 Fig. 22.2 MAMM Pavilion, Medellín. 1:10 scale prototype of the outdoor pavilion comissioned by Museo de Arte Moderno de Medellín (Colombia). Design was developed by Unit 22 together with students from Universidad Pontificai Bolivariana de Medellín directed by Felipe Mesa (Plan B arquitectos, UPB), Jorge Pérez Jaramillo (UPB) and Miguel Mesa (Mesa Editores, UPB). It is composed by six detachable units inspired by local palafito villages allowing them to be relocated in the future. Sponsors: Mamm, U.P.B, The Bartlett School of Architecture, Cluster de Energía de Medellín, Restaurante Blanco, Área Metropolitana de Medellín, Medellín Digital. Figs. 22.3 – 22.4 Le (Lulu) Li, Y5, Scale 1:10 model for Hutong Architecture School drawing studio. The model study aims to reintroduce paper as architecture material and test how paper can be used 268

together with wax to create temporary architectural elements fit for the culture and weather, through a combination of craftsmanship and contemporary digital fabrication.


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Fig. 22.5 Joanna Preston, Y4, Chimney Dwelling: A dwelling for a Local Historian, Batley. Sited at a local vantage point and drawing upon the mechanisms used in the local textile industry, the structure unfolds to become a gathering place where storeys about the towns prosperous history can be shared. Fig. 22.6 Kirsty Williams, Y4, Theatre for traditional Indonesian shadow art, Wayang Kulit. Sited on the Citarum River, widely acknowledged as the most polluted river in the world, it also incorporates a water treatment centre. Fig. 22.7 Akmal Azhar, Y4, A Fish Market for the Sea Nomad in Borneo, Malaysia. The fish pickling aquarium details; the external façades of the aquarium are made out of boat sails that are recycled from the annual Regatta Lepa festival. The sails will be propped open when the pickling process is done to exhibit

the product to the visitors. Fig. 22.8 Le (Lulu) Li, Wax and paper reading table designed for the ‘Hutong Architecture School’ library, to test the idea of revealing through time, and fire as the main source for lighting and heating.

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Fig. 22.9 Claire Taggart, Y5, Start-Up City (Coventry). Adaptable live/work business incubation unit structure for temporary inhabitation in empty high street retail units. Fig. 22.10 Freya Cobbin, Y5, Harbour of Exchanges (Cartagena). Single cut pop-up technique enabled development of an inhabitable terraced roofscape. Fig. 22.11 Megan Townsend, Y5, Bow Creek Cultural Bath House, sited on a derelict outcrop in East London, is a new community and experience driven proposal, for social interaction within London’s modern urban fabric. Fig. 22.12 Yuen Sar (Lilian) Lam, Amphibious harbour: Traditional Khmer health care centre, Cambodia. Sited next to the Tonle Sap which constantly floods its surrounding areas, the design proposes a new approach to deal with

climatic changes and re-establish people’s links to their use of water within the architecture.

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MArch Architecture Unit 22 22.12 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013 22.13 Figs. 22.12 – 22.13 Kirsty Williams, Y4, Theatre for traditional Indonesian shadow art, Wayang Kulit. Sited on the Citarum River, widely acknowledged as the most polluted river in the world, it also incorporates a water treatment centre. Fig. 22.14 Clarissa Yee, Y5, New Migrant Journeys, Sicily. A typology, to house migrant Tunisian agricultural workers in Sicily. The dwelling design draws upon Sicilian and Tunisian culture, each migrant worker is given a house, which is transported by lorries to agricultural lemon and almond picking sites, forming clusters of seasonal accommodation.

