Page 1

Design Anthology UG0 BSc Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 1) Compiled from Bartlett Books 2010–2017


Our Design DNA At The Bartlett School of Architecture, we have been publishing annual exhibition catalogues for each of our design-based programmes for more than a decade. These catalogues, amounting to thousands of pages, illustrate the best of our students’ extraordinary work. Our new Design Anthology series brings together the annual catalogue pages for each of our renowned units, clusters, and labs, to give an overview of how their practice and research has evolved. Throughout this time some teaching partnerships have remained constant, others have changed. Students have also progressed from one programme to another. Nevertheless, the way in which design is taught and explored at The Bartlett School of Architecture is in our DNA. Now with almost 50 units, clusters and labs in the school across eight programmes, the Design Anthology series shows how we define, progress and reinvent our agendas and themes from year to year. Professor Frédéric Migayrou Chair of The Bartlett School of Architecture Professor Bob Sheil Director of The Bartlett School of Architecture


2017 Pleasure! Murray Fraser (on sabbatical), Tamsin Hanke, Sara Shafiei 2016 Soft City Murray Fraser, Justin C.K. Lau, Sara Shafiei 2015 Urban Rituals Murray Fraser, Justin C. K. Lau, Sara Shafiei 2014 Movement London Murray Fraser, Justin C.K. Lau 2013 Exchange Murray Fraser, Kenny Kinugasa-Tsui, Justin C.K. Lau 2012 The Edge of London Murray Fraser, Pierre d’Avoine 2010 Collections, Collectors and Hoarders Abigail Ashton


2017 Pleasure! Murray Fraser (on sabbatical), Tamsin Hanke, Sara Shafiei


UG0

Pleasure! Murray Fraser (on sabbatical), Tamsin Hanke, Sara Shafiei

Year 2 James Carden, Yoojin Chung, Theo Clarke, Dan Johnson, Megan Makinson, Chloe Woodhead, George Wallis Year 3 Freya Bolton, Jun Chan, Ella Caldicott, Elliot Nash, Jimmy Liu, Dan Pope, Claudia Walton

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Thank you to: Mike Arnett, Edwina Attlee, Tim Barwell, Matthew Butcher, Joanne Chen, Max Dewdney, Stephen Gage, Ruairi Glynn, Ewa Hazla, Jessica In, Lilly Kudic, Chee Kit Lai, CJ Lim, Mads Peterson, Jonathan Pile, Richard Townend, Emmanuel Vercruysse, Patrick Weber Sponsored by Bean Buro

26

Our theme for the year was pleasure. This is a complex concept, but also a deeply important one. From Ancient Greece through to more recent historical thinkers, such as Jeremy Bentham, Sigmund Freud and Henri Lefebvre, pleasure has long been one of the guiding principles of human existence. We conceived of pleasure in its widest sense, and as such, included the wide range of architectural, spatial, social and cultural discoveries that can be found in the modern city. How, then, can architects contribute to a contemporary concept of pleasure? Urban tactics for a city like London suggest a need for play, subversion, fantasy, temporariness, mobility and transgression. This year, therefore, Unit 0 students were asked to investigate and conceive projects that hinged upon ideas of urban delight. To start the year, students scrutinised the pleasures of everyday existence for those living in London. This involved them in rediscovering ignored, or neglected, acts of utility and function, and investigating manoeuvres and behaviours carried out instinctively. How might the process of recording these activities or things come to be seen as a moment of pleasure, perhaps by enhancing or subverting the course of the everyday, or by taking delight in silent but novel ways of capturing moments of happiness? Students imagined how the everyday might be re-read as a thing of surprise, disruption and enjoyment, thereby creating spaces or objects of delight. Our unit field trip in early January was to Mumbai and Ahmedabad, along with some stepwells in the Gujarat province, where we studied the conditions of pleasure to be found there in many guises. We uncovered the excitement held within ancient pieces of architecture and relived the anticipation of modernist architects as they broke ground. Students visited craftsmen who daily find inspiration and materials from the landscapes around them, and met with those in architectural schools and practices there.


BSc Architecture UG0

OPENING SPREAD – FULL BLEED IMAGE ON FACING PAGE Ensure image ‘bleeds’ 3mm beyond the trim edge.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.0 0.1 27


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.1 Freya Bolton Y3, ‘A Tailored Sanatorium’, Vale of Health, Hampstead, NW3. A day-care health centre helps those affected by pollution as London’s air quality becomes increasingly hostile. Conceived as a protective suit and sited in the appropriately named Vale of Health, occupants are alienated from the city around them. The breathable garment shrouds the building’s body at points where the drench of rain would be felt, yet it never wholly seals the interior. Rather, the building embraces its surroundings while acting as a defensive barrier to external pollutants. Fig. 0.2 Ella Caldicott Y3, ‘Aseptic/Administrative IV Clinic’, East India Dock Basin, E14. This walk-in clinic for IV (intravenous) therapy has two halves on either side of the dock inlet: on one side is an aseptic drug preparation facility, and on the other the administration clinic

– with the pharmacy acting as a ‘kissing gate’ between them. These elements are normally never placed together, yet here their subtle intercommunication produces its own sense of functional ornamentation. Fig. 0.3 Jun Hao Chan Y3, ‘Capability Brown’s Unfinished Landscape’, Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire. The influential eighteenth-century landscape architect, Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown, owned this site but never got a chance to design it. This project therefore aims to translate the uniform horizontality of the landscape into a series of rotationally cast interventions that bring out both its picturesque and its sublime qualities.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.2

0.0 0.3 28

0.0 0.4


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.5 0.0

29


BSc Architecture UG0 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Figs. 0.4 – 0.5 Jun Hao Chan Y3, ‘Institute of Geographers’, Mudchute, Isle of Dogs, E14. How can the concept of horizon, as the intersection of ground and sky, be translated and challenged architecturally? Just southwest of Mudchute City Farm, a new Institute of Geographers responds to the alliance between human and physical geography caused by scientists’ declaration of a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. The building interacts directly with the site’s geology through raw excavation, using special foundation techniques and the earth as formwork for concrete casting. As a result, the boundaries between earth, ground plane and inhabitable space become blurred, promoting a novel spatial experience for users. Figs. 0.6 – 0.7 Ella Caldicott Y3, ‘Survival of the Prettiest’. Beauty and pleasure are interlinked through factors such as symmetry,

thus also serving a functional purpose in evolutionary adaptation. Here a scientific study of butterflies and geometric patterns creates intense delight through slicing, folding and dissecting. Figs. 0.8 – 0.9 Freya Bolton Y3, ‘The Pluviophile’. Encapsulating the duality of an experience when felt in two different places, London’s rain – harsh drops ricocheting off concrete surfaces – stands in contrast to the immersive, atmospheric rain in the northern woods outside Preston. The culmination is a suit for a Pluviophile, someone who loves rain. When worn, the suit invokes sodden and restrictive clothing, thereby reminding its wearer of home amidst the nondescript rain in London. Fig. 0.10 Daniel Johnston Y2, ‘The Insurance Market’, St Dunstan-in-the-East, City of London, EC3. Next to a derelict City church, this project

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

30


0.10

0.11

0.0 0.12

0.13

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

Theatre’, Carey Street, WC2. Directly behind the Royal Courts of Justice, an innovative type of courthouse is proposed that uses theatre and set design to reconstruct the physical environment of the case being tried, so as to counteract the inaccuracies and distortions of witnesses’ memory of criminal events.