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22.17 incubation unit structure for temporary inhabitation in empty Fig. 22.15 Freya Cobbin, Y5, Harbour of Exchanges: National Apprenticeship Centre, Cartagena. Section and Plan. high street retail units. Implemented over three sites within the city, the proposal draws together both informal and formal spaces for learning and living in response to Cartagena’s vibrant street life and urban activity, fostering the process of knowledge interchange. Fig. 22.16 Megan Smedy, Y5, Eco-Hotel and Tourist Route within a South African landscape. The two main drivers for the design project are temporality (deconstructability) and a relationship with the natural environment. A series of functional carts have been designed to meet specific needs alongside the railway. These can be moved or deconstructed, as and when seasonal demands change. Fig. 22.17 Clarie Taggart, Y5, Start-Up City (Coventry). Adaptable live/work business 275


Dare to Care... Through a Year Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor with Helen&Hard


Unit 22

DARE TO CARE... THROUGH A YEAR Izaskun Chinchilla, Carlos Jiménez with Helen&Hard

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Technification pushed us to hold onto the illusion that humans are invulnerable. It has allowed economic privilege and the short-sightedness of the commercial sphere to overwhelm ecological and social circumstances. Modernity established an official language based on success, on the message that “everything is under control”. Probably the main architectural expression of this tradition is the visual predominance: modern architecture is mostly the visual demonstration of what we can build as an act of dominance. This year, Unit 22 has attempted to abandon the language of power and has embraced the language of care. To what extent we are enriching our context should be the main indicator of architectural quality. Through an architecture that Dares to Care, Unit 22 students have discovered the following:

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Many of the public and economic systems associated with power and governmental control require amazing resources. Helping threatened minor communities inside these systems can provide flexibility. A good example is Kaowen’s work, in which the private life of the British Monarchy helps the promotion of the UK car industry; or Julian’s work, in which immigrant communities in London decrease public expenditure on health by providing domestic vernacular treatments. Communal typologies will receive new benefits from preserving the particular intimacy and comfort of users renovating the archaic welfare state concept. Claire provided a double entrance and communication system to a dilapidated high rise enabling immigrant women to freely enjoy both public and intimate experiences together. By reassembling halls, stairs, courtyards and gardens in an office buildings, William went beyond the pure commercial image of the British office, instead providing a ‘landscape office’; thus ensuring a healthy and larger rentable working space. Building materials have been traditionally chosen for their mechanics. A more integral approach to materials, that takes time into account, adds new capacities relating material and shape with further processes. Clarissa worked with existing site materials to improve their performance by changing their state. She is using only soft techniques, such as transforming mud into footings with ‘jet grouting’. Negin created a modular system suitable for organic urban evolution. Self-supported frames are designed only for their own weight while lightweight screens absorb efforts due to their position in a bigger scheme. Users have the opportunity to overlap screens providing all for family changes through their lifetime. Cross design effects on different scales prevents sources of vulnerability. Urban architecture relies on the surrounding territory. Context not only provides ingredients for city construction, but it is also the source of energy,


logistics and materials for maintenance. Paul’s Food Banks react to scarcity in the agricultural belt around cities, learning how it can affect supplies. Insects and Kombucha tea provides a successful urban daily diet while providing independency from the surrounding territory. Liwei developed a housing project in which the necessary footprint for recycling waste is absorbed on-site.

Preserving vulnerability requires other methods than just drawing plans and sections. ZOETROPES are a good alternative example. These devices produce the illusion of motion from a rapid evolution of static figures. Each zoetrope accompanies users in a time-based activity focusing on parts of architecture that interacts with human actions in a continuous space, the space of life. Zoetropes force a dynamic vision on a scale that connects industrial design with landscape. Let’s dare to try. ROCA, VIDAL Y ASOCIADOS ARQUITECTOS and ARTEMIDE generously supported Unit 22. Richard Hyams has been practice tutor and Roberto Marin Sampalo has been structural consultant.

Year 4: Megan Smedy, Akmal Afandi Azhar, Clarissa Yee, Michelle Young, Megan Townsend, Claire Taggart, Kaowen Ho, Paul Leader-Williams Year 5: Sung-Hwa Rachel Cha, Liwei Deng, William Fisher, Negin Ghorbani-Moghaddam, Julian Zi Liang Huang, Paul McManamon, Sinan Pirie

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Our goals should be small but related to different issues, incorporating varied range of materiality, they should be based on existing structures and create new patterns that are partly made out of analogies from visible and non visible parts of reality. Megan S. transformed Essex Road into a homestead facility to provide ingredients to Upper Street restaurants. Michelle combined two programs that together raise awareness on the relationship between the preservation of intangible heritages and climate change. An urban quarry is used to refurbish Paris monuments and provides a new type of performance space. Megan T. created an urban market that offers new ways of neighbours’ development through participation in the production of the distributed goods and the use of the market over night.

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Understanding bodies can detail biological dimensions, which in turn gives enormous clues to reinforcing the ecosystem’s fragile balance. Preserving biological bodies help us to empower ecosystems when environmental complexity overwhelms our analytical capacity. Akmal prevents insomnia by living on the wild British coastline subjugating human behavior to natural rhythms. Rachel developed a way to promote laws for preserving American Landscapes by recording and playing back images and perceptions humans used to have.


Fig. 22.1 UNIT22, Zoetrope device. Fig. 22.2 AkmalAfandi Azhar, Cuptopus. Cupping bath tub based on the traditional cupping method to remove the contaminant in the vulnerable heart. Fig. 22.3 Michelle Young, UNESCO Centre of Intangible Cultural Heritage, Paris. Weather defined as the state of the atmosphere. In the new museum the building will aim to recreate the contexts, or most specifically the atmospheres, of the heritages that are being showcased. Fig. 22.4 Michelle Young, UNESCO Centre of Intangible Cultural Heritage, Paris. Arrangement of Exhibition Spaces, within the building, the exhibition spaces have been organized so that opportunities arise where visitors can view other visitors engaging in a performance of cultural heritage. Fig. 22.5 Megan Smedy, The High Street Homestead,

London. Collection of traditional atmospheres and popular knowledge to organize Housing Units, Farms, Edible Gardens & Test Labs, Existing Architectures and Public Kitchen. Fig. 22.6 Megan Smedy, The High Street Homestead, London. Façade study, composition of casted windows from Essex Road traditional shops facades.

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Fig. 22.7 Megan Smedy, The High Street Homestead, London. House Units plan. Vernacular and traditional techniques are combined with contemporary ones. Fig. 22.8 Megan Smedy, The High Street Homestead, London. The goat turrets are constructed of pre fabricated water tower components, however the wall system is bespoke. It is simply a double cable system that supports and constrains hay bales that sit between the two. Fig. 22.9 Megan Townsend. A Manifesto for a Local Consumerism Movement, Tower Hamlets Permanent Market and New Town Square, London. Long section (and small roof plan) of my building cutting through one of the germination towers and the main market and trading building, highlighting the community interaction with each of the buildings,

as well as how the building interacts with existing infrastructure, and the new landscaped area around the site. Fig. 22.10 — 22. 11 Clarissa Yee, Slow Housing Typology, Lancashire, UK. Familiar Kitchen and Comunal Kitchen desined to optimize the cooking procedures, maintining the highest level of vitamines.

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Fig. 22.12 Clarissa Yee, Slow Housing Typology, existing living spaces in Ampthill Square housing estate, Lancashire, UK. Communal kitchen modelled for video Somers Town whilst new towers and decks provide library, to explore user experience within internal spaces. exercise, childcare, garden and community hall spaces. Fig. 22.13 Claire Taggart, Social Housing, Creating social and extended community living spaces for a more sociable housing strategy in Ampthill Square Estate, Somers Town. London. Fig. 22.14 Claire Taggart, Social Housing- retrofit extensions to existing residential tower blocks in Ampthill Square housing estate, Somers Town stretch private social spaces into new connecting back garden balconies. Fig. 22.15 Claire Taggart, Social Housing — sequence model showing a typical day’s route through extended living spaces, play tower and library in Ampthill Square housing estate, Somers Town. Fig. 22.16 Claire Taggart, Social Housing- secondary façades extend

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Fig. 22.17 Kaowen Ho, The Vulnerable Queen, London. An Investigation into the symbiotic relationship of HRM The Queen and her people. Fig. 22.18 Kaowen Ho, The Vulnerable Queen, London. Inside the media machine. Fig. 22.19 Kaowen Ho, The Vulnerable Queen, London. The Queen and the media; perspective long section. Fig. 22.20 Kaowen Ho, The Vulnerable Queen, London. HRM vehicle display and maintenance. Fig. 22.21 Kaowen Ho, The Vulnerable Queen, London. speculative views of Buckingham Palace interiors.