BSc Architecture UG0

alternates between the formal space of an insurance broker and an everyday repair market where you can simply get something fixed. Suspended leather for the insurance office hints at the opulence and comfort of traditional banks, creating – perhaps – a false sense of security when buying insurance. Breaks within the stitching form pockets to file documents, stash cash, or quiet spaces to console oneself after a heavy claim. Figs. 0.11 – 0.12 Chloe Woodhead Y2, ‘A Natural Education’, Forest Road, Dalston, E8. Amidst a square of London’s dwellings, an after-school facility is buried into the soil beneath an exquisitely undulating roof – partly occupied and partly planted – to encourage 4- to 11-year-old children to immerse themselves and learn through play within the natural environment. Fig. 0.13 Claudia Walton Y3, ‘The Memory

31


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.14 James Carden Y2, ‘30 Minutes’, Shoreditch High Street, E1. In an abandoned petrol station in trendy Shoreditch, a night-time observatory within a pocket urban park allows occupants to glimpse the stars and planets above. The choreographed walking route through the project takes half an hour to complete, allowing for one’s eyesight to acclimatise to this microclimate of darkness in the city. Fig. 0.15 Elliot Nash Y3, ‘Resting the Black Cab’, Stoke Newington Common, N16. The iconic and nostalgic black cab is a mobile landmark within London, yet cabbies are suffering. This project forecasts change by imagining a future in which only one hundred London cabbies exist: their prices have been forced up, and they have become an exclusive service. The building serves and monumentalises the cab, welcoming back the Victorian

cabmen’s shelter as an exclusive place of rest. Fig. 0.16 Megan Makinson Y2, ‘A Factory of Domesticity’, Barnard Park, N1. Within a Victorian terraced street, the building provides a space for three families to inhabit and make wallpaper, thereby reviving a traditional manufacturing process. Hung paper screens act as the membrane between the domestic and the factory, allowing visitors the pleasure of peeling back a layer of wallpaper to glimpse the inhabitants’ lives.

0.0 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.0 0.14

0.0 0.15

0.17

0.16 32


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.17

33


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.17 Claudia Walton Y3, ‘Spatialising Memory’. This is an exploration of differing perceptions of time during an event, particularly temporal illusions during moments of stress, and the effects these can then have on the space around us – such as in the personal memory of falling from a bicycle. Fig. 0.18 Jimmy Liu Y3, ‘Kensington Cuteness’, Kensington, W8. Using dwellings near to Holland Park, the project seeks to cutify London’s terraced houses. Starting by deforming their front elevations through mathematical/geometrical rules, a series of structural interventions and material injections strip away Victorian conventions. Fig. 0.19 Dan Pope Y3, ‘A Stage for Poplar’, Jamestown Way, E14. A watery riverside landscape offers stages for protest in East London, as part of a broader scheme to amplify protest. Elements are conceived of as

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.0 0.18

0.0

0.0 0.19 34

deployable interruptions within the public space, manipulating how the protests are viewed and broadcast. Strategically placed inflatable silhouette screens capture and project people’s movements, whilst urinals clip together in pockets to encourage gathering. Fig. 0.20 Dan Pope Y3, ‘What Happened to Irene?’ On 18 April 1964, the body of Irene Lockwood, who had been murdered, was discovered on the Thames bank in Hammersmith. This project forensically reconstructs viewpoints from multiple witnesses through a material language that distinguishes ‘known’ from ‘unknown’. 3D scanning technology proves an unreliable witness, as metallic surfaces in the model glitch the scanner, creating spaces of narrative ambiguity.


BSc Architecture UG0

Ensure image ‘bleeds’ 3mm beyond the trim edge.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2017

0.0 0.20

35


2016

Soft City Murray Fraser, Justin C.K. Lau, Sara Shafiei


UG0

Soft City Murray Fraser, Justin C.K. Lau, Sara Shafiei

Year 2 Peter Davies, Qi (Nichole) Ho, Simina Marin, Carolina Mondragon, Rosie Murphy, Elena Real-Davies, Louise Rymell, Felix Sagar

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

Year 3 Linzi Ai, Angus Iles, Cheuk Wang (Chaplin) Ko, Ka Wing (Clarence) Ku, Maryna Omelchenko, Achilleas Papakyriakou, Sophie Percival, Bethan Ring, Ben Sykes-Thompson Thanks to our consultants and critics: Julia Backhaus, Tim Barwell, Anthony Boulanger, Eva Branscome, Matthew Butcher, Mollie Claypool, Pierre D’Avoine, George Epolito, Pedro Font-Alba, Stephen Gage, Penelope Haralambidou, Ewa Hazla, Jonathan Hill, Johan Hybschmann, Tim Ireland, Mary Johnson, Hazel McGregor, Martin Manfai, Roy Nash, Jack Newton, Justin Nicholls, Luke Olsen, Stuart Piercy, Aleksandra Rizova, Bob Sheil, Matthew Springett, Ben Stringer, Michiko Sumi, Richard Townend, Graeme Williamson Thanks to our sponsors Bean Buro

26

The theme of the unit for this year was the ‘soft city’. Students were asked to investigate ways of looking differently at a major global city such as London, seeing it not as a harsh or alienating environment, or as existing only in the realm of economics and other systems, but rather as an open and fluid entity that allows for many readings of ‘softness’. This term could be understood literally, in terms of the relative density/hardness of the materials which are used to create buildings and urban spaces; or else more metaphorically in terms of the flows and interactions of human bodies, energies, weather patterns, trees, plants and animal species within the city; or else poetically through the expression of feelings such as love, warmth, openness and communality. How can designing the spatial practices and physical qualities of softness contribute to our urban experience, including the enhancement of sensations such as health and wellbeing? How might softness and hardness be designed together, whether in opposition or symbiosis, or indeed as some complex hybrid form? To start the year, students were asked to investigate their personal understanding of London through an artefact, or perhaps a series of artefacts, which explored ideas of softness in relation to a specific area of the city. The aim of designing and/or making this artefact(s) was to introduce a diverse set of sensibilities and ideas about London as a ‘soft city’. These investigations then fed into the main design project for each student, in which they developed their own particular theme on a site of their own choosing within London in order to engage more substantively with ideas of softness in metropolitan life. These projects were asked to deal with aspects of social and cultural life (eating, sleeping, congregating, etc); economic exchange (business, shops, markets, etc); ritualised ceremonies (religion, shopping, education, etc); urban performances (media, theatre, sport, etc); or environmental conditions (parks, gardening, seasonal activities, etc). Our unit field trip, from late November to early December, was to northern India, during which we visited the cities of Delhi/New Delhi, Chandigarh, Jaipur, Jodhpur and Agra. There we encountered very different cultural attitudes and traditions towards issues of softness/ hardness, openness/closure, official/unofficial within the city, and this in turn greatly enriched the projects that students designed this year.