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Fig. 22.22 Negin Ghorbani-Moghaddam, Modular Social Housing in Southall, London. Descriptions of a series of modifications of a privet modular dwelling following the needs of a family all through their life. Fig. 22.23 William Fisher. Cooperative office space in Euston, London.The project investigates how spaces in which people carry out office work can enable them to be more productive, more in control and happy with their work, and better placed to integrate work into a balanced life. Fig. Fig. 22.24 Sung Hwa Cha. Image Productions using Materials and Spaces. Pinhole camera photography Installation displayed in the lost landscape. The new artificial landscape integrated in the urban space allows Landscape Photographers to recreate impossible nature without digital technology. Fig. 22.25 Liwei Deng. Waste Issues And Vulnerable

Community. Newham, London. House typology designed thaking into consideration the collection and management of the domestic waste production in the UK. Recycling activities start just after consumption. The modifications, enlargements and dwelling improvements are encouraged by the regulations.

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Fig. 22.26 Paul McManamon, FOOD BANK #4 Project, London. The project is a model for the extension of London’s ailing infrastructure which supports the urban dweller, and thus is a response to the classification of London as a city of serious food and energy shortages. The proposal looks towards the future when London’s consumption is expected to be unable to meet demand and when the global population reaches 8.3 billion. This project introduces a half organic, half industrial architecture supplying the City of London with a new series of production and distribution network hubs that adapt their sizes to the amount of resources contained inside of them, feeding the city, providing jobs and reusing the existing architectural infrastructure. Fig. 22.27 Paul McManamon, FOOD BANK #4 Project, London.

The project creates an alternative sharing scheme which provides a rapid and dedicated distribution route network across London via the reinvention of the London post office railway as the ‘Resource-Rail’. Kombucha Towers producing organic cellulose and gas. Fig. 22.28 Paul McManamon, FOOD BANK #4 Project, London. The project envisages a municipal food production and energy system located in the abandoned royal mail centres across London, giving a purposeful and sustainable legacy to the mail infrastructure in the City.

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Fig. 22.29 Julian Huang. Instant Alternative Healthcare Service in Peckham, London. The proposal is set 50 years ahead in the future in 2060, when the NHS is predicted to have been fully privatised from the government. Instead it would be operated and ran by pharmaceutical corporations, who controls and manipulates who, why and how we access its health service. Collection of movable, semi-permanent and permanent Clinics. Each Clinic unit uses an specific medical procedure of the Peckham population. Fig. 22.30 Julian Huang. Instant Alternative Healthcare Service in Peckham, London. Instant access to healthcare procedures. Diagrams illustrating how local residents would be able to obtain healthcare as part of their everyday process; such as visiting the ‘Shiro Dhara’ clinic above the clothing store, the ‘Swedana’ clinic behind the hair salon, the ‘Pizhichil’

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clinic directly from the patient’s own home and the ‘firecupping’ clinic above the supermarket. A critical goal of the AHS is to provide treatment methods that are based on the local demographics, as future health care should consider not just who, but what type of health service could be administered. As our society is becoming ever more multi-cultural, our health service need evolve and reflect this change, and adapt fully to the different needs of its patients.


Fig. 22.31 Julian Huang. Instant Alternative Healthcare end destination where one goes to fix one’s health, but an Service in Peckham, London. Axonometric of Peckham on-going, continuous process that can interact/intervene showing the relationship between the various health with our daily lives. clinics and the local urban fabric, and how the implementation of an alternative health service would alter the urban landscape of the area. A network of over 25 mobile, temporary and semi-permanent alternative health clinics would offer instant access of health service to its local population, as opposed to the often arduous and long waiting time offered by the NHS. These health clinics would be diffused and saturated into the everyday places of the urban fabric. These include a variety of shops, bars, gyms, restaurants and entertainments complexes, the aim of this is to create a much more dynamic health care system, where places of medical practice is not an

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(In-)Water Dwelling and Some Other Clues Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Carlos JimĂŠnez Cenamor


M A rc h A rch U n i t 22

(IN-)WATER DWELLING AND SOME OTHER CLUES

Izaskun Chinchilla & Carlos Jiménez

Water’s essential nature makes it a strategic natural resource globally. Riparian water rights have become issues of international diplomacy, in addition to domestic and regional water rights and politics. World Bank Vice President Ismail Serageldin predicted, ‘Many of the wars of the 20th century were about oil, but wars of the 21st century will be over water.’ The causes are many and varied; they include local scarcity, limited availability and population pressures, but also human activities of mass consumption, misuse, environmental degradation and water pollution, as well as climate change. Fresh water — now more precious than ever in our history for its extensive use in agriculture, high-tech manufacturing, and energy production — is increasingly receiving attention as a resource requiring better management and sustainable use. Water is, therefore, a whole REAL issue. For many other pedagogical techniques, the evaluation of the students’ work depends principally on academic facts — representation, beauty, material ability. In contrast, Unit 22 tries to measure the value of architecture observing how it improves and rearranges reality. This blurring of the academic goals in the final object of design will encourage the student to define what is necessary and desirable, achieving what we will call Meaningful Learning (Asubel,

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1963), which drives the students to realise that their decisions have real and sometimes outstanding results and consequences for reality. The students’ design produces not only statements and reflection but also informs social and political realities. Reality has been conceptualised as a wild field of crossinfluences not previously classified in typologies or styles in which everything is possible and everything is problematic. Reality has not been a previously fixed system providing limits to the action of the student, but the complex result of the highly defined student action and proposal. Adam’s giant water canopy establishes a shared use of wet domestic activities, allowing to dramatically reduce time assigned for housework and coining the expression Water Socialism. Jawad housing towers and soap factory make it possible to maintain, irrigate and plant seasonally stripes of lavender fields over all roofs looking south-east to downtown Marseilles, competing with the southwest visual identity of the Mediterranean blue. In Tony´s houses you can watch your baby oysters from the living room and the whole neighbourhood allows for the rearrangement of ecological balance. All students have worked on empowering the user capacities and have faced plenty of problematic and difficult situations. THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONFIDENCE. Year 4: Victoria Bateman, Liwei Deng, Catherine Francis, Negin Ghorban-Moghaddam, Julian Zi Liang Huang, Paul McManamon, Anna Mill, Sinan Pirie, Megan Smedy Year 5: Abdeljawad Abdelhafid, David Ronald Cheape, Jen Ting Chu, Adam Holland, Winston Luk, Anthony Staples


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22.6 Fig. 22.1 Negin Ghorbani-Moghaddam. Market Community. Chiloé, Chile. Façade studies for the Chiloé market community housing. The programme for a market community is conceived as a new public and domestic focal point for Castro. The mixed-use scheme provides: formal trading space, 50 live-work housing units, 25–50 bed space for visitors and a new ‘everyday’ public space. Fig. 22.2 Taling Chan, Market Restaurant, Bangkok, Thailand. Partial section. Partial section. New kitchen buildings should preserve existing vegetation. Fig. 22.3 Paul McManamon. The Clesea Urban Reservoir. London. The project suggests a private members’ urban reservoir spa and water purification complex in Chelsea by the River Thames which provides luxurious flavoured drinking water for the affluent Chelsea locals, where each month flavour is added to the water via the existing chimneys, reusing the abandoned Lots

Road Plant Poweras, a lido/water reservoir. The scheme will collect, store, filter and clean Thames water. Fig. 22.4 Victoria Bateman. Cookery School, Cornwall. Landscape connections. The surrounding landscape design helps to absorb the impact of human activity on the environment, especially in relation to critical nearby ecosystem services. Fig. 22.5 Sinan Pirie, Balat Community Wastewater Gardens. Istanbul, Turkey. Greenhouse section. A water treatment plant located in the centre of Istanbul treats waste inputs as a resource, providing benefits for the local community (water for the hammam located below the greenhouses, clean supply for the pleasure garden water features and irrigation). Fig. 22.6 Sinan Pirie, Balat Community Wastewater Gardens. Istanbul, Turkey. Mobile Hammam. A specific sequence of preparation is undertaken each time the hammam moves to a new location involving collaboration with the local community.