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

0.1

0.1

27


BSc Architecture UG0 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

Fig. 0.1 Ben Sykes-Thompson Y3, ‘Sensing Silvertown, Millennium Mills’, Rayleigh Road, E16. Geometric projection of entire scheme. A disused flour mill in the Royal Docks is turned into a sensory park based upon sight, sound and smell. In part of the older tradition of parks providing repose within the city, here that is accentuated by inserting new facilities through which citizens can self-diagnose early-stage problems developing in their eyes, ears and noses. As a landscape project and a creative reuse of a powerful existing building, a novel community-distributed model of healthcare is promoted. Figs. 0.2 – 0.3 Ben Sykes-Thompson Y3, ’Memory Mapping’. Folded section; physical model. We understand cities not through maps or fixed notions of time, but by individual journeys through the urban continuum. In doing so, we link

together seemingly disparate places based on our durations of travel and occupation, as shown by a series of models and folded drawings. Fig. 0.4 Rosie Murphy Y2, ‘Centre for Slow Sports’, Finsbury Square, EC2. Basement plan; time-stretched basement plan. Urban workers need places to escape the frantic pace of London, so a slow sports centre in the City of London offers a chance to engage in time-honoured pursuits like bowls, chess, tiddlywinks, and staring contests. Sunk into a basement car park below an urban square, sensations of time are investigated graphically in sliced and extended drawings.

0.2

0.3

0.4 28


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.5 Simina Marin Y2, ‘Edible Eden’, Camley Street Natural Park, King’s Cross, N1. Physical model. In the much-loved but much-threatened Camley Street park, an innovative strategy aims to resist the gentrification and displacement of the King’s Cross redevelopment by building a nutrition school for local children. By introducing them to the processes involved in growing and cooking food, the revised park will stimulate play, physical pleasure, and a healthier diet for these children.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

0.5 29


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.6 Peter Davies Y2, ‘Softening Brutalism’, Barbican Estate, EC2. Physical model; render; general projection showing lines of views. Examining Brutalism's legacy, it is clear that the clichéd views about its harshness and inhumanity are grossly exaggerated. By careful analysis of the Barbican Estate through light and colour, a softer and more nuanced appreciation is derived. Fig. 0.7 Felix Sagar Y2, ‘Psychological Thresholds’, Prince Albert Road, Regent’s Park, NW1. Geometric projection. The boundary edges of Regent’s Park offer scant preparation or protection for those who suffer from psychological conditions like agoraphobia, and find its open spaces terrifying. A new after-school centre and playground helps children with such anxieties to develop a happier relationship with this loveliest of Royal Parks.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

0.6 30


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

0.7

31


BSc Architecture UG0 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

Fig. 0.8 Carolina Mondragon Y2, ‘Incendiary Institute’, Bethnal Green, E1. Physical model. In a dense urban site near Brick Lane, a test facility is created for experimental new materials being developed by the digital artisanal culture now developing in that area. Visitors can walk around and enjoy the burning of materials to experience the softness of ashes, probably the softest of all our urban materials. Fig. 0.9 Cheuk Wang (Chaplin) Ko Y3, ‘Prisoners of Knowledge’, Camden Road, Holloway, N7. Physical model. In this twist on the ‘halfway houses’ used to re-introduce prisoners to society, here the emphasis is on rehousing/training those who worked as prison librarians. Deep shade and bright light highlight the book displays that are open to the public, especially local children. Fig. 0.10 Linzi Ai Y3, ‘The Snug’, Princess Louise Pub, Holborn,

WC1. Embossed drawing. Within the toughness of Victorian London, the city’s pubs offered decorative oases of rest and indulgence, made especially soft in the snug bars of the Princess Louise and other pubs. Now this sense of material and decoration can be reused to design places of drinking in contemporary London. Fig. 0.11 Ka Wu (Clarence) Ku Y3, ‘Flying Breakfast’, City Airport, Hartmann Road, E16. Test models. Flight crews coming in and out of the increasingly internationalised City Airport are provided with a special hotel where they can stop over, and above all, enjoy wondrous 'Full English' breakfasts that incorporate bacon, eggs and other produce grown on site.

0.0 0.8

0.0 0.9

0.10

0.11

32


0.12

0.13

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

square and local houses, and which records the displacement of people and their possessions from London over time. Figs. 0.14 – 0.15 Bethan Ring Y3, ‘Lund Point Mash-Up’, Carpenters Estate, Stratford, E15. Geometric projection, pattern book construction sheets. Stratford is one of London’s development hotspots but this is leading to the erasure of the communities that once lived there. So, rather than demolishing a tower block on the Carpenters Estate, this design strips it back to basics and provides facilities for a diverse mixture of users: allotments for existing residents, live/work studio spaces for artists, digital fabrication laboratories for UCL students, and a rooftop vantage point for West Ham football fans.

BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.12 Maryna Omelchenko Y3, ‘Farm/Temple of Falling Water’, Commercial Road, Limehouse, E14. Geometric projection. In gritty Limehouse, close to the canal basin, a new urban farm is inserted that also serves as a place of contemplation for those who wish to walk through it. Aeroponic tubes are fed with water that is collected on a large disused railway bridge, thereby linking the local environment directly to the building’s programme. Fig. 0.13 Elena Real-Davies Y2, ‘The Museum of Impermanence’, Rochester Square, Camden, NW1. Poster. Housing rights in London are being eroded through escalating prices and punitive legislation, so in a Camden square a group of squatters take action. A political campaign to defend their occupation is then turned into a museum that occupies the

0.14

0.15 33


BSc Architecture UG0

Figs. 0.16 – 0.18 Sophie Percival Y3, ‘Holly-Burb-Land’, Hampstead Garden Suburb, NW11. Physical models of bricks; section; ground-floor plan. So successful has Hampstead Garden Suburb been in defying change that it has become perhaps what it was always destined to be, a television and film set for endless Edwardian class-based dramas. Here a few existing houses are stealthily tuned into studios by peeling back walls, inserting luminous pink bricks, and hiding camera positions into the ubiquitous hedges that line the estate. Fig. 0.19 Achilleas Papakyriakou Y3, ‘Asclepeion by the Thames’, Doon Street, South Bank Centre, London SE1. Ground-floor plan; section. In Ancient Greece, those experiencing mental health issues could retire for a while to an asclepeion, a retreat that included bathing pools, theatres,

0.16 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

0.17

0.18 34

libraries, and other places to sit and think and recover. Using the Greek-inspired Olivier Theatre and the cultural facilities of the South Bank as its trigger, this scheme offers sumptuous relaxing baths to citizens on what is currently a grungy car park.


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2016

0.19

35


2015 Urban Rituals Murray Fraser, Justin C. K. Lau, Sara Shafiei


UG0

Urban Rituals Murray Fraser, Justin C. K. Lau, Sara Shafiei

Year 2 Bingqing (Angelica) Chen, Minesh Patel, Duangkaew (Pink) Protpagorn, Sheau Wei (Amanda) Tam, Fei Waller, Xinyue (Angell) Yao

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

Year 3 Samuel Coulton, Kelly Frank, Katja Hasenauer, Jun Wing (Michelle) Ho, Jessica Hodgson, Ka Wing (Clarence) Ku, Tomiris Kupzhassarova, Shirley Ying Lee, Matei-Alexandru Mitrache, Henrietta (Etta) Watkins We would like to thank our consultants and critics: Ben Allwood, Scott Batty, Anthony Boulanger, Matthew Butcher, Rhys Cannon, Aran Chadwick, Nat Chard, James Cheung, Mollie Claypool, Hannah Corlett, Ben Cowd, Kate Davies, Stephen Gage, Manuel Jimenez Garcia, Nasser Golzari, Penelope Haralambidou, Ewa Hazla, Colin Herperger, Bill Hodgson, Konrad Holtsmark, Tom Hopkins, Jessica In, Chee-Kit Lai, Guan Lee, Hazel McGregor, Jamileh Manoochehri, Jack Newton, Luke Olsen, David Patterson, Lukas Pauer, Stuart Piercy, Frosso Pimenides, Jack Sardeson, Natalie Savva, Yara Sharif, Bob Sheil, Neil Stacey, Sven Steiner, Richard Townend, Nina Vollenbröker, Bill Watts We are grateful to our sponsors, Bean Buro