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22.8 Fig. 22.7 Julian Huang. East London Horticultural club cum Alternative Treatment Centre. Section of Alternative Treatment Centre. The East London horticultural club is a new hub of alternative and preventative treatment where the local community is invited to participate in the maintenance of the gardens and allotments which supply the alternative treatment centre with ingredients such as essential oils and herbs. Fig. 22.8 Adam Holland, Water Socialism. Plumbed water from residents’ houses is removed and a new water-based infrastructure is created. Rainwater is collected and filtered using a series of suspended glass canopies above the town, providing Economic, Environmental and Social benefits. Fig. 22.9 Leo Chu, Cultural Embassy for Southeast Asian Union. Bangkok, Thailand. Building configuration and urban relationship aiming to make ‘power’ transparent

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through its programme and the meaning it conveys, a democratic and ‘free embassy’. Fig. 22.10 Ronald Cheape, The Three Glens Dam Project. Scotland. Following on from the growth in the renewable energy sector in the NW of Scotland, the project proposes an inhabited multiple arch structure hydroelectric dam and a working holiday resort that inhabits the dam wall. Fig. 22.11 Winston Luk. Inhabiting Pripyat, Ucrania. Pripyat Hotel. The new tourism boom Pripyat has experienced has given rise to the possible requirement of a hotel in the area. The curiosity of visitors to come to the area allows them to dictate their own fate; whether they want to live within the old abandoned buildings littered with radioactive dust or to remain on the outside. Fig. 22.12 Winston Luk. Inhabiting Pripyat, Ucrania. Typical Housing Section. Showing the hydroponic gardens, and mechanisms that provide clean water for the residents


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22.13 and also that aid the decontamination process of existing buildings. Fig. 22.13 Winston Luk. Inhabiting Pripyat, Ucrania. Elevational Section. Showing the requirements of the housing units to be elevated off the ground to minimise the effect of ionising radiation.

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22.19 Fig. 22.14 Anthony Staples, Canvey Archipelago. The negotiation boardgame Masterplan for Canvey Archipelago, a continual process of negotiation guarantees adaptation to changing realities. Fig. 22.15 Anthony Staples, Canvey Archipelago. Ex-industrial fishing. The defunct industrial oil refineries on Canvey are reappropriated to desalinate water, breed fish and grow vegetables. Fig. 22.16 Anthony Staples, Canvey Archipelago. The oyster pub — Leigh-on-sea. Fig. 22.17 Anthony Staples, Canvey Archipelago. Living in a crow’s nest. The island’s maritime traditions and skilled local builders enable the construction of a floating destination equally attractive to migratory birds as well as visitors. Fig. 22.18 Anthony Staples, Canvey Archipelago. Oyster terrace. As marsh and tidal mudflats begin to encroach on residential areas the existing housing typology must be modified.

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Fig. 22.19 Anthony Staples, Canvey Archipelago. Oyster suburbs. The suburbs are adapted to aid the inhabitation of oyster as well as human islanders; each user benefits from a reciprocal relationship. Fig. 22.20 Jawad Abdelhafid. The Ultra-Rational, Ultra-Contextual, Ultra-Adaptable Unité of Purification, Marseille. Landscape vision showing the purification of water, the city, the human and architecture. The Ultra-Rational, Ultra-Contextual and Ultra-Adaptable Unite of Purification purifies not only water. It also purifies the human soul (this was Le Corbusier’s obsession) and the city; the man becoming a new part of a new industrial reality, and the city with a new post-industrial landscape of flowers. Fig. 22.21 Jawad Abdelhafid. The Ultra-Rational, Ultra-Contextual, Ultra-Adaptable Unité of Purification, Marseille. The Site-plan Semblant of the Three Corbusian Potentialities. A Windy July evening on the site.