40

The aim of UG0 is for students to learn how to carry out intensive research into architectural ideas, urban conditions, cultural relations, practices of everyday life, and similar matters – and then use these findings to create innovative forms of architecture for the contemporary city. This year’s theme was ‘urban rituals’, taken in the very widest sense. Ever since humans organised themselves into communities, the importance of ritual has been paramount. We are no different today in our highly technologised capitalist society. It is just that the rituals have changed. This leads to some intriguing questions. How do people inhabit cities through the performance of rituals? What are these differing beliefs and practices? What is the role of ritual within the processes of everyday life, or as part of exceptional spectacular events? How can architecture and urbanism either help or hinder such activities, and connect them to vital issues as energy consumption and urban biodiversity? Standard definitions of ritual refer to factors such as time, rhythm, routine, pattern, habit, location, beliefs, value systems, behaviour, observance, custom, tradition, celebration, ceremony, performance, acting, and so on. Rituals can thus be ultra-low-key in the sense of those carried out repeatedly and consistently as part of daily life. The word can equally apply to the psychological desire for events and spectacles which on the surface might claim to be unique, unrepeatable and deviant, but yet are in themselves an acknowledgment of the need for an agreed temporary respite from normative practices. Indeed, there can be seen to be an overlap between the needs for repetition and exception, and in that sense we can conceive of performance as being part of the theatre of everyday life, with the streets and urban spaces of our cities forming the open space for theatrical performance. How can looking into urban rituals in London – a vast multi-ethnic constellation that contains many different value systems – trigger new ideas about architecture and its role in society? The students’ initial projects were framed as proposals for an object, space, installation, pavilion or other form of insertion into London, with a particular focus on ritualistic behaviour. Their main projects were then on sites they chose where powerful forms of urban ritual already exist, and could thus be added to. In late November, our unit field trip was to Shanghai, where we experienced a vibrant and economically booming city in which pressures of development are creating new kinds of urban rituals, while also frequently coming into conflict with older patterns of everyday life. Other highlights were the beautiful water gardens of Suzhou, where ritual and landscape are fascinatingly blended together.


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.1

41


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.1 Samuel Coulton Y3, ‘Wallbrook Solar Credit Union, City of London, EC4’. Series of physical models. This project proposes the setting up of a Credit Union to look after the interests of the low-paid cleaners in the City of London who have to work through the night. Their bank is situated inside the first large park to be created in that part of town, protected all around by a thin, inhabited wall of poche spaces. The rays and energy from the sun are collected by giant metal ‘flowers’ in the park, with the light and heat then being funnelled down into sunken spaces below the ground. Figs. 0.2 – 0.3 Duangkaew (Pink) Protpagorn Y2, ‘The Soho Congee Club, D’Arblay Street, W1’. Low-relief section; physical model. Chinese migrant workers are badly exploited in Soho, working hard for almost no pay and with little care being given

to their living conditions. Here a new collective facility functions as a temporary club for migrants, hidden behind a typical London façade, filled with prefabricated cubicles in which the residents can sleep, wash, eat and play. Figs. 0.4 – 0.5 Samuel Coulton Y3 ‘Wallbrook Solar Credit Union, City of London, EC4’. Geometric projection; partsection. Drawing on precise analysis of the proportions of Wren’s St Paul’s and St Stephen Wallbrook, a cluster of alabaster domes and carefully designed scoops capture and transmit sunlight to the Credit Union and the underground sleeping rooms for cleaners. In another act of public generosity, the Wallbrook Rover is excavated to enhance the environmental biodiversity of the City of London’s new-found park.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.2

0.3 42

0.4


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.5

43


BSc Architecture UG0

Figs. 0.6 – 0.8 Jun Wing (Michelle) Ho Y3, ‘Silk Wedding Dress Farm, Fonthill Road, N4’. Interior render; general isometric; construction detail. As part of the lively garment district next to Finsbury Park Station, a silk farm is inserted, with the worms being bred in tall timber lattice towers. Overhead shading is provided by thin webs of spun cables, under which customers can peruse and choose their soon-to-be-cherished silk wedding dress. Fig. 0.9 Kelly Frank Y3, ‘The Royal Astronomical Society Museum, Regent Street, W1’. Section. The stuffy Royal Astronomical Society in Burlington House has lost the capacity to make the subject exciting and relevant to citizens. In this age of popular science, what could make more sense than a new astronomical museum and research centre in Regent Street, sitting behind a retained commercial street-front so

as to encourage shoppers to drop in? Fig. 0.10 Jessica Hodgson Y3, ‘Pop-Up High Street, Loughborough Junction, Brixton, SW9’. Perspective view. The Loughborough Estate is one of the poorest and toughest in London, and so this project contains communal gardening and retail facilities such as ‘pop-up’ shops, greenhouses, youth centre, allotments, park spaces, etc. Constructed out of brick by local residents, it acts also as a skills training exercise through its very creation. Fig. 0.11 Kelly Frank Y3, ‘The Royal Astronomical Society Museum, Regent Street, W1’. Ground floor plan. At the rear of the site, a public garden is used to showcase the wonders of the heavens to passers-by, including an open-air amphitheatre for the dissemination of the very latest astronomical discoveries.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.6

0.7 44

0.8


BSc Architecture UG0

0.11

0.10 0.0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.9

45


BSc Architecture UG0

Fig. 0.12 Sheau Wei (Amanda) Tam Y2, ‘Rites of the Afterlife, Plaistow, E13’. Physical model. In what appears to be a plain crematorium and cemetery in east London, vivid time-based rituals such as Chinese Ancestors’ Day and Sunday league football are forced to share a common site boundary. A redesigned crematorium caters for the deceased from the British-Chinese population while its pathways double as terraces from which to watch hectic football matches. Fig. 0.13 Shirley Ying Lee Y3, ‘Brick and Bread Bakery, Golders Green, NW11’. Low-relief section. Bricks and bread are the stuff of life in suburbs such as Golders Green, not least as part of Jewish tradition, and so this scheme proposes that these baking activities should be combined. Their two tall chimneys act as practical and symbolic references to the domestic

rituals which take place each day in the houses nearby. Fig. 0.14 Matei-Alexandru Mitrache Y3, ‘The Red Nest, St Bart’s Hospital, EC1’. Rendered model. The use of drones to distribute emergency blood supplies would be five times faster and nine times cheaper than using ambulances or motorcycle couriers, so this project imagines the old historic buildings in a busy London hospital being retrofitted to accommodate the good-hearted ‘mosquitos’ which would be buzzing over our heads in their efforts to save lives. Fig. 0.15 Tomiris Kupzhassarova Y3, ‘Billboard Farm, Aldgate Roundabout, E1’. Low-relief section. The large advertising billboards within our cities could be redesigned to be occupied by greenhouses, affordable apartments and community facilities, such as for this busy roundabout on the fringe of the City of London.

0.0 0.12 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.13

0.14 46

0.15


BSc Architecture UG0

The light and heat that is being produced by the signs is redistributed as a kind of financial subsidy to support the lifestyle of poorer local residents.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015 47


BSc Architecture UG0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.16

0.17

48


BSc Architecture UG0

Figs. 0.16 – 0.18 Katja Hasenauer Y3, ‘The Peerless Pool Pleasure Garden, Old Street, EC1’. Low-relief section; perspective views; part-plan. On the former site of a popular 18th century bathing pool, an extensive new pleasure garden is provided for the enjoyment of today’s public. Small theatres, water landscapes, and bags of optical trickery are all employed to bring back sensuousness and playfulness into what is otherwise a tough urban site. Buildings and plants become fused together in a delirious and joyous riot of forms, materials and colours.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2015

0.18

49


2014 Movement London Murray Fraser, Justin C.K. Lau


Unit 0

Movement London Murray Fraser, Justin C.K. Lau

Year 2 Francis Hardy, Douglas Kakuda Croll, Ka Yi Kwan, Yi Ki Liong, Zi (Kevin) Meng

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

Year 3 Rufus Edmondson, Alexandra Edwards, Christian Georcelin, Konrad Holtsmark, Suhee Kim, Tomiris Kupzhassarova, Julia Rutkoska, Jack Sardeson, Benedict Tay, Henrietta Watkins, Zisheng (Andrew) Yap, Park Hin Yeung Term 1 Workshop tutors: Nicholas Szczepaniak, Guan Lee, Ifigeneia Liangi Technical tutors: Aran Chadwick, Laura Guerrini, Ewa Hazla, Richard Townend, Bill Watts Thanks to our guest critics: Francisco Alcazar, Laura Allen, Peter Besley, Matthew Butcher, Jason Chan, Mollie Claypool, Ben Cowd, James Curtis, Pierre D’Avoine, Reenie Elliott, William Firebrace, Jon Goodbun, Jeong Hye, Damjan Iliev, Arthur Kay, Yoonjin Kim, Ben Kirk, Julian Krüger, Chee-Kit Lai, Ifigeneia Liangi, CJ Lim, Guan Lee, Claudio Leoni, Ian Lomas, Samar Maqusi, Jane McAllister, Tony Monk, Jack Newton, Emily Pavlatou, Frosso Pimenides, Rodolfo Rodriguez, Jack Sargent, Sara Shafiei, Yara Sharif, Helen Sisley, Sarah Stevens, Nicholas Szczepaniak, Ben Stringer, Chris Wilkinson We are grateful to our supporters and partners Make, Bean Buro, Guan Lee and Grymsdyke Farm

40

Unit 0’s main aim is for students to learn how to carry out intensive research – into contemporary architectural ideas, urban conditions, cultural relations, practices of everyday life – and then use their findings to propose innovative forms of architecture. Students are asked to grasp the unique speculative space offered by academic study and combine this with a commitment to social engagement, as if their projects were actually going to be built. A clear understanding of technological, environmental and developmental issues is seen as vital. In order to develop their design proposals, students are expected to capitalise on the full range of methods of investigation and representation: physical models, digital fabrication, photography, drawings, computer models, renderings, animations and films. In their approach, students should allow for intuitive and spontaneous design-based responses. After all, strong design ideas produced by speculative or lateral thinking can stimulate specific theoretical investigations just as much as the other way around. Our theme for this year’s design investigation is ‘movement’ in the city. It can be related to the movement of people within the urban environment. Or it can be about the movement of vehicles, birds or of more ephemeral elements like the wind, rain, light and sound. By looking at London as a ‘movement economy’, or in more social and aesthetic terms as a ‘city in motion’, we posed the question: How might this be used to trigger new architectural ideas? In Term 1 students took part in a workshop to make sizeable prototypical objects and spaces that encapsulated the concept and realities of movement. Students then chose their own site in London for the main project. How could their design add to the importance and exhilaration of movement in the city? Student projects explored the notion of movement to propose new kinds of building uses that could encourage and enhance urban and cultural interaction. The final designs are architectural propositions that have clear structural and environmental qualities, addressing aspects of technology, craft and the means of production. On our field trip to Seoul in South Korea, we explored a fascinating and highly digitised city in which pressures of the movement of people, goods and data is ever-present. We linked up with local universities and leading practices to discover what is happening there architecturally.


BSc Architecture Unit 0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

0.1

41


BSc Architecture Unit 0

0.2 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

42

0.4

0.3


no longer able to afford to maintain Regent’s Park, this project envisages a monastery for a set of ecologically focused monks who give up their lives to collect the plant waste in the park, process it in anaerobic digesters, and generally involve themselves in work that combines religious devotion with a real desire to improve London’s green environment.

BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.1 Konrad Holtsmark Y3, ‘Sunken Space for Contemplation’, Regent’s Park, London NW1, physical model. Those who might be seeking solace can retreat to these sunken hollows set within the park, and whenever there are enough believers gathered together and standing on the floor-plate, the resulting weight triggers the unexpected opening of the roof ‘petal’ segments overhead – immediately transforming one’s experience of these internal spaces. Fig. 0.2 – 0.5 Konrad Holtsmark Y3, ‘Monastery for Gardening Monks’, Regent’s Park, London NW1. Collective photograph of all of the study models for the project; part-section showing the daylight lighting for the main chapel; model of the final design; digital render of the exterior. Set in a near-future scenario when government cuts have meant that the state is

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

0.5 43


BSc Architecture Unit 0

the city, creates a different aural experience of London. Fig. 0.9 Jack Sardeson Y3, ‘New-Wave Health Clinic’, Farringdon Road, EC1, exploded isometric. In a future where bacteria have become resistant to current antibiotics, this project suggests an innovative form of health clinic where patients can be fully isolated and hence escape fear of hospital super-bugs. It also revives the past history of the now-buried Fleet River, turning it into a passageway leading to the new Crossrail station, and harking back to the Fleet’s medieval reputation as a spa with healing waters.

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

Fig. 0.6 Benadict Tay Y3, ‘Water Droplet Screens’, model photograph. This research project developed fine screens of fishing wire and natural resin as prototypes for an external building fabric that could collect rainfall, then release it slowly as droplets, so that it dripped for effect over a period of hours. Fig. 0.7 Park Hin Yeung Y3, ‘Self-Growing Restaurant’, Kings Cross Goodsyard, WC1, interior render. This scheme imagines that the Kings Cross redevelopment area next to incoming Eurostar trains will be transformed into a self-sufficient growing zone where hydroponic tubes and terraced planters are mixed with vegetarian restaurants where visitors brush up against a new breed of urban farmers. Fig. 0.8 Douglas Kakuda Croll Y2, ‘Auto-Instrument’, physical model. This prosthetic, worn under one’s jacket, and played and strummed when passing through

44


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.10 Yi Ki Liong Y2, ‘Carving and Casting’, Hampstead Road, NW1, CADCAM model. Using cut-and-fill landscaping to mirror the nearby sunken mainline railway into Euston Station, this scheme for a local housing estate proposes a layered landscape with play spaces for all ages. Fig. 0.11 Ka Yi Kwan Y2, ‘Fringe Theatre’, Torbat Street, NW1, night-time render. Using an interlocking timber junction system from Japanese precedent, this is a small loose-fit theatre just off the Camden hipster drag, where audience and performers mix easily. Fig. 0.12 Zisheng (Andrew) Yap Y3, ‘Organically Grown Market and Restaurant’, Oxford Street, W1. Borrowing from Hackney’s organic restaurants that grow their own food, this project is for a food market and hydroponic growing centre at the east end of Oxford Street, set above an entrance to the Crossrail station.