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Decadence John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak


Dip Unit 22 Yr 4: Carrie Behar, Jonathan Harvey, Christopher Hildrey, Milad Hossainzadeh, Bceddyn Jones, Kevin Kelly, Raphaela Potter. Yr 5: Martin Brooks, Christopher Bryant, Han Chun Chen, Maria-Eugenia Chiotopoulou-Isaia, Anna Hastings, Lida Kokorelia, Gemma Clare Noakes, Natasha Telford, Evie Tsigeridou, Chung Ming Janice Wong.

Decadence We live in a time of excess. In our work, our lifestyles, our aspirations - and in our architecture - we have thrown off the values of the past and indulged in a new freedom. We live in a time of extremes. Great opulence exists alongside extreme scarcity. These conditions sprawl across the globe and compact themselves into cities. But is opulence the same as decadence, and scarcity the same as modesty? Can decadence exist without decay? This year, Unit 22 questioned what defines modesty and decadence at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The unit studied these conditions and questioned how they manifest themselves in contemporary life and architecture. From this basis students developed projects that exploited and exaggerated the existing conditions of modesty and decadence, attempting to anticipate future trends

Peter Szczepaniak and John Puttick Christopher Bryant, A House of Cards: A Contemporary Tower of Babel.

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This page top to bottom: Jonathan Harvey, The Rickshaw Rank; Gemma Noakes, The Orchestral Island. Facing page, clockwise from top left: Carrie Behar, Last Tango in Peckham; Han Chun Chen, The Nature Observation Centre; Milad Hossainzadeh, Bonsai Cultivation; Raphaela Potter, The Puppetry Guild; Christopher Hildrey, The Specialist Tobacconist; Rhys Jones, Auguracula; Natasha Telford The Snail Restaurant; Chung Ming Janice Wong, Butterflies and Plants Research Centre; Kevin Kelly, Dapper Dogs: Hair Boutique; Anna Hastings, Ode to Vellamo: the Finnish Fishing Village. Show Cat 08.indd 148

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Left: Maria-Eugenia Chiotopoulou-Isaia and Lida Kokorelia, City Garden. Right: Martin Brooks, The Weather Station; Facing page: Evie Tsigeridou, The Mechanical Garden.

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Patterns John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak


Dip Unit 22 Yr 4: Martin Brooks, Christopher Bryant, Joanna Chen, Ki Wing May Ho, Lida Kokorelia, Evie Tsigeridou, Chung Ming Wong. Yr 5: Beatie Blakemore, Yeo Jin Choi, Shyuan Kuee, Hazel Levene, Jane Middlehurst, Amy Poulsom, Caspar Rodgers, Tristan Wigfall, Irene Yeung.

Patterns An exploration of the nature of patterns will form the point of departure for the unit’s work this year. Adopting the position that the world as we perceive it is constituted by a kaleidoscope of patterns continuously evolving over time, the unit will examine the characteristics that define patterns and the possibilities that these present for the design of architecture. The relevance of such notions as simplicity, repetition and recurrence will be carefully considered. During the first term, each unit member will identify a specific pattern or series of related patterns which they will analyse and interpret to establish a set of design parameters. The unit will encourage a plurality of different approaches to the selection of patterns and the manner in which they are subsequently translated into boundaries for a design. Patterns might range from those directly associated with physical phenomena such as geological traces, paths of migration and movement, ebb and flow and entropic dispersal, to patterns that are located within particular social and cultural rituals and behaviours, a poem or a piece of music, a mathematical model or a geometric abstraction. The design parameters and ideas developed in the first term will then be applied over the course of the year to create an architectural proposition. As part of its initial research into patterns, the unit will travel to Barcelona.

Peter Szczepaniak and John Puttick


This and facing page: Caspar Rodgers.


This page: Tristan Wigfall. Facing page, clockwise from top left: Beatie Blakemore, Amy Poulsom, Shyuan Kuee, Yeojin Choi, Irene Yeung, Hazel Levene.


This page, clockwise from top left: Chris Bryant, Joanna Chen, Lida Kokorelia, May Ho, Evie Tsigeridou, Janice Wong, Martin Brookes.Facing page: Jane Middlehurst.