0.10 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

0.11

0.12 45


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.13 Julia Rutkoska Y3, ‘Prisoners’ Rehabilitation Workshop’, Bloomfontein Road, W12. Model photograph. Given the high number of prisoners that re-offend, here is a workshop facility in west London where offenders can produce furniture and other items to sell to members of the local population using the neighbourhood park in which it is situated. Fig. 0.14 Rufus Edmondson Y3, ‘Flutter’. Rendered image of illuminated fluttering object. The project comprised an investigation into a number of fascinating and beautiful lightweight objects, each of them held in place by a minimal tensegrity structure. Here is shown a study for an illuminated lit lantern which forms part of the glimmering aesthetic of the lightweight suspended structure at night. Fig. 0.15 – 0.16 Zi (Kevin) Meng Y2, ‘Kensal Green Crematorium’, Harrow Road,

W10. Rendered interior images. This new-look crematorium, set within a beautiful existing cemetery, includes a variety of exquisite contemplative spaces that are closely linked to the painful processes of cremation and memory. Fig. 0.17 Jack Sardeson Y3, ‘Water-Activated Light Fitting’, Fleet River Tunnel, Farringdon Road, EC1, technical section of light fitting. In a scheme to reclaim the culverted and buried Fleet River, which is now no longer a passageway for London’s sewage, but which still suffers from flooding, this investigatory produced a full-scale prototype of an installed device that would automatically open up and light the Fleet River Tunnel whenever there was no water present and yet which would be triggered and closed whenever the tunnel started to become inundated with water.

0.13

0.14

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014 0.15

0.16 46


BSc Architecture Unit 0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

0.17

47


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.18 – 0.19 Alexandra Edwards Y3, ‘Folding Screen Studies for London Bus Stops and for Health Rehabilitation Centre’, Hampstead Heath environs, NW3, rendered sometic and photos of physical model. Using a colourful illuminated palette of materials and lighting effects for an initial project to design far livelier and attractive bus stops for London’s dreary streets, here a similar line of investigation went into how one might subtly alter the daylight levels inside treatment rooms and courtyard spaces for a new health building where patients can undergo special treatment and/or physiotherapy for problems with joint movements in their arms and legs. Fig. 0.20 Christian Georcelin Y3, ‘Superbike’, rendered image. This research project imagined a new superbike in which 30 or so cyclists could combine to provide a collective transport service

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

0.18

0.19 48

that would only strengthen their hand in London, showing would-be critics also the wider health and energy-generation benefits of using mass cycle-power as a major alternative power source for the capital. This premise was then incorporated into a theme for a major project to design a cyclists’ social/leisure hub located close to Old Street roundabout.


BSc Architecture Unit 0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2014

0.20

49


2013 Exchange Murray Fraser, Kenny Kinugasa-Tsui, Justin C.K. Lau


Unit 0

Exchange Murray Fraser, Kenny Kinugasa-Tsui, Justin C.K. Lau

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

Unit 0’s underlying aim is for students to learn how to carry out intensive research – into architectural ideas, urban conditions, cultural relations, practices of everyday life – and then use their findings to devise innovative and challenging proposals for the contemporary city. Students are asked to grasp the unique speculative space offered by academic study and combine this with a commitment to social engagement and urban improvement, as if their projects were actually going to be built. A clear understanding of the technological, environmental and developmental issues involved in architecture is also vital. Furthermore, in order to develop their designs, students are expected to capitalise on the full range of methods of investigation and representation: sketches, models, digital fabrication, photography, drawings, computer renders and animations. In their approach, students should allow for intuitive and spontaneous design-based responses. After all, strong design ideas produced by speculative or lateral thinking can stimulate theoretical investigations just as much as the other way around. The theme we set our students this year was the concept of ‘exchange’. This term of course carries many meanings. Exchange is used as the principle for the trade of goods and services, originally on a barter system, later as a financial transaction between buyer and seller – of currency, commodities, information data spread by modern communication technologies, and such like. Yet it could simply refer to an exchange of ideas, or of bodily contacts, among a small group or even just between two people. On a wider scale, when talking of processes like globalisation, it can also refer to sweeping cultural interchange between different ethnic groups or countries around the world. Unit 0 regards architecture as a discipline which is very much rooted in the exchange of ideas and material expressions on multiple cultural levels. Today, in our fast moving digital-techno-media culture, many fragments of the ‘foreign’, both material and 42

psychological, penetrate intimately into our daily lives. Instead of viewing this as loss of cultural authenticity or as a process of homogenisation, we see global exchange in architectural production as creative and positive. When it comes to buildings, the idea of exchange can be traced in a range of ways: aesthetics, economics, construction methods, thresholds between inside/outside, feedback cycles and user adjustments. It was hence up to each Unit 0 student to research into exchange and come up with an interpretation to explore through their design work. To start the year, we asked students to think about cultural interchange by studying various Londonbased collections of Chinese artefacts. At the same time they divided into groups to research specific themes in relation to the NoHo site in Mortimer Street – formerly the location of Middlesex Hospital, and undeveloped for many years following the 2008 economic crash. Students then began to design and make their own individual designs/ models/installations as their initial project for the year. They then were allowed to remain with this site for their major project or else find another site of their choosing which better suited their idea of exchange. The ensuing research encompassed many fields: anthropology, history, ecology, climate, economics, sociology, technology, etc. High-end computer modelling and communication tools associated were combined with more traditional design techniques, thereby addressing distinctions between actual and virtual, digital and analogue, scientific and artistic, and instrumental and philosophical. Several questions were posed to the Unit 0 students. How can your site become a place of exchange for the future? How might global influences shape a new identity for your chosen site, as well as for the rest of London? How might the different uses you are proposing enhance urban and cultural interaction? Design investigations were required to deal explicitly with issues of site, ground,


BSc Architecture Unit 0

space, form, structure, environment, production, occupation, performance and display.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

Meanwhile, the Unit 0 field trip enabled us to examine Beijing as an increasingly globalised city. China is just one of the overseas locations that London interacts with, but is likely become an increasingly important one as global wealth and power continues to shift to Asian countries. How might this global change reshape London for the better? Our trip involved visiting architectural schools and well known architectural practices in Beijing, as well as looking at historical and contemporary buildings and parts of the city – not least a detailed study of some of its surviving hutong districts. Thanks to our visiting critics and lecturers: Abi Abdolwahabi, Ben Addy, Laura Allen, Abigail Ashton, Tim Barwell, Camillo Boano, Anthony Boulanger, Rhys Cannon, Joseph Conteh, Lorene Faure, Katy Ghahremani, Anneli Giencke, Jon Goodbun, Penelope Haralambidou, Linnea Isen, Tobias Klein, Guan Lee, Ifigeneia Liangi, Dessislava Lyutakova, Yeoryia Manolopoulou, Jack Newton, James Redman, Min Jeong Song, Sarah Stevens, Ben Stringer, Nicholas Szczepaniak, Joanna Ewa Szulda, Michael Tite and Barry Wark. Technical Tutors: Aran Chadwick (Atelier One), Bill Watts (Max Fordham) Year 2 Marcus Cole, Ysabel Kaye, Paalan Lakhani, Smiti Mittal, Cheol-Young (Nick) Park, Marie Walker-Smith Year 3 Nicolas Chung, Malina Dabrowska, Arthur Kay, Yoonjin Kim, Lauren Marshall, Huma Mohyuddin, Julia Rutkowska, Jack Sargent, Peter Simpson, James Tang, Miljun (Celeste) Wong