Tales of the Unexpected John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak


Dip Unit 22 Yr 4: Yeo Jin Choi, Hazel Levene, Jane Middlehurst, Amy Poulsom, Caspar Rodgers, Tristan Wigfall, Irene Yeung. Yr 5: Marcus White, Sue Lyn Ang, Jeanie Chang, Harriet Comben, Serena Croxson, Pereen D’Avoine, Christopher Daniel, Konstantinos Karabatakis, Noor Abdul Aziz.

Tales of the Unexpected This year the unit endeavoured to explore, question and manipulate established conventions in order to reveal the Unexpected. Initially, students were asked to choose a set of distinct and separate conditions, which could relate to a particular site, context, form and/or programme. Following a period of research into each of the conditions, the students investigated the possibilities of cutting, splicing, weaving and/or stitching these together in order to create architectures and scenarios that would deviate from the normal. In pursuing the 'twist in the tale', the strategy adopted by the unit shared many similarities with the Surrealist technique of the 'exquisite corpse' - a method by which a collective collage of images or words would be formed on a sheet of folded paper passed between participants. Just as the resulting designs or writing would adhere to the Surrealist principle of metaphoric displacement, so the assemblage of conditions chosen by students would attempt to partially dissolve the conventions associated with them and reveal the Unexpected. The unit encouraged a plurality of different responses to the programme and the selection of initial conditions. As part of its investigations, the unit travelled to Budapest and Venice with the majority of students choosing sites and programmes in one of the two cities.

Peter Szczepaniak and John Puttick

Top left: Amy Poulsom. Bottom: Harriet Comben.


Clockwise from top: Irene Yeung, Noor Abdul Aziz, Konstantinos Karabatakis, Jane Middlehurst, Yeo jin Choi.


Top: Chris Daniel. Bottom: Pereen D’Avoine .


Clockwise from top: Caspar Rodgers, Tristan Wigfall, Hazel Levene.


Top: Jeanie Chang. Bottom: Marcus White.


Top: Serena Croxon. Bottom: Lyn Ang.


Ordinary/Extraordinary John Puttick, Peter Szczepaniak


Dip Unit 22 Yr 4: Sue Lyn Ang, Jeanie Chang, Serena Croxson, Christopher Daniel, Catherine Fearon, Konstantinos Karabatakis, Sang Hoon Kim, Nicholas Stearns, Marcus White. Yr 5: Eleanor Brough, Ji Hyang Ja Kim, Vanda Oliveira, David Roy, Fiona Sheppard, Jason Spiliotakos, Niek Turner, Thomas Van Hoffelen, Daniel Welham, Karen Wong.

Ordinary/Extraordinary Ordinary 1. According to established order; methodical; settled; regular. 2. Common; customary; usual. 3. Of common rank, quality, or ability; not distinguished by superior excellence or beauty; hence, not distinguished in any way; commonplace; inferior. Extraordinary 1. Beyond or out of the common order or method; not usual, customary, or regular. 2. Exceeding the common degree, measure, or condition; hence, remarkable; uncommon; rare; wonderful. An interrogation of the distinction between ‘ordinary’ and ‘extraordinary’ formed the central theme of the unit’s work this year. Beginning with an exploration of the apparently dualistic nature of these terms in relation to a set of specific conditions, the unit attempted to identify the boundaries that separate and define the ‘ordinary’ and ‘extraordinary’ and to expose the territory which might lie inbetween. Strategies for achieving this included juxtaposition, hybridisation, deformation, exaggeration and subversion. The resulting architecture seeks to locate the extraordinary within the ordinary and the ordinary within the extraordinary. Unit 22 encouraged a plurality of different responses to the programme, both in the selection of initial conditions and the strategies adopted. As part of its investigations, the unit travelled to Finland and Estonia.

John Puttick and Peter Szczepaniak

Top: Karen Wong, bottom: Fiona Sheppard.


Clockwise from top left: Eleanor Brough, Thomas Van Hoffelen, Daniel Welham, Vanda Oliveira, Ji Hyang Ja Kim, Niek Turner. Overleaf, left: David Roy, right: Jason Spiliotakos.


ucl.ac.uk/architecture

Bartlett Design Anthology | Unit 22  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...

Bartlett Design Anthology | Unit 22  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...