43


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.1 – 0.4 Yoonjin Kim, Y5, Apple River, Mortimer Street, London W1. Site context model; general aerial view; internal perspective; long section. Local residents earn tokens by saving energy in their homes, and can then exchange these for apples or cider grown by an agricultural cooperative on the large NoHo site. High-level walkways enable visitors to experience the orchard while below a river of apple juice flows from the trees where the fruit is picked to a central processing point.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013 44


BSc Architecture Unit 0

0.1

0.3 0.2

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.4

45


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.5 – 0.7 Huma Mohyuddin, Y3, Muslim/Christian Exchange, Mortimer Street, W1. Perspective of the mosque entrance; isometric view of the water collection system; interior perspective of the ablution room. Linked and yet also differentiated by their religious water rituals, here an ecumenical mixing of Muslim and Christian worship is facilitated by food grown on site for use in a community restaurant. Fig. 0.8 Pete Simpson, Y3, Fitzrovia Arts Hub, Howland Street, W1. South elevation. In bringing artists back into central London and connecting them with Fitzrovia’s burgeoning art scene, the building combines artists’ studios with community spaces where local residents can take part in art projects or engage in lifelong learning in a range of skills and subjects. Fig. 0.9 – 0.11 Malina Dabrowska, Y3, Furniture

Design and Manufacturing Facility, Tottenham Court Road/ Grafton Way, W1. Aerial view; permanent shuttering detail; chair design. By offering open access to the latest digital design and fabrication equipment, made freely available by phone apps and online services, customers can use this facility to create their very own prototype furniture.

0.6 The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.5

0.7

0.6

0.7

46


BSc Architecture Unit 0

0.8

0.10 0.9

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.11

47


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.12 Yoonjin Kim, Y3, The Reward System, Lower Lea Valley, E16. Sectional model of the project. Sited where the River Lea meets the Thames, as the central hub of a London-wide agricultural cooperative, members can bring produce to the weekly floating market, charge up batteries to collect free power, or debate alternative social and economic ideals. Fig. 0.13 – 0.14 Marcus Cole, Y2, Rehabilitation through Occupation, Centre for Addiction Care, Millfield Lane, N6. Massing model and interior perspective of the communal living space. This building responds to the notion of ‘negative exchange’ by tackling issues surrounding drug rehabilitation treatment. Located on the borders of Hampstead Heath, the design blurs the threshold between nature and architecture to offer a sense of calm within the city. Fig. 0.15 Marie Walker-

Smith, Y2, Dim Sum Trade Project. Perspective of a typical mobile unit. A series of customised mobile dim sum kitchens move slowly around the central parts of London to provide a network of street food outlets selling authentic Chinese food. Fig. 0.16 Miljun Celeste Wong, Y3, Facade of Fish, Billingsgate Market/Canary Wharf, EC3. Interior perspective at basement level. This fish restaurant and aquarium complex taps its power from the discarded waste heat of the adjacent Canary Wharf office megaliths, while also linking to Billingsgate fish market. Above, in a curved tower, specialised eateries serve up Chinese delicacies such as abalone.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.12

0.13

0.14

0.20 0.15

0.16

48


BSc Architecture Unit 0

Fig. 0.17 Nicolas Chung, Y3, The Social Tea Machine. General arrangement of a tea-making machine. This collectivised and mobile tea device can be located in many different spots around London to help revive the lost tradition of tea dances as sociable events.

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.17 49


BSc Architecture Unit 0

workers in nearby Chinatown creates a labyrinth of varied Fig. 0.18 – 0.19 Arthur Kay, Y3, Crossing Generations, Lupus lighting and acoustic characteristics to suit different needs. Street, SW1. Massing model and exploded isometric showing all the floor levels. On the site of the demolished Pimlico Comprehensive School, the intermixing of learning and leisure activities for the very young and very old takes place on the building’s stepped terraces. Fig. 0.20 – 0.21 Jack Sargent, Y3, The Evaporated University, Mortimer Street, W1. Conceptual sketch and roof plan. Now we can no longer afford to build new universities, this scheme provides just the most essential educational functions set within a busy urban park which students engaged in ‘blended learning’ have to share with everyday city users. Fig. 0.22 James Tang, Y3, a Hotel in Soho, Great Windmill Street, W1. Second floor plan. The combination of a gourmet hotel and short-term pods for tired restaurant

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.18

0.2

0.0 0.20

0.4 0.19

0.34 0.21 50


BSc Architecture Unit 0

The Bartlett School of Architecture 2013

0.22

51


2012 The Edge of London Murray Fraser, Pierre d’Avoine


Unit 0

THE EDGE OF LONDON Murray Fraser, Pierre d’Avoine

B Sc Arch Un i t 0 — pa g e 42 —

The underlying aim of Unit 0 is for students to engage in a process of intensive research into contemporary architectural ideas, urban conditions, cultural relationships, practices of everyday life, and such like, and then for them to use their findings to propose innovative and challenging forms of architecture for contemporary London. Above all, students are expected to grasp the unique speculative space offered by academic study, yet combine this with a commitment to social engagement and urban improvement as if their project might actually be built. A clear understanding of the technological, environmental and developmental issues involved in their proposals is regarded as essential. As the theme for this academic year, we asked students to think about the presence of edges and boundaries within the city. After all, buildings play vital roles as mediators and transitional zones between a wide variety of urban conditions that include:

B A RT LET T 2012

Links between public and private spaces Interstices between natural and man-made ecosystems Prosthetic devices which extend the human body and senses Connectors between areas of affluence and poverty Boundary conditions such as walls therefore take on a double-edged existence, in that their presence can be seen as positive or negative – or even both at the same time. It was the task for students to define the terms in relation to the urban condition they had decided to engage with. Hence their design investigations were required to deal with issues of site, ground, space, form, occupation, performance and display. The designs arrived at were conceived as material forms at a scale which defined them as buildings – in other words, architectural propositions which are structural and environmental and as such engage with technology/craft and the means of production. In order to locate these investigations, the sites for student projects were intended to be somewhere of their choosing on the north-eastern fringes of Regent’s Park, close to Camden, or in the urban swathe through to Kings Cross. This area is no longer in the suburbs but 200 years ago it was literally the edge of London. Today it is an active boundary between the systems of biodiversity, economic life and social interaction which occur in Regent’s Park and those in the surrounding streets. With the empty ditch that was once a spur of the Regent’s Canal, or the nearby mini-city of London Zoo, or the copious bars and restaurants in Parkway, or the elegant villas of Park Village East and West, or the mainline railway that passes beneath on its way to Euston, or further to the east, the area offers a complex yet fractured borderline within the city.


Technical Tutors: Aran Chadwick (Atelier One), Bill Watts (Max Fordham LLC) Visiting Critics: Ben Addy, Laura Allen, Alessandro Ayuso, Julia Backhaus, Anthony Boulanger, Mark Campbell, Rhys Cannon, Pereen d’Avoine, Jeff Day, William Firebrace, Penelope Haralambidou, Jonathan Hill, Damjan Iliev, Ben Kirk, Constance Lau, Guan Lee, Lucy Leonard, Jane McAllister, Luke Olsen, Frosso Pimenides, Laurence Pinn, Sophia Psarra, Mark Rist, Ingrid Schroder, Daniel Serafimovski, Yara Sharif, Ben Stringer, Mark Whitby Year 2: Phoebe Nickols, Ka Yu Jamie Wong Year 3: Ophelia Blackman, Ruthie Falconer, Roma Gadomska-Miles, Alice Haugh, David Hawkins, Elzbieta Kaleta, Kok Cin Lim, Shiue Nee Pang, Asha Pooran, Alec Scragg, Pippa Shaw Carveth, Lok Man Melody Siu

— page 43 — B A RT LET T 2012

To start off the year, the students were divided into groups of 3-4 people for the first few weeks to produce investigations and tentative designs for imaginary interstitial spaces around Regent’s Park. In order to introduce a diversity of approaches, each of these groups was given a specific allocated scale: 1:1, 1:20, 1:500 or 1:10,000. Following these initial collaborative studies, each of the students pursued their own individual project for the remainder of the year, mostly in the area from Regent’s Park to Kings Cross, although a couple of them chose to locate their project elsewhere in the city. As part of their research, students were also required to liaise closely with the structural engineer and environmental services designer for the unit. Out of this wide ranging investigatory process, a number of distinctive and original projects emerged.

B Sc Arch Un i t 0

Students were also expected to investigate the changing physical and social fabric of this part of London. Notably, more and more analysts are coming to the view that cities no longer have any meaningful ‘physical limits’; theorists such as Henri Lefebvre long ago hinted that defined named cities would be supplanted by sprawling growth known as ‘planetary urbanisation’. Therefore it seems ever more obvious that the edges that exist are within the complex fissures or folds inside urban entities such as London. In that sense, it was envisaged that the students’ projects would explore the notion of edge, or boundary, to create designs that introduce different programmes and uses in an attempt to enhance the concept of urban interface.


Fig. 0.1 Alec Scragg, 1:1 viewing device for looking at London from Primrose Hill (group project with Ophelia Blackman, Phoebe Nickols and Melody Siu), model. Fig 0.2 Pippa Shaw Carveth, Pin-Wall test model with speakers. Fig 0.3 Shiue Nee Pang, Bird’s-eye perspective of new growing wall in Cumberland Street allotments (group project with Roma Gadomska-Miles and Alice Haugh). Fig 0.4 Melody Siu, 1:1 first-person immersive perspective of voting booth for new Camden and Regents Park constituency (group project with Ophelia Blackman, Phoebe Nickols and Alec Scragg).

B Sc Arch Un i t 0 —

0.1

pa g e 44 — B A RT LET T 2012 0.3

0.2


B Sc Arch Un i t 0

page

45 —

B A RT LET T 2012

0.4


Fig. 0.5 Phoebe Nickols, Meat Market for breeding and eating exotic animals located next to Regent’s Park Zoo, perspective from park. Fig 0.6 Phoebe Nickols, Meat Market adjacent to Regent’s Park Zoo, section. Fig 0.7 David Hawkins, New inhabited structure for West Yard in Camden Market using scaffolding formwork previously used to create underground vaults, perspective.

B Sc Arch Un i t 0 — pa g e 46 — B A RT LET T 2012 0.5

0.6


B Sc Arch Un i t 0

page

47 —

B A RT LET T 2012

0.7


Fig 0.8 Shiue Nee Pang, Coffee growing centre and public allotments on King’s Boulevard in the Kings Cross redevelopment area, perspective of street-level coffee bars. Fig. 0.9 Roma Gadomska-Miles, Redevelopment scheme to turn the vacant Heygate Estate at Elephant and Castle into an urban farm with market building, roof plan.

B Sc Arch Un i t 0 — pa g e 48 — B A RT LET T 2012 0.8

0.9


Fig 0.10 David Hawkins, Study for underground vaults and above-ground scaffolding formwork in West Yard in Camden Market, model. Fig 0.11 David Hawkins, Cast of excavation works for West Yard site, model. Fig 0.12 Ela Kaleta, Public spa and flood control facility on Hampstead Heath, section cut through computer model. Fig 0.13 Roma Gadomska-Miles, Redevelopment scheme for Heygate Estate, site model. Fig 0.14 Kok Cin Lim, Floating tree market and management centre, Regents Canal, Camden, short section

B Sc Arch Un i t 0

0.10

0.11

— page 49 — B A RT LET T 2012

0.12

0.13

0.14


Fig 0.15 Roma Gadomska-Miles, Redevelopment scheme for Heygate Estate, bird’s-eye perspective. Fig 0.16 Kok Cin Lim, Floating tree market and management centre, Regents Canal, Camden, exploded isometric showing the components of the project. Fig 0.17 Ruthie Falconer, Baths for weary commuters in King’s Cross Station forecourt, perspective of upper-level open-air pool. Fig 0.18 Alec Scragg, New Town Hall for Camden spanning the Euston railway cutting in Hampstead Road, perspective of computer server facility. Fig 0.19 Alice Haugh, Naturalisation test centre and community building just off The Highway in Wapping, close-up perspective on a major festival day. Fig 0.20 Alice Haugh, Movable pavilions inside the naturalisation test centre and

B Sc Arch Un i t 0 —

0.15

0.16

0.17

0.18

0.19

0.20

pa g e 50 — B A RT LET T 2012


community building, study model. Fig 0.21 Alec Scragg, Registry Office zone within the new Camden Town Hall, plan. Fig. 0.22 Alec Scragg, Moss garden suspended over new HS2 railway cutting showing illumination at night, perspective.

B Sc Arch Un i t 0 0.21

— page 51 — B A RT LET T 2012

0.22


2010 Collections, Collectors and Hoarders Abigail Ashton


BSc Unit 0 Yr 2: Heaseung Choi, Frances Heslop, Grace Mark Yr 3: Jane Brodie, Dhiren Patel, Olivia Pearson, Rida Qureshi, Jonathan De Wind, Lee Young Woo

Collections, Collectors and Hoarders ‘The clock face is the most important thing I have ever recovered from the town dump. I… rolled it home down the path to the island and rumbled it over the footbridge. I stored it in the shed until my father was away for the day, then I strained and sweated all day to get it up into the loft.’ Iain Banks, The Wasp Factory. Collections, collectors and hoarders were of interest this year. Collections give us an insight into the mind of the collector. Inevitably this can be the catalyst that reveals compulsions, obsessions and other peculiarities in an individual. Indeed the fictional Wasp Factory gives us an eerie insight into the gory mind of the book’s central protagonist, a homicidal sixteen year old. However, in a larger, more demographic, context it can also be the vehicle through which cultural or political imperatives manifest themselves through organisations or even nations. Regardless of scale and setting, and other potentially sinister implications, collections, collectors and hoarders are also about passion. Students were asked to beg, borrow and preferably not steal their collections – scouring the city in a strategic manner, using the infrastructure and transport network as a guiding framework, or perhaps using a psycho-geographic reading of the city, and defining a more personal agenda. The unit trip was to The Sir Soane Joan Museum.

Abigail Ashton

Top: Heaseung ChOi, Toy Collectors’ Storage Facility and Display Case. Bottom: Jonathan De Wind, Alzheimer Day Care Centre, Tottenham Court Road.


Clockwise from top left: Lee Young Woo, Technology Recycling Centre, Tottenham Court Road; Jane Brodie, Theatrical Museum, Blackfriars.


Clockwise from top left: Dhiren Patel, Gallery, Greenwich, Frances Heslop, Urban Dye Farm, Spitalfields.


Top: Olivia Pearson, Tailoring School, Spitalfields. Bottom: Grace Mark, Clockmaker’s Museum and Workshop, Clerkenwell.


ucl.ac.uk/architecture

Bartlett Design Anthology | UG0  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...

Bartlett Design Anthology | UG0  

Architectural design teaching on The Bartlett School of Architecture's BSc and MArch Architecture programmes is organised around ‘units’: co...